WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainable village power

  1. Renewables for sustainable village power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, L.

    1997-03-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizeable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six activities, including village applications development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and Internet-based village power project data base. While the current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets, micro-hydro and micro-biomass technologies may be integrated in the future. NREL's RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. The integration of the technology developments, institutional experiences, and the financial solutions for the implementation of renewables in the main line rural electrification processes in both the developing world and remote regions of the developed world is the goal

  2. Village Power `97. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, J.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.; Weingart, J. [eds.

    1997-09-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-disciplinary, multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six key activities, including village application development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and an Internet-based village power project database. The current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. This document contains reports presented at the Proceedings of Village Power, 1997. Individual projects have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  3. Village Power '98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, Julie; Flowers, Larry; Siegel, Judy; Taylor, Roger; Weingart, Jerome

    1999-03-24

    This is the fifth Village Power workshop sponsored by NREL. We have held these meetings every year since 1993, to focus, challenge, and provide a forum for interaction among practitioners working in the field of using renewable energy technologies as an economically viable pathway to electrification of rural populations throughout the world. Starting with a small group of 30 colleagues in 1993, this ''workshop'' has doubled in size every year. When the NREL staff was planning for this meeting, they were hoping for something around 400 participants. We are now looking at over 500, and we apologize for the somewhat cramped accommodations. This overwhelming response, however, shows that the use of renewable energy to solve some of the world's serious problems is coming of age. This meeting, this ''conference'' (it's clearly no longer a workshop) marks a transition. A transition from the viewpoint that renewables are, and forever will be a technology of the future; to the reality that renewables have come of age. We have technologies available today, at today's prices, that can make a substantive contribution to the pressing needs of environmentally sustainable development in the world. This is a collection of all the papers presented at the Village Power '98 conference.

  4. Village power options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three different computer codes which have been written to model village power applications. The reasons which have driven the development of these codes include: the existance of limited field data; diverse applications can be modeled; models allow cost and performance comparisons; simulations generate insights into cost structures. The models which are discussed are: Hybrid2, a public code which provides detailed engineering simulations to analyze the performance of a particular configuration; HOMER - the hybrid optimization model for electric renewables - which provides economic screening for sensitivity analyses; and VIPOR the village power model - which is a network optimization model for comparing mini-grids to individual systems. Examples of the output of these codes are presented for specific applications.

  5. Village power in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the electric power system in Thailand. 99% of the country is electrified, but much of this is with diesel generators which leaves high costs but a high level of service. The paper discusses renewable energy projects which have been sited in the country, and examples of hybrid systems which have been retrofit into existing diesel generator systems. Photovoltaic and hydroelectric power projects are described. Dedicated systems have been installed for water pumping and battery charging applications.

  6. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  7. Institutional issues in Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a view on renewable energy resource projects from one much closer to recipient of the services. The author argues that such programs aimed at development of village power situations need to keep certain points clearly in focus. These include the fact that electricity is not the goal, technology is not the problem, site selection involves more than just resource potential, the distinction between demonstration and pilot programs, and that such programs demand local involvement for success. The author recommends coordinating such projects with programs seeking competing funds such as health, education, and transportation. The projects must demonstrate a high economic benefit to justify the high economic cost, and one must use the benefits to leverage the program funding.

  8. Sustainable Architecture Analyses of Walls in Miyaneh Village Houses, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Salavatizadeh; Feridoun NahidiAzar; Sara Salavatizadeh; Seyyed Hossein Salehi; Ahadollah Azami

    2012-01-01

    Even though so many efforts have been taken to renovate and renew the architecture of Miyaneh villages in cold and dry regions of Iran-s northwest, these efforts failed due to lack of significant study and ignoring the past and sustainable history of those villages. Considering the overpopulation of Iran-s villages as well as the importance in preventing their immigration to cities, recognizing village architecture and its construction technology is of great significance ...

  9. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  10. Lessons Learned from the NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.

    1998-07-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NRELs recent experiences and lessons learned.

  11. Sustainability of fisherman village in urban area case study : untia fisherman village, makassar, indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegroho, N.; Ardiani, Y. M.

    2017-12-01

    Major cities in Indonesia, many of which have a fisherman village in the city area. One of them is the village of Untia in Makassar which keeps the story about relocation history of fishermen’s settlement in Makassar city. Initially, this village is very ‘friendly’ for the fishermen, especially the existence of canals that can be passed by the fishing boat to the front of the each house. However, the sustainability of this fisherman village is threatened by the development of urban functions that are urging towards it. From day to day, this village is segregated with the surrounding area, not only from its function but also from social point of view. This condition will be more severe related to the local government plan to reclaim sea far to the west side, thus threatening the sustainability of fisherman life in this village. How does a fisherman village in an urban area have to survive? The research begins by highlighting the conditions and problems that exist, data was collected by field survey. This data combined with some literatures then analyzed to propose a direction how fisherman’s village respond to the surrounding development. Become a Tourism village is a one way for fisherman’s village to survive in urban area.

  12. Sustainability literacy of older people in retirement villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian; Skitmore, Martin; Buys, Laurie; Hu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia's central business district (CBD). Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  13. Perspectives on renewable energy and Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    The author provides a brief overview of the role the Department of Energy has been playing in the area of renewable energy sources and their applications at a village level. Energy demand is rising sharply, and shortages are becoming more acute. Developing countries will present a large demand, and market opportunity over the next 40 years. Environmental concerns are a factor in the choice for what sources to promote and develop. The author touches on the features of renewable sources which makes them attractive to DOE for some applications, and what the goals of the department are in supporting this technology. Examples of applications at the level of village power are presented for both the US and abroad.

  14. Village power hybrid systems development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.; Green, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, M. [Bergey Windpower Co., Norman, OK (United States); Lilley, A. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mott, L. [Northern Power Systems, Moretown, VT (United States)

    1994-11-01

    The energy demand in developing countries is growing at a rate seven times that of the OECD countries, even though there are still 2 billion people living in developing countries without electricity. Many developing countries have social and economic development programs aimed at stemming the massive migration from the rural communities to the overcrowded, environmentally problematic, unemployment-bound urban centers. To address the issue of providing social, educational, health, and economic benefits to the rural communities of the developing world, a number of government and nongovernment agencies are sponsoring pilot programs to install and evaluate renewable energy systems as alternatives to line extension, diesels, kerosene, and batteries. The use of renewables in remote villages has yielded mixed results over the last 20 years. However, recently, photovoltaics, small wind turbines, and microhydro system shave gained increasing recognition as reliable, cost-effective alternatives to grid extension and diesel gensets for village-electricity applications. At the same time, hybrid systems based on combinations of PV/wind/batteries/diesel gensets have proven reliable and economic for remote international telecommunications markets. With the growing emphasis on environmentally and economically sustainable development of international rural communities, the US hybrid industry is responding with the development and demonstration of hybrid systems and architectures that will directly compete with conventional alternatives for village electrification. Assisting the US industry in this development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has embarked on a program of collaborative technology development and technical assistance in the area of hybrid systems for village power. Following a brief review of village-power hybrid systems application and design issues, this paper presents the present industry development activities of three US suppliers and the NREL.

  15. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  16. Lighting: The Killer App of Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This paper looks at lighting systems as the major market for village level power generation. To the consumer it is something which is needed, could come from a much friendlier source, and the issues of affordability, convenience, and reliability are important. To the supplier lighting has an enormous range of potential customers, it opens the opportunity for other services, and even small demand can give big returns. Because the efficiency of the light source is critical to the number of lights which a fixed power supply can drive, it is important to pick the proper type of bulb to use in this system. The paper discusses test results from an array of fluorescent and incadescent lamps, compared with a kerosene lamp. Low wattage fluorescents seem to perform the best.

  17. Private sector village enterprise a new approach to sustainable financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, C.F.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an enterprise plan for introducing solar power in a rural market, while providing economic development, and hence the ability of the user to pay for the power source. This plan is based on a product called GEEP - a solar sewing machine conversion kit. This kit can be retrofit onto pedal sewing machines and marketed to village tailors in India, as part of a marketing program which includes increased demand for tailored products which will allow the tailors to be able to finance the conversion kits.

  18. Sustainability as an Input for the Design of Olympic Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu DORALP

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, hosting the Olympic Games has been seen as an opportunity to create urban development. The post-Games use of sport venues, the fulfillment of a city’s housing needs by using Olympic Village buildings and the renewal of transport and other infrastructure that accompanies hosting of the Games may be considered indicators for the success of the International Olympic Games. But the city and its citizen do not benefit from these investments in the design of new structures if that design is not carried out in the light of wellplanned urban development projecting. Local and international studies on sustainability, particularly since the 1980s, have shown that sustainable urbanization is only achievable with sustainable development planning. Therefore economic, social and environmental development needs to be provided. If the last Olympic cities are examined in relation to this aspect, it will be seen that an understanding of such factors is reflected in their development. Throughout the history of the modern Games host cities have considered them as an opportunity for development, but cities are now heading towards the implementation of more sensitive actions for the future generation, social and environmental values with the improvement in the approach of sustainable development.

  19. Overview of village scale, renewable energy powered desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.E.

    1997-04-01

    An overview of desalination technologies is presented, focusing on those technologies appropriate for use in remote villages, and how they can be powered using renewable energy. Technologies are compared on the basis of capital cost, lifecycle cost, operations and maintenance complexity, and energy requirements. Conclusions on the appropriateness of different technologies are drawn, and recommendations for future research are given.

  20. Design for sustainability: rural connectivity with village operators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has approximately 26500 primary and secondary schools, of which at least 17000 are in remote rural villages. None of these rural schools have any form of Internet connectivity. The same rural villages may have one health facility...

  1. Financing renewable energy for Village Power application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santibanez-Yeneza, G.

    1997-12-01

    When one talks of rural development, no doubt, the issue of rural energy is not far behind. As a significant component of any development strategy, rural energy is seen as the engine for growth that can bring about economic upliftment in the countryside. Many approaches to rural energy development have been tried. These approaches differ from country to country. But regardless of structure and approach, the goal remain essentially the same: to provide rural communities access to reliable energy services at affordable prices. In recent years, as global concern for the environment has increased, many governments have turned to renewable energy as a more environment friendly alternative to rural electrification. Technological advances in renewable energy application has helped to encourage this use. System reliability has improved, development costs have, to some extent been brought down and varied application approaches have been tried and tested in many areas. Indeed, there is huge potential for the development of renewable energy in the rural areas of most developing countries. At the rural level, renewable energy resources are almost always abundantly available: woodwaste, agricultural residues, animal waste, small-scale hydro, wind, solar and even sometimes geothermal resources. Since smaller scale systems are usually expected in these areas, renewable energy technologies can very well serve as decentralized energy systems for rural application. And not only for rural applications, new expansion planning paradigms have likewise led to the emergence of decentralized energy systems not only as supply options but also as corrective measures for maintaining end of line voltage levels. On the other hand, where renewable energy resource can provide significant blocks of power, they can be relied upon to provide indigenous power to the grids.

  2. A Sustainability Model for Bringing Core Villages into Eco-tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öztan TUĞUN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eco villages comprise a part of eco-tourism in rural regions, and are the destination of choice for those who wish to experience a taste of traditional life. In 2004, through a series of by-laws, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (KKTC initiated an eco-tourism movement in the Karpaz Peninsula. It was envisioned then that a planning approach within the framework of sustainability would be of importance to the island, and the project was developed using a sustainable planning approach with a view to contributing to the state’s initiative to incorporate core villages into tourism on the island. Eco-tourism and the eco-village were explored within the framework of environmental problems, sustainable development and environmental sustainability, and the concept of core village was explained, with an emphasis on its benefits for tourism on the island. To ensure sustainability of the villages, a conceptual framework based on the principles of sustainable planning was established, specifically, in this case, on the Wheeler principles. These are grouped as: a. Compact, efficient land use, b. Less automobile use, better access, c. Efficient use of resources, reduction of pollution and waste, d. Restoration of natural systems, e. Good housing and living environments, f. Healthy social ecology, g. Sustainable economics, h. Community participation, i. Preservation of local culture and wisdom. These are used as cross references in assessing the situation in Büyükkonuk Village, the place nominated as the pilot area for eco-tourism.

  3. Actualizing Communities of Practice (COPs and Situated Learning for A Sustainable Eco-Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Pineda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An eco-village as defined by Robert Gilman is a “human-scale, full-featured settlement where you feel you know the others, and human activities are integrated with natural, biological systems.” Roland Mayerl argued that this maybe ideal, but there are huge challenges. He claims the challenges are at different levels—there is the physical layer that constitutes food production, animals, water and wastewater treatment. Other layers will be the built environment, the economic system and the governance in the village.This paper argues that one of the challenging layers is the human layer that was excluded in the modeling of many eco-village works. While there are many good models of an eco-village, sustainability will primarily be laid on the shoulders of the members of the community or the village for that matter. Sustainability should be espoused by the members of the eco-village. But how can sustainability be attained? What sustainability approach or strategy can be employed?“Communities of practice (COP are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor.“ (Wenger, 2004 COPs are concepts commonly applied in organizations and virtual communities. Using this approach together with periphery participation and situated learning, this paper presents a human-based model of a sustainable eco-village and some useful examples.The paper also argues that an eco-village necessitates the support of technology in enhancing and preserving the shared practices. Hence, use of social media deployed in the web is one of the recommended ways that also permit collective action among members of the eco-village.

  4. Sustainable Living and Co-Housing: Evidence from a Case Study of Eco-Villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Bella Margrethe Mørch; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2012-01-01

    is whether co-housing offers better opportunities for choosing and using more sustainable technologies, which also relates to the question of whether co-housing offers better opportunities for building smaller and denser and thus more energy efficient buildings. The second and third questions are socially......, as the growing number of small households is an emerging sustainability problem. The empirical analyses are based on the results from a Danish study of eco-villages including a survey, interviews with representatives of the eco-village movement and a detailed case study of a group of people in the process...... of establishing a new cluster in an existing eco-village. The aim of the article is to contribute to the general discussions about co-housing and sustainability. The study adds nuances to this discussion and shows that the answer is not as straightforward as presented in much of the literature....

  5. Design description of the Tangaye Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, J. E.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The engineering design of a stand alone photovoltaic (PV) powered grain mill and water pump for the village of Tangaye, Upper Volta is described. The socioeconomic effects of reducing the time required by women in rural areas for drawing water and grinding grain were studied. The suitability of photovoltaic technology for use in rural areas by people of limited technical training was demonstrated. The PV system consists of a 1.8-kW (peak) solar cell array, 540 ampere hours of battery storage, instrumentation, automatic controls, and a data collection and storage system. The PV system is situated near an improved village well and supplies d.c. power to a grain mill and a water pump. The array is located in a fenced area and the mill, battery, instruments, controls, and data system are in a mill building. A water storage tank is located near the well. The system employs automatic controls which provide battery charge regulation and system over and under voltage protection. This report includes descriptions of the engineering design of the system and of the load that it serves; a discussion of PV array and battery sizing methodology; descriptions of the mechanical and electrical designs including the array, battery, controls, and instrumentation; and a discussion of the safety features. The system became operational on March 1, 1979.

  6. SUSTAINABLE CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT: THE FATE OF BALINESE ADAT VILLAGE POSTERIOR THE ENACTMENT OF LAW NUMBER 6 YEAR 2014 CONCERNING VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Nurjaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of indigenous peoples existence is very dependent on the will of the Government. The village government as formulated in Act number 6/2014 of the village, as well as Government Regulation number 43/2014 about Implementation of the Act number 6/2014 has naturally become a bureaucratic and legal officials law, that the village is set in the system of local government under the supervision of State law. In the case of Bali and the local Government of Bali, there is legal consequences with the fate and the future existence and life of indigenous village/pakraman village as a social and cultural system of the Hindu society, it is the law on the development basis of the indigenous village/pakraman village will not remain be ”the awig-awig” as Balinese traditional society customary law; philosophy and the essence, function and role of the indigenous village/pakraman village changed physically as well as community life of Balinese people loss; traditional customs and Government system should be changed in accordance with the system of the village Government; on one side the customs affairs village should organize pakraman village administration and bureaucracy under the structure of local governments, and on the other hand the indigenous village is at the same time responsible to organize and responsible about the culture, traditions, customs and ritual as Hindu affairs, village understanding of pakraman village customs and traditions should be completely ignored in Balinese village daily community life.

  7. Design health village with the approach of sustainable architecture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 8, No 3 (2016) > ... a natural environment and away from the pollution of urban life , traditional medical care, hydrotherapy, sports and ... Keywords: Health; city health; smart; sustainability in architecture; architectural design ...

  8. Chinese villages and their sustainable future: the European Union-China-Research Project "SUCCESS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumreicher, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    China has 800,000 villages-one person out of seven on the globe is living in a Chinese rural settlement. Yet the global discussions about the situation in China is currently characterised by a disproportionate focus on the development of towns and until now circumstances have generally been neglected in the rural areas, where 70% of the Chinese population is still living. Within the 5 years of the SUCCESS project research, this set of actual problems has been considered and analysed under the principle of sustainability: "What to maintain?" "What to change?" were the overall research questions asked in the SUCCESS project; the researchers were looking for answers under a sustainability regime, respecting the need to raise the quality of life in the villages. Several interweaving processes were used to achieve results: the inter-disciplinary research process between many areas of expertise, the trans-disciplinary process between the researchers and the Chinese villagers, and a negotiation process that made the connection between these two processes. The introduction describes the basic sustainability definition that was orienting the whole study. The innovation lays mostly in the methodology: the inter-disciplinary research co-operation related to practice and to involving the affected communities is needed to manage the significant and growing imbalances between urban and rural areas regarding their sustainability. In the transdisciplinary work, the project developed "village future sentences" that describe the local outcome of the research as one step towards better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms that could lead to a sustainable future, and they also managed to start sustainability processes in the case study sites. The integrated approach of the project helped generating future scenarios for these villages covering all aspects of their development, including urban design issues. Out of these scenarios, the villages developed small projects that could

  9. Establishing Priorities for Sustainable Environmental Design in the Rural Villages of Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pitts

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses sustainable rural village development in China. Rural development is unlike the process of urbanization in Chinese cities and reflects different land ownership rules and different organizational structures. Even though there are an increasing number of Chinese residents in cities, there are still more than 600 million people living in the countryside. The attention lavished on city development has been, in part, now refocused to rural villages. Since 2006, the support for large-scale investment in the countryside has created much change; however, not all of this change is well organized, with potential for less than optimum impacts on the environment and sustainability. The paper identifies the key influences and drivers from historic and contemporary points of view. The sustainability of the villages will derive from long-term self-sufficiency, and this must include the understanding of environmental design principles, which enable suitable dwelling design. Two villages are taken as contrasting examples, and information derived from other sources is discussed. Technologies and techniques that can help determine environmental design priorities are evaluated and directions for future development suggested. This includes development of a design support aid with key drivers of: orientation and site location, window design and key construction features.

  10. Designing Tiban island as tourist destination and sustainable coastal in Bleder village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwanti, Sri; Setiawan, Agung

    2018-05-01

    This study is on tourism development process, which involves the function of local potential tourist attraction confronted to the needs for area natural conservation. The study location is a village called Bleder, or Kartika Jaya, in Patebon sub district, Kendal regency CentralJjava. The research unit is the management of a sandy island called “pulau tiban”or ‘suddenly appears island’, and village’s surrounding area. Qualitative methods approach is utilized in order to understand the village situation, community social economy activities toward the sandy island, and the meaning of thatt sandy island for the village sustainability. The study result shows that some problems have evident in the exploitation of natural potential for tourist attraction as confronted to environment conservation. Conflict of interests have also emerged among groups of people and group to group regarding the management of turism attraction. To deal with the problems, comprehensive program is proposed especially to increase community’s awareness on sustainable tourism, marine and coastal conservation, and the benefit and risk of ecotourism. For Bleder tourism development, the community need to concern to their village environmental safety more than on economic benefit purpose only. Introduction

  11. Making nuclear power sustainable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B

    2003-01-01

    According to the present data, we must double our energy production while dividing by a factor of two the greenhouse gases emissions, knowing that today, 80% of our energy comes from the combustion of coal, gas and oil, all of which produce CO, released in the atmosphere. This is the toughest challenge facing us in the next few decades, and I include the water challenge, since producing drinking water will also increase our energy needs. This formidable challenge will not be easily met. No magic bullet is in sight, not even a nuclear bullet. To have any chance of success, we must actually implement all the available measures, and invent some more. In fact, we shall certainly need a three-pronged approach: Increase energy efficiency to limit energy consumption in our developed countries; Diversify our energy mix to reduce the share supplied by fossil fuels and that translates into increasing nuclear and renewable energy source; Trap and sequester CO 2 wherever and whenever economically possible. This article focuses on the nuclear issue. According to International Energy Agency (lEA) statistics, nuclear energy accounts today for 6.8% of the world energy supply. Is it realistic to expect this share to grow, when many forecasts (including lEA's own) predict a slow reduction? The future is not engraved in marble, it is ours to make; the future role of nuclear power will depend on the results of our present efforts to expand or overcome its limitations. It is quite possible that, within four decades, 40% of the electric power generated in all OECD countries, plus Russia, China, India and Brazil, comes from nuclear reactors. It is not far-fetched, when you consider that it took only two decades for France to increase its nuclear share of electricity from 8% to 80%. More ambitious, let's assume that in the same time frame and within the same countries 15% of the fuels for transportation come from nuclear produced hydrogen and that 10% of the space heating is supplied by

  12. Analysis on Sustainable Development Management Model of Village Banks - Based on Bayan Rongxing Village Bank in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang shuang; Wang Ji-heng; Liu Bing; Yu Xiao-wen

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarized the management models of village banks in China. We compared and analyzed different management models of four village banks in different regions on four aspects: regional agriculture feature, loan for farmers, loan for enterprises and the construction of network, then came to the conclusion that, if the village banks' health development can realize, they must pay attention to innovating in loan patterns as well as material loan and starting out the network development.

  13. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    Transforming the energy system is at the core of the dedicated sustainable development goal on energy within the new United Nations development agenda. This publication explores the possible contribution of nuclear energy to addressing the issues of sustainable development through a large selection of indicators. It reviews the characteristics of nuclear power in comparison with alternative sources of electricity supply, according to economic, social and environmental pillars of sustainability. The findings summarized in this publication will help the reader to consider, or reconsider, the contribution that can be made by the development and operation of nuclear power plants in contributing to more sustainable energy systems.

  14. Sustainable tourism and harmonious culture: a case study of cultic model at village tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astawa, I. P.; Triyuni, N. N.; Santosa, I. D. M. C.

    2018-01-01

    The research aims to analyze an event model of Culture and Tourism International Camp (Cultic) from two aspects, harmonious culture and sustainable tourism. Currently, Indonesian government promotes village tourism by involving more villagers to achieve village independence in its development. The program has faced various obstacles, such as the eroded local cultures due to the development of a massive and money-oriented tourism with less attention on the environmental damage. One of the offered programs is a green tourism model for an event named Culture and Tourism International Camps - Cultic. The research is conducted in several stages. The first stage is the development of model based on the theoretical study. The second stage is the implementation of the model with 85 participants. The third stage is the evaluation of the model through harmonious culture and sustainable tourism approaches. The data is collected through a direct observation and a questionnaire. The result of qualitative analysis indicates that the developed event model supports the harmonious culture, especially the natural environment. Whereas, the result of quantitative analysis indicates that the participants enjoy the activities, such as green food, material natural, waste management, and ecosystem. Another finding is that the community strongly supports the concept of sustainable tourism.

  15. What does 'nuclear power village' represent in the newspaper articles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, I., E-mail: isshin.takenaka@gmail.com [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, H., E-mail: kimura.hiroshi.0110@gmail.com [Public Outreach, Non-Profit, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster in 2011, we have often heard the word 'Nuclear Power Village (Genshiryoku-Mura in Japanese)' in Japan. 'Nuclear Power Village' is used for the Japanese community related to nuclear power generation. In this paper, we analysed Japanese newspapers and clarified usages of 'Nuclear Power Village'. As a result, we found there are two images of 'Nuclear Power Village'. One image has a common purpose of the promotion of nuclear power. Another image has a common purpose of acquiring gain. We also clarified the characteristics of the images such as interdependence, closed community and so on. (author)

  16. What does 'nuclear power village' represent in the newspaper articles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, I.; Kimura, H.

    2014-01-01

    Since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster in 2011, we have often heard the word 'Nuclear Power Village (Genshiryoku-Mura in Japanese)' in Japan. 'Nuclear Power Village' is used for the Japanese community related to nuclear power generation. In this paper, we analysed Japanese newspapers and clarified usages of 'Nuclear Power Village'. As a result, we found there are two images of 'Nuclear Power Village'. One image has a common purpose of the promotion of nuclear power. Another image has a common purpose of acquiring gain. We also clarified the characteristics of the images such as interdependence, closed community and so on. (author)

  17. Analysis of Sustainability of New Rural Housing (Case of ole Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyran Chamcham

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modernization of rural housing based on the principles of sustainability is one of the most important prerequisites for achieving sustainable development in rural areas. This can only be achieved by knowing the exact status of rural housing and its range of stability. And rural planning is not possible without it. On the other hand, survey of the stability of the different aspects of rural housing will have a decisive role in decisions related to how to promote this project aimed at sustainable rural development. Therefore, this study we have investigated and compared the economic, Social, environmental, technical and physical aspects of new rural housing with sustainability approach, quantitative paradigm and the case study method. The statistical population in the study were all the people of Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village from which a number were selected who had reconstructed their homes. The results are shown in 4 dimensions of new housing's economic, social, environmental, technical and physical aspects in the Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village although they have very little inclination towards sustainability. Despite this, the hybrid economic index for reconstruction of rural housing turned out to be more stable than other metrics.

  18. Nuclear power and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandklef, S.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Power is a new, innovative technology for energy production, seen in the longer historic perspective. Nuclear technology has a large potential for further development and use in new applications. To achieve this potential the industry needs to develop the arguments to convince policy makers and the general public that nuclear power is a real alternative as part of a sustainable energy system. This paper examines the basic concept of sustainable development and gives a quality review of the most important factors and requirements, which have to be met to quality nuclear power as sustainable. This paper intends to demonstrate that it is not only in minimising greenhouse gas emissions that nuclear power is a sustainable technology, also with respect to land use, fuel availability waste disposal, recycling and use of limited economic resources arguments can be developed in favour of nuclear power as a long term sustainable technology. It is demonstrated that nuclear power is in all aspects a sustainable technology, which could serve in the long term with minimal environmental effects and at minimum costs to the society. And the challenge can be met. But to achieve need political leadership is needed, to support and develop the institutional and legal framework that is the basis for a stable and long-term energy policy. Industry leaders are needed as well to stand up for nuclear power, to create a new industry culture of openness and communication with the public that is necessary to get the public acceptance that we have failed to do so far. The basic facts are all in favour of nuclear power and they should be used

  19. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF TOURISM IN HISTORICAL MARAMURES CASE STUDY: BREB VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Berlingher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development has become an extremely important issue for both the academic as well as the economic and political sectors during recent years. The concept of sustainable development has emerged in the context of the announced danger of planet and surrounding environment destruction as a result of the investments made in all areas of activity throughout the world. One of the concept objectives is to find a solution to reconcile three desiderata: economic growth, environmental quality and social justice. The specialists have introduced this concept in order to make investments and to create business environments able to bring about an economic growth in a strong connection with nature, without destroying the natural resources. Tourism comes from behind with a tremendous force, a new economic market orientation strongly connected to nature. It provides us with the opportunity to review the main challenges faced during recent years in relation to the environmental, cultural and interpersonal relationships, in order to develop, protect and preserve the touristic potential. The historical Maramures represents such a region with a strong touristic potential. A study performed by Pricewaterhouse Coopers Management Consultants on the attractiveness of Romania‟s development regions places it on the II-nd position and illustrates the capacity of the region to develop and attract investments able to support the sustainable development of the area without destroying its uniqueness and originality. The herein study focusses on one of the Maramures villages that has managed to fully retain its originality and cultural uniqueness through the wooden houses, the Maramures traditional gates, the local traditional vestments and the ancient customs. Foreign investors have come into this village to set up traditional accommodation facilities, true to the style of the area, to restore old wooden houses, thus becoming sometimes more fond of the area than

  20. Sustainable landscape management in Tara National Park (Village Jagoštica, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Nature Protection Act of the Republic of Serbia, national park is defined as a large area with natural ecosystems of high value, in terms of conservation, complexity of structures, biogeographical features, cultural-historical values, and flora and fauna wealth. Owing to their exceptional natural integrity, national park is the treasure of great national importance. Villages (hamlets are integral parts of national park, but are sadly on the verge of disappearing, due to lack of inhabitants. The locals that choose to stay, by fighting for their village's survival and existence, are coming into a conflict with the management board of the national park (mainly directed towards the protection and preservation of biodiversity resources. The research presented here focused on Jagoštica village, located in the far northwestern part of Tara National Park, Serbia. According to the landscape reading, mapped land­scape (spatial elements and social survey, the researched aim was the development of a unique model for sustainable development, focused at protecting diversity of flora and fauna, as well as improving the living standards of local people. Rural tourism and production of local traditional products were found to be the most optimal strategies for moderating the development of this area.

  1. Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources

  2. Efficacy of local neem extracts for sustainable malaria vector control in an African village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchemin Jean-Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Banizoumbou, whereas no change was found in Zindarou. Conclusion With a high abundance of neem plants in many villages in this area, the results of this study suggest that larval control using neem seed powder offers a sustainable additional tool for malaria vector control in the Sahel region of Niger.

  3. Energy sustainable cities. From eco villages, eco districts towards zero carbon cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaręba, Anna; Krzemińska, Alicja; Łach, Janusz

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing energy consumption is the effect of sustainable design technics as among many others: designing buildings with solar access and natural ventilation, using climate responsive design materials and effective insulation. Contemporary examples of zero-carbon cities: Masdar City, United Arab Emirates and Dongtan, China, confirm technical feasibility of renewable energy by implementation of solar PV and wind technologies. The ecological city - medium or high density urban settlement separated by greenspace causes the smallest possible ecological footprint on the surrounding countryside through efficient use of land and its resources, recycling used materials and converting waste to energy. This paper investigates the concept of energy sustainable cities, examines, how urban settlements might affect building energy design in eco-villages, eco-districts (e.g. Vauban, Freiburg in Germany, Bo01 Malmo in Sweden), and discuss the strategies for achieving Zero Emission Cities principles in densely populated areas. It is focused on low energy architectural design solutions which could be incorporated into urban settlements to create ecological villages, districts and cities, designed with consideration of environmental impact, required minimal inputs of energy, water, food, waste and pollution.

  4. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible

  5. Albergo Diffuso as a model of original hospitality and sustainable development of small historical villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Dall'Ara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper fits within the wider context related to the definition of restoration strategies and models, and revitalization of small historical towns and villages, focusing on touristic use and on the Albergo Diffuso (AD model. This latter, in its functional elements, includes solutions to solve degeneration and gradual depopulation problems, typical in these cases, by enhancing both tangible and intangible resources. The purpose of this research study was to verify, about 20 years after the first implementations, to what extent and by means of what type of intervention the AD model influenced regeneration processes of historical villages and refunctionalization of reused building heritage. By means of an exploratory investigation and an in situ monitoring activity, it was possible to outline an initial measurement of both direct and indirect results following the application of ADs. The activities confirmed the virtuosity of the model and identified both critical issues and strong points, directly connected to the type of users and to the sustainability features of the interventions.

  6. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The substantial increase in global energy consumption in coming decades will be driven principally by the developing world. Although there is some awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favored option in a sustainable energy future. This paper, after discussion of rising energy consumption, concentrates on a comparison of the environmental impacts of the available energy options. (author)

  7. Sustainability and vulnerability: Understanding the anomaly from disaster perspectives. Case study: Glagaharjo Village in Mount Merapi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depari, C. D. A.

    2017-06-01

    In its concern for human safety, the Government’s policy to relocate those living in disaster prone areas is twofold: it is perceptibly profound yet socially cataclysmic. This anomaly, created by the contradiction between the need for sustainability and the fact of vulnerability, could be found in the case of Mount Merapi. Communities living in the hazardous zone of Merapi, particularly those in Glagaharjo Village, are acknowledged for their persistent rejection of relocation programs despite their high exposure to the catastrophic impacts of eruptions. To mitigate the impacts, a safe and conducive dwelling place which considers the characteristics of these affected communities must be encouraged. This research adopts a consensus method towards responses obtained through a Likert scale-questionnaire and measured with a statistical program. Prior this process, theoretical reviews toward the concept of place attachment, place dependence and place identity was established in order to determine the research variables for the questionnaire.

  8. Towards sustainable nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, Andrei A.; Murogov, Victor M.; Kuptsov, Ilya S.

    2014-01-01

    The review of the current situation in the nuclear energy sector carried out in this article brings to light key problems and contradictions, development trends and prospects, which finally determine the role and significance of nuclear power as a factor ensuring a sustainable energy development. Authors perspectives on the most appropriate developments of nuclear power, which should be based on a balanced use of proven innovative nuclear technologies and comprehensive multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle are expressed. The problems of wording appropriate and essential requirements for new countries with respect to their preparedness to develop nuclear programs, taking into account their development level of industry and infrastructure as well as national heritages and peculiarities, are explained. It is also indicated that one of the major components of sustainability in the development of nuclear power, which legitimates its public image as a power technology, is the necessity of developing and promoting the concepts of nuclear culture, nuclear education, and professional nuclear ethics. (orig.)

  9. Towards sustainable nuclear power development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, Andrei A.; Murogov, Victor M.; Kuptsov, Ilya S. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhl, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    The review of the current situation in the nuclear energy sector carried out in this article brings to light key problems and contradictions, development trends and prospects, which finally determine the role and significance of nuclear power as a factor ensuring a sustainable energy development. Authors perspectives on the most appropriate developments of nuclear power, which should be based on a balanced use of proven innovative nuclear technologies and comprehensive multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle are expressed. The problems of wording appropriate and essential requirements for new countries with respect to their preparedness to develop nuclear programs, taking into account their development level of industry and infrastructure as well as national heritages and peculiarities, are explained. It is also indicated that one of the major components of sustainability in the development of nuclear power, which legitimates its public image as a power technology, is the necessity of developing and promoting the concepts of nuclear culture, nuclear education, and professional nuclear ethics. (orig.)

  10. Indigenous utilization of termite mounds and their sustainability in a rice growing village of the central plain of Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivilay Sengdeaune

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to investigate the indigenous utilization of termite mounds and termites in a rain-fed rice growing village in the central plain of Laos, where rice production is low and varies year-to-year, and to assess the possibility of sustainable termite mound utilization in the future. This research was carried out from 2007 to 2009. Methods The termites were collected from their mounds and surrounding areas and identified. Twenty villagers were interviewed on their use of termites and their mounds in the village. Sixty-three mounds were measured to determine their dimensions in early March, early July and middle to late November, 2009. Results Eleven species of Termitidae were recorded during the survey period. It was found that the villagers use termite mounds as fertilizer for growing rice, vegetable beds and charcoal kilns. The villagers collected termites for food and as feed for breeding fish. Over the survey period, 81% of the mounds surveyed increased in volume; however, the volume was estimated to decrease by 0.114 m3 mound-1 year-1 on average due to several mounds being completely cut out. Conclusion It was concluded that current mound utilization by villagers is not sustainable. To ensure sustainable termite utilization in the future, studies should be conducted to enhance factors that promote mound restoration by termites. Furthermore, it will be necessary to improve mound conservation methods used by the villagers after changes in the soil mass of mounds in paddy fields and forests has been measured accurately. The socio-economic factors that affect mound utilization should also be studied.

  11. Indigenous utilization of termite mounds and their sustainability in a rice growing village of the central plain of Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Shuichi; Koyama, Yusaku; Kokubo, Mika; Matsushita, Yuichi; Adachi, Yoshinao; Sivilay, Sengdeaune; Kawakubo, Nobumitsu; Oba, Shinya

    2011-08-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the indigenous utilization of termite mounds and termites in a rain-fed rice growing village in the central plain of Laos, where rice production is low and varies year-to-year, and to assess the possibility of sustainable termite mound utilization in the future. This research was carried out from 2007 to 2009. The termites were collected from their mounds and surrounding areas and identified. Twenty villagers were interviewed on their use of termites and their mounds in the village. Sixty-three mounds were measured to determine their dimensions in early March, early July and middle to late November, 2009. Eleven species of Termitidae were recorded during the survey period. It was found that the villagers use termite mounds as fertilizer for growing rice, vegetable beds and charcoal kilns. The villagers collected termites for food and as feed for breeding fish. Over the survey period, 81% of the mounds surveyed increased in volume; however, the volume was estimated to decrease by 0.114 m3 mound(-1) year(-1) on average due to several mounds being completely cut out. It was concluded that current mound utilization by villagers is not sustainable. To ensure sustainable termite utilization in the future, studies should be conducted to enhance factors that promote mound restoration by termites. Furthermore, it will be necessary to improve mound conservation methods used by the villagers after changes in the soil mass of mounds in paddy fields and forests has been measured accurately. The socio-economic factors that affect mound utilization should also be studied.

  12. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The United Kingdom Government's strategy aimed at securing sustainable development has recently been published, and is analysed here by the Energy Issues Adviser, for the British Nuclear Industry Forum. The energy framework aims to ensure secure supplies of energy at competitive prices and to minimise possible adverse environmental impacts of energy use. It is argued here that both of these aims will be promoted by the continued and growing use of nuclear power in the United Kingdom. As the cost of nuclear electricity depends chiefly on the price of uranium, which is likely to stabilize due to increased supplies from nuclear weapons destruction, uranium recycling and mixed oxide fuel reprocessing, it is unlikely that world fuel price inflation will affect these costs. Secondly, nuclear power is not associated with acid rain or the threat of global warming, so its environment protection claims can be substantiated. Indeed, unlike other fuel sources, nuclear power already pays for its waste and decommissioning procedures. (UK)

  13. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Although there is an awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favoured option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. With various groups calling for a role for nuclear power, there is a need openly and objectively to discuss the concerns that limit its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, the disposal of high level waste and nuclear proliferation. This brochure discusses these concerns, and also the distinct advantages of nuclear power. Extensive comparisons with other energy sources are made

  14. Sustainable development and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Although there is an awareness on both the technical and political levels of the advantages of nuclear power, it is not a globally favoured option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. With various groups calling for a role for nuclear power, there is a need openly and objectively to discuss the concerns that limit its acceptance: the perceived health effects, the consequences of severe accidents, the disposal of high level waste and nuclear proliferation. This brochure discusses these concerns, and also the distinct advantages of nuclear power. Extensive comparisons with other energy sources are made. Figs, tabs.

  15. Control aspects of the Schuchuli Village stand-alone photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groumpos, P. P.; Culler, J. E.; Delombard, R.

    1984-11-01

    A photovoltaic power system in an Arizona Indian village was installed. The control subsystem of this photovoltaic power system was analyzed. The four major functions of the control subsystem are: (1) voltage regulation; (2) load management; (3) water pump control; and (4) system protection. The control subsystem functions flowcharts for the control subsystem operation, and a computer program that models the control subsystem are presented.

  16. Empowering the village communities for sustained observation of permafrost-related environmental changes, Upper Kuskokwim, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, S. K.; Kholodov, A. L.; Hanson, T.

    2016-12-01

    A suite of environmental changes are underway in the North directly affecting the socio-economic state of native communities in remote Arctic villages. We cannot possibly have enough scientists and professionals on the ground to timely predict and effectively respond to the major changes. We believe the most cost-effective and possibly sustainable approach to cover more ground for monitoring and prediction of changes is by building community capacity for monitoring and research, and supporting communities to use resulting data and new findings to address emerging environmental issues and ensuing socio-economic challenges. The goal of this project is to help the communities of Upper Kuskokwim region take the lead in assessing and responding to the environmental changes that are coming with warmer climate and thawing permafrost. The permafrost related societal impacts that the communities are aware of are a) drying of lakes which affect their fishing and trapping, b) lower water level in Rivers due to bank erosion which affect their main mode of transportation in summer, c) appearance of sinkholes that pose threat to the safety of the community members and their properties, and d) eruption of a sand dune in the middle of the Telida village air strip. In August 2016 we will spend ten days in the Nikolai and Telida communities to understand the community need for monitoring through a community survey. We will offer training workshop on climate science and landscape change, and in making scientific observation and data collection. Also, we will install sensors to monitor air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture, and snow at 12 sites spread across different ecotypes and topographic settings. Also, we will survey sites of major change to help develop a geo-hazard map for the region to facilitate safe subsistence practices and land use. As broader impact, the project will offer the traditionally-underserved native communities of the Upper Kuskokwim region an

  17. Sustainable Tourism Development: the Adaptation and Resilience of the Rural Communities in (the Tourist Villages of Karimunjawa, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiawan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2009 to 2015, the growth of tourism in the tourist villages (desa wisata of Karimunjawa underwent rapid progress. However, the level of poverty in Karimunjawa remained high. Nevertheless, the involvement of rural people in the sustainable development of tourism has received only limited discussion. Therefore, this article discusses the rural communities’ adaptation and resilience in Karimunjawa with the support of sustainable development planning in tourist villages. It covers the background of sustainable development, the elements of the communities’ adaptive capacity and resilience, and the role of the regional government. Empirical evidence of variations in the capacity to respond to changes of socioeconomic and ecological environments due to tourism development is presented. In addition, a case study is used in this article to describe how the people learned from their experience, knowledge, and past efforts. To obtain the necessary information, in-depth interviews were conducted with a number of key informants in the tourist villages of Karimunjawa, which were selected via purposive and snowball sampling. The results of the research show that social resilience will increase among those communities that are capable of accessing flexible social networks. These social networks are practical tools that open up the dissemination of new information and knowledge. This is a key element for a stronger process of transformation. Furthermore, communities that have capital and financial access as well as skills will also be capable of adaptation to the transformation process.

  18. Family vs Village-Based: Intangible View on the Sustainable of Seaweed Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniwut, Wellem A.; Teniwut, Yuliana K.; Teniwut, Roberto M. K.; Hasyim, Cawalinya L.

    2017-10-01

    Compare to other fishery activities for instance fish mariculture and catching fisheries, seaweed farming is considered easier. Also, the market for seaweed is wider and will keep growing. Thus, makes seaweed farming as one of the fastest commodity to improve the welfare of a coastal community. There are technical and non-technical factors in seaweed farming management, for non-technical on this intangible factors vary between family-based and village-based management, therefore aimed of this study was to simulate farmers decision to choose between family-based and village-based on seaweed managing system trigger by intangible factors. We conducted our study in Southeast Maluku, data collecting conducted from October to December 2016 by depth interview and questionnaires on seaweed farmers. We used logistic regression to compare each intangible factors on family and village-based seaweed farming management. The result showed that for family-based management farmers were willing to transfer their knowledge among each member in the household. For village-based revealed that farmers with higher education background tend to work on village-based, also, the result also stated that in village-based management member were those who have better capability and skill, at the same time village-based management had a small probability for conflict to occur compared to family-based.

  19. Field report-Iidate village and Minamisoma city in Fukushima prefecture and Onagawa Nuclear Power Plants of Tohoku Electric Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Etsuji

    2011-01-01

    Although the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. was foreseen to be an end with bringing the reactor a stable cooling condition and mitigating the release of radioactive materials, there would be various uncertainties and risks. The public was turned to 'nuclear power phase-out ' or 'nuclear power reduced' and Fukushima prefecture launched a restoration vision not dependent on nuclear power. In July editors joined the visit on Iidate village and Minamisoma city in Fukushima prefecture and Onagawa Nuclear Power Plants of Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., which was organized by Energy and Environmental Email Forum. This feature consisted of six articles based on interviews with respective mayor and discussion meeting of participants. Nuclear world would be responsible for the cooperation and support of Fukushima moving toward restoration with the same stance. Development of renewable energy utilizing damaged fields might be promoted. Respective district was tried to restore based on the trademark of 'Iidate-village in the world' or introduction of central facilities of decommission technology or medical care against radiation hazards. Onagawa Nuclear Power Plants of Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., which was 14.8 m above sea level, was not damaged so much by the tsunami of 13 m high and after the disaster many residents in a neighboring area came to the nuclear power plant office for the refuge. (T. Tanaka)

  20. A Model of Small Capacity Power Plant in Tateli Village, North Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangari, F. J.; Rompas, P. T. D.

    2017-03-01

    The electricity supply in North Sulawesi is still very limited so ubiquitous electric current outage. It makes rural communities have problems in life because most uses electrical energy. One of the solutions is a model of power plants to supply electricity in Tateli village, Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The objective of this research is to get the model that generate electrical energy for household needs through power plant that using a model of Picohydro with cross flow turbine in Tateli village. The method used the study of literature, survey the construction site of the power plant and the characteristics of the location being a place of research, analysis of hydropower ability and analyzing costs of power plant. The result showed that the design model of cross flow turbines used in pico-hydro hydropower installations is connected to a generator to produce electrical energy maximum of 3.29 kW for household needs. This analyze will be propose to local government of Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia to be followed.

  1. Walking the village: LiveDiverse – Sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nortje, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available LiveDiverse is a multi-year, multi-country collaborative research project that focuses on the interface between livelihoods and biodiversity of people in rural communities who live in or in the vicinity of a biodiversity ‘hotspot’. Five villages...

  2. SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT OF TRADITIONAL CRAFT INDUSTRY IN LOPATI TOURISM VILLAGE, YOGYAKARTA

    OpenAIRE

    VITASURYA Vincentia Reni; PUDIANTI Anna

    2016-01-01

    Ecotourism has been growing in Yogyakarta that can be seen through the development of rural tourism. The development of rural tourism has positive impact to improve local community’s welfare nevertheless, it has also negative impact onto environmental carrying capacity. Lopati tourism village is located in Bantul, Yogyakarta, relying on traditional craft industry as tourism attraction. Traditional crafts are livelihood of local residents, so that environmental management efforts become part o...

  3. Nuclear power for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpuz, Antonio T.

    1997-01-01

    The need for stable and reliable energy supply was clearly illustrated by the Philippine experience of the last five years where the bleak energy supply situation caused massive losses in productivity. Indigenous energy resources even if exploited to full capacity is not sufficient to support the progress needed to give our growing population the quality of life it deserves. Important too is the fact that world energy resources especially oil and natural gas is estimated to last up to the first half of the next century. Thus the entry of nuclear power as a vital contributor to a safe, reliable, competitive and cost effective source of energy supply become a necessity. (author)

  4. Negotiating power relations, gender equality, and collective agency: are village health committees transformative social spaces in northern India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kerry; George, Asha S; Harvey, Steven A; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-09-15

    Participatory health initiatives ideally support progressive social change and stronger collective agency for marginalized groups. However, this empowering potential is often limited by inequalities within communities and between communities and outside actors (i.e. government officials, policymakers). We examined how the participatory initiative of Village Health, Sanitation, and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) can enable and hinder the renegotiation of power in rural north India. Over 18 months, we conducted 74 interviews and 18 focus groups with VHSNC members (including female community health workers and local government officials), non-VHSNC community members, NGO staff, and higher-level functionaries. We observed 54 VHSNC-related events (such as trainings and meetings). Initial thematic network analysis supported further examination of power relations, gendered "social spaces," and the "discourses of responsibility" that affected collective agency. VHSNCs supported some re-negotiation of intra-community inequalities, for example by enabling some women to speak in front of men and perform assertive public roles. However, the extent to which these new gender dynamics transformed relations beyond the VHSNC was limited. Furthermore, inequalities between the community and outside stakeholders were re-entrenched through a "discourse of responsibility": The comparatively powerful outside stakeholders emphasized community responsibility for improving health without acknowledging or correcting barriers to effective VHSNC action. In response, some community members blamed peers for not taking up this responsibility, reinforcing a negative collective identity where participation was futile because no one would work for the greater good. Others resisted this discourse, arguing that the VHSNC alone was not responsible for taking action: Government must also intervene. This counter-narrative also positioned VHSNC participation as futile. Interventions to strengthen

  5. SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT OF TRADITIONAL CRAFT INDUSTRY IN LOPATI TOURISM VILLAGE, YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VITASURYA Vincentia Reni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecotourism has been growing in Yogyakarta that can be seen through the development of rural tourism. The development of rural tourism has positive impact to improve local community’s welfare nevertheless, it has also negative impact onto environmental carrying capacity. Lopati tourism village is located in Bantul, Yogyakarta, relying on traditional craft industry as tourism attraction. Traditional crafts are livelihood of local residents, so that environmental management efforts become part of their daily lives. This research aims to review the roles of community to reduce environmental impacts through analyzing the waste management of traditional craft industry. It used case study method to examine the uniqueness of Lopati village. Data collecting used participatory action research techniques in order to gather information from residents. Community participation acted to anticipate negative impact on development of rural tourism.  Waste management in Lopati committed by local residents not to cause adverse environmental impacts. The result show that waste management based on community participation supports the development of rural tourism.

  6. Laying a solid foundation for sustainable development in Bolivian mountain villages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, A.

    2008-01-01

    In Bolivia, recent decentralisation policies have broadened the participation of local actors in development processes. However, development is far from sustainable, and poverty and natural resources degradation still increase. The challenge is to develop strategies that achieve the genuine

  7. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible [fr

  8. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible [es

  9. Assessing the Sustainability of the Built Environment in Mountainous Rural Villages in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous rural areas such as those in southwest China are developing rapidly. This requires scientific understanding and a framework for assessing the sustainability of the built environment that is suitable to such areas. At present, no such framework exists. This lack of assessment options has contributed to the unsustainable development of these areas, which has caused a series of environmental, social, and economic problems. This article analyzes existing assessment frameworks, reviews the theory on sustainable rural development as it applies to rural southwest China, and proposes a new assessment framework that is more suitable to this region and others like it. This framework is based on a sustainable development model for rural areas that emphasizes endogenous development; addresses the environmental, social, and economic dimensions of sustainability; and takes the natural and social conditions of mountainous rural areas into account. Our study tested its applicability to rural southwest China and its sensitivity to local conditions and found them to be better than those of existing assessment frameworks.

  10. Residents’ Attitudes towards Sustainable Tourism Development in a Historical-Cultural Village: Influence of Perceived Impacts, Sense of Place and Tourism Development Potential

    OpenAIRE

    He Zhu; Jiaming Liu; Zongcai Wei; Weiheng Li; Lei Wang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to assess the residents’ support for sustainable tourism development in a destination that is in the initial tourism development stage. Residents’ perception of sustainable tourism development potential, sense of place, perceived tourism impacts, and tourism development support were involved in this study. A total of 331 completed questionnaire surveys were collected in Luozhou, a historical-cultural village in China. The empirical data were analyzed using a structural equatio...

  11. Differences in Power Structures Regarding Access to Natural Resources at the Village Level in Central Sulawesi (Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Barkmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The mountain forests of the Indonesian province of Central Sulawesi include core areas of the global Wallacea biodiversity “hotspot”. Remote sensing data indicated that deforestation rates around Central Sulawesi’s Lore-Lindu National Park differ more strongly between villages than could be explained by differences in the individual characteristics of the village households as assessed by quantitative village censuses. This setting provided the background for a study into inter-village differences in power structures regarding access to natural resources. Our results are abstracted from 3*10 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with key informants from the leading groups of autochthonous and migrant households of three contrasting villages. In village A, nearly feudal power relationships are exerted by a group of local “first settler” families that dominate formal village leadership as well as the influential Council of Traditional Leaders (Lembaga Adat, and that restrict deforestation and land transactions. No such institutional restrictions exist in village C. Traditional power relationships are replaced by economic power based on petty capitalist type production of the international agricultural commodity cocoa. Deforestation is muchhigher in village C. In village B, traditional institutions and power structures still appear in place although land transactions are less restricted than in village A, resulting also in high deforestation rates. While contrasting problematic social effects, our study highlights the potential efficacy of traditional institutions in the regulation of access to resources. ----- Die Bergregenwälder Zentralsulawesis sind Teil des globalen Wallacea-Biodiversität-"Hotspots" und beheimaten viele endemische Tier- und Pflanzenarten. Die Entwaldung im Bereich des dortigen Lore-Lindu Nationalparks unterscheidet sich zwischen umliegenden Dörfern stärker, als dies durch quantitative Haushaltsdaten zu erkl

  12. Identifying the Conditions for Rural Sustainability through Place-Based Culture: Applying the CIPM and CDPM Models into Meibei Ancient Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transitional rural China faces more serious challenges in its sustainable development. How to regain the vital momentum of those historically and culturally preeminent villages, among over 680,000 administrative villages in total, has become the pressing agenda for all the stakeholders, due to the fact that these villages have huge potential to be the leverage for successful rural transition and new urbanization in China. This paper therefore tries to diagnose and identify the current situation of those villages from a cultural perspective by taking the Meibei ancient village as the case. By applying the proposed Cultural Inverted Pyramid Model (CIPM and Cultural Dual Pyramid Model (CDPM with seven layers, i.e., root/vision, value, symbol, hero, ritual, lifestyle, and governance & management, Meibei’s development mechanism has been systematically explored from a cultural perspective through the comparison between its past prosperity and present challenges. It is found that the great merit of Meibei’s past prosperity lied in the organic integration of cultural elements in all the layers through the five development dimensions, i.e., economic, social, institutional, environmental and cultural dimensions. The empirical study proves that CIPM is a useful tool for diagnosing and identifying the current situation of the village, while CDPM is an effective instrument for planning and designing a culture-embedded and improved place for the future. Unless Meibei can recreate a new cultural ecosystem with resilience fitting to its existed heritage with cultural excellence and tourism promotion, the village cannot catch up with its past prosperity. Finally, this paper calls for more in-depth culture-oriented research to improve the CIPM and CDPM paradigm to allow for the realization of rural sustainability, particularly from the perspectives of policy options and academic concerns.

  13. The sustainability indicators of power production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onat, Nevzat [Vocational School of Technical Studies, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey); Bayar, Haydar [Technical Education Faculty, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    One of the most important elements of economical and social development is to provide uninterrupted electric energy to consumers. The increasing world population and technological developments rapidly increase the demand on electric energy. In order to meet the increasing demand for sustainable development, it is necessary to use the consumable resources of the world in the most productive manner and minimum level and to keep its negative effects on human health and environment in the lowest level as much as possible. In this study, alignment of hydrogen fuel cells, hydroelectric, wind, solar and geothermal sourced electric energy systems, in addition to fossil fueled coal, natural gas and nuclear power plants, in respect to sustainability parameters such as CO{sub 2} emission, land use, energy output, fresh water consumption and environmental and social effects is researched. Consequently, it has been determined that the wind and nuclear energy power plants have the highest sustainability indicators. The fuel cells that use hydrogen obtained by using coal and natural gas are determined as the most disadvantageous transformation technologies in respect to sustainability. This study contains an alignment related to today's technologies. Using of renewable energy resources especially in production of hydrogen, output increases to be ensured with nanotechnology applications in photovoltaic systems may change this alignment. (author)

  14. Design of village power and micro-grids for rural areas of Zimbabwe with specific attention to voltage regulation on low voltage meshed distribution grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinarwo, David

    2009-07-01

    This work constitutes a feasibility study of the use of renewable energy resources in rural farming villages in Zimbabwe. A case study was done for a farming village consisting of a dairy farm called Rosenwald with 627 dairy cows and surrounded by local villagers offering manpower labour for the dairy activities. The village setup presents great opportunities for a sustainable power supply system in the form of village power system using the powerful microgrid concept since the farm is already connected to the national grid but with great problems of reliability, which is already a national problem if not regional due to the worst economics crisis facing the country coupled with the present regional power shortage experiencing the whole Southern Africa region. With the intended on-farm energy generation, the energy services are to be extended to the surrounding villages. Thus the study aims to stimulate better focus to the use of locally available renewable energy resources at bigger scales starting from the disadvantaged communities in the rural areas. The focus is put to these rural farming communities because these could be a strong force in the speedy electrification of the poor communities surrounding them. This could be more viable given the already existing business activities in these farms. So in this thesis the study of the on-farm energy generation using the farm and animal waste has shown that such communities can be totally independent from the electric grid by using the locally available resources. Here the technologies assessed are the biogas and solar and all the evaluation of the designs, choice of components and their suitable sizes was done with the help of a micropower optimization model HOMER simulation programme from National Renewable Energy Laboratory available at their website www.nrel.gov/homer. From the assessment done for the case study farm, it was shown that an electricity price of EUR 0.26/kWh is possible from the on - farm energy

  15. Towards self-sustainable power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angjelichinoski, Marko; Danzi, Pietro; Stefanovic, Cedomir

    2017-01-01

    We propose use of a “modemless” communication solution, termed power talk, tailored for optimization and monitoring, i.e., upper layer control in low voltage DC MicroGrids (MGs). Specifically, the exchange of the information required for the upper control among control agents is achieved by modul......We propose use of a “modemless” communication solution, termed power talk, tailored for optimization and monitoring, i.e., upper layer control in low voltage DC MicroGrids (MGs). Specifically, the exchange of the information required for the upper control among control agents is achieved...... of minimizing the cost of the generation. The simulation results prove the feasibility of power talk as enabler of fully self-sustainable DC MicroGrids....

  16. Green power perspectives on sustainable electricity generation

    CERN Document Server

    Neiva de Figueiredo, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Green Power: Perspectives on Sustainable Electricity Generation; João Neiva de Figueiredo and Mauro GuillénAn Overview of Electricity Generation Sources; Akhil Jariwala and Saumil JariwalaGermany's Energy Revolution; José Carlos Thomaz, Jr. and Sean MichalsonChina's Energy Profile and the Importance of Coal; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengChina's Search for Cleaner Electricity Generation Alternatives; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengRenewable Energy in Spain: A Quest for Energy Security; José Normando Bezerra, Jr.Renewable Energy in French Polynesia: From Unpredictable to Energy Independence? Dia

  17. Synopsis of sustainability and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ishfaq

    2001-01-01

    Full text: World population is steadily increasing and yet one-third of them - over two billion people - lack access to electricity. Development depends on energy, including electricity, and the alternative to development is poverty, disease, misery, and death. This is a recipe for chaos, instability and widespread violence. During the next fifty years energy demand is expected to triple while the demand for electricity will grow nearly five-fold; a substantial portion of the demand coming from developing countries. It will be an immense challenge to meet the increased demand in energy without sustaining long term damage to the environment including the surface and air pollution as well as global warming and associated ecological disasters. While most of world's energy is derived from fossil fuels and hydroelectric power, still with 434 nuclear reactors operating worldwide, nuclear power is meeting 16% of the world's annual electricity needs and providing it to more than a billion people. Nuclear power has the potential for meeting a substantial portion of the world's growing energy needs in an environment friendly and sustainable manner contributing to a prosperous and safe world for posterity. The problems that developing countries face in imbibing nuclear technology and promoting the use of nuclear power are daunting. However, as nuclear technology is a proven technology, then in a shrinking world a sharing of knowledge and technology should make it much easier. If the world has to move towards shared political values and a global economy it is imperative that there should be a global access to civilian nuclear technology. (author)

  18. Market definition study of photovoltaic power for remote villages in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, C.; Quashie, P.

    1980-01-01

    The potential market of photovoltaic systems in remote village applications in developing countries is assessed. It is indicated that photovoltaic technology is cost-competitive with diesel generators in many remote village applications. The major barriers to development of this market are the limited financial resources on the part of developing countries, and lack of awareness of photovoltaics as a viable option in rural electrification. A comprehensive information, education and demonstration program should be established as soon as possible to convince the potential customer countries and the various financial institutions of the viability of photovoltaics as an electricity option for developing countries.

  19. Transformation of traditional houses in the development of sustainable rural tourism, case study of Brayut Tourism Village in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasurya, V. R.; Hardiman, G.; Sari, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to reveal local values used by Brayut villagers to maintain the existence of the traditional house as a dwelling. The transformation of traditional houses goes as time passes, influenced by internal aspects related to the needs of residents and external aspects related to the regional development by the government. Traditional Javanese house as a cultural identity of Javanese people, especially in the village, has also experienced the transformation phenomenon. Modernization affects local residents’ needs and the Government’s Development Program for tourism village influences demands of change. An unfocused transformation can lead to a total change that can eliminate the cultural identity of the rural Java community. The method used is the case study by taking three models of Javanese house in Brayut Village. Brayut Tourism Village is a cultural tourism village that relies on tradition as a tourist attraction. The existence of traditional Javanese house is an important asset for retaining its authenticity as a dwelling. Three models taken as the case studies represent the traditional Javanese house types. The result obtained is that the family bond is a major factor in preserving the traditional Javanese house in Brayut Village, Yogyakarta.

  20. Nuclear power - Sustainable development - Professional skill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Paraschiva, M.V.; Banutoiu, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Sustainable development of society implies taking political decisions integrating harmoniously ingredients like these: - technological maturity; - socio-economic efficiency; - rational and equitable use of natural resources; - compliance with requirements concerning the environment and population; - professional ethics; - communications with the public and media; - professional skill; - public opinion acceptance. A rational analysis of these factors shows clearly that nuclear power appears to be an optimal ground for a sustainable power source besides the hydro and thermo-electric systems. Such a conclusion was confirmed by all types of analyses, methodologies or programs like for instance: MAED, WASP, FINPLAN, DECADES, ENPEP and more recently MESSAGE. The paper describes applications of these analytical methodologies for two scenarios of Cernavoda NPP future development. To find the optimal development strategy for the electric system, implying minimal costs the optimization analysis mode of the ELECSAM analysis module was used. The following conclusions were reached: - the majority of Romania's classical electrical stations are old; consequently, part of them should be decommissioned while others will be refurbished. Instead of installing new power groups these options will result in lowering the investment cost, as well as, in reduction of noxious gas emission; - the nuclear power system developed in Romania upon the CANDU technology appears to be one of the most performing and safe technology in the world. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioned on December 2, 1996 covers about 10% to 12% of the energy demand of the country. The CANDU systems offers simultaneously secure energy supply, safe operation, low energy costs and practically a zero impact upon the environment. The case study for Romania by means of DECADES project showed that the development program with minimal cost for electrical stations implies construction of new 706.5 MW nuclear units and new 660 MW

  1. SWOT of nuclear power plant sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaspour, M.; Ghazi, S.

    2008-01-01

    SWOT Analysis is a Useful tool that can he applied to most projects or business ventures. In this article we are going to examine major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of nuclear power plants in view of sustainable development. Nuclear power plants have already attained widespread recognition for its benefits in fossil pollution abatement, near-zero green house gas emission, price stability and security of energy supply. The impressive new development is that these virtues are now a cost -free bonus, because, in long run, nuclear energy has become an inexpensive way to generate electricity. Nuclear energy's pre-eminence economically and environmentally has two implications for government policy. First, governments should ensure that nuclear licensing and safety oversight arc not only rigorous but also efficient in facilitating timely development of advanced power plants. Second, governments should be bold incentivizing the transformation to clean energy economics, recognizing that such short-term stimulus will, in the case of nuclear plants, simply accelerate desirable changes that now have their own long-term momentum. The increased competitiveness of nuclear power plant is the result of cost reductions in all aspects of nuclear economics: Construction, financing, operations, waste management and decommissioning. Among the cost-lowering factors are the evolution to standardized reactor designs, shorter construction periods, new financing techniques, more efficient generation technologies, higher rates of reactor utilization, and longer plant lifetimes. U.S World Nuclear Association report shows that total electricity costs for power plant construction and operation were calculated at two interest rates. At 10%, midrange generating costs per kilowatt-hour are nuclear at 4 cents, coal at 4.7 cents and natural gas at 5.1 cent. At a 5% interest rate, mid-range costs per KWh fall to nuclear at 2.6 cents, coal at 3.7 cents and natural gas at 4.3 cents

  2. Effectiveness of community-based mangrove management for sustainable resource use and livelihood support: A case study of four villages in Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damastuti, Ekaningrum; de Groot, Rudolf

    2017-12-01

    Community-Based Mangrove Management (CBMM) is implemented with different approaches and outcomes. This study examined the effectiveness of various CBMM practices to achieve sustainable management of mangrove resources. We analyzed local mangrove resource management strategies in four coastal villages (e.g. Sriwulan, Bedono, Timbulsloko, and Surodadi) on Central Java, Indonesia. Local data on institutions, socio-economic conditions and mangrove resources utilization was collected through participatory resource mapping and interviews with 16 key actors and 500 households. The main differences in CBMM-practices that affect the outcomes in each village were the type of community participation, the level of organizational and economic assistance from external institutions, the magnitude of the rehabilitation project, the time selected for rehabilitation and the maintenance strategies applied in each village. Surodadi achieved most in terms of both efficient resource utilization and local livelihood improvement. Bedono's management strategy was most effective in extending and maintaining the rehabilitated mangrove areas but less in terms of livelihood support while the strategy applied in Timbulsloko resulted in higher resource utilization compared to Surodadi. Sriwulan failed on most criteria. This study suggests that combining the management strategies practiced in Bedono and Surodadi and adding external scientific and technological assistance, income diversification, institutional reinforcement and continuous monitoring of the functioning of local institutions can improve the CBMM performance to sustainably manage mangrove resources and improve livelihoods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomass energy technologies for rural infrastructure and village power - opportunities and challenges in the context of global climate change concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, V.V.N.; Bhandari, P.M.; Gupta, P.

    2004-01-01

    The potential and role of biomass resources in developing countries for addressing global climate change concerns are highlighted using India as a case study. Promotion of technologies, which use biomass more efficiently, is seen as a key strategy to integrate the concerns of both developing countries and developed countries. The role of various biomass technologies for improving rural infrastructure and village power is discussed in detail. A vision of establishing and running a chain of rural energy service companies, operating with a basket of devices and technologies, under the general provisions of CDM, is examined for commercialization and mainstreaming of biomass technologies which have achieved reasonable levels of maturity. (author)

  4. LEADERSHIP IN OPTIMIZING MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR GROUP SUSTAINABILITY (Case of Farmer Groups of Gisik Pranaji Bugel Village Panjatan Kulon Progo Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kuning Retno Dewandini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leadership is one important aspect in the sucess of the group. The leader of a group have a role as determinat sucess of the group. Nothing a leader, a group will only run without direction and purpose. But the sucess of a group is not only determined by a leader, but also it determined by his followers as well as a supportive environment. Gisik Pranaji farmer groups in the Bugel village of Panjatan Kulon Progo Regency able to survive due to the role of farmer group. To sustain these group need the support of the parties involved in it, including all the members of farmers and the environment.

  5. Van Quan new town in Hanoi and its socio-economic impacts on the four surrounding villages - towards a more sustainable urban development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang Minh; Doan, The Trung; Tran, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Manh Tri; Hoa Ta, Quynh

    2018-04-01

    Developed by Housing and Urban Development Corporation (HUD) over a decade ago as one of the pioneering and modelling urban housing projects in Hanoi, Van Quan new town can be regarded as a fairly successful scheme, because it provides people with a better living quality than most of the other new residential quarters planned and built at the same time, and even afterwards. However, the success would be greater, if the project developer paid due attention to some socio-economic aspects of mass housing construction - such as income, education, healthcare and social interaction as well as communication - in one of the city’s fastest-growing and most typical areas characterised with the presence of traditional old villages where a rich rural culture can still be found and should be conserved in the rapid urbanisation and modernisation. Van Quan makes an even more remarkable case study, because there are four villages connected to the site with both similar and different features, rather than the other new towns with only one or two villages nearby. The research results drawn and the lessons learnt from Van Quan will be useful for other projects, as far as a harmony and a sustainable development between the old and the new factors are concerned.

  6. Potency of Micro Hydro Power Plant Development Use of Kelampuak River Flow Located in Tamblang Village – Buleleng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Ngakan Ketut Putra Negara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Need of electrical energy is increasing along with people population and economic growth. According to PLN data, Bali Province’s electrical consumption is predicted growth 5,6% in average every year. Until year 2007, electrical condition in Bali is categorized critical. If Power Plat in Bali, PLTG Gilimanuk that has power 130 MW is out of system, affecting Bali’s electrical back up is minus. Consecuenlly, it will be extinguishing if there is not adding power plan or new energy supply. This problem needs to be anticipated by use of thermal energy program such as coal, gas and geothermal and use of alternative energy such as solar, wind and ocean energies. Regency of Buleleng is one of Regency in Bali having potency of renewable energy development especially water resource. It has some rivers that have potency to be developed as a Micro Hydro Power Plant (PLTMH. One of them is Kelampuak River which is located in Tamblang Village. As a first step in developing of Micro Hydro Power Plant, it needs to be known water debit and head of the river. For that reason, it needs to be investigated debit and head of Kelampuak River so that it can be predicted the power can be generated.

  7. Marital Construction of Family Power among Male-out-Migrant Couples in a Chinese Village: A Relation-Oriented Exchange Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    This study examines marital construction of family power among male-out-migrant couples in a Chinese village in Guangxi Province. In-depth interviews show that male-out-migrant couples prefer joint decision making. When couples are in disputes, power tends to go to the ones who shoulder greater household-based responsibilities; in this case, they…

  8. Sustainable energy landscapes: The power of imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stremke, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resource depletion and climate change motivate a transition to sustainable energy systems that make effective use of renewable sources. Sustainable energy transition necessitates a transformation of large parts of the existing built environment and presents one of the great challenges of present-day

  9. Community-Based Rural Tourism in Inter-Organizational Collaboration: How Does It Work Sustainably? Lessons Learned from Nglanggeran Tourism Village, Gunungkidul Regency, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asnawi Manaf

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, socio-economic disparities, especially between rural and urban areas (Gini index up to 0.4 have attracted significant concern from the Government of Indonesia, which developed a community-based rural tourism program as one of the attempts to overcome this problem. Though the program seems quite promising, the implementation was challenging, especially regarding sustainability. Therefore, successful and sustainable practical examples are needed. This paper analyzes the results of a case study from the experiences of community-based tourism implementation in Nglanggeran Tourism Village, Gunungkidul Regency, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, which was considered as successful and sustainable. The main focus of this research is on how the collaboration and involvement of the related inter-organizational stakeholders, initiated by the local community, particularly the youth, has contributed to the program sustainability. Data and information for this study were obtained through in-depth interviews, observation, and documents review. This study found that the local community has a major role in implementing the program, among those various entities of stakeholders. Hence, the paper states this is the key to the success and sustainability of the program.

  10. Nuclear power - an inevitable component of a sustainable energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesarovic, M.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants already add consequential amounts of energy to the global energy supply and continue to offer advantages for large additions of capacity. If increased, the nuclear share in world's energy mix would reduce the environmental damages as well as the climate change threats caused by the use of fossil fuels, thus providing an essential element of sustainable development. Such a potential contribution of nuclear power on large scale in a sustainable energy mix is considered, with its actual burdens and challenges discussed. Sustainable energy development with or without nuclear power is presented, with public acceptance of nuclear energy and global warming issues discussed in more details. (author)

  11. Power Distribution at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Illumination through Affordable and Sustainable Solution of Gram Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nisha; Sarswat, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    Energy plays a vital role in the socio -economic development, mainly due to the dependency of indispensable amenities on electricity. However, a matter of concern is developing country domestic power needs and inadequate supply. One of the cases is Indian subcontinent, where more than 50,000 villages still not have access to uninterrupted electric power. `Power theft' is a major challenge due to the lack of adequate energy supply and the financial constraints. Long distances, inaccurate and inflated electricity bills are the other issues lead to default on payments. Gram Power, a social enterprise, is providing a smart metering and affordable solution in areas where the extension of existing grid supply is economically not viable. India's first solar powered micro-grid (centralized array of solar panels) in Rajasthan was established by this initiative. The core innovation is a smart distribution technology that consists of smart meters with recharging facility and grid monitoring, to provide on-demand, theft-proof power through centralized servers with a pay-as-you-use schedule. The details of the changes, socio-economic transformation, and operational sustainability of such a community engagement model will be discussed in this study.

  12. Modeling and control of sustainable power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2011-01-01

    The concept of the smart grid promises the world an efficient and intelligent approach of managing energy production, transportation, and consumption by incorporating intelligence, efficiency, and optimality into the power grid. Both energy providers and consumers can take advantage of the convenience, reliability, and energy savings achieved by real-time and intelligent energy management. To this end, the current power grid is experiencing drastic changes and upgrades. For instance, more significant green energy resources such as wind power and solar power are being integrated into the power

  13. Intermediate-sized photovoltaic plants to supply power villages: Future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previ, A.

    1990-01-01

    The activity promoted by the European Communities, aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of supplying both active and passive power distribution networks by means of photovoltaic plants (PV) has been highly successful. The PV plants at Aghia Roumeli, Pellworm, Rondulinu, and Vulcano are stand-alone plants that can supply small isolated communities. The plant at Kytnos supplies power to the grid with the help of electrochemical storage; the plants at Pellworm, and Vulcano can also supply power to the grid, the first with e.c. storage and the second without such storage. This paper gives an overview of the activity promoted by the Communities EEC-DGXII research group aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of supplying both active and passive power distribution networks by means of PV plants. Possible improvements of the power conditioning sub-system are presented

  14. Smart grids - intelligence for sustainable electrical power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, J.G.; Cordova, C.E.P.; Montes Portela, C.; Morren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the adverse impacts of the consumption of fossil fuels on our environment, the quest for a more sustainable energy supply is increasingly intensifying. Many renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar and tidal power generate electricity. Therefore, the development towards a sustainable

  15. Sustainability indicators for the assessment of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamford, Laurence; Azapagic, Adisa

    2011-01-01

    Electricity supplies an increasing share of the world's total energy demand and that contribution is set to increase. At the same time, there is increasing socio-political will to mitigate impacts of climate change as well as to improve energy security. This, in combination with the desire to ensure social and economic prosperity, creates a pressing need to consider the sustainability implications of future electricity generation. However, approaches to sustainability assessment differ greatly in their scope and methodology as currently there is no standardised approach. With this in mind, this paper reviews sustainability indicators that have previously been used to assess energy options and proposes a new sustainability assessment methodology based on a life cycle approach. In total, 43 indicators are proposed, addressing the techno-economic, environmental and social sustainability issues associated with energy systems. The framework has been developed primarily to address concerns associated with nuclear power in the UK, but is applicable to other energy technologies as well as to other countries. -- Highlights: → New framework for life cycle sustainability assessment of nuclear power developed. → The framework comprises 43 indicators addressing techno-economic, environmental and social sustainability. → Completely new indicators developed to address different sustainability issues, including nuclear proliferation, energy supply diversity and intergenerational equity. → The framework enables sustainability comparisons of nuclear and other electricity technologies. → Indicators can be used by various stakeholders, including industry, policy makers and NGOs to help identify more sustainable electricity options.

  16. Nuclear power and sustainable energy supply for Europe. European Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, W.

    2005-01-01

    The right energy mix is decisive. The European Commission feels that nuclear power can make an important contribution towards sustainable energy supply in Europe. Nuclear power should keep its place in the European energy mix. One important aspect in this regard is improved public acceptance through communication, transparency, and confidence building. High safety standards and a credible approach to the safe long-term management of radioactive waste are major components of this sustainable energy source. (orig./GL)

  17. Sustainable promotion nuclear power enterprise procurement bidding risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power enterprise procurement bidding work faced with certain risk in recent years, the domestic nuclear power enterprises in the bidding work never stop research and explore the effective ways to guard against legal risks, and has made considerable progress, the eighteenth big country advocates the safety and efficiency of nuclear power development policy, in the face of the subsequent nuclear power construction projects have started, nuclear power enterprise bidding risk management work shoulder heavy responsibilities article through nuclear power enterprise procurement bidding risk management present situation, proposed the sustainable promotion nuclear power enterprise procurement bidding risk management countermeasures. (author)

  18. Harnessing wind power with sustained policy support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meera, L. [BITS-Pilani. Dept. of Economics, Hyderabad (India)

    2012-07-01

    The development of wind power in India began in the 1990s, and has significantly increased in the last few years. The ''Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association (IWTMA)'' has played a leading role in promoting wind energy in India. Although a relative newcomer to the wind industry compared with Denmark or the US, a combination of domestic policy support for wind power and the rise of Suzlon (a leading global wind turbine manufacturer) have led India to become the country with the fifth largest installed wind power capacity in the world. Wind power accounts for 6% of India's total installed power capacity, and it generates 1.6% of the country's power. (Author)

  19. Creating the Urban Village: Teaching Pre-Service Teachers about Sustainable Design in Architecture and Community Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Zande, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable design is a philosophy adopted by people concerned with the health of society and the natural environment. The practice of sustainable design works toward the improvement of the quality of the built environment, while reducing or eradicating the negative impact on the natural environment (McLennan 2004). It is a philosophical approach…

  20. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  1. Optimal Sizing Of An Off-Grid Small Hydro-Photovoltaic-Diesel Generator Hybrid Power System For A Distant Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebanji B.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented an optimal sizing technique for an off-grid hybrid system consisting of Small Hydro SHP system Photovoltaic PV modules Battery BATT banks and Diesel Generator DG. The objective cost function Annualized Cost System and the Loss of Power Supply Probability LPSP were minimized with application of Genetic Algorithm GA in order to reduce the Cost of Energy COE generation. GA compared to other convectional optimization methods has the ability to attain global optimum easily. The decision variables are the number of small hydro turbines NSHP number of solar panels NPV number of battery banks NBATT and the capacity of DG PDG. The proposed method was applied to a typical rural village Itapaji-Ekiti in Nigeria. The monthly average solar irradiance data were converted into hourly solar irradiance data for uniformity. Sensitivity analysis was also performed to identify the most important parameter influencing the optimized hybrid system. The optimal sizing result of the HPS is 954 kW of SHP 290 kW of PV panels 9500 sets of 600Ah battery strings and 350 kW of DG. The optimal Loss of Power Supply Probability LPSP is 0.0054 and the Renewable Fraction RF is 0.62 which is indeed a significant improvement on the environment and comparatively better than any other combinations in the system.

  2. Radiocesium concentrations in wild mushrooms collected in Kawauchi Village after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanami Nakashima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known from the experience after the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant that radiocesium tends to concentrate in wild mushrooms. In this study, we collected wild mushrooms from the Kawauchi Village of Fukushima Prefecture, located within 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and evaluated their radiocesium concentrations to estimate the risk of internal radiation exposure in local residents. We found that radioactive cesium exceeding 100 Bq/kg was detected in 125 of 154 mushrooms (81.2%. We calculated committed effective doses based on 6,278 g per year (age > 20 years, 17.2 g/day, the average intake of Japanese citizens, ranging from doses of 0.11–1.60 mSv, respectively. Although committed effective doses are limited even if residents eat contaminated foods several times, we believe that comprehensive risk-communication based on the results of the radiocesium measurements of food, water, and soil is necessary for the recovery of Fukushima after this nuclear disaster.

  3. Sustaining the nuclear power option in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal Khaer bin Ibrahim.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken to establish the information base required prior to a decision on a nuclear power programme, and the strategy adopted and the rationale behind the development of the basic core expertise on nuclear reactor technology. The effect of a lack of decision on the question of nuclear power generation on efforts to build this core technical expertise is also described. (author)

  4. Findings from the Caring International Research Collaborative: Using Caring Science To Assess and Support Food Sustainability Systems for Women Living with HIV/AIDS in a Village in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relindis Oyebog Moffor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes Caring Science as an innovative way to facilitate food systems sustainability in areas of the world that continue to suffer from food insecurity and food shortages. An interdisciplinary group that included a nurse, an agronomist, an environmentalist, and a statistical analyst collaborated to study food sustainability in a village in Bambui, Cameroon. The village was composed of only women and children, and all the women were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. This interdisciplinary approach not only met the food needs of the village, but, within the assessment process, identified other needs as well. This interdisciplinary approach facilitated holistic assessment of food, finances, personal self-worth and health.

  5. Impacts of Power Structure on Sustainable Supply Chain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Li; Yangyang Xu; Fumin Deng; Xuedong Liang

    2017-01-01

    The present paper examines the manufacturer’s operational decisions, e.g., wholesale price and product sustainability level, the retailer’s operational decision, e.g., retail margin, and supply chain efficiency under three supply chain power structures: manufacturer Stackelberg, Nash and retailer Stackelberg. As a benchmark, we first obtain the equlibrium price and product sustainability level in a vertically integrated supply chain. Our analysis provides some interesting findings in a decent...

  6. Innovative global architecture for sustainable nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, John; Kagramanyan, Vladimir; Poplavskaya, Elena; Edwards, Geoffrey; Dixon, Brent; Usanov, Vladimir; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Beatty, Randall

    2011-01-01

    The INPRO collaborative project 'Global architecture of innovative nuclear energy systems based on thermal and fast reactors with the inclusion of a closed nuclear fuel cycle (GAINS)' was one of several scenario studies implemented in the IAEA in recent years. The objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems (NESs) taking into account sustainable development, and to validate the results through sample analyses. Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, France, India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, Ukraine, USA, the European Commission and Argentina as an observer participated in the project. The results received are discussed in the paper, including: development of a heterogeneous multi-group model of a global NES, estimation of nuclear energy demand, identification of a representative set of reactors and fuel cycles, evaluation capability of available analytical and modelling tools, and quantitative analysis of the different options of the global architecture. It was shown that the approach used contributes to development of a coherent vision of driving forces for nuclear energy system development and deployment. (author)

  7. The power of design product innovation in sustainable energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Reinders, Angele H; Brezet, Han

    2012-01-01

    The Power of Design offers an introduction and a practical guide to product innovation, integrating the key topics that are necessary for the design of sustainable and energy-efficient products using sustainable energy technologies. Product innovation in sustainable energy technologies is an interdisciplinary field. In response to its growing importance and the need for an integrated view on the development of solutions, this text addresses the functional principles of various energy technologies next to the latest design processes and innovation methods. From the perspec

  8. Emergy-based sustainability evaluation of wind power generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Emergy is used to quantify the sustainability level of wind farms. • A GHG-based indicator is incorporated into emergetic accounting. • Possible pathways to achieve sustainable wind farm management are analyzed. - Abstract: With large-scale commercialization of wind technology, one must investigate economical and sustainable wind resource utilization. In this paper, emergy analysis is used to quantify the environmental pressure, renewability, economic efficiency, and sustainability of a typical wind power system, considering the lifetime stages from extraction and processing of raw materials and resources to the final product (electricity) via material transportation, construction and operation. Possible pathways to achieve sustainable management of wind energy supply chain were also analyzed based on scenario analysis. Results show that wind power is a promising means of substituting traditional fossil fuel-based power generation systems, with the lowest transformity of 4.49 × 10"4 sej/J, smaller environmental loading ratio of 5.84, and lower greenhouse gas emission intensity of 0.56 kg/kWh. To shed light on potential pathways to achieve sustainable and low-carbon wind energy supply chain management and make informed choices, a sensitivity analysis was done by establishing scenarios from the perspectives of material recycling and technical development. Results suggest that using new materials of lower energy intensity or recycled materials in upstream wind turbine manufacturing and construction materials are the most effective measures.

  9. Impacts of Power Structure on Sustainable Supply Chain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the manufacturer’s operational decisions, e.g., wholesale price and product sustainability level, the retailer’s operational decision, e.g., retail margin, and supply chain efficiency under three supply chain power structures: manufacturer Stackelberg, Nash and retailer Stackelberg. As a benchmark, we first obtain the equlibrium price and product sustainability level in a vertically integrated supply chain. Our analysis provides some interesting findings in a decentralized supply chain: (i a dominant manufacturer (retailer always benefits from its power; (ii the entire supply chain earns the most profit from the Nash game, and the least from the retailer Stackelberg game, respectively; (iii as the power shifts from the manufacturer to the retailer, product sustainability and retail price increase; (iv dominant manufacturer does not necessarily imply low wholesale price that would benefit the retailer. Managerial insights are provided for the manufacturer and the retailer, respectively.

  10. Sustainable nuclear power - the human dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicorda, K.L.; Poston, John W. Sr.; Sayko, Tami Davis; Porter, Jay; Reece, W. Dan; Earl, Beth; Ostroskaya, Natela; Lagoudas, Magdalini; Crenshaw, John; Jump, Will; Fenner, Clarence; Lowery, Kirby; Sieben, Steve; Jones, Larry; Ridge, Douglas; Robertson, Dale; Hyde, Carliss; Kuruvilla, John; Kinnison, Wayne; Harris, Kendall; Aghara, Sukesh; Pezold, Frank; Bird, Bobby; Rice, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The availability of a well-prepared workforce is fundamental to the increased use of nuclear energy. Significant numbers of new employees will be needed not only for the new plants, but to replace retirees at the existing plants. In addition, a wide variety of disciplines and levels of educational backgrounds are needed. The Nuclear Power Institute is a partnership of industry, higher education, secondary and middle schools, state government and civic and community leadership that has come together to meet the challenge of attracting and preparing the nuclear workforce. (authors)

  11. Residents’ Attitudes towards Sustainable Tourism Development in a Historical-Cultural Village: Influence of Perceived Impacts, Sense of Place and Tourism Development Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the residents’ support for sustainable tourism development in a destination that is in the initial tourism development stage. Residents’ perception of sustainable tourism development potential, sense of place, perceived tourism impacts, and tourism development support were involved in this study. A total of 331 completed questionnaire surveys were collected in Luozhou, a historical-cultural village in China. The empirical data were analyzed using a structural equation modeling (SEM technique, and the results revealed that perceived collective benefits had a significant positive effect on tourism development support, whereas the other three perceived impacts’ influence were not significant. The relationship between residents’ sense of place and perceived collective and personal benefits, perceived personal costs and tourism development support, were significant. Additionally, residents’ perceptions of tourism development potential had a significant influence on perceived impact and tourism development support except for perceived personal benefits. Some practical implications of those findings for tourism planning and development are also discussed.

  12. Regulator's role in sustainability of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Parikshat; Sinha, Soumen; Bhattacharya, Ramdas

    2015-01-01

    A development which is environmentally benign, economically viable as well socially acceptable is regarded as sustainable development. Nuclear power scores extremely well with the first two parameters: i.e its cost of production is competitive with that of other power sources and is considered a clean source of power as the greenhouse gas emissions and discharge of other hazardous pollutants are insignificant. However, when it comes to acceptability by the society at large, there are issues. Early shutting down of power plants like Superphénix at France, abandonment of Yucca mountain project, agitation during commissioning of KKNPP etc. are few examples where the public perception was the main reason for such actions. These events tell us about the importance of public perception in sustainability of a project or nuclear power as a whole. In this backdrop, the role of regulator to present the safety aspects in correct perspective assumes enormous significance and goes in a long way in clearing unwarranted apprehensions, thereby playing a pivotal role in sustainability of nuclear power. The nuclear regulator needs to build long lasting trust and confidence with stakeholders. Therefore it needs to be continuously in touch with public, not only during crisis but also during peace time, disseminating information on safe use of ionizing radiation and atomic energy without undue risk to the health of the people and environment. (author)

  13. Sustainability assessment of renewable power and heat generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombi, Mihály; Kuti, István; Balogh, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Rationalisation of consumption, more efficient energy usage and a new energy structure are needed to be achieved in order to shift the structure of energy system towards sustainability. The required energy system is among others characterised by intensive utilisation of renewable energy sources (RES). RES technologies have their own advantages and disadvantages. Nevertheless, for the strategic planning there is a great demand for the comparison of RES technologies. Furthermore, there are additional functions of RES utilisation expected beyond climate change mitigation, e.g. increment of employment, economic growth and rural development. The aim of the study was to reveal the most beneficial RES technologies with special respect to sustainability. Ten technologies of power generation and seven technologies of heat supply were examined in a multi-criteria sustainability assessment frame of seven attributes which were evaluated based on a choice experiment (CE) survey. According to experts the most important characteristics of RES utilisation technologies are land demand and social impacts i.e. increase in employment and local income generation. Concentrated solar power (CSP), hydropower and geothermal power plants are favourable technologies for power generation, while geothermal district heating, pellet-based non-grid heating and solar thermal heating can offer significant advantages in case of heat supply. - highlights: • We used choice experiment to estimate the weights of criteria for the sustainability assessment of RES technologies. • The most important attributes of RES technologies according to experts are land demand and social impacts. • Concentrated solar power (CSP), hydropower and geothermal power plants are advantageous technologies for power generation. • Geothermal district heating, pellet-based non-grid heating and solar thermal heating are favourable in case of heat supply

  14. Supervision functions - Secure operation of sustainable power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten

    2013-01-01

    of power systems operation control. The use of PMUs allows more penetration of DG mainly, with technologies based on renewable resources with intermittent and unpredictable operation such a wind power. This paper introduces the Secure Operation of Sustainable Power Systems (SOSPO) project. The SOSPO...... project tries to respond to the question "How to ensure a secure operation of the future power system where the operating point is heavily is fluctuating?" focusing in the Supervision module architecture and in the power system operation states. The main goal of Supervision module is to determine...... the power system operation state based on new stability and security parameters derived from PMUs measurement and coordinate the use of automatic and manual control actions. The coordination of the control action is based not only in the static indicators but also in the performance evaluation of control...

  15. Nuclear Power Plants and Sustainable Development on a Liberalized Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androcec, I.; Stanic, Z.; Tomsic, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Finding a way to generate electricity so as to satisfy the terms of sustainable development of the entire society is the only way which will secure safe energy future. If we talk about energy in the context of sustainable development, one of the most important element is environmental protection. Since CO 2 emissions stemming from electricity generation have predominant impact on climate change, one of the options for reducing emissions is the use of fuels without carbon, such as e.g. nuclear fuel. The future of nuclear power plants was considered in view of: nuclear fuel supply; potential impact of fuel cycle on environment, power plant operation, decommissioning and secondary products from electricity generation; and the entire nuclear power plant economy. Nuclear power plants were also examined in the context of the Kyoto Protocol stipulating reduction of greenhouse gases emissions. Nuclear power plants can not reduce CO 2 emissions in a short-term because they already operate with maximum output, but in a long-run they can play a significant role. This paper is aiming to analyse the role of nuclear power plants in long term environmental sustainability in electricity sector reform (liberalisation, deregulation, privatisation) in small or medium sized power supply systems. Nuclear power plants are associated with certain environmental aspects which will be taken into account. A comparison will be made through externalities with other energy resources, especially fossil fuels, which are prevailing energy resources, considering possible use of nuclear power plants in the countries with small and medium-size grids. It will be given an example of the role of NPP Krsko on air emissions reduction in Croatia. (author)

  16. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. The Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands.

  17. Nuclear power: an eco friendly energy source for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaidurrahman, K.; Singh, Om Pal

    2009-01-01

    When viewed from a large set of criteria such as abundance of energy resources, environmental impacts, low fuel inventory, quantum of waste generated and green house gas emissions, nuclear power can be considered as a large scale sustainable energy source. Among all energy sources, nuclear energy has perhaps the lowest impact on the environment, especially in relation to kilowatt-hr produced, because nuclear plants do not emit harmful gases and produce small quantity of waste. In other words, nuclear energy is the most environmental friendly electricity source. There are no significant adverse effects to water, land, habitat, species and air resources. The present paper discusses the sustainability and feasibility of nuclear power as an eco friendly energy source in the changing and challenging competitive power market. (author)

  18. Sustainability Challenge of Micro Hydro Power Development in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didik, H.; Bambang, P. N.; Asep, S.; Purwanto, Y. A.

    2018-05-01

    Rural electrification using renewable energy is the best choice for many locations that far away from national grid. Many renewable energy project have been built for rural electrification such as micro hydro power plant (MHPP) and solar photovoltaic (SPV). Sustainability still the main challenge of off-grid renewable energy development for off-grid rural electrification in Indonesia. The objective of this paper is to review sustainability of micro hydro power development in Indonesia. The research method was done by field observation, interview with MHPP management, and reviewing some research about MHPP in Indonesia. Sustainability issues include various aspects that can be classified into 5 dimensions: technical, economic, socio-cultural, institutional, and environmental. In technical factors that lead to sustainability problem are: improper MHPP design and construction, improper operation and maintenance, availability of spare parts and expertise. In the economic dimension are generally related to: low electricity tariff and utilization of MHPP for productive use. In the social dimension are: the growth of consumer’s load exceeding the capacity, reduced number of consumers, lack of external institutional support. In the institutional side, it is generally related to the ability of human resources in managing, operating and maintaining of MHPP. Environmental factors that lead the sustainability problems of MHPP are: scarcity of water discharge, conflict of water resources, land conversion over the watershed, and natural disasters.

  19. A Conceptual Study on the Sustainability of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Choi, Hang Bok; Lim, Chae Young; Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, Seong Won

    2007-06-15

    Due to the current population growth and industrialization, energy consumption is increasing continuously. The world population and energy consumption were 2.5 billion and 1.5 billion tons of equivalent oil in 1950, but they are expected to be 9.2 billion and 60 tons, respectively, in 2100. This amount of energy consumption will result in an exhaustion of fossil resources and cause a serious environmental problem such as global warming. Therefore it is necessary to develop sustainable energy resources that maintain current economic growth and social welfare level without burdening a next generation's life style. Nuclear energy has an excellent competitiveness from the viewpoint of a sustainability. Especially nuclear power can effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can be developed in a complementary way with a new and renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and hydrogen energy. It is expected that nuclear power will maintain its sustainability in the following directions: Implementation of a fast reactor fuel cycle with a high uranium utilization efficiency, Implementation of a pyro-process with an excellent proliferation-resistance, Activity on the enhancement of a domestic social acceptance for nuclear power, International cooperation and joint research for the enhancement of an international nuclear transparency, Optimization of a nuclear grid structure through an accommodation of new and renewable energy resources, Application to a mass production of hydrogen energy.

  20. Pakistan - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Jalal, A.I.; Mumtaz, A.; Latif, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although Pakistan's contribution to global GHG emissions is very small (currently only 0.3% of world-wide emissions), it shares with the world community the concerns of climate change due to the build-up of GHGs. Pakistan is committed to co-operating with global efforts to avert the potential threat of global warming and is already working towards its own socio-economic development in a sustainable manner. However, due to the country's limited technical and financial capabilities, its efforts are diluted and limited to only high priority areas of national interest. There is a large potential for expanding these efforts, if the necessary technical and financial support can be made available, and such an expansion would contribute significantly to the collective global objective of sustainable development. One such step is the reduction of GHG emissions from Pakistan's power sector by introducing advanced cleaner technologies. Nuclear power is one such technology

  1. On nuclear power, population and sustainable global civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Humanity is facing a multitude of difficult problems that threaten not only human development but the very continuity of civilization. The fundamental cause is the size of the human population but at present the subject is not discussed in international fora. It is not clear if it is wishfully avoided or if it is not recognized as the fundamental problem. Without limiting fertility and population globally, there will be no future for civilization as we know it and there will be no need for nuclear power as a source of energy. Instead, nuclear power will be the principal agent of the end. The nuclear community is in a position to point out the problem and propose a solution. Principles of sustainability and a path to a sustainable global civilization are shown. (author)

  2. Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Water has always been crucial to combustion and hydroelectric processes, but it could become the source of power in membrane-based systems that capture energy from natural and waste waters. Two processes are emerging as sustainable methods for capturing energy from sea water: pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis. These processes can also capture energy from waste heat by generating artificial salinity gradients using synthetic solutions, such as thermolytic salts. A further source of energy comes from organic matter in waste waters, which can be harnessed using microbial fuel-cell technology, allowing both wastewater treatment and power production. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Banquet speech: nuclear power, competition and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The essential ingredients of sustainable development are economics and efficiency in the use of energy and materials, and in the prevention, disposal and recycling of wastes. Nuclear power will continue to be an important means of electricity generation for the foreseeable future but the extent to which this will be the case depends on the nuclear industry resolving public concerns over environmental, health and safety risks, and competing successfully with other generating technologies. In the final analysis, the future of nuclear power will be determined primarily by economic considerations. (UK)

  4. Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-08-15

    Water has always been crucial to combustion and hydroelectric processes, but it could become the source of power in membrane-based systems that capture energy from natural and waste waters. Two processes are emerging as sustainable methods for capturing energy from sea water: pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis. These processes can also capture energy from waste heat by generating artificial salinity gradients using synthetic solutions, such as thermolytic salts. A further source of energy comes from organic matter in waste waters, which can be harnessed using microbial fuel-cell technology, allowing both wastewater treatment and power production. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies for sustainable development of the Polish electric power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janiczek, R.

    1996-01-01

    The key features of sustainable development of the Polish electric power industry are discussed. Priorities and limitations for changes and power demand forecasts are described. Results of least-cost planning for existing power plants' modernization and generation expansion with environmental impacts are presented. The least-cost strategy is given by the optimal upgrades of older plants until year 2002 and by expansion of gas-fired units. The limited availability of gas after 2010 will lead to the construction of new coal-fired plants. For the next planning process, an integrated resource planning methodology is proposed, which includes dynamic optimization of supply and demand side options. Innovative mechanisms are shown to overcome barriers of development like long-terms contracts and decentralization of the power system planning process. (author)

  6. Powering the future: Blueprint for a sustainable electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1997-01-01

    Long known for its vast scale and fierce resistance to change, the US power industry is poised for a sweeping transformation. Although driven by many of the same forces propelling the telecommunications revolution, the electricity industry has received only a fraction as much attention. Yet the electric industry is far larger, with a current investment per customer of $6,000--double that of the phone and cable industries combined. Moreover, unlike telecommunications, the future of the power industry will have an enormous impact on the global environment. The glimmerings of a more efficient, decentralized, and less-polluting power system are beginning to capture the interest--and even the investment dollars--of some. In this paper, the authors describe the route to a more environmentally sustainable electric industry to power the twenty-first century

  7. Nuclear power and sustainable energy supply for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, W.

    2006-01-01

    Developing and promoting a farsighted energy policy is a key aspect in achieving sustainable development in the European Union. Factors to be coped with in this context are the Union's increasing dependence on energy imports, and the threats facing the climate. Moreover, it is imperative that the Lisbon strategy be pursued, according to which Europe is to be made the world's most dynamic knowledge-based economic region by 2010. As early as in 2000, the EU Commission published its Green Paper, ''Towards a European Strategy of Continuity in Power Supply.'' Continuity of supply, in this context, not only stands for maximized self-sufficiency or minimized dependencies. What is at stake is a reduction of the risks stemming from dependence on imports and from changes in the environment. This goal can be achieved through a balanced and diverse structure both of energy resources and of the geographic origins of fuels. The right energy mix is decisive. The European Commission feels that nuclear power can make an important contribution towards sustainable energy supply in Europe. Nuclear power should keep its place in the European energy mix. One important aspect in this regard is improved public acceptance through communication, transparency, and confidence building. High safety standards and a credible approach to the safe long-term management of radioactive waste are major components of this sustainable energy source. (orig.)

  8. Study on the “3F-in-1” Sustainable Reconstruction of Rural Architecture from Placeality Perspective--A Case Study of Caiyuan Village in Jingmen City, Hubei Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangyu, Fu; Yu, Cao

    2017-05-01

    This paper takes Caiyuan Village in Jingmen City of Hubei Province as the research object, analyzes the production, life and ecological functions of rural buildings and the “3F-in-1” inherent mechanism from the local perspective. Based on the concept analysis of placeality and “3F-in-1”, this paper clarifies the relationship among the value of life function, production function, ecological function so as to analyze the “3F-in-1” mode of rural architecture with placeality. On this basis, this thesis puts forward the strategy of sustainable spatial transformation (1) preserve the traditional overall spatial structure of villages, (2) improve the adaptability and function of rural architecture, (3) extend the rural social culture, (4) pay attention to local perception, with a view to explore an organic system design method for the exhibition of placeality and sustainable development of beautiful countryside.

  9. Transforming the Nigerian power sector for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatugel Usman, Zubairu; Abbasoglu, Serkan; Tekbiyik Ersoy, Neyre; Fahrioglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has been plagued with acute power shortages due to poor performance of its power sector. Several policies and reforms have been implemented by the government to address the poor performance of the power generation, transmission and distribution sectors of the electricity industry. Also various strategies were employed by the government which includes encouraging private sector participation, diversification of the energy generation sources and promoting energy efficiency for sustainable development. In addition the government has spent billions of dollars since 2001 in the construction of new power generation facilities, transmission lines and distribution centers to boost the power supply. It has deregulated the generation and distribution sectors to encourage private sector participation and empowers the Energy Commission of Nigeria to embark on programs and strategies that can boost energy generation from renewable sources. This paper examined the country's energy sources and the power sector reforms adopted by the government. The paper also outlined some recommendations based on reforms implemented by other countries with similar resources to Nigeria which yielded positive results. - Highlights: • Available resources for power generation in Nigeria. • Power sector challenges, policies and reforms. • Implications of the reforms implemented. • Recommendations for improving the sector's performance.

  10. Sustainable Development in India - A case for Nuclear Power - 189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, S.

    2010-01-01

    India needs a sustained high economic growth to realize its objectives of poverty alleviation and improving the standard of living of its population. Energy/ Electricity being the key driver for economic growth, there is a pressing need for large augmentation in generation capacity, infrastructure and enhancement of energy efficiency to ensure that there is equity amongst population as far as energy availability is concerned. India is not very energy rich and has limited resources of fossil fuels. India's nuclear power resources profile comprises of very modest uranium but abundant thorium resources. A unique three stage programme, based on optimum utilization of indigenous resources, offers a solution for the country's long term energy security and sustainability. India's nuclear power programme is based on a closed fuel cycle. The philosophy, apart from increasing the energy potential of the resource manifold, reduces the amount waste considerably. There is also the benefit of nuclear power being clean free. While the indigenous nuclear power programme is robust and on course, a much faster nuclear capacity addition in the near term, to meet the rising demand and mitigating existing energy shortages, is contemplated through additionalities based on international cooperation. (authors)

  11. Multi-pulse power injection and spheromak sustainment in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; Bulmer, R. H.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Woodruff, S.; Sspx Team

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. Spheromak formation (gun injection phase) and sustainment experiments are now routine in SSPX using a multi-bank power system. Gun voltage, impedance, and power coupling show a clear current threshold dependence on gun flux (I_th~=λ_0φ_gun/μ_0), increasing with current above the threshold, and are compared with CTX results. The characteristic gun inductance, L_gun~=0.6 μH, derived from the gun voltage dependence on di/dt, is larger than expected from Corsica modeling of the spheromak equilibrium. It’s value is consistent with the n=1 ‘doughook’ mode structure reported in SPHEX and believed important for helicity injection and toroidal current drive. Results of helicity and power balance calculations of spheromak poloidal field buildup are compared with experiment and used to project sustainment with a future longer pulse power supply. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  12. Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2004-10-01

    As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

  13. Limitations of Nuclear Power as a Sustainable Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Pearce

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review and analysis of the challenges that nuclear power must overcome in order to be considered sustainable. The results make it clear that not only do innovative technical solutions need to be generated for the fundamental inherent environmental burdens of nuclear energy technology, but the nuclear industry must also address difficult issues of equity both in the present and for future generations. The results show that if the concept of just sustainability is applied to the nuclear energy sector a global large-scale sustainable nuclear energy system to replace fossil fuel combustion requires the following: (i a radical improvement in greenhouse gas emissions intensity by improved technology and efficiency through the entire life cycle to prevent energy cannibalism during rapid growth; (ii the elimination of nuclear insecurity to reduce the risks associated with nuclear power so that the free market can indemnify it without substantial public nuclear energy insurance subsidies; (iii the elimination of radioactive waste at the end of life and minimization of environmental impact during mining and operations; and (iv the nuclear industry must regain public trust or face obsolescence as a swarm of renewable energy technologies quickly improve both technical and economic performance.

  14. Sustainable Power Supply Solutions for Off-Grid Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Mohamad Aris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The telecommunication sector plays a significant role in shaping the global economy and the way people share information and knowledge. At present, the telecommunication sector is liable for its energy consumption and the amount of emissions it emits in the environment. In the context of off-grid telecommunication applications, off-grid base stations (BSs are commonly used due to their ability to provide radio coverage over a wide geographic area. However, in the past, the off-grid BSs usually relied on emission-intensive power supply solutions such as diesel generators. In this review paper, various types of solutions (including, in particular, the sustainable solutions for powering BSs are discussed. The key aspects in designing an ideal power supply solution are reviewed, and these mainly include the pre-feasibility study and the thermal management of BSs, which comprise heating and cooling of the BS shelter/cabinets and BS electronic equipment and power supply components. The sizing and optimization approaches used to design the BSs’ power supply systems as well as the operational and control strategies adopted to manage the power supply systems are also reviewed in this paper.

  15. Welcome to The Green Village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A sustainable world can only be achieved by an open collaboration between science, business and the public. That is why we create the Green Village: an innovative, lively, interactive and challenging environment where entrepreneurs, innovators, companies, artists, teachers and visitors can meet,

  16. Investigation of the sustainability of nuclear power use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk-Mazouz, N.; Hubig, C.; Mazous, N.

    2001-01-01

    The report reviews the sustainability discussion, specifically for the energy sector. Definitions, rules and indicators are gone into. Publications speaking against nuclear power are analysed: Brundtland, UBA, SRU, UNCSD, HGF. The main section analyzed positive publications, i.e. Voss, Kessler, and the NEA study. 11 central argumentation strategies are identified and analyzed. They are shown to be faulty, based on selective argumentations which omit either important comparative arguments relevant to the whole energy sector, or alternative options, or additional risks caused by changes in boundary conditions. Further, aspects of human and social acceptability are left out of account as well as problems of institutionalisation. (orig.) [de

  17. Romanian nuclear power in the context of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan; Bilegan, Iosif C.

    2003-01-01

    Energy use is a vital force for the economic welfare. It drives many aspects of the economic activity and is essential to a high quality life. However, the unwanted side-effects of energy use, including local pollution and the global warming due mainly to release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), are detrimental to life quality and may induce climate changes at a large-scale. The nuclear power has a lot of economical, social and environmental benefits. The paper deals with aspects referring to the CANDU nuclear technology that is developed in Romania, within the sustainable development framework. (authors)

  18. Performance of Power Systems under Sustained Random Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Verdejo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies linear systems under sustained additive random perturbations. The stable operating point of an electric power system is replaced by an attracting stationary solution if the system is subjected to (small random additive perturbations. The invariant distribution of this stationary solution gives rise to several performance indices that measure how well the system copes with the randomness. These indices are introduced, showing how they can be used for the optimal tuning of system parameters in the presence of noise. Results on a four-generator two-area system are presented and discussed.

  19. Government installation guidelines for the sustainable development of wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    The Government of Quebec has made a commitment to clean renewable energy, including wind power, as part of its sustainable development strategy. However, any proposed projects are subject to conditions imposed by regional municipalities. Municipalities are responsible for urban planning laws with jurisdiction over landscape, noise, public safety, and wildlife. Project proponents must meet both social and environmental criteria to ensure the preservation of the municipal territory and the quality of life. Regulations are in place to ensure economic development occurs in tandem with meeting the energy needs of local and regional communities. 16 refs

  20. Sampling strategies and materials for investigating large reactive particle complaints from Valley Village homeowners near a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.; Davis, H.; Frazar, B.; Haines, B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper will present Phase 3's sampling strategies, techniques, methods and substrates for assisting the District to resolve the complaints involving yellowish-brown staining and spotting of homes, cars, etc. These spots could not be easily washed off and some were permanent. The sampling strategies for the three phases were based on Phase 1 -- the identification of the reactive particles conducted in October, 1989 by APCD and IITRI, Phase 2 -- a study of the size distribution and concentration as a function of distance and direction of reactive particle deposition conducted by Radian and LG and E, and Phase 3 -- the determination of the frequency of soiling events over a full year's duration conducted in 1995 by APCD and IITRI. The sampling methods included two primary substrates -- ACE sheets and painted steel, and four secondary substrates -- mailbox, aluminum siding, painted wood panels and roof tiles. The secondary substrates were the main objects from the Valley Village complaints. The sampling technique included five Valley Village (VV) soiling/staining assessment sites and one southwest of the power plant as background/upwind site. The five VV sites northeast of the power plant covered 50 degrees span sector and 3/4 miles distance from the stacks. Hourly meteorological data for wind speeds and wind directions were collected. Based on this sampling technique, there were fifteen staining episodes detected. Nine of them were in summer, 1995

  1. Sustainable development: the nuclear power and non-nuclear power in the XXI century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of sustainable development and the role of energy in the implementation of this concept. The Rio de Janeiro Agenda 21, the objectives and managerial rules for the long term implementation of sustainable development, as well as its general principles are issued addressed with a special emphasis on the sustainable energy supply. The problem of the radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear energy is especially assessed. The implementation of the sustainable developments principles implies a triangle formed of university, industry and society. While university is ensuring education and sciences the industry's role is to ensure efficiency and technical innovation. The society is appealed then to support science and technology. This talk given in front of Romanian Academy concludes with the following wording by Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker: All dangers we face are not technically or technologically unsurpassable but rather reflect our inability to use our own innovative and discovery power

  2. Sustainable power planning for the island of Crete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giatrakos, Georgios P.; Tsoutsos, Theocharis D.; Zografakis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Crete, as one of the largest and most touristic islands of the Mediterranean, is facing abrupt population and economic growth tendencies that result in the incessant problem of inability to meet power demand increase. This paper evaluates the island's present electrical energy status, and examines the possibility of further penetration of sustainable energy. Various energy modelling software solutions are examined and evaluated, in order to form scenarios according to the governmental and EU directives for renewable energy sources (RES), as well as to the planned conventional power plant upgrades and LNG transition. RES are fully exploited in the plan's scenarios, always taking into account all technical and legislative limitations. Analysis shows that even the most modest and realistic RES implementation scenarios, combined with a partially successful demand restriction, could indeed contract the island's environmental footprint. RES penetration in Crete's electric seems to be able to surpass 30% by 2020, surpassing even the optimistic EU targets for 20% RES by 2020

  3. Evolutions of the power grid: vector of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croguennoc, Alain; Dalle, Bernard; Archambault, R.; Bony, P.E.; Bouneau, C.; Bourguignon, B.; Bouvier, D.; Beltran, A.; Chauvancy, A.; Chevassus-au-Louis, B.; Citi, S.; Claverie, B.; Colomb, B.; Dallet, M.; Deveaux, L.; Dubus, D.; Fresnedo, S.; Herreros, J.; Herz, O.; Isoard, J.; Jaussaud, E.; Laffaye, H.; Laroche, J.P.; Lasserre, D.; Lebas, N.; Lebranchu, D.; Leclerc, F.; Lemoine, D.; Leydier, C.; Malique, F.; Mazoyer, F.; Meudic, M.A.; Nguefeu, S.; Pajot, S.; Pilate, J.M.; Real, G.; Rosso, F.; Waeraas de Saint Martin, G.; Schwartzmann, S.; Serres, E.

    2011-01-01

    The abatement of energy consumption and the mass production of renewable energy are the main actions implemented to meet the climate challenge. In this context, the share of electric power in the final consumption is continuously growing up. Adapting the power transportation grid is necessary if we want to take up the challenge of the new paradigm 'new power generation sites, fatal and intermittent energy'. If this grid is the symbol of a modern and well-equipped France, it is also the revealer of our society antagonisms: change without disruption, progress without sacrifice of heritage and natural landscapes. Industries and grid operators will have to show some innovation and anticipation if they want this deep change to be a success. The French power grid has permitted the regional development in the past and will allow to take up the climate challenge in the future. Its inevitable position in the success of past transformations makes it an essential vector of sustainable development. (J.S.)

  4. Powering Kuwait into the 21. Century. Adopting a Sustainable Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncourt, Maite de

    2012-09-01

    of the new buildings. New refining activities will also be energy intensive. This in turn could increase the number of migrant workers and consequently the population would grow faster than on a business as usual trend. Consumption forecasts are well below neighbour countries estimates, and this report is also conservative compared to official forecasts data. Last but not least, other sectors such as transport or petrochemicals will need an increasing amount of oil. The domestic oil consumption will in any case in increase in the years to come. This report concludes that Kuwait's power sector fuel mix and consumption path is not sustainable. In the short term, rising power consumption could lead to shortages in power capacity. Due to this unexpected power demand, capacity utilisation has been almost complete. Successive black outs in the last years led to the installation of expensive to run emergency gas fired turbines. In the no change scenario, growing power consumption would lead to decrease in oil export revenues, representing 91.6% of the state 2010/2011 budget. This would have a very negative impact on the overall economy, which is not substantially diversified yet. Costs would on the other hand increase as more power capacity would need to be installed, a larger amount of increasingly expensive fuel will have to be purchased and the state power subsidies bill, already amounting to $9 billion, will explode. While rising oil prices could compensate to a certain extent, and wait and see strategy risks locking Kuwait into a non-viable path

  5. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands. For the first time this year, Essent is fully incorporated in the RWE company profile. SPE, a company covered for the first time, is included in the company profile of its owner EdF. The Vattenfall and Nuon fact sheets were drafted and reviewed separately, and combined into one company profile afterwards. In total, the 2010 series consist of ten company fact sheets; Delta, Dong Energy, E.ON, EdF, SPE, Eneco, Enel, Gdf Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, Nuon/Vattenfall and RWE. The company fact sheets form the basis of three separate reports, covering companies active in (1) The Netherlands, (2) Belgium, and an overview of (3) the largest European companies. This report is the version for Belgium, and covers the following companies, all active on the Belgian market: EdF, GDF Suez/Electrabel, RWE, SPE, Vattenfall/Nuon.

  6. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands. For the first time this year, Essent is fully incorporated in the RWE company profile. SPE, a company covered for the first time, is included in the company profile of its owner EdF. The Vattenfall and Nuon fact sheets were drafted and reviewed separately, and combined into one company profile afterwards. In total, the 2010 series consist of ten company fact sheets; Delta, Dong Energy, E.ON, EdF, SPE, Eneco, Enel, Gdf Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, Nuon/Vattenfall and RWE. The company fact sheets form the basis of three separate reports, covering companies active in (1) The Netherlands, (2) Belgium, and an overview of (3) the largest European companies. This report is the version for Europe, and covers the following companies, all among the largest electricity companies in Europe: EdF, Enel, E.ON, GDF Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, RWE, Vattenfall/Nuon.

  7. The role of nuclear power in sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V.M.; Juhn, P.E.; Kagramanian, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Today's developing countries, with some three-quarters of the world population, consume only one-fourth of the global energy. In coming decades, the global energy consumption is anticipated to increase substantially, to a large extent driven by the developing world. Responsive long-term energy strategies that exploit energy sources with a minimum of greenhouse-gas emissions need be developed and implemented as rapidly as possible to limit environmental pollution. The energy mix that evolves will not depend only on environmental considerations, but also on economic, technological, supply and political factors. On the global level, fossil fuels will continue to be the major energy source, probably with natural gas as the major component. Nuclear power is currently a significant source of energy supply, but there is no consensus regarding its future role. Its use has stagnated in Europe and in North America, but it maintains its position as a strong option in Asian countries. Economy and security of supply, along with an awareness of environmental benefits, have been principal considerations in the choice of nuclear power and these three factors will also determine its long-term role in a sustainable energy future. Comparative assessments of the full energy chain of energy options consider a number of issues: fuel and land requirements; environmental pollutants; confinement vs. dispersion of waste; greenhouse gas emissions; natural resources; and external costs, e.g. interest and depreciation, waste management, and energy taxes. Such assessments will help clarify the merits of nuclear power. (author)

  8. Southern Africa power pool : benefits, achievements, challenges and sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.O.; Opok, A.O.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the Southern Africa Power Pool (SAPP) was presented. The SAPP was formed by 12 southern African developing countries as a means of minimizing electricity costs and maintaining reliability. The pool includes over 200 million people in a region of 9 million square meters. The SAPP relies on long-term bilateral contracts for electricity supply between customers and generators. The contracts are supplemented by short-term contracts in the short-term energy market. The pool uses a pricing mechanism with 13 detailed schedules dealing with firm power contracts of varying duration; non-firm power contracts of varying duration; mutual support contracts and emergency energy and control area services; scheduled outage energy; and energy banking. Benefits of the pool include reductions or postponements in generating capacity, reserves and fuel costs. New major initiatives planned by the SAPP include increasing interconnection points, the construction of new transmission lines, and the formulation of regional environmental studies. SAPP is now making plans to increase rural electrification in its membership countries with funding from an electricity levy. It was concluded that political and economic co-operation between member states has resulted in the sustained supply of energy in the region. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs

  9. Uranium oxide recycling to give more sustainable power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagger, R.; Garner, D.S.J.; Beaumont, D.M.; Hesketh, K.

    2001-01-01

    In broad terms there are two routes for irradiated nuclear fuel, the closed cycle involving recycling and the open cycle culminating in direct disposal. The benefits of following the closed cycle are presented. The environmental burdens associated with open and closed cycles are compared using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for non-active burdens and human irradiation. Consideration is given to the extension of the nuclear fuel cycle to include a proportion of MOX fuel elements within a reactor core, and the impact in terms of total activity, waste volumes and Integrated Toxic Potential (ITP) discussed. The potential of moving to a fast reactor cycle is also raised in support of the recycling of spent nuclear fuel giving sustainable power generation. (author)

  10. Global Sustainable Development: The Role of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Stanley R.

    1990-01-01

    The inevitable growth in the world's population and the need for a reasonable standard of living for all nations will drive the demand for energy to much higher levels than the world has yet experienced. A radical improvement in energy efficiency and conservation could limit the global annual demand to 100 GJ per person. consumption of North America. With the developing nations achieving a standard of living commensurate with this level, the global energy demand would increase by a factor of 2.5 to 1000 EJ per year. Concern over the impact of CO 2 emissions on global warming will likely lead to an international consensus on some reduction in the use of fossil fuels. To maintain environmental sustainability, all nations of the world would need to limit their fossil fuel consumption, particularly those in North America and Europe. Other energy sources will play an important role in all regions. However, the main burden is likely to fall upon nuclear energy as an essential element of the total energy supply. The danger eliminated while sustaining global development if the governments of the world commit to the use of nuclear power on a global scale. The industrial intrastucture can be put in place for such a major international program. A more difficult question is the availability of the necessary financing. On a global scale the financial requirement is within the range of current military expenditures. However, it is clear that not all the countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America will be able to finance their own needs. A new international cooperative program will be necessary. The needed change in energy patterns is dramatic and will take time to implement. The change should be underway by the beginning of the next century. Otherwise the world faces the prospect of environmental disaster and social disruption as the nations struggle to improve their living standards through the increased use of fossil fuels. The role of nuclear power in providing the energy for

  11. Radiation hygienic assessment of centralized heat and hot water supply of Bilibino village from Bilibin central nuclear heating- and power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.A.; Marej, A.N.; Nechiporenko, N.I.; Rasskazov, A.P.; Sayapin, N.P.; Soldatov, G.E.; Shcherbinin, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The experience in using an atomic power plant for heat and hot water supply of the village of Bilibino is outlined. Particular attention is given to the population radiation safety. It has been demonstrated that radiation safety of the system is ensured by maintaining fixed pressure levels in the heating media and by the hermetic state of heat exchanges. Water in the heat and hot water supply network meets the requirements for drinking water. Radioactive corrosion products were not detected in the test water. Gamma-radiation dose rate from the surface of heating devices and pipe-lines in the test premises did not exceed the natural background, that is, U.U1-0.025 mrad

  12. Sustain ability and sustainable development indicators case study: Egypt electric power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses sustain ability criteria and the associated indicators allowing ope rationalization of the sustain ability concept in general and specially in the context of electricity supply. The criteria and indicators cover economic, environmental and social aspects. Egypt has rapidly growing population and per capita demand. As a signatory of the framework convention on climate change, Egypt is making all efforts to comply with the strategy of Egypt to meet the challenge of the increasing demand management, integrating it into national decision making and improving environmental performance continuously: for the electricity sector, this can be summarized in improvement of power system efficiency by all available means. On the other hand energy conservation and demand side management programs are ongoing, also the environmental consideration has become one of the major issues in calculating the feasibility of any new addition to the system. This paper deals with the review of the Macro Indicators based on total greenhouse emissions provide a measure of overall performance. Then propose the Primary Indicators. A set of performance indicators is developed against which implementation of the national strategy measures aimed at reducing green house gas emissions can be evaluated. Some selected results from environmental analysis are given. In the study about 20 indicators are used as a measure of the overall performance relative to targets and benchmarks for past and future projections up to year 2020. The potential performance indicators for energy sector include: fossil fuel consumption (primary energy), greenhouse gas emissions from energy sector, energy related greenhouse gas emissions per unit of energy delivered, energy related greenhouse gas emission per unit GDP, and energy related greenhouse gas emission per capita. The selected indicators are used to measure progress towards sustainable development in the country

  13. Nuclear power in the frame of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sustainable development conception defines a development aiming at fulfilment of aspirations, requirements and exigencies of the present society under the stringent condition of not jeopardizing further development of the next generations. An analysis of the nuclear field implies taking into account comparatively the following indicators: 1. availability distribution of resources; 2. the power utilization rate and the raw materials intake; 3. the impact upon population health; 4. the critical limits to environmental release; 5. land utilization and impacts upon habitats; 6. risk potential of generating major and irreversible phenomena. By taking into account the economic, social and environmental factors the following indicators proper for nuclear energy analysis were established: 1. capital (USD/kWe), marginal cost (USD/kWe); 2. cumulated dose to the public (Sv/kWh), number of employees (pers/kWh), education (number of university courses); 3. volume of solid waste (m 3 /kWh), activity level of solid waste (Bq/kWh), fuel utilization rate (tU/kWh), gaseous and liquid effluent activity (Bq/kWh). A comparison of capital investments for NPPs (CANDU type reactors), natural gas and coal thermal power plants is given. One of the economic advantages of nuclear power is the stability of production cost due to the fact that the uranium cost amounts only some percents of the total cost of electricity. External costs of a severe nuclear accident with a probability of 5 x 10 -5 per year are given. The waste resulting from nuclear power electricity generation represents only one percent from the total volume of noxious waste in countries with nuclear industry. At the same time radioactive waste can be isolated from biosphere at reasonable costs and with well established technologies. Socially nuclear power appears to be attracting because it implies a knowledge core and intellectual level of high quality. The nuclear technology and science interact successfully with other

  14. 1480 W Plts Solar Power Plant Architecture With Solar Tracker For Controlling Microcontroller-Based Solar Panel In Tigaraja Village Sub-District Of Tigadolok Regency Of Simalungun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Samosir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy has become a basic need for human being. In some remote areas however electricity is unreachable and poses a taboo subject and cannot be enjoyed by local people such as in Tigaraja Village Sub-District of Tigadolok Regency of Simalungun. The sun is a renewable energy that it is beneficial for power plant use. With PLTS solar energy can be changed into the sun through the solar panel. Battery Charge Regulator BCR operates stabilizing voltage from solar panel to battery. The battery will save electrical power to be distributed for household consumption. Since battery power has direct current however Inverter operates changing its direct current into alternating current. To optimize absorption of solar energy a servo motor is used to make solar panel moving by following the suns path. Arduino Uno as direct control of solar panel using solar sensor gives current for servo motor. Then the servo motor can move in reverse and forward. Therefore Household goods like water pumps lamps and televisions have been worked when people come home from their work.

  15. Locally manufactured wind power technology for sustainable rural electrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, J.; While, A.; Howell, R.

    2012-01-01

    To date, the use of wind power for rural electrification has been limited. However the fact that micro-wind turbines can be manufactured using only basic workshop tools, techniques and materials, and therefore can be produced locally is often overlooked. Local manufacture has the potential to boost the local economy, build local capacity, reduce costs and produce resilient and flexible energy systems. However, locally manufactured technology must be seen as socially embedded due to the variety of local knowledge, skills, equipment and materials needed to construct and maintain such systems, as well as the organisational structures needed to ensure their long term sustainability. Evidence from successful initiatives suggests that stable institutional support from intermediaries such as the local/national government or NGOs is necessary to foster the development of a wind power industry based on local manufacture. The roles of these intermediaries include identifying and targeting windy areas with favourable environmental conditions, conducting research and development, collecting feedback from end users, creating supply chains for new parts and materials and developing relevant knowledge and skills. In this paper, three case studies of specific initiatives are analysed to draw out the social, economic and technical factors that could facilitate wider adoption of the technology. - Highlights: ► Local manufacture of wind turbines often overlooked for rural electrification. ► Flexible to adapt to local context and benefits local economy, capacity and supply chain. ► Development of technology discussed and 3 case studies of dissemination analysed. ► Critical factors: institutional support, system level planning, continuity of supply. ► Dissemination successful in Inner Mongolia; work continues elsewhere.

  16. India - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nema, A.K.; Pathak, B.K.; Grover, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing use of the earth's resources to improve our quality of life has led to certain deleterious effects on the environment. The increased concentration of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is one such important effect. GHG emissions have come primarily from industrialized countries. Currently industrialized countries emit 11.4 tonnes of carbon per year per capita. For India the corresponding figure is 1.0, and for China it is 2.7. We recognize the necessity of both meeting the development needs of all the countries in the South, and ensuring that such development is sustainable. The CDM may have an important role to play, although the positions of a number of countries, including India, with respect to the CDM appear to be still evolving. In any event, nuclear energy should be an important energy option under the CDM, if and when the CDM is ready to be implemented. The present study is an attempt to understand the implications of setting up a nuclear power plant (NPP) in India as a CDM project

  17. Marin Solar Village: feasibility study and technical analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-31

    The energy needs of Hamilton Air Force Base's Solar Village for electricity and heating and cooling of buildings are considered and alternative ways of meeting the Village's requirements for these forms of energy are evaluated. First, Solar Village's energy demand is calculated and compared to a base case representing calculations for typical energy usage for a development of similar size and density that is in conformance with current state and local ordinances. The potential of selected alternative technologies to meet the Solar Village projected demand for electrical power and natural gas is evaluated. Scenarios were developed to reduce demand, particularly in the building sector. Four alternative on-site energy technologies have been evaluated: wind, solar thermal electric, biomass conversion, photovoltaics. Each alternative is analyzed in detail. Of the four alternatives considered, the one with the greatest present potential is biomass conversion. Two technologies have been incorporated into the design. A 3-acre land fill is covered with a mantle of soil. A network of pipes carries off the methane gas which is a natural product of anaerobic decomposition of the materials in the land fill. The second technology involves the planting of rapidly-growing trees on denuded and unused portions of the site; 50 acres devoted to tree production could yield 12% of the back-up energy required for home heating on a sustainable basis.

  18. Performance optimization of solar PV systems to meet school's power requirements. A case study of Viveka Tribal School at Hosahally Village, Karnataka State - India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsundar, S.; Kayungilo, Shaaban S.

    2007-07-01

    The use of solar PV systems to provide power for lighting and other applications in India's rural areas has became popular due to the well established promotion and subsidies system adopted by the government to popularize the PV technology. However, there are limited mechanisms put to monitor the performance of the various PV systems once they are installed to ensure that designed output is delivered by the systems. This is important in giving confidence and trust of the technology to end-users and hence further popularization of the PV technology among larger population, increasing the penetration rate and tapping the real benefits of the technology itself like reduced dependence on fossil fuels (kerosene, diesel or electricity generated from coal power plants) and thus saving the environment. This paper describes the results of the study made at Viveka Tribal School at Hosahally Village, Mysore District of Karnataka State-India. The study was carried out to investigate the possibility for the school to become energy-self sufficient based on renewable energy technologies, thus becoming a role model in the use and promotion of renewable energy sources within Mysore District and Karnataka State at large. (orig.)

  19. Distributed Optimization of Sustainable Power Dispatch and Flexible Consumer Loads for Resilient Power Grid Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantha, Pirathayini

    Today's electric grid is rapidly evolving to provision for heterogeneous system components (e.g. intermittent generation, electric vehicles, storage devices, etc.) while catering to diverse consumer power demand patterns. In order to accommodate this changing landscape, the widespread integration of cyber communication with physical components can be witnessed in all tenets of the modern power grid. This ubiquitous connectivity provides an elevated level of awareness and decision-making ability to system operators. Moreover, devices that were typically passive in the traditional grid are now `smarter' as these can respond to remote signals, learn about local conditions and even make their own actuation decisions if necessary. These advantages can be leveraged to reap unprecedented long-term benefits that include sustainable, efficient and economical power grid operations. Furthermore, challenges introduced by emerging trends in the grid such as high penetration of distributed energy sources, rising power demands, deregulations and cyber-security concerns due to vulnerabilities in standard communication protocols can be overcome by tapping onto the active nature of modern power grid components. In this thesis, distributed constructs in optimization and game theory are utilized to design the seamless real-time integration of a large number of heterogeneous power components such as distributed energy sources with highly fluctuating generation capacities and flexible power consumers with varying demand patterns to achieve optimal operations across multiple levels of hierarchy in the power grid. Specifically, advanced data acquisition, cloud analytics (such as prediction), control and storage systems are leveraged to promote sustainable and economical grid operations while ensuring that physical network, generation and consumer comfort requirements are met. Moreover, privacy and security considerations are incorporated into the core of the proposed designs and these

  20. Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management.

  1. The impact of desert solar power utilization on sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq Ali Shah; Yang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the prospects of developing a solar based desert economy in the deserts of solar-rich countries. The potential deserts are analysed to study their positive impact on the sustainable development processes in these regions. The sustainability of the processes is established on the basis of self-contained nature of energy generation, environmental emission reduction and desert land reclamation. (authors)

  2. Demographic surveillance and health status of population within 0-5 km radius of proposed nuclear power plant at village Gorakhpur, District Fatehabad, Haryana, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Takdir; Nimble, Sarina; Jyotsana; Garg, Vinod Kumar; Narayanan, Usha

    2012-01-01

    Generation of power is a fundamental catalyst to the economic development of a country. India needs more power in order to have a strong industrial base and for infrastructure development. It is essential to take a baseline of the target area with an objective to know demographic details, health status of the area. This study was conducted to find out the demographic details and health status of the population within 0-5 km radius of proposed Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site covering five villages of Fatehabad and Hisar districts. The study methodology includes Interview Schedule for data collection. Of the total population from 4501 households covered, 51.60% were male and 48.40% were females. The total population of the study area is 24415. The core observation in the study area pertaining to demographic and health status studies indicate that the literacy rate is 62.92% and mostly population is literate up to metric (50.16%), mostly population falls in the age group between 11-30 years, unemployment status of population is 70.50%. Most prevalent diseases at the time of study were Fever (6.10%), Cold/Cough (7.07%), Wounds (5 .22%), Irritation/Skin rashes (1.62%) and Respiratory Problems (2.36%). Talking about other important diseases like Cancer (0.0002.86%), Congenital Malformation (0.0002.86%), Deaf and dumb (0.0011%), Mental Retardation (0.0007%) and Polio are found (0.0006%) out of total population. So in the nut shell it can be concluded that the literacy rate is good and most of the surveyed population is healthy and there are no serious health problems in the area related to health point of view. (author)

  3. External Benefit Evaluation of Renewable Energy Power in China for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available China’s renewable energy power has developed rapidly in recent years. Evaluating the external benefits of renewable energy power can provide a reference for the Chinese government to set diverse development goals and to implement differentiated supporting policies for different renewable energy power types, which can promote their sustainable development. In this paper, a hybrid MCDM method was applied to evaluate the external benefits of China’s renewable energy power. Firstly, the impacts of renewable energy power accessing the power grid for multiple stakeholders in the electric power system were analyzed. Secondly, the external benefit evaluation index system for renewable energy power was built from the economic, social and environmental factors, based on the concept of sustainability. Then, the basic theory of the hybrid MCDM method employed in this paper was introduced in two parts: the superiority linguistic ratings and entropy weighting method for index weight determination and the fuzzy grey relation analysis for ranking alternatives. Finally, the external benefits of wind power, solar PV power and biomass power were evaluated. Taking a regional electric power system as an example, the results show that PV power has the greatest external benefit, followed by wind power and biomass power. Therefore, more policies supporting PV power should be put in place to promote the harmonious and sustainable development of the whole renewable energy power industry.

  4. Power in Transition: Empowering Discourses on Sustainability Transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Avelino (Flor)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis is a book about power and transformative change. It explores how groups of people who are trying to transform the mobility system are affected by notions of change and power, and how they deal with the dilemmas of power. Academic literature on power and transitions offers concepts

  5. Power in Transition: Empowering Discourses on Sustainability Transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Avelino, Flor

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis is a book about power and transformative change. It explores how groups of people who are trying to transform the mobility system are affected by notions of change and power, and how they deal with the dilemmas of power. Academic literature on power and transitions offers concepts to grasp phenomena in practice. And visa versa, observing these practices allows us to gain new understanding of power in relation to transformative change. More specifically, this book is about pow...

  6. Integrated multiperiod power generation and transmission expansion planning with sustainability aspects in a stochastic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddighi, Amir Hossein; Ahmadi-Javid, Amir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multistage stochastic programming model to address sustainable power generation and transmission expansion planning. The model incorporates uncertainties about future electricity demand, fuel prices, greenhouse gas emissions, as well as possible disruptions to which the power system is subject. A number of sustainability regulations and policies are considered to establish a framework for the social responsibility of the power system. The proposed model is applied to a real-world case, and several sensitivity analyses are carried out to provide managerial insights into different aspects of the model. The results emphasize the important role played by sustainability policies on the configuration of the power grid. - Highlights: • This paper considers integrated power generation and transmission expansion planning. • Sustainability aspects are incorporated into a multiperiod stochastic setting. • A stochastic mathematical programming model is developed to address the problem. • The model is applied to a real-world case and numerical studies are carried out

  7. Sensitivity analysis of technological, economic and sustainability evaluation of power plants using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzimouratidis, Athanasios I.; Pilavachi, Petros A.

    2009-01-01

    Technological, economic and sustainability evaluation of power plants by use of the analytic hierarchy process and nine end node criteria for a reference scenario based on subjective criteria weighting has been presented in a previous paper by authors. However, criteria weight variations may substantially modify overall evaluations and rankings of power plants. The current paper presents a sensitivity analysis with four alternative scenarios (sets of criteria weights) compared with the reference scenario. The results show that priority to 'technology and sustainability' favors renewable energy power plants, while priority to 'economic' criteria favors mainly nuclear power plants and less the four types of fossil fuel power plant

  8. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of Moon Village Workshops were organised at ESTEC and at ILEWG community events in 2015 and 2016. They gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. Three working groups focused on 1) Moon Habitat Design; 2) science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and 3) engaging stake-holders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacuum. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community and creating social places for astronauts to interact and relax. The

  9. "The Moon Village and Journey to Mars enable each other"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldavs, Vidvuds

    2016-07-01

    NASA has proposed the Journey to Mars, a multi-decade collaborative international effort to establish permanent manned operations on the Martian surface as well as in orbit, most likely on the Martian moons. NASA's proposed the Journey to Mars has come under politically motivated attack as illusory, as beyond NASA's capabilities and anticipated NASA budgets in the foreseeable future. [1]. Other concerns come from various communities of researchers concerned about securing sustaining funding for their largely robotic research missions. ESA's Director General Dietrich Woerner's proposed Moon Village faces challenges ESA member states concerned about sustaining funding for projects already underway or in planning. Both the Journey to Mars and Moon Village raise the question - who will or who can pay for it? The 2013 US Research Council study suggested potential benefits to a mission to Mars from activities on the Moon [2]. The NASA funded Flexible Lunar Architecture study came to similar conclusions using a different methodology [3]. A logistics analysis by an MIT team suggested the possibility of cost savings through use of lunar water for propellant to reach Mars [4]. The highly promising private-public financing approach has been examined for potential application to funding the costs of reaching Mars [5]. Insofar as the feasibility of utilization of lunar water has not been determined these conclusions are speculative. This study will examine the following alternative scenarios for establishing sustainable, manned operations on Mars and permanent manned operations on the Moon: A. NASA-led Journey to Mars without an ESA-led Moon Village B. ESA-led Moon Village without NASA-led Journey to Mars C. NASA-led Journey to Mars with an ESA-led Moon Village D. Shared Infrastructure scenario - NASA-led Journey to Mars with ESA-led Moon Village and with a potential JAXA-led space-based-solar power initiative E. Space Industrialization scenario - Shared Infrastructure scenario

  10. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  11. New energy vision in Sawauchi Village area. Toward establishment of Sawauchi Village having unaided power based on 'new energies, lessons learned from past'; Sawauchimura chiiki shin energy vison. 'Onkochi shin energy' ni yoru jiriki aru Sawauchimura no kakuritsu ni mukete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A new energy vision was established in the Sawauchi Village area in Iwate Prefecture. As the energy species to be discussed for introduction, Sawauchi Village has assumed 'solar (beam and heat)', 'forest bio-mass', 'stock breeding bio-mass', 'small hydro-power' and 'snow'. The new energy introduction project included the proliferation and enlightenment activities using the Snow Country Culture Research Institute as the core, new energy introduction into the Sawauchi Baden, introduction of small hydropower generation and micro hydropower generation, new energy introduction into snow melting systems, new energy introduction into agricultural greenhouses, introduction of snow room-cooling systems into public facilities, development of new business targeted at promotion of forestry, and proliferation and enlightenment activities coordinated with relevant organizations. Particularly in the development of new business targeted at promotion of forestry, tackling will be moved forward to sale and manufacture of pellet stoves, manufacture of wood pellets, research, development, and commercialization of bio-mass power plant and new housings incorporating snow country cultures, with an aim of promotion of utilization of woods and thinned woods available in the village. (NEDO)

  12. VT Boundaries - village polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The BNDHASH dataset depicts Vermont villages, towns, counties, Regional Planning Commissions (RPC), and LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee)...

  13. A village group, Trashibiola

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, John, 1837-1921, photographer

    2003-01-01

    158 x 111 mm. Woodburytype. A view showing a group of villagers seated in a paved courtyard in front of a stonewalled house (the principal house in the village). The village is near the town of Paphos. The photograph appears in Thomson's 'Through Cyprus with the camera, in the autumn of 1878' (vol.2, London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, 1879). Thomson states that the purpose of the gathering was twofold: to welcome strangers to the village and to discuss a point of law c...

  14. Technological, economic and sustainability evaluation of power plants using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzimouratidis, Athanasios I.; Pilavachi, Petros A.

    2009-01-01

    Complexity of power plant evaluation is steadily rising, as more criteria are involved in the overall assessment while evaluation data change rapidly. Apart from evaluating several aspects of power plants separately, a multicriteria analysis based on hierarchically structured criteria is necessary, so as to address the overall assessment of power plants according to the technological, economic and sustainability aspects. For this reason, in this paper, ten types of power plant are evaluated using nine end node criteria properly structured under the Analytical Hierarchy Process. Moreover, pairwise comparisons allow for accurate subjective criteria weighting. According to the scenario based on the subjective criteria weighting, emphasis is laid on sustainability driving renewable energy power plants at the top of the overall ranking, while nuclear and fossil fuel power plants rank in the last five positions. End node criteria contribution to each power plant and power plant performance per end node criterion is presented for all types of power plant and end node criteria. (author)

  15. Assessing Sustainability Transition in the US Electrical Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen McCauley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines sustainability transition dynamics in the US electricity system, drawing on the socio-technical systems approach. We view system change as unfolding along several critical dimensions and geographical scales, including dynamics in the environment, science, civil society, discourse, and state regulatory institutions, as well as in capital and technology formations. A particular emphasis is given to the interaction of discourses, policy networks, and institutions. We trace four distinct regimes which have characterized the evolution of this discourse-network-institutional nexus over the last century. The research examines dynamics that present a challenge to the incumbent energy regime based on fossil fuels, nuclear and hydropower, and demonstrates how the actor-network supporting renewables and energy efficiency has grown stronger and more capable of moving toward a sustainability transition than at any time since the sustainable energy movement began a generation ago.

  16. Building the Leviathan--Voluntary centralisation of punishment power sustains cooperation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; Méder, Zsombor Z; Okamoto-Barth, Sanae; Riedl, Arno

    2016-02-18

    The prevalence of cooperation among humans is puzzling because cooperators can be exploited by free riders. Peer punishment has been suggested as a solution to this puzzle, but cumulating evidence questions its robustness in sustaining cooperation. Amongst others, punishment fails when it is not powerful enough, or when it elicits counter-punishment. Existing research, however, has ignored that the distribution of punishment power can be the result of social interactions. We introduce a novel experiment in which individuals can transfer punishment power to others. We find that while decentralised peer punishment fails to overcome free riding, the voluntary transfer of punishment power enables groups to sustain cooperation. This is achieved by non-punishing cooperators empowering those who are willing to punish in the interest of the group. Our results show how voluntary power centralisation can efficiently sustain cooperation, which could explain why hierarchical power structures are widespread among animals and humans.

  17. Building the Leviathan – Voluntary centralisation of punishment power sustains cooperation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; Méder, Zsombor Z.; Okamoto-Barth, Sanae; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cooperation among humans is puzzling because cooperators can be exploited by free riders. Peer punishment has been suggested as a solution to this puzzle, but cumulating evidence questions its robustness in sustaining cooperation. Amongst others, punishment fails when it is not powerful enough, or when it elicits counter-punishment. Existing research, however, has ignored that the distribution of punishment power can be the result of social interactions. We introduce a novel experiment in which individuals can transfer punishment power to others. We find that while decentralised peer punishment fails to overcome free riding, the voluntary transfer of punishment power enables groups to sustain cooperation. This is achieved by non-punishing cooperators empowering those who are willing to punish in the interest of the group. Our results show how voluntary power centralisation can efficiently sustain cooperation, which could explain why hierarchical power structures are widespread among animals and humans. PMID:26888519

  18. Economic Performance and Emission Reduction of Supply Chains in Different Power Structures: Perspective of Sustainable Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiutian Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental issues have increasingly received attention in both industry and academia. Many firms have started to make sustainable investments, such as adopting the pollution-abatement technologies, to reduce carbon emissions. To investigate the impacts of the sustainable investment on firms’ profit and emission reduction, we consider supply chains with uncertain demand in different power structures. Specifically, we examine the sustainable investment problem in three supply chain power structures, i.e., manufacturer Stackelberg (MS power structure, vertical Nash (VN power structure and retailer Stackelberg (RS power structure. We first derive the optimal decisions for both the retailer and manufacturer in each power structure. Then, by comparing the results in the three power structures, we find that the manufacturer gets benefits from making the sustainable investment, especially in unequal power structures. When the average market size is large (small enough, both of the supply chain members obtain more profits in the MS (RS power structure. From an environmental perspective, we find that the emission reduction is more significant in sequential games (i.e., MS and RS power structures than that in a simultaneous game (i.e., VN power structure. In addition, we conduct some numerical studies and discuss more managerial insights in the paper.

  19. Nuclear power: status, outlook, guarantees of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The principal advantages of nuclear power - almost unlimited fuel resources, its high energy capacity, ecological compatibility with a possibility of high wastes concentration - determine the large-scale nuclear power development. The signs of large-scale power - a large rate (dozens of percent) in electricity production, diverse areas (electricity, heat supply, technologies, transport) and media of application (land, ocean, space), extension of number of user countries, diversified power systems (centralized, autonomous), obligatory reproduction and reuse of produced fuel - create various requirements to nuclear power installations of the future. Economic efficiency and competitiveness, safety (of reactors and fuel cycle with waste), proper characteristics of nuclear fuel reproduction, guarantees of nuclear arm's non-proliferation and, particularly, public acceptance are the conditions of such nuclear power development. The up-to-date situation is the following: the 441 nuclear power-generation units with total installed power of 377.36 GW el. (in 31 countries) supply by 1/6 part of the world electric-power consumptions. The 32 units are in stage of the construction. To the present mid-century the level of the nuclear power production, as supposed, must be increased 4-5 times at the following scenario of a regional distribution of nuclear electric powers, GW: USA, Europe and developed countries of Eastern Asia - 1000, FSU-countries - 100 and developing countries - 400

  20. Sustainability Assessment of Power Generation Systems by Applying Exergy Analysis and LCA Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; van der Kooi, H.J.; Valero Delgado, A.

    2015-01-01

    The selection of power generation systems is important when striving for a more sustainable society. However, the results of environmental, economic and social sustainability assessments are subject to new insights into the calculation methods and to changing needs, economic conditions and societal

  1. Sustainable model for financial viability of decentralized biomass gasifier based power projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palit, D.; Malhotra, R.; Kumar, Atul

    2011-01-01

    This paper made a modest attempt for designing a sustainable model for financial viability of biomass gasifier power projects for enhancing electricity access in India and other developing countries. For long term sustainability of distributed generation projects in remote rural areas, viability

  2. Implications of sustainability assessment for electricity system design: The case of the Ontario Power Authority's integrated power system plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, Mark; Gibson, Robert B.; Markvart, Tanya; Gaudreau, Kyrke; Taylor, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the results and implications of an illustrative application of a sustainability assessment framework in the design and evaluation of a major integrated power system plan. The paper examines the integrated power system plan developed by the Ontario Power Authority in 2007. The basic framework rests on a generic set of evaluation criteria reflecting basic requirements for progress towards sustainability that was adopted, reinterpreted and applied by the Authority in support of its proposed plan. In response to evident deficiencies in the Authority's work, the authors and colleagues undertook a re-examination using a more fully elaborated sustainability assessment framework, specified for application to power system planning. The results point to a plan and plan components substantially different from those proposed by the Authority. More generally, the results highlight three advantages of applying such a sustainability assessment framework: comprehensive coverage of key requirements for progress towards sustainability while ensuring careful attention to the context and concerns of the sector; emphasis on identifying plan options that avoid major trade-offs among the sustainability criteria and recognition of interactions among the social, ecological, economic and technological realms favouring options that offer multiple, mutually reinforcing and lasting benefits.

  3. Education as a Global "Soft Power" for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayamov, Yury Nikolayevich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse various aspects of education for sustainable development (ESD) drawing attention to the approaching end of the UN Decade on ESD (DESD) in 2014 and to the necessity of the continuation of ESD activities. Defining the internationalisation of education as an ever more significant part of globalisation,…

  4. MHR fuel cycle options for future sustainability of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Alan; Venneri, Francesco; Rodriguez, Carmelo; Fikani, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The future sustainability of the nuclear option is not significantly tied to the level of resources. For example, current high quality uranium reserves (∼3.34x10 6 tons) are enough for more than 55 years at present consumption rates (IAEA estimate). Doubling of the present uranium ore price (∼$26/kg) could create about a tenfold increase in resources, providing more than 550 years of supply at present rates (World Nuclear Association estimate). There are also thorium reserves which are estimated to be about three times those of uranium, and would allow for a significant increase in annual consumption levels. The key to a sustainable nuclear future is really tied to the political and technical problems of long term waste disposal, and the perceived risks of nuclear weapons proliferation. Thus fuel cycle options for a sustainable nuclear future must address and solve these issues. High temperature, Gas-Cooled, Graphite Moderated, reactors (MHRs) have nuclear and operational characteristics to provide multiple fuel cycle options to solve these issues. Three fuel cycles for the MHD are described in this paper, and their capabilities for meeting a sustainable nuclear future in terms of nuclear waste minimization and destruction, and reduction of proliferation risk, are discussed. (author)

  5. Nuclear power and sustainable energy supply for Europe; Kernenergie im Kontext einer nachhaltigen Energieversorgung fuer Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilden, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The right energy mix is decisive. The European Commission feels that nuclear power can make an important contribution towards sustainable energy supply in Europe. Nuclear power should keep its place in the European energy mix. One important aspect in this regard is improved public acceptance through communication, transparency, and confidence building. High safety standards and a credible approach to the safe long-term management of radioactive waste are major components of this sustainable energy source. (orig./GL)

  6. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Energy Policy: Promises and Perils

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis N. Kessides

    2010-01-01

    The author examines the challenges and opportunities of nuclear power in meeting the projected large absolute increase in energy demand, especially electricity, throughout the industrialized and developing world, while helping to mitigate the threat of climate change. A significant global nuclear power deployment would engender serious risks related to proliferation, safety, and waste disposal. Unlike renewable sources of energy, nuclear power is an unforgiving technology because human lapses...

  7. Events as Power Source: Wireless Sustainable Corrosion Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guodong; Qiao, Guofu; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source), which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC) structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event) releases electric energy; this is ...

  8. KWAKIUTL VILLAGE AND SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WOLCOTT, HARRY F.

    THE AUTHOR'S ONE-YEAR RESIDENCY AS TEACHER IN A KWAKIUTL INDIAN VILLAGE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA FORMS THE BASIS OF THIS CASE STUDY. WITH EMPHASIS ON THE LIVES AND FAMILIES OF 5 SCHOOL CHILDREN, THE STUDY DEALS WITH THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURAL BACKGROUND OF THE VILLAGE, DISINTEGRATION OF THE INDIAN CULTURE AND THE TRANSITION TOWARD THE…

  9. It Takes a Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuharic, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project that allows students to create a joint community on paper. Through this project, students create imaginary villages by looking first at various architectural styles and then look at the different ways contemporary artists portray communities or architecture focusing on village scenes. The inspiration for this…

  10. Fiscal 2000 regional new energy vision formulation - Financially aided project. Report on regional new energy vision formulation for Ueno village (Object of survey: Commercialization feasibility study for a stand-alone type wind power generation system at Ueno German Culture Village); 2000 nendo Uenoson chiiki shin energy vision sakutei hokokusho. Ueno Doitsu bunkamura dokuritsugata furyoku hatsuden system jigyoka feasibility study chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A survey is conducted about the profitability of installing a stand-alone type wind power system at Ueno village (Miyako Island), Okinawa Prefecture. The German Culture Village, which is an integrated resort house provided with accommodations (500 people), educational and cultural facilities, and sports facilities consumes 272 MWh/year in electric power. The results of the survey are summarized in six chapters, which are (1) the survey of the business under the project to be the object of feasibility study, (2) project to be the object of feasibility study, (3) outline of the Okinawa Electric Power Co., Inc., Miyakojima system and problems to ensue from its interconnection with wind turbines, (4) survey of stand-alone type wind turbine power generation systems, (5) technical/economic feasibility study, and (6) project management and future tasks. It is concluded that there will be profit in the presence of a subsidy that covers 65% or more of the total cost of constructing a system comprising three 600 KW wind turbines, three 400 kW class diesel generators, and storage batteries. (NEDO)

  11. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Yoshida

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS, we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. Methods We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were “anorexia,” “subjective feelings about health,” “feelings about sleep satisfaction,” and “bereavement caused by the disaster,” confounding variables were “age” and “sex,” and outcome variables were “K6 points.” We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6 and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542 of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. Results A total of 474 residents (87.5% scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6% scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p < 0.05. In addition, the proportion of residents with anorexia and mental illness among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively. The amount of residents who scored 44 points or more in the PCL-S among people with K6 score above the cut-off was also considerably higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (79.4 vs 12.9%, p < 0.001. Interestingly, the proportion of residents who scored more than among people with K6 score above the cut-off and the

  12. Events as Power Source: Wireless Sustainable Corrosion Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source, which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event releases electric energy; this is a novel idea proposed by this study. For accumulating the micro-corrosion energy, we integrate EPS with a COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf energy-harvesting chip that recharges a supercapacitor. In particular, this study designs automatic energy management and adaptive transmitted power control polices to efficiently use the constrained accumulated energy. Finally, a set of preliminary experiments based on concrete pore solution are conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of EPS.

  13. Events as power source: wireless sustainable corrosion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong; Qiao, Guofu; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhibo

    2013-12-17

    This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source), which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC) structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event) releases electric energy; this is a novel idea proposed by this study. For accumulating the micro-corrosion energy, we integrate EPS with a COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) energy-harvesting chip that recharges a supercapacitor. In particular, this study designs automatic energy management and adaptive transmitted power control polices to efficiently use the constrained accumulated energy. Finally, a set of preliminary experiments based on concrete pore solution are conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of EPS.

  14. The role of nuclear power in sustainable energy strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, B.A.; Bennett, L.L.; Bertel, E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of future demand outlooks for energy, electricity and nuclear power, as a background for discussion of the design and operation aspects of advanced nuclear power systems. The paper does not attempt to forecast the actual outcomes of nuclear power programmes, since this will depend upon many factors that cannot be predicted with certainty. Rather, the paper outlines the size of the opportunity for nuclear power, in terms of the expected growth in energy and electricity demands, the need to diversify energy supply options and substitute depletable fossil fuels by other energy sources, and the need to mitigate health and environmental impacts including in particular those arising from the the atmospheric emissions from burning of fossil fuels. 7 refs

  15. Dynamic vulnerability assessment and intelligent control for sustainable power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Longatt, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Identifying, assessing, and mitigating electric power grid vulnerabilities is a growing focus in short-term operational planning of power systems. Through illustrated application, this important guide surveys state-of-the-art methodologies for the assessment and enhancement of power system security in short-term operational planning and real-time operation. The methodologies employ advanced methods from probabilistic theory, data mining, artificial intelligence, and optimization, to provide knowledge-based support for monitoring, control (preventive and corrective), and decision making tasks. Key features: Introduces behavioural recognition in wide-area monitoring and security constrained optimal power flow for intelligent control and protection and optimal grid management. Provides in-depth understanding of risk-based reliability and security assessment, dynamic vulnerability as essment methods, supported by the underpinning mathematics. Develops expertise in mitigation techniques using intelligent protect...

  16. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    A fixed-price procurement contract for $24.9 million was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, CA, for the design, manufacture, installation, and acceptance testing of the sustaining neutral beam power supply system (SNBPSS). This system is scheduled for completion in early 1981 and will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each of the 24 power supply sets will provide the accel potential of 80 kV at 88 A, the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module

  17. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas construction plan in Jeruk Manis Village in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsir, A. [University of Mataram, Mataram (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. The proposed small-scale renewable energy project to be developed under the Casindo Technical Working Group IV in West Nusa Tenggara is focused on household biogas. The project will be implemented in Jeruk Manis, which has been selected as the target location for the implementation of the renewable energy project in the program Casindo. Administratively, the village of 'Jeruk Manis' is located in the district Sikur, East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara province. The number of households eligible as the target of the program in Jeruk Manis is 63. To implement the project, the Casindo team in WNT has partnered with Hivos and its BIRU program (Biogas Rumah program or Indonesia Domestic Biogas Programme). The biogas digester construction will be conducted by BIRU Lombok, in collaboration with a construction partner organization called Yayasan Mandiri Membangun Masyarakat Sejahtera (YM3S) and managed by the Casindo project team from the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Mataram. If the project is implemented, it will bring many benefits for poor people in the target location, which are likely to be sustained for a long time. While the benefits of developing biogas in the selected low-income location are obvious and abundant, there are also many challenges. The main problem for the proposed project is finding other interested funders to support the building of household biogas, as the financial capacity of the target households is very small.

  18. Introductory statement to the 2nd scientific forum on sustainable development: A role for nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement to the 2nd Scientific Forum on 'Sustainable Development - A Role for Nuclear Power?' (Vienna, 28 September 1999), the Director General of the IAEA focussed on the the main aspects concerning the development of nuclear power: safety, competitiveness, and public support

  19. Role of nuclear power in Romania's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Anca; Lavrov, George; Costea, Diana; Vasile, Camelia

    2002-01-01

    The role of nuclear power in Romania can be assessed by taking into account the present situation of Romania electro-power systems, the socio-economic and technological evolution, of Romania as well as world wide evolution of the unique power market according the 'Green Card - Towards an European strategy for power securement' endorsed by the European Commission in November 2000. The Romanian electro-power systems is currently undergoing a restructuring process aiming at efficiency improvement, cost reduction, private investment encouraging, efficient use of available national resources. The energy demand in Romania decreased in the period 1989-2000 by an annual rate of 3.8% due to the new trends in the Romanian economy. A thorough analysis for the 2002-2020 showed the necessity for installing a capacity of about 9,000 MW what implies: - achievement of about 1935 MW in hydroelectric plants and 2,100 MW from the Cernavoda NPP; - construction of new condensation groups operating with domestic lignite and pitcoal from import; - new groups with combined cycle based on natural gas; - new nuclear units with 700 MW CANDU type reactors. Achievement of the nuclear program will reduce the Romania's dependences on fossil fuel import enhance will secure the fulfilment of the provisions of European Union's Green Card. It will require important investments what will entailed a rice in cost of the electric energy for end consumers. Although a moderate nuclear power realization is a viable solution for Romania ensuring both the levelling of prices and taxes for fuel and energy to those of European countries and the fulfilment of the Kyoto protocol requirements. Decision for the proper sizing of nuclear program will be made according to many factors implied in the Romanian electro-power system development, as well as by using the experience acquired from the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 operation

  20. Economic and Environmental Performance of Fashion Supply Chain: The Joint Effect of Power Structure and Sustainable Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiutian Shi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fashion supply chain members now search for trade-offs between sustainable investment and the related incentives, such as savings on environmental taxes and gains in incremental demands. To evaluate the economic and environmental performance of sustainable investment from a power perspective, we develop an analytical model to study a two-echelon sustainable supply chain consisting of one retailer and one manufacturer with three different power structures. We derive the optimal solutions for various cases associated with different supply chain power structures and sustainable investors. Though it is beneficial for both the manufacturer and retailer to make sustainable investment, they often utilize high power to gain economic benefit with less sustainable investment. Interestingly, the follower with less supply chain power has more incentive to make a sustainable effort to achieve a higher profit. The optimal amount of sustainable investment in the apparel manufacturer investment case is greater than that in the retailer investment case in most scenarios.

  1. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas Construction Plan in Segoroyoso Village Yogyakarta Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesmana, Surya Budi; Putra, Sri Atmaja [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. To achieve the CASINDO objective seven Technical Working Groups have been established with the aim to conduct the technical activities under the various work packages and to produce the agreed deliverables. This report presents results from Technical Working Group IV on Renewable Energy project development. Its main aims were: To identify suitable non-hydro RE projects that can be developed in the province; To conduct an energy needs assessment in a selected location; To develop a business plan for a proposed solution to the identified main energy problem of the target community; To identify potential investors; To construct the project.

  2. Sustainable Development of Regional Power Systems and the Consumption of Electric Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Lisin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the most imminent problems facing power systems in post-industrial countries is the sustainable development of power systems under conditions of increasing power consumption irregularity due to the reduction of the industry’s share in consumers’ demand for electric power. In today’s Russia, this issue is becoming very acute due to the significant share of electric power and heat co-generation that is demonstrating low manoeuvrability and poor adaptation to operations in the daily variation of electric power demand. This paper considers the problem of improving the power system steady-state through the optimization of the production structure of thermal power plants. We propose a combinatorial algorithm that improves the planning of the structural and technological modernization of the power equipment configuration, with a glance at the forecast of the increasing irregularity of power consumption.

  3. Nuclear power for sustainable development. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamantiades, A.; Kessides, I.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in nuclear power has been revived as a result of volatile fossil fuel prices, concerns about the security of energy supplies, and global climate change. This paper describes the current status and future plans for expansion of nuclear power, the advances in nuclear reactor technology, and their impacts on the associated risks and performance of nuclear power. Advanced nuclear reactors have been designed to be simpler and safer, and to have lower costs than currently operating reactors. By addressing many of the public health and safety risks that plagued the industry since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, these reactors may help break the current deadlock over nuclear power. In that case, nuclear power could make a significant contribution towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, significant issues persist, fueling reservations among the public and many decision makers. Nuclear safety, disposal of radioactive wastes, and proliferation of nuclear explosives need to be addressed in an effective and credible way if the necessary public support is to be obtained. (author)

  4. Nuclear power in the frame of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy is treated taking into account the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, environmental and social. Some nuclear energy relevant indicators are identified and used in the analysis. The economic efficiency is a relevant indicator insofar as market prices reflect the full costs for society of a given product or activity. For nuclear energy the economic criteria applicable to market competition and subsidies are used. The core indicators for the environmental dimension of sustainable development include criteria related to natural resource management, climate change, air and water quality, biodiversity and landscaping. The nuclear electricity generation chain does not release gases or particles that acidify rains, contribute to urban smog or deplete of the ozone layer. The human and social dimension comprises human capital in the form of knowledge, education and employment opportunities, human welfare, equity and participation, social capital in the form of effective institutions and voluntary associations, the rule of law, and social cohesion. From this point of view the nuclear energy is characterized by a net contribution to human and social capital and a challenge in terms of public acceptability and widely varying perceptions of the risks and benefits. (authors)

  5. Large Combined Heat and Power Plants for Sustainable Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    . CHP (combined heat and power) plants in Denmark will change their role from base load production to balancing the fluctuation in renewable energy supply, such as wind power and at the same time they have to change to renewable energy sources. Some solutions are already being planned by utilities...... in Denmark; conversion of pulverised fuel plants from coal to wood pellets and a circulating fluidised bed (CFB) plant for wood chips. From scientific research projects another solution is suggested as the most feasible; the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant. In this study a four scenarios...

  6. China - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Deshun; Zhao Xiusheng; Zheng Jiantao

    2000-01-01

    Coal-fired power plants are the major source of electricity in China, accounting in 1998 for 73% of total installed capacity. However coal-fired plants create serious air pollution problems, and their fuel transport requirements place a heavy burden on the transportation system. Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are therefore a potentially attractive option for China, particularly in the coastal regions, which are both more economically developed and far from the main coal mines in northern and western China. Currently, China has no capability to build large-scale nuclear power plants. Nor would nuclear power plants in China be financially competitive with coal-fired plants under fair market conditions. China does have three NPPs currently in operation, built partly with French and British expertise and assistance, and eight more under construction. These have all benefited from a number of favourable government policies - i.e. exemptions from taxes on imported equipment and from value-added taxes, and an electricity purchase agreement at an artificially high price

  7. Turby - sustainable urban wind power from the roof top

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.; Van Bussel, G.; Mols, B.

    2005-01-01

    If current trends are anything to go by, in future we will no longer produce all our electricity in large, central power stations. Small-scale local electricity generation will gain in importance. Sander Mertens, a post-doctoral student at TU Delft, developed the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine

  8. Transforming Island power supply to sustainability. The example of Bonaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeller, M. [DIgSILENT GmbH (Germany); Burges, K. [Ecofys GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Until 2015, the contribution of renewable energies to the overall electricity supply of the island of Bonaire shall increase to at least 50%, produced by a wind-diesel power plant, which is currently in a planning stage. For the longer term, there are plans to increase the share of renewable energies up to 100% by replacing the diesel (HFO) by locally produced bio diesel. At the same time, a very high power quality and reliability of supply standard is required for accommodating the expectations of the tourism industry. In 2007 Ecofys and DIgSILENT carried out extensive studies for the new wind-diesel power plant on the island of Bonaire for working out the basic design and for validating it against the required quality of supply requirements. This paper provides a general background of the new wind-diesel power plant for the island of Bonaire describes the basic design of the new plant and provides an overview of the modeling approaches and studies that have been carried out for design and impact analysis. This includes loss of load analysis, stability studies, harmonic studies and flicker impact assessment. (orig.)

  9. How can nuclear phaseout and climate protection be combined? Sustainable power supply in the residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallentin, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear phaseout and the resulting energy turnaround will bring about changes in the power supply systems, especially if climate protection goals are to be reached. The author presents the example of a housing development in Germany which mirrors the private households sector. It is shown that the only way to achieve sustainable power supply is by consequently enhancing efficiency and by decarbonizing heat and power supply. The next two decades will be decisive.

  10. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will tend to have closed

  11. Reverse electrodialysis heat engine for sustainable power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamburini, A.; Tedesco, M.; Cipollina, A.; Micale, G.; Ciofalo, M.; Papapetrou, M.; Van Baak, W.; Piacentino, A.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: State of the art technologies for the conversion of heat into power. Grey circles refer to technologies at very early stage of development and non-available at industrial level. The Carnot efficiency (on the secondary horizontal axis) is evaluated assuming a cold sink temperature of 25 °C. SRC-hot gases: Steam Rankine Cycle integrated with gas turbine/other topping cycles; SRC-fuel: Steam Rankine Cycle directly fuelled by oil, coal or other fuels; KC: Kalina Cycle; ORC: Organic Rankine Cycle; TEG: Thermoelectric Generation; PEPG: Piezoelectric Power Generation with waste heat-powered expansion/compression cycle; OHE: Osmotic Heat Engine; REDHE, Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine (this paper). Display Omitted -- Highlights: •For the first time, the potential of Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine is assessed. •An overview of the possible regeneration methods is presented. •Performance of the RED unit fed by different salty solutions was suitably optimized. •Three different RED Heat Engine scenarios were studied. •Exergetic efficiency of about 85% could be achieved in the foreseen future. -- Abstract: Reverse Electrodialysis Heat Engine (REDHE) is a promising technology to convert waste heat at temperatures lower than 100 °C into electric power. In the present work an overview of the possible regeneration methods is presented and the technological challenges for the development of the RED Heat Engine (REDHE) are identified. The potential of this power production cycle was investigated through a simplified mathematical model. In the first part of the work, several salts were singularly modelled as possible solutes in aqueous solutions feeding the RED unit and the corresponding optimal conditions were recognized via an optimization study. In the second part, three different RED Heat Engine scenarios were studied. Results show that power densities much higher than those relevant to NaCl-water solutions can be obtained by using different

  12. Visiting 'J' Village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to entrance into twenty km evacuated zone of Fukushima Daiichi, there is so called 'J' Village. Until now, it was a centre used by the Japan football representation. Today, employees working at this locality as well as all visits pass this village. They can only enter the evacuated area in a bus, equipped with an electronic dosimeter, with a face mask, gloves, and shoe covers. (author)

  13. The power supply of the future - sustainable or nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenthal, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the available contribution the author directs the view of the complexity as a neglected peculiarity of the large technology. Many elements of the energy conflicts and dangers of the energy supply are explainable only by the uncritical attitudes in relation to the associated and not sufficiently solvable complexity problems. The criticism to it is directed not alone against the atomic energy, but more generally against the heedless technique philosophy of the power suppliers

  14. The village as a ‘community of practice’ Constitution of village belonging through leisure sociality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Barlocco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the formation and display of a form of identification alternative to the national one, the belonging to the village, within the leisure practices of Kadazan villagers in Sabah, East Malaysia, both constituted by the regular meetings of peer groups and by festive events. The analysis of the paper applies the concept of ‘community of practice’ to the group of villagers who regularly invest most of their resources of free time, but also money, in interacting between themselves and in organising celebrations for various life-cycle events or for other occasions, and argues that a strong sense of belonging to the village is developed through this engagement. These practices are informed by a powerful and widely spread local ideology, positing the village as the central point of reference for its inhabitants’ sense of belonging and as the locus of a traditionalist ‘way of life’, based on cooperation, sharing and egalitarian principles, and rejecting the modern, multi-ethnic urban world from which the majority of the villagers derive their livelihood. This ideology defines the village as Kadazan and Christian, determining a rootedness in everyday life of ethnic identity as well as a general rejection of government-led nationalist propaganda and of its policies. This ideology is an essential part of the affirmation by the villagers of the primacy of the local and of direct involvement and participation over their sense of belonging to collective categories.

  15. Developing an Indicator System for Measuring the Social Sustainability of Offshore Wind Power Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzay-An Shiau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan’s government has promoted investment in an offshore wind power farm, and local fishermen have protested. A social impact assessment (SIA has examined the impact of the proposed offshore wind power farm on all stakeholders. The main objective of the present study was to develop an indicator system for measuring the social sustainability of offshore wind power farms; this study also reports on the particular case of Taiwan’s offshore wind power project. This study began by defining 35 social sustainability indicators and selecting 23 representative indicators by using rough set theory. Subsequently, 14 key indicators were constructed using the social construction of technology (SCOT method. Finally, we developed a social impact index for evaluating the social sustainability of offshore wind power farms by using the analytic network process and Dempster-Shafer theory. Our social impact index yields a total score of 0.149 for Taiwan’s pilot offshore wind power project; this result indicates that the pilot project is socially sustainable. A substantial contradiction exists between the fishermen’s protest and the results of the social impact assessment. The findings can assist the government in building a coordination platform for the investors and the fishermen. Government regulation is necessary to set boundaries for fishing areas that protect both the fishermen’s and investors’ rights.

  16. Public Acceptance for Sustainable Power Development: Sharing Nepalese Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dilli Bahadur; Singh, Anju; Shrestha, Sugam

    2007-07-01

    Nepal with 83000 MW of hydropower potential has harnessed only 1% of it. With a target of 8% GDP growth rate needs 15000 MW of hydropower to be exported, by 2012. Which will bring the majority(32%) of its population above the poverty line. For this Nepal ought to develop its hydropower potential maintaining social equity and environmental justice leading towards the sustainable development. One of the key attributes/ingredient to this is Public Participation/Acceptance. Hence, an in depth study was conducted for examining the level of peoples' participation/acceptance. Field visit of 6 projects and questionnaire survey conducted involving 13 groups of stakeholders revealed that public participation were sufficiently done and acceptance was also sought specially after the promulgation of Environmental Legislations. Nepal has no choice other than to develop its hydropower potential for its internal demand and to supply to the neighbouring countries, in the endeavour to reduce/eliminate the poverty, prevailing as a cancer. Henceforth, all the hydropower projects to be developed in the future should be socio-culturally acceptable, economically viable and environmentally benign. For this to happen one of the key ingredients/attributes is the public participation and gaining public acceptance in an effective and efficient manner. (auth)

  17. A review of wireless power transfer for electric vehicles: Prospects to enhance sustainable mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Zicheng; Kan, Tianze; Mi, Chunting Chris; Zhang, Yiming; Zhao, Zhengming; Keoleian, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reviewed technology advances and sustainability performance of WPT for EVs. • Identified the technical bottlenecks for improving system performance. • Highlighted system performance of case studies and real-world demonstrations. • Evaluated energy, environmental, economic, and societal impacts of WPT deployment. • Defined WPT challenges and opportunities for enhancing future sustainable mobility. - Abstract: Wireless power transfer (WPT), which transmits power by an electromagnetic field across an intervening space, provides the prospect of new opportunities for electric vehicles (EVs) to enhance sustainable mobility. This review article evaluates WPT technology for EV applications from both technical and sustainability perspectives. The objectives of this review include: (1) to present the state-of-the-art technical progress and research bottlenecks in WPT development and applications in the transportation sector; (2) to characterize the demonstrations of the real-world deployment of WPT EV systems; and (3) to evaluate the sustainable performance and identify challenges and opportunities for improvement. From the technical perspective, progress on coil design, compensation topologies, and power electronics converters and control methods are reviewed with a focus on system performance. From the sustainability perspective, performance is defined in terms of energy, environmental, and economic metrics, and policy drivers and issues of health and safety are also examined.

  18. Effect of impurities and ripple upon power regulation in self-sustained tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak power reactors will likely operate in a self sustained heating mode where additional power losses are introduced to permit higher levels of alpha particle heating (and thus higher levels of total fusion power) at thermal equilibrium. Illustrative 0-dimensional calculations are made to assess requirements for power regulation of self sustained tokamak plasmas by the use of impurity radiation. Effects of impurities upon allowable fuel density and thermal stability are determined. Requirements are calculated for passive thermal stability control by temperature driven radial motion in the presence of ripple transport losses; it appears that stability might be attained over a relatively wide temperature range with a small amount of ripple transport loss. Requirements for power regulation by the use of ripple transport are also determined

  19. Optimizing cutting conditions on sustainable machining of aluminum alloy to minimize power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Rusdi; Suyuti, Muhammad Arsyad; Susanto, Tri Agus

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum is widely utilized in the industrial sector. There are several advantages of aluminum, i.e. good flexibility and formability, high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity, and high heat. Despite of these characteristics, however, pure aluminum is rarely used because of its lacks of strength. Thus, most of the aluminum used in the industrial sectors was in the form of alloy form. Sustainable machining can be considered to link with the transformation of input materials and energy/power demand into finished goods. Machining processes are responsible for environmental effects accepting to their power consumption. The cutting conditions have been optimized to minimize the cutting power, which is the power consumed for cutting. This paper presents an experimental study of sustainable machining of Al-11%Si base alloy that was operated without any cooling system to assess the capacity in reducing power consumption. The cutting force was measured and the cutting power was calculated. Both of cutting force and cutting power were analyzed and modeled by using the central composite design (CCD). The result of this study indicated that the cutting speed has an effect on machining performance and that optimum cutting conditions have to be determined, while sustainable machining can be followed in terms of minimizing power consumption and cutting force. The model developed from this study can be used for evaluation process and optimization to determine optimal cutting conditions for the performance of the whole process.

  20. The advanced smart grid edge power driving sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Carvallo, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Placing emphasis on practical ""how-to"" guidance, this cutting-edge resource provides you with a first-hand, insider's perspective on the advent and evolution of smart grids in the 21st century (smart grid 1.0). You gain a thorough understanding of the building blocks that comprise basic smart grids, including power plant, transmission substation, distribution, and meter automation. Moreover, this forward-looking volume explores the next step of this technology's evolution. It provides a detailed explanation of how an advanced smart grid incorporates demand response with smart appliances and

  1. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  2. Rural electrification or village energization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D V

    1980-03-01

    Decentralized power generation using renewable energy resources is more appropriate to the energy needs of the rural Third World. These countries often look to the rural electrification programs of the US and Soviet Union as the answer to their problem even though studies consistently show this to be inefficient and frequently ineffective, often reinforcing existing social and economic inequities. When the uses of energy in rural villages are examined in detail, the only approach which will supply energy to the rural poor must be based on a local and regional match of need to indigenous energy sources and to the development of local talent and enthusiasm. 29 references. (DCK)

  3. Wind Power: Growing with the Demand of Sustainable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chengxu; Li Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ History review Looking back upon the human history, China is among the earliest countries which make use of wind energy. It started to use the wind energy to pump water for irrigation very long time ago. Since the establishment of the new China, pilot projects of wind energy generation have been carried out in many areas. In 1975, Tsinghua University and the Inner Mongolia Prairie Research Institute cooperated to develop wind turbines. They developed prototypes of 50/100-W off-grid micro wind turbines. Meanwhile, small wind turbines were also developed in other areas. The wind turbines produced at that time were all in small capacity and did not play important role in power industry.

  4. The hydrogen village: building hydrogen and fuel cell opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation addressed the progress the Hydrogen Village Program has made in its first 24 months of existence and will provide an understanding of the development of new markets for emerging Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies based on first hand, real world experience. The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is an End User driven, Market Development Program designed to accelerate the sustainable commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through awareness, education and early deployments throughout the greater Toronto area (GTA). The program is a collaborative public-private partnership of some 35 companies from a broad cross section of industry administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. The intent of the H2V is to develop markets for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies that benefit the local and global community. The following aspects of market development are specifically targeted: 1) Deployments: of near market technologies in all aspects of community life (stationary and mobile). All applications must be placed within the community and contact peoples in their day-to-day activity. End user involvement is critical to ensure that the applications chosen have a commercial justification and contribute to the complementary growth of the market. 2) Development: of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure. The infrastructure will develop following the principles of conservation and sustainability. 3) Human and societal factors: - Public and Corporate policy, public education, Codes/ Standards/ Regulations - Opportunity for real world implementation and feedback on developing codes and standards - Build awareness among regulatory groups, public, and the media. The GTA Hydrogen Village is already well under way with strategically located projects covering a wide range of hydrogen and fuel cell applications including: Residential heat and power generation using solid oxide

  5. Energy and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean: Approaches for the power policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    Energy and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean is a joint project of the Latin American Organization of Energia (OLADE), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (Cepal) of the United Nations and the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammennarbeit (GTZ). The intention of this project is the one to fortify the processes of formulation of power policies to harmonize economic growth, social fairness and protection of the environment in order to contribute to that the reforms that come undertaking the countries from the region prohang to the sustainable development. The made work it is come off that the sustainability of the power development raises a series of challenges to future. Concordant with the reactivation of the economic growth in the Nineties a low power productivity is still pronounced. To this they add one reduced to cover of satisfaction of the power necessities and the forest deterioration, jointly with the low quality of the power consumption and the impacts in the level of transmissions that will have the incorporation of polluting sources in the expansion of the regional power systems. On the other hand, the work shows a preoccupation with respect to the sustainability of the expansion of the power systems. At the present time the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean do not have a significant responsibility in the global environmental problems, since single they generate 5% of the world-wide CO2 transmissions whereas the developed countries contribute around 70%. Nevertheless, the new power developments based on the greater hydrocarbon consumption will be able to increase the contribution from the region to the deterioration of the atmosphere. At the same time, the expansion based on the hydroelectric generation also has some limitations although it contributes positively to the mitigation of the transmissions, which raises new challenges to the reform of the power sector

  6. Ensuring the sustainability of EDF power plant operating capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.

    2009-01-01

    The life extension of the power plants is considered whereas EDF must face an acceleration of the retirement rates due to the fact that the first generations of the baby-boom are ageing 60 years, now. Between 2000 and 2006, EDF gradually set up a system of management of competencies. On the one hand, EDF moved from logic of relatively standardized training to a more individualized logic of acquisition of competencies. In addition, the objective of maintenance of internat competencies defined in 2000 was supplemented in 2003 by a prospective dimension intended to anticipate the departures in inactivity. Then in 2006 competencies of sub-contractors were taken into account. During this period I.R.S.N. has assessed 3 times this system of management. This article briefly presents the principal lessons driven from these evaluations. It accounts for the undeniable effort made by EDF to ensure the maintenance of its competencies. However, it stresses that a high level of vigilance is still needed because it is not stabilized already. (author)

  7. Sustained qualification process for full scope nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, J.; Stubbe, E.; Vanhoenacker, L.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, simulator training for all nuclear power plant operators has evolved into a vital requirement. To assure a correct training, the simulator qualification process is an important issue not only for the initial validation but also following major simulator updates, which are necessary during the lifetime of the simulator. In order to avoid degradation of the simulator validated software, the modifications have to be introduced according to a rigorous methodology and a practical requalification process has to be applied. Such methodology has to be enforced at every phase of the simulator construction or updating process from plant data package constitution, over simulator software development to simulator response qualification. The initial qualification and requalification process is based on the 3 levels identified by the ANSI/ANS 3-5 standard for steady-state, operational transients and accident conditions. For the initial certification of the full scope simulators in Belgium, a practical qualification methodology has been applied, which has been adapted into a set of non regression tests for the requalification after major simulator updates. (orig.) (4 refs., 3 figs.)

  8. Utilization of nuclear power - a sustainable error of history?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugerli, D.

    2004-01-01

    The history of atomic energy has been producing major surprises for at least half a century. A wave of atomic enthusiasm - which grew to a veritable atomic euphoria - was triggered by the famous atoms-for-peace speech by US president Eisenhower in 1953. Despite their inherent technocratic pacifism, Eisenhower's atoms led to critical conflicts within those societies that subscribed to the nuclear development scheme. A critical revision of these conflicts reveals a dramatic falling apart of the historic horizon of expectations and the historic development path. Notwithstanding, both the apologists of nuclear energy use and their antagonists have erred in many ways without truly losing their capacity to act. They misjudged the planning security, the safety of the installations, and the stability of the price relations on the energy and capital equipment markets. Moreover, both sides erred in their predictions concerning the political conditions and the social consequences of nuclear power plants. This observation is not historically insightful in the sense of learning from one's mistakes. It is insightful rather for the relationship between experience, expectation and decision on the one hand and socio-technical change on the other hand. (orig.)

  9. Developing nuclear power to realize low-carbon and economic sustainable development of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xingfa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal power is the primary power energy of China, whose basic primary energy consumption is mostly burning coal. And thereby carbon dioxide emission reduction becomes much difficult in China. Seeking low-carbon discharge power energy is the necessary trend in China electric power development. Among the new energy, wind power, hydropower and solar energy have some distinctive shortcoming, which can not make up the energy growth demand with the rapid growth of the economy. Comparing to other kinds of electric energy, the nuclear power possesses the evident advantages, it will become the basis energy to carry out the goal of energy conservation and emission reduction in China and developing nuclear power can realize the sustainable development of China economy under low-carbon condition. (author)

  10. Concentrating solar power: a sustainable and renewable way to get energy from solar light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montecchi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Solar light irradiating the Earth is a great sustainable and renewable power source. In concentrating solar power plants, mirrors are used to redirect the solar light toward a small area where a receiver captures and converts it into thermal-energy which can be stored. ENEA has been developing the parabolic-trough Italian technology, as well as several facilities for the component characterization. The paper reports on some of those which are purely optical instruments [it

  11. Is nuclear power environmentally sustainable? Paper no. IGEC-1-121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The sustainability of nuclear energy is discussed in terms of its environmental impacts and its utilization of resources. The reactors in the present generation of fission reactors extract only a small percentage of the energy available from uranium. A solution to the long-term management of highly radioactive used reactor fuel is also a key factor in fission's sustainability. Recycling used fuel for enhanced energy production in advanced reactors and the mitigation of the long-term management of the remaining wastes, ideally with their ultimate destruction by nuclear transmutation are technologies that need to be developed in order to ensure the long term sustainability of nuclear fission. In contrast nuclear fusion, while not yet available for power production, promises to be inherently sustainable. (author)

  12. Nuclear power and sustainable development: a vision from a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Monica; Harriague, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    From the understanding of sustainable development as 'growing assets and opening options - not foreclosing them' (IAEA, 2006a), an analysis is made on sustainability conditions for nuclear power in a developing country, based on Argentinean experience. The necessity of developing an autonomous decision-making capability and a technological-industrial infrastructure is stressed. As an example, a brief history of nuclear power in Argentina is summarized, focusing in key elements that contributed to sustainability and also pointing out some draw-backs that may have affected it. Finally, some lessons learned are presented, with the aim of sharing the experience and offering a contribution to the present debate on nuclear energy deployment in the periphery. (authors)

  13. Requirements on future energy supply. Analysis on the demand of future power plant capacity and strategy for a sustainable power utilization in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This strategy paper was drawn up with a view to maximum ecological compatibility of pwer plant modernization and sustainable power generation and use. The first part of the paper analyzes the power plants to be decommissioned on a medium-term basis and - against the background of several different scenarios for future power demand - an estimate of power plant capacities required by 2020. The second part describes the goals and concrete requirements of sustainable energy use. In the final part, the available instruments are presented, and those instruments are recommended that will be best suited for making power demand and supply efficient, sustainable and environment-friend.y [de

  14. Solar Power Generation for ICT and Sustainable Development in Emerging Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Damasen I.; Uhomoibhi, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to systematically examine and draw attention to the potential benefits of solar power generation for access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICT) aimed at sustainable development in emerging economies. Design/methodology/approach: Electricity plays a crucial role in the development and…

  15. Sustainability assessment of nuclear power: Discourse analysis of IAEA and IPCC frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbruggen, Aviel; Laes, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sustainability assessments (SAs) are methodologically precarious. • Discourse analysis reveals how the meaning of sustainability is constructed in SAs. • Discourse analysis is applied on the SAs of nuclear power of IAEA and IPCC. • For IAEA ‘sustainable’ equals ‘complying with best international practices’. • The IAEA framework largely inspires IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. - Abstract: Sustainability assessments (SAs) are methodologically precarious. Value-based judgments inevitably play a role in setting the scope of the SA, selecting assessment criteria and indicators, collecting adequate data, and developing and using models of considered systems. Discourse analysis can reveal how the meaning and operationalization of sustainability is constructed in and through SAs. Our discourse-analytical approach investigates how sustainability is channeled from ‘manifest image’ (broad but shallow), to ‘vision’, to ‘policy targets’ (specific and practical). This approach is applied on the SA frameworks used by IAEA and IPCC to assess the sustainability of the nuclear power option. The essentially problematic conclusion is that both SA frameworks are constructed in order to obtain answers that do not conflict with prior commitments adopted by the two institutes. For IAEA ‘sustainable’ equals ‘complying with best international practices and standards’. IPCC wrestles with its mission as a provider of “policy-relevant and yet policy-neutral, never policy-prescriptive” knowledge to decision-makers. IPCC avoids the assessment of different visions on the role of nuclear power in a low-carbon energy future, and skips most literature critical of nuclear power. The IAEA framework largely inspires IPCC AR5

  16. Biomass District Heat System for Interior Rural Alaska Villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, William A.; Parker, Charles R.

    2014-09-01

    Alaska Village Initiatives (AVI) from the outset of the project had a goal of developing an integrated village approach to biomass in Rural Alaskan villages. A successful biomass project had to be ecologically, socially/culturally and economically viable and sustainable. Although many agencies were supportive of biomass programs in villages none had the capacity to deal effectively with developing all of the tools necessary to build a complete integrated program. AVI had a sharp learning curve as well. By the end of the project with all the completed tasks, AVI developed the tools and understanding to connect all of the dots of an integrated village based program. These included initially developing a feasibility model that created the capacity to optimize a biomass system in a village. AVI intent was to develop all aspects or components of a fully integrated biomass program for a village. This meant understand the forest resource and developing a sustainable harvest system that included the “right sized” harvest equipment for the scale of the project. Developing a training program for harvesting and managing the forest for regeneration. Making sure the type, quality, and delivery system matched the needs of the type of boiler or boilers to be installed. AVI intended for each biomass program to be of the scale that would create jobs and a sustainable business.

  17. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, T., E-mail: Naito.Teruki@bc.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp [Advanced Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Yamaura, S. [Information Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-8501 (Japan); Fukuma, Y. [Communication System Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Sakai, O. [Department of Electronic System Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  18. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  19. Feasibility study for power generation using off- grid energy system from micro hydro-PV-diesel generator-battery for rural area of Ethiopia: The case of Melkey Hera village, Western Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Nigussie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electricity supply in Ethiopia is extremely antiquated. Most of the remote rural areas of Ethiopia are not yet electrified. Electrifying these remote areas by extending grid system is difficult and costly. Melkey Hera village is one of a rural community situated in western Ethiopia. In this village, extension of the grid is not yet practical. As the current international trend in rural electrification is to utilize renewable energy resources; solar, wind, biomass, and micro hydro power systems can be seen as alternatives. Therefore, the target of this paper is to investigate the viability of a micro hydro, Photo Voltaic (PV and Diesel Generator-battery hybrid power system options to come up with the best techno-economic and optimum configuration for supplying electricity to this village. The study was performed by an assessment of the predicted village energy demand, the available renewable energy resources, and then using the software called HOMER. The best hybrid system type was described and the optimization of the system configuration was also done. Furthermore, through the simulation of different configuration of the supply system, the optimal mini-grid hybrid system design was established to combine hydro, solar PV, battery energy storage and diesel generator. This system demonstrated to be more reliable in operation, and the most cost-effective for the required level of service. The role of energy storage in system operation also demonstrated to offer additional operational advantages in-terms of reliability and cost savings. Overall, the design results show that the majority of energy obtained from hydropower, which accounts 79%, the PV module covers 20%, and diesel generator is only 1% of the total load consumption. The obtained hybrid system is cost competitive with $\\$$0.133/kWh, which is somewhat good to satisfy the community needs. However, this is more than current energy price in Ethiopia which $\\$$0.06/kWh. If due-merit given

  20. Sustainable development of the wind power industry in a complex environment: a flexibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Jiang; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As a new and developing green energy business in emerging economies such as China, the wind power industry chain faces some complex issues that are further compounded by turbulent internal and external environments. To deal with the complex environment, the wind power industry needs to improve its level of flexibility so that it can become more adaptable to the changing environment. Hence it is important to explore the dynamics of the wind power industry chain flexibility with respect to the ever changing environment. This study uses questionnaire surveys and expert interviews to identify the influential flexibility components of the wind power industry chain. Subsequently a fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) methodology was used to establish a flexibility operating mechanism model. The research found that special attention should be paid to competition flexibility, technology flexibility, and intellectual property and talent flexibility. Policies play a pivotal role in regulating the driving effects of these components of flexibility with the aim being long term sustainability of a healthy level of overall flexibility of the wind power industry chain. This should in turn facilitate the sustainable development of the industry. - Highlights: • Wind power industry shall improve flexibility to deal with complex environment. • Critical components of flexibility of wind power industry chain were identified. • An operating mechanism model for flexibility of wind power industry is proposed. • Fuzzy cognitive mapping method is employed to model the dynamics of flexibility. • Policies play a pivotal role in fostering an industry environment toward flexibility

  1. Harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator as a sustainable power source and a self-powered active vibration sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Bai, Peng; Yang, Ya; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-13

    A harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is presented as a sustainable power source and an active vibration sensor. It can effectively respond to vibration frequencies ranging from 2 to 200 Hz with a considerably wide working bandwidth of 13.4 Hz. This work not only presents a new principle in the field of vibration energy harvesting but also greatly expands the applicability of TENGs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 MΩ and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 kΩ. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics.

  3. Pascal software structures achieve definite control of the 24 MFTF sustaining neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Precise control of large, complex systems is not assured unless there is known to be no unintended interactions in the control system. The software controlling the sustaining neutral-beam power supplies of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility accomplishes this feat. The software structures comprise some 16,000 lines of commented Pascal code, distributed amoung 10 different tasks. Each task may control any of the 24 power supplies. All the tasks are strictly event-driven, and are not subject to any system mode. Since there is no global information in the software, we know that all the power supplies are controlled independently

  4. Energy forum 2005: Nuclear power - in competition with sustainable energy supply in Europe. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The forum of energy for future organized on 29st September 2005 the annual Energy Forum at Berlin. The Energy Forum 2005 dealt with nuclear power in competition with sustainable energy supply in Europe and didn't only give their members the possibility of a discussion on this actual theme. Furtheron demanding aims on CO2-reduction, increased raw material- and energy prices as the construction of a new Finnish nuclear power plant have countries moved to evaluate again the future-oriented role of nuclear power. (orig./GL)

  5. Power grid operation risk management: V2G deployment for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadian, Ghazale J.

    The production, transmission, and delivery of cost--efficient energy to supply ever-increasing peak loads along with a quest for developing a low-carbon economy require significant evolutions in the power grid operations. Lower prices of vast natural gas resources in the United States, Fukushima nuclear disaster, higher and more intense energy consumptions in China and India, issues related to energy security, and recent Middle East conflicts, have urged decisions makers throughout the world to look into other means of generating electricity locally. As the world look to combat climate changes, a shift from carbon-based fuels to non-carbon based fuels is inevitable. However, the variability of distributed generation assets in the electricity grid has introduced major reliability challenges for power grid operators. While spearheading sustainable and reliable power grid operations, this dissertation develops a multi-stakeholder approach to power grid operation design; aiming to address economic, security, and environmental challenges of the constrained electricity generation. It investigates the role of Electric Vehicle (EV) fleets integration, as distributed and mobile storage assets to support high penetrations of renewable energy sources, in the power grid. The vehicle-to-grid (V2G) concept is considered to demonstrate the bidirectional role of EV fleets both as a provider and consumer of energy in securing a sustainable power grid operation. The proposed optimization modeling is the application of Mixed-Integer Linear Programing (MILP) to large-scale systems to solve the hourly security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) -- an optimal scheduling concept in the economic operation of electric power systems. The Monte Carlo scenario-based approach is utilized to evaluate different scenarios concerning the uncertainties in the operation of power grid system. Further, in order to expedite the real-time solution of the proposed approach for large-scale power systems

  6. The Quest for Rural Sustainability in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Wegren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rural depopulation and the disappearance of villages in rural Russia occurred as part of the historical process of urbanization and industrialization. Rural depopulation also occurred for structural reasons having to do with village location, and for behavioral reasons whereby villagers react to primitive living conditions and poor economic prospects. Three possible strategies for addressing the problem of sustainable villages are considered. The government is attempting to improve rural living conditions, but rural depopulation is likely to continue. Characteristics of sustainable villages are outlined. Agro-tourism is analyzed for its potential to support sustainable villages.

  7. Evaluating the level and nature of sustainable development for a geothermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The paper provides for an evaluation of the potential level and nature of sustainable development of the Sabalan geothermal power plant in NW Iran, to be operational in 2011. The paper achieves this by applying a mathematical model of sustainable development developed by the author (re: Phillips), in respect to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) conducted by Yousefi et al. using the Rapid Impact Assessment Matrix (RIAM) methodology (re: Pastakia; Pastakia and Jensen). Using a model application methodology developed for the RIAM, the results indicated that the nature of sustainable development for Sabalan was considered to be very weak (S = 0.063). This was due to the imbalance between negative environmental impacts and positive socio-economic impacts deriving from the project. Further, when placed into context with a similar set of results obtained from the EIA of the Tuzla geothermal power plant by Baba also using the RIAM methodology, then the similarities between the results obtained raises some legimate questions as to the sustainable development credentials of geothermal power production. (author)

  8. Framework of systematic sustainability assessment strategy (FSSAS) for hydroelectric power industry in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johan, Kartina; Turan, Faiz Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Hydroelectric power is an alternative power resource in Malaysia and always associated with negative impact on environmental, social and economy of the surrounding site. The dispute over environmental, societal and economic issues can be minimised if compliance to sustainability development requirement is included in the project as part of the project premises during planning phase. This paper suggests a framework targeted for decision-makers in charge of implementing the projects to produce hydropower the sustainable way in Malaysian context which can mitigate the risks in social, environment and economy. The framework is strategic in nature and based on project management methodology with objective to provide a ‘common language’ by having a project value as measureable for stakeholders to state their mutual agreement of what a sustainable hydropower project in the context of Malaysia and in line with the United Nations (UN) 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The paper discusses how the proposed systematic sustainability assessment strategy (FSSAS) framework support the call for Malaysia to promote meaningful public participation in ensuring land and natural resource decisions and to address citizens’ interests which is the core idea of Environmental Democracy Index established in 2014. The paper argues that, even though it is at present impossible to define precision status of sustainability development with respect to the nature of the multi stakeholders and the lack of systematic assessment the proposed FSSAS framework can be a valuable tool because it tracks the project value as a quantitative deliverable to determine the status of the journey in sustainable development towards accomplishing the SDG under a consensus in hydropower industry of any scale over time.

  9. Millennium Global Village-Net: bringing together Millennium Villages throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Andrew S; Negin, Joel; Olayo, Bernard; Bukachi, Frederick; Johnson, Edward; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich

    2009-12-01

    The Millennium Villages Project (MVP), based at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, is a bottom-up, community led approach to show how villages in developing countries can get out of the poverty trap that afflicts more than a billion people worldwide. With well-targeted, practical inputs can help the community invest in a path leading to self-sustaining development. There are 80 Millennium Villages clustered in 10 countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa. MVP is an important development process for empowering communities to invest in a package of integrated interventions aiming to increase food production, improve access to safe water, health care, education and infrastructure. The process benefits from synergies of the integrated approach and relies on community leadership as empowered by proven technological inputs. MVP is committed to a science-based approach to assess and monitor the progress of the communities towards clear objectives; the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and to do so with mechanisms that are scalable and sustainable. This approach offers much more than simply collecting and analyzing data since the mechanism used for recording progress would provide a bridge over the divide which separates the haves and the have-nots (by facilitating the sharing of solutions from one community to another bidirectionally). By so doing, it allows people to enhance their own futures in a sustainable manner. Solutions found in one community are transferable to similar communities in other MVP villages. To achieve this goal, the MVP requires an information and communication system which can provide both necessary infrastructure for monitoring and evaluation, and tools for communicating among the villages, cities and countries. This system is called the Millennium Global Village-Net (MGV-Net). It takes advantage of the latest in open source software (OpenMRS), databases (MySQL), interface terminology, a centralized concept dictionary, and uses appropriate

  10. Multi-criteria sustainability analysis of thermal power plant Kolubara-A Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škobalj, P.; Kijevčanin, M.; Afgan, N.; Jovanović, M.; Turanjanin, V.; Vučićević, B.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a possible approach for creating business decisions based on multi-criteria analysis. Seven options for a possible revitalization of the thermal power plant “Kolubara”-A Unit No. 2 with energy indicators of sustainable development (EISD) are presented in this paper. The chosen EISD numerically express the essential features of the analyzed options, while the sustainability criteria indicate the option quality within the limits of these indicators. In this paper, the criteria for assessing the sustainability options are defined based on several aspects: economic, social, environmental and technological. In the process of assessing the sustainability of the considered options the Analysis and Synthesis of Parameters under Information Deficiency (ASPID) method was used. In this paper, the EISD show that production and energy consumption are closely linked to economic, environmental and other indicators, such as economic and technological development of local communities with employment being one of the most important social parameter. Multi-criteria analysis for the case study of the TPP “Kolubara”-A clearly indicated recommendations to decision makers on the choice of the best available options in dependence on the energy policy. - Highlights: • Options for sustainable generation of electricity have been proposed. • Energy Indicators of Sustainable Development have been formed. • ASPID methodology has been implemented.

  11. Solar power for energy sustainability and environmental friendliness of Curtin University Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, C.; Goh, Alvin

    2016-03-01

    The demand on electrical energy is rapidly increasing. Everything around us requires electrical energy either during its production or usage stage. Sustainability has become the main concern nowadays as the availability of fossil fuels is limited. As renewable energy is the path-way to energy sustainability and environmental friendly environment, this paper proposes a solar power system for Curtin University Sarawak to reduce its electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The proposed 208 kW solar system saves an energy consumption of more than 380,000 kWh per year, and a CO2 offset by 285 Tons per year

  12. Solar power for energy sustainability and environmental friendliness of Curtin University Sarawak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanichamy, C; Goh, Alvin

    2016-01-01

    The demand on electrical energy is rapidly increasing. Everything around us requires electrical energy either during its production or usage stage. Sustainability has become the main concern nowadays as the availability of fossil fuels is limited. As renewable energy is the path-way to energy sustainability and environmental friendly environment, this paper proposes a solar power system for Curtin University Sarawak to reduce its electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The proposed 208 kW solar system saves an energy consumption of more than 380,000 kWh per year, and a CO 2 offset by 285 Tons per year (paper)

  13. FleetPower: Creating Virtual Power Plants in Sustainable Smart Electricity Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Kahlen (Micha); W. Ketter (Wolfgang); A. Gupta (Alok)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractElectric vehicles have the potential to be used as virtual power plants to provide reliable back-up power. This generates additional profits for carsharing rental firms, who rent vehicles by the minute. We show this by developing a discrete event simulation platform based on real-time

  14. Unruly energies: Provocations of renewable energy development in a northern German village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jennifer D.

    This dissertation asks how inhabitants of a sustainable village are living out Germany's transition from nuclear to renewable energy. The sustainable village remains a locus of optimistic attachments for renewable energy advocates, who argue that a decentralized power grid will enable people to more directly participate in power production and politics as "energy citizens." Yet while rural areas have become sites of speculation, innovation and growth, few rural-dwellers are enfranchised in (or profiting from) the technoscientific projects in their midst. I draw upon 13 months of fieldwork in a northern German village transformed by wind turbines, photovoltaics and biofuels to consider why, asking what kinds of public life flourish in the absence of democratic engagement with renewable technologies. This ethnography engages the village as multiply constituted across domains of everyday life, including transit, farming, waste management, domestic life, and social gatherings. I found that environmental policy, everyday practices, and the area's material histories combined to produce ontologies---senses of what exists---that circumscribe citizen participation in the energy sector, affording more formal opportunities to men than to women, and privileging farmers' interests in plans that impacted the larger community. These findings illuminate how many villagers become ambivalent toward the project of the energy transition and disenfranchised from its implementation. Yet many who were excluded from formal participation also engaged with renewable technologies as they sensed out their worlds, using tropes of sustainable energy and technoscientific materials to place themselves in this emerging energy polity. Their everyday worldmaking brimmed with what I call unruly energies, structures of feeling that registered more as affects than as discourse. In the village, these took form as sensory disturbances, disquiet among neighbors, technoscientific optimism and skepticism

  15. A sustainable scenario for Venezuelan power generation sector in 2050 and its costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautista, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    The present research study used the quantitative approach to analyze the present and future situation of the Venezuelan power generation sector; to achieve that, the total energy generation costs and GHG emissions of four scenarios in 2050 were estimated and compared, considering two demand groups, high and low demand. For each demand scenario, two supply matrix were considered, a generation matrix based on the existing national power generation plans and trends (these scenarios were referred as BAU) and a configuration based on the renewable energy resources available in Venezuela and without the use of either nuclear or CCS technologies, and these scenarios are referred as Sustainable Scenarios (SUS). In the first section, the present situation is presented, followed by an explanation of the applied methodology and the implemented tools. In the third and fourth sections the available recourses and the applied basic assumptions for the four of scenarios are presented and discussed, respectively, followed by the results. In this study it is shown that Venezuela has all the resources it needs to achieve sustainable development in the power generation sector. It is also proved that an energy efficiency improvement is the easiest path to reduce GHG emissions. - Highlights: ► Venezuela has enough energy resources to supply the energy require for its development. ► A sustainable scenario is posible in Venezuelan power generation sector in 2050. ► The sustainable scenario is technically possible without nuclear power or carbon capture storage technologies. ► The impact over the depleatable resources is higher under the BAU assumptions.

  16. Rotating-Disk-Based Hybridized Electromagnetic-Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Sustainably Powering Wireless Traffic Volume Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Chen, Jun; Jin, Long; Deng, Weili; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhu, Minhao; Yang, Weiqing; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Wireless traffic volume detectors play a critical role for measuring the traffic-flow in a real-time for current Intelligent Traffic System. However, as a battery-operated electronic device, regularly replacing battery remains a great challenge, especially in the remote area and wide distribution. Here, we report a self-powered active wireless traffic volume sensor by using a rotating-disk-based hybridized nanogenerator of triboelectric nanogenerator and electromagnetic generator as the sustainable power source. Operated at a rotating rate of 1000 rpm, the device delivered an output power of 17.5 mW, corresponding to a volume power density of 55.7 W/m(3) (Pd = P/V, see Supporting Information for detailed calculation) at a loading resistance of 700 Ω. The hybridized nanogenerator was demonstrated to effectively harvest energy from wind generated by a moving vehicle through the tunnel. And the delivered power is capable of triggering a counter via a wireless transmitter for real-time monitoring the traffic volume in the tunnel. This study further expands the applications of triboelectric nanogenerators for high-performance ambient mechanical energy harvesting and as sustainable power sources for driving wireless traffic volume sensors.

  17. International and Domestic Sustainable Forest Management Policies: Distributive Effects on Power among State Agencies in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Giessen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades of forest policy discussions have been dominated by calls for sustainable management of forest resources. Consequently, multiple international and domestic policies, supporting sustainable forest management (SFM, have evolved in numerous jurisdictions. Policies in developing countries often rely on foreign donors’ projects, which supplement domestic SFM policy. These policies assign various policy tasks to specific public bureaucracies, who then compete for these very tasks, as well as the related staff and budgets. Therefore, project and policy task assignment greatly influences bureaucratic power. This article analyzes the distributive effects of SFM policy on power (in terms of coercion, incentives and dominant information among relevant domestic and foreign donor bureaucracies in Bangladesh. Concepts from power theory, bureaucratic politics theory, and concepts of policy and policy process were combined to analyze 121 Bangladeshi SFM policies from 1992–2013, which assign a total of 1012 policy tasks to specific public bureaucracies. Using qualitative content analysis, inferences about power were assigned to specific competing bureaucracies by the totality of SFM policies made. Results identify domestic and foreign bureaucracies whose power distribution benefit most from the SFM policies viz. their competitors. It is concluded that bureaucracies gaining the most power set the limits and directions in designing, implementing and evaluating various elements of any national SFM policies.

  18. Nuclear power and sustainable development. Maintaining and increasing the overall assets available to future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A central goal of sustainable development is to maintain or increase the overall assets available to future generations, while minimizing consumption of finite resources and not exceeding the carrying capacities of ecosystems. The development of nuclear power broadens the natural resource base usable for energy production, increases human and man-made capital, and, when safely handled, has little impact on ecosystems. Energy is essential for sustainable development. With continuing population and economic growth, and increasing needs in the developing world, substantially greater energy demand is a given, even taking into account continuing and accelerated energy efficiency and intensity improvements. Today, nuclear power is mostly utilized in industrialized countries that have the necessary technological, institutional and financial resources. Many of the industrialized countries that are able and willing to use nuclear power are also large energy consumers. Nuclear power currently generates 16% of the world's electricity. It produces virtually no sulfur dioxide, particulates, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds or greenhouse gases. Globally, nuclear power currently avoids approximately 600 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually, about the same as hydropower. The 600 MtC avoided by nuclear power equals 8% of current global greenhouse gases emissions. In the OECD countries, nuclear power has for 35 years accounted for most of the reduction in the carbon intensity per unit of delivered energy. Existing operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) for which initial capital investments are largely depreciated are also often the most cost-effective way to reduce carbon emissions from electricity generation. In fact in the United States in 2000, NPPs were the most cost-effective way to generate electricity, irrespective of avoided carbon emissions. In other countries the advantages of existing nuclear generating stations are also increasingly recognized. Interest

  19. Feasibility study of self sustaining capability on water cooled thorium reactors for different power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, S.; Takaki, N.; Sekimoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    Thorium fuel cycle can maintain the sustainable system of the reactor for self sustaining system for future sustainable development in the world. Some characteristics of thorium cycle show some advantages in relation to higher breeding capability, higher performance of burn-up and more proliferation resistant. Several investigations was performed to improve the breeding capability which is essential for maintaining the fissile sustainability during reactor operation in thermal reactor such as Shippingport reactor and molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project. The preliminary study of breeding capability on water cooled thorium reactor has been investigated for various power output. The iterative calculation system is employed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of PIJ module of SRAC2000. In this calculation, 1238 fission products and 129 heavy nuclides are employed. In the cell calculation, 26 heavy metals and 66 fission products and 1 pseudo FP are employed. The employed nuclear data library was JENDL 3.2. The reactor is fueled by 2 33U-Th Oxide and it has used the light water coolant as moderator. Some characteristics such as conversion ratio and void reactivity coefficient performances are evaluated for the systems. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) values and average burnups are studied for survey parameter. The parametric survey for different power outputs are employed from 10 MWt to 3000 MWt for evaluating the some characteristics of core size and leakage effects to the spectra profile, required enrichment, breeding capability, fissile inventory condition, and void reactivity coefficient. Different power outputs are employed in order to evaluate its effect to the required enrichment for criticality, breeding capability, void reactivity and fissile inventory accumulation. The obtained value of the conversion ratios is evaluated by using the equilibrium atom composition. The conversion ratio is employed based on the

  20. The "Village" model: a consumer-driven approach for aging in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew; Graham, Carrie; Lehning, Amanda

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the characteristics of the "Village" model, an innovative consumer-driven approach that aims to promote aging in place through a combination of member supports, service referrals, and consumer engagement. Thirty of 42 fully operational Villages completed 2 surveys. One survey examined Villages' member characteristics, membership types, and fee structures. An additional survey collected information about organizational mission, goals, methods of operation, funding sources, challenges, and older adults' roles. Villages provide a variety of support services designed to help members age in place, meet service needs, and promote health and quality of life. Most Villages operate relatively autonomously, relying primarily on member fees and donations. Village members typically are highly involved in organizational development and oversight and provide services to other members in almost half of the Villages. Members predominantly are aged 65 years or older, White, non-Hispanic, homeowners, and have care needs that are slightly lower than those of the elderly U.S. population overall. Villages are a promising model for addressing service needs among middle-class seniors who seek to age in their own homes and communities. Financial sustainability is apt to be a challenge unless Villages secure more stable sources of funding. Organizational sustainability may be promoted through affiliations with social service agencies and other sources of technical and financial assistance. Future evaluation is needed regarding the impact of Villages on elders' ability to age in place as well as the long-term sustainability of the Village model.

  1. Recording Village Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cromwell, Jennifer Adele

    and economic changes happening at both the community and country-wide levels during the early years of Islamic rule in Egypt. Additionally, they offer a fascinating picture of the scribe’s role within this world, illuminating both the practical aspects of his work and the social and professional connections......Recording Village Life presents a close study of over 140 Coptic texts written between 724–756 CE by a single scribe, Aristophanes son of Johannes, of the village Djeme in western Thebes. These texts, which focus primarily on taxation and property concerns, yield a wealth of knowledge about social...... of late antique studies, papyrology, philology, early Islamic history, social and economic history, and Egyptology....

  2. Harvesting energy an sustainable power source, replace batteries for powering WSN and devices on the IoT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Vadean, A.; Pop, P. P.; Latinovic, T.; Barz, C.; Lung, C.

    2017-05-01

    Harvesting energy from nonconventional sources in the environment has received increased attention over the past decade from researchers who study these alternative energy sources for low power applications. Although that energy harvested is small and in the order of milliwatt, it can provide enough power for wireless sensors and other low-power applications. In the environment there is a lot of wasted energy that can be converted into electricity to power the various circuits and represents a potentially cheap source of power. Energy harvesting is important because it offers an alternative power supply for electronic devices where is does not exist conventional energy sources. This technology applied in a wireless sensor network (WSN) and devices on the IoT, will eliminate the need for network-based energy and conventional batteries, will minimize maintenance costs, eliminate cables and batteries and is ecological. It has the same advantage in applications from remote locations, underwater, and other hard to reach places where conventional batteries and energy are not suitable. Energy harvesting will promote environmentally friendly technologies that will save energy, will reduce CO2 emissions, which makes this technology indispensable for achieving next-generation smart cities and sustainable society. In response to the challenges of energy, in this article we remind the basics of harvesting energy and we discuss the various applications of this technology where traditional batteries cannot be used.

  3. Thematic village Zalesie Royal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dombrowicz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zalesie Królewskie is a village located in the district lay in the municipality of Swiekatowo. It is a town with well-preserved heritage Borowiakow Tucholskich. This heritage is rich and focused around the values of material culture, but also immaterial. People who live here have many features in common with neighboring Kociewiacy and Kashubian, but also have their own unique ethnographic, which is attractive for tourism.

  4. Deregulation and sustainable energy supply: perspectives of nuclear power and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the concept expressed by the Brundtland Commission and in the Rio Declaration, sustainability incorporates the need - contradictory at first sight - to make sparing use of the environment and promote economic and social development at the same time. Future generations must not be stripped of their possibilities to live and develop. In this comprehensive interpretation, some quantitative orientation for various energy options can be obtained by means of lifetime analyses. The parameters available for evaluation are resource, environmental and economic aspects. Introducing competition and deregulation in the power industry is legitimate not only for reasons of economic theory. Experience has shown that efficient growth and careful management of scarce resources are achieved not by government planning and regulation, but by the allocation efficiency of the markets. This makes competition a key factor of sustainable development. Against this background, perspectives of nuclear power and of renewable energy sources are evaluated. (orig.) [de

  5. Research on the localization method of protecting traditional village landscape: a case study on Tangyin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available China has over 271 million villages and less than the number in ten years ago in which there are 363 million villages. New rural construction indeed do some good for common villages but still destroy hundreds and thousands traditional village which contain great cultural, science, artistic values. In addition, traditional villages can't meet the increasing needs in more convenient and comfortable living conditions. Increasing population also makes traditional villages out of control in construction. With the background of this, we have to set up in traditional village protection. This article put forward an idea in protection which make use of landscape localization to pursue the sustainable development and vernacular landscape protection. Tangyin Town is a famous trade center in history and left many cultural heritage, especially historical buildings. Take Tangyin as a case study to apply the localization method which could guide other similar villages to achieve same goals.

  6. Sustainable model for financial viability of decentralized biomass gasifier based power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, Debajit; Malhotra, Ramit; Kumar, Atul

    2011-01-01

    This paper made a modest attempt for designing a sustainable model for financial viability of biomass gasifier power projects for enhancing electricity access in India and other developing countries. For long term sustainability of distributed generation projects in remote rural areas, viability from both project implementing agency (PIA) and the end-users need to be ensured. The minimum required prices of electricity from both PIA and end-user perspective have been estimated. While for PIA the cost recovery is the key for viability, the affordability to pay the electricity cost is crucial for the end users. Analysis carried out in this paper on the basis of data obtained from operational projects implemented in India reveal that it is essential to operate the system at a higher capacity utilization factor. While this can be achieved though creating convergence with locally relevant economic activity, it is also observed that micro-enterprises cannot pay beyond a certain price of electricity to keep it sustainable. This paper sets forth a case for developing a regulatory mechanism to extend the tariff fixation for the projects and providing cross-subsidies to ensure long term sustainability of off-grid project. - Highlights: → We design sustainable financial model for viability of biomass gasifier projects. → Analysis based on field data obtained from operational projects in India. Estimated electricity pricing from both implementing agency and end-users perspective. → A regulatory mechanism for tariff fixation and cross subsidization is recommended.

  7. Energy for the future - with Risoe from nuclear power to sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrup, M. (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    The title of the book is inspired by Risoe's mission which, at the time of its 50th anniversary, remains uncannily close to that given to Risoe when it was inaugurated in 1958. First and foremost, then as now, Risoe is engaged in the development of tomorrow's energy technologies. In 1958, it was nuclear power. On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, Risoe is working with a palette of sustainable energy sources. (author)

  8. Analysis of an Improved Solar-Powered Hydrogen Generation System for Sustained Renewable Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    hydrogen gas by electrolysis. In LT Aviles’ design , distilled water was collected from the ambient air using Peltier dehumidifiers, manufactured by...Figure 13 shows the shelfing along with the entire system. Figure 13. Reconfigured Hydrogen Production Facility Because the system was designed for...POWERED HYDROGEN GENERATION SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINED RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION by Sen Feng Yu December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Garth V. Hobson Co

  9. The Role of Nuclear Power for Sustainable Development: Assessment of Nuclear Power's Contribution to National Economic Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Lee, M. K.; Ahn, S. K.

    2008-04-01

    The study begins with a short review of nuclear power development in Korea within the overall reference energy system. It then explores changing circumstances, present energy balances and ultimately the needs underpinning future electricity requirements. The major part of the study uses a model-based approach to analyze and quantify economic linkages between nuclear technologies and other economic sectors, and to assess various techno-economic futures that include nuclear generation for the Korean power sector, exploring for each future scenario the optimal electricity supply mix. The results of the analysis represents that the nuclear industry in the Republic of Korea has already made strong contributions to the growth of the country. It has been an integral part of the country's economic development, evolving from an import- to an export-oriented industry, providing spin-offs to Korean technological innovation as well as to socio-economic development such as infrastructure and education. Furthermore, the study provides some meaningful suggestions and recommendations in order to make sound decisions for sustainable energy policy and strategies, in particular for achieving a balance in nuclear power development and socio-economic development consistent with sustainable energy development goals. In general, these reflect the increasing national (public and private) participation in the nuclear industry. Specifically, the study identifies the nuclear relevant strategies in four dimensions: innovative nuclear technology development, nuclear human resource development and management (HRD and M), investment and financing of the nuclear technology and enhancement of institutional framework

  10. Space architecture for MoonVillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2017-10-01

    The concept of a multinational MoonVillage, as proposed by Jan Wörner of ESA, is analyzed with respect to diverse factors affecting its implementation feasibility: potential activities and scale as a function of location, technology, and purpose; potential participants and their roles; business models for growth and sustainability as compared to the ISS; and implications for the field of space architecture. Environmental and operations constraints that govern all types of MoonVillage are detailed. Findings include: 1) while technically feasible, a MoonVillage would be more distributed and complex a project than the ISS; 2) significant and distinctive opportunities exist for willing participants, at all evolutionary scales and degrees of commercialization; 3) the mixed-use space business park model is essential for growth and permanence; 4) growth depends on exporting lunar material products, and the rate and extent of growth depends on export customers including terrestrial industries; 5) industrial-scale operations are a precondition for lunar urbanism, which goal in turn dramatically drives technology requirements; but 6) industrial viability cannot be discerned until significant in situ operations occur; and therefore 7) government investment in lunar surface operations is a strictly enabling step. Because of the resources it could apply, the U.S. government holds the greatest leverage on growth, no matter who founds a MoonVillage. The interplanetary business to be built may because for engagement.

  11. Village registers for vital registration in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singogo, E; Kanike, E; van Lettow, M; Cataldo, F; Zachariah, R; Bissell, K; Harries, A D

    2013-08-01

    Paper-based village registers were introduced 5 years ago in Malawi as a tool to measure vital statistics of births and deaths at the population level. However, usage, completeness and accuracy of their content have never been formally evaluated. In Traditional Authority Mwambo, Zomba district, Malawi, we assessed 280 of the 325 village registers with respect to (i) characteristics of village headmen who used village registers, (ii) use and content of village registers, and (iii) whether village registers provided accurate information on births and deaths. All village headpersons used registers. There were 185 (66%) registers that were regarded as 95% completed, and according to the registers, there were 115 840 people living in the villages in the catchment area. In 2011, there were 1753 births recorded in village registers, while 6397 births were recorded in health centre registers in the same catchment area. For the same year, 199 deaths were recorded in village registers, giving crude death rates per 100 000 population of 189 for males and 153 for females. These could not be compared with death rates in health centre registers due to poor and inconsistent recording in these registers, but they were compared with death rates obtained from the 2010 Malawi Demographic Health Survey that reported 880 and 840 per 100 000 for males and females, respectively. In conclusion, this study shows that village registers are a potential source for vital statistics. However, considerable inputs are needed to improve accuracy of births and deaths, and there are no functional systems for the collation and analysis of data at the traditional authority level. Innovative ways to address these challenges are discussed, including the use of solar-powered electronic village registers and mobile phones, connected with each other and the health facilities and the District Commissioner's office through the cellular network and wireless coverage. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Strategic Role of Financial Institutions in Sustainable Development of Indian Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, V K

    2007-07-01

    Paper focuses on appraisal of Indian power sector, its achievements and inadequacies, measures and initiatives taken by Government of India (GOI) and blueprint for the development of power sector in next five years i.e. XI Plan (2007-2012); the role played by various Financial Institutions, Banks, Bilateral/Multilateral agencies etc. with focus on role of Power Finance Corporation (PFC) in development and financing of Indian Power sector and in Institutional development of State power utilities by facilitating in their reform and restructuring process and improving their financial health; role played by PFC in implementation of various policies and programmes of GOI; its competitive edge in Indian financial sector and growth strategies for enriching the stakeholders' value and acting as a significant partner in the development of power sector and growth of the nation. The paper provides information on capacity addition planned along with matching transmission and distribution system in the next five years to achieve GOI's 'Mission 2012: Power for All'; estimated funds required; funds that can be generated both in the form of Debt and Equity; the funding gap; proposed measures to meet overall funding requirement for sustainable development of the power sector. (auth)

  13. Strategic Role of Financial Institutions in Sustainable Development of Indian Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, V.K.

    2007-07-01

    Paper focuses on appraisal of Indian power sector, its achievements and inadequacies, measures and initiatives taken by Government of India (GOI) and blueprint for the development of power sector in next five years i.e. XI Plan (2007-2012); the role played by various Financial Institutions, Banks, Bilateral/Multilateral agencies etc. with focus on role of Power Finance Corporation (PFC) in development and financing of Indian Power sector and in Institutional development of State power utilities by facilitating in their reform and restructuring process and improving their financial health; role played by PFC in implementation of various policies and programmes of GOI; its competitive edge in Indian financial sector and growth strategies for enriching the stakeholders' value and acting as a significant partner in the development of power sector and growth of the nation. The paper provides information on capacity addition planned along with matching transmission and distribution system in the next five years to achieve GOI's 'Mission 2012: Power for All'; estimated funds required; funds that can be generated both in the form of Debt and Equity; the funding gap; proposed measures to meet overall funding requirement for sustainable development of the power sector. (auth)

  14. Sustaining the future: the role of nuclear power in meeting future world energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.; Sun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A description is given of recently informed analyses showing the potential that nuclear power has in meeting global energy demands. For both the electricity and transportation sectors, we can quantify the beneficial effects on the environment, and we show how nuclear power deserves credit for its role in assisting future world energy, environmental and economic sustainability. The continuing expansion of the world's and Asia's energy needs, coupled with the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and other emissions, will require new approaches for large scale energy production and use. This is particularly important for China and Asia with respect to meeting both the energy demand and sustainability challenges. We show and explore the role of nuclear power for large-scale energy applications, including electricity production and hydrogen for transportation. Advanced nuclear technologies, such as those like CANDU's next generation ACR, can meet future global energy market needs, avoid emissions, and mitigate the potential for global climate change. We use the latest IPCC Scenarios out to the year 2100 as a base case, but correct them to examine the sensitivity to large scale nuclear and hydrogen fuel penetration. We show a significant impact of nuclear energy on energy market penetration, and in reducing GHGs and other emissions in the coming century, particularly in the industrial developing world and in Asia. This is achieved without needing emissions credits, as are used or needed as economic support for other sources, or for subsidies via emissions trading schemes. Nuclear power offers the relatively emissions-free means, both to provide electricity for traditional applications and, by electrolytic production of hydrogen, to extend its use deep into the transportation sector. For the published IPCC Marker Scenarios for Asia we show the reduction in GHG emissions when electrolysis using electricity from nuclear power assists the introduction of hydrogen as a fuel

  15. Towards a Moon Village: Young Lunar Explorers Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard; Batenburg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The Moon Village Workshop at ESTEC on the 14th December 2015 was organized by ILEWG/ESTEC in conjunction with the Moon 2020-2030 Symposium. It gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. The workshop participants split in three working groups focusing on Moon Habitat Design, science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and engaging stakeholders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacu-um. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community

  16. An Investigation of Sustainable Power Generation from Oil Palm Biomass: A Case Study in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Aghamohammadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak is the largest state in Malaysia, with 22% of the nation's oil palm plantation area, making it the second largest contributor to palm biomass production. Despite the enormous amount of palm biomass in the state, the use of biomass as fuel for power generation remains low. This study is designed to investigate the sustainability of power generation from palm biomass specifically in Sarawak by conducting a survey among the palm oil mill developers. To conduct this investigation, several key sustainability factors were identified: the security of the biomass supply, the efficiency of conversion technology, the existing network system, challenges and future prospects for power generation from palm biomass. These factors were assessed through a set of questionnaires. The returned questionnaires were then analysed using statistical tools. The results of this study demonstrate that Sarawak has biomass in abundance, and that it is ready to be exploited for large scale power generation. The key challenge to achieving the renewable energy target is the inadequate grid infrastructure that inhibits palm oil developers from benefiting from the Feed-in-Tariff payment scheme. One way forward, a strategic partnership between government and industrial players, offers a promising outcome, depending on an economic feasibility study. The decentralization of electricity generation to support rural electrification is another feasible alternative for renewable energy development in the state.

  17. Promoting nuclear power, achieving sustainable development of nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, R.

    2006-01-01

    The past 5 decades witnessed the rapid growth of China's nuclear industry. The sustained and rapid economic growth and continuous improvement of people's living standards have placed higher requirements for energy and power supplies. As a safe and clean energy source, nuclear energy has been gradually and widely accepted by the Chinese government and the public. The Chinese government has adopted the policy a ctively pushing forward the nuclear power development , set up the target to reach 40GWe of nuclear power installed capacity by 2020, accounting for about 4% of the total installed capacity in China. In this regard, this paper presents the China's nuclear program to illustrate how China is going to achieve the target. The paper is composed of 3 parts. The first part gives a review of the achievements in nuclear power in the last 20 years. The second part presents China's ''three approach'' strategy for furthering the nuclear power development: carrying out duplication projects at the existing plant sites; introducing GUI technology via international bidding; developing the brand C NP1000 , i.e. Chinese Nuclear Power lOOOMwe class, with China's own intellectual property. This part also explores the ways of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power development. The third part concludes with CNNC's ''3221'' strategy which aims at building a world class conglomerate, and expresses its sincere wish to work with the nuclear community to push the nuclear industry worldwide by strengthening international cooperation

  18. Liberalising European electricity markets: opportunities and risks for a sustainable power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, M.

    2003-01-01

    The process of liberalising European electricity markets, encompassing a wide range of restructuring activities, has mainly been spurred by the attempt to increase the economic efficiency of the whole sector. This process might be used to trigger a development towards a sustainable power sector by increasing the use of renewable energy sources and enhancing energy efficiency on the supply and demand side. However, by taking a closer look at the current trends of the European electricity markets, it becomes obvious that the liberalisation not only implies opportunities but also risks for the creation of a sustainable power sector. Many of these risks are due to market distortions and imperfections caused by the delay in creating a fully functional single European market. Thus, in the short-term, the market liberalisation tends to constitute more risks than opportunities without government actions to prevent these risks. In the long run, though, the efficiency gains of the sector and the appearance of new market factors are likely to bring forth the opportunities of liberalisation and actively foster a transformation towards a sustainable electricity sector. (author)

  19. Supplier selection criteria for sustainable supply chain management in thermal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoz, Faisal; Narayan Biswal, Jitendra; Satapathy, Suchismita

    2018-02-01

    Supplies are always in great demand when it comes to industrial operations. The quality of raw material their price accompanied by sustainability and environmental effects are a major concern for industrial operators these days. Supply Chain Management is the subject which is focused on how the supply of different products is carried out. The motive is that each operation performed can be optimized and inherently the efficiency of the whole chain is integrated. In this paper we will be dealing with all the criteria that are required to be evaluated before selecting a supplier, in particular, focusing on Thermal Power Plant. The most suppliers of the thermal power plant are the coal suppliers. The quality of coal directly determines the efficiency of the whole plant. And when there are matters concerning coal environmental pollution plays a very crucial role. ANP method has been used here to select suppliers of thermal power sectors in Indian context. After applying ANP to prioritize the sustainable supplier selection criteria, it is found that for thermal power industries best suppliers are Nationalized/State owned suppliers then 2nd ranked suppliers are imported supplier. Private owned suppliers are ranked least. So private owned suppliers must be more concerned about their performance. Among these suppliers it is found that to compete in the global market privatized suppliers have to give more emphasize on most important criteria like sustainability, then fuel cost and quality. Still some sub-criteria like a clean program, environmental issues, quality, reliability, service rate, investment in high technology, green transportation channel, waste management etc needs for continuous improvement as per their priority.

  20. The power of the Brown v. Board of Education decision: theorizing threats to sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Michelle

    2004-09-01

    Interviews with African American and White American elders capture the immediate power of the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) decision and the biography of its impact over time. This article reviews the lived experience of the decision and theorizes 3 threats to sustainability that ruthlessly undermined the decision over time: (a) the unacknowledged and enormous sacrifice endured by the African American community in the name of desegregation; b) the violent and relentless resistance to the decision by government officials, educators, and many White community members; and (c) the dramatic shrinkage of the vision of Brown from the dismantling of White supremacy to a technical matter of busing. Implications are drawn for the study of desegregation and for the study of sustainability of social justice more broadly. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  1. The Facilitation of a Sustainable Power System: A Practice from Data-Driven Enhanced Boiler Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing penetration of renewable energy may bring significant challenges to a power system due to its inherent intermittency. To achieve a sustainable future for renewable energy, a conventional power plant is required to be able to change its power output rapidly for a grid balance purpose. However, the rapid power change may result in the boiler operating in a dangerous manner. To this end, this paper aims to improve boiler control performance via a data-driven control strategy, namely Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC. For practical implementation, a tuning method is developed for ADRC controller parameters to maximize its potential in controlling a boiler operating in different conditions. Based on a Monte Carlo simulation, a Probabilistic Robustness (PR index is subsequently formulated to represent the controller’s sensitivity to the varying conditions. The stability region of the ADRC controller is depicted to provide the search space in which the optimal group of parameters is searched for based on the PR index. Illustrative simulations are performed to verify the efficacy of the proposed method. Finally, the proposed method is experimentally applied to a boiler’s secondary air control system successfully. The results of the field application show that the proposed ADRC based on PR can ensure the expected control performance even though it works in a wider range of operating conditions. The field application depicts a promising future for the ADRC controller as an alternative solution in the power industry to integrate more renewable energy into the power grid.

  2. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  3. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Habitat Design group discussed principles and concepts for a minimum base that would start with 4-10 crew, allowing a later evolution to 50 crew and elements contributed by Moon Village partners at large. Various aspects were assessed including habitats, laboratories, EVAs, pressurized vehicles, core modules, inflatable extensions, power systems, life support systems and bioreactors, ISRU using regolith, emergency, services, medical, escape, shelters. The Science and Technology group analyzed the importance and readiness level of technologies needed for lunar robotic landers and for the Moon Village. The current ESA lunar exploration activities focus on the contribution within ISS operations barter of the ESA service module to bring Orion capsule to the Moon starting with an automatic demonstration in 2018. It is encouraged to consolidate this path for using the ser-vice module for crewed missions EM2 and EM3 giving also the possibility of an ESA astronaut, together with advanced technology, operations and science utilization. They noted the interesting contribution of instruments, drill, communications, and landing in support to Russian lunar polar lander missions Luna 27. The Engaging Stakeholders working group started by identifying the main stakeholders and groups that play a role or that could play a role towards the Moon Village project. These stakeholders were classified on their influence towards the programme, and their attitude towards it. One clear conclusion was that most of the stakeholders showed a positive view towards the Moon Village programme, and that the most important step within a short term strategy should focus on the actions to be taken to engage stakeholders for the next ESA Ministerial to support the programme. Finally the group came up with some recommendations on which should be the actions to be taken by the ESA DG to engage the most direct stakeholders: ESA delegations, media, national governments, citizens, taxpayers, and to invite partners

  4. Climate protection and reliability of supply. Development of a sustainable power supply concept; Klimaschutz und Versorgungssicherheit. Entwicklung einer nachhaltigen Stromversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus, Thomas; Loreck, Charlotte; Mueschen, Klaus

    2009-09-15

    Germany, like other states, committed itself to sustainable development in the Rio declaration of 1992. The boundary conditions for this are set by nature itself, whose laws must be respected if goals like reliability of supply and economic efficiency are to be achieved. This study of the Federal Environmental Office shows how sustainable power supply can be achieved. It is possible to combine climate protection, reliability of supply and economic efficiency, even without nuclear power and without constructing new conventional power plants that do not have the function of combined heat and power generation. (orig.)

  5. Key methods for sustaining quality engineering data in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, A [Canatom Ltd., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses key methods for sustaining quality engineering data, the fundamental principles that these methods are based on, and the methods for supporting the performance of nuclear power plants by the provision of quality engineering data at all times. The concept of an `engineering data foundation`, and a Configuration Management data model are developed. The concepts and methods for managing the integrity of engineering data across many different databases and document systems are developed, including the key concepts of data-positions and data-values, Master Data and Copy Data, and the concept of a `partnership between people and technology`. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  6. Key methods for sustaining quality engineering data in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses key methods for sustaining quality engineering data, the fundamental principles that these methods are based on, and the methods for supporting the performance of nuclear power plants by the provision of quality engineering data at all times. The concept of an 'engineering data foundation', and a Configuration Management data model are developed. The concepts and methods for managing the integrity of engineering data across many different databases and document systems are developed, including the key concepts of data-positions and data-values, Master Data and Copy Data, and the concept of a 'partnership between people and technology'. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  7. Improving the Environmental Sustainability of Flash Geothermal Power Plants—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Bruscoli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of geothermal energy production is analyzed with reference to a production plant located in a specific area (Monte Amiata, Italy. Four solutions combining a flash power plant with an Organic Rankine Cycle in a hybrid configuration are analyzed in terms of production of electricity, exergy balance and emissions level (CO2, H2S, Hg. The different solutions correspond to increasing environmental performance, and for the most advanced case achieve near-zero emissions (complete reinjection of the natural resource, including incondensable gases. The results show that this can be achieved at the price of a progressive reduction of electrical productivity.

  8. Tackling malaria, village by village: a report on a concerted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Can an information intervention facilitated by information technology and carried out by an interdisciplinary team comprising medical students, technical experts, and the community itself make a positive contribution in reducing the burden of malaria at the village level? In Mifumi village in Eastern Uganda, ...

  9. Analysis of the similarity factors of the villages in the areas of the nuclear power plants from the premature death-rate performed by fuzzy logic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letkovicova, M.; Rehak, R.; Korec, J.; Mihaly, B.; Prikazsky, V.

    1998-01-01

    results. So we claim that 20 years of operation of SE-EBO does not influence the health situation in its surrounding are that would be shown in premature death cases in any of the villages close by.(author)

  10. Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems – a perfect match for a sustainable society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frede Blaabjerg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The energy consumption is steadily increasing very rapid due to more people on the earth, betterliving conditions as well as we are trying to live in areas where the energy demand is high. Theeconomy growth in the last century has not been possible without low prize of energy which has beenachieved by fossil fuels. Looking into the future – the fossil fuel resources have a time limit – whichcan appear faster than expected – both because of the limited resources but also because the marketcan suddenly increase the prize. Therefore there is a demand to come up with sustainable energysolutions for energy production like wind turbines, hydro power as well as photovoltaics. At the sametime it is evident that by the use of new technology it is possible to make energy saving. In bothsituations power electronics are making this possible – we are using power electronics to interfacerenewable sources to maximize the energy yield from wind turbines and photovoltaics as well assmoothly integrate it to the grid. Also in many applications we use power electronics to interface a loadwith the grid and control the behavior of the electrical equipment according to the demand. In manycases power electronics is able to ensure a large amount of energy saving like in pumps, compressorsas well as in ventilation systems. Also the transportation gain a lot of using electricity instead of fossilfuel – clearly made possible due to the power electronics. Denmark is one of the societies which have been the frontier of implementing the renewabletechnology and has today covered more than 50 % of the electrical energy consumption by means ofrenewable and has as ambition to be fully independent on fossil fuels in 2050. Already in 2035 100 %of the electricity will be covered by renewables. At the same time the energy consumption has notreally increased for 20 years despite the GDP has grown by more than 60 % - much is enabled byenergy efficient technologies based on

  11. Water Power: The “Hydropower Discourse” of China in an Age of Environmental Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen-ching Bellette Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As the world searches for renewable energy in the face of climate change and China attempts to expand its power supply to further its economic development, hydroelectricity has moved to the top of the country’s energy agenda. This has given rise to a new form of  “hydropower discourse” in China. The discourse is underpinned by the ideas of environmental protection and sustainable development, which are widely perceived as unobjectionable in view of the current availability of resources. This article argues that the apparent ethical pursuit of renewable energy by building dams to generate electricity masks relations of dominance and helps to enable large energy companies, political leaders, and regional decision makers to pursue their interests against those who have limited or no access to the knowledge and capital employed in the development process. It will examine the ideological assumptions and institutional rootedness of hydropower discourse, and the power relations embedded in it.

  12. International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the conference are to: • Review developments in the global status of HRD since the 2010 international conference; • Emphasize the role of human resources and capacity building programmes at the national and organizational level for achieving safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programmes; • Discuss the importance of building competence in nuclear safety and security; • Provide a forum for information exchange on national, as well as international, policies and practices; • Share key elements and best practices related to the experience of Member States that are introducing, operating or expanding nuclear power programmes; • Highlight the practices and issues regarding HRD at the organizational and national level; • Highlight education and training programmes and practices; • Emphasize the role of nuclear knowledge management for knowledge transfer and HRD; and • Elaborate on the role and scope of various knowledge networks

  13. IN VOZDVIZHENSKOE VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetyrina Natalya Arkadevna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers civil engineering in retrospect. The paper presents the records of the two contracts that date back to 1837 and 1838. The contracts cover the two stages of construction of a famous church in Vozdvizhenskoe Village in the Moscow Province. These documents were stored in the Central Historic Archive, namely, in the collection of the town hall of Sergievskij Possad. These records of the two agreements in the collection of the brokers notes (or in other books of the same type are of particular value, as the majority of authentic contracts have been lost. One of the contracts covers the organizational procedure and pre-construction works, while the other one covers the construction of the church. The first document gives the idea of environmental protection, employment of ecological technologies, and safe disposal and recycling of human biowaste in the course of dismantling of an old structure in Vozdvizhenskoe village. The second document that dates back to 1838 covers the sequence of construction works, starting from the foundation and ending with the arches, the types of building materials used, and peculiarities of stone masonry. The information recorded in the contract includes the names of the counterparties, day-to-day mode of life of seasonal workers, remuneration of labour and procedures that assure the quality of construction. This agreement makes it possible to outline the construction process that includes workers, bricklayers, the foreman, the contractor, the architect, and the customer. On the whole, both documents help us outline and assess some of the building practices of the 19th century. This issue is relevant nowadays, as our society has entered the phase of the market economy, while the experience accumulated by the past generations is of undeniable value.

  14. Costs of reducing water use of concentrating solar power to sustainable levels: Scenarios for North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerau, Kerstin; Williges, Keith; Patt, Anthony G.; Gauche, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) has the potential to become a leading sustainable energy technology for the European electricity system. In order to reach a substantial share in the energy mix, European investment in CSP appears most profitable in North Africa, where solar potential is significantly higher than in southern Europe. As well as sufficient solar irradiance, however, the majority of today's CSP plants also require a considerable amount of water, primarily for cooling purposes. In this paper we examine water usage associated with CSP in North Africa, and the cost penalties associated with technologies that could reduce those needs. We inspect four representative sites to compare the ecological and economical drawbacks from conventional and alternative cooling systems, depending on the local environment, and including an outlook with climate change to the mid-century. Scaling our results up to a regional level indicates that the use of wet cooling technologies would likely be unsustainable. Dry cooling systems, as well as sourcing of alternative water supplies, would allow for sustainable operation. Their cost penalty would be minor compared to the variance in CSP costs due to different average solar irradiance values. - Highlights: → Scaling up CSP with wet cooling from ground water will be unsustainable in North Africa. → Desalination and alternative cooling systems can assure a sustainable water supply. → On large-scale, the cost penalties of alternative cooling technologies appear minor.

  15. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Development (Spanish Edition); Energia Nucleoelectrica y Desarrollo Sostenible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-15

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite supply of energy. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability. How can we meet these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations? Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all' option. It is a choice that has a place among the mix of solutions, and expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by energy security concerns, nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions, and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, it is important that the nuclear power option be kept open and accessible [Spanish] En cualquier analisis de las tendencias energeticas del siglo XXI hay que tomar en cuenta el desequilibrio energetico mundial. Aproximadamente 1 600 millones de persona aun no tienen acceso a servicios energeticos modernos, y pocos aspectos del desarrollo - ya se trate de los niveles de vida, la atencion sanitaria o la productividad industrial - pueden conseguirse sin el necesario suministro de energia. Si consideramos el siglo que tenemos por delante, vemos que el crecimiento de la demanda energetica sera sustancial y que una clave del progreso consistira en 'conectar a los que carecen de conexion'. Otro desafio sera la sostenibilidad. Como podemos satisfacer estas necesidades

  16. Powering Africa's sustainable development: The potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The electricity deficit is one of the most serious contemporary issues facing sub-Saharan Africa. Many countries in the region have insufficient generation capacity to meet rapidly rising demand. Electricity shortages have become a binding and powerful constraint on the continent's sustainable development. Their resolution will require coordinated effort to improve the effectiveness and governance of the region's utilities and to significantly scale-up generation capacity. A broad portfolio of low carbon (low-C) technologies needs to be deployed in order to address the electricity deficit in a cost-effective way and not be disruptive to economic growth. Since nuclear power can deliver low-C electricity in bulk, reliably and without intermittency, it could make a significant contribution towards resolving Africa's power crisis. However, the post-Fukushima safety concerns related to large nuclear plants with substantial radioactive inventories will be especially pronounced in Africa. Moreover, large scale reactors with huge upfront investment requirements are likely to be unsuitable for capital-constrained African countries with small electricity grids. One promising direction for nuclear development in Africa might be to downsize reactors from the gigawatt scale to less-complex smaller units (with substantially smaller radioactive inventory) that are more affordable. - Highlights: • We examine the potential role of nuclear power in Africa. • There is growing African interest in nuclear power. • Nuclear power in Africa will require grid strengthening. • Small modular reactors could enhance Africa's energy security. • There are concerns about Africa's safety culture for nuclear power

  17. Integrating environmental equity, energy and sustainability: A spatial-temporal study of electric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touche, George Earl

    The theoretical scope of this dissertation encompasses the ecological factors of equity and energy. Literature important to environmental justice and sustainability are reviewed, and a general integration of global concepts is delineated. The conceptual framework includes ecological integrity, quality human development, intra- and inter-generational equity and risk originating from human economic activity and modern energy production. The empirical focus of this study concentrates on environmental equity and electric power generation within the United States. Several designs are employed while using paired t-tests, independent t-tests, zero-order correlation coefficients and regression coefficients to test seven sets of hypotheses. Examinations are conducted at the census tract level within Texas and at the state level across the United States. At the community level within Texas, communities that host coal or natural gas utility power plants and corresponding comparison communities that do not host such power plants are tested for compositional differences. Comparisons are made both before and after the power plants began operating for purposes of assessing outcomes of the siting process and impacts of the power plants. Relationships between the compositions of the hosting communities and the risks and benefits originating from the observed power plants are also examined. At the statewide level across the United States, relationships between statewide composition variables and risks and benefits originating from statewide electric power generation are examined. Findings indicate the existence of some limited environmental inequities, but they do not indicate disparities that confirm the general thesis of environmental racism put forth by environmental justice advocates. Although environmental justice strategies that would utilize Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the disparate impact standard do not appear to be applicable, some findings suggest potential

  18. Village Dogs in Coastal Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, Eliza; Hebinck, P.G.M.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Village dogs are important for households in coastal Mexico, yet they are seen as out of place by etic stakeholders (public health and wildlife experts, and animal welfarists). Caregivers of village dogs are considered irresponsible, a view that is reinforced by Mexican policy. We describe two

  19. World Heritage Site Designation Impacts on a Historic Village: A Case Study on Residents’ Perceptions of Hahoe Village (Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonki Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between World Heritage Site (WHS designation and the community sustainability of a historic village, focusing on Hahoe Village, Korea, which was inscribed in 2010. It examines residents’ perceptions of increasing tourism at Hahoe Village by adopting a questionnaire and using an interview as research methods. This study examined both the positive and negative impacts that Hahoe Village’s WHS designation has had on its sustainability. Of all of the impacts examined in this research, the three most noteworthy issues are identified: (1 the acceleration of the change of the village’s industrial base and the influx of strangers; (2 the degradation of quality of life (in the physical aspects caused by increasing tourism; and (3 the collision predicated by the tension between conserving the village’s historic environments and developing tourism. In conclusion, the WHS designation impacts on Hahoe Village, which local residents perceived, have both positive and negative aspects. WHS designation needs to be accompanied by a management plan that is more concerned about the impact from tourism after the designation. In this context, Hahoe Village must not only have a comprehensive preservation plan that balances with the demand for tourism development, but also secure the village’s community sustainability as a living place other than a tourist destination.

  20. Optimizing long-term investments for a sustainable development of the ASEAN power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Matthias; Roger, Albert; Hamacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The electricity consumption in the ASEAN (Association of East Asian Nations) region is one of the fastest growing in the world and will lead to a dramatic increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the next decades. A decarbonization of the region's electricity supply is thus a very important measure when taking action on global climate change. This paper defines cost-optimal pathways towards a sustainable power system in the region by employing linear optimization. The proposed model simultaneously optimizes the required capacities and the hourly operation of generation, transmission, and storage. The obtained results show that all different kinds of renewable sources will have to be utilized, while none of them should have a share of more than one third. The findings give reason for setting up an ASEAN power grid, as it enables the transportation of electricity from the best sites to load centers and leads to a balancing of the fluctuations from wind and solar generation. We suggest fostering a diversified extension of renewables and to elaborate on political and technical solutions that enable the build up an transnational supergrid. - Highlights: • Article presents an optimization model of the ASEAN power system with high temporal and spatial resolution. • Cost-optimal investment options for achieving a sustainable electricity system are explored. • All types of renewable energies have to be employed while none of them should provide more than one third of overall supply. • Large transcontinental transmission grids will be crucial for a cost-minimal decarbonization of the ASEAN electricity sector

  1. MoonVillage: Frame & Opportunity for Space Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.

    2017-09-01

    We shall discuss the frame and opportunity for space economy in the context of elaborating the concept of a Moon Village with the goal of a sustainable human presence and activity on the lunar surface as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. This enterprise can federate all interested Nations and partners, in particular from terrestrial and non space commercial sectors .

  2. The influence of sand mining towards the sustainability of power support and capacity of Lambidaro River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniah, Restu; Rahmi, Hisni

    2017-11-01

    Activities of sand mining on the surface stream (river) conducted by Panji Mahakarya company potentially cause various environmental issues. These problems include the destruction of the river ecosystem, decreased the quality of river water quality, increased water pollution load, and another effect on capacity and power support river. The Lambidaro River is one of the rivers found in Palembang, where the inhabitants who live around it take advantage of the existence of this river to meet their daily needs such as bathing, washing, and latrines. The purpose of this research is to know the influence of mining activities towards sustainability of the power support and capacity of the river. The method used in this research is to compare the availability of water and water needs of the population in determining the status of environmental power support based on regulation of the state minister of the environment number 17 in 2009 about the determination of the power guidance support environment in spatial regions, as well as using the index method of pollution based on the decision of the State Minister of the environment number 115 in 2003 about the determination of the status of water quality guidelines with parameters measured are TDS, TSS, pH, DO, COD, dan BOD5. The results of the calculation of the power support river are deficit where SA (34,200,655.64 m3/year) < DA (253,105,600 m3/year). The result of pollution index calculation at 5 water sampling locations shows that the condition of a river is in good condition (uncontaminated) and mild pollutant.

  3. High-Efficiency Solar-Powered 3-D Printers for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jephias Gwamuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of the open source 3-D printer known as the RepRap (a self-Replicating Rapid prototyper resulted in the potential for distributed manufacturing of products for significantly lower costs than conventional manufacturing. This development, coupled with open source-appropriate technology (OSAT, has enabled the opportunity for 3-D printers to be used for sustainable development. In this context, OSAT provides the opportunity to modify and improve the physical designs of their printers and desired digitally-shared objects. However, these 3-D printers require electricity while more than a billion people still lack electricity. To enable the utilization of RepRaps in off-grid communities, solar photovoltaic (PV-powered mobile systems have been developed, but recent improvements in novel delta-style 3-D printer designs allows for reduced costs and improved performance. This study builds on these innovations to develop and experimentally validate a mobile solar-PV-powered delta 3-D printer system. It is designed to run the RepRap 3-D printer regardless of solar flux. The electrical system design is tested outdoors for operating conditions: (1 PV charging battery and running 3-D printer; (2 printing under low insolation; (3 battery powering the 3-D printer alone; (4 PV charging the battery only; and (5 battery fully charged with PV-powered 3-D printing. The results show the system performed as required under all conditions providing feasibility for adoption in off-grid rural communities. 3-D printers powered by affordable mobile PV solar systems have a great potential to reduce poverty through employment creation, as well as ensuring a constant supply of scarce products for isolated communities.

  4. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Simon Christopher

    Widespread access to renewable electricity is seen as a viable method to mitigate carbon emissions, although problematic are the issues associated with the integration of the generation systems within current power system configurations. Wind power plants are the primary large-scale renewable generation technology applied globally, but display considerable short-term supply variability that is difficult to predict. Power systems are currently not designed to operate under these conditions, and results in the need to increase operating reserve in order to guarantee stability. Often, operating conventional generation as reserve is both technically and economically inefficient, which can overshadow positive benefits associated with renewable energy exploitation. The purpose of this thesis is to introduce and assess an alternative method of enhancing power system operations through the control of electric loads. In particular, this thesis focuses on managing highly-distributed sustainable demand-side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles, and electrolyzers, as dispatchable short-term energy balancing resources. The main contribution of the thesis is an optimal control strategy capable of simultaneously balancing grid- and demand-side objectives. The viability of the load control strategy is assessed through model-based simulations that explicitly track end-use functionality of responsive devices within a power systems analysis typically implemented to observe the effects of integrated wind energy systems. Results indicate that there is great potential for the proposed method to displace the need for increased reserve capacity in systems considering a high penetration of wind energy, thereby allowing conventional generation to operate more efficiently and avoid the need for possible capacity expansions.

  5. Micro-hydrokinetic turbine potential for sustainable power generation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, M. B.; Kamaruddin, N. M.; Mohamed-Kassim, Z.

    2018-05-01

    Micro-hydrokinetic turbine (μ-HKT) technology is considered a viable option for sustainable, green and low cost power production. In recent years, there is growing number of research and development on this technology to replace conventional power production systems such as fossil fuel as well as to provide off-grid electrification to communities in remote areas. This paper provides an overview of μ-HKT system, the implementation of the technology and the potential of using μ-HKT in Malaysia. A review on the climate in Malaysia shows that its average annual rainfall is higher than the world’s average annual rainfall. It contributes to the total hydropower resource of about 29,000 MW which is available all year-round. Currently, hydropower resource contributes only 7.4% of the total electrical power production in Malaysia but is expected to increase with the main contribution coming from μ-HKT. However, the μ-HKT technology has not been adopted in Malaysia due to some challenges that hinder the development of the system. This paper reviews the μ-HKT technology and its potential for application in Malaysia, particularly in remote areas.

  6. Sustainable Solution for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Separation using Concentrated Solar Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Piyush; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Nath Mahendra, Som; Motahhir, Saad

    2017-08-01

    In today’s scenario to combat with climate change effects, there are a lot of reasons why we all should use renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels. Solar energy is one of the best options based on features like good for the environment, independent of electricity prices, underutilized land, grid security, sustainable growth, etc. This concept paper is oriented primarily focused on the use of Solar Energy for the crude oil heating purpose besides other many prospective industrial applications to reduce cost, carbon footprint and moving towards a sustainable and ecologically friendly Oil & Gas Industry. Concentrated Solar Power technology based prototype system is proposed to substitute the presently used system based on natural gas burning method. The hybrid system which utilizes the solar energy in the oil and gas industry would strengthen the overall field working conditions, safety measures and environmental ecology. 40% reduction on natural gas with this hybrid system is estimated. A positive implication for an environment, working conditions and safety precautions is the additive advantage. There could also decrease air venting of CO2, CH4 and N2O by an average of 30-35%.

  7. Assessment of the turkey’s electric power policies in terms of sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atis Selcuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, using statistical data published by the Turkish Electricity Transmission Company, analyzes key parameters such as installed capacity and energy demand growth rates, investment plans and emission rates, taking into consideration the expected increase in use through the year 2023. The results of the analyses were compared to relevant data from around the world. The weight of domestic - and especially renewable - resources in investment plans for the next 10 years was discussed. Recommendations for an investment plan to support sustainable development in Turkey are listed. Consequently, the lack of investment in domestic and renewable energy projects decreases the competitive power of Turkey vis-à-vis Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development countries in terms of many parameters. For a sustainable development, the country must make significant changes in its foreign-dependent energy production policies. Any future policies must encourage supplying local resources to meet the continuously increasing demand. Qualifications for incentive mechanisms applied to investments in renewable energy should be developed. The impact of the private sector on the installation of new plants must also be increased by quickly completing the privatization process.

  8. Assessment of Renewable Energy Sources & Municipal Solid Waste for Sustainable Power Generation in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderoju, Olaide M.; Dias, Guerner A.; Echakraoui, Zhour

    2017-12-01

    The demand for Energy in most Sub-Saharan African countries has become unimaginable despite its high potential of natural and renewable resources. The deficit has impeded the regions’ economic growth and sustainability. Nigeria as a nation is blessed with fossil fuels, abundant sunlight, hydro, wind and many among others, but the energy output to its population (185 million) still remains less than 4000MW. Currently, the clamour for an alternative but renewable energy source is the demand of the globe but it is quite expensive to achieve the yield that meets the Nigeria demand. Hence, this study aims at identifying and mapping out various regions with renewable energy potentials. The study also considers municipal solid waste as a consistent and available resource for power generation. Furthermore, this study examines the drawbacks inhibiting the inability to harness these renewable, energy generating potentials in full capacity. The study will enable the authorities and other stakeholders to invest and plan on providing a sustainable energy for the people.

  9. Local Power -- Global Connections: linking the world to a sustainable future through decentralized energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, Richard; Sweet, David

    2007-07-01

    Various international dynamics are converging to increase the attractiveness of decentralized energy as a complement to existing centralized energy infrastructures. Decentralized energy (DE) technologies, including onsite renewables, high efficiency cogeneration and industrial energy recycling, offer considerable benefits to those seeking working alternatives to emerging challenges in the energy sector. DE is ideally suited to provide clean affordable energy to areas where modern energy services are currently lacking. Having smaller generators close to where energy is required ensures a safe, reliable and secure energy supply when the energy is required. Furthermore, because DE is a much cleaner alternative than conventional central power plants and the energy provided comes at a much smaller price tag DE is an increasingly acceptable alternative both in the developed and developing world. DE is sure to play a key role in any plan to build a sustainable energy future. (auth)

  10. Energy supply and use in a rural West African village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Nathan G.; Bryden, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Over three billion people live in the rural areas of low- and middle-income countries. Often rural households have many unmet energy needs, including cooking, lighting, heating, transportation, and telecommunication. Designing solutions to meet these needs requires an understanding of the human, natural, and engineered systems that drive village energy dynamics. This paper presents the results of a novel study of energy supply and use over a one year period in an isolated rural village of 770 people in Mali. Quantitative data and narrative descriptions from this study portray village energy supply and use. Annual village energy use is 6000 MJ cap −1 yr −1 . Domestic energy needs account for 93% of village energy use. Wood is the primary energy source and provides 94% of the village energy supply. Approximately 98% of the wood is used for domestic consumption. The uses of wood in the home are cooking (52.2%), heating water (22.2%), space heating (19.1%), and other activities (6.5%). This paper also reports variations in energy usage over the period of a year for a broad range of domestic, artisan, transport, and public energy uses. -- Highlights: ► Village energy supply and use is driven by human, natural, and engineered systems. ► Village energy use varies by 250% between the hot and cold seasons. ► Domestic wood consumption accounts for 92% of village energy. ► Solar PV cells and batteries supply power to pumps, lights, and personal electronics. ► Every household uses multiple energy sources to meet basic needs.

  11. Determinants of the return to hometowns after the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: A case study for the village of Kawauchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orita, M.; Hayashida, N.; Urata, H.; Shinkawa, T.; Endo, Y.; Takamura, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011 destroyed the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) and almost all residents in a 20 km radius from the plant eventually evacuated. FNPP reactors were stabilised in December 2011; some evacuees decided to return to their hometowns, and the other evacuees remained. Efforts were made to identify the determinants that affect the decision to return home in order to promote recovery of the surrounding area of FNPP. Seventy one residents who had not returned to hometown and 56 residents who had returned were selected. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for confounding factors showed that being female [odds ratio (OR): 2.43, p=50.03], living in areas with relatively higher ambient doses (OR: 3.60, p=50.01) and expressing anxiety over radiation exposure (OR: 8.91, p < 0.01) were independently associated with decisions not to return. Results of this study suggest the importance of active participation by scientists and local authorities in communicating the risk to the general population involved in returning home. (authors)

  12. Possibilities and consequences of the Total Cumulative Exergy Loss method in improving the sustainability of power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stougie, Lydia; Kooi, Hedzer J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The TCExL method can be applied to all kinds of technological systems. • All exergy losses during the lifetime of a technological system are considered. • The results of the TCExL method are independent of time and weighting factors. • Applying the TCExL method can improve the sustainability of power generation. • The system with the lowest TCExL score is not always economically favourable. - Abstract: It is difficult to decide which power generation system is the most sustainable when environmental, economic and social sustainability aspects are taken into account. Problems with conventional environmental sustainability assessment methods are that no consensus exists about the applied models and weighting factors and that exergy losses are not considered. Economic sustainability assessment methods do not lead to results that are independent of time because they are influenced by market developments, while social sustainability assessment methods suffer from the availability and qualitative or semi-quantitative nature of data. Existing exergy analysis methods do not take into account all exergy losses and/or are extended with factors or equations that are not commonly accepted. The new Total Cumulative Exergy Loss (TCExL) method is based on fundamental thermodynamic equations and takes into account all exergy losses caused by a technological system during its life cycle, i.e. internal exergy losses, exergy losses caused by emission abatement and exergy losses related to land use. The development of the TCExL method is presented as well as the application of this method and environmental, economic and social sustainability assessment methods to two case studies: power generation in combination with LNG evaporation and Fossil versus renewable energy sources for power generation. According to the results of the assessments, large differences exist between the environmental sustainability assessment and TCExL methods in the sense that different

  13. A Systematical Framework of Schedule Risk Management for Power Grid Engineering Projects’ Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Rao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Schedule risks are the main threat for high efficiency of schedule management in power grid engineering projects (PGEP. This paper aims to build a systematical framework for schedule risk management, which consists of three dimensions, including the personnel dimension, method dimension and time dimension, namely supervisory personnel, management methods and the construction process, respectively. Responsibilities of staff with varied functions are discussed in the supervisory personnel part, and six stages and their corresponding 40 key works are ensured as the time dimension. Risk identification, analysis, evaluation and prevention together formed the method dimension. Based on this framework, 222 schedule risks occur in the whole process of PGEPs are identified via questionnaires and expert interviews. Then, the relationship among each risk is figured out based on the Interpretative Structure Model (ISM method and the impact of each risk is quantitatively assessed by establishing evaluation system. The actual practice of the proposed framework is verified through the analysis of the first stage of a PGEP. Finally, the results show that this framework of schedule risk management is meaningful for improving the efficiency of project management. It provides managers with a clearer procedure with which to conduct risk management, helps them to timely detect risks and prevent risks from occurring. It is also easy for managers to judge the influence level of each risk, so they can take actions based on the level of each risk’s severity. Overall, it is beneficial for power grid enterprises to achieve a sustainable management.

  14. Self-sustained photocatalytic power generation using eco-electrogenic engineered systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruva, Dileep Kumar; Chiranjeevi, P; Butti, Sai Kishore; Mohan, S Venkata

    2018-07-01

    An eco-electrogenic engineered system (EES) was designed to mimic the functional role of natural aquatic ecosystems and evaluated their response to bio-electrogenic activity by cascadically interlinking three tanks with functionally diverse biota viz., floating macrophytes (Tank 1), submerged plants (Tank 2) and filter feeders (fish and snails) (Tank 3). Tank 1 showed efficient power generation (voltage (series): 0.86 V; current density (parallel): 37 mA/m 2 ) than Tank 2 (voltage (series): 0.76 V; current density (parallel): 34 mA/m 2 ) and Tank 3 (voltage (series): 0.65 V; current density (parallel): 22 mA/m 2 ). Integrating all three tanks enabled maximum power generation in parallel-series (P-S) connection (9.5 mW/m 2 ) than individual series and parallel connections (6.5/5 mW/m 2 ). Interaction of microbes and plants studied at the interface of electrochemical and engineering aspects illustrated the feasibility of EES as a self-sustainable system with innate diverse functional aquatic biota and rhizo-microbiome to produce bioelectricity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental Disclosure of Electric Power Companies Listed in the Corporate Sustainability Index (CSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clésia Ana Gubiani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to verify the level of disclosure of environmental information in the administration reports of the energy companies listed in the Corporate Sustainability Index (CSI. A descriptive and quantitative research was done, using the content analysis technique on the administration reports from 2006 to 2008. The sample consisted of 11 electric power companies listed in the CSI. For quantitative analysis of the disclosure index, the data collection instrument was based on the study of Rover, Murcia and Borba (2008, which proposes eight environmental categories and 36 subcategories. For the whole analysis of the data were elaborated networks of the items disclosed in each company, using the software UNICET ®. The survey results showed that there is satisfactory disclosure in the categories of environmental policies and education, training and research environment. However, it was found that there is need for greater disclosure of categories of products impacts and processes in the environment, power polices and financial environmental information. It was concluded that the information disclosed in the administration reports of the companies surveyed about the environmental information do not respect the principle of full disclosure.

  16. Nuclear power in Canada : an examination of risks, impacts and sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, M.; Jamison, A.; Wong, R.; Czajkowski, P.

    2006-12-01

    This study examines the environmental impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Canada through each of the four major stages of nuclear energy production: uranium mining and milling; uranium refining, conversion and fuel fabrication; nuclear power plant operation; and waste fuel management. It is intended to inform public debate over the future role of nuclear energy in Canada, and to facilitate comparisons of nuclear energy with other potential energy sources. The study examines waste generation, atmospheric releases, impacts on water quality and water use, and landscape and ecosystem impacts of nuclear energy production. It also examines the occupational and community health impacts of nuclear power and key long-term challenges to its sustainability, including security and weapons proliferation risks. Specific environmental impacts are examined in the context of CANDU nuclear technology, the only reactor type currently in use in Canada. The study findings likely underestimate the overall impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity production in Canada. This is a result of significant gaps in the publicly available information on releases of pollutants and contaminants, as well as on the fate of certain waste streams related to the nuclear industry. In addition, the study relies on what are likely conservative estimates in a number of key areas, particularly with respect to the generation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

  17. Nuclear power in Canada : an examination of risks, impacts and sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, M.; Jamison, A.; Wong, R.; Czajkowski, P.

    2006-12-15

    This study examines the environmental impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Canada through each of the four major stages of nuclear energy production: uranium mining and milling; uranium refining, conversion and fuel fabrication; nuclear power plant operation; and waste fuel management. It is intended to inform public debate over the future role of nuclear energy in Canada, and to facilitate comparisons of nuclear energy with other potential energy sources. The study examines waste generation, atmospheric releases, impacts on water quality and water use, and landscape and ecosystem impacts of nuclear energy production. It also examines the occupational and community health impacts of nuclear power and key long-term challenges to its sustainability, including security and weapons proliferation risks. Specific environmental impacts are examined in the context of CANDU nuclear technology, the only reactor type currently in use in Canada. The study findings likely underestimate the overall impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity production in Canada. This is a result of significant gaps in the publicly available information on releases of pollutants and contaminants, as well as on the fate of certain waste streams related to the nuclear industry. In addition, the study relies on what are likely conservative estimates in a number of key areas, particularly with respect to the generation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

  18. Sustainable development - a role for nuclear power? 2nd scientific forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    The 2nd Scientific Forum of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was held during the 43rd General Conference. This paper summarizes the deliberations of the two-day Forum. The definition of 'sustainable development' of the 1987 Bruntland Commission - 'development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs' - provided the background for the Forum's debate whether and how nuclear power could contribute to sustainable energy development. The framework for this debate comprises different perspectives on economic, energy, environmental, and political considerations. Nuclear power, along with all energy generating systems, should be judged on these considerations using a common set of criteria (e.g., emission levels, economics, public safety, wastes, and risks). First and foremost, there is a growing political concern over the possible adverse impact of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion. However, there is debate as to whether this would have any material impact on the predominantly economic criteria currently used to make investment decisions on energy production. According to the views expressed, the level of safety of existing nuclear power plants is no longer a major concern - a view not yet fully shared by the general public. The need to maintain the highest standards of safety in operation remains, especially under the mounting pressure of competitiveness in deregulated and liberalized energy markets. The industry must continuously reinforce a strong safety culture among reactor designers, builders, and operators. Furthermore, a convincing case for safety will have to be made for any new reactor designs. Of greater concern to the public and politicians are the issues of radioactive waste and proliferation of nuclear weapons. There is a consensus among technical experts that radioactive wastes from nuclear power can be disposed of safely and

  19. Wind power projects in the CDM: Methodologies and tools for baselines, carbon financing and sustainability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringius, L.; Grohnheit, P.E.; Nielsen, L.H.; Olivier, A.L.; Painuly, J.; Villavicencio, A.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended to be a guidance document for project developers, investors, lenders, and CDM host countries involved in wind power projects in the CDM. The report explores in particular those issues that are important in CDM project assessment and development - that is, baseline development, carbon financing, and environmental sustainability. It does not deal in detail with those issues that are routinely covered in a standard wind power project assessment. The report tests, compares, and recommends methodologies for and approaches to baseline development. To present the application and implications of the various methodologies and approaches in a concrete context, Africa's largest wind farm-namely the 60 MW wind farm located in Zafarana, Egypt- is examined as a hypothetical CDM wind power project The report shows that for the present case example there is a difference of about 25% between the lowest (0.5496 tCO2/MWh) and the highest emission rate (0.6868 tCO 2 /MWh) estimated in accordance with these three standardized approaches to baseline development according to the Marrakesh Accord. This difference in emission factors comes about partly as a result of including hydroelectric power in the baseline scenario. Hydroelectric resources constitute around 21% of the generation capacity in Egypt, and, if excluding hydropower, the difference between the lowest and the highest baseline is reduced to 18%. Furthermore, since the two variations of the 'historical' baseline option examined result in the highest and the lowest baselines, by disregarding this baseline option altogether the difference between the lowest and the highest is reduced to 16%. The ES3-model, which the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory has developed, makes it possible for this report to explore the project-specific approach to baseline development in some detail. Based on quite disaggregated data on the Egyptian electricity system, including the wind power production

  20. Sustainability for power generation exemplarily shown by regenerative energy systems. Final report; Nachhaltigkeit am Beispiel regenerativer Energiesysteme zur Stromerzeugung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, T.J.; Wagner, H.J.

    2005-07-01

    Since the energy sector plays a key role in the concept of sustainable development, aspects of sustainability should be addressed within the scope of technology assessments. This applies particularly to new energy systems and new technological solutions. To evaluate sustainability, indicators are needed. A system of indicators was designed within a research project carried out by the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics of the Ruhr-University Bochum. At first, the Brundtland-Definition for sustainable development was put in terms for energy conversion systems. Secondly, indicators were selected. For this purpose, a standardized procedure was developed that allows quantified multi criteria analysis. Overall objective was to cover all significant issues of sustainability by a minimum number of indicators. Seven appropriate indicators were identified: cumulated energy demand, power production costs, demand of air, water and area, as well as two new developed indicators to describe risks related to the security of energy supply, and employment effects. To prove the applicability of the indicator system, sample calculations were made for several solar and wind energy systems as well as for a natural gas fired power plant. Beside these examples, the indicator set in principle is applicable to any other technological pathway. It enables comparisons between conventional power generation technologies and innovative (renewable) energy systems. (orig.)

  1. Sustainability performance for Brazilian electricity power industry: An assessment integrating social, economic and environmental issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, S.; Witjes, S.; Campos, L.M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The increased pressure on companies to address sustainability issues has resulted in the development of several voluntary corporate sustainability integration approaches. The array of existing approaches is large and overwhelming, resulting in companies not understanding what corporate

  2. 'Powering up' a green Saskatchewan: exploring possible sustainable solutions for Saskatchewan's electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.; Faubert, I.; Steele, K.; Wohrizek, J.; Donev, J.

    2013-01-01

    The electrical market in Saskatchewan is embarking on an exciting journey to both increase its generating capacity and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to promote a more sustainable future. SaskPower is the centralized generation and transmission crown corporation for the province and has the ability to implement the necessary actions to create a sustainable electrical system. There are many paths that Saskatchewan can take for a more sustainable future. Currently, the future of Saskatchewan's electrical market depends on results from the Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Plant. This project proposes electrical capacity models for SaskPower in the event their current CCS project is not a feasible option. (author)

  3. Aeroacoustic power generated by a compact axisymmetric cavity: Prediction of self-sustained osciallation and influence of depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakiboglu, G.; Manders, H.B.M.; Hirschberg, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Aeroacoustic power generation due to a self-sustained oscillation by an axisymmetric compact cavity exposed to a low-Mach-number grazing flow is studied both experimentally and numerically. The feedback effect is produced by the velocity fluctuations resulting from a coupling with acoustic standing

  4. Planning renewable energy in electric power system for sustainable development under uncertainty – A case study of Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, S.; Huang, Charley Z.; Huang, G.H.; Li, Y.P.; Chen, J.P.; Fan, Y.R.; Cheng, G.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Interval type-2 fuzzy fractional programming is developed to optimize ratio problem. • It is advantageous in reflecting conflicting objectives and complex uncertainties. • Uncertainties existed as interval numbers and type-2 fuzzy intervals are quantified. • Results reveal that share of renewable power generation in gross supply increase. • Alternative to manage mixed energy system with sustainable development is suggested. - Abstract: An interval type-2 fuzzy fractional programming (IT2FFP) method is developed for planning the renewable energy in electric power system for supporting sustainable development under uncertainty. IT2FFP can tackle output/input ratio problems where complex uncertainties are expressed as type-2 fuzzy intervals (T2FI) with uncertain membership functions. The IT2FFP method is then applied to planning Beijing electric power system, where issues of renewable energy utilization, electricity supply security, and pollutant/greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation are incorporated within the modeling formulation. The obtained results suggest that the coal-fired power would continue to decrease and the share of renewable energy in gross electricity supply would maintain an increasing trend. Results also reveal that imported electricity plays a significant role in the city’s energy supply. A number of decision alternatives are also analyzed based on the interval solutions as well as the projected applicable conditions, which represent multiple options with sustainable and economic considerations. The optimal alternative that can give rise to the desirable sustainable option under the maximization of the share of renewable power generation has been suggested. The findings can help decision makers identify desired alternatives for managing such a mixed energy system in association with sustainable development. Compared with the conventional optimization methods that optimize single criterion, it is proved that IT2FFP is

  5. Sustainability from the Occurrence of Critical Dynamic Power System Blackout Determined by Using the Stochastic Event Tree Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Murtadha Othman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of advanced technology in smart grid, the implementation of renewable energy in a stressed and complicated power system operation, aggravated by a competitive electricity market and critical system contingencies, this will inflict higher probabilities of the occurrence of a severe dynamic power system blackout. This paper presents the proposed stochastic event tree technique used to assess the sustainability against the occurrence of dynamic power system blackout emanating from implication of critical system contingencies such as the rapid increase in total loading condition and sensitive initial transmission line tripping. An extensive analysis of dynamic power system blackout has been carried out in a case study of the following power systems: IEEE RTS-79 and IEEE RTS-96. The findings have shown that the total loading conditions and sensitive transmission lines need to be given full attention by the utility to prevent the occurrence of dynamic power system blackout.

  6. Developing Sustainable Organizations for New Nuclear Power Countries through Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, R.; Kovacic, D.; Einwechter, M.; Reed, J.; Therios, I.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Countries with emerging nuclear power programmes face unique challenges with respect to building competent and sustainable organizations. By nature, such organizations are dynamic and evolving, energetic, and feel a sense of mission. They are also typically preoccupied with near and mid-term objectives, may be resource–constrained, can incur high staff turnover rate, and encounter difficulties in obtaining experienced, qualified personnel. Such conditions can make it difficult to think about, much less implement, a knowledge management (KM)-based culture. The result can be missed opportunities if a KM system is not in place to collect institutional knowledge leveraged to advance the organization’s mission. Nevertheless, knowledge is perishable, and the best time to capture it is as it is being created, not at the end of a career. This paper explores some of the resource–efficient methods for knowledge capture applicable to programs/organizations early in their formation and which might be constrained in some way from instituting larger KM initiatives. The emphasis is on tools, techniques, and methods that integrate well with the day-to-day processes of the organization, reduce single points of failure, and transfer/preserve knowledge early in the lifecycle. (author

  7. The hydrogen economy for a sustainable future and the potential contribution of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hydrogen Economy encompasses the production of hydrogen using a wide range of energy sources, its storage and distribution as an economic and universal energy carrier, and its end use by industry and individuals with negligible emission of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier not a primary energy source, just like electricity is an energy carrier. The advantages of hydrogen as a means of storage and distribution of energy, and the methods of production of hydrogen, are reviewed. Energy sources for hydrogen production include fossil fuels, renewables, hydropower and nuclear power. Hydrogen has many applications in industry, for residential use and for transport by air, land and sea. Fuel cells are showing great promise for conversion of hydrogen into electricity and their development and current status are discussed. Non-energy uses of hydrogen and the safety aspects of hydrogen are also considered. It is concluded that the Hydrogen Economy, especially if coupled to renewable and nuclear energy sources, is a technically viable and economic way of achieving greater energy diversity and security and a sustainable future in this century

  8. The greenhouse index of sustainable development for metallurgical processes of production in aspect of green power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisienko Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accounting of greenhouse gases (GHG according to plans of the Russian Federation becomes obligatory since 2016 for the enterprises with issue of GHG not less than 150 thousand tons of CO2, since 2017 – from 50 thousand tons of CO2. Introduction of a carbon tax (15 dollars/t of CO2 is planned. Voluntary inventory of GHG of the enterprises and territories which in the long term apply is carried out to be called clever. According to University of Cambridge (USA about 45% depreciation of joint-stock portfolios in the world markets, the expected climate change connected with are expected. Parameter for an assessment of the clever city with the developed metallurgy and need of decrease in greenhouse emissions in the atmosphere – the indicator of a sustainable development considering emission of carbon dioxide, prime cost of steel and its power consumption is offered. Its values for tandems blast furnace (BF + oxygen converter (OC, BF, Corex, Romelt, Midrex, Hyl-3 everyone with arc furnace (AF are defined.

  9. Viet Nam - Nuclear power for GHG mitigation and sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Doan Phac; Nguyen Tien Nguyen; Le Van Hong; Nguyen Huu Thanh; Nguyen Anh Tuan

    2000-01-01

    The Government of Viet Nam has recently formulated a national energy programme entitled Strategy and Policy of Sustainable Energy Development. Its aim is to define a development policy for the country for the period from 2000 to 2020. The main objectives of the national energy programme are: 1. Increasing energy efficiency and demand side management (DSM) 2. Expanding rural electrification 3. Defining an energy price policy (e.g. pricing such that revenues cover costs) 4. Minimizing environmental impacts 5. Encouraging private investment in the energy and electricity sectors 6. Energy supply security 7. Diversifying energy sources, and 8. Exploring the potential role of nuclear power in Viet Nam. In formulating this programme, one of the objectives has been to minimize environmental impacts, including those caused by the electricity sector. Nevertheless, the shortage of investment capital in Viet Nam and the difficulty of securing favourable financial arrangements are crucial obstacles to the introduction of new technology options to mitigate GHG emissions. Viet Nam views CDM as an opportunity to find ways to overcome such problems and expects that all GHG mitigating technologies will be considered equally under the CDM

  10. Sustainable Modular Adaptive Redundancy Technique Emphasizing Partial Reconfiguration for Reduced Power Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Al-Haddad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As reconfigurable devices' capacities and the complexity of applications that use them increase, the need for self-reliance of deployed systems becomes increasingly prominent. Organic computing paradigms have been proposed for fault-tolerant systems because they promote behaviors that allow complex digital systems to adapt and survive in demanding environments. In this paper, we develop a sustainable modular adaptive redundancy technique (SMART composed of a two-layered organic system. The hardware layer is implemented on a Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA to provide self-repair using a novel approach called reconfigurable adaptive redundancy system (RARS. The software layer supervises the organic activities on the FPGA and extends the self-healing capabilities through application-independent, intrinsic, and evolutionary repair techniques that leverage the benefits of dynamic partial reconfiguration (PR. SMART was evaluated using a Sobel edge-detection application and was shown to tolerate stressful sequences of injected transient and permanent faults while reducing dynamic power consumption by 30% compared to conventional triple modular redundancy (TMR techniques, with nominal impact on the fault-tolerance capabilities. Moreover, PR is employed to keep the system on line while under repair and also to reduce repair time. Experiments have shown a 27.48% decrease in repair time when PR is employed compared to the full bitstream configuration case.

  11. State Democratic Rights as Current Political Power Limit and a New Culture for Social Promotion of Development and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Rejane Liczbinski Sarreta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed study relates to the democracy and political power considering the implementation of sustainability. Presented as theoretical basis the democratic principle itself, as well as the realization of human and fundamental rights. Exploring the possibility of re (construction of the state and own power and political and social culture of democracy through the promotion of development and sustainability. In a democratic state the appropriate political power embodies the rights of the citizen. A key element that should be considered is education for training social actors capable of promoting the transformation of dominant practices and that take important roles in politics and influence the state and society. The method used is deductive.

  12. A Rhetorical Analysis of Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Pynt

    2011-01-01

    The award-winning TV spot Village is a creative example of NGO advertising using condensed visual stprytelling. The spot is analysed using rhetorical concepts and communication theory, and potential effects are discused in relation to contexts, strategy and communication ethics....

  13. A self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment system using solar-bio-hybrid power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Liao, Wei

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on system analysis of a self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment concept combining solar technologies, anaerobic digestion, and aerobic treatment to reclaim water. A solar bio-hybrid power generation unit was adopted to power the wastewater treatment. Concentrated solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) were combined with biogas energy from anaerobic digestion. Biogas is also used to store the extra energy generated by the hybrid power unit and ensure stable and continuous wastewater treatment. It was determined from the energy balance analysis that the PV-bio hybrid power unit is the preferred energy unit to realize the self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment. With short-term solar energy storage, the PV-bio-hybrid power unit in Phoenix, AZ requires solar collection area (4032m 2 ) and biogas storage (35m 3 ), while the same unit in Lansing, MI needs bigger solar collection area and biogas storage (5821m 2 and 105m 3 , respectively) due to the cold climate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

    2008-12-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure

  15. Sustainability Assessment of Coal-Fired Power Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Butner, R. Scott; Elliott, Michael L.; Freeman, Charles J.

    2011-11-30

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has the ability to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power production. Most studies find the potential for 70 to 80 percent reductions in CO2 emissions on a life-cycle basis, depending on the technology. Because of this potential, utilities and policymakers are considering the wide-spread implementation of CCS technology on new and existing coal plants to dramatically curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the power generation sector. However, the implementation of CCS systems will have many other social, economic, and environmental impacts beyond curbing GHG emissions that must be considered to achieve sustainable energy generation. For example, emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and particulate matter (PM) are also important environmental concerns for coal-fired power plants. For example, several studies have shown that eutrophication is expected to double and acidification would increase due to increases in NOx emissions for a coal plant with CCS provided by monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing. Potential for human health risks is also expected to increase due to increased heavy metals in water from increased coal mining and MEA hazardous waste, although there is currently not enough information to relate this potential to actual realized health impacts. In addition to environmental and human health impacts, supply chain impacts and other social, economic, or strategic impacts will be important to consider. A thorough review of the literature for life-cycle analyses of power generation processes using CCS technology via the MEA absorption process, and other energy generation technologies as applicable, yielded large variability in methods and core metrics. Nonetheless, a few key areas of impact for CCS were developed from the studies that we reviewed. These are: the impact of MEA generation on increased eutrophication and acidification from ammonia emissions and increased toxicity

  16. The Power of Urban Planning on Environmental Sustainability: A Focus Group Study in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva-Sofia Säynäjoki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable communities are promoted as a desirable policy goal and, in particular, local authorities are encouraged to contribute to climate change mitigation through urban planning. Furthermore, recent research takes a broad perspective on the environmental sustainability of urban areas and considers the environmental impact of all consumption. A focus group study was conducted in Finland for the purpose of examining how increased environmental awareness influences urban land use. The 32 participants of three focus groups were professionals of urban planning and environmental sustainability, at both a municipal and a state level. The main finding was that urban planning is viewed as being unable to support environmental sustainability in the broader sense. In general, the participants did not see a connection between urban structure and sustainable lifestyles and only the influence of planning on housing and daily journeys was recognised. Three main reasons for this were identified. Firstly, environmental sustainability in its broader definition is seen as too complex for urban planners to influence alone. Secondly, the dominance of short-term economic issues in decision-making and the lack of co-operation from other stakeholders to achieve environmental aims demotivate land use planners. Thirdly, the prioritisation of urban density may overrule alternative means of promoting environmental sustainability, such as the encouragement of sustainable suburban or non-urban lifestyles.

  17. Tin Zaouatine: A full solar energy village in the Algerian Sahara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, S.; Yaici, B.

    1991-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) electrification of the title village is part of a wide solar energy program sponsored by the Algerian government. A description is given of the realization of phase 1 of the project, achieved in February 1990. Phase 1 covers 80% of the energy demand of the village and comprises 8 PV installations (AC power), 10 small PV installations (kits-DC power), and 2 PV pumping systems (DC power) for drinking water only. After a brief description of the village attention is paid to the design approach, the social aspects, the problems encountered, the experiments gained and some initial results. 1 fig., 1 tab., 2 refs

  18. Village in the Jungle: The Eighth Annual Doireann MacDermott Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baden Offord

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a slightly edited version of a keynote lecture, delivered at the Aula Magna of the University of Barcelona as The Eighth Annual Doireann MacDermott Lecture, organized by the university’s Australian Studies Centre in December 2007. Offord’s essay takes us from Leonard Woolf’s creative and ethical intervention in Britain’s colonial project, forged through a transformative vision of the ‘spirit of place’ in his novel The Village in the Jungle (1931, to the Australian specifics of colonialism and its aftermath. Highly critical of the dominant power structures in Australian society that keep sustaining the Enlightenment discourse of an unfinished colonial project, Offord delineates alternative strategies so as to deal with identity and belonging, arguing for a notion/nation of ‘cultural citizenship’, no longer based on exclusions.

  19. The IAEA, nuclear power and sustainable development. Maintaining and increasing the overall assets available to future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of one of the fundamental objectives of the IAEA mandate to enhance the contribution of nuclear technologies towards meeting the needs of Member States, the present status, all the aspects, and the future of nuclear power are reviewed. The development of nuclear power broadens the natural resource base usable for energy production, increases human and man-made capital, and when safely handled has little impact on ecosystems. This means that it could meet the central goal of sustainable development, considering that it covers maintaining or increasing the overall assets available to future generations, while minimizing consumption of finite resources and not exceeding the carrying capacities of ecosystems

  20. Conflicts when liberalising network industries: towards a sustainable development of the European power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, N.; Madlener, R.

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of the changes in the industrial organisation of the (European) electricity supply industry pull in different directions. Pairs of largely antithetic issues in the transition towards a more liberalised electricity supply industry include: competition vs monopoly; efficiency vs equity and/or public service considerations; short-term vs long-term policy goals; slow vs rapid transition to a more competition-oriented industry structure; permanent vs temporary regulation; light-handed vs heavy-handed regulation; centralised vs decentralised regulation; and public vs private ownership. Because of the increasing recognition of the importance of sustainability, this paper aims to shed some light on the various impacts of electricity sector reform on sustainable development and, in turn, on how sustainable development policies tend to affect the electricity sector. We find that for a transition towards a more sustainable development in the electricity sector it is crucial that increased energy production and use does not outweigh the (efficiency, equity, social, environmental, etc.) gains that are, or have been, achieved towards sustainable development. In this respect an internalisation of external costs, which includes the abolition of subsidies for non-sustainable energy carriers ('first-best solution'), or an explicit accounting of the benefits offered by renewable and efficiency technologies ('second-best solution'), plus rigorous energy saving and energy efficiency promotion measures, are paramount on the path towards sustainability. (author)

  1. Village microgrids: The Chile project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a village application in Chile. The objective was to demonstrate the technical, economic and institutional viability of renewable energy for rural electrification, as well as to allow local partners to gain experience with hybrid/renewable technology, resource assessment, system siting and operation. A micro-grid system is viewed as a small village system, up to 1200 kWh/day load with a 50 kW peak load. It can consist of components of wind, photovoltaic, batteries, and conventional generators. It is usually associated with a single generator source, and uses batteries to cover light day time loads. This paper looks at the experiences learned from this project with regard to all of the facets of planning and installing this project.

  2. Entrepreneurship in tourism on the example of good practice: Ethno villages Latkovac in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has become a generator of economic development in many countries of the world. Serbia is becoming increasingly requested destination on the tourist map of Europe. The aim of this paper is to show on the example of a good business practice - Ethno village Latkovac, that entrepreneurship in tourism Serbia should be based on the concept of economic, sociological and social sustainable development with achieving the full satisfaction of the consumers - tourists. The subject of the paper is original and diverse content offers as an example of creative entrepreneurship that has helped to accelerate the development of the local villages. Method of the work - Case Study 'Ethno Village Latkovac'.

  3. Market Segmentation: An Application to the Schist Village Tourism Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Martinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The Schist Village network is a sustainable development project in Portugal’s Pinhal Interior region that includes 27 villages located in the central inland area of the country. Overall, this study sets out evidence about the motivations, interests, behaviors, and images of visitors/tourists (tourism consumers regarding the Schist Villages in the area. Design/Methodology/Approach – The sample of individuals interviewed includes a total of 223 individuals (59 international and 164 national tourists, all of whom personally answered the questionnaire. Findings and implications – Through analysis of the survey results obtained, it is possible to chart a profile of Schist Village visitors/tourists, ascertain their preferences and the key attributes associated with the image of this tourist destination and, based on these, put forward strongly focused orientations and guidelines to help develop future marketing plans for this territory. Limitations – One limitation stems from how the data was gathered and analyzed constitutes but a mere “moment” in a fairly vast and dynamic universe given that the questionnaires were completed across a defined and fairly brief period of time. The fact that the questionnaires were handed out by network partners effectively excluded from the study all those tourism consumers who travel and visit the territory without any direct recourse to the services of the aforementioned partners. Originality – This study presents an easy and clear way to segment the market that could be used by several stakeholders in order to improve their targeting activities.

  4. Optimal allocation of energy sources for sustainable development in South Korea: Focus on the electric power generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joongha; Woo, JongRoul; Lee, Jongsu

    2015-01-01

    National energy planning has become increasingly complex owing to a pressing need to incorporate sustainability considerations. In this context, we applied least-cost and cost-risk optimization models to allocate energy sources for sustainable development in the Korean electric power generation industry. The least-cost model determined an electricity generation mix from 2012 to 2030 that incurs minimum generation cost to meet electricity demand. The cost-risk model determined electricity generation mixes in 2030 considering the risks associated with each energy source in order to lessen external risks. In deriving these optimal electricity generation mixes, we considered both conventional and renewable energy sources in conjunction with physical and policy constraints that realistically reflect Korean circumstances. Moreover, we accounted for CO 2 and external costs within the electricity generation costs for each energy source. For sustainable development in Korea, we conclude that a portion of the coal and gas in the electricity generation mix must be substituted with nuclear and renewable energy. Furthermore, we found that least-cost allocation is sub-optimal from cost-risk perspective and that it limits the adoption of renewables. Finally, we also discuss the implications of decisions taken by the Korean government regarding the electricity generation mix for next-generation energy planning to achieve sustainability. - Highlights: • Optimal least-cost/cost-risk energy mix for sustainable development in Korea. • We account for CO 2 and external costs of generation from each energy source. • Externalities and physical/policy constraints in Korea produce realistic energy mix. • Nuclear and renewables should replace coal and gas for sustainability in Korea. • Least-cost approach limits uptake of renewables and produces high-risk energy mix

  5. Generating power at high efficiency combined cycle technology for sustainable energy production

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffs, E

    2008-01-01

    Combined cycle technology is used to generate power at one of the highest levels of efficiency of conventional power plants. It does this through primary generation from a gas turbine coupled with secondary generation from a steam turbine powered by primary exhaust heat. Generating power at high efficiency thoroughly charts the development and implementation of this technology in power plants and looks to the future of the technology, noting the advantages of the most important technical features - including gas turbines, steam generator, combined heat and power and integrated gasification com

  6. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in the Energy Sector: A Perspective from a Brazilian Power Utility Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira Brasil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The key question in this article consists of identifying the conditions under which the social projects developed by the firm Alpha are really promoting the sustainable development in the state of Ceará, located in Northeast Brazil. The general goal is to discuss if the firm’s social projects are related to the sustainable corporate entrepreneurship (SCE. This paper intends to stimulate the scientific community to advance knowledge on entrepreneurial, innovation and sustainability. This case study focuses on four Alpha’s projects: Ecological Initiative, Efficient Exchange, Social Energy, and School of Efficient Paths. The thematic content’s analysis methodology was used in this article. The documental research served as primary data source and helped to better elucidate the studied object. The researcher obtained 12 questionnaires answered. It was found an agreement of respondents to the categories: values, transparency and governance, workforce, environment, suppliers, consumers and customers and community. For the theme government and society, the results showed a disagreement with the category and for the last theme, innovation, the respondents are indifferent. After lexical analysis of data the results confirm in accordance with state of art of literature the existence of triple bottom line in the social projects of Alpha, by the categories resulted (profit, planet, people from content’s analysis of open questions. Alpha is a strong example of social commitment with poverty and environment. In conclusion, the research confirms that the firm promotes sustainable entrepreneurship and innovativeness leading to sustainable development.

  7. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Purnomo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial resources of the village that are sourced from a country or a Regional Finance Financial based Law Number 6 Year 2014 of The Village is the mandate of the law that must be allocated to the village. The interconnectedness of the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or Region concerned the Financial administrative and territorial relations, and there is no setting directly regarding the finances of the village as part of the financial system of the country or the financial area. In respect of the elements of the crime of corruption deeds against financial irregularities of the village there are still disagreements on the interpretation of the law in trapping the perpetrators of corruption on the village chief that implies not satisfy the principle of legality and legal certainty in the ruling of the matter of financial irregularities. In fact, many of the village chief or Councilor caught the criminal offence of corruption over the use of financial irregularities. This research analyzes How the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or region, as well as whether the financial resources of the village is derived from the state budget or region budget managed in village budget belongs to the category of village finances and whether tort against the financial management of the village can be categorized as a criminal act corruption. How To Cite: Purnomo, H. (2015. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System. Rechtsidee, 2(2, 121-140. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v2i2.81

  8. New Energy Villages in Taiwan and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. S.; Wang, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan locates in the active tectonic subdution and collision belts, therefore, the geothermal gradient is very high and have found 128 sites of high geothermal areas; 20% of them have the temperature between 75 - 200 degree C in which they can be directly used for the electricity generation; 50% of them are in 50 - 74 degree C and the rest 30% are below 50 degree C. These areas need the deep drillings to get into higher temperature for power energy. The first 20% high temperature areas are mostly located in the coastal or mountain regions. The government is interesting to develop these areas as the "New Energy Villages" so that they can not only become self-energy sufficient sites, but also to protect themself from being the loss of electricity and water during the typhoon and earthquake hazards. The multiple usages of hot water (such as the first power generation and then the hot spring utilization) have its merits. China, in the other hand, is not within the present-day active tectonic zone. However, the recent Sino Probe Experiments (Deep Exploration in China) have mapped the Cetaceous plate boundaries in the coast of China. The heat is still possibly migrating to near the surface through the existing structures. For example, the Feng Shun Geothermal Power Station in north of Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, used the 96 degree C hot water from a well of 800 m producing a small amount of 300 KW power since 1984. The Guangdong Province is located in the edge of Mesozoic South China Plate. Further in land, the Huang Mountain, one of the world heritage sites, is located at the boundary of another Mesozoic Yangtze River Plate. There is not a geothermal power plant; however, a number of hot springs are in a booming tour business at the foot hill of the mountain. The electricity has to come from a long way of net working. If China develops the local, small, but sufficient power plants by using the modern geothermal exploration and drilling techniques. The "New Energy

  9. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting: A Green and Clean Alternative for Sustained Power Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Chennault, Kimberly Ann; Thambi, Nithya; Bitetto, Mary Anne; Hameyie, E. B.

    2008-01-01

    Providing efficient and clean power is a challenge for devices that range from the micro to macro in scale. Although there has been significant progress in the development of micro-, meso-, and macro-scale power supplies and technologies, realization of many devices is limited by the inability of power supplies to scale with the diminishing sizes…

  10. Risk Evaluation of a UHV Power Transmission Construction Project Based on a Cloud Model and FCE Method for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the sustainable development of energy, Ultra High Voltage (UHV power transmission construction projects are being established in China currently. Their high-tech nature, the massive amount of money involved, and the need for multi-agent collaboration as well as complex construction environments bring many challenges and risks. Risk management, therefore, is critical to reduce the risks and realize sustainable development of projects. Unfortunately, many traditional risk assessment methods may not perform well due to the great uncertainty and randomness inherent in UHV power construction projects. This paper, therefore, proposes a risk evaluation index system and a hybrid risk evaluation model to evaluate the risk of UHV projects and find out the key risk factors. This model based on a cloud model and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation (FCE method combines the superiority of the cloud model for reflecting randomness and discreteness with the advantages of the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method in handling uncertain and vague issues. For the sake of proving our framework, an empirical study of “Zhejiang-Fuzhou” UHV power transmission construction project is presented. As key contributions, we find the risk of this project lies at a “middle” to “high” level and closer to a “middle” level; the “management risk” and “social risk” are identified as the most important risk factors requiring more attention; and some risk control recommendations are proposed. This article demonstrates the value of our approach in risk identification, which seeks to improve the risk control level and the sustainable development of UHV power transmission construction projects.

  11. SOSPO-SP: Secure Operation of Sustainable Power Systems Simulation Platform for Real-Time System State Evaluation and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Vancraeyveld, Pieter; Pedersen, Allan Henning Birger

    2014-01-01

    Measurement Units (PMUs) provides more information and enables wide-area monitoring with accurate timing. One of the challenges in the near future is converting the high quantity and quality of information provided by PMUs into useful knowledge about operational state of a global system. The use of real-time...... simulation in closed-loop is essential to develop and validate new real-time applications of wide-area PMU data. This paper presents a simulation platform developed within the research project Secure Operation of Sustainable Power Systems (SOSPO). The SOSPO simulation platform (SOSPO-SP) functions...... in a closed-loop, integrating new real-time assessment methods to provide useful information to operators in power system control centers and to develop new control methodologies that handle emergency situations and avoid power system blackouts....

  12. Exploitation of Renewable Energy--A Strategic Choice for Sustainable Development of Power Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Dabing

    2005-01-01

    Since China is being faced with the pressure of energy shortage and environmental conservation, the power industry in China has to actively develop the renewable energy for electricity generation while raising the utilization efficiency of conventional energy. In view of such facts, China Guodian Corporation decided on a development strategy of giving priority to green power, such as wind power. Based on the national planning of wind power development, the corporation set out its own target of installing wind power capacity of 1500 MW by the end of 2010, and is adopting appropriate measures including promoting the localization of wind turbines and developing hydropower, thermal power and wind power simultaneously. Moreover, it put some relevant suggestions.

  13. Tourism Village Model Based on Local Indigenous: Case Study of Nongkosawit Tourism Village, Gunungpati, Semarang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniasih; Nihayah, Dyah Maya; Sudibyo, Syafitri Amalia; Winda, Fajri Nur

    2018-02-01

    Officially, Nongkosawit Village has become a tourism village since 2012. However, the economic impact has not been received by the society yet because of inappropriate tourism village model. Therefore, this study aims to find out the best model for the development of Nongkosawit Tourism Village. This research used Analytical Hierarchy Process method. The results of this research shows that the model of tourism village which was suitable to the local indigenous of Nongkosawit Tourism Village was the cultural based tourism village with the percentage of 58%. Therefore, it is necessary to do re-orientation from the natural-based village model into the cultural-based village model by raising and exploring the existing culture through unique and different tourism products.

  14. Modeling and control of sustainable power systems. Towards smarter and greener electric grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingfeng Wang (ed.) [Toledo Univ., OH (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Dept.

    2012-07-01

    The concept of the smart grid promises the world an efficient and intelligent approach of managing energy production, transportation, and consumption by incorporating intelligence, efficiency, and optimality into the power grid. Both energy providers and consumers can take advantage of the convenience, reliability, and energy savings achieved by real-time and intelligent energy management. To this end, the current power grid is experiencing drastic changes and upgrades. For instance, more significant green energy resources such as wind power and solar power are being integrated into the power grid, and higher energy storage capacity is being installed in order to mitigate the intermittency issues brought about by the variable energy resources. At the same time, novel power electronics technologies and operating strategies are being invented and adopted. For instance, Flexible AC transmission systems and phasor measurement units are two promising technologies for improving the power system reliability and power quality. Demand side management will enable the customers to manage the power loads in an active fashion. As a result, modeling and control of modern power grids pose great challenges due to the adoption of new smart grid technologies. In this book, chapters regarding representative applications of smart grid technologies written by world-renowned experts are included, which explain in detail various innovative modeling and control methods. (orig.)

  15. Sustainability in Oceans Governance : Small Islands, Emerging Powers, and Connecting Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larik, J.E.; Singh, A.

    2017-01-01

    As evidenced by Goal No. 14 of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, the importance of oceans governance as a matter of global policy can hardly be overstated. The unsustainable uses of their resources could lead to serious consequences, not only for coastal communities, but remote landlocked

  16. Environmental, economic and exergetic sustainability assessment of power generation from fossil and renewable energy sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; Giustozzi, N.; van der Kooi, H.J.; Stoppato, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Energy conversion systems have assumed a crucial role in current society. The threat of climate change, fossil fuel depletion and the growing world energy demand ask for a more sustainable way of electricity production, eg, by using renewable energy sources, by improving the conversion efficiency

  17. Governing "Eco-Certified Children" through Pastoral Power: Critical Perspectives on Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses how "eco-certified children" are constructed as desirable subjects in teaching materials addressing education for sustainable development. We are interested in how discourses structure this cherished practice and how this practice has become "natural" and obvious for us. A discourse analysis is carried out…

  18. The Power of One: The Impact of Family and Consumer Sciences Education on Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    The issues related to environmental sustainability can be overwhelming. It is difficult to imagine that actions of one person could make a difference. This article addresses that perception and illustrates the impact of one person, a family and consumer sciences educator, on the lives of others and on environmental resources. Making a difference…

  19. SusDesign - An approach for a sustainable process system design and its application to a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abul Hossain, K; Khan, F; Hawboldt, K [Mem University of Newfoundland, St John, NF (Canada). Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a structured process design approach, SusDesign, for the sustainable development of process systems. At each level of process design, design alternatives are generated using a number of thermodynamic tools and applying pollution prevention strategies followed by analysis, evaluation and screening processes for the selection of potential design options. The evaluation and optimization are carried out based on an integrated environmental and cost potential (IECP) index, which has been estimated with the IECP tool. The present paper also describes a flowsheet optimization technique developed using different thermodynamic tools such as exergy/energy analysis, heat and mass integration, and cogeneration/trigeneration in a systematic manner. The proposed SusDesign approach has been successfully implemented in designing a 30 MW thermal power plant. In the case study, the IECP tool has been set up in Aspen HYSYS process simulator to carry out the analysis, evaluation and screening of design alternatives. The application of this approach has developed an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly thermal system design with an overall thermal efficiency of 70% and CO{sub 2} and NO emissions of 0.28 kg/kW h and 0.2 g/kW h respectively. The cost of power generation is estimated as 4 cents kWh. These achievements are significant compared to the conventional thermal power plant, which demonstrates the potential of the SusDesign approach for the sustainable development of process systems.

  20. SusDesign - An approach for a sustainable process system design and its application to a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Khandoker Abul [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X5 (Canada); Khan, Faisal [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X5 (Canada); Hawboldt, Kelly [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X5 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a structured process design approach, SusDesign, for the sustainable development of process systems. At each level of process design, design alternatives are generated using a number of thermodynamic tools and applying pollution prevention strategies followed by analysis, evaluation and screening processes for the selection of potential design options. The evaluation and optimization are carried out based on an integrated environmental and cost potential (IECP) index, which has been estimated with the IECP tool. The present paper also describes a flowsheet optimization technique developed using different thermodynamic tools such as exergy/energy analysis, heat and mass integration, and cogeneration/trigeneration in a systematic manner. The proposed SusDesign approach has been successfully implemented in designing a 30 MW thermal power plant. In the case study, the IECP tool has been set up in Aspen HYSYS process simulator to carry out the analysis, evaluation and screening of design alternatives. The application of this approach has developed an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly thermal system design with an overall thermal efficiency of 70% and CO{sub 2} and NO emissions of 0.28 kg/kW h and 0.2 g/kW h respectively. The cost of power generation is estimated as 4 cents /kW h. These achievements are significant compared to the conventional thermal power plant, which demonstrates the potential of the SusDesign approach for the sustainable development of process systems.

  1. SusDesign - An approach for a sustainable process system design and its application to a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Khandoker Abul; Khan, Faisal; Hawboldt, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a structured process design approach, SusDesign, for the sustainable development of process systems. At each level of process design, design alternatives are generated using a number of thermodynamic tools and applying pollution prevention strategies followed by analysis, evaluation and screening processes for the selection of potential design options. The evaluation and optimization are carried out based on an integrated environmental and cost potential (IECP) index, which has been estimated with the IECP tool. The present paper also describes a flowsheet optimization technique developed using different thermodynamic tools such as exergy/energy analysis, heat and mass integration, and cogeneration/trigeneration in a systematic manner. The proposed SusDesign approach has been successfully implemented in designing a 30 MW thermal power plant. In the case study, the IECP tool has been set up in Aspen HYSYS process simulator to carry out the analysis, evaluation and screening of design alternatives. The application of this approach has developed an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly thermal system design with an overall thermal efficiency of 70% and CO 2 and NO emissions of 0.28 kg/kW h and 0.2 g/kW h respectively. The cost of power generation is estimated as 4 cents /kW h. These achievements are significant compared to the conventional thermal power plant, which demonstrates the potential of the SusDesign approach for the sustainable development of process systems.

  2. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  3. A roadmap for production of sustainable, consistent and reliable electric power from agricultural biomass- An Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of agricultural biomass for production of electric power can help to reduce the environmental emissions while achieving energy security and sustainable development. This paper presents a methodology for estimating the power production potential of agricultural biomass in a country. Further, the methodology has been applied to develop a roadmap for producing reliable power in India. The present study reveals that about 650 Mt/year of agricultural biomass is generated in India, while about one-third of this has been found to be surplus for energy applications. The cereal crops have major contribution (64.60%) in production of surplus biomass followed by sugarcane (24.60%) and cotton (10.68%). The energy potential of these resources is of the order of 3.72 EJ, which represents a significant proportion of the primary energy consumption in the country. These biomass resources can produce electric power of 23–35 GW depending upon the efficiency of thermal conversion. The delivery of biomass to the plants and selection of appropriate technology have been found as the major issues that need to be resolved carefully. In the end, the study summarizes various technological options for biomass collection and utilization that can be used for producing clean and consistent power supply. - Highlights: •The production of bioelectricity in India is imperative and inevitable. •About one-third of the agricultural biomass is available for power generation. •The power potential of these resources is of the order of 23–31 GW. •The delivery of biomass to plants and technology selection are the key issues. •India should exploit these resources for producing clean and reliable power.

  4. Probabilistic stability analysis: the way forward for stability analysis of sustainable power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Jovica V

    2017-08-13

    Future power systems will be significantly different compared with their present states. They will be characterized by an unprecedented mix of a wide range of electricity generation and transmission technologies, as well as responsive and highly flexible demand and storage devices with significant temporal and spatial uncertainty. The importance of probabilistic approaches towards power system stability analysis, as a subsection of power system studies routinely carried out by power system operators, has been highlighted in previous research. However, it may not be feasible (or even possible) to accurately model all of the uncertainties that exist within a power system. This paper describes for the first time an integral approach to probabilistic stability analysis of power systems, including small and large angular stability and frequency stability. It provides guidance for handling uncertainties in power system stability studies and some illustrative examples of the most recent results of probabilistic stability analysis of uncertain power systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Options for sustaining solar-powered mosquito trapping systems on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oria, Prisca A.; Wijnands, Michiel; Alaii, Jane; Leeuwis, Cees

    2018-01-01

    Background: In 2012, a donor-supported proof of principle study was launched to eliminate malaria from Rusinga Island, western Kenya, using solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS). SMoTS, which also provided power for room lighting and charging mobile telephones, were installed in houses. In

  6. Sustainable energy management in industry of Republic of Serbia: Biogas power plants advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golušin Mirjan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the specifics of energy policy in Serbia on the example of designing a biogas power plant. The biogas power plant is designed in accordance with the existing energy policy that recognizes producers of energy from renewable sources as This paper reviews the previously performed analysis in the sphere of energy consumption, which served as the basis for creating a new corporate energy policy. The paper presents an analysis of biogas power plant output (electrical and thermal energy, potential prices on the market, that are consistent with the incentives of energy policy of Serbia. In addition, special emphasis is given to the revenues that a biogas power plant realizes by using mechanism of energy policy, which promotes gaining revenues by reducing pollution of the atmosphere. The authors also show the procedure, costs and expected effects for the qualification of this power plant project (CDM project categories.

  7. Constructing a sustainable power sector in China: current and future emissions of coal-fired power plants from 2010 to 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, D.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    As the largest energy infrastructure in China, power sector consumed more coal than any other sector and threatened air quality and greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement target. In this work, we assessed the evolution of coal-fired power plants in China during 2010-2030 and the evolution of associated emissions for the same period by using a unit-based emission projection model which integrated the historical power plants information, turnover of the future power plant fleet, and the evolution of end-of-pipe control technologies. We found that, driven by the stringent environmental legislation, SO2, NOx, and PM2.5 emissions from China's coal-fired power plants decreased by 49%, 45%, and 24% respectively during 2010-2015, comparing to 14% increase of coal consumption and 15% increase in CO2 emissions. We estimated that under current national energy development planning, coal consumption and CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants will continue to increase until 2030, in which against the China's Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) targets. Early retirement of old and low-efficient power plants will cumulatively reduce 2.2 Pg CO2 emissions from the baseline scenario during 2016-2030, but still could not curb CO2 emissions from the peak before 2030. Owing to the implementation of "near zero" emission control policy, we projected that emissions of air pollutants will significantly decrease during the same period under all scenarios, indicating the decoupling trends of air pollutants and CO2 emissions. Although with limited direct emission reduction benefits, increasing operating hours of power plants could avoid 236 GW of new power plants construction, which could indirectly reduce emissions embodied in the construction activity. Our results identified a more sustainable pathway for China's coal-fired power plants, which could reduce air pollutant emissions, improve the energy efficiency, and slow down the construction of new units. However, continuous

  8. Measurement of Accountability Management of Village Funds

    OpenAIRE

    Yunita, Anggraeni; Christianingrum

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the accountability of village funds management in Kabupaten Bangka. In relation to the Village Funds program which is a government program, the measurement of accountability of Village Funds management uses accountability principles consisting of Transparency, Liability, Controlling, Responsibility and Responsiveness which are the principles of accountability developed by the United Nations Development Program in measuring bureaucratic accountability. T...

  9. Design and test of-80 kV snubber core assemblies for MFTF sustaining-neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, S.R.; Mayhall, D.J.; Wilson, J.H.; De Vore, K.R.; Ross, R.I.; Sears, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Core snubbers, located near the neutral beam source ends of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS) source cables, protect the neutral beam source extractor grid wires from overheating and sputtering during internal sparkdowns. The snubbers work by producing an induced counter-emf which limits the fault current and by absorbing the capacitive energy stored on the 80 kV source cables and power supplies. A computer program STACAL was used in snubber magnetic design to choose appropriate tape wound cores to provide 400 Ω resistance and 25 J energy absorption. The cores are mounted horizontally in a dielectric structure. The central source cable bundle passes through the snubber and terminates on three copper buses. Multilam receptacles on the buses connect to the source module jumper cables. Corona rings and shields limit electric field stresses to allow close clearances between snubbers

  10. Measuring sustainability by Energy Efficiency Analysis for Korean Power Companies: A Sequential Slacks-Based Efficiency Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving energy efficiency has been widely regarded as one of the most cost-effective ways to improve sustainability and mitigate climate change. This paper presents a sequential slack-based efficiency measure (SSBM application to model total-factor energy efficiency with undesirable outputs. This approach simultaneously takes into account the sequential environmental technology, total input slacks, and undesirable outputs for energy efficiency analysis. We conduct an empirical analysis of energy efficiency incorporating greenhouse gas emissions of Korean power companies during 2007–2011. The results indicate that most of the power companies are not performing at high energy efficiency. Sequential technology has a significant effect on the energy efficiency measurements. Some policy suggestions based on the empirical results are also presented.

  11. Study on garbage disposal mode with low energy consumption for villages and towns in cold region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through field research of typical villages and towns in China's northern cold region, this paper research energy consumption and resource recovery in the process of village and town garbage collection and disposal and organizes current situation and problems of village and town garbage collection and disposal. At present, village and town garbage collection and disposal means and thoughts are traditional and lag behind in China's northern cold region. There is the lack of garbage collection and disposal mode suitable for cold villages and towns. Thus, village and town resources are not effectively utilized, and residents’ living environment is affected continuously. This paper selects two mature garbage disposal methods: sanitary landfill and incineration power generation. Meanwhile, energy consumption and ultimate emission utilization of two schemes in garbage collection and disposal links are overall compared to propose garbage collection and disposal mode with low energy consumption suitable for green villages and towns in cold region. Besides, various control indexes of village and town garbage disposal schemes are explained in detail in combination of specific conditions.

  12. CULTURAL CAPITAL AS TOURISM DEVELOPMENT BASIS IN TRADITIONAL VILLAGE OF KUTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Sumadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a favourite sector in improving Bali revenue and kind of tourismdeveloped is cultural one. In cultural tourism, it takes place meaning modification ofcultural practice by krama (member of traditional village in order to cultural capitalcan survive in the middle of tourism dynamic condition. This research entitled“Cultural capital as tourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta”, byproposing three problems, namely how is the process of cultural capital as tourismdevelopment basis, what factors can motivate tourism capital as tourism developmentbasis, and what is the meaning of cultural capital as tourism development basis.The research is conducted using qualitative method and cultural studiesapproach, so data analysis is conducted in descriptive qualitative and interpretativeones. Selection of traditional village of Kuta as research location based onconsideration that traditional village of Kuta having integrated tourism facilities forfacilities addressed to member of traditional village. The review about culturalcapital as the tourism development basis in this traditional village of Kuta, eclecticstheories consisting of Hegemonic theory of Gramsci, co-modification theory of KarlMarx and Adorno, discourse-power/knowledge and truth theory of Foucoult anddeconstruction theory of Derrida.Based on the research output, it can be known: (1 Cultural capital process astourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta is inseparable fromforeigners arrival in traditional village of Kuta, the entrance of Military (TheCooperative Center of Arm Force in managing Kuta beach and the occurrence ofBali bombing tragedy on October 12th, 2002; (2 The factors that motivate culturalcapital as the tourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta, such asmotivation and the necessity of tourists visiting traditional village of Kuta, tourismhegemony, changing of life philosophy of member of traditional village fromidealism into

  13. The Management of Village Fund Finances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inten Meutia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to know the implementation of fund management of village fund in Ogan Ilir Regency, South Sumatera. The population in this study were 224 villages in Ogan Ilir Regency that received the allocation of Village Funds in 2016. The purposive sampling technique was applied to obtain samples and produce 26 villages. The analysis will be carried out with a quantitative and qualitative description process. Based on the data obtained, the researcher tries to describe or describe systematically, accurately, and factually about matters relating to the field as fact, nature, and relationship between phenomena. Quantitative techniques will also use frequency analysis that aims to provide an overview of the general condition. The results reveal that the financial management aspects are generally in accordance with those set out in Permendagri 113/2014 and have complied with the basic principles of financial management. Reporting and accountability remain a problem for some villages. Not all of the villages studied have aspects of human resource reporting and accountability. Taking into account the composition of village budgeting, the village does not meet the rules that require a ratio of 70:30, this results in inequality in the implementation of rural development. The conclusion of this research is that the implementation of village fund management in Ogan Ilur Regency has been running well according to Permendagri 113/2014.

  14. Professionals Cultivations: critical to the safe operation & sustainable development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Mingguang

    2017-01-01

    Challenges to nuclear power development: Challenges to nuclear power: •Public acceptance & confidences shaking after SAs •Ecology concerning seriously on rad-waste & spent fuel •Both AP1000 & EPR delayed with investment greatly increased •Economic competition from Renewable & marginal effects from severe regulatory guides; Challenges from HR: •No peoples willing to enter industry for countries with NP phased out •No motivations to develop or innovate the new technology for countries with NP operation but no further planning •Professionals need badly for developing countries looking for more nuclear power •HR setup the balance between money & missions, prides & success

  15. Sustainable Low-Carbon Expansion for the Power Sector of an Emerging Economy: The Case of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Juan-Pablo; Shaw, Brittany J; Avila, Nkiruka I; Kammen, Daniel M

    2017-09-05

    Fast growing and emerging economies face the dual challenge of sustainably expanding and improving their energy supply and reliability while at the same time reducing poverty. Critical to such transformation is to provide affordable and sustainable access to electricity. We use the capacity expansion model SWITCH to explore low carbon development pathways for the Kenyan power sector under a set of plausible scenarios for fast growing economies that include uncertainty in load projections, capital costs, operational performance, and technology and environmental policies. In addition to an aggressive and needed expansion of overall supply, the Kenyan power system presents a unique transition from one basal renewable resource-hydropower-to another based on geothermal and wind power for ∼90% of total capacity. We find geothermal resource adoption is more sensitive to operational degradation than high capital costs, which suggests an emphasis on ongoing maintenance subsidies rather than upfront capital cost subsidies. We also find that a cost-effective and viable suite of solutions includes availability of storage, diesel engines, and transmission expansion to provide flexibility to enable up to 50% of wind power penetration. In an already low-carbon system, typical externality pricing for CO 2 has little to no effect on technology choice. Consequently, a "zero carbon emissions" by 2030 scenario is possible with only moderate levelized cost increases of between $3 and $7/MWh with a number of social and reliability benefits. Our results suggest that fast growing and emerging economies could benefit by incentivizing anticipated strategic transmission expansion. Existing and new diesel and natural gas capacity can play an important role to provide flexibility and meet peak demand in specific hours without a significant increase in carbon emissions, although more research is required for other pollutant's impacts.

  16. The economics of hybrid power systems for sustainable desert agriculture in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamel, S.M.; Dahl, C.

    2005-01-01

    Egypt has embarked on an ambitious desert land reclamation program in order to increase total food production. Energy planners for these desert agriculture locations have chosen diesel generation power technology because minimization of the initial capital cost of a power supply system is their top...... priority. This heavy reliance on diesel generation has negative effects on the surrounding environment including soil, groundwater, and air pollution. Although good solar and wind resource prospects exist for the use of cleaner hybrid power systems in certain desert locations, little research has been done...... to investigate the economic potential of such systems in Egypt’s desert agriculture sector. Using optimization software, we assess the economics of hybrid power systems versus the present diesel generation technology in a remote agricultural development area. We also consider the emission reduction advantages...

  17. Prospects of nuclear power plants for sustainable energy development in Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorashi, Amir Hossien

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the feasible contributive share of electricity generation from each energy resources. This includes the economical feasibilities and all demographic projections involved in forecasting methodology, which explicitly reflect on overall national power demand projection in the Energy prospects of Islamic Republic of Iran till 2033. The Energy demand and reliability are presented with a view to elaborate on significant role and required capacity of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) towards fulfillment of an energy mix policy in the country

  18. Energy-Sustainable Framework and Performance Analysis of Power Scheme for Operating Systems: A Tool

    OpenAIRE

    G. Singh; P. K. Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Recently, an Information and Communications Technology (ICT) devices has become more user-friendly, which raised the problem of power dissipation across the globe and computer systems are one among them. This emerging issue of power dissipation has imposed a very significant issue on the system and software design. The concept of ‘green computing’ gaining popularity and is being considered as one of the most promising technology by the designers of Information Technology (IT) industry, which ...

  19. Combined Heat and Power Systems for the Provision of Sustainable Energy from Biomass in Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ortwein Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Against the background of greenhouse gases causing climate change, combined heat and power (CHP) systems fueled by biomass can efficiently supply energy with high flexibility. Such CHP systems will usually consist of one or more thermo-chemical conversion steps and at least one (the more or less separated) electric power generation unit. Depending on the main products of the previous conversion steps (e.g. combustible gases or liquids, but also flue gases with sensible heat), different techno...

  20. Power supply - HVDC and facts make it sustainable and secure; Stromversorgung - nachhaltig und sicher mit HGUeund Facts. Grid Access fuer ''gruene Energie''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uecker, Karl; Retzmann, Dietmar [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). HVDC/Facts Sales and Marketing; Schultze, Alberto [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Grid Access and Industry

    2010-09-06

    Due to the global climate change, the power industry has a lot of changes in store. For reasons of environmental protection, the reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in power generation and loss minimization in power transmission are of particular importance. This means that the share of wind power in a lot of countries, Germany among them, must be as high as possible, for the other ''green'' energy resources, such as hydro or solar power, play only a subordinate part for reasons of their geographical location. Along with sustainability and efficiency of power supply, grid security must be taken into account as well. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear Power Introduction in Indonesia : Securing the National Energy Supply for Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana; Sudi Ariyanto; Arnold Y Soetrisnanto

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power construction planning study has already done by BATAN. The studies that cover various aspects have also done related to this preparation. The research centers in BATAN that have activities in energy application are directed to this preparation. This paper will generally describe the activities and result of the preparation study, especially related to technology aspect, site aspect, and social-economic impact. The preparation study has taken into account of some aspects, but still need updated and some more complementary study. The choice of technology will determine the ability for technology transfer. Industrial infrastructure and the design and engineering capability are the key role for self reliance in nuclear power technology. But the technology transfer will not succeed without government support. Muria Peninsula, precisely in Ujung Lemahabang has become the first candidate site, while Ujung Grenggengan and Ujung Watu as a second and third candidate sites. Though site could accommodate 7.000 MWe installed capacity, but are need to consider stability and capacity of transmission line to channeling the nuclear power out put in Jawa-Madura-Bali grid interconnection. From the economic impact aspect, nuclear power is competitive among other power plant system in order the role of nuclear power to give a solution in energy optimum mix policy and will reduce oil fuel consumption. (author)

  2. Combined Heat and Power Systems for the Provision of Sustainable Energy from Biomass in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortwein Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of greenhouse gases causing climate change, combined heat and power (CHP systems fueled by biomass can efficiently supply energy with high flexibility. Such CHP systems will usually consist of one or more thermo-chemical conversion steps and at least one (the more or less separated electric power generation unit. Depending on the main products of the previous conversion steps (e.g. combustible gases or liquids, but also flue gases with sensible heat, different technologies are available for the final power conversion step. This includes steam cycles with steam turbines or engines and different working fluids (water, organic fluids, but also combustion based systems like gas turbines or gas engines. Further promising technologies include fuel cells with high electric efficiency. When integrating such CHP systems in buildings, there are different strategies, especially concerning electric power generation. While some concepts are focusing on base load production, others are regulated either by thermal or by electric power demand. The paper will give a systematic overview on the combination of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass and combined heat and power production technologies. The mentioned building integration strategies will be discussed, leading to conclusions for further research and development in that field.

  3. Exergy-based sustainability analysis of a low power, high frequency piezo-based ultrasound reactor for rapid biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseinpour, Soleiman; Khounani, Zahra; Hosseini, Seyed Sina

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Piezoultrasonic-assisted biodiesel production was exergetically analyzed. • Alcohol content, sonication time, and temperature affected exergetic parameters. • 6:1 methanol/oil, 10 min sonication, and 60 °C temperature were the best conditions. • The exergetic sustainability index at the favorable conditions was found to be 11. - Abstract: In this work a thermodynamic model was developed to attain enhanced process comprehension of waste cooking oil (WCO) transesterification process in a low power, high frequency piezo-based ultrasound reactor. The reactor performance was assessed using the exergy concept to distinguish the effects of various operational variables, i.e., methanol to oil molar ratio (4:1–8:1), ultrasonic irradiation time (6–10 min), and temperature (40–60 °C) on the efficiency and sustainability factors. The exergetic efficiency of the developed reactor was found to be ranging from 98% to 99% and from 9% to 91% using the universal and functional definitions, respectively. The maximum functional exergetic efficiency as a decision making parameter, was found at 91% for methanol to oil molar ratio of 6:1, ultrasonic irradiation time of 10 min, and temperature of 60 °C. The exergetic sustainability index of the transesterification process at the selected conditions was determined at about 11. Under these conditions, the reactor efficiently converted triglycerides to methyl esters with an acceptable conversion efficiency of 97%, satisfying the ASTM standard. Overall, the outcomes of the current survey manifested that exergy analysis can be a preferred basis for decision making on the efficiency and sustainability of various biodiesel synthesizing systems.

  4. Electric power and sustainable rural development: a way for the citizenship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Fernando Selles; Pazzini, Luiz Henrique Alves; Pelegrini, Marcelo Aparecido; Galvao, Luiz Claudio Ribeiro; Udaeta, Miguel Edgar Morales

    1999-01-01

    The present paper is an analysis of the rural electrification usage. Rural production requires efficient energy sources, and the State must encourage landowners to make use of market forces to modernize their activities. Important authors have claimed that rural electrification should be viewed as an investment in the energy structure of a region, an investment to achieve economic returns. In this paper, this opinion is criticized in light for the need of sustainable rural development. More than just a macroeconomic policy, electrification should be viewed through a social lens, as indispensable component of citizenship. (author)

  5. The Power of Micro Urban Structures, Theory of EEPGC - the Micro Urban Energy Distribution Model as a Planning Tool for Sustainable City Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkáč Štefan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the smart growth and equitable development in the region, urban planners should consider also lateral energies represented by the energy urban models like further proposed EEPGC focused on energy distribution via connections among micro-urban structures, their onsite renewable resources and the perception of micro-urban structures as decentralized energy carriers based on pre industrialized era. These structures are still variously bound when part of greater patterns. After the industrial revolution the main traded goods became energy in its various forms. The EEPGC is focused on sustainable energy transportation distances between the villages and the city, described by the virtual “energy circles”. This more human scale urbanization, boost the economy in micro-urban areas, rising along with clean energy available in situ that surely gives a different perspective to human quality of life in contrast to overcrowded multicultural mega-urban structures facing generations of problems and struggling to survive as a whole.

  6. The Power of Micro Urban Structures, Theory of EEPGC - the Micro Urban Energy Distribution Model as a Planning Tool for Sustainable City Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkáč, Štefan

    2015-11-01

    To achieve the smart growth and equitable development in the region, urban planners should consider also lateral energies represented by the energy urban models like further proposed EEPGC focused on energy distribution via connections among micro-urban structures, their onsite renewable resources and the perception of micro-urban structures as decentralized energy carriers based on pre industrialized era. These structures are still variously bound when part of greater patterns. After the industrial revolution the main traded goods became energy in its various forms. The EEPGC is focused on sustainable energy transportation distances between the villages and the city, described by the virtual "energy circles". This more human scale urbanization, boost the economy in micro-urban areas, rising along with clean energy available in situ that surely gives a different perspective to human quality of life in contrast to overcrowded multicultural mega-urban structures facing generations of problems and struggling to survive as a whole.

  7. Perceptions of Village Dogs by Villagers and Tourists in the Coastal Region of Rural Oaxaca, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the village dog-keeping system, and of perceptions of dog-related problems by villagers and tourists, in the coastal region of Oaxaca, Mexico. We conducted a survey of the inhabitants of three villages (Mazunte, Puerto Angel, and Río Seco),

  8. Adapting sustainable low-carbon techologies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Peter Shyr-Jye

    1997-09-01

    The scientific community is deeply concerned about the effect of greenhouse-gases (GHGs) on global climate change. A major climate shift can result in tragic destruction to our world. Carbon dioxide (COsb2) emissions from coal-fired power plants are major anthropogenic sources that contribute to potential global warming. The People's Republic of China, with its rapidly growing economy and heavy dependence on coal-fired power plants for electricity, faces increasingly serious environmental challenges. This research project seeks to develop viable methodologies for reducing the potential global warming effects and serious air pollution arising from excessive coal burning. China serves as a case study for this research project. Major resolution strategies are developed through intensive literature reviews to identify sustainable technologies that can minimize adverse environmental impacts while meeting China's economic needs. The research thereby contributes technological knowledge to the field of Applied Sciences. The research also integrates modern power generation technologies with China's current and future energy requirements. With these objectives in mind, this project examines how China's environmental issues are related to China's power generation methods. This study then makes strategic recommendations that emphasize low-carbon technologies as sustainable energy generating options to be implemented in China. These low-carbon technologies consist of three options: (1) using cleaner fuels converted from China's plentiful domestic coal resources; (2) applying high-efficiency gas turbine systems for power generation; and (3) integrating coal gasification processes with energy saving combined cycle gas turbine systems. Each method can perform independently, but a combined strategy can achieve the greatest COsb2 reductions. To minimize economic impacts caused by technological changes, this study also addresses additional alternatives that can be implemented in

  9. Old regime towns and villages: consent and conflict in local castile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Truchuelo García

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Castilian towns and villages had a long development process in medieval times. Then, they were formed as political bodies to the prosecution of the common good. Despite town and village reciprocal relationships were part of the common political body they formed together, their relationships were hierarchical. Towns, as heads of jurisdictional districts, kept relations of domination on the villages. There, powerful local lineages tried to widen their authority and power. This traditional scheme, that explained town and village Old Regime relationships, was changing in the long-run perspective. Charles V initiated sales of town titles and privileges to increase royal incomes. This favored not only these last, but also higher degrees of jurisdictional local autonomy and, at the same time, it went in favor of local oligarchies aspirations of wider spheres of local self government

  10. A School in Every Village: Educational Reform in a Northeast China County, 1904-31. Contemporary Chinese Studies Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVen, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    In the early 1900s, the Qing dynasty implemented a series of institutional reforms to shore up its power. The most important were a nationwide school system and the abolition of the centuries-old civil examinations. "A School in Every Village" recounts how villagers and local state officials in Haicheng County enacted orders to establish…

  11. Life under the source : Sustainable housing using low-voltage DC power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedeman, M.; Van Timmeren, A.; Boelman, E.; Schoonman, J.; Van der Graaf, A.

    2003-01-01

    Emergency phone systems, yachts, and caravans increasingly use solar panels to generate the energy they require to operate. The Dutch government offers generous grant schemes for solar panels on houses and offices. Solar energy is the power of the future. There is however a slight drawback because

  12. Virtual Power Plants of Electric Vehicles in Sustainable Smart Electricity Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Kahlen (Micha)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe batteries of electric vehicles can be used as Virtual Power Plants to balance out frequency deviations in the electricity grid. Carsharing fleet owners have the options to charge an electric vehicle's battery, discharge an electric vehicle's battery, or keep an electric vehicle

  13. Facilitating sustainability through smart network design in combination with virtual power plant operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Bakari, K.; Kling, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    While smart grids are considered as an outcome to integrate a high penetration level of dispersed generation (DG) in the power system, most distribution networks are still passive controlled. To accelerate the transition towards smart grids network operators can take two important steps: 1.

  14. Space Power: A Theory for Sustaining US Security Through the Information Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    between our national security, our national competitiveness, resilience, and moral example. And it reaffirms America’s commitment to pursue our... relativism respectively on the rise and fall of great powers. Their research provides guiding principles which allow nations operating within Vesna

  15. Subsidy project in fiscal 1999 to accelerate forming an environment harmonizing energy community. Report on the survey on energy supply investigation project by using a wastes electric power generation system in wide city and village area in the Joso area; Joso chiho koiki shichosonken ni okeru haikibutsu hatsuden ni yoru energy kyokyu chosa jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Discussions were given on the feasibility of a project to be performed jointly by the Business Bureau of the Ibaraki Prefectural Government who takes charge of the wastes electric power generation project, and the Joso Area Wide City and Village Area Affair Association who performs refuse disposal project. The basic plan for the system may be summarized as follows: the gasification melting furnace shall have a capacity of 420 tons per day, discharge concentrations of dioxins shall be 0.01 ng-TEQ/m{sup 3} or less, the power generation system shall be the steam high-temperature high-pressure system, the power generation efficiency shall be 25%, and the electric power generation takes priority, with the steam after power generation use utilized for heat supply. The evaluation on the effect of introducing the project can be summarized as follows: in the social aspect, the execution of the joint project is safe and effective for the residents and society; it contributes to activation of the areas and assistance to the regional activities; correspondence will be possible to the tighter enforcement of the laws and regulations in the future; in the environmental aspect, discharge of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and dioxins can be suppressed; and in the economic aspect, the ultimate disposal quantity in refuse treatment will be reduced greatly, serving for saving the treatment expense, and the refuse treatment cost may be reduced by assuring the earning from selling the electric power. (NEDO)

  16. An Integrated Multi-Criteria Decision Making Model and AHP Weighting Uncertainty Analysis for Sustainability Assessment of Coal-Fired Power Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianfa Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of the power generation industry from coal-based to more sustainable energy sources is an irreversible trend. In China, the coal-fired power plant, as the main electric power supply facility at present, needs to know its own sustainability level to face the future competition. A hybrid multi-criteria decision making (MCDM model is proposed in this paper to assess the sustainability levels of the existing Chinese coal-fired power units. The areal grey relational analysis (AGRA method is involved in the hybrid model, and a combined weighting method is used to determine the priorities of the criteria. The combining weight fuses the fuzzy rough set (FRS and entropy objective weighting method together with the analytic hierarchy process (AHP subjective weighting method by game theory. Moreover, an AHP weighting uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo (MC simulation is introduced to measure the uncertainty of the results, and a 95 percent confidence interval (CI is defined as the uncertainty measurement of the alternatives. A case study about eight coal-fired power units is carried out with a criteria system, which contains five aspects in an operational perspective, such as the flexibility, economic, environmental, reliability and technical criterion. The sustainability assessment is performed at the unit level, and the results give a priority rank of the eight alternatives; additionally, the uncertainty analysis supplies the extra information from a statistical perspective. This work expands a novel hybrid MCDM method to the sustainability assessment of the power generation systems, and it may be a benefit to the energy enterprises in assessing the sustainability at the unit level and enhance its ability in future sustainable development.

  17. Addressing the security of a future sustainable power system: The Danish SOSPO project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guangya; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    evaluated to secure the operation from both transmission and distribution levels. The Danish SOSPO project is launched from 2012 targeting at the system security assessment in the control room for the future scenarios. Methods will be developed in this project to counteract with the future challenges......Current power systems have been undergoing in depth changes by the increasing use of renewable generations. At one hand, the grid is progressively more interconnected in order to collect the renewable generation from geographically dispersed places meanwhile reduce the risks of intermittency......; on the other, the power is increasingly generated at relative low voltage networks which in turn gives rise to new challenges in the conventional system design. The high governmental objective of greenhouse gas reduction provokes accelerating adoptation of the renewables. The effect of this has to be carefully...

  18. Power system operational security analysis to obtain sustainable, strategic and economic dispatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.A.J.; Alemadi, N.; Mulla, Y.A.; Choudhry, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the most critical question that is static/online security system n power system operation and managements. Therefore, we do originated couple of models with their operational scenarios. How to identify the main security constraints and their most suitable reinforcements needed to maintain the system security as per determine boundary. It would also render instrumental approach to enhance the security operational constraints. Therefore, it will also provide the system operator to take preventive action or formulate the action plan prior to contingencies occurred In past the both demand side management system and load shedding have been used for to provide reliable power system under normal or emergency operation and control [4,5 J.) (author)

  19. Challenges of nuclear power for the sustainable role in Korean energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to introduce the current role of nuclear power of Korea as the economic and low carbon emitter in the long term expansion planning and to improve the public acceptance of nuclear as the environmentally friendliness energy source. Nuclear and coal have been selected as the major electricity sources due to the insufficient domestic energy resources, and will provide more than 60% of total electricity generation in Korea for quite some time. National energy policy addressing environmental friendliness, stable supply and least cost has made it difficult to decide which energy resource is the best for the long term energy planning. Climate change regime will diminish the coal power plants in generation amount, the public still keeps nuclear at a distance and insists to replace nuclear by renewable and renewable doesn't any guarantee of stable supply although its economics is fast being improved. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the long-term power expansion planning in various points of view such as environmental friendliness, benefit of carbon reduction and system reliability as well as least cost operation. The objective and approach of this study are to analyze the proper role of nuclear power by comparing the different types of scenarios in terms of the system cost changes, CO 2 emission reduction and system reliability. The results from this analysis are useful for the Korean government in charge of long-term energy policy to go over what kinds of role can each electric resources play and what are the best way to solve the triangular dilemma as economics, environmental friendliness, stable supply of the electricity

  20. Energy Storage System Control Algorithm by Operating Target Power to Improve Energy Sustainability of Smart Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeongkwan Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As energy issues are emerging around the world, a variety of smart home technologies aimed at realizing zero energy houses are being introduced. Energy storage system (ESS for smart home energy independence is increasingly gaining interest. However, limitations exist in that most of them are controlled according to time schedules or used in conjunction with photovoltaic (PV generation systems. In consideration of load usage patterns and PV generation of smart home, this study proposes an ESS control algorithm that uses constant energy of energy network while making maximum use of ESS. Constant energy means that the load consumes a certain amount of power under all conditions, which translates to low variability. The proposed algorithm makes a smart home a load of energy network with low uncertainty and complexity. The simulation results show that the optimal ESS operating target power not only makes the smart home use power constantly from the energy network, but also maximizes utilization of the ESS. In addition, since the smart home is a load that uses constant energy, it has the advantage of being able to operate an efficient energy network from the viewpoint of energy providers.

  1. A lignite-geothermal hybrid power and hydrogen production plant for green cities and sustainable buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkis, B. [Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2011-02-15

    Turkey is rich in both geothermal energy and lignite reserves, which in many cases, are co-located. This condition makes it feasible to utilize both lignite and geothermal energy in a hybrid form for combined power heat, and cold generation, which may lead to optimally energy and exergy efficient, environmentally benign, and economically sound applications. This paper presents a novel concept of hybrid lignite-geothermal plant for a district energy system and hydrogen production facility in Aydin with special emphasis on high performance, green buildings and green districts. In this concept, lignite is first introduced to a partially fluidized-bed gasifier and then to a fluidized-bed gas cleaning unit, which produces synthetic gas and finally hydrogen. The by-products, namely char and ash are used in a fluidized-bed combustor to produce power. Waste heat from all these steps are utilized in a district heating system along with heat received from geothermal production wells after power is generated there. H{sub 2}S gas obtained from the separator system is coupled with hydrogen production process at the lignite plant. Absorption cooling systems and thermal storage tanks complement the hybrid system for the tri-generation district energy system. On the demand side, the new, green OSTIM OSB administration building in Ankara is exemplified for greener, low-exergy buildings that will compound the environmental benefits.

  2. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  3. Contesting legitimacy of voluntary sustainability certification schemes: valuation languages and power asymmetries in the roundtable on sustainable palm oil in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin-Burgos, V.; Clancy, Joy S.; Lovett, Jonathan Cranidge

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary certification schemes aimed at assuring producer compliance with a set of sustainability criteria have emerged as market-based instruments (MBIs) of sustainability governance. However, the impacts they tackle can be part of a complex arena of socio-environmental conflict, where values and

  4. Regional new energy vision for Yakumo village; Yakumomura chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A regional new energy vision has been formulated for Yakumo village, Shimane Prefecture, which abides with the village doctrines of introducing new energy for quality life and building a community advanced in terms of environmental protection. Yakumo village, which has a population of approximately 6,800 engaged mainly in agriculture or forestry, consumed 5 times 10{sup 5} GJ in energy in fiscal 1998. The results of activities conducted in this connection are summarized in nine chapters which are (1) the trends of affairs surrounding new energy, (2) Yakumo village's local characteristics as seen from the new energy viewpoint, (3) collection of information on new energy measures taken by local governments, (4) estimation of demand for energy in Yakumo village, (5) estimation of the existing amount and available amount of new energy in Yakumo village, (6) study of the basic concept and basic policy of the vision, (7) study of new energy introduction, (8) approach to the issue by thinking, and (9) reference materials. In concrete terms, discussion is held about introduction into public facilities of photovoltaic power generation and water heaters, wind power generation, cogeneration, and waste heat utilization. For the sake of gardening at public facilities, for instance, the introduction of photovoltaic power generation is taken up. (NEDO)

  5. Ripple Effects and Quiet Revolution by the Power of Tourism Innovation : What tourism can do to realize the more sustainable world?

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chia Lun; Kim, Joo Young; Deguchi, Sayaka

    2012-01-01

    Tourism has a power to realize the more sustainable world. New types of tourism, rather than conventional types of tourism (e.g. mass tourism), can contribute to making the world more sustainable. For example, new types of tourism, such as pro-poor tourism, community-based tourism, volunteer tourism, cross-cultural tourism and eco-tourism, can be tools to reduce poverty and tensions among different nations and cultures and also to protect natural environment and traditions. However, there has...

  6. Analysis of Balancing Requirements in Future Sustainable and Reliable Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frunt, J.

    2011-06-01

    This thesis elaborates on the rules for power balancing, provides a method for quantifying balancing requirements and examines the effect of future changes on balancing. Chapter 2 elaborates on system balancing and the different actors and entities in the electricity delivery system. The necessity and implementation of power balancing are explained. Also different subsequent markets (i.e., day-ahead markets, intraday markets and imbalance settlement systems) and options to trade electricity are discussed. As the research focusses mainly on the Netherlands, properties of the Dutch imbalance settlement system are analyzed. Based on this framework an in-depth analysis of imbalances and calls for balancing capacity with the corresponding prices is given. This shows the incentives to minimize the amount of imbalance in the system and to participate in the imbalance settlement system. Chapter 3 elaborates on the level of aggregation that the entities, involved in the imbalance settlement system, in electricity markets can have. Based on current market rules, incentives to either grow or shrink and by aggregating more or less entities are discussed. The level of aggregation will directly influence the functioning of the imbalance settlement system. It is shown that larger aggregations benefit more from the canceling out of imbalances. The imbalances of the Netherlands and Belgium have been aggregated to illustrate the possible benefits of aggregating multiple national imbalance settlement systems. The increased penetration of renewable generation strongly influences the planning and operation of the power system. As many renewable energy generators have a fluctuating power output, several methods are discussed in chapter 4 that can be used to classify and quantify the balancing requirements to counteract these fluctuations. Chapter 4 discusses the multiple existing classes of balancing capacity and the corresponding methods to quantify their needs. Due to the

  7. Analysis of Balancing Requirements in Future Sustainable and Reliable Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frunt, J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis elaborates on the rules for power balancing, provides a method for quantifying balancing requirements and examines the effect of future changes on balancing. Chapter 2 elaborates on system balancing and the different actors and entities in the electricity delivery system. The necessity and implementation of power balancing are explained. Also different subsequent markets (i.e., day-ahead markets, intraday markets and imbalance settlement systems) and options to trade electricity are discussed. As the research focusses mainly on the Netherlands, properties of the Dutch imbalance settlement system are analyzed. Based on this framework an in-depth analysis of imbalances and calls for balancing capacity with the corresponding prices is given. This shows the incentives to minimize the amount of imbalance in the system and to participate in the imbalance settlement system. Chapter 3 elaborates on the level of aggregation that the entities, involved in the imbalance settlement system, in electricity markets can have. Based on current market rules, incentives to either grow or shrink and by aggregating more or less entities are discussed. The level of aggregation will directly influence the functioning of the imbalance settlement system. It is shown that larger aggregations benefit more from the canceling out of imbalances. The imbalances of the Netherlands and Belgium have been aggregated to illustrate the possible benefits of aggregating multiple national imbalance settlement systems. The increased penetration of renewable generation strongly influences the planning and operation of the power system. As many renewable energy generators have a fluctuating power output, several methods are discussed in chapter 4 that can be used to classify and quantify the balancing requirements to counteract these fluctuations. Chapter 4 discusses the multiple existing classes of balancing capacity and the corresponding methods to quantify their needs. Due to the

  8. MIRACLES SHOWN BY MARRIAGE CUSTOMS IN SOPA FISHING VILLAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sopa Village in Chushur County of Lhasa Municipality is the only village in Tibet with a fishing business.The unique culture of this village includes ancient traditional customs.One in particular is a strange marriage custom.

  9. Sustainability of the nuclear power as a technology with minimal relative impact on the economic and environmental resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oussanov, V.I.

    2001-01-01

    The ''entropy'' model for quantitative assessment of the impact of the electricity generating systems is discussed in the paper. Introduction of the ''entropy'' notion opens an opportunity to come to a new understanding of the competitiveness of the electricity generating technologies under taking into account not only economic but also environmental resources. The criterion of the effectiveness should be formulated as production the unit of electricity under minimal dissipation of human energy and natural resources or, in another words, under minimal increase of the 'nooentropy' in the production system. Under such wide definition, the effectiveness of a technology for electricity production becomes a very important index of the sustainability. The assessment of the ''nooentropy'' effectiveness of the main full-energy-chain electricity production options with normalization to natural resources of Russia has demonstrated important advantages of the nuclear power which are missed in another models of the system analysis, specifically, less impact on natural resource. (author)

  10. How Biodiversity Conservation Policy Accelerates Agrarian Differentiation: The Account of an Upland Village in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dressler, W.H.; Xuan To, P.; Mahanty, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows how the implementation of Vietnam«SQ»s recent biodiversity conservation policy in Ba Vi National Park has increased the economic value of nature, created sustained conflict, and exacerbated agrarian differentiation in an upland village in northern Vietnam. Increased global and

  11. Optical mathematical model of medical tourism village at Euan Mousa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faten H Fahmy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a computer simulation model of the main components of the designed photovoltaic energy system to feed the suggested whole load of the presented medical village. The main topic of this paper is to serve a medical services for special patients who need benefits of natural water spots, and special sand that exist in Euan Mousa, Safaga, South of Sinai. For that, a healthy PV medical tourism village contains all the necessary requirements for these patients and tourists is designed. Also, it presents full hospitality for tourists. The energy flow through the photovoltaic system is determined as time-integrated value of power being produced during each hour. The energy balance model, which governs the behaviour of the different components (array, battery and load), is obtained by considering the energy flow at each component of the system

  12. Power to the poor: sustainable energy at the base of the pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarsky, Lyuba [Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA (United States); Wilson, Emma

    2009-11-15

    Four billion people – over half of humanity – live on less than US$2 a day, effectively forming the bottom of the world economic pyramid. This majority may have minimal access to cash but they need, and will pay for, essential goods and services – including energy. 'The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid,' a 2002 article, argues that if global corporations target this 4 billion, they can reduce poverty and make profit. That the private sector is already playing a key role in meeting development challenges, such as energy poverty, is increasingly recognised. 'Inclusive' and 'shared value' business approaches have begun to multiply. International energy companies, including hydrocarbon and renewable energy producers, can (and do) facilitate local access to energy in poorer regions of the world. To reach the poorest and to effectively contribute to sustainable local development in the long term, however, standard business models need to be modified, and alliances forged with government, local enterprises, donors and NGOs. Smaller local firms are often the ones that reach the poor more effectively. They just need the right support.

  13. The power of competition: Effects of social motivation on attention, sustained physical effort, and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynne Catherine DiMenichi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Competition has often been implicated as a means to improve effort-based learning and attention. Two experiments examined the effects of competition on effort and memory. In Experiment 1, participants completed a physical effort task in which they were rewarded for winning an overall percentage, or for winning a competition they believed was against another player. In Experiment 2, participants completed a memory task in which they were rewarded for remembering an overall percentage of shapes, or more shapes than a competitor. We found that, in the physical effort task, participants demonstrated faster reaction times—a previous indicator of increased attention— in the competitive environment. Moreover, individual differences predicted the salience of competition’s effect. Furthermore, male participants showed faster reaction times and greater sustained effort as a result of a competitive environment, suggesting that males may be more affected by competition in physical effort tasks. However, in Experiment 2, participants remembered fewer shapes when competing, and later recalled less of these shapes during a post-test, suggesting that competition was harmful in our memory task. The different results from these two experiments suggest that competition can improve attention in a physical effort task, yet caution the use of competition in memory tasks.

  14. Evaluation of nuclear power development scenarios in romania envisaging the long-term national energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.; Apostol, M.; Visan, I.; Prodea, I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of RATEN ICN Pitesti experts' activities in the IAEA's Collaborative Project INPRO-SYNERGIES. Romanian study proposes to evaluate and analyze development of the nuclear capacity and increasing of its share in national energy sector, envisaging the long term national and regional energy sustainability by keeping options open for the future while bringing solutions to short/medium-term challenges. The study focused on the modelling of national NES (Nuclear Energy System) development on short and medium-term (time horizon 2050), considering the existing NFC (Nuclear Fuel Cycle) infrastructure and legislation, provisions of strategic documents in force and including also the possibility of regional collaboration regarding U/fresh fuel supply and SF (Spent Fuel) storage, as services provided at international market prices. The energy system modelling was realized by using the IAEA's MESSAGE program. The study results offer a clear image and also the possible answer to several key questions regarding: potential of nuclear energy to participate with an important share in national energy mix, in conditions of cost competitiveness, safety and security of supply; impact on national energy mix portfolio of capacities and electricity production; impact on Uranium domestic resources; economic projection/investments needed for new nuclear capacities addition; fresh fuel requirements for nuclear capacities; SF annually discharged and transferred to interim wet storage for cooling; SF volume in interim dry storage, etc. (authors)

  15. Enhancing the Sustainability of Nuclear Power: the Pebble Bed HTR in Deep Burn Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Cruz, D.F.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Van Heek, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    The scenario of a utility in an industrialized country starting new nuclear construction with a single PBMR reactor has been considered. To make the new construction project acceptable by government and society, a maximum effort to obtain sustainability (i.e. minimization of resource use and waste production) will have to be shown. Therefore the usual open cycle for HTR has been abandoned, and the spent fuel will be reprocessed once. The long-lived transuranic (TRU) elements Pu, Np, Am and Cm are all re-fabricated into so-called transmutation fuel elements, and loaded back into the same reactor, in our case a 110 MWe PBMR with low-enriched uranium cycle. In this study, the reactor physical prospects have been investigated: to what extent the amount of TRU could be reduced. In this way, 75% of the initial amount of TRU waste is being destructed, while the time span in which the waste is more radio-toxic than uranium ore is being reduced to one-third. Also, the amount of fresh driver fuel needed is decreases by 25%. A preliminary cost analysis has been performed as well. It shows that there is also a cost advantage of operating the reactor in Deep Burn mode in industrialized countries, where the waste storage fees charged per volume are relatively high. (authors)

  16. Nuclear recycle: One of the key factors ensuring the sustainable development of China's nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yunqing

    2002-01-01

    Since early 1970's China has established a complete nuclear fuel cycle system for defense purpose. CNNC and its formers deal mainly with business in nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle fields. Now COSTIND (CAEA) implements the governmental functions. Based on the features of energy sources, China is steady developing nuclear power as the appropriate supplement to meet demand of electricity in the southeast coastal regions. In the middle of 1980's, considering a number of elements, covering spent fuel arising from PWR dominantly, uranium source availability, development of FBR, radioactive waste management safely and existing good nuclear industry foundation etc., the closed fuel cycle strategy was formulated and announced internationally. In view of complexity of reprocessing technology and the limited spent fuel arising in the early period of nuclear power growing up, a multi-purpose pilot plant will be first set up. The plant involved in spent fuel AFR storage, and HEU/LEU fuel reprocessing separately has been constructed since 1991. At present more than a half of the project job has been completed while the preparation for long-distance transport of spent fuel is actively pushed on. It is expected that a centralized wet storage facility will be finished at the end of next year but the whole plant will be put into active commissioning in 2003. With the extension of the cumulative arising of spent fuel, a large scale reprocessing plant would be established around 2020. Reprocessed uranium will be surely re-enriched in the past manner while reactor-grade plutonium would be fabricated into MOX fuel to supply to FBR program. (author)

  17. Powering Cuba: A Possible Action Plan For Creating Cuba's Sustainable Energy Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Brandon; Hess, Matt; Sloane, Taylor; Harris, Zach

    2017-01-01

    While Cuba enjoys a high rate of electrification, 82% of its electricity today is generated from oil with an overall estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of $0.27 per kWh. Moreover, Cuba is experiencing increased electricity demand driven by a burgeoning tourism industry and an emerging small-medium size business sector. If the current power mix persists until 2040, power generation costs and carbon emissions would nearly double to US$9.8B and 24M MT CO2 per year respectively. This paper presents an overall strategy for Cuba to ensure its energy security and provide the Cuban people with clean, affordable and reliable access to electricity. With a total estimated cost of $14.1B, our proposal aims to reduce the overall cost of electricity generation to $0.14 per kWh by 2040. We recommend: Implementing a comprehensive renewable energy strategy that includes an energy mix of: (1) community-solar for small cooperative business (8.5%); (2) long-term investments for utility-scale solar IPPs (8.5%); (3) development of wind farms by IPPs (17.5%); and (4) maintaining supplementary biomass generation (6%); Installing complementary reliable sources of grid power from natural gas combined cycle plants (NGCC) via domestic production and LNG imports from a floating storage regasification unit (FSRU), accounting for 35% of Cuba’s energy; Attracting $700 million in infrastructure investment necessary to decrease transmission and distribution (T&D) losses; and Enacting reforms that increase regulatory certainty, investor protection, and the ease of doing business in Cuba for foreign investors. (author)

  18. Thin-Film Composite Pressure Retarded Osmosis Membranes for Sustainable Power Generation from Salinity Gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Yip, Ngai Yin

    2011-05-15

    Pressure retarded osmosis has the potential to produce renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. This work presents the fabrication of thin-film composite membranes customized for high performance in pressure retarded osmosis. We also present the development of a theoretical model to predict the water flux in pressure retarded osmosis, from which we can predict the power density that can be achieved by a membrane. The model is the first to incorporate external concentration polarization, a performance limiting phenomenon that becomes significant for high-performance membranes. The fabricated membranes consist of a selective polyamide layer formed by interfacial polymerization on top of a polysulfone support layer made by phase separation. The highly porous support layer (structural parameter S = 349 μm), which minimizes internal concentration polarization, allows the transport properties of the active layer to be customized to enhance PRO performance. It is shown that a hand-cast membrane that balances permeability and selectivity (A = 5.81 L m-2 h-1 bar-1, B = 0.88 L m-2 h-1) is projected to achieve the highest potential peak power density of 10.0 W/m2 for a river water feed solution and seawater draw solution. The outstanding performance of this membrane is attributed to the high water permeability of the active layer, coupled with a moderate salt permeability and the ability of the support layer to suppress the undesirable accumulation of leaked salt in the porous support. Membranes with greater selectivity (i.e., lower salt permeability, B = 0.16 L m-2 h-1) suffered from a lower water permeability (A = 1.74 L m-2 h-1 bar-1) and would yield a lower peak power density of 6.1 W/m2, while membranes with a higher permeability and lower selectivity (A = 7.55 L m-2 h-1 bar-1, B = 5.45 L m-2 h-1) performed poorly due to severe reverse salt permeation, resulting in a similar projected peak power density of 6.1 W/m2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Local Strongmen At The Village Level: The Conflict Of The Demolition Of The First Raja Brawijaya ‘Petilasan’ At Sudimoro Village, Jombang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirojul Huda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Having been enacted since 2014, the Act No. 6/2014 has given a spirit and a huge authority to the villages in developing their potential resources. Unfortunately, those special authorities have not been fcollowed by the leadership’s capacity of the village’s head. This paper attempts to analyze the rise of local actors so-called local strongmen at the village level. This study uses Sidel (1999 perspective on how to seek local strongmen in local area at Sudimoro Village, Megaluh District in Jombang Regency. In case, the head of Sudimoro village produces a despotic action by unloading and dredging the historical land where there was a petilasan from King of Majapahit, well-known as Raja Brawijaya 1. Then, this action eventually triggered a conflict in the middle of its society and has been solved after the hall of cultural heritage of the government of Jombang Regency has intervened. This paper concluded that the high of authority and power would potentially rise the new local strongmen at the village level. Therefore, the existence of the principle of recognition and subsidiarity owned by the village is only used by a few local elites for their interests without any accountability and accessibility for the society.

  20. Management Restoration Plans for Coastal Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudianto Rudianto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The village is located in the coastal area up to this time has decreased the quality of the coastal environment either caused by the process of natural or anthropogenic processes. Coastal damage Persistent will affect people's lives. Based on studies conducted by Rudianto (2013 and continued research by Rudianto (2014 on the institutional model for implementing the strategy, the resulting output coast of research called restoration plan for coastal villages or R2DP coastal villages. The objective of R2DP is helping the village administration to alleviate the problems of coastal areas. R2DP is a guideline that will be used by the village government based on a legal framework called the village regulations. The method used to compile R2DP is descriptive method. By using the method of Miles and Huberman (1984 used data reduction techniques. This technique is to pick and choose which data is critical to focus on the purpose of research. the results of research to produce findings about the restoration plan or a coastal village called R2DP. The essence of the mechanism and procedure R2DP is doing the restoration work by using institutions as a means of restoration.

  1. The Participation Role of Villagers in Village Plan Implementation: A Comparative Study on Two Villages in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengzhi; YIN; Haitao; CHEN

    2013-01-01

    China is in a process of rapid urbanization. Meanwhile, building development in rural areas is also accelerating. The paper intends to illustrate an original study focusing on villagers’ role in participation in village plan implementation in rural areas of China. Case studies, comparative studies, interviews, and questionnaires have been applied to reveal the mechanism of villager participation in village plan imple-mentation. Two case villages, which are pioneer units in the transition in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, have been selected. The study outcome shows that the villager participation plays an extremely important role in implementing the official village plan. The ideal development regulation mode in village planning in rural China should be a local government-villager cooperating system formed by three pillars: financial and technical supports from local governments; the participation of rural autonomous organizations, non-governmental organizations, and 'able persons' in formulation, implementation, and monitoring of official village plans; village construction teams like developers.

  2. Initiating a sustained diffusion of wind power: The role of public-private partnerships in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinica, Valentina

    2008-01-01

    The literature on policy approaches for the market support of renewable electricity is dominated by narrow conceptualizations of policy, referring mostly to direct instruments for economic feasibility. Such approaches often led to unsatisfactory explanations of diffusion results. This is the case of wind power diffusion in Spain, the success of which is typically credited to the 'feed-in-tariff' instrument. This paper offers an alternative explanatory account for wind power diffusion in Spain. It is argued that diffusion can be explained by a less obvious policy of stimulating investments by means of public-private partnerships (PPPs). The three legal frameworks for economic feasibility applicable up to 2004 harbored high economic risks. Although projects could have high profitability because of generous investment subsidies, up to mid 1990s most investments were based on PPPs, to address the risk perceptions of early investors. Fully-private partnerships now dominate investments, though PPPs have not disappeared. Next to winning investors' confidence, the PPP policy led to an investment culture whereby partnership investments dominate. By 2000, 95.7% of the installed wind capacity was owned by partnerships, and only 4.3% by individual companies. Partnerships invest in larger projects, have ambitious investment plans, and these lead to a high diffusion tempo

  3. Safety procedures for the MFTF sustaining-neutral-beam power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The MFTF SNBPSS comprises a number of sources of potentially hazardous electrical energy in a small physical area. Power is handled at 80 kV dc, 80 A; 70 V dc, 4000 A; 25 V dc, 5500 A; 3 kV dc, 10 A; and 2 kV dc, 10 A. Power for these systems is furnished from two separate 480 V distribution systems and a 13.8 kV distribution system. A defense in depth approach is used; interlocks are provided in the hardware to make it difficult to gain access to an energized circuit, and the operating procedure includes precautions which would protect personnel even if no interlocks were working. The complexity of the system implies a complex operating procedure, and this potential complexity is controlled by presenting the procedure in a modular form using 37 separate checklists for specific operations. The checklists are presented in flowchart form, so contingencies can be handled at the lowest possible level without compromising safety

  4. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustainable Development in a Changing World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Important changes concerning nuclear energy are coming to the fore, such as economic competitiveness compared to other energy resources, requirement for severe measures to mitigate man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, due to the rise of energy demand in Central and Eastern Europe and Asia and to the greater public concern with respect to the nuclear safety, particularly related to spent fuel and radioactive waste disposal. Global safety culture, as well as well focused nuclear research and development programs for safer and more efficient nuclear technology manifest themselves in a stronger and effective way. Information and data on nuclear technology and safety are disseminated to the public in timely, accurate and understandable fashion. Nuclear power is an important contributor to the world's electricity needs. In 1999, it supplied roughly one sixth of global electricity. The largest regional percentage of electricity generated through nuclear power last year was in western Europe (30%). The nuclear power shares in France, Belgium and Sweden were 75%, 58% and 47%, respectively. In North America, the nuclear share was 20% for the USA and 12% for Canada. In Asia, the highest figures were 43% for the Republic of Korea and 36% for Japan. In 1998, twenty-three nations produced uranium of which, the ten biggest producers (Australia, Canada, Kazakhstan, Namibia, Niger, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Ukraine, USA and Uzbekistan) supplied over 90% of the world's output. In 1998, world uranium production provided only about 59% of world reactor requirements. In OECD countries, the 1998 production could only satisfy 39% of the demand. The rest of the requirements were satisfied by secondary sources including civilian and military stockpiles, uranium reprocessing and re-enrichment of depleted uranium. With regard to the nuclear fuel industry, an increase in fuel burnup, higher thermal rates, longer fuel cycle and the use of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX

  5. Hydrogen Village : creating hydrogen and fuel cell communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a collaborative public-private partnership administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. This end user-driven, market development program accelerates the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell (FC) technologies throughout the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The program targets 3 specific aspects of market development, notably deployment of near market technologies in community based stationary and mobile applications; development of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure; and societal factors involving corporate policy and public education. This presentation focused on lessons learned through outreach programs and the deployment of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) heat and power generation; indoor and outdoor fuel cell back up power systems; fuel cell-powered forklifts, delivery vehicles, and utility vehicles; hydrogen internal combustion engine powered shuttle buses, sedans, parade float; hydrogen production/refueling stations in the downtown core; and temporary fuel cell power systems

  6. Role of nuclear option in sustainable power system planning in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsic, Z.; Kovacevic, T.; Feretic, D.

    1998-01-01

    To support the projected economic growth, electricity consumption in Croatia should rise by an average annual rate of at least 2.3% till the year 2030. After examining the potentials of new renewable energy sources (wind and solar energy and biomass) for large-scale electricity generation, projections of the required new generating capacities are made and possible developing scenarios of Croatian power system created. Nuclear and non-nuclear expansion options are analyzed, and optimal capacity and generation mixes are found on the basis of annual production costs and the assumption that the natural gas availability is limited. Emissions of SO 2 , NO x , particulates and CO 2 to the atmosphere in both options are calculated. Apart from that, it is analyzed how the hypothetical introduction of a CO 2 emission charge would affect the optimal capacity mix. (author)

  7. Hydrogen generation by nuclear power for sustainable development in the 21-st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilegan, Iosif Constantin; Pall, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen is the main non-polluting fuel. It is produced by natural gas steam reforming, water electrolysis and thermonuclear processes. Currently, 4% of the hydrogen world production is obtained by water electrolysis. The use of nuclear power for hydrogen production avoids the generation of greenhouse gases and the dependence of primary external energy sources. The US is currently developing a modular reactor for hydrogen production and water desalination, STAR - H 2 (Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor for Hydrogen production) with fast neutrons, lead cooling and passive safety systems operating at a temperature of 780 deg C. Also, a Russian reactor of the same type is operated at 540 deg C. China and India joint industrial countries like France, Japan, Russia and US in recognizing that any strategies aiming at a future with clean energy implies the nuclear energy

  8. Sustainable power and scenic beauty: The Niagara River Water Diversion Treaty and its relevance today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedoff, Andrei; Schott, Stephan; Karney, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Niagara Falls and the Niagara River have always attracted great public interest due to their natural beauty, their enormous potential for electricity generation, their recreational value and as an important ecosystem. There have been simultaneous efforts to preserve this unique natural wonder and harness its power through hydroelectric development projects by both the United States and Canada. This paper explores the evolution of these efforts that culminated with the signing of the 1950 Niagara River Water Diversion Treaty that established minimum water flow rates to protect the “scenic beauty” of the falls, allowing the remaining water to be diverted for power production. We examine the rationale that led to specific water flow restrictions and question to what extent they are relevant today, as water intake capacity on the Canadian side has just been extended by around 25%. We find that current restrictions under the Niagara River Water Treaty (that expired in 2000) are not based on sound scientific evidence and estimate the upper limit of potential foregone benefits from clean electricity generation and greenhouse gas reductions. We identify a number of important issues that emerged in the last decades and that would justify an exploration of new treaty rules. - Highlights: • We examine the history of water diversion at Niagara Falls. • We examine the rationale that led to water flow restrictions over Niagara Falls and its relevance today. • We estimate the opportunity cost of foregone energy generation with the new Canadian intake capacity. • Water flow stipulations were not based on the sound scientific or ecosystem analysis. • A renegotiation of the 1950 Niagara River Water Diversion Treaty is overdue

  9. Barriers to Local Residents’ Participation in Community-Based Tourism: Lessons from Houay Kaeng Village in Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sangkyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the barriers to local residents’ participation in the process of community-based tourism planning and development in a developing country. Focusing on the case of Houay Kaeng Village in Sayabouly Province, Laos, a qualitative exploratory study was conducted by adopting in-depth interviews with the various levels of local community’s members. The key barriers to local community participation identified in this research include: (1 low education levels and lack of knowledge about tourism; (2 poor living conditions and lack of financial support; (3 busy daily routine and lack of time for tourism participation; (4 local community’s perception of tourism as a seasonal business with low income; and (5 power disparities, institutional disincentives and local’s distrust in authorities. The results suggest that only a small number of the local residents in the village were satisfied with their current and on-going participation expressing their strong willingness to continue in participating in the process of tourism planning and development, whereas a large group of the residents were not willing to do it at all in the future. The paper further discusses implications for the government and communities in regard to community-based sustainable tourism development.

  10. DEMOCRACY AND AUTONOMY TRANSFORMATION IN THE GOVERNANCE OF MENGWI VILLAGE IN THE TRANSITION ERA: A CULTURAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Gede Suacana

    2012-11-01

    the procedural patternaccompanied by the strengthening of supra village government power decreasing theautonomy of the villages. Fourth, democracy and autonomy transformationcontributed to the demand for the strengthening of democracy institutions, bettercommunity participation and more accountable public services, transparence and responsiveness to what was needed by the people. Fifth, democracy and villageautonomy transformation, in addition to having the sense of involving the activeparticipation of the society in the village governance, also had the sense ofstrengthening the civil and political society in every village social organization whichactualized what was needed by the society. This condition at the same timefunctioned as the responses to nation’s hegemony through the supra villagegovernment which took place until the first transition era.

  11. Photovoltaic powered ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes for sustainable point-of-use disinfection of drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Jagals, Paul; Stuetz, Richard

    2014-09-15

    For many decades, populations in rural and remote developing regions will be unable to access centralised piped potable water supplies, and indeed, decentralised options may be more sustainable. Accordingly, improved household point-of-use (POU) disinfection technologies are urgently needed. Compared to alternatives, ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection is very attractive because of its efficacy against all pathogen groups and minimal operational consumables. Though mercury arc lamp technology is very efficient, it requires frequent lamp replacement, involves a toxic heavy metal, and their quartz envelopes and sleeves are expensive, fragile and require regular cleaning. An emerging alternative is semiconductor-based units where UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) are powered by photovoltaics (PV). Our review charts the development of these two technologies, their current status, and challenges to their integration and POU application. It explores the themes of UV-C-LEDs, non-UV-C LED technology (e.g. UV-A, visible light, Advanced Oxidation), PV power supplies, PV/LED integration and POU suitability. While UV-C LED technology should mature in the next 10 years, research is also needed to address other unresolved barriers to in situ application as well as emerging research opportunities especially UV-A, photocatalyst/photosensitiser use and pulsed emission options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The bioenergy village. Prerequisites and consequences of an independent heat supply and power supply by biomass for the agriculture, ecology and lifestyle culture in the rural area; Das Bioenergiedorf. Voraussetzungen und Folgen einer eigenstaendigen Waerme- und Stromversorgung durch Biomasse fuer Landwirtschaft, Oekologie und Lebenskultur im laendlichen Raum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, Hans [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum; Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Nachhaltige Entwicklung; Schmuck, Peter (eds.) [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Nachhaltige Entwicklung; UMC Potsdam (Germany). Inst. fuer Nachhaltigkeit und Umweltpolitik

    2010-07-01

    The transformation of the power supply and heat supply in the bioenergy village Juende (Federal Republic of Germany) on the basis of the energy source biomass was completed in the autumn 2005. Within this flagship project it could be shown that new ways are passable if the persons concerned design the new concepts. The contribution under consideration reports on the results of the final phase of this project describing the socio-economic and ecologic impacts of the implementation of the energy supply on the biomass in Juende. Within this part of project the disciplines crop science, soil science, geosciences, economy, psychology and sociology interact. The most important results of the single disciplines are presented in this final report.

  13. Life cycle assessment of village electrification based on straight jatropha oil in Chhattisgarh, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuender, Simon Michael; Zah, Rainer; Widmer, Rolf [Technology and Society Lab, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Ueberlandstr. 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bhatacharjee, Somnath [Winrock India International, New Delhi (India); Classen, Mischa [First Climate AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mukherjee, Prodyut [Sir Dorabji Tata Trust and Allied Trusts, New Delhi (India)

    2010-03-15

    A decentralized power generation plant fuelled by straight jatropha oil was implemented in 2006 in Ranidhera, Chhattisgarh, India. The goal of this study was to assess the environmental sustainability of that electrification project in order to provide a scientific basis for policy decisions on electrifying remote villages. A full Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was conducted on jatropha-based rural electrification and then compared with other electrification approaches such as photovoltaic (PV), grid connection and a diesel-fuelled power generator. In summary, the jatropha-based electrification in Ranidhera reduces greenhouse gas emissions over the full life cycle by a factor of 7 compared to a diesel generator or grid connection. The environmental performance is only slightly improved, mainly due to the high air pollution from pre-heating the jatropha seeds. With additional measures oil extraction and overall efficiency could be further improved. However, environmental benefits can only be achieved if jatropha is cultivated on marginal land and land use competition can be excluded. Under these conditions, jatropha-based electricity generation might be a useful alternative to other renewable electrification options, as the technology is very sturdy and can be maintained even in remote and highly under-developed regions. (author)

  14. Power for the future : towards a sustainable electricity system for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, M.S.; Horne, M.; McClenaghan, T.; Peters, R.

    2004-05-01

    Ontario's electricity system has undergone major changes since 1998, when the Hydro-Electric Power Commission was divided into four separate entities, Ontario Power Generation, Hydro One, the Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation, and the Electrical Safety Authority. In addition, retail and wholesale electricity markets were introduced in 2002 under the supervision of the Ontario Energy Board. The removal from service of several nuclear generating facilities in the province led to greater reliance on coal-fired generation to meet energy demands. In 2003, the newly elected provincial government made a commitment to phase out coal-fired plants by 2007 for environmental reasons. It is estimated that all the the existing nuclear facilities will reach their projected operational lifetimes by 2018. Given the province's growing electricity demand, several options have been proposed as to how future energy needs could be met. The options range from investment into low-impact renewable energy sources such as small-scale hydro, solar, biomass and wind, to the construction of new nuclear generating facilities. The Pembina Institute and the Canadian Environmental Law Association examined the following four key issues regarding Ontario's future direction in electricity generation, transmission and distribution: (1) by how much can electricity demand be reduced through the adoption of energy efficient technologies, fuel switching, cogeneration and demand response measures, (2) how much electricity supply can be obtained from low-impact renewable energy sources, (3) how should the grid demand be met once the electricity system has maximized the technically and economically feasible contributions from energy efficiency, fuel switching, cogeneration, response management measures (RMM) and renewable energy sources, and (4) what public policies should the province adopt to maximize energy efficiency, fuel switching, cogeneration, RMM and renewable energy sources. The Canadian

  15. Multi-Generation Concentrating Solar-Hydrogen Power System for Sustainable Rural Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krothapalli, A.; Greska, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes an energy system that is designed to meet the demands of rural populations that currently have no access to grid-connected electricity. Besides electricity, it is well recognized that rural populations need at least a centralized refrigeration system for storage of medicines and other emergency supplies, as well as safe drinking water. Here we propose a district system that will employ a multi-generation concentrated solar power (CSP) system that will generate electricity and supply the heat needed for both absorption refrigeration and membrane distillation (MD) water purification. The electricity will be used to generate hydrogen through highly efficient water electrolysis and individual households can use the hydrogen for generating electricity, via affordable proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and as a fuel for cooking. The multi-generation system is being developed such that its components will be easy to manufacture and maintain. As a result, these components will be less efficient than their typical counterparts but their low cost-to-efficiency ratio will allow for us to meet our installation cost goal of $1/Watt for the entire system. The objective of this paper is to introduce the system concept and discuss the system components that are currently under development. (auth)

  16. Two energy storage alternatives for a solar-powered sustainable single floor desert home

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-09-30

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic analysis of a totally solarpowered desert home. The home is air-conditioned and provides all modern comforts and facilities. It features closely spaced, roof mounted photovoltaic modules, which collect the solar energy driving the whole energy system. During the day time, the modules form an elevated horizontal surface above the roof, shielding it from direct solar radiation. After sunset, the photovoltaic modules are flipped vertically upwards to expose the roof to the sky, thus enhancing night-time cooling. Two methods of energy storage are proposed and compared, one using solely battery storage of electrical output, and the other employing a combination of cold water storage and battery storage. The analysis is based on detailed dynamic heat transfer calculations for the entire building envelope, coupled with a solar radiation model, and followed by energy balances. The results reveal that indeed it is feasible to employ solar energy as the only source of energy to power the home, and that each storage system has its own merits and shortcomings. © 2010 WIT Press.

  17. Development Planning of Tourist Village Using Participatory Mapping (Case study: Mambal Village, Badung Regency, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, I. N. S.; Wiguna, P. P. K.; Narka, I. W.; Febrianti, N. K. O.

    2017-12-01

    Tourism sector is the highest source of income in Badung Regency so it is interesting to see the development of tourist village as one of the alternative tourist destinations in Badung Regency. Most of the village areas in Badung Regency do not have policies, vision and mission as an effort to develop the village into a tourist village. As a result the role of tourist village does not grow in terms of economic and social community. The purpose of this research is to determine and to map the tourism development plan using participatory mapping. The methodology used in this research is field surveys and interviews for data collection and participatory mapping to map the development plan to support tourism. Mambal village is located in Sub-district of Abiansemal, Badung Regency, Indonesia. Mambal village has the potential to become a tourism village because it is supported by the uniqueness of nature and tradition. Mambal village passed by Ayung river, where along the river there are beautiful cliffs which potential to develop as adventure tourism. There is also Senaung Pengibul Cave with a length of more than 15 meters and is wide enough to pass. Mambal village also has a spiritual tour of Pura Demung and Pancoran Pitu, which has a magical story. Currently farmers in Mambal Village are focusing on developing organic farming, of which 38% of the rice fields present in Mambal are pure organic that produces organic rice. Around the rice field area is also created a jogging track for visitors while enjoying the natural beauty of rice fields. Farmers also cultivate oyster mushrooms. In addition, Mambal Village Community also produces handicraft products that are woven in the form of symmetrical Endek (traditional fabrics) and processed products from used goods such as bags, wallets, pencil boxes and others.

  18. Green Power Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPCs are towns, villages, cities, counties, or tribal governments in which the local government, businesses, and residents collectively use green power in amounts that meet or exceed EPA's Green Power Community purchase requirements.

  19. Concentrating solar power. Its potential contribution to a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This report summarises the findings and recommendations of a study of concentrating solar power (CSP). The study has examined the potential contribution of CSP in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (the MENA region) over the period to 2050, and the scientific and technical developments that will be required to realise that potential. This study critically reviews existing work and describes the scientific consensus on the status and prospects of this technology. It also identifies key outstanding issues and where knowledge gaps need to be filled for CSP to fulfil its potential contribution in Europe and the MENA region. Based on these findings, the study makes recommendations on how to improve national and European support programmes for CSP development and deployment. Specific aims of the study have been the following: (1) to review the current status of CSP technologies and identify the technological developments and research and development (R and D) needed to achieve reliable operation and cost competitiveness with fossil fuelled electricity generation; (2) to consider how issues associated with the intermittent nature of CSP for electricity generation due to the daily pattern of insolation and the potential for cloudy days can best be addressed; (3) to identify the environmental impacts and infrastructure requirements of CSP, and comment on the significance of these in relation to other options for electricity supply; and, consequently, (4) to develop a view of the potential contribution that CSP located in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa could make to the energy mix in those regions by 2020 and 2050. This report focuses primarily on the generation of electricity from CSP, but it is recognised that there are other potentially significant 'products' from CSP such as process steam for industry, water desalination, alternative energy carriers such as hydrogen and syngas, and decontamination of water supplies. Although not discussed in

  20. The Internalization of Externalities from Electrical Power Plants as a Tool for Progressing Towards Sustainability in Small Island Developing States: The Case of Bahrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Al-Hesabi (Ali)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPower is the engine of growth of any economy. Consumption of electrical energy is a universally accepted indicator of progress in the productive sectors, and of the well being of the people of any country. No major economic activity can be sustained without an adequate and reliable

  1. Teens, Power Tools, and Green Schools: Education for Sustainability through a University Environmental Design Program and Middle School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the role of green schools in promoting education for sustainability by reflecting on a university-middle school partnership focused on sustainable design. Undergraduates and middle school students met weekly for a semester to learn about sustainability through simple design projects and activities that focused on…

  2. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11... VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock shall... owner of the animal, if known, by certified mail or by posting in the village square. The notice shall...

  3. Measuring the Development Patterns of Urban Villages in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Urban villages are widespread in many Chinese cities, providing affordable and accessible housing for rural migrants. These urban villages are developed by the indigenous village population base on a self-help approach and in an unauthorized style. Consequently, urban villages are characterized by

  4. Potentialities of the molten salt reactor concept for a sustainable nuclear power production based on thorium cycle in epithermal spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttin, Alexis

    2002-01-01

    In the case of a significant nuclear contribution to world energy needs, the problem of present nuclear waste management pose the sustainability of the PWR fuel cycle back into question. Studies on storage and incineration of these wastes should therefore go hand in hand with studies on innovative systems dedicated to a durable nuclear energy production, as reliable, clean and safe as possible. We are here interested in the concept of molten salt reactor, whose fuel is liquid. This particularity allows an online pyrochemical reprocessing which gives the possibility to overcome some neutronic limits. In the late sixties, the MSBR (Molten Salt Breeder Reactor) project of a graphite-moderated fluoride molten salt reactor proved thus that breeding is attainable with thorium in a thermal spectrum, provided that the online reprocessing is appropriate. By means of simulation tools developed around the Monte Carlo code MCNP, we first re-evaluate the performance of a reference system, which is inspired by the MSBR project. The complete study of the pre-equilibrium transient of this 2,500 MWth reactor, started with 232 Th/ 233 U fuel, allows us to validate our reference choices. The obtained equilibrium shows an important reduction of inventories and induced radio-toxicities in comparison with the other possible fuel cycles. The online reprocessing is efficient enough to make the system breed, with a doubling time of about thirty years at equilibrium. From the reference system, we then test different options in terms of neutron economy, transmutation and control of reactivity. We find that the online reprocessing brings most of its flexibility to this system, which is particularly well adapted to power generation with thorium. The study of transition scenarios to this fuel cycle quantifies the limits of a possible deployment from the present French power stock, and finally shows that a rational management of the available plutonium would be necessary in any case. (author)

  5. Sustainability of the nuclear power as a technology with minimal relative impact on the economic and environmental resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oussanov, V.I. [State Scientific Center Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The ''entropy'' model for quantitative assessment of the impact of the electricity generating systems is discussed in the paper. Introduction of the ''entropy'' notion opens an opportunity to come to a new understanding of the competitiveness of the electricity generating technologies under taking into account not only economic but also environmental resources. The criterion of the effectiveness should be formulated as production the unit of electricity under minimal dissipation of human energy and natural resources or, in another words, under minimal increase of the 'nooentropy' in the production system. Under such wide definition, the effectiveness of a technology for electricity production becomes a very important index of the sustainability. The assessment of the ''nooentropy'' effectiveness of the main full-energy-chain electricity production options with normalization to natural resources of Russia has demonstrated important advantages of the nuclear power which are missed in another models of the system analysis, specifically, less impact on natural resource. (author)

  6. The bioenergy village - preconditions and consequences of autonomous heat and power supply on the basis of biomass for agricultrue, ecology and lifestyle in rural regions. Final report phase I; Das Bioenergiedorf - Voraussetzungen und Folgen einer eigenstaendigen Waerme- und Stromversorgung durch Biomasse fuer Landwirtschaft, Oekologie und Lebenskultur im laendlichen Raum. Endbericht Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, H.; Ahl, C.; Girschner, W.; Krumbein, W.; Marggraf, R.; Scheffer, K.; Schmuck, P. (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    With support from the Federal Minister of Consumer Protection, Nutrition and Agriculture through the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V. (Renewable Fuels Agency), a project group of Goettingen University was able to demonstrate how complete conversion to biomass of heat and power supply can be achieved for a whole village with maximum social acceptance, environmental compatibility, and economic and technical efficiency. This and further projects will provide flexible, generally applicable concepts for wider use and are expected to give new impetus to bioenergy and help reduce CO2 emissions. This documentation presents the results of the first project phase, which lasted from October 2000 through November 2002. After describing the criteria for which the model village was selected, the work carried out by the various scientific disciplines cooperating in the project (environmental geoscience, crop research, soil research, agricultural economy, psychology, sociology and political science) is described, and the current project status is outlined. (orig.) [German] Mit Unterstuetzung des Bundesministeriums fuer Verbraucherschutz, Ernaehrung und Landwirtschaft durch die Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe e.V. konnte die Projektgruppe der Universitaet damit beginnen, beispielhaft in einem Dorf zu demonstrieren, wie eine komplette Umstellung der Strom- und Waermeversorgung auf den Energietraeger Biomasse sozial, umweltvertraeglich, wirtschaftlich und technisch erfolgen kann. Auf der Basis dieser konkreten Umstellugsarbeiten und Erfahrungen aus anderen aehnlichen Projekten sollen uebertragbare, flexible Konzepte erarbeitet werden, die der Nutzung der Bioenergie einen deutlichen Auftrieb geben und dadurch auch erhebliche Kohlendioxid-Einsparpotentiale erschliessen koennen. In dieser Dokumentation sind die Ergebnisse der ersten Phase des Projektes 'Das Bioenergiedorf' vom Oktober 2000 bis November 2002 niedergelegt. Es wird zunaechst in einem Ueberblick

  7. New energy vision in Murone Village area; 2000 nendo Muronemura chiiki shin energy vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A new energy vision was established in the Murone Village area in Iwate Prefecture. The population of the village as of 1995 was 6,552 persons, which has continued with slow decrease in the last decade, revealing remarkable departure from agriculture. Energy consumption in this village per person is 11.5 two-hundred-liter drums, and carbon dioxide discharge per person is 5.6t-CO2. This is about 60% of the national average, because of no existence of thermal power plants and factories. The existing quantity of new energies is occupied by bio-mass as the largest because more than 70% of the village area is forest, followed by solar beam and heat. However, in the case of forest, since the energy is actually utilized only from the felled woods, the utilizable quantity is considerably small, whereas the availability of solar beam and heat is higher. With regard to introduction of new energies, the efforts of the introduction thereof are directed to introduction into primary schools, the village office, the special nursing home for elderly people, and the meal providing center for middle schools, in addition to proliferation and enlightenment of household solar systems, and photovoltaic power generation systems. Furthermore, discussions were given on introduction of a pellet burning power plant utilizing waste woods. (NEDO)

  8. On Stability of Sustainable Power Systems : Network Fault Response of Transmission Systems with Very High Penetration of Distributed Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boemer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Power systems are undergoing a historic structural and technological transformation. The increase of distributed generation (DG), recently mostly wind power park modules (WPPMs) and photovoltaic power park modules (PVPPMs), is already changing the way power systems are structured and operated.

  9. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  10. Water Resource Sustainability Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Resource Sustainability Issues on Tropical Islands December 1 - 3, 2015 | Hilton Hawaiian Village | Honolulu, Hawaii Presented By Water Resources Research Center (WRRC), Hawaii and American Samoa Water and Environmental Research Institute (WERI), Guam Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute

  11. Making nuclear power sustainable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, B. [European Nuclear Society, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2004-05-01

    Even though it is almost 35 years old, there is a picture which still cannot be seen without emotion: the first photograph of the Earth shown as a modest white and blue dot in the black sky, beyond the barren desolation of the Moon in the foreground. This tiny planet, surrounded by the fragile bubble of its atmosphere, is our only home, and it will be eons, if ever, before humans can find another place to live. And our home is endangered. Let's state the facts: Today over 6 billion human beings inhabit the earth, many of whom do not have enough available energy to enjoy a decent life. Tomorrow, there shall be 9 billion of us. Within a mere century, we have pumped so much carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere that their concentration exceeds by far any level ever experienced by humans since their mastery of fire, half a million years ago. All the available models predict that if we do not curb drastically our GHG emissions, we are bound for a catastrophe with dire consequences, a catastrophe which may be irreversible by human standards. In summary, we must double our energy production while dividing by a factor of two our GHG emissions, knowing that today, 80% of our energy comes from the combustion of coal, gas and oil, all of which produce CO{sub 2} released in the atm sphere. This is the toughest challenge facing us in the next few decades, and I include the water challenge, since producing drinking water will also increase our energy needs. (author)

  12. Making nuclear power sustainable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.

    2004-01-01

    Even though it is almost 35 years old, there is a picture which still cannot be seen without emotion: the first photograph of the Earth shown as a modest white and blue dot in the black sky, beyond the barren desolation of the Moon in the foreground. This tiny planet, surrounded by the fragile bubble of its atmosphere, is our only home, and it will be eons, if ever, before humans can find another place to live. And our home is endangered. Let's state the facts: Today over 6 billion human beings inhabit the earth, many of whom do not have enough available energy to enjoy a decent life. Tomorrow, there shall be 9 billion of us. Within a mere century, we have pumped so much carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere that their concentration exceeds by far any level ever experienced by humans since their mastery of fire, half a million years ago. All the available models predict that if we do not curb drastically our GHG emissions, we are bound for a catastrophe with dire consequences, a catastrophe which may be irreversible by human standards. In summary, we must double our energy production while dividing by a factor of two our GHG emissions, knowing that today, 80% of our energy comes from the combustion of coal, gas and oil, all of which produce CO 2 released in the atm sphere. This is the toughest challenge facing us in the next few decades, and I include the water challenge, since producing drinking water will also increase our energy needs. (author)

  13. Clinical significance of neurocysticercosis in endemic villages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, H.H.; Gilman, R.H.; Tsang, V.C.W.; Gonzalez, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral cysticercosis is the main cause of late-onset epilepsy in most developing countries. Data on the neuroepidemiology of cysticercosis in endemic populations is scarce. In an endemic village on the northern coast of Peru, 49 individuals with neurological symptomatology (41 epileptic and 8 non-epileptic) were screened for antibodies to Taenia solium, using a serum electroimmuno transfer blot assay. Fifteen subjects were seropositive, 14 (34%) of those with epilepsy but only one (13%) of those who were non-epileptic. A history of passing proglottides was associated with positive serology. Thirteen of the 15 seropositive individuals underwent cerebral computed tomography; only 7 (54%) were abnormal. A randomly selected sample of 20 pigs from the village was also tested, and 6 (30%) were seropositive. This study demonstrated the importance of cysticercosis in the aetiology of epilepsy in endemic villages and the close relationship between porcine and human infection

  14. Optimal Time to Enter a Retirement Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the financial planning problem of a retiree wishing to enter a retirement village at a future uncertain date. The date of entry is determined by the retiree’s utility and bequest maximisation problem within the context of uncertain future health states. In addition, the retiree must choose optimal consumption, investment, bequest and purchase of insurance products prior to their full annuitisation on entry to the retirement village. A hyperbolic absolute risk-aversion (HARA utility function is used to allow necessary consumption for basic living and medical costs. The retirement village will typically require an initial deposit upon entry. This threshold wealth requirement leads to exercising the replication of an American put option at the uncertain stopping time. From our numerical results, active insurance and annuity markets are shown to be a critical aspect in retirement planning.

  15. Report of a photovoltaic power generation field test at Deigo-en, an old people`s home, in Ginoza village, Okinawa prefecture; Deigoen taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (Okinawaken Ginozamura) hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-26

    A photovoltaic power generation system was installed on the roof of Deigo-en, a special nursing home for the aged, to collect various operation data through a long-term operation. This photovoltaic power generation system has an output of 99 kW, batteries, and functions of inverse power flow and self-operation. The solar cell module is the polycrystal system, its conversion efficiency is 12.6%, and the maximum output is 108.2 W. The array configuration is composed of 2 sets of 9 series and 51 parallels, and totally 918 modules are used. This system supplies the power for lighting and air conditioning, which are indispensable for living of 105 old-age dwellers in the home, as well as for refrigerator for storing foods, and medical equipment for maintaining their health. At the outage caused by typhoon, other disasters, or emergency, crisis management is conducted using the batteries and self-operation function, which enables to supply energy with a function of an evacuation place. Arrangement and analysis of the long-term operation data and trouble examples are to be carried out. 13 figs.

  16. Sustainability Evaluation of Power Grid Construction Projects Using Improved TOPSIS and Least Square Support Vector Machine with Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxiao Niu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric power industry is of great significance in promoting social and economic development and improving people’s living standards. Power grid construction is a necessary part of infrastructure construction, whose sustainability plays an important role in economic development, environmental protection and social progress. In order to effectively evaluate the sustainability of power grid construction projects, in this paper, we first identified 17 criteria from four dimensions including economy, technology, society and environment to establish the evaluation criteria system. After that, the grey incidence analysis was used to modify the traditional Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS, which made it possible to evaluate the sustainability of electric power construction projects based on visual angle of similarity and nearness. Then, in order to simplify the procedure of experts scoring and computation, on the basis of evaluation results of the improved TOPSIS, the model using Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm (MFOA to optimize the Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM was established. Finally, a numerical example was given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  17. Report on new energy vision in Fudai Village area; Fudaimura chiiki shin energy vision hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A new energy vision was established in the Fudai Village area in Iwate Prefecture. The population of Fudai Village is decreasing from the peak of 4,103 persons in 1985. Its basic industry is fishery and agricultural industries, with the fish and marine product raising industry particularly active. The energy consumption in Fudai Village is, in the decreasing order, the transportation field (48.5%), the social and household field (26.5%), social industry, and manufacturing industry. Homes consume room heating energy at a greater extent. Energies are supplied by fuel oil at 53,554 Gcal (79.3%) and electric power at 11,551 Gcal (17.1%). The new energy introducing project has discussed introduction of cogeneration into the Kurosaki House, introduction of photovoltaic power generation and solar heat utilization systems, and introduction wind power generation as a tourism symbol. Discussions were also given on conversion of the automobiles used in the official organizations into clean energy automobiles. Further discussions were given on introduction of small new energy facilities, such as hybrid illumination, small wind power generation, and photovoltaic power generation, into the village office, the station square, the fish market, facilities in the fishing port, the children's hall, and the Road Station. (NEDO)

  18. Sustainability and power in health promotion: community-based participatory research in a reproductive health policy case study in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rosilda; Plaza, Veronica; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-03-01

    Health promotion programs are commonly viewed as value-free initiatives which seek to improve health, often through behavior change. An opposing view has begun to emerge that health promotion efforts, especially ones seeking to impact health policy and social determinants of health, are vulnerable to political contexts and may depend on who is in power at the time. This community-based participatory research study attempts to understand these interactions by applying a conceptual model focused on the power context, diverse stakeholder roles within this context, and the relationship of political levers and other change strategies to the sustainability of health promotion interventions aimed at health policy change. We present a case study of a health promotion coalition, New Mexico for Responsible Sex Education (NMRSE), as an example of power dynamics and change processes. Formed in 2005 in response to federal policies mandating abstinence-only education, NMRSE includes community activists, health promotion staff from the New Mexico Department of Health, and policy-maker allies. Applying an adapted Mayer's 'power analysis' instrument, we conducted semi-structured stakeholder interviews and triangulated political-context analyses from the perspective of the stakeholders.We identified multiple understandings of sustainability and health promotion policy change, including: the importance of diverse stakeholders working together in coalition and social networks; their distinct positions of power within their political contexts; the role of science versus advocacy in change processes; the particular challenges for public sector health promotion professionals; and other facilitators versus barriers to action. One problem that emerged consisted of the challenges for state employees to engage in health promotion advocacy due to limitations imposed on their activities by state and federal policies. This investigation's results include a refined conceptual model, a power

  19. Sustaining Collective Action in Urbanizing China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, Xianwen; Goebel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The recent years have seen a proliferation of scholarship on protests and other forms of collective action in China. Important insights have been gained into how conflicts between social groups and local governments begin, which strategies and instruments protesters apply, and under which...... challenges of sustaining collective action in China: the continuing existence of substantial grievances, the re-activation of strong social ties, the presence of unifying frames and an adaptive protest leadership. The comparison shows that especially the last factor is crucial: while the two villages were...... similar in all other respects, leadership in Village B was far more adaptive in Village A, which goes a long way towards explaining why collective action could be sustained twice as long in Village B....

  20. Combined heat and power's potential to meet New York City's sustainability goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Bianca; Saba, Alexis; Gerrard, Michael; Modi, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has been proven as a mature technology that can benefit both building owners and utility operators. As the economic and environmental benefits of CHP in urban centers gain recognition, regulations and policies have evolved to encourage their deployment. However, the question remains whether these policies are sufficient in helping to achieve the larger sustainability goals, such as the New York City-specific goal of incorporating 800 MW of distributed generation. In this paper, the current regulatory and policy environment for CHP is discussed. Then, an engineering analysis estimating the potential for CHP in NYC at the individual building and microgrid scale, considered a city block, is performed. This analysis indicates that over 800 MW of individual building CHP systems would qualify for the current incentives but many systems would need to undergo more cumbersome air permitting processes reducing the viable capacity to 360 MW. In addition microgrid CHP systems with multiple owners could contribute to meeting the goal even after considering air permits; however, these systems may incorporate many residential customers. The regulatory framework for microgrids with multiple owners and especially residential customers is particularly uncertain therefore additional policies would be needed to facilitate their development. - Highlights: • Estimates 1580 MW and 3042 MW CHP capacity at the building and microgrid scales. • Citywide emissions could reduce 4% at the building and 9% at the microgrid scale. • CHP microgrid systems operate at similar efficiencies while providing energy to buildings not viable for CHP. • Current regulatory and policy mechanisms would affect at least 800 MW of CHP systems. • Microgrid CHP systems may be necessary to the City's meet distributed generation goals

  1. Macro Study of Spatial Development Area on Tourism Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widhianthini Widhianthini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro study is one approach that combines the rational method based on the results of previous studies by the authority with the empirical method utilizing the survey techniques. The purpose of this macro study is to identify and analyze the potentials, problems, and the limiting factors, and the needs of the regency; and to recommend the programs and models required by the community to achieve the sustainable development. This research uses the Participatory Rural Appraisal method, the  interview techniques (Semi Structured Interview, the technique of focused group discussion (FGD, the Rapid District Appraisal (RDA, then it is analyzed by the empirical and dynamical systems. The overview of macro studies is particularly relevant in developing the regions, especially the rural areas, based on the existing advantages, such as in Tabanan Regency. Tabanan Regency is a granary in Bali Province and the zoning of agricultural commodities in quadrant III,which is the rural farming area with combined functions between the cultivated and rural areas supported by the tourism department. The studies of the areas in the form of potential analysis, problem analysis, requirement analysis become the guidelines for preparing the development scenarios and program formats. The studies will then constitute the factors driving the realization of sustainable development of tourism villages in supporting the sustainable agriculture.

  2. Agroforestry practice in villages surrounding Nyamure former ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    Household surveys were conducted in the three administrative cells ... In order to be more concise, only those villages (settlements) within 5-10 km radius .... Market. 3. 1.9. Firewood collection from public land consumed a lot of time from ... in order to assess the extent of agroforestry practice so as to guide in planning.

  3. Communicative and narrative sound in Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben

    2010-01-01

    The soundtrack of the TV spot Village tells a story of its own. Some of the sounds communicate meaning very close to the visuals, for example by creating an African soundscape. But the soundtrack also supplies narrative elements of its own, which is most remarkable when it adds a happy ending...

  4. Radon variations in a Hungarian village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, E.; Deak, F.; Marx, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Vajda, N.

    1997-01-01

    A steady radon exhalation is assumed in most publications. In a village of North-East Hungary, however, high radon concentrations have been measured, differing strongly in neighbouring houses and varying in time, due to the interplay of geochemical phenomena. (orig.)

  5. Discussion based on the adaptability design for the construction of rural tourism for the revival of villages in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guanyi; Li, Xingyi; Zhao, Hanyu

    2018-05-01

    Tourist development has been an increasingly popular part in rural construction in contemporary China, and has become a juncture of rural renewal and revival. Taking the three perspectives of rural physical form, rural culture, human action and activities, this article summarizes the problems and conflicts created by Chinese rural tourism, and analyzes the root reason for the conflicts. We try to generalize valuable experience learned from Chinese New Village experimental base so far from different aspects such as architectural forms, spatial scales, ecological environment, arts and culture and residential life, integrated with notion of ‘adaptability design’ in the theoretical system of sustainable development, and then deduct a strategy for designing rural sustainable development, under the intervention of tourism. Lastly, the example of a Chinese village - Fenshui Village is chosen to practice, and construction conception is raised accordingly.

  6. A vision for growing a world-class power technology cluster in a smart, sustainable British Columbia : full report to the Premier's Technology Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umedaly, M.

    2005-03-01

    This report presents a framework for power technology in British Columbia and the development of new sources of energy while ensuring the sustainable economic growth. It also explores the opportunities present in the power technology sector. A definition of the power technology industry was provided, and market drivers were identified, describing the region's competitive advantage and assets. Five market opportunities were introduced, comprising the report's targeted innovation strategy: remote power solutions; sustainable urban practices; smart transport; smart grid; and large scale clean green power production. An outline of the current energy market in British Columbia was presented with details of research and development in renewable energy sources. Global power demands were also outlined. A regional action plan was presented in order to develop the power technology cluster. Leadership strategies were presented, with economic development goals and working teams geared towards an implementation resource plan. A commercialization strategy was suggested in order to address local demand, commercialization funds, and increasing access and resources. A growth strategy was also presented to assist in the development of access to world markets, create partnerships and assist in branding and collaborations with industry and government. An innovation strategy was outlined, with the aim of developing research initiatives, support centres in key market and technology areas and connecting existing efforts in basic sciences to power technology applications. It was concluded that in order to achieve full implementation of these strategies, a short term task force is necessary to shape overall plans. Additionally, an ongoing vision team, working groups and coordination is necessary to implement overall strategies and subcomponents. Appendices were included with reference to each of the five market opportunities presented in the report. 58 refs.

  7. A vision for growing a world-class power technology cluster in a smart, sustainable British Columbia : full report to the Premier's Technology Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umedaly, M.

    2005-03-01

    This report presents a framework for power technology in British Columbia and the development of new sources of energy while ensuring the sustainable economic growth. It also explores the opportunities present in the power technology sector. A definition of the power technology industry was provided, and market drivers were identified, describing the region's competitive advantage and assets. Five market opportunities were introduced, comprising the report's targeted innovation strategy: remote power solutions; sustainable urban practices; smart transport; smart grid; and large scale clean green power production. An outline of the current energy market in British Columbia was presented with details of research and development in renewable energy sources. Global power demands were also outlined. A regional action plan was presented in order to develop the power technology cluster. Leadership strategies were presented, with economic development goals and working teams geared towards an implementation resource plan. A commercialization strategy was suggested in order to address local demand, commercialization funds, and increasing access and resources. A growth strategy was also presented to assist in the development of access to world markets, create partnerships and assist in branding and collaborations with industry and government. An innovation strategy was outlined, with the aim of developing research initiatives, support centres in key market and technology areas and connecting existing efforts in basic sciences to power technology applications. It was concluded that in order to achieve full implementation of these strategies, a short term task force is necessary to shape overall plans. Additionally, an ongoing vision team, working groups and coordination is necessary to implement overall strategies and subcomponents. Appendices were included with reference to each of the five market opportunities presented in the report. 58 refs

  8. Village operator feasibility framework: A recommended method for assessing the viability of village operator sites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Von Staden, R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available model will serve to enhance local industry and government services, and contribute directly to the local economy through job creation. The proposed model empowers local ICT service providers, known as Village Operators, to implement broadband...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: BIOMASS CO-FIRING IN INDUSTRIAL BOILERS--MINNESOTA POWER'S RAPIDS ENERGY CENTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA operates the Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluation (ESTE) program to facilitate the deployment of innovative technologies through performance verification and information dissemination. This ESTE project involved evaluation of co-firing common woody bio...

  10. Examining the market potential for natural-gas-powered trucks : barriers and opportunities for promoting environmental sustainability and economic prosperity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, public concerns have grown over America's energy use and production. Pushes : towards more environmentally friendly and sustainable sources of energy have moved out of fringe politics : and into mainstream political discourse. A...

  11. Barefoot in Afghanistan: solar electrification of villages in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Bunker [Barefoot Coll., Rajasthan (India); Synnevag, Gry [Norwegian Church Aid (Norway)

    2006-05-15

    In the mountains of Afghanistan, villagers must walk long distances and pay high prices to buy fuel to survive. The authors report on an innovative solar electrification scheme that has enabled villagers to be self-reliant installers. (Author)

  12. Alaska Native Villages and Rural Communities Water Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant human health and water quality problems exist in Alaska Native Village and other rural communities in the state due to lack of sanitation. To address these issues, EPA created the Alaska Rural and Native Villages Grant Program.

  13. Feasibility of freight villages in the NYMTC region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    This report summarizes the work conducted to analyze the site impact of freight villages. The analysis included assessing traffic, : logistics and economic impacts, which are then used to determine the extent to which freight village development has ...

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user's workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  15. Ground fissures in the area of Mavropigi Village (N. Greece): Seismotectonics or mining activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogirou, Eleni; Tsapanos, Theodoros; Karakostas, Vassilios; Marinos, Vassilios; Chatzipetros, Alexandros

    2014-12-01

    In the beginning of July 2010, a ground fissure was observed in the field near the village of Mavropigi (Northern Greece) and specifically in its NW side. Later on (early September), a second ground fissure was perceived, close and almost parallel to the first one and very close to the limits of the lignite exploitation mine (by the Public Power Corporation, PPC). It was observed that the village of Mavropigi slides away slowly towards the PPC lignite mine. Geological, seismological, as well as geotechnical survey in the field indicated that the phenomenon is related to the coal mining exploitation in the near vicinity of the village rather than to any seismotectonic activity in the surrounding area.

  16. On China's Sustainable Development of Energy—Opportunity for the China's Nuclear Power Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZengShaolun

    2005-01-01

    According to the poficy of reforming the power industry and accelerating the power construction of our country, by 2020, the national power consumption will be up to 3.6-3.7 trillion kilowatt-hours, the installed power-generating capacity is more than 800 million kilowatts. Therefore, the development of the China's nuclear power industry faces good international and domestic environments and good historical opportunities. From the point of national energy security, economic development, and resource distribution, it is analyzed that China must develop the nuclear power in a more cost-effective style in this paper.

  17. Spatial diversity of urban village development in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341235814; Geertman, S.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072392924; Hooimeijer, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073398578; Sliuzas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic urbanization in China during the reform period has led to the emergence and proliferation of so-called urban villages in many cities. The development of urban villages, based on a self-help approach of indigenous villagers, has been satisfying great demand for migrant housing and space for

  18. Village health volunteers: key issues facing agencies in Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants discussed recruitment, training, rewards, retention, and roles of village health volunteers. This paper presents background data on village health volunteers in Malawi and elsewhere and reviews the key issues facing health care providers in working with village health volunteers. A copy of the workshop ...

  19. Geographic and socio-economic barriers to rural electrification: New evidence from Indian villages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugoua, Eugenie; Liu, Ruinan; Urpelainen, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The International Energy Agency estimates that more than a billion people remain without household electricity access. However, countries such as India have recently made major progress in rural electrification. Who has benefited from these achievements? We focus on 714 villages in six energy-poor states of northern and eastern India to investigate trends in electricity access. We use data both from the 2011 Census of India and an original energy access survey conducted in 2014 and 2015. During the three years that separated the surveys, distance to the nearest town and land area lose their power as predictors of the percentage of households in the village that has access to electricity. In this regard, the Indian government's flagship rural electrification program seems to have managed to overcome a major obstacle to grid extension. On the other hand, socio-economic inequalities between villages related to caste status and household expenditure remain strong predictors. These findings highlight the importance of socio-economic barriers to rural electricity access and alleviate concerns about remoteness and population density as obstacles to grid extension. - Highlights: • Empirical analysis of rural electrification progress in India. • Geographic differences across villages no longer explain electricity access. • Social and economic inequities remain stark. • Future policy should focus on household electrification within villages.

  20. Securing a Right to Health: "Integration Villages" and Medical Citizenship of Roma People in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    A national deportation campaign targeting Romanian Roma in France has recently drawn international criticism from human rights organizations and the European Union. In this context, some French municipalities have created villages d'insertion -integration villages-for some of their Roma residents. Proponents of these spaces have declared that they are humanitarian solutions to the existence of Roma slums in the urban peripheries of many French cities. Yet the creation of a "healthy space" for Roma migrants in the city has also legitimated the further eviction and exclusion of people from "unhealthy slums." This article is based on ethnographic research among residents of an integration village and a number of unauthorized encampments in Strasbourg, France. This article analyzes the village d'insertion as a contemporary setting where the uneven medical citizenship of Roma migrants in France is being articulated in relation to wider debates about Roma inclusion in Europe. Ultimately, the village d'insertion is a local manifestation of state power, where the division between those deserving and undeserving of public support is reconfigured through the provision and exclusion of access to rights such as health care and shelter.

  1. Nuclear energy technology innovation and restructuring electric power industry for sustainable development in Korea in 21st century - issues and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.W.; Chae, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    After TMI and Chernobyl accidents, concerns on nuclear safety and radiation health risk from radioactive wastes become the target issues for anti-nuclear. Nevertheless, nuclear power is a substantial contributor to the world electricity production, supplying more than 16 % of global electricity. The objectives of Korean nuclear energy technology innovation are to improve safety, economic competitiveness, energy security and the effectiveness of radioactive waste management in harmony with environment. Meeting such objectives, public concerns on safety and health risks would be cleared. Innovative nuclear energy system will certainly enhance socio-political acceptance and enable wider application of nuclear energy for sustainable development in Korea in the 21st Century. In parallel to such technology innovations, the effective first phase restructuring of electric power industry is in progress to enhance management efficiency and customer services. The power generation division of the former state-run utility, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) was separated and divided into six companies - five thermal power and one hydro and nuclear power generation companies - in last April. After the reorganization of KEPCO and the break-up of monopoly, the new electric power industry will be driven by market force. (author)

  2. COMMODIFICATION OF TELAJAKAN AT UBUD VILLAGE, GIANYAR, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Brata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to understand the phenomenon of the commodification of telajakan at Ubud Village, Gianyar Regency, Bali in the era of globalization. It focused on how the commodification of telajakan took place in the era of globalization; what factors causing the commodification of telajakan to take place; and what were the impact and meaning of the commodification of telajakan at Ubud Village. The data were collected through observation, interview, library research and documentation study. The theory of Commodification, the theory of Discourse, the theory of Power and Knowledge, and the theory of Globalization were eclectically used in the present study.   The results of the study were as follows. The commodification of telajakan was defined as how it was produced as economic space, how it was distributed through printed media, announcement board, from mouth to mouth, and through the meetings held by traditional organizations, and then it was consumed by the owners and others undertaking businesses. The factors contributing to the commodification of telajakan were market ideology, business of tourism, technological flow, and mass media as the popular cultural agent, mimicry, and economic libido. For the sake of money, telajakan was not regarded as a local genius any longer; its value as traditional green open space was neglected; as a result, ecological damage could not be avoided; the aesthetics of the Balinese architecture was getting extict; and the Balinese identity was getting  destructed. 

  3. Estimation of photovoltaic systems for rural development: a case study of village near Quetta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasir, S.M.; Raza, S.M.; Hyder, S.

    1994-01-01

    The energy needs in Pakistan are rising in all sectors whereas the supplies seem to be still heavily dependent on oil and electricity generation from WAPDA (Water and Power Development Authority). It is estimated that there are more than 100 villages having population more than 500. These villages are remotely scattered and are away from the industrial belt. It is unlikely to electrify all these villages in the near future. It is difficult to reach them with fossil fuels, particularly oil in quantities they need. In this context, solar and wind power may offer a viable solution. Increasing human and financial commitment would enable the societies to take advantage of this new technology. Considering the demand and supply infrastructure economy, social and cultural set up of the rural communities where a large number of people live must be considered. A case study was made of a village (Killi Paind Khan) near Quetta. The results show that the photovoltaic power system (PPS) is quite attractive for a small community for their lighting and other household appliances. (author)

  4. The promotion of sustainable development in China through the optimization of a tax/subsidy plan among HFC and power generation CDM projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnier, Martin; Wang, Can; Du, Pengfei; Chen, Jining

    2007-01-01

    China is expected to reach record growth by 2020 in the energy sector by at least doubling its electricity generation capacity. In order to protect the environment and foster economic development, China will greatly benefit from transfers of state-of-the-art power generation technologies through international agreements such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). However, a buyer-driven carbon market and a highly competitive environment due to more cost-effective projects attribute to China's need to achieve a balance between sustainability and profitability for CDM projects implemented in China. In the CDM Tax/Subsidy Optimization Model (CDMTSO Model) here developed, a sustainable development assessment method evaluates the CDM projects' economic and environmental benefits and an optimization program returns tax/subsidy rates at which the greatest number of CDM technologies becomes viable and where 'better' CDM projects can be the most profitable, bringing China's development on a more sustainable path. The results show that the CDMTSO Model brings the sustainable CDM projects' Internal Rate of Return closed to 10%. If a discount rate of 9% is considered, it allows three clean energy technologies (natural gas combined cycle, wind energy, and hydropower) to become economically viable and the environmental costs avoided are increased by 37%

  5. Landscape ethnoecological knowledge base and management of ecosystem services in a Sz?kely-Hungarian pre-capitalistic village system (Transylvania, Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Moln?r, Zsolt; Gell?ny, Krisztina; Marg?czi, Katalin; Bir?, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed an in-depth ecological understanding by traditional people of managing natural resources. We studied the landscape ethnoecological knowledge (LEEK) of Sz?kelys on the basis of 16-19th century village laws. We analyzed the habitat types, ecosystem services and sustainable management types on which village laws had focused. Methods Sz?kelys had self-governed communities formed mostly of ?noble peasants?. Land-use was dominated by commons and regulated by villa...

  6. Human–dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacán, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Ortolani, A.; Ortega-Pacheco, A.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs’ behavioural responses towards familiar and

  7. Development of village doctors in China: financial compensation and health system support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Zhu, Weiming; Fu, Yaqun; Zhang, Minmin; Zhao, Yang; Hanson, Kara; Martinez-Alvarez, Melisa; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2017-07-01

    Since 1968, China has trained about 1.5 million barefoot doctors in a few years' time to provide basic health services to 0.8 billion rural population. China's Ministry of Health stopped using the term of barefoot doctor in 1985, and changed policy to develop village doctors. Since then, village doctors have kept on playing an irreplaceable role in China's rural health, even though the number of village doctors has fluctuated over the years and they face serious challenges. United Nations declared Sustainable Development Goals in 2015 to achieve universal health coverage by 2030. Under this context, development of Community Health workers (CHWs) has become an emerging policy priority in many resource-poor developing countries. China's experiences and lessons learnt in developing and maintaining village doctors may be useful for these developing countries. This paper aims to synthesis lessons learnt from the Chinese CHW experiences. It summarizes China's experiences in exploring and using strategic partnership between the community and the formal health system to develop CHWs in the two stages, the barefoot doctor stage (1968 -1985) and the village doctor stage (1985-now). Chinese and English literature were searched from PubMed, CNKI and Wanfang. The information extracted from the selected articles were synthesized according to the four partnership strategies for communities and health system to support CHW development, namely 1) joint ownership and design of CHW programmes; 2) collaborative supervision and constructive feedback; 3) a balanced package of incentives, both financial and non-financial; and 4) a practical monitoring system incorporating data from the health system and community. The study found that the townships and villages provided an institutional basis for barefoot doctor policy, while the formal health system, including urban hospitals, county health schools, township health centers, and mobile medical teams provided training to the barefoot

  8. Village poultry production in the Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalafalla, A.I.; Awad, S.; Hass, W.

    2002-01-01

    A survey form provided by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division was used to collect data on village poultry production in the Sudan. The production system in the households was based on scavenging indigenous domestic chickens, at times accompanied by pigeons, guinea fowls, ducks or turkeys. The average flock size was 18.8 birds and included 44.3% hens, 10% cocks, 20% growers and 24.8% chicks. The hen to cock ratio was 4.4:1. Average egg production was 3.1 per hen per month, of which 76% were incubated by hens. About 78% of incubated eggs hatched of which 75% survived the brooding period. Approximately half of the households provided the chickens with housing. Around 25.7% of interviewed households used chicken manure as fertilizer. While scavenging, chickens fed on insects, grass, vegetables and kitchen wastes. Feed supplements included sorghum, millet and sometimes wheat bran and alfalfa. The ownership of village chickens was shared between all gender categories and all were involved in the management of the birds. The major constraints to village poultry production in the Sudan were identified and included inadequate health care, poor production, inappropriate housing and poor knowledge of poultry management. (author)

  9. Encouraging girl child education in my village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Entongwe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available My critical reflection will be drawn from an experience I had just a year after my graduation from the university where I was appointed as one of the X-students to lead a student cultural week in my village with the theme “raising awareness on education”. At the university, I was a member of my association in which students from my tribe generally come together to promote unity and encourage others in education. My role was to present a discourse on girl child education all the entire villagers who were gathered at the village square that evening. A high dropout rate at school and illiteracy are major problems in my region, in which there is still a great deal of gender disparity when it comes to educating children, especially the girl child. This programme is in line with the government’s policy of promoting education in my country, whose priority is for education to reach the grass-roots communities.

  10. Research on the historic preservation of Zhaojiashan village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Li

    2018-03-01

    Through field investigation and field visiting, we studied and analyzed the ancient villages of Zhaojiashan in Jiancaoping District, Taiyuan City of Shanxi Province. We learned that Zhaojiashan Village is on the only way of the Shanxi Merchants The Tea Road starting from Taiyuan to Xinzhou. It occupies an indispensable and important position in camel road. There are many historical and cultural relics in the village. The analysis of the historical value and the environment of the village has provided the basis for the protection and exploitation of ancient villages.

  11. Electric power and vegetable oil for the sustainable development of the Rio Ouro Preto, Rondonia, BR extractive reservation; Eletricidade e oleo vegetal para o desenvolvimento sustentavel da reserva extrativista do Rio Ouro Preto em Rondonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ana Teresa Siqueira; Lascio, Marco Alfredo Di; Dias, Elizabete Moreira; Hutin, Jill Rochelle Anahita [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Faculdade de Tecnologia. Depto. de Eng. Eletrica]. E-mails: anateresa22@bol.com.br; marcodilascio@unb.br; bete.cead@gmail.com; bete.cead@gmail.com

    2006-07-01

    This article gives an option of sustainable development of the area, through the implementation of two small vegetable oil extraction industries, use of the residues for electric power generation, commercialization of ecological tourism products and two small furniture industries.

  12. Development of Micro-sized Microbial Fuel Cells as Ultra-Low Power Generators Using Nano-engineered Materials and Sustainable Designs

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-12-01

    Many of the most pressing global challenges today and in the future center around the scarcity of sustainable energy and water sources. The innovative microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology addresses both as it utilizes bacteria to convert wastewaters into electricity. Advancing this technology requires a better understanding of the optimal materials, designs and conditions involved. The micro-sized MFC was recently developed to serve this need by providing a rapid testing device requiring only a fraction of the materials. Further, development of micro-liter scale MFCs has expanded into potential applications such as remote and self-sustained power sources as well as on-chip energy generators. By using microfabrication, the fabrication and assembly of microsized MFCs is potentially inexpensive and mass produced. The objective of the work within this dissertation was to explore and optimize the micro-sized MFC to maximize power and current generation towards the goal of a usable and application-oriented device. Micro-sized MFCs were examined and developed using four parameters/themes considered most important in producing a high power generating, yet usable device: Anode- The use of nano-engineered carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes and graphene, as anode as well as testing semiconductor industry standard anode contact area materials for enhanced current production. 5 Cathode- The introduction of a membrane-less air cathode to eliminate the need for continuous chemical refills and making the entire device mobile. Reactor design- The testing of four different reactor designs (1-75 μLs) with various features intended to increase sustainability, cost-effectiveness, and usability of the microsized MFC. Fuels- The utilization of real-world fuels, such as industrial wastewaters and saliva, to power micro-sized MFCs. The micro-sized MFC can be tailored to fit a variety of applications by varying these parameters. The device with the highest power production here was

  13. Long-lived coherences: Improved dispersion in the frequency domain using continuous-wave and reduced-power windowed sustaining irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadet, A.; Fernandes, L.; Kateb, F.; Balzan, R.; Vasos, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLC's) are detectable magnetisation modes with favourable relaxation times that translate as sharp resonances upon Fourier transform. The frequency domain of LLC's was previously limited to the range of J-couplings within pairs of homonuclear spins. LLC evolution at high magnetic fields needs to be sustained by radio-frequency irradiation. We show that LLC-based spectral dispersion can be extended beyond the J-couplings domain using adapted carrier offsets and introduce a new reduced-power sustaining method to preserve LLC's within the required range of offsets. Spectral resolution is enhanced as the natively narrow lines of LLC's are further dispersed, making them potential probes for the study of biomolecules featuring strong resonance overlap and for media where NMR spectroscopy is commonly hindered by line broadening.

  14. Long-lived coherences: Improved dispersion in the frequency domain using continuous-wave and reduced-power windowed sustaining irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadet, A.; Fernandes, L.; Kateb, F.; Balzan, R.; Vasos, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLC’s) are detectable magnetisation modes with favourable relaxation times that translate as sharp resonances upon Fourier transform. The frequency domain of LLC's was previously limited to the range of J-couplings within pairs of homonuclear spins. LLC evolution at high magnetic fields needs to be sustained by radio-frequency irradiation. We show that LLC-based spectral dispersion can be extended beyond the J-couplings domain using adapted carrier offsets and introduce a new reduced-power sustaining method to preserve LLC's within the required range of offsets. Spectral resolution is enhanced as the natively narrow lines of LLC's are further dispersed, making them potential probes for the study of biomolecules featuring strong resonance overlap and for media where NMR spectroscopy is commonly hindered by line broadening

  15. Hybrid Off-Grid SPV/WTG Power System for Remote Cellular Base Stations Towards Green and Sustainable Cellular Networks in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Alsharif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address the sustainability of power resources and environmental conditions for telecommunication base stations (BSs at off-grid sites. Accordingly, this study examined the feasibility of using a hybrid solar photovoltaic (SPV/wind turbine generator (WTG system to feed the remote Long Term Evolution-macro base stations at off-grid sites of South Korea the energy necessary to minimise both the operational expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions. Three key aspects have been discussed: (i optimal system architecture; (ii energy yield analysis; and (iii economic analysis. In addition, this study compares the feasibility of using a hybrid SPV/WTG system vs. a diesel generator. The simulation results show that by applying the proposed SPV/WTG system scheme to the cellular system, the total operational expenditure can be up to 48.52% more efficient and sustainability can be ensured with better planning by providing cleaner energy.

  16. Long-lived coherences: Improved dispersion in the frequency domain using continuous-wave and reduced-power windowed sustaining irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadet, A.; Fernandes, L.; Kateb, F., E-mail: fatiha.kateb@parisdescartes.fr, E-mail: balzan.riccardo@parisdescartes.fr; Balzan, R., E-mail: fatiha.kateb@parisdescartes.fr, E-mail: balzan.riccardo@parisdescartes.fr; Vasos, P. R. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biochimie Toxicologiques et Pharmacologiques UMR-8601, Université Paris Descartes - CNRS, PRES Paris Sorbonne Cité, 75006 Paris (France)

    2014-08-07

    Long-lived coherences (LLC’s) are detectable magnetisation modes with favourable relaxation times that translate as sharp resonances upon Fourier transform. The frequency domain of LLC's was previously limited to the range of J-couplings within pairs of homonuclear spins. LLC evolution at high magnetic fields needs to be sustained by radio-frequency irradiation. We show that LLC-based spectral dispersion can be extended beyond the J-couplings domain using adapted carrier offsets and introduce a new reduced-power sustaining method to preserve LLC's within the required range of offsets. Spectral resolution is enhanced as the natively narrow lines of LLC's are further dispersed, making them potential probes for the study of biomolecules featuring strong resonance overlap and for media where NMR spectroscopy is commonly hindered by line broadening.

  17. New energy vision for Ginoza village. Fiscal 2000 survey report on new energy vision formulation project for Ginoza village; Ginozason shin energy vision. 2000 nendo Ginozason shin energy vision sakutei nado jigyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A new energy vision has been formulated for Ginoza village, Okinawa Prefecture, for the realization of symbiosis with nature. It is a 5,000-strong entirely farming village situated along the eastern coast at the middle of the main island of the Ryukyus, with energy consumption of 9,982 kl in terms of crude oil in fiscal 1999. The results of activities in this connection are summarized in six chapters, which are (1) the state of the village and new energy, (2) current state of energy supply/demand and outlook for the future, (3) existing amount of new energy, (4) trends of types of new energy under study, (5) feasibility of new energy introduction, and (6) Ginoza village's new energy vision. Chapter (6) is constituted of the general principles of new energy introduction into Ginoza village and a long-term vision of new energy introduction for each field, and discusses the introducible types which are photovoltaic power generation, wind power generation, small scale hybrid power source systems, fuel cells, natural gas fired cogeneration, refuse fueled power generation, and clean energy vehicles. (NEDO)

  18. Exergy sustainability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  19. Local village heating. Final rapport; Landsby Naervarme. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojesen, C.

    2012-04-15

    Local Village Heating project relates to smaller villages which are located outside existing or planned district heating areas in Denmark. The analysis phase of Local Village Heating has shown that the concept can be the most feasible common heating system for villages that: 1. has a high building density - the buildings must be placed close together; 2. at least one large heat consumer, school, elder home or company is present in the village; 3. the number of buildings/households in the village is less than approx. 100. The analysis has shown that it is theoretical possible to establish a controlling system for the combined supplier/consumer option and an overall system for prioritizing the primary heat suppliers. A feasible Local Village Heating organisation could be a cooperative similar to other supply systems, such as common water supply and waste water cooperative. (Author)

  20. Sustainable renewable energy projects for intelligent rural electrification in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Brisa; Vetter, Matthias [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany); Bourg, Catherine [Fondation Energies pour le Monde (France); Crehay, Romain [Centre Wallon de Recherches Agronomiques (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The project ''Renewable Energy Sustainable Programs for Intelligent Rural Electrifrication'' RESIREA has been looking for the creation of conditions that make possible the establishment of Renewable Energy Technologies (RET) markets in targeted provinces to Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam. As a main result of the project, in three different selected provinces (one in each country) have been proposed villages as ''ready to implement''. The ''ready to implement'' villages are specific RET projects resulted from applying developed methodologies. One methodology is a deeply well structured cross-analysis of technical and economic parameters and the results have been integrated in a Geographical Information System GIS. Based on the least-cost methodology, off-grid biomass and photovoltaic PV power supply systems have been designed and asset for the proposed villages. In the case of PV system designs, a detailed study has been carried out by means of simulations tools and extensive field data. The PV system design looks to contribute to an ''easy scale-up'' concept for off-grid power supply systems, especially when rural communities are too diverse. Further expected benefits besides the supply of electricity services are the improvement of the living and health conditions of the populations, the stimulation of local markets for RET and economic activities. (orig.)