WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainable village power

  1. Renewables for Sustainable Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.; Baring-Gould, I.; Bianchi, J.; Corbus, D.; Drouilhet, S.; Elliott, D.; Gevorgian, V.; Jimenez, A.; Lilienthal, P.; Newcomb, C.; Taylor, R.

    2000-11-06

    This paper describes the efforts of NREL's Renewables for Sustainable Village Power team to match renewable energy technologies with rural energy needs in the international market. The paper describes the team's activities, updates the lessons learned, and proposes an integrated approach as a model for rural electrification with renewables.

  2. Renewables for sustainable village power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L

    1997-03-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizeable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six activities, including village applications development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and Internet-based village power project data base. While the current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets, micro-hydro and micro-biomass technologies may be integrated in the future. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. The integration of the technology developments, institutional experiences, and the financial solutions for the implementation of renewables in the main line rural electrification processes in both the developing world and remote regions of the developed world is the goal.

  3. Village Power `97. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, J.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.; Weingart, J. [eds.

    1997-09-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-disciplinary, multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six key activities, including village application development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and an Internet-based village power project database. The current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. This document contains reports presented at the Proceedings of Village Power, 1997. Individual projects have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  4. Village Power '98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, Julie; Flowers, Larry; Siegel, Judy; Taylor, Roger; Weingart, Jerome

    1999-03-24

    This is the fifth Village Power workshop sponsored by NREL. We have held these meetings every year since 1993, to focus, challenge, and provide a forum for interaction among practitioners working in the field of using renewable energy technologies as an economically viable pathway to electrification of rural populations throughout the world. Starting with a small group of 30 colleagues in 1993, this ''workshop'' has doubled in size every year. When the NREL staff was planning for this meeting, they were hoping for something around 400 participants. We are now looking at over 500, and we apologize for the somewhat cramped accommodations. This overwhelming response, however, shows that the use of renewable energy to solve some of the world's serious problems is coming of age. This meeting, this ''conference'' (it's clearly no longer a workshop) marks a transition. A transition from the viewpoint that renewables are, and forever will be a technology of the future; to the reality that renewables have come of age. We have technologies available today, at today's prices, that can make a substantive contribution to the pressing needs of environmentally sustainable development in the world. This is a collection of all the papers presented at the Village Power '98 conference.

  5. Village power options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three different computer codes which have been written to model village power applications. The reasons which have driven the development of these codes include: the existance of limited field data; diverse applications can be modeled; models allow cost and performance comparisons; simulations generate insights into cost structures. The models which are discussed are: Hybrid2, a public code which provides detailed engineering simulations to analyze the performance of a particular configuration; HOMER - the hybrid optimization model for electric renewables - which provides economic screening for sensitivity analyses; and VIPOR the village power model - which is a network optimization model for comparing mini-grids to individual systems. Examples of the output of these codes are presented for specific applications.

  6. Village power in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the electric power system in Thailand. 99% of the country is electrified, but much of this is with diesel generators which leaves high costs but a high level of service. The paper discusses renewable energy projects which have been sited in the country, and examples of hybrid systems which have been retrofit into existing diesel generator systems. Photovoltaic and hydroelectric power projects are described. Dedicated systems have been installed for water pumping and battery charging applications.

  7. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  8. Institutional issues in Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a view on renewable energy resource projects from one much closer to recipient of the services. The author argues that such programs aimed at development of village power situations need to keep certain points clearly in focus. These include the fact that electricity is not the goal, technology is not the problem, site selection involves more than just resource potential, the distinction between demonstration and pilot programs, and that such programs demand local involvement for success. The author recommends coordinating such projects with programs seeking competing funds such as health, education, and transportation. The projects must demonstrate a high economic benefit to justify the high economic cost, and one must use the benefits to leverage the program funding.

  9. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  10. Lessons Learned from the NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.

    1998-07-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NRELs recent experiences and lessons learned.

  11. Organizational Characteristics Associated With the Predicted Sustainability of Villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew E; Lehning, Amanda J; Davitt, Joan K; Greenfield, Emily A; Graham, Carrie L

    2017-02-01

    Guided by resource dependence theory, this mixed-methods study examined organizational characteristics contributing to the perceived sustainability of Villages, a rapidly proliferating grassroots approach for promoting social participation and service access for community-dwelling older adults. Surveys conducted with leaders of 86% of Villages in the United States in 2012 found that higher predicted confidence in their Village's 10-year survival was associated with greater financial reserves, human resources, number of Village members, formal policies and procedures, and formal collaboration agreements. Respondents' explanations of their confidence ratings revealed additional themes of organizational leadership and perceived community need. Member resource inputs were not found to be as salient for Village leaders' perceptions of sustainability as was anticipated given the Village model's emphasis on consumer involvement. Despite the lack of longitudinal prospective data, study findings suggest potential limitations of consumer-driven organizational models such as Villages, including the need for a more stable resource base.

  12. Sustainability of fisherman village in urban area case study : untia fisherman village, makassar, indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegroho, N.; Ardiani, Y. M.

    2017-12-01

    Major cities in Indonesia, many of which have a fisherman village in the city area. One of them is the village of Untia in Makassar which keeps the story about relocation history of fishermen’s settlement in Makassar city. Initially, this village is very ‘friendly’ for the fishermen, especially the existence of canals that can be passed by the fishing boat to the front of the each house. However, the sustainability of this fisherman village is threatened by the development of urban functions that are urging towards it. From day to day, this village is segregated with the surrounding area, not only from its function but also from social point of view. This condition will be more severe related to the local government plan to reclaim sea far to the west side, thus threatening the sustainability of fisherman life in this village. How does a fisherman village in an urban area have to survive? The research begins by highlighting the conditions and problems that exist, data was collected by field survey. This data combined with some literatures then analyzed to propose a direction how fisherman’s village respond to the surrounding development. Become a Tourism village is a one way for fisherman’s village to survive in urban area.

  13. Generating sustainable towns from Chinese villages: a system modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Richard S; Hughes, Michael T; Ryan Mather, Casey; Yanarella, Ernest J

    2008-04-01

    The great majority of China's developing towns will be extensions of already existing villages. With the prospect of hundreds of millions of Chinese farmers projected to leave their villages to become industrial workers in new and expanded towns within the next few years, new challenges will be faced. As expansion and modernization progress, this development moves from the traditional village model that operates not far from resource sustainability to increasingly unsustainable patterns of commerce, urban development, and modern life. With such an unprecedented mass migration and transformation, how can Chinese culture survive? What is to become of the existing million plus agricultural villages? How can these massively unsustainable new industrial towns survive? In the European Commission sponsored research program SUCCESS, researchers worked from the scale of the Chinese village to find viable answers to these questions. To address these issues, the Center for Sustainable Cities, one of the SUCCESS teams, studied the metabolism of several small villages. In these studies, system dynamics models of a village's metabolism were created and then modified so that inherently unsustainable means were eliminated from the model (fossil fuels, harmful agricultural chemicals, etc.) and replaced by sustainability-oriented means. Small Chinese farming villages are unlikely to survive in anything like their present form or scale, not least because they are too small to provide the range of life opportunities to which the young generation of educated Chinese aspires. As a response to this realization as well as to the many other threats to the Chinese village and its rural way of life, it was proposed that one viable path into the future would be to enlarge the villages to become full service towns with sufficient diversity of opportunity to be able to attract and keep many of the best and brightest young people who are now migrating to the larger cities. Starting with the

  14. Pedal power : the Indian villages of Kinchlingi and Tumba and proving that small-scale biodiesel generation can create self-sufficient, sustainable communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Sankaranarayanan, R. [CTx GreEn, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The Canadian non-profit organization CTx GreEn was involved with the installation of a pedal-driven biodiesel reactor in the Indian village of Kinchlingi four years ago. The reactor produces biodiesel to fuel a pump that supplies drinking water and running water to the village's washrooms. The reactor produces biodiesel in 5-litre batches from a combination of vegetable oil, lye and alcohol. By-products of the process include glycerine which can be used for soap, and oil cake which makes an organic fertilizer or a feed for livestock. The total production process takes 4 hours, which includes one hour of pedalling. Three hours of pedalling is sufficient to supply biodiesel for an entire month for the 75 inhabitants of Kinchlingi. CTx GreEn ensures that the machinery can be operated with ease and is manufactured and maintained locally. When fuel demand rises, an optional step-down motor-drive can replace the typical five-speed bicycle. The authors emphasized that only these higher production volumes would justify the additional effort and expense of installing, operating and maintaining a motor driven generator. Kinchlingi grows 2 hectares of an edible oilseed crop to produce the oil required to make biodiesel. The village of Tumba plans to use a non-edible tree-borne oilseed crop to fuel irrigation pumps, a power tiller and an oil expeller. With a local, renewable source of energy, it is possible to envision the transformation of both villages into self-sufficient local economies. Federal and state governments in India are promoting the large-scale cultivation of a non-indigenous oilseed species to reduce the country's dependence on foreign oil. However, the authors cautioned that such large scale schemes increase the dependence of rural communities on external inputs and puts money into the pockets of fuel refiners and retailers rather than support farmers. The feasibility of using biodiesel to generate electricity for lighting and to fuel small farm

  15. Perspectives on renewable energy and Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    The author provides a brief overview of the role the Department of Energy has been playing in the area of renewable energy sources and their applications at a village level. Energy demand is rising sharply, and shortages are becoming more acute. Developing countries will present a large demand, and market opportunity over the next 40 years. Environmental concerns are a factor in the choice for what sources to promote and develop. The author touches on the features of renewable sources which makes them attractive to DOE for some applications, and what the goals of the department are in supporting this technology. Examples of applications at the level of village power are presented for both the US and abroad.

  16. Lighting: The Killer App of Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This paper looks at lighting systems as the major market for village level power generation. To the consumer it is something which is needed, could come from a much friendlier source, and the issues of affordability, convenience, and reliability are important. To the supplier lighting has an enormous range of potential customers, it opens the opportunity for other services, and even small demand can give big returns. Because the efficiency of the light source is critical to the number of lights which a fixed power supply can drive, it is important to pick the proper type of bulb to use in this system. The paper discusses test results from an array of fluorescent and incadescent lamps, compared with a kerosene lamp. Low wattage fluorescents seem to perform the best.

  17. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  18. Private sector village enterprise a new approach to sustainable financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, C.F.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an enterprise plan for introducing solar power in a rural market, while providing economic development, and hence the ability of the user to pay for the power source. This plan is based on a product called GEEP - a solar sewing machine conversion kit. This kit can be retrofit onto pedal sewing machines and marketed to village tailors in India, as part of a marketing program which includes increased demand for tailored products which will allow the tailors to be able to finance the conversion kits.

  19. Overview of village scale, renewable energy powered desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.E.

    1997-04-01

    An overview of desalination technologies is presented, focusing on those technologies appropriate for use in remote villages, and how they can be powered using renewable energy. Technologies are compared on the basis of capital cost, lifecycle cost, operations and maintenance complexity, and energy requirements. Conclusions on the appropriateness of different technologies are drawn, and recommendations for future research are given.

  20. Financing renewable energy for Village Power application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santibanez-Yeneza, G.

    1997-12-01

    When one talks of rural development, no doubt, the issue of rural energy is not far behind. As a significant component of any development strategy, rural energy is seen as the engine for growth that can bring about economic upliftment in the countryside. Many approaches to rural energy development have been tried. These approaches differ from country to country. But regardless of structure and approach, the goal remain essentially the same: to provide rural communities access to reliable energy services at affordable prices. In recent years, as global concern for the environment has increased, many governments have turned to renewable energy as a more environment friendly alternative to rural electrification. Technological advances in renewable energy application has helped to encourage this use. System reliability has improved, development costs have, to some extent been brought down and varied application approaches have been tried and tested in many areas. Indeed, there is huge potential for the development of renewable energy in the rural areas of most developing countries. At the rural level, renewable energy resources are almost always abundantly available: woodwaste, agricultural residues, animal waste, small-scale hydro, wind, solar and even sometimes geothermal resources. Since smaller scale systems are usually expected in these areas, renewable energy technologies can very well serve as decentralized energy systems for rural application. And not only for rural applications, new expansion planning paradigms have likewise led to the emergence of decentralized energy systems not only as supply options but also as corrective measures for maintaining end of line voltage levels. On the other hand, where renewable energy resource can provide significant blocks of power, they can be relied upon to provide indigenous power to the grids.

  1. Sustainability-based Study on the Development of Human Settlement in Traditional Villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yali; Huang, Liping; Lu, Qi

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyze the status quo of the living environment in traditional villages, and to identify current issues and developing strategies based on data analysis. It is proposed that comprehensive sustainable strategies for land use should be designed, defined and used as guidelines for the constructions of traditional villages in the process of rapid urbanization. Such sustainable strategies should be applicable for remediation and development of traditional villages. This will promote the coordinated development in society, economy and environment in traditional villages.

  2. The concept of participatory local sustainability projects in seven Chinese villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschalek, Ilse

    2008-04-01

    SUCCESS was a scientific, multi-disciplinary case study of seven selected villages in China, coordinated by the Viennese research institute Oikodrom in which I have been a team member for 6 years. We assembled an international team of researchers to work together with local team leaders with the aim of involving village dwellers in a sustainability negotiation process. The project had a strong bottom-up approach, combined with top-down elements. Using participatory research methods, village teams discussed and developed ideas for concrete sustainability-oriented projects in their villages. By the end of the 3-year study of SUCCESS, equipped with the seeds of a multiple-scenario building process and the appropriate funding, each of the seven case study villages had generated ideas for local sustainability-oriented projects and put them into practice. The outcome of this participatory process is manifold. One major impact of the implementation of local projects was their visibility which was crucial for the village dwellers' confidence and their motivation to become engaged in a decision making process. The experience of their successful participation in a decision making process empowered them for self-organisation processes or a civil society process. The small projects offered interesting theoretical insights into how local contexts impact upon village dweller's decision on appropriate sustainability interventions. How they are as well in line with characteristics of different types of villages that were carried out within the study will be shown in this article.

  3. Actualizing Communities of Practice (COPs and Situated Learning for A Sustainable Eco-Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Pineda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An eco-village as defined by Robert Gilman is a “human-scale, full-featured settlement where you feel you know the others, and human activities are integrated with natural, biological systems.” Roland Mayerl argued that this maybe ideal, but there are huge challenges. He claims the challenges are at different levels—there is the physical layer that constitutes food production, animals, water and wastewater treatment. Other layers will be the built environment, the economic system and the governance in the village.This paper argues that one of the challenging layers is the human layer that was excluded in the modeling of many eco-village works. While there are many good models of an eco-village, sustainability will primarily be laid on the shoulders of the members of the community or the village for that matter. Sustainability should be espoused by the members of the eco-village. But how can sustainability be attained? What sustainability approach or strategy can be employed?“Communities of practice (COP are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor.“ (Wenger, 2004 COPs are concepts commonly applied in organizations and virtual communities. Using this approach together with periphery participation and situated learning, this paper presents a human-based model of a sustainable eco-village and some useful examples.The paper also argues that an eco-village necessitates the support of technology in enhancing and preserving the shared practices. Hence, use of social media deployed in the web is one of the recommended ways that also permit collective action among members of the eco-village.

  4. Design description of the Schuchuli Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, A. F.; Vasicek, R. W.; Delombard, R.

    1981-01-01

    A stand alone photovoltaic (PV) power system for the village of Schuchuli (Gunsight), Arizona, on the Papago Indian Reservation is a limited energy, all 120 V (d.c.) system to which loads cannot be arbitrarily added and consists of a 3.5 kW (peak) PV array, 2380 ampere-hours of battery storage, an electrical equipment building, a 120 V (d.c.) electrical distribution network, and equipment and automatic controls to provide control power for pumping water into an existing water system; operating 15 refrigerators, a clothes washing machine, a sewing machine, and lights for each of the homes and communal buildings. A solar hot water heater supplies hot water for the washing machine and communal laundry. Automatic control systems provide voltage control by limiting the number of PV strings supplying power during system operation and battery charging, and load management for operating high priority at the expense of low priority loads as the main battery becomes depleted.

  5. Xia Futou's public bathhouse--a sustainable urbanization experiment in a Chinese village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyi; Li, Limin; Zhang, Hua

    2008-04-01

    Xia Futou, a small Chinese village with a unique cultural landscape, consists of two unbalanced parts, an old village up the hill and a new one down the hill. In order to upgrade and preserve the unique cultural landscape of the older village and rebalance the dislocation of the two parts, a small public bathhouse project has been carried out according to sustainable architecture principles. Based on the current cultural landscape of the bathhouse and its surroundings, this approach is attempting to localize an informed, balance-seeking, design process in the village and in so doing develop a series of diverse possibilities and beneficial paths. The experiment of the public bathhouse's design and construction led to two key conceptual questions that need to be examined, the one is to research a village with a dynamic system conception instead of a static one; the other is to research a village with a self-organizing system conception1 instead of an organized one. Furthermore, we can give the sustainable path for the future that such naturally evolved Chinese villages evolve into sustainable towns and cities.

  6. Design description of the Tangaye Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, J. E.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The engineering design of a stand alone photovoltaic (PV) powered grain mill and water pump for the village of Tangaye, Upper Volta is described. The socioeconomic effects of reducing the time required by women in rural areas for drawing water and grinding grain were studied. The suitability of photovoltaic technology for use in rural areas by people of limited technical training was demonstrated. The PV system consists of a 1.8-kW (peak) solar cell array, 540 ampere hours of battery storage, instrumentation, automatic controls, and a data collection and storage system. The PV system is situated near an improved village well and supplies d.c. power to a grain mill and a water pump. The array is located in a fenced area and the mill, battery, instruments, controls, and data system are in a mill building. A water storage tank is located near the well. The system employs automatic controls which provide battery charge regulation and system over and under voltage protection. This report includes descriptions of the engineering design of the system and of the load that it serves; a discussion of PV array and battery sizing methodology; descriptions of the mechanical and electrical designs including the array, battery, controls, and instrumentation; and a discussion of the safety features. The system became operational on March 1, 1979.

  7. Design description of the Tangaye Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, J. E.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1982-06-01

    The engineering design of a stand alone photovoltaic (PV) powered grain mill and water pump for the village of Tangaye, Upper Volta is described. The socioeconomic effects of reducing the time required by women in rural areas for drawing water and grinding grain were studied. The suitability of photovoltaic technology for use in rural areas by people of limited technical training was demonstrated. The PV system consists of a 1.8-kW (peak) solar cell array, 540 ampere hours of battery storage, instrumentation, automatic controls, and a data collection and storage system. The PV system is situated near an improved village well and supplies d.c. power to a grain mill and a water pump. The array is located in a fenced area and the mill, battery, instruments, controls, and data system are in a mill building. A water storage tank is located near the well. The system employs automatic controls which provide battery charge regulation and system over and under voltage protection. This report includes descriptions of the engineering design of the system and of the load that it serves; a discussion of PV array and battery sizing methodology; descriptions of the mechanical and electrical designs including the array, battery, controls, and instrumentation; and a discussion of the safety features. The system became operational on March 1, 1979.

  8. Chinese villages and their sustainable future: the European Union-China-Research Project "SUCCESS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumreicher, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    China has 800,000 villages-one person out of seven on the globe is living in a Chinese rural settlement. Yet the global discussions about the situation in China is currently characterised by a disproportionate focus on the development of towns and until now circumstances have generally been neglected in the rural areas, where 70% of the Chinese population is still living. Within the 5 years of the SUCCESS project research, this set of actual problems has been considered and analysed under the principle of sustainability: "What to maintain?" "What to change?" were the overall research questions asked in the SUCCESS project; the researchers were looking for answers under a sustainability regime, respecting the need to raise the quality of life in the villages. Several interweaving processes were used to achieve results: the inter-disciplinary research process between many areas of expertise, the trans-disciplinary process between the researchers and the Chinese villagers, and a negotiation process that made the connection between these two processes. The introduction describes the basic sustainability definition that was orienting the whole study. The innovation lays mostly in the methodology: the inter-disciplinary research co-operation related to practice and to involving the affected communities is needed to manage the significant and growing imbalances between urban and rural areas regarding their sustainability. In the transdisciplinary work, the project developed "village future sentences" that describe the local outcome of the research as one step towards better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms that could lead to a sustainable future, and they also managed to start sustainability processes in the case study sites. The integrated approach of the project helped generating future scenarios for these villages covering all aspects of their development, including urban design issues. Out of these scenarios, the villages developed small projects that could

  9. Design health village with the approach of sustainable architecture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Create structures to increase user safety as well as attracting investment and making money the prevalence in different parts of the country can benefit. For people to have this design can be found in different locations accomplished and the success and benefits enjoyed it. Keywords: Health; city health; smart; sustainability ...

  10. Sustainable tidal power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsum, E. van

    2003-07-01

    North America is increasingly searching for ways to achieve energy self-sufficiency. This paper discussed the tidal power potential of the Upper Bay of Fundy, located on Canada's east coast. The Bay of Fundy has the largest tides in the world. It is also close to a major electricity market. Tidal power plants could mean substantial quantities of clean, renewable energy. Some of the environmental concerns with the development of tidal power plants on the Bay of Fundy include: siltation, shorebird survival, fish-stock survival, sea-mammal survival, drainage of agricultural lands, and changes in the tidal regime of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine Basin. In this paper, the author proved that it is possible to qualitatively assess those concerns, but that the quantitative assessment is more complex. A quantitative assessment of the effect on living organisms would require assessing the overall performance of an ecologically designed, built and operated pilot tidal power plant. The author argued that a full-fledged tidal power plant construction can take place once a pilot plant has been proven to operate symbiotically with a thriving marine shore-based flora and fauna. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  11. Establishing Priorities for Sustainable Environmental Design in the Rural Villages of Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pitts

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses sustainable rural village development in China. Rural development is unlike the process of urbanization in Chinese cities and reflects different land ownership rules and different organizational structures. Even though there are an increasing number of Chinese residents in cities, there are still more than 600 million people living in the countryside. The attention lavished on city development has been, in part, now refocused to rural villages. Since 2006, the support for large-scale investment in the countryside has created much change; however, not all of this change is well organized, with potential for less than optimum impacts on the environment and sustainability. The paper identifies the key influences and drivers from historic and contemporary points of view. The sustainability of the villages will derive from long-term self-sufficiency, and this must include the understanding of environmental design principles, which enable suitable dwelling design. Two villages are taken as contrasting examples, and information derived from other sources is discussed. Technologies and techniques that can help determine environmental design priorities are evaluated and directions for future development suggested. This includes development of a design support aid with key drivers of: orientation and site location, window design and key construction features.

  12. Learning for sustainability: participatory resource management in Cambodian fishing villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschke, Melissa; Sinclair, A John

    2009-01-01

    Considerable attention is now being given to the role and importance of education and learning implications of participatory resource and environmental governance. The contention is that such learning has the potential to transform behaviour, and in the case of resource management, may help change current patterns in resource use towards a more sustainable social-ecological system. Our purpose is to establish the opportunities for learning afforded to those participating in local level resource management committees in two Cambodian fishing communities and consider the learning outcomes from such opportunities. Our approach was qualitative and used a case study design. The findings establish a wide range of committee resource management activities that resulted in both instrumental (e.g., learning about administrative procedures) and communicative (e.g., insights into the need to conserve mangroves) learning. It was revealed that such learning can lead to changes in behaviour at the community level (e.g., managing local waste). Our findings also indicated a number of motivators and enablers of learning such as opportunities for dialogue, leadership and the presence of declining resources.

  13. Orbital Space Solar Power Option for a Lunar Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2017-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges to the implementation of a continuously manned lunar base is power. During the lunar day (14 Earth days), it is conceptually simple to deploy solar arrays to generate the estimated 35 kilowatts of continuous power required. However, generating this level of power during the lunar night (also 14 Earth days) has been an extremely difficult problem to solve. Conventional solutions range from the requirement that the base be located at the lunar south pole so as to take advantage of the continuous sunshine available there to developing a space-qualified nuclear reactor and power plant to generate the needed energy. There is a third option: Use the soon-to-be-available Space Launch System to place a space based solar power station in lunar orbit that would beam the needed energy to the lunar base. Several detailed studies have been performed by NASA, universities and others looking at the lunar south pole for locating the base. The results are encouraging: by taking advantage of the moon's orbital tilt, large solar arrays can be deployed there to track the sun continuously and generate the power needed to sustain the base. The problem with this approach is inherent to its design: it will only work at the lunar south pole. There is no other site on the Moon with geometry favorable to generating continuous solar power. NASA has also considered the development of a compact fission reactor and power plant to generate the needed power, allowing the base to be sited anywhere on the Moon. The problem with this approach is that there are no space fission reactors available, none are being planned and the cost of developing one is prohibitively expensive. Using an orbiting space based solar power station to generate electrical power and beam it to a base sited anywhere on the moon should therefore be considered. The technology to collect sunlight, generate greater than the estimated 35 kilowatts of power, and beam it to the surface using

  14. Analysis of Sustainability of New Rural Housing (Case of ole Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyran Chamcham

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modernization of rural housing based on the principles of sustainability is one of the most important prerequisites for achieving sustainable development in rural areas. This can only be achieved by knowing the exact status of rural housing and its range of stability. And rural planning is not possible without it. On the other hand, survey of the stability of the different aspects of rural housing will have a decisive role in decisions related to how to promote this project aimed at sustainable rural development. Therefore, this study we have investigated and compared the economic, Social, environmental, technical and physical aspects of new rural housing with sustainability approach, quantitative paradigm and the case study method. The statistical population in the study were all the people of Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village from which a number were selected who had reconstructed their homes. The results are shown in 4 dimensions of new housing's economic, social, environmental, technical and physical aspects in the Baba Hoseyn Bridge Village although they have very little inclination towards sustainability. Despite this, the hybrid economic index for reconstruction of rural housing turned out to be more stable than other metrics.

  15. Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources

  16. Description of photovoltaic village power systems in the United States and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, A. F.; Bifano, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Photovoltaic power systems in remote villages in the United States and Africa are described. These projects were undertaken to demonstrate that existing photovoltaic system technology is capable of providing electrical power for basic domestic services for the millions of small, remote communities in both developed and developing countries. One system is located in the Papago Indian Village of Schuchuli in southwest Arizona (U. S.) and became operational 16 December 1978. The other system is located in Tangaye, a rural village in Upper Volta, Africa. It became operational 1 March 1979. The Schuchuli system has a 3.5 kW (peak) solar array which provides electric power for village water pumping, a refrigerator for each family, lights in the village buildings, and a community washing machine and sewing machine. The 1.8 kW (peak) Tangaye system provides power for community water pumping, flour milling and lights in the milling building. These are both stand-alone systems (i.e., no back-up power source) which are being operated and maintained by local personnel. Both systems are instrumented. Systems operations are being monitored by NASA to measure design adequacy and to refine designs for future systems.

  17. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF TOURISM IN HISTORICAL MARAMURES CASE STUDY: BREB VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Berlingher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development has become an extremely important issue for both the academic as well as the economic and political sectors during recent years. The concept of sustainable development has emerged in the context of the announced danger of planet and surrounding environment destruction as a result of the investments made in all areas of activity throughout the world. One of the concept objectives is to find a solution to reconcile three desiderata: economic growth, environmental quality and social justice. The specialists have introduced this concept in order to make investments and to create business environments able to bring about an economic growth in a strong connection with nature, without destroying the natural resources. Tourism comes from behind with a tremendous force, a new economic market orientation strongly connected to nature. It provides us with the opportunity to review the main challenges faced during recent years in relation to the environmental, cultural and interpersonal relationships, in order to develop, protect and preserve the touristic potential. The historical Maramures represents such a region with a strong touristic potential. A study performed by Pricewaterhouse Coopers Management Consultants on the attractiveness of Romania‟s development regions places it on the II-nd position and illustrates the capacity of the region to develop and attract investments able to support the sustainable development of the area without destroying its uniqueness and originality. The herein study focusses on one of the Maramures villages that has managed to fully retain its originality and cultural uniqueness through the wooden houses, the Maramures traditional gates, the local traditional vestments and the ancient customs. Foreign investors have come into this village to set up traditional accommodation facilities, true to the style of the area, to restore old wooden houses, thus becoming sometimes more fond of the area than

  18. Efficacy of local neem extracts for sustainable malaria vector control in an African village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchemin Jean-Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Banizoumbou, whereas no change was found in Zindarou. Conclusion With a high abundance of neem plants in many villages in this area, the results of this study suggest that larval control using neem seed powder offers a sustainable additional tool for malaria vector control in the Sahel region of Niger.

  19. Efficacy of local neem extracts for sustainable malaria vector control in an African village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Rebecca L; Bomblies, Arne; Dafalla, Mustafa; Issa-Arzika, Ibrahim; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Eltahir, Elfatih Ab

    2008-07-23

    a high abundance of neem plants in many villages in this area, the results of this study suggest that larval control using neem seed powder offers a sustainable additional tool for malaria vector control in the Sahel region of Niger.

  20. Energy sustainable cities. From eco villages, eco districts towards zero carbon cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaręba Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimizing energy consumption is the effect of sustainable design technics as among many others: designing buildings with solar access and natural ventilation, using climate responsive design materials and effective insulation. Contemporary examples of zero-carbon cities: Masdar City, United Arab Emirates and Dongtan, China, confirm technical feasibility of renewable energy by implementation of solar PV and wind technologies. The ecological city - medium or high density urban settlement separated by greenspace causes the smallest possible ecological footprint on the surrounding countryside through efficient use of land and its resources, recycling used materials and converting waste to energy. This paper investigates the concept of energy sustainable cities, examines, how urban settlements might affect building energy design in eco-villages, eco-districts (e.g. Vauban, Freiburg in Germany, Bo01 Malmo in Sweden, and discuss the strategies for achieving Zero Emission Cities principles in densely populated areas. It is focused on low energy architectural design solutions which could be incorporated into urban settlements to create ecological villages, districts and cities, designed with consideration of environmental impact, required minimal inputs of energy, water, food, waste and pollution.

  1. Energy sustainable cities. From eco villages, eco districts towards zero carbon cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaręba, Anna; Krzemińska, Alicja; Łach, Janusz

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing energy consumption is the effect of sustainable design technics as among many others: designing buildings with solar access and natural ventilation, using climate responsive design materials and effective insulation. Contemporary examples of zero-carbon cities: Masdar City, United Arab Emirates and Dongtan, China, confirm technical feasibility of renewable energy by implementation of solar PV and wind technologies. The ecological city - medium or high density urban settlement separated by greenspace causes the smallest possible ecological footprint on the surrounding countryside through efficient use of land and its resources, recycling used materials and converting waste to energy. This paper investigates the concept of energy sustainable cities, examines, how urban settlements might affect building energy design in eco-villages, eco-districts (e.g. Vauban, Freiburg in Germany, Bo01 Malmo in Sweden), and discuss the strategies for achieving Zero Emission Cities principles in densely populated areas. It is focused on low energy architectural design solutions which could be incorporated into urban settlements to create ecological villages, districts and cities, designed with consideration of environmental impact, required minimal inputs of energy, water, food, waste and pollution.

  2. Photovoltaic village power application: Assessment of the near-term market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, L.; Bifano, W. J.; Poley, W. A.; Scudder, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    The village power application represents a potential market for photovoltaics. The price of energy for photovoltaic systems was compared to that of utility line extensions and diesel generators. The potential domestic demand was defined in both the government and commercial sectors. The foreign demand and sources of funding for village power systems in the developing countries were also discussed briefly. It was concluded that a near term domestic market of at least 12 MW min and a foreign market of about 10 GW exists.

  3. Design and fabrication of a photovoltaic power system for the Papago Indian village of Schuchuli (Gunsight), Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifano, W. J.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Ice, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A stand alone photovoltaic power system for installation in the Papago Indian village of Schuchuli is being designed and fabricated to provide electricity for village water pumping and basic domestic needs. The system will consist of a 3.5 kW (peak) photovoltaic array; controls, instrumentations, and storage batteries located in an electrical equipment building and a 120 volt dc village distribution network. The system will power a 2 HP dc electric motor.

  4. Albergo Diffuso as a model of original hospitality and sustainable development of small historical villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Dall'Ara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper fits within the wider context related to the definition of restoration strategies and models, and revitalization of small historical towns and villages, focusing on touristic use and on the Albergo Diffuso (AD model. This latter, in its functional elements, includes solutions to solve degeneration and gradual depopulation problems, typical in these cases, by enhancing both tangible and intangible resources. The purpose of this research study was to verify, about 20 years after the first implementations, to what extent and by means of what type of intervention the AD model influenced regeneration processes of historical villages and refunctionalization of reused building heritage. By means of an exploratory investigation and an in situ monitoring activity, it was possible to outline an initial measurement of both direct and indirect results following the application of ADs. The activities confirmed the virtuosity of the model and identified both critical issues and strong points, directly connected to the type of users and to the sustainability features of the interventions.

  5. Sustainability and vulnerability: Understanding the anomaly from disaster perspectives. Case study: Glagaharjo Village in Mount Merapi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depari, C. D. A.

    2017-06-01

    In its concern for human safety, the Government’s policy to relocate those living in disaster prone areas is twofold: it is perceptibly profound yet socially cataclysmic. This anomaly, created by the contradiction between the need for sustainability and the fact of vulnerability, could be found in the case of Mount Merapi. Communities living in the hazardous zone of Merapi, particularly those in Glagaharjo Village, are acknowledged for their persistent rejection of relocation programs despite their high exposure to the catastrophic impacts of eruptions. To mitigate the impacts, a safe and conducive dwelling place which considers the characteristics of these affected communities must be encouraged. This research adopts a consensus method towards responses obtained through a Likert scale-questionnaire and measured with a statistical program. Prior this process, theoretical reviews toward the concept of place attachment, place dependence and place identity was established in order to determine the research variables for the questionnaire.

  6. Indigenous utilization of termite mounds and their sustainability in a rice growing village of the central plain of Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivilay Sengdeaune

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to investigate the indigenous utilization of termite mounds and termites in a rain-fed rice growing village in the central plain of Laos, where rice production is low and varies year-to-year, and to assess the possibility of sustainable termite mound utilization in the future. This research was carried out from 2007 to 2009. Methods The termites were collected from their mounds and surrounding areas and identified. Twenty villagers were interviewed on their use of termites and their mounds in the village. Sixty-three mounds were measured to determine their dimensions in early March, early July and middle to late November, 2009. Results Eleven species of Termitidae were recorded during the survey period. It was found that the villagers use termite mounds as fertilizer for growing rice, vegetable beds and charcoal kilns. The villagers collected termites for food and as feed for breeding fish. Over the survey period, 81% of the mounds surveyed increased in volume; however, the volume was estimated to decrease by 0.114 m3 mound-1 year-1 on average due to several mounds being completely cut out. Conclusion It was concluded that current mound utilization by villagers is not sustainable. To ensure sustainable termite utilization in the future, studies should be conducted to enhance factors that promote mound restoration by termites. Furthermore, it will be necessary to improve mound conservation methods used by the villagers after changes in the soil mass of mounds in paddy fields and forests has been measured accurately. The socio-economic factors that affect mound utilization should also be studied.

  7. Empowering the village communities for sustained observation of permafrost-related environmental changes, Upper Kuskokwim, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, S. K.; Kholodov, A. L.; Hanson, T.

    2016-12-01

    A suite of environmental changes are underway in the North directly affecting the socio-economic state of native communities in remote Arctic villages. We cannot possibly have enough scientists and professionals on the ground to timely predict and effectively respond to the major changes. We believe the most cost-effective and possibly sustainable approach to cover more ground for monitoring and prediction of changes is by building community capacity for monitoring and research, and supporting communities to use resulting data and new findings to address emerging environmental issues and ensuing socio-economic challenges. The goal of this project is to help the communities of Upper Kuskokwim region take the lead in assessing and responding to the environmental changes that are coming with warmer climate and thawing permafrost. The permafrost related societal impacts that the communities are aware of are a) drying of lakes which affect their fishing and trapping, b) lower water level in Rivers due to bank erosion which affect their main mode of transportation in summer, c) appearance of sinkholes that pose threat to the safety of the community members and their properties, and d) eruption of a sand dune in the middle of the Telida village air strip. In August 2016 we will spend ten days in the Nikolai and Telida communities to understand the community need for monitoring through a community survey. We will offer training workshop on climate science and landscape change, and in making scientific observation and data collection. Also, we will install sensors to monitor air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture, and snow at 12 sites spread across different ecotypes and topographic settings. Also, we will survey sites of major change to help develop a geo-hazard map for the region to facilitate safe subsistence practices and land use. As broader impact, the project will offer the traditionally-underserved native communities of the Upper Kuskokwim region an

  8. A Model of Small Capacity Power Plant in Tateli Village, North Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangari, F. J.; Rompas, P. T. D.

    2017-03-01

    The electricity supply in North Sulawesi is still very limited so ubiquitous electric current outage. It makes rural communities have problems in life because most uses electrical energy. One of the solutions is a model of power plants to supply electricity in Tateli village, Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The objective of this research is to get the model that generate electrical energy for household needs through power plant that using a model of Picohydro with cross flow turbine in Tateli village. The method used the study of literature, survey the construction site of the power plant and the characteristics of the location being a place of research, analysis of hydropower ability and analyzing costs of power plant. The result showed that the design model of cross flow turbines used in pico-hydro hydropower installations is connected to a generator to produce electrical energy maximum of 3.29 kW for household needs. This analyze will be propose to local government of Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia to be followed.

  9. Family vs Village-Based: Intangible View on the Sustainable of Seaweed Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniwut, Wellem A.; Teniwut, Yuliana K.; Teniwut, Roberto M. K.; Hasyim, Cawalinya L.

    2017-10-01

    Compare to other fishery activities for instance fish mariculture and catching fisheries, seaweed farming is considered easier. Also, the market for seaweed is wider and will keep growing. Thus, makes seaweed farming as one of the fastest commodity to improve the welfare of a coastal community. There are technical and non-technical factors in seaweed farming management, for non-technical on this intangible factors vary between family-based and village-based management, therefore aimed of this study was to simulate farmers decision to choose between family-based and village-based on seaweed managing system trigger by intangible factors. We conducted our study in Southeast Maluku, data collecting conducted from October to December 2016 by depth interview and questionnaires on seaweed farmers. We used logistic regression to compare each intangible factors on family and village-based seaweed farming management. The result showed that for family-based management farmers were willing to transfer their knowledge among each member in the household. For village-based revealed that farmers with higher education background tend to work on village-based, also, the result also stated that in village-based management member were those who have better capability and skill, at the same time village-based management had a small probability for conflict to occur compared to family-based.

  10. Market definition study of photovoltaic power for remote villages in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, C.; Quashie, P.

    1980-01-01

    A grass roots evaluation of the market potential was carried out for photovoltaic applications in remote villages in the U. S. and its possessions. An estimate of almost 14 MWp available for conversion from a potential to a real market was defined. The total power potential was based on the energy needs of almost 400 sites reported by Federal agencies and inputs from over 100 Indian tribes. The methodology used, the results achieved, and some recommendations of how to convert this domestic market potential into a real market are detailed.

  11. Walking the village: LiveDiverse – Sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nortje, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available LiveDiverse is a multi-year, multi-country collaborative research project that focuses on the interface between livelihoods and biodiversity of people in rural communities who live in or in the vicinity of a biodiversity ‘hotspot’. Five villages...

  12. Status of Ecological Sustainability in The Management of Biopore Infiltration Hole in Langkapura Village, Langkapura District, Bandar Lampung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Mulyaningsih

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Management of Biopore Infiltration Hole (BIH is an activity undertaken as an effort to reduce the vulnerability of flooding and drought, also reducing the debit of rubbish in Bandar Lampung city. This study conducted in July to August 2014, in Langkapura village, Langkapura district, Bandar Lampung city. The aims of the study are; to know the physical and chemical soil BIH area, to analyze the index and sustainability status of ecological dimensions, and to analyze the sensitive attributes of ecological dimension through the sustainability BIH management. The analytical method used is MDS analysis ( Multidimensional Scaling with Rap-Biopore approach which modified from Rapfish analysis . The analysis stage is using MDS with Rap-Biopore approach which include; scoring attributes BIH management, MDS ordination determination , sensitivity analysis (Leverage , and Monte Carlo analysis. The results of the research; (1 The physical condition of the soil is predominantly blocky clay soil structure, texture (sand 20.47%, dust 25.91%, 53.62% clay; permeability 0:14 cm/h, porosity 57.73%, temperature 27 °C, (2 The chemical soil conditions pH 6.54 and the base saturation 34.66%; sustainability index value reach to 38.10, which the status of sustainability management from LRB is “less sustainable", (4 Attributes that highly sensitive through sustainability management LRB are rainfall and groundwater quality.

  13. Negotiating power relations, gender equality, and collective agency: are village health committees transformative social spaces in northern India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kerry; George, Asha S; Harvey, Steven A; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-09-15

    Participatory health initiatives ideally support progressive social change and stronger collective agency for marginalized groups. However, this empowering potential is often limited by inequalities within communities and between communities and outside actors (i.e. government officials, policymakers). We examined how the participatory initiative of Village Health, Sanitation, and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) can enable and hinder the renegotiation of power in rural north India. Over 18 months, we conducted 74 interviews and 18 focus groups with VHSNC members (including female community health workers and local government officials), non-VHSNC community members, NGO staff, and higher-level functionaries. We observed 54 VHSNC-related events (such as trainings and meetings). Initial thematic network analysis supported further examination of power relations, gendered "social spaces," and the "discourses of responsibility" that affected collective agency. VHSNCs supported some re-negotiation of intra-community inequalities, for example by enabling some women to speak in front of men and perform assertive public roles. However, the extent to which these new gender dynamics transformed relations beyond the VHSNC was limited. Furthermore, inequalities between the community and outside stakeholders were re-entrenched through a "discourse of responsibility": The comparatively powerful outside stakeholders emphasized community responsibility for improving health without acknowledging or correcting barriers to effective VHSNC action. In response, some community members blamed peers for not taking up this responsibility, reinforcing a negative collective identity where participation was futile because no one would work for the greater good. Others resisted this discourse, arguing that the VHSNC alone was not responsible for taking action: Government must also intervene. This counter-narrative also positioned VHSNC participation as futile. Interventions to strengthen

  14. Differences in Power Structures Regarding Access to Natural Resources at the Village Level in Central Sulawesi (Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Barkmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The mountain forests of the Indonesian province of Central Sulawesi include core areas of the global Wallacea biodiversity “hotspot”. Remote sensing data indicated that deforestation rates around Central Sulawesi’s Lore-Lindu National Park differ more strongly between villages than could be explained by differences in the individual characteristics of the village households as assessed by quantitative village censuses. This setting provided the background for a study into inter-village differences in power structures regarding access to natural resources. Our results are abstracted from 3*10 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with key informants from the leading groups of autochthonous and migrant households of three contrasting villages. In village A, nearly feudal power relationships are exerted by a group of local “first settler” families that dominate formal village leadership as well as the influential Council of Traditional Leaders (Lembaga Adat, and that restrict deforestation and land transactions. No such institutional restrictions exist in village C. Traditional power relationships are replaced by economic power based on petty capitalist type production of the international agricultural commodity cocoa. Deforestation is muchhigher in village C. In village B, traditional institutions and power structures still appear in place although land transactions are less restricted than in village A, resulting also in high deforestation rates. While contrasting problematic social effects, our study highlights the potential efficacy of traditional institutions in the regulation of access to resources. ----- Die Bergregenwälder Zentralsulawesis sind Teil des globalen Wallacea-Biodiversität-"Hotspots" und beheimaten viele endemische Tier- und Pflanzenarten. Die Entwaldung im Bereich des dortigen Lore-Lindu Nationalparks unterscheidet sich zwischen umliegenden Dörfern stärker, als dies durch quantitative Haushaltsdaten zu erkl

  15. Radiocesium concentrations in wild mushrooms after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: Follow-up study in Kawauchi village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Makiko; Nakashima, Kanami; Taira, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Toshiki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Kudo, Takashi; Endo, Yuko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2017-07-27

    Since the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, it has become well known that radiocesium tends to concentrate in wild mushrooms. During the recovery process after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), it is important to perform follow-up measurements of the activity concentrations of radiocesium in mushrooms. We evaluated the activity concentrations of the detected artificial radionuclides (radiocesium) in wild mushrooms collected from Kawauchi village, which is within 30 km of the FDNPS, in 2015, four years after the accident. We found that the radiocesium was determined in 147 of 159 mushroom samples (92.4%). Based on the average mushroom consumption of Japanese citizens (6.28 kg per year), we calculated committed effective doses ranging from Fukushima is needed for sustained recovery from the nuclear disaster.

  16. Green power perspectives on sustainable electricity generation

    CERN Document Server

    Neiva de Figueiredo, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Green Power: Perspectives on Sustainable Electricity Generation; João Neiva de Figueiredo and Mauro GuillénAn Overview of Electricity Generation Sources; Akhil Jariwala and Saumil JariwalaGermany's Energy Revolution; José Carlos Thomaz, Jr. and Sean MichalsonChina's Energy Profile and the Importance of Coal; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengChina's Search for Cleaner Electricity Generation Alternatives; Julia Zheng and Xiaoting ZhengRenewable Energy in Spain: A Quest for Energy Security; José Normando Bezerra, Jr.Renewable Energy in French Polynesia: From Unpredictable to Energy Independence? Dia

  17. Sustainable Living and Co-Housing: Evidence from a Case Study of Eco-Villages

    OpenAIRE

    Marckmann, Bella Margrethe Mørch; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine aspects of the different arguments for the environmental advantages of co-housing compared with individual households. The analysis is structured around four main questions, which are argued to be decisive for the question of co-housing and sustainability. The first is whether co-housing offers better opportunities for choosing and using more sustainable technologies, which also relates to the question of whether co-housing offers better opportunities for building s...

  18. Sustainable Living and Co-Housing: Evidence from a Case Study of Eco-Villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Bella Margrethe Mørch; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine aspects of the different arguments for the environmental advantages of co-housing compared with individual households. The analysis is structured around four main questions, which are argued to be decisive for the question of co-housing and sustainability. The first...... is whether co-housing offers better opportunities for choosing and using more sustainable technologies, which also relates to the question of whether co-housing offers better opportunities for building smaller and denser and thus more energy efficient buildings. The second and third questions are socially...... oriented; one relates to the claim that co-housing can support pro-environmental behaviour among residents as they can support each other's norms and practices. The fourth and last claim relates to a discussion of co-housing as a more sustainable opportunity especially for people living alone...

  19. Gathered Village Location Optimization for Chinese Sustainable Urbanization Using an Integrated MODM Approach under Bi-Uncertain Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Gan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization has become a main challenge all over developing countries in the 21st Century. However, decision making should take into account the different national situations with their complex factors to achieve sustainable development. As standards of living have risen in urban areas, local/neighbor urbanization has become a coming trend in China. With this in mind, the paper focuses on the optimization of nearby gathered village locations in Population Migration (PM with consideration of both qualitative and quantitative criteria. Therefore, an integrated multiple objective decision making approach (MODM under a bi-uncertain environment is proposed to solve this problem, which is based on the comprehensive Economy-Society-Ecology-Resource-Religion (ESERR urbanization concept. The first step is to establish a bi-uncertain multiple objective programming model orienting the problem. Secondly, the model process is composed of fuzzy random variable transformation and the expected value model based on a new fuzzy measure, which is given accordingly to obtain the equivalent model. Thirdly, in order to describe the model efficiently, the Multi-Objective Adaptive Global Local Neighbor Particle Swarm Optimization (MOAGLNPSO with three-dimensional Pareto optimal judgment criteria is designed. Finally, a case study is tested to validate the effectiveness and to illustrate the advantages of the whole approach. This novel approach can help optimize sustainable urbanization strategies and ensure their realistic application.

  20. Negotiating power relations, gender equality, and collective agency: are village health committees transformative social spaces in northern India?

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Kerry; George, Asha S; Harvey, Steven A.; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-01-01

    Background Participatory health initiatives ideally support progressive social change and stronger collective agency for marginalized groups. However, this empowering potential is often limited by inequalities within communities and between communities and outside actors (i.e. government officials, policymakers). We examined how the participatory initiative of Village Health, Sanitation, and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) can enable and hinder the renegotiation of power in rural north India. M...

  1. Potential use of neem leaf slurry as a sustainable dry season management strategy to control the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) in west African villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Kyphuong; Dunkel, Florence V; Coulibaly, Keriba; Beckage, Nancy E

    2012-11-01

    Larval management of the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae Giles s.s., has been successful in reducing disease transmission. However, pesticides are not affordable to farmers in remote villages in Mali, and in other material resource poor countries. Insect resistance to insecticides and nontarget toxicity pose additional problems. Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is a tree with many beneficial, insect bioactive compounds, such as azadirachtin. We tested the hypothesis that neem leaf slurry is a sustainable, natural product, anopheline larvicide. A field study conducted in Sanambele (Mali) in 2010 demonstrated neem leaf slurry can work with only the available tools and resources in the village. Laboratory bioassays were conducted with third instar An. gambiae and village methods were used to prepare the leaf slurry. Experimental concentration ranges were 1,061-21,224 mg/L pulverized neem leaves in distilled water. The 50 and 90% lethal concentrations at 72 h were 8,825 mg/L and 15,212 mg/L, respectively. LC concentrations were higher than for other parts of the neem tree when compared with previous published studies because leaf slurry preparation was simplified by omitting removal of fibrous plant tissue. Using storytelling as a medium of knowledge transfer, villagers combined available resources to manage anopheline larvae. Preparation of neem leaf slurries is a sustainable approach which allows villagers to proactively reduce mosquito larval density within their community as part of an integrated management system.

  2. Identifying the Conditions for Rural Sustainability through Place-Based Culture: Applying the CIPM and CDPM Models into Meibei Ancient Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transitional rural China faces more serious challenges in its sustainable development. How to regain the vital momentum of those historically and culturally preeminent villages, among over 680,000 administrative villages in total, has become the pressing agenda for all the stakeholders, due to the fact that these villages have huge potential to be the leverage for successful rural transition and new urbanization in China. This paper therefore tries to diagnose and identify the current situation of those villages from a cultural perspective by taking the Meibei ancient village as the case. By applying the proposed Cultural Inverted Pyramid Model (CIPM and Cultural Dual Pyramid Model (CDPM with seven layers, i.e., root/vision, value, symbol, hero, ritual, lifestyle, and governance & management, Meibei’s development mechanism has been systematically explored from a cultural perspective through the comparison between its past prosperity and present challenges. It is found that the great merit of Meibei’s past prosperity lied in the organic integration of cultural elements in all the layers through the five development dimensions, i.e., economic, social, institutional, environmental and cultural dimensions. The empirical study proves that CIPM is a useful tool for diagnosing and identifying the current situation of the village, while CDPM is an effective instrument for planning and designing a culture-embedded and improved place for the future. Unless Meibei can recreate a new cultural ecosystem with resilience fitting to its existed heritage with cultural excellence and tourism promotion, the village cannot catch up with its past prosperity. Finally, this paper calls for more in-depth culture-oriented research to improve the CIPM and CDPM paradigm to allow for the realization of rural sustainability, particularly from the perspectives of policy options and academic concerns.

  3. Market definition study of photovoltaic power for remote villages in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, C.; Quashie, P.

    1980-01-01

    The potential market of photovoltaic systems in remote village applications in developing countries is assessed. It is indicated that photovoltaic technology is cost-competitive with diesel generators in many remote village applications. The major barriers to development of this market are the limited financial resources on the part of developing countries, and lack of awareness of photovoltaics as a viable option in rural electrification. A comprehensive information, education and demonstration program should be established as soon as possible to convince the potential customer countries and the various financial institutions of the viability of photovoltaics as an electricity option for developing countries.

  4. Eco-Cultural Tourism: A Tool for Environmental, Cultural and Economic Sustainability (A Case Study of Darap Village, West Sikkim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajee Laitpharlang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eco-cultural tourism is a concept where both ecological and cultural aspects of a landscape are combined together creating a tourist paradise. It is travel to destinations where both cultural and natural endowments are the prime attractions and thereby considered to be a potential strategy to support conservation of natural habitats along with economic sustainability particularly to indigenous communities. North Eastern Region of India is one of the most mesmerizing regions of the Indian subcontinent that mirrors a perfect blending of life, culture and ecology. It is a relatively unexplored and unique area in terms of both ecology and cultural diversity and is characterized by the abundance of natural endowments; pristine forests with a huge diversity of flora and fauna, enchanting hills, fast flowing streams and meandering rivers, cascading waterfalls, snowcapped mountain ranges etc. Approximately there are 65 indigenous tribes in the region along with a host of sub-tribes having their own distinctive cultures, customs and traditions preserved till today. This article tries to argue through a case study of village tourism at Darap in West Sikkim that eco-cultural tourism is a potent force for the overall economic, social and cultural development as well biodiversity conservation in the region.

  5. Environmental and exergetic sustainability assessment of power generation from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; Tsalidis, G.A.; van der Kooi, H.J.; Korevaar, G.

    2017-01-01

    Power generation from biomass is mentioned as a means to make our society more sustainable as it decreases greenhouse gas emissions of fossil origin and reduces the dependency on finite energy carriers, such as coal, oil and natural gas. When assessing the sustainability of power generation from

  6. Sustainable Data Evolution Technology for Power Grid Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-10-09

    The SDET Tool is used to create open-access power grid data sets and facilitate updates of these data sets by the community. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its power industry and software vendor partners are developing an innovative sustainable data evolution technology (SDET) to create open-access power grid datasets and facilitate updates to these datasets by the power grid community. The objective is to make this a sustained effort within and beyond the ARPA-E GRID DATA program so that the datasets can evolve over time and meet the current and future needs for power grid optimization and potentially other applications in power grid operation and planning.

  7. Sustainable energy landscapes: The power of imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stremke, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resource depletion and climate change motivate a transition to sustainable energy systems that make effective use of renewable sources. Sustainable energy transition necessitates a transformation of large parts of the existing built environment and presents one of the great challenges of present-day

  8. Transformation of traditional houses in the development of sustainable rural tourism, case study of Brayut Tourism Village in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasurya, V. R.; Hardiman, G.; Sari, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to reveal local values used by Brayut villagers to maintain the existence of the traditional house as a dwelling. The transformation of traditional houses goes as time passes, influenced by internal aspects related to the needs of residents and external aspects related to the regional development by the government. Traditional Javanese house as a cultural identity of Javanese people, especially in the village, has also experienced the transformation phenomenon. Modernization affects local residents’ needs and the Government’s Development Program for tourism village influences demands of change. An unfocused transformation can lead to a total change that can eliminate the cultural identity of the rural Java community. The method used is the case study by taking three models of Javanese house in Brayut Village. Brayut Tourism Village is a cultural tourism village that relies on tradition as a tourist attraction. The existence of traditional Javanese house is an important asset for retaining its authenticity as a dwelling. Three models taken as the case studies represent the traditional Javanese house types. The result obtained is that the family bond is a major factor in preserving the traditional Javanese house in Brayut Village, Yogyakarta.

  9. Power to the people : Local community initiatives and the transition to sustainable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Tineke; Scholtens, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The transition towards renewable and sustainable energy is being accompanied by a transformation of communities and neighbourhoods. This transition may have huge ramifications throughout society. Many cities, towns and villages are putting together ambitious visions about how to achieve 100%

  10. Power to the people: Local community initiatives and the transition to sustainable energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tineke van der Schoor; Bert Scholtens

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The transition towards renewable and sustainable energy is being accompanied by a transformation of communities and neighbourhoods. This transition may have huge ramifications throughout society. Many cities, towns and villages are putting together ambitious visions about how to achieve

  11. Power Distribution at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Illumination through Affordable and Sustainable Solution of Gram Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nisha; Sarswat, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    Energy plays a vital role in the socio -economic development, mainly due to the dependency of indispensable amenities on electricity. However, a matter of concern is developing country domestic power needs and inadequate supply. One of the cases is Indian subcontinent, where more than 50,000 villages still not have access to uninterrupted electric power. `Power theft' is a major challenge due to the lack of adequate energy supply and the financial constraints. Long distances, inaccurate and inflated electricity bills are the other issues lead to default on payments. Gram Power, a social enterprise, is providing a smart metering and affordable solution in areas where the extension of existing grid supply is economically not viable. India's first solar powered micro-grid (centralized array of solar panels) in Rajasthan was established by this initiative. The core innovation is a smart distribution technology that consists of smart meters with recharging facility and grid monitoring, to provide on-demand, theft-proof power through centralized servers with a pay-as-you-use schedule. The details of the changes, socio-economic transformation, and operational sustainability of such a community engagement model will be discussed in this study.

  12. Modeling and control of sustainable power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2011-01-01

    The concept of the smart grid promises the world an efficient and intelligent approach of managing energy production, transportation, and consumption by incorporating intelligence, efficiency, and optimality into the power grid. Both energy providers and consumers can take advantage of the convenience, reliability, and energy savings achieved by real-time and intelligent energy management. To this end, the current power grid is experiencing drastic changes and upgrades. For instance, more significant green energy resources such as wind power and solar power are being integrated into the power

  13. Effectiveness of community-based mangrove management for sustainable resource use and livelihood support: A case study of four villages in Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damastuti, Ekaningrum; de Groot, Rudolf

    2017-12-01

    Community-Based Mangrove Management (CBMM) is implemented with different approaches and outcomes. This study examined the effectiveness of various CBMM practices to achieve sustainable management of mangrove resources. We analyzed local mangrove resource management strategies in four coastal villages (e.g. Sriwulan, Bedono, Timbulsloko, and Surodadi) on Central Java, Indonesia. Local data on institutions, socio-economic conditions and mangrove resources utilization was collected through participatory resource mapping and interviews with 16 key actors and 500 households. The main differences in CBMM-practices that affect the outcomes in each village were the type of community participation, the level of organizational and economic assistance from external institutions, the magnitude of the rehabilitation project, the time selected for rehabilitation and the maintenance strategies applied in each village. Surodadi achieved most in terms of both efficient resource utilization and local livelihood improvement. Bedono's management strategy was most effective in extending and maintaining the rehabilitated mangrove areas but less in terms of livelihood support while the strategy applied in Timbulsloko resulted in higher resource utilization compared to Surodadi. Sriwulan failed on most criteria. This study suggests that combining the management strategies practiced in Bedono and Surodadi and adding external scientific and technological assistance, income diversification, institutional reinforcement and continuous monitoring of the functioning of local institutions can improve the CBMM performance to sustainably manage mangrove resources and improve livelihoods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Harnessing wind power with sustained policy support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meera, L. [BITS-Pilani. Dept. of Economics, Hyderabad (India)

    2012-07-01

    The development of wind power in India began in the 1990s, and has significantly increased in the last few years. The ''Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association (IWTMA)'' has played a leading role in promoting wind energy in India. Although a relative newcomer to the wind industry compared with Denmark or the US, a combination of domestic policy support for wind power and the rise of Suzlon (a leading global wind turbine manufacturer) have led India to become the country with the fifth largest installed wind power capacity in the world. Wind power accounts for 6% of India's total installed power capacity, and it generates 1.6% of the country's power. (Author)

  15. Towards self-sustainable power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angjelichinoski, Marko; Danzi, Pietro; Stefanovic, Cedomir

    2017-01-01

    We propose use of a “modemless” communication solution, termed power talk, tailored for optimization and monitoring, i.e., upper layer control in low voltage DC MicroGrids (MGs). Specifically, the exchange of the information required for the upper control among control agents is achieved by modul......We propose use of a “modemless” communication solution, termed power talk, tailored for optimization and monitoring, i.e., upper layer control in low voltage DC MicroGrids (MGs). Specifically, the exchange of the information required for the upper control among control agents is achieved...... of additional hardware and can be implemented via software modifications of the power electronic converters. We present the communication solution in the context of decentralized optimal power flow, where the generators periodically transmit information about their local generation capacity with an aim...

  16. Distributed Power Systems for Sustainable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Base ALC Automatic Logic Corporation BEMS building energy management system BMS battery management system CHP combined heat and power DC...direct current DOD U.S. Department of Defense DSB Defense Science Board EES electric energy storage EMS energy management system EO Executive...Electrotechnical Commission IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers LCC life-cycle cost MPPT maximum power point of tracking NDAA National

  17. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  18. Measurement of internal radiation exposure among decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nihei, Masahiko; Sato, Katsumi; Masaki, Shin; Sakuma, Yu; Kato, Shigeaki; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Matsumura, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Hayano, Ryugo; Shibuya, Kenji; Kami, Masahiro; Sasaki, Taro

    2013-10-01

    Decontamination workers may face a high risk of exposure to internal irradiation through inhalation during decontamination activities; there is, however, little previous research on the levels of internal contamination during decontamination procedures. The authors reviewed the medical records, including whole body counter measurements, of decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to assess their levels of internal radiation exposure. In total, 83 decontamination workers were enrolled in this study. They were regularly engaged in decontamination activities in highly contaminated areas where surface 137Cs deposition density was over 100 kBq m-2. The present study showed low levels of internal exposure among the decontamination workers near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The cesium burdens of all the decontamination workers were below detection limits. They had reported no acute health problems. The resuspension of radioactive materials may cause minimal internal contamination during decontamination activities.

  19. LEADERSHIP IN OPTIMIZING MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR GROUP SUSTAINABILITY (Case of Farmer Groups of Gisik Pranaji Bugel Village Panjatan Kulon Progo Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kuning Retno Dewandini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leadership is one important aspect in the sucess of the group. The leader of a group have a role as determinat sucess of the group. Nothing a leader, a group will only run without direction and purpose. But the sucess of a group is not only determined by a leader, but also it determined by his followers as well as a supportive environment. Gisik Pranaji farmer groups in the Bugel village of Panjatan Kulon Progo Regency able to survive due to the role of farmer group. To sustain these group need the support of the parties involved in it, including all the members of farmers and the environment.

  20. Limitations of Nuclear Power as a Sustainable Energy Source

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a review and analysis of the challenges that nuclear power must overcome in order to be considered sustainable. The results make it clear that not only do innovative technical solutions need to be generated for the fundamental inherent environmental burdens of nuclear energy technology, but the nuclear industry must also address difficult issues of equity both in the present and for future generations. The results show that if the concept of just sustainability&l...

  1. The power of design product innovation in sustainable energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Reinders, Angele H; Brezet, Han

    2012-01-01

    The Power of Design offers an introduction and a practical guide to product innovation, integrating the key topics that are necessary for the design of sustainable and energy-efficient products using sustainable energy technologies. Product innovation in sustainable energy technologies is an interdisciplinary field. In response to its growing importance and the need for an integrated view on the development of solutions, this text addresses the functional principles of various energy technologies next to the latest design processes and innovation methods. From the perspec

  2. Piikani wind power project : sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Big Bull, W. [Piikuni Utilities Corp., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation reviewed the potential environmental impacts that a wind turbine array may have on the sacred way of life of the Piikuni Nation, an Aboriginal community living in Blackfoot Territory in Alberta and Saskatchewan. A map depicting the traditional land use area as delineated in an 1877 Treaty was presented. Companies that require access to the land must be aware of historic sites and utilize protocol to approach First Nations communities. The community consultation process is driven by a desire to embark in partnerships to ensure that best practice methods are used throughout the duration of the project. The Weather Dancer 1 is a 100 MW wind power joint venture project between the Piikani Utilities Corporation and EPCOR. Electricity is presently being sold to the city of Edmonton. figs.

  3. Optimal Sizing Of An Off-Grid Small Hydro-Photovoltaic-Diesel Generator Hybrid Power System For A Distant Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebanji B.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented an optimal sizing technique for an off-grid hybrid system consisting of Small Hydro SHP system Photovoltaic PV modules Battery BATT banks and Diesel Generator DG. The objective cost function Annualized Cost System and the Loss of Power Supply Probability LPSP were minimized with application of Genetic Algorithm GA in order to reduce the Cost of Energy COE generation. GA compared to other convectional optimization methods has the ability to attain global optimum easily. The decision variables are the number of small hydro turbines NSHP number of solar panels NPV number of battery banks NBATT and the capacity of DG PDG. The proposed method was applied to a typical rural village Itapaji-Ekiti in Nigeria. The monthly average solar irradiance data were converted into hourly solar irradiance data for uniformity. Sensitivity analysis was also performed to identify the most important parameter influencing the optimized hybrid system. The optimal sizing result of the HPS is 954 kW of SHP 290 kW of PV panels 9500 sets of 600Ah battery strings and 350 kW of DG. The optimal Loss of Power Supply Probability LPSP is 0.0054 and the Renewable Fraction RF is 0.62 which is indeed a significant improvement on the environment and comparatively better than any other combinations in the system.

  4. Radiocesium concentrations in wild mushrooms collected in Kawauchi Village after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanami Nakashima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known from the experience after the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant that radiocesium tends to concentrate in wild mushrooms. In this study, we collected wild mushrooms from the Kawauchi Village of Fukushima Prefecture, located within 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and evaluated their radiocesium concentrations to estimate the risk of internal radiation exposure in local residents. We found that radioactive cesium exceeding 100 Bq/kg was detected in 125 of 154 mushrooms (81.2%. We calculated committed effective doses based on 6,278 g per year (age > 20 years, 17.2 g/day, the average intake of Japanese citizens, ranging from doses of 0.11–1.60 mSv, respectively. Although committed effective doses are limited even if residents eat contaminated foods several times, we believe that comprehensive risk-communication based on the results of the radiocesium measurements of food, water, and soil is necessary for the recovery of Fukushima after this nuclear disaster.

  5. Renewable Energy in China: Xiao Qing Dao Village Power Wind/Diesel Hybrid Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, DOE/NREL and the State Power Corporation of China (SPCC) developed a pilot project to electrify Xiao Qing Dao, a small island located in China's Yellow Sea. The project demonstrates the practicality of renewable energy systems for medium-scale, off-grid applications. It consists of four 10 k-W wind turbines connected to a 30-kW diesel generator, a 40-kW inverter and a battery bank.

  6. Modelling Sustainable Development Scenarios of Croatian Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašičko, Robert; Stanić, Zoran; Debrecin, Nenad

    2010-05-01

    The main objective of power system sustainable development is to provide the security of electricity supply required to underpin economic growth and increase the quality of living while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. New challenges such as deregulation, liberalization of energy markets, increased competition on energy markets, growing demands on security of supply, price insecurities and demand to cut CO2 emissions, are calling for better understanding of electrical systems modelling. Existing models are not sufficient anymore and planners will need to think differently in order to face these challenges. Such a model, on the basis on performed simulations, should enable planner to distinguish between different options and to analyze sustainability of these options. PLEXOS is an electricity market simulation model, used for modeling electrical system in Croatia since 2005. Within this paper, generation expansion scenarios until 2020 developed for Croatian Energy Strategy and modeled in PLEXOS. Development of sustainable Croatian energy scenario was analyzed in the paper - impacts of CO2 emission price and wind generation. Energy Strategy sets goal for 1200 MW from wind power plants in 2020. In order to fully understand its impacts, intermittent nature of electricity generation from wind power plant was modeled. We conclude that electrical system modelling using everyday growing models has proved to be inevitable for sustainable electrical system planning in complex environment in which power plants operate today.

  7. Creating the Urban Village: Teaching Pre-Service Teachers about Sustainable Design in Architecture and Community Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Zande, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable design is a philosophy adopted by people concerned with the health of society and the natural environment. The practice of sustainable design works toward the improvement of the quality of the built environment, while reducing or eradicating the negative impact on the natural environment (McLennan 2004). It is a philosophical approach…

  8. Techno-economical study of hybrid power system for a remote village in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himri, Y. [Electricity and Gas National Enterprise (Sonelgaz), Bechar, 05 rue Mokadem Ahmed, Bechar (08000) (Algeria); Boudghene Stambouli, A. [Department of Electronics, University of Sciences and Technology of Oran (Algeria); Draoui, B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bechar (Algeria); Himri, S. [Department of Fundamental Sciences, University of Bechar (Algeria)

    2008-07-15

    The share of renewable energy sources in Algeria primary energy supply is relatively low compared with European countries, though the trend of development is positive. One of the main strategic priorities of NEAL (New Energy Algeria), which is Algeria's renewable energy agency (government, Sonelgaz and Sonatrach), is striving to achieve a share of 10-12% renewable energy sources in primary energy supply by 2010.This article presents techno-economic assessment for off-grid hybrid generation systems of a site in south western Algeria. The HOMER model is used to evaluate the energy production, life-cycle costs and greenhouse gas emissions reduction for this study. In the present scenario, for wind speed less than 5.0 m/s the existing diesel power plant is the only feasible solution over the range of fuel prices used in the simulation. The wind diesel hybrid system becomes feasible at a wind speed of 5.48 m/s or more and a fuel price of 0.162$/L or more. If the carbon tax is taken into consideration and subsidy is abolished, then it is expected that the hybrid system will become feasible. The maximum annual capacity shortage did not have any effect on the cost of energy, which may be accounted for by larger sizes of wind machines and diesel generators. (author)

  9. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. The Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands.

  10. A Conceptual Study on the Sustainability of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Choi, Hang Bok; Lim, Chae Young; Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, Seong Won

    2007-06-15

    Due to the current population growth and industrialization, energy consumption is increasing continuously. The world population and energy consumption were 2.5 billion and 1.5 billion tons of equivalent oil in 1950, but they are expected to be 9.2 billion and 60 tons, respectively, in 2100. This amount of energy consumption will result in an exhaustion of fossil resources and cause a serious environmental problem such as global warming. Therefore it is necessary to develop sustainable energy resources that maintain current economic growth and social welfare level without burdening a next generation's life style. Nuclear energy has an excellent competitiveness from the viewpoint of a sustainability. Especially nuclear power can effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can be developed in a complementary way with a new and renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and hydrogen energy. It is expected that nuclear power will maintain its sustainability in the following directions: Implementation of a fast reactor fuel cycle with a high uranium utilization efficiency, Implementation of a pyro-process with an excellent proliferation-resistance, Activity on the enhancement of a domestic social acceptance for nuclear power, International cooperation and joint research for the enhancement of an international nuclear transparency, Optimization of a nuclear grid structure through an accommodation of new and renewable energy resources, Application to a mass production of hydrogen energy.

  11. Findings from the Caring International Research Collaborative: Using Caring Science To Assess and Support Food Sustainability Systems for Women Living with HIV/AIDS in a Village in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relindis Oyebog Moffor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes Caring Science as an innovative way to facilitate food systems sustainability in areas of the world that continue to suffer from food insecurity and food shortages. An interdisciplinary group that included a nurse, an agronomist, an environmentalist, and a statistical analyst collaborated to study food sustainability in a village in Bambui, Cameroon. The village was composed of only women and children, and all the women were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. This interdisciplinary approach not only met the food needs of the village, but, within the assessment process, identified other needs as well. This interdisciplinary approach facilitated holistic assessment of food, finances, personal self-worth and health.

  12. Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Bruce E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-08-16

    Water has always been crucial to combustion and hydroelectric processes, but it could become the source of power in membrane-based systems that capture energy from natural and waste waters. Two processes are emerging as sustainable methods for capturing energy from sea water: pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis. These processes can also capture energy from waste heat by generating artificial salinity gradients using synthetic solutions, such as thermolytic salts. A further source of energy comes from organic matter in waste waters, which can be harnessed using microbial fuel-cell technology, allowing both wastewater treatment and power production.

  13. Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-08-15

    Water has always been crucial to combustion and hydroelectric processes, but it could become the source of power in membrane-based systems that capture energy from natural and waste waters. Two processes are emerging as sustainable methods for capturing energy from sea water: pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis. These processes can also capture energy from waste heat by generating artificial salinity gradients using synthetic solutions, such as thermolytic salts. A further source of energy comes from organic matter in waste waters, which can be harnessed using microbial fuel-cell technology, allowing both wastewater treatment and power production. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Residents’ Attitudes towards Sustainable Tourism Development in a Historical-Cultural Village: Influence of Perceived Impacts, Sense of Place and Tourism Development Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the residents’ support for sustainable tourism development in a destination that is in the initial tourism development stage. Residents’ perception of sustainable tourism development potential, sense of place, perceived tourism impacts, and tourism development support were involved in this study. A total of 331 completed questionnaire surveys were collected in Luozhou, a historical-cultural village in China. The empirical data were analyzed using a structural equation modeling (SEM technique, and the results revealed that perceived collective benefits had a significant positive effect on tourism development support, whereas the other three perceived impacts’ influence were not significant. The relationship between residents’ sense of place and perceived collective and personal benefits, perceived personal costs and tourism development support, were significant. Additionally, residents’ perceptions of tourism development potential had a significant influence on perceived impact and tourism development support except for perceived personal benefits. Some practical implications of those findings for tourism planning and development are also discussed.

  15. Agroforestry and sustainable vegetable production case study: Nghia Trung Village, Bu Dang District, Binh Phuoc Province, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Du, L.V.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation describes soil conservation studies to be conducted in Vietnam, LTR-5 site. It discusses a baseline study that covered issues on no-tillage vegetable systems and soil and water conservation. It gives a profile of the study area in Vietnam, and outlines the structure of cashew production including farmer perception, intercropping and the potential for future research. LTRA-5 (Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production)

  16. Limitations of Nuclear Power as a Sustainable Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Pearce

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review and analysis of the challenges that nuclear power must overcome in order to be considered sustainable. The results make it clear that not only do innovative technical solutions need to be generated for the fundamental inherent environmental burdens of nuclear energy technology, but the nuclear industry must also address difficult issues of equity both in the present and for future generations. The results show that if the concept of just sustainability is applied to the nuclear energy sector a global large-scale sustainable nuclear energy system to replace fossil fuel combustion requires the following: (i a radical improvement in greenhouse gas emissions intensity by improved technology and efficiency through the entire life cycle to prevent energy cannibalism during rapid growth; (ii the elimination of nuclear insecurity to reduce the risks associated with nuclear power so that the free market can indemnify it without substantial public nuclear energy insurance subsidies; (iii the elimination of radioactive waste at the end of life and minimization of environmental impact during mining and operations; and (iv the nuclear industry must regain public trust or face obsolescence as a swarm of renewable energy technologies quickly improve both technical and economic performance.

  17. Motion charged battery as sustainable flexible-power-unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sihong; Lin, Zong-Hong; Niu, Simiao; Lin, Long; Xie, Yannan; Pradel, Ken C; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-12-23

    Energy harvesting and storage are the two most important energy technologies developed for portable, sustainable, and self-sufficient power sources for mobile electronic systems. However, both have limitations for providing stable direct-current (DC) with an infinite lifetime. Herein, we integrated a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG)-based mechanical energy harvester with Li-ion-battery (LIB)-based energy storage as a single device for demonstrating a flexible self-charging power unit (SCPU), which allows a battery to be charged directly by ambient mechanical motion. This physical integration enables a new operation mode of the SCPU: the "sustainable mode", in which the LIB stores the TENG-generated electricity while it is driving an external load. With the LIB being replenished by the ambient mechanical energy, the SCPU can keep providing a constant voltage to the load by utilizing the stable difference between the battery's intrinsic electrode potentials. This study will impact the traditional trends of battery research and advance the development of the self-powered systems.

  18. The Moon Village Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Piero; Foing, Bernard H.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Haignere, Claudie; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    The "Moon Village" concept Space exploration is anchored in the International Space Station and in the current and future automatic and planetary automatic and robotic missions that pave the way for future long-term exploration objectives. The Moon represents a prime choice for scientific, operational and programmatic reasons and could be the enterprise that federates all interested Nations. On these considerations ESA is currently elaborating the concept of a Moon Village as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. The Moon Village has the ambition to serve a number of objectives that have proven to be of interest (including astronomy, fundamental research, resources management, moon science, etc. ) to the space community and should be the catalyst of new alliances between public and private entities including non-space industries. Additionally the Moon Village should provide a strong inspirational and education tool for the younger generations . The Moon Village will rely both on automatic, robotic and human-tendered structures to achieve sustainable moon surface operations serving multiple purposes on an open-architecture basis. This Europe-inspired initiative should rally all communities (across scientific disciplines, nations, industries) and make it to the top of the political agendas as a the scientific and technological undertaking but also political and inspirational endeavour of the XXI century. The current reflections are of course based on the current activities and plans on board the ISS and the discussion held in international fora such as the ISECG. The paper will present the status of these reflections, also in view of the ESA Council at Ministerial Level 2016, and will give an overview of the on-going activities being carried out to enable the vision of a Moon Village.

  19. Fusion Breeding for Sustainable, Mid Century, Carbon Free Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2015-11-01

    If ITER achieves Q ~10, it is still very far from useful fusion. The fusion power, and the driver power will allow only a small amount of power to be delivered, power producers. Considering the status of other magnetic fusion concepts, it is also very unlikely that any alternate concept will either. Laser fusion does not seem to be constrained by any conservative design rules, but considering the failure of NIF to achhieve ignition, at this point it has many more obstacles to overcome than magnetic fusion. One way out of this dilemma is to use an ITER size tokamak, or a NIF size laser, as a fuel breeder for searate nuclear reactors. Hence ITER and NIF become ends in themselves, instead of steps to who knows what DEMO decades later. Such a tokamak can easily live within the consrtaints of conservative design rules. This has led the author to propose ``The Energy Park'' a sustainable, carbon free, economical, and environmently viable power source without prolifertion risk. It is one fusion breeder fuels 5 conventional nuclear reactors, and one fast neutron reactor burns the actinide wastes.

  20. Performance of Power Systems under Sustained Random Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Verdejo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies linear systems under sustained additive random perturbations. The stable operating point of an electric power system is replaced by an attracting stationary solution if the system is subjected to (small random additive perturbations. The invariant distribution of this stationary solution gives rise to several performance indices that measure how well the system copes with the randomness. These indices are introduced, showing how they can be used for the optimal tuning of system parameters in the presence of noise. Results on a four-generator two-area system are presented and discussed.

  1. An analysis of socio-economic and environmental sustainability of goat production in the Taurus Mountain Villages in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey, with consideration of gender roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davran, Müge K; Ocak, Sezen; Secer, Arzu

    2009-10-01

    This paper aims to reveal socio-economic and environmental sustainability of goat production in the Taurus Mountains' villages in Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey: with consideration of gender roles. Goat production sector is the most important livelihood activity in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. According to various new regulations of the Ministry of Forestry, goat production in the mountainous villages of Taurus Mountains has been banned for recent year for various reasons such as; the destruction of shoots and branches in trees, forest degradation and erosion. Therefore, goat production is decreasing dramatically in that region. Data were collected in 4 districts of 8 villages in which goat production has been done intensively (two villages in each district) by face to face interview with 52 women and 58 men. Data were analyzed in Statistical Program of Social Science (SPSS). According to our findings, goat production has different affects on the lives of men and women and the sustainability of the sector is dependent on social factors, primarily education.

  2. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands. For the first time this year, Essent is fully incorporated in the RWE company profile. SPE, a company covered for the first time, is included in the company profile of its owner EdF. The Vattenfall and Nuon fact sheets were drafted and reviewed separately, and combined into one company profile afterwards. In total, the 2010 series consist of ten company fact sheets; Delta, Dong Energy, E.ON, EdF, SPE, Eneco, Enel, Gdf Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, Nuon/Vattenfall and RWE. The company fact sheets form the basis of three separate reports, covering companies active in (1) The Netherlands, (2) Belgium, and an overview of (3) the largest European companies. This report is the version for Belgium, and covers the following companies, all active on the Belgian market: EdF, GDF Suez/Electrabel, RWE, SPE, Vattenfall/Nuon.

  3. Sustainability in the Power Sector. 2010 Update. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2010-11-15

    This 2010 series of power company and thematic fact sheets aims to raise public awareness about sustainability issues in the electricity sector and to improve the sustainability of power companies operating in the Netherlands. The fact sheet series investigates the companies' performance on incorporating renewable energy sources into their fuel mix for both generation and supply of electricity, and on their investments and future plans with respect to energy sources at both the Dutch and European level. The 2010 fact sheet series is the annual update that is going into its fourth year, and builds on the work from previous years (available at www.somo.nl), but includes a slightly different range of companies due to a number of recent and pending mergers and acquisitions among power companies with operations in the Netherlands. For the first time this year, Essent is fully incorporated in the RWE company profile. SPE, a company covered for the first time, is included in the company profile of its owner EdF. The Vattenfall and Nuon fact sheets were drafted and reviewed separately, and combined into one company profile afterwards. In total, the 2010 series consist of ten company fact sheets; Delta, Dong Energy, E.ON, EdF, SPE, Eneco, Enel, Gdf Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, Nuon/Vattenfall and RWE. The company fact sheets form the basis of three separate reports, covering companies active in (1) The Netherlands, (2) Belgium, and an overview of (3) the largest European companies. This report is the version for Europe, and covers the following companies, all among the largest electricity companies in Europe: EdF, Enel, E.ON, GDF Suez/Electrabel, Iberdrola, RWE, Vattenfall/Nuon.

  4. Study on the “3F-in-1” Sustainable Reconstruction of Rural Architecture from Placeality Perspective--A Case Study of Caiyuan Village in Jingmen City, Hubei Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangyu, Fu; Yu, Cao

    2017-05-01

    This paper takes Caiyuan Village in Jingmen City of Hubei Province as the research object, analyzes the production, life and ecological functions of rural buildings and the “3F-in-1” inherent mechanism from the local perspective. Based on the concept analysis of placeality and “3F-in-1”, this paper clarifies the relationship among the value of life function, production function, ecological function so as to analyze the “3F-in-1” mode of rural architecture with placeality. On this basis, this thesis puts forward the strategy of sustainable spatial transformation (1) preserve the traditional overall spatial structure of villages, (2) improve the adaptability and function of rural architecture, (3) extend the rural social culture, (4) pay attention to local perception, with a view to explore an organic system design method for the exhibition of placeality and sustainable development of beautiful countryside.

  5. Energy indicators impact in multi-criteria sustainability analyse of thermal power plant unit

    OpenAIRE

    Škobalj Predrag D.; Kijevčanin Mirjana Lj.; Jovanović Marina P.; Afgan Naim H.; Erić Milić D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents method for sustainability assessment of thermal power plant unit using multi-criteria analysis with aim to create base for business decision. Seven options of possible status of thermal power plant „Kolubara A” unit No. 2 with energy indicators of sustainable development were shown. Energy indicators of sustainable development consists of sets of resource preservation, economic, environmental, and social indicators. Sustainability assessment often fails to account for soci...

  6. Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2004-10-01

    As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

  7. Research of Reconstruction of Village in the Urban Fringe Based on Urbanization Quality Improving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of urban-rural integration, it is an acute and urgent challenge for the destiny of farmers and the development of village in the urban fringe in the developed area. Based on the “urbanization quality improving” this new perspective and through the analysis of experience and practice of Village renovation of Xi’nan Village of Zengcheng county, this article summarizes the meaning of urbanization quality in developed areas and finds the villages in the urban fringe’s reconstruction strategy. The study shows that as to the distinction of the urbanization of the old and the new areas, the special feature of the re-construction of the villages on the edge of the cities, the government needs to make far-sighted lay-out design and carry out strictly with a high standard in mind. The government must set up social security system, push forward the welfare of the residents, construct a new model of urban-rural relations, attaches great importance to sustainable development, promote the quality of the villagers, maintain regional cultural characters, and form a strong management team. All in all, in the designing and building the regions, great importance must be attached to verified ways and new creative cooperative development mechanism with a powerful leadership and sustainable village construction.

  8. LIFE: a sustainable solution for developing safe, clean fusion power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Susana; Dunne, Mike; Kramer, Kevin; Anklam, Tom; Havstad, Mark; Mazuecos, Antonio Lafuente; Miles, Robin; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Deri, Bob

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California is currently in operation with the goal to demonstrate fusion energy gain for the first time in the laboratory-also referred to as "ignition." Based on these demonstration experiments, the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed at LLNL in partnership with other institutions with the goal to deliver baseload electricity from safe, secure, sustainable fusion power in a time scale that is consistent with the energy market needs. For this purpose, the LIFE design takes advantage of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology and adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units used on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. The LIFE market entry plant will demonstrate the feasibility of a closed fusion fuel cycle, including tritium breeding, extraction, processing, refueling, accountability, and safety, in a steady-state power-producing device. While many fusion plant designs require large quantities of tritium for startup and operations, a range of design choices made for the LIFE fuel cycle act to reduce the in-process tritium inventory. This paper presents an overview of the delivery plan and the preconceptual design of the LIFE facility with emphasis on the key safety design principles being adopted. In order to illustrate the favorable safety characteristics of the LIFE design, some initial accident analysis results are presented that indicate potential for a more attractive licensing regime than that of current fission reactors.

  9. External Benefit Evaluation of Renewable Energy Power in China for Sustainability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Huiru; Guo, Sen

    2015-01-01

    ... goals and to implement differentiated supporting policies for different renewable energy power types, which can promote their sustainable development. In this paper, a hybrid MCDM method was ap...

  10. Welcome to The Green Village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A sustainable world can only be achieved by an open collaboration between science, business and the public. That is why we create the Green Village: an innovative, lively, interactive and challenging environment where entrepreneurs, innovators, companies, artists, teachers and visitors can meet,

  11. The role of participatory problem analysis in performance improvement and sustainable management of rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems: A case study of Makanya village, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabu, Kossa R. M.

    Poor availability of water and pastures has been identified as the single most important factor constraining productivity of livestock in Tanzania. Many smallholder livestock keepers have responded to the problem of shortage of water by constructing charco dams (dug out ponds constructed in flat semi-arid areas to store surface runoff). However, most of these charco dams are performing poorly. A participatory problem analysis was carried out in Makanya village in Tanzania in 2001/2002 to identify causes of poor performance of privately owned charco dams and to design appropriate intervention measures for each charco dam. A total of twenty charco dams were investigated, with storage capacities ranging from 20 to 2000 m 3. The retention period of water in the investigated charco dams ranged from 2 to 7 months depending on the capacity of the charco dam, household size and the number of livestock kept. The analysis revealed that major problems causing poor performance of the charco dams were: (i) rapid siltation of the charco dams, (ii) low water retention period, and (iii) lack of or inadequate working tools to carry out maintenance works. Although most of the charco dam owners were aware of the first two problems they were not sure of their causes or their proper remedies. Evaluations done in 2003 and early 2004 has revealed that after improvement of the charco dams, the water retention period has increased by 2 months for the same household size and number of livestock. It was also noted that even those charco dam owners who were at first reluctant to join the initiative; have improved their charco dams accordingly through knowledge sharing with their neighbours. The study has shown that although farmers and pastoralists are endowed with vast indigenous knowledge, their technical know-how has some limitations. They therefore need to be supported by local institutions with the required technical know-how in order to sharpen their skills. This will enable them to

  12. Cow power : stepping stones towards sustainable livestock husbandry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.P.; Cornelissen, J.M.R.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2009-01-01

    Realising sustainable livestock husbandry is a practical quest in the end. Many parties and initiatives are already aiming at sustainability in dairy husbandry. In interaction with livestock farmers, trade and industry, and policy makers, the Animal Sciences Group of Wageningen UR has produced

  13. External Benefit Evaluation of Renewable Energy Power in China for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available China’s renewable energy power has developed rapidly in recent years. Evaluating the external benefits of renewable energy power can provide a reference for the Chinese government to set diverse development goals and to implement differentiated supporting policies for different renewable energy power types, which can promote their sustainable development. In this paper, a hybrid MCDM method was applied to evaluate the external benefits of China’s renewable energy power. Firstly, the impacts of renewable energy power accessing the power grid for multiple stakeholders in the electric power system were analyzed. Secondly, the external benefit evaluation index system for renewable energy power was built from the economic, social and environmental factors, based on the concept of sustainability. Then, the basic theory of the hybrid MCDM method employed in this paper was introduced in two parts: the superiority linguistic ratings and entropy weighting method for index weight determination and the fuzzy grey relation analysis for ranking alternatives. Finally, the external benefits of wind power, solar PV power and biomass power were evaluated. Taking a regional electric power system as an example, the results show that PV power has the greatest external benefit, followed by wind power and biomass power. Therefore, more policies supporting PV power should be put in place to promote the harmonious and sustainable development of the whole renewable energy power industry.

  14. Power in Transition: Empowering Discourses on Sustainability Transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Avelino (Flor)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis is a book about power and transformative change. It explores how groups of people who are trying to transform the mobility system are affected by notions of change and power, and how they deal with the dilemmas of power. Academic literature on power and transitions offers concepts

  15. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Nakashima, Kanami; Orita, Makiko; Yasui, Kiyotaka; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yabe, Hirooki; Maeda, Masaharu; Hayashida, Naomi; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS) of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were "anorexia," "subjective feelings about health," "feelings about sleep satisfaction," and "bereavement caused by the disaster," confounding variables were "age" and "sex," and outcome variables were "K6 points." We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S) to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542) of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. A total of 474 residents (87.5%) scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6%) scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old) among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p Fukushima, there is a need to continue providing them with physical and mental support, as well as communication regarding the health risks of radiation.

  16. Selecting Green Supplier of Thermal Power Equipment by Using a Hybrid MCDM Method for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the growing worldwide awareness of environmental protection and sustainable development, green purchasing has become an important issue for companies to gain environmental and developmental sustainability. Thermal power is the main power generation form in China, and the green supplier selection is essential to the smooth and sustainable construction of thermal power plants. Therefore, selecting the proper green supplier of thermal power equipment is very important to the company’s sustainable development and the sustainability of China’s electric power industry. In this paper, a hybrid fuzzy multi-attribute decision making approach (fuzzy entropy-TOPSIS is proposed for selecting the best green supplier. The fuzzy set theory is applied to translate the linguistic preferences into triangular fuzzy numbers. The subjective criteria weights are determined by using decision makers’ superiority linguistic ratings and the objective ones are determined by combining the superiority linguistic ratings and fuzzy-entropy weighting method. The fuzzy TOPSIS is employed to generate an overall performance score for each green supplier. An empirical green supplier selection is conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of this proposed fuzzy entropy-TOPSIS approach. This proposed fuzzy entropy-TOPSIS approach can select the proper green supplier of thermal power equipment, which contributes to promoting the company’s sustainable development and the sustainability of China’s electric power industry to some extent.

  17. Report on the field test project for wind power development at Oshima Village (wind characteristics investigation); Oshimamura ni okeru furyoku kaihatsu field test jigyo (fukyo seisa) hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    Wind characteristics are observed for a year at Oshima City, Fukuoka Prefecture. The annual average wind speed is 6.7m/s at 20m above ground, reflecting the general trend in Japan's climate that wind is strong in the cold season and weak in the warm season. The wind direction occurrence rate is the highest of 13.2% in the ENE direction. Now that the occurrence of the NE, SW, and WSW directions occupying the same wind axis is also high throughout the year, Oshima Village is suitable for wind turbine installation. Since the wind speed is high in the high-occurrence NE-ESE directions, the relation between the wind direction occurrence rate and wind speed is said to be convenient. The conditions for a success in wind power development, that the wind speed be 5.8m/s or more and energy density 215W/m{sup 2} or more at an altitude of 20m above the ground, are satisfied at this observation station. As for the operation rate and capacity ratio of each of 150kW, 300kW, and 750kW wind turbine models, they are all over the reference values. The site is highly promising as a wind power development site because all the wind turbine availability conditions, such as the annual average wind speed, annual wind energy density, operating rate, and capacity ratio are found to be better than the reference values.

  18. Technological, economic and sustainability evaluation of power plants using the analytic hierarchy process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzimouratidis, Athanasios I.; Pilavachi, Petros A. [Department of Engineering and Management of Energy Resources, University of Western Macedonia, 50100 Kozani (Greece)

    2009-03-15

    Complexity of power plant evaluation is steadily rising, as more criteria are involved in the overall assessment while evaluation data change rapidly. Apart from evaluating several aspects of power plants separately, a multicriteria analysis based on hierarchically structured criteria is necessary, so as to address the overall assessment of power plants according to the technological, economic and sustainability aspects. For this reason, in this paper, ten types of power plant are evaluated using nine end node criteria properly structured under the Analytical Hierarchy Process. Moreover, pairwise comparisons allow for accurate subjective criteria weighting. According to the scenario based on the subjective criteria weighting, emphasis is laid on sustainability driving renewable energy power plants at the top of the overall ranking, while nuclear and fossil fuel power plants rank in the last five positions. End node criteria contribution to each power plant and power plant performance per end node criterion is presented for all types of power plant and end node criteria. (author)

  19. Building the Leviathan – Voluntary centralisation of punishment power sustains cooperation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; Méder, Zsombor Z.; Okamoto-Barth, Sanae; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cooperation among humans is puzzling because cooperators can be exploited by free riders. Peer punishment has been suggested as a solution to this puzzle, but cumulating evidence questions its robustness in sustaining cooperation. Amongst others, punishment fails when it is not powerful enough, or when it elicits counter-punishment. Existing research, however, has ignored that the distribution of punishment power can be the result of social interactions. We introduce a novel experiment in which individuals can transfer punishment power to others. We find that while decentralised peer punishment fails to overcome free riding, the voluntary transfer of punishment power enables groups to sustain cooperation. This is achieved by non-punishing cooperators empowering those who are willing to punish in the interest of the group. Our results show how voluntary power centralisation can efficiently sustain cooperation, which could explain why hierarchical power structures are widespread among animals and humans. PMID:26888519

  20. Assessing Sustainability Transition in the US Electrical Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen McCauley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines sustainability transition dynamics in the US electricity system, drawing on the socio-technical systems approach. We view system change as unfolding along several critical dimensions and geographical scales, including dynamics in the environment, science, civil society, discourse, and state regulatory institutions, as well as in capital and technology formations. A particular emphasis is given to the interaction of discourses, policy networks, and institutions. We trace four distinct regimes which have characterized the evolution of this discourse-network-institutional nexus over the last century. The research examines dynamics that present a challenge to the incumbent energy regime based on fossil fuels, nuclear and hydropower, and demonstrates how the actor-network supporting renewables and energy efficiency has grown stronger and more capable of moving toward a sustainability transition than at any time since the sustainable energy movement began a generation ago.

  1. Sustainable model for financial viability of decentralized biomass gasifier based power projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palit, D.; Malhotra, R.; Kumar, Atul

    2011-01-01

    This paper made a modest attempt for designing a sustainable model for financial viability of biomass gasifier power projects for enhancing electricity access in India and other developing countries. For long term sustainability of distributed generation projects in remote rural areas, viability

  2. Sustainability Assessment of Power Generation Systems by Applying Exergy Analysis and LCA Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; van der Kooi, H.J.; Valero Delgado, A.

    2015-01-01

    The selection of power generation systems is important when striving for a more sustainable society. However, the results of environmental, economic and social sustainability assessments are subject to new insights into the calculation methods and to changing needs, economic conditions and societal

  3. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Energy Policy : Promises and Perils

    OpenAIRE

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2010-01-01

    The author examines the challenges and opportunities of nuclear power in meeting the projected large absolute increase in energy demand, especially electricity, throughout the industrialized and developing world, while helping to mitigate the threat of climate change. A significant global nuclear power deployment would engender serious risks related to proliferation, safety, and waste disposal. Unlike renewable sources of energy, nuclear power is an unforgiving technology because human lapses...

  4. Nuclear Power and Sustainable Energy Policy: Promises and Perils

    OpenAIRE

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2010-01-01

    The author examines the challenges and opportunities of nuclear power in meeting the projected large absolute increase in energy demand, especially electricity, throughout the industrialized and developing world, while helping to mitigate the threat of climate change. A significant global nuclear power deployment would engender serious risks related to proliferation, safety, and waste disposal. Unlike renewable sources of energy, nuclear power is an unforgiving technology because human lapses...

  5. STUDY ON THE OPERATION OF THE THERMOELECTRIC POWER PLANTS IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristinel RACOCEANU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study on the technical measures applied in the thermoelectric power plants in order to achieve an ecological functioning. Sustainable development implies the adaptation of Romanian thermoelectric power plants to the European Union requirements for environmental protection. The results of the experimental measurements of the thermoelectric power plant pollutants, which comprise 330 MW energy groups, are presented. There are presented the technical measures that lead to the sustainable development of the Romanian thermal power plants, the influence of the energy efficiency of the steam boiler of the 330 MW energy group on the environment.

  6. Remediation Optimization and Sustainability: Wind Turbine on Cape Cod to Power Groundwater Remediation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-04

    1 Mr. Jon Davis, P.E. Program Manager May 4, 2009 Remediation Optimization and Sustainability: Wind Turbine on Cape Cod to Power Groundwater...Sustainability: Wind Turbine on Cape Cod to Power Groundwater Remediation Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Std Z39-18 2 Outline  Brief Background  Program Consumption/Emissions  Small Scale Initiatives  Wind Turbine 3 Massachusetts Vineyard Sound Cape

  7. Nuclear power and sustainable energy supply for Europe; Kernenergie im Kontext einer nachhaltigen Energieversorgung fuer Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilden, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The right energy mix is decisive. The European Commission feels that nuclear power can make an important contribution towards sustainable energy supply in Europe. Nuclear power should keep its place in the European energy mix. One important aspect in this regard is improved public acceptance through communication, transparency, and confidence building. High safety standards and a credible approach to the safe long-term management of radioactive waste are major components of this sustainable energy source. (orig./GL)

  8. Education as a Global "Soft Power" for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayamov, Yury Nikolayevich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse various aspects of education for sustainable development (ESD) drawing attention to the approaching end of the UN Decade on ESD (DESD) in 2014 and to the necessity of the continuation of ESD activities. Defining the internationalisation of education as an ever more significant part of globalisation,…

  9. Marin Solar Village: feasibility study and technical analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-31

    The energy needs of Hamilton Air Force Base's Solar Village for electricity and heating and cooling of buildings are considered and alternative ways of meeting the Village's requirements for these forms of energy are evaluated. First, Solar Village's energy demand is calculated and compared to a base case representing calculations for typical energy usage for a development of similar size and density that is in conformance with current state and local ordinances. The potential of selected alternative technologies to meet the Solar Village projected demand for electrical power and natural gas is evaluated. Scenarios were developed to reduce demand, particularly in the building sector. Four alternative on-site energy technologies have been evaluated: wind, solar thermal electric, biomass conversion, photovoltaics. Each alternative is analyzed in detail. Of the four alternatives considered, the one with the greatest present potential is biomass conversion. Two technologies have been incorporated into the design. A 3-acre land fill is covered with a mantle of soil. A network of pipes carries off the methane gas which is a natural product of anaerobic decomposition of the materials in the land fill. The second technology involves the planting of rapidly-growing trees on denuded and unused portions of the site; 50 acres devoted to tree production could yield 12% of the back-up energy required for home heating on a sustainable basis.

  10. External Benefit Evaluation of Renewable Energy Power in China for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Huiru Zhao; Sen Guo

    2015-01-01

    China’s renewable energy power has developed rapidly in recent years. Evaluating the external benefits of renewable energy power can provide a reference for the Chinese government to set diverse development goals and to implement differentiated supporting policies for different renewable energy power types, which can promote their sustainable development. In this paper, a hybrid MCDM method was applied to evaluate the external benefits of China’s renewable energy power. Firstly, the impacts o...

  11. Strategic Sustainable Electric Power Energy for Ethiopia:- Electric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mengesha

    MSc program covering high-voltage engineering, transmission and distribution systems, renewable energy technologies and power electronics and derives. The first batches of electrical power engineering masters students, from EEPCo are working on their. MSc thesis proposal at present. The followings are the main areas ...

  12. Concentrations of Radiocesium in Local Foods Collected in Kawauchi Village after the Accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Makiko; Nakashima, Kanami; Hayashida, Naomi; Endo, Yuuko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the current concentrations of radiocesium in local foods collected in Kawauchi Village, which is located less than 30 km from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, to minimize public anxiety regarding internal radiation exposure through the consumption of locally produced foods after the 2011 Fukushima accident. The number of samples exceeding the regulatory radiocesium limit (100 Bq/kg for general foods) was five out of 4,080 vegetables (0.1%), 652 of 1,986 (32.8%) among edible wild plants and fungi, and eight of 647 (1.2%) in fruits. Our study confirmed that the internal radiation doses of ingesting these foods are acceptably low compared to the public dose limit, ranging from 24.4 to 42.7 μSv for males and from 21.7 to 43.4 μSv for females, although the potential for radiation exposure still exists. Long-term comprehensive follow-up should take place to clarify trends in radiocesium concentrations in local foods and the committed effective doses found in Fukushima-area residents. By constructing a system that allows residents to access information on radiocesium concentration in foods, a risk communication model between specialists and residents could be developed in the recovery phase after the Fukushima accident.

  13. Events as Power Source: Wireless Sustainable Corrosion Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source, which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event releases electric energy; this is a novel idea proposed by this study. For accumulating the micro-corrosion energy, we integrate EPS with a COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf energy-harvesting chip that recharges a supercapacitor. In particular, this study designs automatic energy management and adaptive transmitted power control polices to efficiently use the constrained accumulated energy. Finally, a set of preliminary experiments based on concrete pore solution are conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of EPS.

  14. Events as power source: wireless sustainable corrosion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong; Qiao, Guofu; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhibo

    2013-12-17

    This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source), which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC) structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event) releases electric energy; this is a novel idea proposed by this study. For accumulating the micro-corrosion energy, we integrate EPS with a COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) energy-harvesting chip that recharges a supercapacitor. In particular, this study designs automatic energy management and adaptive transmitted power control polices to efficiently use the constrained accumulated energy. Finally, a set of preliminary experiments based on concrete pore solution are conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of EPS.

  15. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  16. Procedure for determining maximum sustainable power generated by microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Joseph; Beyenal, Haluk; Marsili, Enrico; Veluchamy, Raajaraajan Angathevar; Demir, Goksel; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2006-02-01

    Power generated by microbial fuel cells is computed as a product of current passing through an external resistor and voltage drop across this resistor. If the applied resistance is very low, then high instantaneous power generated by the cell is measured, which is not sustainable; the cell cannot deliver that much power for long periods of time. Since using small electrical resistors leads to erroneous assessment of the capabilities of microbial fuel cells, a question arises: what resistor should be used in such measurements? To address this question, we have defined the sustainable power as the steady state of power delivery by a microbial fuel cell under a given set of conditions and the maximum sustainable power as the highest sustainable power that a microbial fuel cell can deliver under a given set of conditions. Selecting the external resistance that is associated with the maximum sustainable power in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is difficult because the operator has limited influence on the main factors that control power generation: the rate of charge transfer at the current-limiting electrode and the potential established across the fuel cell. The internal electrical resistance of microbial fuel cells varies, and it depends on the operational conditions of the fuel cell. We have designed an empirical procedure to predict the maximum sustainable power that can be generated by a microbial fuel cell operated under a given set of conditions. Following the procedure, we change the external resistors incrementally, in steps of 500 omega every 10, 60, or 180 s and measure the anode potential, the cathode potential, and the cell current. Power generated in the microbial fuel cell that we were using was limited by the anodic current. The anodic potential was used to determine the condition where the maximum sustainable power is obtained. The procedure is simple, microbial fuel cells can be characterized within an hour, and the results of the measurements can serve

  17. A test to assess the mechanical power sustainable during everyday activities in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, Edda Maria; Saibene, Franco

    2003-01-01

    to define with a simple test the power sustainable by older people during everyday occupations. nine healthy subjects (65-71 years) performed two series of 5-6 trials on bicycle and arm ergometers at constant power. Throughout the exercise they reported their evaluation of the effort, referred either to perceived whole body exertion or to the working muscles, using Borg's category-ratio, CR10, scale. The exercise was interrupted when CR7 was attained. From a linear regression of the individual data of the work done from the start of each trial to the transition from CR4 to CR5, corresponding to 'somewhat heavy' and 'heavy', and the corresponding duration it was possible to calculate the slope of the work/time relationship. This was considered as the value of power sustainable for leg or arm muscles. on average the sustainable power for the work done on the bicycle ergometer represented 55% of the maximal mechanical power. During the control trial on the bicycle ergometer at a power corresponding to their sustainable power the subjects were able to exercise for 30 min without symptoms of fatigue or discomfort, with an average CR of 3. The average heart rate was 114 bpm and the blood lactate concentration at the end of the exercise was always lower than 4 mmol/l. Sustainable power calculated for the arm muscles was about one quarter that of the leg muscles, but all subjects reported the evaluation of the effort as more difficult. the determination of power sustainable for the leg muscles with this simple test appears reliable and accurate.

  18. New energy vision in Sawauchi Village area. Toward establishment of Sawauchi Village having unaided power based on 'new energies, lessons learned from past'; Sawauchimura chiiki shin energy vison. 'Onkochi shin energy' ni yoru jiriki aru Sawauchimura no kakuritsu ni mukete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    A new energy vision was established in the Sawauchi Village area in Iwate Prefecture. As the energy species to be discussed for introduction, Sawauchi Village has assumed 'solar (beam and heat)', 'forest bio-mass', 'stock breeding bio-mass', 'small hydro-power' and 'snow'. The new energy introduction project included the proliferation and enlightenment activities using the Snow Country Culture Research Institute as the core, new energy introduction into the Sawauchi Baden, introduction of small hydropower generation and micro hydropower generation, new energy introduction into snow melting systems, new energy introduction into agricultural greenhouses, introduction of snow room-cooling systems into public facilities, development of new business targeted at promotion of forestry, and proliferation and enlightenment activities coordinated with relevant organizations. Particularly in the development of new business targeted at promotion of forestry, tackling will be moved forward to sale and manufacture of pellet stoves, manufacture of wood pellets, research, development, and commercialization of bio-mass power plant and new housings incorporating snow country cultures, with an aim of promotion of utilization of woods and thinned woods available in the village. (NEDO)

  19. Economic and Environmental Performance of Fashion Supply Chain: The Joint Effect of Power Structure and Sustainable Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiutian Shi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fashion supply chain members now search for trade-offs between sustainable investment and the related incentives, such as savings on environmental taxes and gains in incremental demands. To evaluate the economic and environmental performance of sustainable investment from a power perspective, we develop an analytical model to study a two-echelon sustainable supply chain consisting of one retailer and one manufacturer with three different power structures. We derive the optimal solutions for various cases associated with different supply chain power structures and sustainable investors. Though it is beneficial for both the manufacturer and retailer to make sustainable investment, they often utilize high power to gain economic benefit with less sustainable investment. Interestingly, the follower with less supply chain power has more incentive to make a sustainable effort to achieve a higher profit. The optimal amount of sustainable investment in the apparel manufacturer investment case is greater than that in the retailer investment case in most scenarios.

  20. Vibration energy harvester with sustainable power based on a single-crystal piezoelectric cantilever array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Ham, Yong-Hyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Kwon, Jong-Kee; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a bimorph cantilever array for sustainable power with an integrated Cu proof mass to obtain additional power and current. We fabricated a cantilever system using single-crystal piezoelectric material and compared the calculations for single and arrayed cantilevers to those obtained experimentally. The vibration energy harvester had resonant frequencies of 60.4 and 63.2 Hz for short and open circuits, respectively. The damping ratio and quality factor of the cantilever device were 0.012 and 41.66, respectively. The resonant frequency at maximum average power was 60.8 Hz. The current and highest average power of the harvester array were found to be 0.728 mA and 1.61 mW, respectively. The sustainable maximum power was obtained after slightly shifting the short-circuit frequency. In order to improve the current and power using an array of cantilevers, we also performed energy conversion experiments.

  1. Turby - sustainable urban wind power from the roof top

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.; Van Bussel, G.; Mols, B.

    2005-01-01

    If current trends are anything to go by, in future we will no longer produce all our electricity in large, central power stations. Small-scale local electricity generation will gain in importance. Sander Mertens, a post-doctoral student at TU Delft, developed the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine

  2. Supervision functions - Secure operation of sustainable power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten

    2013-01-01

    the power system operation state based on new stability and security parameters derived from PMUs measurement and coordinate the use of automatic and manual control actions. The coordination of the control action is based not only in the static indicators but also in the performance evaluation of control...

  3. Transforming Island power supply to sustainability. The example of Bonaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeller, M. [DIgSILENT GmbH (Germany); Burges, K. [Ecofys GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Until 2015, the contribution of renewable energies to the overall electricity supply of the island of Bonaire shall increase to at least 50%, produced by a wind-diesel power plant, which is currently in a planning stage. For the longer term, there are plans to increase the share of renewable energies up to 100% by replacing the diesel (HFO) by locally produced bio diesel. At the same time, a very high power quality and reliability of supply standard is required for accommodating the expectations of the tourism industry. In 2007 Ecofys and DIgSILENT carried out extensive studies for the new wind-diesel power plant on the island of Bonaire for working out the basic design and for validating it against the required quality of supply requirements. This paper provides a general background of the new wind-diesel power plant for the island of Bonaire describes the basic design of the new plant and provides an overview of the modeling approaches and studies that have been carried out for design and impact analysis. This includes loss of load analysis, stability studies, harmonic studies and flicker impact assessment. (orig.)

  4. Energy indicators impact in multi-criteria sustainability analyse of thermal power plant unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škobalj Predrag D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents method for sustainability assessment of thermal power plant unit using multi-criteria analysis with aim to create base for business decision. Seven options of possible status of thermal power plant „Kolubara A” unit No. 2 with energy indicators of sustainable development were shown. Energy indicators of sustainable development consists of sets of resource preservation, economic, environmental, and social indicators. Sustainability assessment often fails to account for social influence on energy system. Considering to this, special focus will be on social indicators, their definition, forming, and impact on multi-criteria sustainability analysis. Analysis of quality of the selected options (energy systems in respect to sustainable development by compare of their general index of sustainability is presented. Methodology of multi-criteria analyse of thermal power plant unit can show decision makers how to find best available options when the social indicators impact is leading. The aim of this paper is to choose the criteria for the evaluation of the available options, determine the relative importance of specific criteria and present methodology of multi-criteria analysis in the decision-making process.

  5. Urban warming in villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, J.; Grimmond, C. S. B.; Esper, J.

    2015-07-01

    Long term meteorological records (> 100 years) from stations associated with villages are generally classified as rural and assumed to have no urban influence. Using networks installed in two European villages, the local and microclimatic variations around two of these rural-village sites are examined. An annual average temperature difference (Δ{T}) of 0.6 and 0.4 K was observed between the built-up village area and the current meteorological station in Geisenheim (Germany) and Haparanda (Sweden), respectively. Considerably larger values were recorded for the minimum temperatures and during summer. The spatial variations in temperature within the villages are of the same order as recorded over the past 100+ years in these villages (0.06 to 0.17 K/10 years). This suggests that the potential biases in the long records of rural-villages also warrant careful consideration like those of the more commonly studied large urban areas effects.

  6. Large Combined Heat and Power Plants for Sustainable Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    . CHP (combined heat and power) plants in Denmark will change their role from base load production to balancing the fluctuation in renewable energy supply, such as wind power and at the same time they have to change to renewable energy sources. Some solutions are already being planned by utilities......An energy supply based on 100% renewable energy in Denmark is the official goal for the Danish energy policy towards 2050. A smart energy system should be developed to integrate as much supply from fluctuating renewable sources and to utilise the scarce biomass resources as efficiently as possible...... are constructed to analyse how the different alternatives influences the energy system. The scenarios are analysed in the energy systems modelling tool EnergyPLAN both from a technical energy systems perspective and from a market economic analysis with focus on the electricity exchange potential of the scenarios...

  7. "The Moon Village and Journey to Mars enable each other"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldavs, Vidvuds

    2016-07-01

    NASA has proposed the Journey to Mars, a multi-decade collaborative international effort to establish permanent manned operations on the Martian surface as well as in orbit, most likely on the Martian moons. NASA's proposed the Journey to Mars has come under politically motivated attack as illusory, as beyond NASA's capabilities and anticipated NASA budgets in the foreseeable future. [1]. Other concerns come from various communities of researchers concerned about securing sustaining funding for their largely robotic research missions. ESA's Director General Dietrich Woerner's proposed Moon Village faces challenges ESA member states concerned about sustaining funding for projects already underway or in planning. Both the Journey to Mars and Moon Village raise the question - who will or who can pay for it? The 2013 US Research Council study suggested potential benefits to a mission to Mars from activities on the Moon [2]. The NASA funded Flexible Lunar Architecture study came to similar conclusions using a different methodology [3]. A logistics analysis by an MIT team suggested the possibility of cost savings through use of lunar water for propellant to reach Mars [4]. The highly promising private-public financing approach has been examined for potential application to funding the costs of reaching Mars [5]. Insofar as the feasibility of utilization of lunar water has not been determined these conclusions are speculative. This study will examine the following alternative scenarios for establishing sustainable, manned operations on Mars and permanent manned operations on the Moon: A. NASA-led Journey to Mars without an ESA-led Moon Village B. ESA-led Moon Village without NASA-led Journey to Mars C. NASA-led Journey to Mars with an ESA-led Moon Village D. Shared Infrastructure scenario - NASA-led Journey to Mars with ESA-led Moon Village and with a potential JAXA-led space-based-solar power initiative E. Space Industrialization scenario - Shared Infrastructure scenario

  8. Online Identification of Power Required for Self-Sustainability of the Battery in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles have shown great potential for enhancing fuel economy and reducing emissions. Deriving a power management control policy to distribute the power demanded by the driver optimally to the available subsystems (e.g., the internal combustion engine, motor, generator, and battery) has been a challenging control problem. One of the main aspects of the power management control algorithms is concerned with the self-sustainability of the electrical path, which must be guaranteed for the entire driving cycle. This paper considers the problem of identifying online the power required by the battery to maintain the state of charge within a range of the target value. An algorithm is presented that realizes how much power the engine needs to provide to the battery so that self-sustainability of the electrical path is maintained.

  9. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of Moon Village Workshops were organised at ESTEC and at ILEWG community events in 2015 and 2016. They gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. Three working groups focused on 1) Moon Habitat Design; 2) science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and 3) engaging stake-holders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacuum. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community and creating social places for astronauts to interact and relax. The

  10. Developing an Indicator System for Measuring the Social Sustainability of Offshore Wind Power Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzay-An Shiau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan’s government has promoted investment in an offshore wind power farm, and local fishermen have protested. A social impact assessment (SIA has examined the impact of the proposed offshore wind power farm on all stakeholders. The main objective of the present study was to develop an indicator system for measuring the social sustainability of offshore wind power farms; this study also reports on the particular case of Taiwan’s offshore wind power project. This study began by defining 35 social sustainability indicators and selecting 23 representative indicators by using rough set theory. Subsequently, 14 key indicators were constructed using the social construction of technology (SCOT method. Finally, we developed a social impact index for evaluating the social sustainability of offshore wind power farms by using the analytic network process and Dempster-Shafer theory. Our social impact index yields a total score of 0.149 for Taiwan’s pilot offshore wind power project; this result indicates that the pilot project is socially sustainable. A substantial contradiction exists between the fishermen’s protest and the results of the social impact assessment. The findings can assist the government in building a coordination platform for the investors and the fishermen. Government regulation is necessary to set boundaries for fishing areas that protect both the fishermen’s and investors’ rights.

  11. Large combined heat and power plants in sustainable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2015-01-01

    resources as efficiently as possible. Using the advanced energy systems analysis tool EnergyPLAN and Denmark as a case, this analysis defines which of the three assessed types of CHP plants connected to district heating systems is most feasible in terms of total socioeconomic costs and biomass consumption......In many countries, the electricity supply and power plant operation are challenged by increasing amounts of fluctuating renewable energy sources. A smart energy system should be developed to integrate as much energy supply from fluctuating renewable sources and to utilise the scarce biomass...

  12. The advanced smart grid edge power driving sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Carvallo, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Placing emphasis on practical ""how-to"" guidance, this cutting-edge resource provides you with a first-hand, insider's perspective on the advent and evolution of smart grids in the 21st century (smart grid 1.0). You gain a thorough understanding of the building blocks that comprise basic smart grids, including power plant, transmission substation, distribution, and meter automation. Moreover, this forward-looking volume explores the next step of this technology's evolution. It provides a detailed explanation of how an advanced smart grid incorporates demand response with smart appliances and

  13. Optimizing cutting conditions on sustainable machining of aluminum alloy to minimize power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Rusdi; Suyuti, Muhammad Arsyad; Susanto, Tri Agus

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum is widely utilized in the industrial sector. There are several advantages of aluminum, i.e. good flexibility and formability, high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity, and high heat. Despite of these characteristics, however, pure aluminum is rarely used because of its lacks of strength. Thus, most of the aluminum used in the industrial sectors was in the form of alloy form. Sustainable machining can be considered to link with the transformation of input materials and energy/power demand into finished goods. Machining processes are responsible for environmental effects accepting to their power consumption. The cutting conditions have been optimized to minimize the cutting power, which is the power consumed for cutting. This paper presents an experimental study of sustainable machining of Al-11%Si base alloy that was operated without any cooling system to assess the capacity in reducing power consumption. The cutting force was measured and the cutting power was calculated. Both of cutting force and cutting power were analyzed and modeled by using the central composite design (CCD). The result of this study indicated that the cutting speed has an effect on machining performance and that optimum cutting conditions have to be determined, while sustainable machining can be followed in terms of minimizing power consumption and cutting force. The model developed from this study can be used for evaluation process and optimization to determine optimal cutting conditions for the performance of the whole process.

  14. Public Acceptance for Sustainable Power Development: Sharing Nepalese Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dilli Bahadur; Singh, Anju; Shrestha, Sugam

    2007-07-01

    Nepal with 83000 MW of hydropower potential has harnessed only 1% of it. With a target of 8% GDP growth rate needs 15000 MW of hydropower to be exported, by 2012. Which will bring the majority(32%) of its population above the poverty line. For this Nepal ought to develop its hydropower potential maintaining social equity and environmental justice leading towards the sustainable development. One of the key attributes/ingredient to this is Public Participation/Acceptance. Hence, an in depth study was conducted for examining the level of peoples' participation/acceptance. Field visit of 6 projects and questionnaire survey conducted involving 13 groups of stakeholders revealed that public participation were sufficiently done and acceptance was also sought specially after the promulgation of Environmental Legislations. Nepal has no choice other than to develop its hydropower potential for its internal demand and to supply to the neighbouring countries, in the endeavour to reduce/eliminate the poverty, prevailing as a cancer. Henceforth, all the hydropower projects to be developed in the future should be socio-culturally acceptable, economically viable and environmentally benign. For this to happen one of the key ingredients/attributes is the public participation and gaining public acceptance in an effective and efficient manner. (auth)

  15. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Yoshida

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS, we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. Methods We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were “anorexia,” “subjective feelings about health,” “feelings about sleep satisfaction,” and “bereavement caused by the disaster,” confounding variables were “age” and “sex,” and outcome variables were “K6 points.” We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6 and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542 of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. Results A total of 474 residents (87.5% scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6% scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p < 0.05. In addition, the proportion of residents with anorexia and mental illness among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively. The amount of residents who scored 44 points or more in the PCL-S among people with K6 score above the cut-off was also considerably higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (79.4 vs 12.9%, p < 0.001. Interestingly, the proportion of residents who scored more than among people with K6 score above the cut-off and the

  16. Sustainable Forward Operating Base Nuclear Power Evaluation (Relationship Mapping System) Users’ Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2012-01-01

    The Sustainable Forward Operating Base (FOB) Nuclear Power Evaluation was developed by the Idaho National Laboratory Systems Engineering Department to support the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in assessing and demonstrating the viability of deploying small-scale reactors in support of military operations in theatre. This document provides a brief explanation of how to access and use the Sustainable FOB Nuclear Power Evaluation utility to view assessment results as input into developing and integrating the program elements needed to create a successful demonstration.

  17. Villages in landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    , and the physical appearance of many villages and detached farms can at best be characterized as shockingly inferior. It can be argued that the Danish society has grossly omitted to take care of the largest and most important part of its cultural heritage in the Danish landscape; 6-7,000 large and small villages...... dispersed in the Danish cultural landscape.These villages are crucial to the future of rural areas and are normally neglected....

  18. VT Boundaries - village polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The BNDHASH dataset depicts Vermont villages, towns, counties, Regional Planning Commissions (RPC), and LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee)...

  19. The non-technical factors that affect sustainability of borehole systems in rural communities - A study on selected villages for the ASWSD project in Limpopo province

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mamakoa, E

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available of the communities that benefited from such schemes are now without water or are struggling to get adequate supply due to frequent breakdowns in the borehole systems. This paper seeks to understand the non-technical factors that affect sustainability of borehole...

  20. Harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator as a sustainable power source and a self-powered active vibration sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Bai, Peng; Yang, Ya; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-13

    A harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is presented as a sustainable power source and an active vibration sensor. It can effectively respond to vibration frequencies ranging from 2 to 200 Hz with a considerably wide working bandwidth of 13.4 Hz. This work not only presents a new principle in the field of vibration energy harvesting but also greatly expands the applicability of TENGs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Tucson Solar Village: Project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    The Tucson Solar Village is a Design/Build Project In Sustainable Community Development which responds to a broad spectrum of energy, environmental, and economic challenges. This project is designed for 820 acres of undeveloped State Trust Land within the Tucson city limits; residential population will be five to six thousand persons with internal employment provided for 1200. This is a 15 year project (for complete buildout and sales) with an estimated cost of $500 million. Details of the project are addressed with emphasis on the process and comments on its transferability.

  2. Solar Power Generation for ICT and Sustainable Development in Emerging Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Damasen I.; Uhomoibhi, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to systematically examine and draw attention to the potential benefits of solar power generation for access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICT) aimed at sustainable development in emerging economies. Design/methodology/approach: Electricity plays a crucial role in the development and…

  3. Power grid operation risk management: V2G deployment for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadian, Ghazale J.

    The production, transmission, and delivery of cost--efficient energy to supply ever-increasing peak loads along with a quest for developing a low-carbon economy require significant evolutions in the power grid operations. Lower prices of vast natural gas resources in the United States, Fukushima nuclear disaster, higher and more intense energy consumptions in China and India, issues related to energy security, and recent Middle East conflicts, have urged decisions makers throughout the world to look into other means of generating electricity locally. As the world look to combat climate changes, a shift from carbon-based fuels to non-carbon based fuels is inevitable. However, the variability of distributed generation assets in the electricity grid has introduced major reliability challenges for power grid operators. While spearheading sustainable and reliable power grid operations, this dissertation develops a multi-stakeholder approach to power grid operation design; aiming to address economic, security, and environmental challenges of the constrained electricity generation. It investigates the role of Electric Vehicle (EV) fleets integration, as distributed and mobile storage assets to support high penetrations of renewable energy sources, in the power grid. The vehicle-to-grid (V2G) concept is considered to demonstrate the bidirectional role of EV fleets both as a provider and consumer of energy in securing a sustainable power grid operation. The proposed optimization modeling is the application of Mixed-Integer Linear Programing (MILP) to large-scale systems to solve the hourly security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) -- an optimal scheduling concept in the economic operation of electric power systems. The Monte Carlo scenario-based approach is utilized to evaluate different scenarios concerning the uncertainties in the operation of power grid system. Further, in order to expedite the real-time solution of the proposed approach for large-scale power systems

  4. FleetPower: Creating Virtual Power Plants in Sustainable Smart Electricity Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Kahlen (Micha); W. Ketter (Wolfgang); A. Gupta (Alok)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractElectric vehicles have the potential to be used as virtual power plants to provide reliable back-up power. This generates additional profits for carsharing rental firms, who rent vehicles by the minute. We show this by developing a discrete event simulation platform based on real-time

  5. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas construction plan in Jeruk Manis Village in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsir, A. [University of Mataram, Mataram (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. The proposed small-scale renewable energy project to be developed under the Casindo Technical Working Group IV in West Nusa Tenggara is focused on household biogas. The project will be implemented in Jeruk Manis, which has been selected as the target location for the implementation of the renewable energy project in the program Casindo. Administratively, the village of 'Jeruk Manis' is located in the district Sikur, East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara province. The number of households eligible as the target of the program in Jeruk Manis is 63. To implement the project, the Casindo team in WNT has partnered with Hivos and its BIRU program (Biogas Rumah program or Indonesia Domestic Biogas Programme). The biogas digester construction will be conducted by BIRU Lombok, in collaboration with a construction partner organization called Yayasan Mandiri Membangun Masyarakat Sejahtera (YM3S) and managed by the Casindo project team from the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Mataram. If the project is implemented, it will bring many benefits for poor people in the target location, which are likely to be sustained for a long time. While the benefits of developing biogas in the selected low-income location are obvious and abundant, there are also many challenges. The main problem for the proposed project is finding other interested funders to support the building of household biogas, as the financial capacity of the target households is very small.

  6. Possibilities and consequences of the Total Cumulative Exergy Loss method in improving the sustainability of power generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; van der Kooi, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to decide which power generation system is the most sustainable when environmental, economic and social sustainability aspects are taken into account. Problems with conventional environmental sustainability assessment methods are that no consensus exists about the applied models

  7. Sustainability assessment of power generation in combination with lng evaporation : A comparison of lca methods and exergy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stougie, L.; Van der Kooi, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several options exist for power generation, but it is difficult to determine which option is the most sustainable. When assessing the sustainability of an option or system, it is important to consider the environmental, economic and social aspects of sustainability and to take a life-cycle point of

  8. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas Construction Plan in Segoroyoso Village Yogyakarta Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesmana, Surya Budi; Putra, Sri Atmaja [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. To achieve the CASINDO objective seven Technical Working Groups have been established with the aim to conduct the technical activities under the various work packages and to produce the agreed deliverables. This report presents results from Technical Working Group IV on Renewable Energy project development. Its main aims were: To identify suitable non-hydro RE projects that can be developed in the province; To conduct an energy needs assessment in a selected location; To develop a business plan for a proposed solution to the identified main energy problem of the target community; To identify potential investors; To construct the project.

  9. Framework of systematic sustainability assessment strategy (FSSAS) for hydroelectric power industry in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johan, Kartina; Turan, Faiz Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Hydroelectric power is an alternative power resource in Malaysia and always associated with negative impact on environmental, social and economy of the surrounding site. The dispute over environmental, societal and economic issues can be minimised if compliance to sustainability development requirement is included in the project as part of the project premises during planning phase. This paper suggests a framework targeted for decision-makers in charge of implementing the projects to produce hydropower the sustainable way in Malaysian context which can mitigate the risks in social, environment and economy. The framework is strategic in nature and based on project management methodology with objective to provide a ‘common language’ by having a project value as measureable for stakeholders to state their mutual agreement of what a sustainable hydropower project in the context of Malaysia and in line with the United Nations (UN) 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The paper discusses how the proposed systematic sustainability assessment strategy (FSSAS) framework support the call for Malaysia to promote meaningful public participation in ensuring land and natural resource decisions and to address citizens’ interests which is the core idea of Environmental Democracy Index established in 2014. The paper argues that, even though it is at present impossible to define precision status of sustainability development with respect to the nature of the multi stakeholders and the lack of systematic assessment the proposed FSSAS framework can be a valuable tool because it tracks the project value as a quantitative deliverable to determine the status of the journey in sustainable development towards accomplishing the SDG under a consensus in hydropower industry of any scale over time.

  10. Harvesting energy an sustainable power source, replace batteries for powering WSN and devices on the IoT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Vadean, A.; Pop, P. P.; Latinovic, T.; Barz, C.; Lung, C.

    2017-05-01

    Harvesting energy from nonconventional sources in the environment has received increased attention over the past decade from researchers who study these alternative energy sources for low power applications. Although that energy harvested is small and in the order of milliwatt, it can provide enough power for wireless sensors and other low-power applications. In the environment there is a lot of wasted energy that can be converted into electricity to power the various circuits and represents a potentially cheap source of power. Energy harvesting is important because it offers an alternative power supply for electronic devices where is does not exist conventional energy sources. This technology applied in a wireless sensor network (WSN) and devices on the IoT, will eliminate the need for network-based energy and conventional batteries, will minimize maintenance costs, eliminate cables and batteries and is ecological. It has the same advantage in applications from remote locations, underwater, and other hard to reach places where conventional batteries and energy are not suitable. Energy harvesting will promote environmentally friendly technologies that will save energy, will reduce CO2 emissions, which makes this technology indispensable for achieving next-generation smart cities and sustainable society. In response to the challenges of energy, in this article we remind the basics of harvesting energy and we discuss the various applications of this technology where traditional batteries cannot be used.

  11. Nanoscale triboelectric-effect-enabled energy conversion for sustainably powering portable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-12-12

    Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based on triboelectric effect has been proven to be simple, cost-effective, and robust. However, its output is still insufficient for sustainably driving electronic devices/systems. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed arch-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) by utilizing the contact electrification between a polymer thin film and a metal thin foil. The working mechanism of the TENG was studied by finite element simulation. The output voltage, current density, and energy volume density reached 230 V, 15.5 μA/cm(2), and 128 mW/cm(3), respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated. The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a lithium ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a commercial cell phone, which is the first demonstration of the nanogenerator for driving personal mobile electronics, opening the chapter of impacting general people's life by nanogenerators.

  12. The village as a ‘community of practice’ Constitution of village belonging through leisure sociality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Barlocco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the formation and display of a form of identification alternative to the national one, the belonging to the village, within the leisure practices of Kadazan villagers in Sabah, East Malaysia, both constituted by the regular meetings of peer groups and by festive events. The analysis of the paper applies the concept of ‘community of practice’ to the group of villagers who regularly invest most of their resources of free time, but also money, in interacting between themselves and in organising celebrations for various life-cycle events or for other occasions, and argues that a strong sense of belonging to the village is developed through this engagement. These practices are informed by a powerful and widely spread local ideology, positing the village as the central point of reference for its inhabitants’ sense of belonging and as the locus of a traditionalist ‘way of life’, based on cooperation, sharing and egalitarian principles, and rejecting the modern, multi-ethnic urban world from which the majority of the villagers derive their livelihood. This ideology defines the village as Kadazan and Christian, determining a rootedness in everyday life of ethnic identity as well as a general rejection of government-led nationalist propaganda and of its policies. This ideology is an essential part of the affirmation by the villagers of the primacy of the local and of direct involvement and participation over their sense of belonging to collective categories.

  13. Analysis of the sustainability of using wastes in the Brazilian power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciano Basto; de Araujo, Maria Silvia Muylaert; Rosa, Luiz Pinguelli; Barata, Martha; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre [Energy Planning Program - COPPE/UFRJ (Coordination of the Post Graduation Programs in Engineering at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), Centro de Tecnologia, bloco C, sala 211, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, CEP: 21949-900 (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a methodology for analyzing the sustainability of using wastes in the Brazilian power industry. It will describe projects, both completed and under development by coordination of the post-graduation programs in engineering (COPPE) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), for generating energy from wastes. The results of these projects were included in a doctoral thesis [Oliveira LB. Aproveitamento energetico de lixo e biodiesel no Brasil (energy use of garbage and biodiesel in Brazil). Dissertation (doctoral), COPPE/UFRJ, 2004, p. 204, http://www.ppe.ufrj.br/ppe/production/tesis/lboliveira.pdf] defended in 2004 at the Energy Planning Program of the COPPE at the UFRJ - PPE/COPPE/UFRJ. The study encompasses an analysis of sustainability using a methodology developed for the above-mentioned dissertation, taking two existing methodologies into account: sustainability analysis and data envelopment analysis. (author)

  14. Recording Village Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cromwell, Jennifer Adele

    Recording Village Life presents a close study of over 140 Coptic texts written between 724–756 CE by a single scribe, Aristophanes son of Johannes, of the village Djeme in western Thebes. These texts, which focus primarily on taxation and property concerns, yield a wealth of knowledge about social...... of late antique studies, papyrology, philology, early Islamic history, social and economic history, and Egyptology....

  15. Feasibility study for power generation using off- grid energy system from micro hydro-PV-diesel generator-battery for rural area of Ethiopia: The case of Melkey Hera village, Western Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Nigussie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electricity supply in Ethiopia is extremely antiquated. Most of the remote rural areas of Ethiopia are not yet electrified. Electrifying these remote areas by extending grid system is difficult and costly. Melkey Hera village is one of a rural community situated in western Ethiopia. In this village, extension of the grid is not yet practical. As the current international trend in rural electrification is to utilize renewable energy resources; solar, wind, biomass, and micro hydro power systems can be seen as alternatives. Therefore, the target of this paper is to investigate the viability of a micro hydro, Photo Voltaic (PV and Diesel Generator-battery hybrid power system options to come up with the best techno-economic and optimum configuration for supplying electricity to this village. The study was performed by an assessment of the predicted village energy demand, the available renewable energy resources, and then using the software called HOMER. The best hybrid system type was described and the optimization of the system configuration was also done. Furthermore, through the simulation of different configuration of the supply system, the optimal mini-grid hybrid system design was established to combine hydro, solar PV, battery energy storage and diesel generator. This system demonstrated to be more reliable in operation, and the most cost-effective for the required level of service. The role of energy storage in system operation also demonstrated to offer additional operational advantages in-terms of reliability and cost savings. Overall, the design results show that the majority of energy obtained from hydropower, which accounts 79%, the PV module covers 20%, and diesel generator is only 1% of the total load consumption. The obtained hybrid system is cost competitive with $\\$$0.133/kWh, which is somewhat good to satisfy the community needs. However, this is more than current energy price in Ethiopia which $\\$$0.06/kWh. If due-merit given

  16. Energy for the future - with Risoe from nuclear power to sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrup, M. (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    The title of the book is inspired by Risoe's mission which, at the time of its 50th anniversary, remains uncannily close to that given to Risoe when it was inaugurated in 1958. First and foremost, then as now, Risoe is engaged in the development of tomorrow's energy technologies. In 1958, it was nuclear power. On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, Risoe is working with a palette of sustainable energy sources. (author)

  17. Cotton-textile-enabled flexible self-sustaining power packs via roll-to-roll fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zan; Bumgardner, Clifton; Song, Ningning; Zhang, Yunya; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    With rising energy concerns, efficient energy conversion and storage devices are required to provide a sustainable, green energy supply. Solar cells hold promise as energy conversion devices due to their utilization of readily accessible solar energy; however, the output of solar cells can be non-continuous and unstable. Therefore, it is necessary to combine solar cells with compatible energy storage devices to realize a stable power supply. To this end, supercapacitors, highly efficient ener...

  18. Strategic Role of Financial Institutions in Sustainable Development of Indian Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, V.K.

    2007-07-01

    Paper focuses on appraisal of Indian power sector, its achievements and inadequacies, measures and initiatives taken by Government of India (GOI) and blueprint for the development of power sector in next five years i.e. XI Plan (2007-2012); the role played by various Financial Institutions, Banks, Bilateral/Multilateral agencies etc. with focus on role of Power Finance Corporation (PFC) in development and financing of Indian Power sector and in Institutional development of State power utilities by facilitating in their reform and restructuring process and improving their financial health; role played by PFC in implementation of various policies and programmes of GOI; its competitive edge in Indian financial sector and growth strategies for enriching the stakeholders' value and acting as a significant partner in the development of power sector and growth of the nation. The paper provides information on capacity addition planned along with matching transmission and distribution system in the next five years to achieve GOI's 'Mission 2012: Power for All'; estimated funds required; funds that can be generated both in the form of Debt and Equity; the funding gap; proposed measures to meet overall funding requirement for sustainable development of the power sector. (auth)

  19. Toward sustainable energy development in the Indian power sector: A critique of fifty years of power development in India and an analysis of sustainable energy alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajalu, Chandrasekhar

    At present, the Indian electric power sector (EPS) finds itself in a "triple bind," plagued by a severe resource crunch, adverse environmental impacts and unequal social access to energy services, and a poor record of technical performance in generation and distribution of electricity. The problems of the EPS are seen in this dissertation as manifestations of a larger crisis of unsustainable energy development, rooted in the political economy of power development in India. A theoretical framework is articulated based on a political economy approach constructed for this dissertation. The political economy framework is comprised of three elements: a materialization thesis that describes the core social relations in support of a specific political and economic structure; an institutionalization thesis that describes how these material relations are reproduced; and an ideology thesis which argues that a pervasive ideology exists making intelligible the existence of a particular form of political economy. From the vantage-point of this framework, and through a detailed examination of the political history of the power sector in India, the crisis in the Indian power sector is linked to the contradictions of what is termed as the "conventional model of energy development" (CMED) embraced by Indian planners at the time of independence. It is argued that the crisis in the EPS is caused by the intensive bureaucratization and technicization of the system, all but removing it from social and environmental evaluation. Current policy prescriptions for the Indian EPS, both Western as well as domestic, call for further strengthening the technocratic construct of the EPS. Privatization and restructuring experiments, underway in India, rather than breaking away from the existing approach, actually deepen the institutional hold of the CMED. Sustainable energy development (SED) is examined as an alternative to the CMED. The meaning and relevance of this concept in the context of the

  20. Empowering women in villages: all-women village councils in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the impact of all-women panchayats (village councils) in three small villages in Maharashtra state in India on women's well-being. Field work was conducted during 1991-93 in the villages of Yenora, Metikheda, and Vitner. In 1989 there were nine all-women village councils, which were elected owing to the efforts of a large independent farmers' organization, the Shetkari Sanghatana (SS). Findings indicate that the all-women village councils made a significant difference in women's lives. The mix of male and female leaders varied between the villages and affected the outcomes. The author argues that the strategy for empowerment is more successful than enclave strategies that focus only on a poor minority or radical feminist strategies that insist on women's action and hostility toward male involvement. The legal mandate for the panchayat as a vehicle for development was adopted in Maharashtra in 1965. However, the participation of the community in panchayats was only an assumption. In 1988-89, the 73rd Constitutional Amendment was passed to give power to panchayats and to reserve 30% of the legislative seats for women and backward castes. Prior to 1986, women were appointed, but not elected, to panchayats. During 1986-91, women's interest in local political power increased. As a result of the all-women village councils, women's attitudes toward themselves and their daughters changed in all three villages. Panchayats improved the accessibility of fuel, water, and fodder, which relieved women of their burdens and allowed girls to attend schools. Women's mobility and assets increased. The number of wife-beating incidents declined. Women gained respect in their families and in their maternal homes. Women still had dual labor roles in the labor force and at home. Two of the villages illustrated effective women's leadership. The cases illustrate the effectiveness of a broad-based strategy for women's empowerment.

  1. An Investigation of Sustainable Power Generation from Oil Palm Biomass: A Case Study in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Aghamohammadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak is the largest state in Malaysia, with 22% of the nation's oil palm plantation area, making it the second largest contributor to palm biomass production. Despite the enormous amount of palm biomass in the state, the use of biomass as fuel for power generation remains low. This study is designed to investigate the sustainability of power generation from palm biomass specifically in Sarawak by conducting a survey among the palm oil mill developers. To conduct this investigation, several key sustainability factors were identified: the security of the biomass supply, the efficiency of conversion technology, the existing network system, challenges and future prospects for power generation from palm biomass. These factors were assessed through a set of questionnaires. The returned questionnaires were then analysed using statistical tools. The results of this study demonstrate that Sarawak has biomass in abundance, and that it is ready to be exploited for large scale power generation. The key challenge to achieving the renewable energy target is the inadequate grid infrastructure that inhibits palm oil developers from benefiting from the Feed-in-Tariff payment scheme. One way forward, a strategic partnership between government and industrial players, offers a promising outcome, depending on an economic feasibility study. The decentralization of electricity generation to support rural electrification is another feasible alternative for renewable energy development in the state.

  2. Recent Progress in Triboelectric Nanogenerators as a Renewable and Sustainable Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs provide an excellent approach to convert mechanical energy into electricity, which are mainly based on the coupling between triboelectrification and electrostatic induction. The TENG has the potential of harvesting many kinds of mechanical energies such as vibration, rotation, wind, human motion, and even water wave energy, which could be a new paradigm for scavenging large scale energy. It also demonstrates a possible route towards practical applications for powering electronic devices. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the four modes of TENGs: vertical contact-separation mode, in-plane sliding mode, single-electrode mode, and free-standing triboelectric-layer mode. The performance enhancements of TENGs for harvesting energy as a sustainable power source are also discussed. In addition, recent reports on the hybridized nanogenerator are introduced, which may enable fully self-powered electronic devices. Finally, the practical applications of TENGs for energy harvesting are presented.

  3. The Quest for Rural Sustainability in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Wegren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rural depopulation and the disappearance of villages in rural Russia occurred as part of the historical process of urbanization and industrialization. Rural depopulation also occurred for structural reasons having to do with village location, and for behavioral reasons whereby villagers react to primitive living conditions and poor economic prospects. Three possible strategies for addressing the problem of sustainable villages are considered. The government is attempting to improve rural living conditions, but rural depopulation is likely to continue. Characteristics of sustainable villages are outlined. Agro-tourism is analyzed for its potential to support sustainable villages.

  4. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  5. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses.

  6. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S.; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a paradigm—“hydricity”—that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40–46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a “turbine”-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65–70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses. PMID:26668380

  7. Biomass District Heat System for Interior Rural Alaska Villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, William A.; Parker, Charles R.

    2014-09-01

    Alaska Village Initiatives (AVI) from the outset of the project had a goal of developing an integrated village approach to biomass in Rural Alaskan villages. A successful biomass project had to be ecologically, socially/culturally and economically viable and sustainable. Although many agencies were supportive of biomass programs in villages none had the capacity to deal effectively with developing all of the tools necessary to build a complete integrated program. AVI had a sharp learning curve as well. By the end of the project with all the completed tasks, AVI developed the tools and understanding to connect all of the dots of an integrated village based program. These included initially developing a feasibility model that created the capacity to optimize a biomass system in a village. AVI intent was to develop all aspects or components of a fully integrated biomass program for a village. This meant understand the forest resource and developing a sustainable harvest system that included the “right sized” harvest equipment for the scale of the project. Developing a training program for harvesting and managing the forest for regeneration. Making sure the type, quality, and delivery system matched the needs of the type of boiler or boilers to be installed. AVI intended for each biomass program to be of the scale that would create jobs and a sustainable business.

  8. Sustainable Development Commission Scotland response to the Scottish Government 'Consultation on the consenting process for thermal power stations in Scotland'

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission Scotland

    2009-01-01

    This document is the response of the Sustainable Development Commission Scotland to the Scottish Government’s 'Consultation on the consenting process for thermal power stations in Scotland' Publisher PDF

  9. The power of the Brown v. Board of Education decision: theorizing threats to sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Michelle

    2004-09-01

    Interviews with African American and White American elders capture the immediate power of the Brown v. Board of Education (1954) decision and the biography of its impact over time. This article reviews the lived experience of the decision and theorizes 3 threats to sustainability that ruthlessly undermined the decision over time: (a) the unacknowledged and enormous sacrifice endured by the African American community in the name of desegregation; b) the violent and relentless resistance to the decision by government officials, educators, and many White community members; and (c) the dramatic shrinkage of the vision of Brown from the dismantling of White supremacy to a technical matter of busing. Implications are drawn for the study of desegregation and for the study of sustainability of social justice more broadly. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  10. A micro-sized bio-solar cell for self-sustaining power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-01-21

    Self-sustainable energy sources are essential for a wide array of wireless applications deployed in remote field locations. Due to their self-assembling and self-repairing properties, "biological solar (bio-solar) cells" are recently gaining attention for those applications. The bio-solar cell can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities under day-night cycles. Despite the vast potential and promise of bio-solar cells, they, however, have not yet successfully been translated into commercial applications, as they possess persistent performance limitations and scale-up bottlenecks. Here, we report an entirely self-sustainable and scalable microliter-sized bio-solar cell with significant power enhancement by maximizing solar energy capture, bacterial attachment, and air bubble volume in well-controlled microchambers. The bio-solar cell has a ~300 μL single chamber defined by laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates and it uses an air cathode to allow freely available oxygen to act as an electron acceptor. We generated a maximum power density of 0.9 mW m(-2) through photosynthetic reactions of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is the highest power density among all micro-sized bio-solar cells.

  11. Climate protection and reliability of supply. Development of a sustainable power supply concept; Klimaschutz und Versorgungssicherheit. Entwicklung einer nachhaltigen Stromversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus, Thomas; Loreck, Charlotte; Mueschen, Klaus

    2009-09-15

    Germany, like other states, committed itself to sustainable development in the Rio declaration of 1992. The boundary conditions for this are set by nature itself, whose laws must be respected if goals like reliability of supply and economic efficiency are to be achieved. This study of the Federal Environmental Office shows how sustainable power supply can be achieved. It is possible to combine climate protection, reliability of supply and economic efficiency, even without nuclear power and without constructing new conventional power plants that do not have the function of combined heat and power generation. (orig.)

  12. The influence of sand mining towards the sustainability of power support and capacity of Lambidaro River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniah, Restu; Rahmi, Hisni

    2017-11-01

    Activities of sand mining on the surface stream (river) conducted by Panji Mahakarya company potentially cause various environmental issues. These problems include the destruction of the river ecosystem, decreased the quality of river water quality, increased water pollution load, and another effect on capacity and power support river. The Lambidaro River is one of the rivers found in Palembang, where the inhabitants who live around it take advantage of the existence of this river to meet their daily needs such as bathing, washing, and latrines. The purpose of this research is to know the influence of mining activities towards sustainability of the power support and capacity of the river. The method used in this research is to compare the availability of water and water needs of the population in determining the status of environmental power support based on regulation of the state minister of the environment number 17 in 2009 about the determination of the power guidance support environment in spatial regions, as well as using the index method of pollution based on the decision of the State Minister of the environment number 115 in 2003 about the determination of the status of water quality guidelines with parameters measured are TDS, TSS, pH, DO, COD, dan BOD5. The results of the calculation of the power support river are deficit where SA (34,200,655.64 m3/year) good condition (uncontaminated) and mild pollutant.

  13. Improving the Environmental Sustainability of Flash Geothermal Power Plants—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Bruscoli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of geothermal energy production is analyzed with reference to a production plant located in a specific area (Monte Amiata, Italy. Four solutions combining a flash power plant with an Organic Rankine Cycle in a hybrid configuration are analyzed in terms of production of electricity, exergy balance and emissions level (CO2, H2S, Hg. The different solutions correspond to increasing environmental performance, and for the most advanced case achieve near-zero emissions (complete reinjection of the natural resource, including incondensable gases. The results show that this can be achieved at the price of a progressive reduction of electrical productivity.

  14. Unruly energies: Provocations of renewable energy development in a northern German village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jennifer D.

    This dissertation asks how inhabitants of a sustainable village are living out Germany's transition from nuclear to renewable energy. The sustainable village remains a locus of optimistic attachments for renewable energy advocates, who argue that a decentralized power grid will enable people to more directly participate in power production and politics as "energy citizens." Yet while rural areas have become sites of speculation, innovation and growth, few rural-dwellers are enfranchised in (or profiting from) the technoscientific projects in their midst. I draw upon 13 months of fieldwork in a northern German village transformed by wind turbines, photovoltaics and biofuels to consider why, asking what kinds of public life flourish in the absence of democratic engagement with renewable technologies. This ethnography engages the village as multiply constituted across domains of everyday life, including transit, farming, waste management, domestic life, and social gatherings. I found that environmental policy, everyday practices, and the area's material histories combined to produce ontologies---senses of what exists---that circumscribe citizen participation in the energy sector, affording more formal opportunities to men than to women, and privileging farmers' interests in plans that impacted the larger community. These findings illuminate how many villagers become ambivalent toward the project of the energy transition and disenfranchised from its implementation. Yet many who were excluded from formal participation also engaged with renewable technologies as they sensed out their worlds, using tropes of sustainable energy and technoscientific materials to place themselves in this emerging energy polity. Their everyday worldmaking brimmed with what I call unruly energies, structures of feeling that registered more as affects than as discourse. In the village, these took form as sensory disturbances, disquiet among neighbors, technoscientific optimism and skepticism

  15. Millennium Global Village-Net: bringing together Millennium Villages throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Andrew S; Negin, Joel; Olayo, Bernard; Bukachi, Frederick; Johnson, Edward; Sachs, Sonia Ehrlich

    2009-12-01

    The Millennium Villages Project (MVP), based at The Earth Institute at Columbia University, is a bottom-up, community led approach to show how villages in developing countries can get out of the poverty trap that afflicts more than a billion people worldwide. With well-targeted, practical inputs can help the community invest in a path leading to self-sustaining development. There are 80 Millennium Villages clustered in 10 countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa. MVP is an important development process for empowering communities to invest in a package of integrated interventions aiming to increase food production, improve access to safe water, health care, education and infrastructure. The process benefits from synergies of the integrated approach and relies on community leadership as empowered by proven technological inputs. MVP is committed to a science-based approach to assess and monitor the progress of the communities towards clear objectives; the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and to do so with mechanisms that are scalable and sustainable. This approach offers much more than simply collecting and analyzing data since the mechanism used for recording progress would provide a bridge over the divide which separates the haves and the have-nots (by facilitating the sharing of solutions from one community to another bidirectionally). By so doing, it allows people to enhance their own futures in a sustainable manner. Solutions found in one community are transferable to similar communities in other MVP villages. To achieve this goal, the MVP requires an information and communication system which can provide both necessary infrastructure for monitoring and evaluation, and tools for communicating among the villages, cities and countries. This system is called the Millennium Global Village-Net (MGV-Net). It takes advantage of the latest in open source software (OpenMRS), databases (MySQL), interface terminology, a centralized concept dictionary, and uses appropriate

  16. Water Power: The “Hydropower Discourse” of China in an Age of Environmental Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen-ching Bellette Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As the world searches for renewable energy in the face of climate change and China attempts to expand its power supply to further its economic development, hydroelectricity has moved to the top of the country’s energy agenda. This has given rise to a new form of  “hydropower discourse” in China. The discourse is underpinned by the ideas of environmental protection and sustainable development, which are widely perceived as unobjectionable in view of the current availability of resources. This article argues that the apparent ethical pursuit of renewable energy by building dams to generate electricity masks relations of dominance and helps to enable large energy companies, political leaders, and regional decision makers to pursue their interests against those who have limited or no access to the knowledge and capital employed in the development process. It will examine the ideological assumptions and institutional rootedness of hydropower discourse, and the power relations embedded in it.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Power Transfer Development for Sustainable Campus Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a convenient, safe, and autonomous means for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging that has seen rapid growth in recent years for stationary applications. WPT does not require bulky contacts, plugs, and wires, is not affected by dirt or weather conditions, and is as efficient as conventional charging systems. This study summarizes some of the recent Sustainable Campus Initiative activities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in WPT charging of an on-campus vehicle (a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle). Laboratory development of the WPT coils, high-frequency power inverter, and overall systems integration are discussed. Results cover the coil performance testing at different operating frequencies, airgaps, and misalignments. Some of the experimental results of insertion loss due to roadway surfacing materials in the air-gap are presented. Experimental lessons learned are also covered in this study.

  18. Electricity price as a factor of the national electric power industry sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Sanja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PE Elektroprivreda Srbije (Electric Power Industry of Serbia - PE EPS is of a strategic importance for national economy. Long-term policy of depressed electricity price has caused a number of distortions, mainly through direct impact on the operations of EPS and a number of other effects such as irrational consumption, high energy intensity, low charges, high level of technical and commercial losses, etc. Serbia still has the lowest electricity price in Europe, but regulated price model provides a certain profit level for EPS. The aim of this paper is to show the potential that the electric power industry as a branch can have if the Government provides the conditions for its sustainable operation.

  19. Integrating environmental equity, energy and sustainability: A spatial-temporal study of electric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touche, George Earl

    The theoretical scope of this dissertation encompasses the ecological factors of equity and energy. Literature important to environmental justice and sustainability are reviewed, and a general integration of global concepts is delineated. The conceptual framework includes ecological integrity, quality human development, intra- and inter-generational equity and risk originating from human economic activity and modern energy production. The empirical focus of this study concentrates on environmental equity and electric power generation within the United States. Several designs are employed while using paired t-tests, independent t-tests, zero-order correlation coefficients and regression coefficients to test seven sets of hypotheses. Examinations are conducted at the census tract level within Texas and at the state level across the United States. At the community level within Texas, communities that host coal or natural gas utility power plants and corresponding comparison communities that do not host such power plants are tested for compositional differences. Comparisons are made both before and after the power plants began operating for purposes of assessing outcomes of the siting process and impacts of the power plants. Relationships between the compositions of the hosting communities and the risks and benefits originating from the observed power plants are also examined. At the statewide level across the United States, relationships between statewide composition variables and risks and benefits originating from statewide electric power generation are examined. Findings indicate the existence of some limited environmental inequities, but they do not indicate disparities that confirm the general thesis of environmental racism put forth by environmental justice advocates. Although environmental justice strategies that would utilize Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the disparate impact standard do not appear to be applicable, some findings suggest potential

  20. Interpretation of 798: Changes in Power of Representation and Sustainability of Industrial Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juncheng Dai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of economic transformation and urban renewal, the protection and sustainable development of urban industrial landscapes has become an important practical issue, and how to maintain the unique local culture of these landscapes is key to solving the problem. By integrating the concept of “layer” and regarding the landscape as text, this paper will investigate the representation of industrial landscapes and the process of changes in power represented by different actors through different texts from the perspective of representation. The paper selected Beijing 798 as the research area to explore the shaping of changes in the industrial landscape of 798 from a weapon manufacturing area to an arts district, creative industry park and the “pan 798” by the factory owners, government, management committee, artists, media and tourists through different presentation forms, revealing the game process of representation of powers among the coalition between artists, management committee and the government. The paper points out that in fact, the representation of industrial landscape by different actors through different texts is a process that continues to explore and define the value of landscape. However, we need to look at this when the value of the industrial landscape is no longer given by localized life practices, but rather depends on different actors to produce and reproduce the value of landscape by representation, and thereby affecting the sustainable development of industrial landscape.

  1. Research on the localization method of protecting traditional village landscape: a case study on Tangyin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available China has over 271 million villages and less than the number in ten years ago in which there are 363 million villages. New rural construction indeed do some good for common villages but still destroy hundreds and thousands traditional village which contain great cultural, science, artistic values. In addition, traditional villages can't meet the increasing needs in more convenient and comfortable living conditions. Increasing population also makes traditional villages out of control in construction. With the background of this, we have to set up in traditional village protection. This article put forward an idea in protection which make use of landscape localization to pursue the sustainable development and vernacular landscape protection. Tangyin Town is a famous trade center in history and left many cultural heritage, especially historical buildings. Take Tangyin as a case study to apply the localization method which could guide other similar villages to achieve same goals.

  2. Space architecture for MoonVillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2017-10-01

    The concept of a multinational MoonVillage, as proposed by Jan Wörner of ESA, is analyzed with respect to diverse factors affecting its implementation feasibility: potential activities and scale as a function of location, technology, and purpose; potential participants and their roles; business models for growth and sustainability as compared to the ISS; and implications for the field of space architecture. Environmental and operations constraints that govern all types of MoonVillage are detailed. Findings include: 1) while technically feasible, a MoonVillage would be more distributed and complex a project than the ISS; 2) significant and distinctive opportunities exist for willing participants, at all evolutionary scales and degrees of commercialization; 3) the mixed-use space business park model is essential for growth and permanence; 4) growth depends on exporting lunar material products, and the rate and extent of growth depends on export customers including terrestrial industries; 5) industrial-scale operations are a precondition for lunar urbanism, which goal in turn dramatically drives technology requirements; but 6) industrial viability cannot be discerned until significant in situ operations occur; and therefore 7) government investment in lunar surface operations is a strictly enabling step. Because of the resources it could apply, the U.S. government holds the greatest leverage on growth, no matter who founds a MoonVillage. The interplanetary business to be built may because for engagement.

  3. Stricken village. 1948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marion

    2008-01-01

    An historical reprint, this account of a public health nurse's work with village residents during an outbreak of pneumonia related to tuberculosis was originally published in Public Health Nursing in December 1948. The author, Marion Curtis, was a public health nurse in the Territorial Health Department of Alaska called upon to respond to the rapid death of several victims of an unknown disease affecting a small outpost on Kodiak Island in the Territory of Alaska. Her narrative tells us about the settlement village and what happened from the time of the wire for help to the time she left the community for home. Her original spelling of names has been retained. Curtis's response to the emergency was quick and demonstrated experience. Her application of infection control principles helped quickly control the outbreak. At the end of her story, Curtis reflected on the impact of disease on communities and civilizations, predicting that villages like the one she had described might vanish within 20 years due to tuberculosis. Readers may reflect whether Curtis's view presents an etic or an emic perspective. Old Harbor, however, remains a small but vital community on Kodiak Island's southwestern shore.

  4. High-Efficiency Solar-Powered 3-D Printers for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jephias Gwamuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of the open source 3-D printer known as the RepRap (a self-Replicating Rapid prototyper resulted in the potential for distributed manufacturing of products for significantly lower costs than conventional manufacturing. This development, coupled with open source-appropriate technology (OSAT, has enabled the opportunity for 3-D printers to be used for sustainable development. In this context, OSAT provides the opportunity to modify and improve the physical designs of their printers and desired digitally-shared objects. However, these 3-D printers require electricity while more than a billion people still lack electricity. To enable the utilization of RepRaps in off-grid communities, solar photovoltaic (PV-powered mobile systems have been developed, but recent improvements in novel delta-style 3-D printer designs allows for reduced costs and improved performance. This study builds on these innovations to develop and experimentally validate a mobile solar-PV-powered delta 3-D printer system. It is designed to run the RepRap 3-D printer regardless of solar flux. The electrical system design is tested outdoors for operating conditions: (1 PV charging battery and running 3-D printer; (2 printing under low insolation; (3 battery powering the 3-D printer alone; (4 PV charging the battery only; and (5 battery fully charged with PV-powered 3-D printing. The results show the system performed as required under all conditions providing feasibility for adoption in off-grid rural communities. 3-D printers powered by affordable mobile PV solar systems have a great potential to reduce poverty through employment creation, as well as ensuring a constant supply of scarce products for isolated communities.

  5. Towards a Moon Village: Young Lunar Explorers Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard; Batenburg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The Moon Village Workshop at ESTEC on the 14th December 2015 was organized by ILEWG/ESTEC in conjunction with the Moon 2020-2030 Symposium. It gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. The workshop participants split in three working groups focusing on Moon Habitat Design, science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and engaging stakeholders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacu-um. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community

  6. Local Power -- Global Connections: linking the world to a sustainable future through decentralized energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, Richard; Sweet, David

    2007-07-01

    Various international dynamics are converging to increase the attractiveness of decentralized energy as a complement to existing centralized energy infrastructures. Decentralized energy (DE) technologies, including onsite renewables, high efficiency cogeneration and industrial energy recycling, offer considerable benefits to those seeking working alternatives to emerging challenges in the energy sector. DE is ideally suited to provide clean affordable energy to areas where modern energy services are currently lacking. Having smaller generators close to where energy is required ensures a safe, reliable and secure energy supply when the energy is required. Furthermore, because DE is a much cleaner alternative than conventional central power plants and the energy provided comes at a much smaller price tag DE is an increasingly acceptable alternative both in the developed and developing world. DE is sure to play a key role in any plan to build a sustainable energy future. (auth)

  7. GIS based evaluation of crop suitability for agricultural sustainability around Kolaghat thermal power plant, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Subhas; Adhikari, Kalyan; Brahmachari, Koushik

    2016-09-01

    Fly ash exhaust from Kolaghat thermal power plant, West Bengal, India,?? affects the areas within the radius of 3 - 4 km. Land information system indicated that surface texture within 4 km was silty loam and clay content increased with increase of distance. Soil pH was alkaline (7.58-8.01) in affected circles, whereas soil was acidic (5.95-6.41) in rest of block. Organic carbon (OC) is roving from 0.36 to 0.64% in the nearer circles which is lesser from others. The present Crop suitability analysis revealed that 96.98 % area was suitable (S1) for maize, sesame, jute, whereas these were cultivated in less than 1% of land. Flowers are the best suitable (S1) in 88.9 % but it was grown in 6.02 % area.? The present rice area within 4 km of KTPP is showing moderately suitable (S2) and S1 for the rest. Wheat is moderately suitable (S2) in the almost all the circles.? Cultivation of vegetable crops is limited in the affected circles while the highly suitable (S1) comprises 67.49 % for the remaining areas though it covered only 6.01 % of the block.? This evaluation precisely improves more than 300% from the earlier cropping intensity of 177.95 %. Suitability based land use allocation serves as stepping stone to promote agricultural sustainability. Geographic information system (GIS) model has been developed to assess site specific crop suitability for sustainable agricultural planning.

  8. Assessment of the turkey’s electric power policies in terms of sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atis Selcuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, using statistical data published by the Turkish Electricity Transmission Company, analyzes key parameters such as installed capacity and energy demand growth rates, investment plans and emission rates, taking into consideration the expected increase in use through the year 2023. The results of the analyses were compared to relevant data from around the world. The weight of domestic - and especially renewable - resources in investment plans for the next 10 years was discussed. Recommendations for an investment plan to support sustainable development in Turkey are listed. Consequently, the lack of investment in domestic and renewable energy projects decreases the competitive power of Turkey vis-à-vis Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development countries in terms of many parameters. For a sustainable development, the country must make significant changes in its foreign-dependent energy production policies. Any future policies must encourage supplying local resources to meet the continuously increasing demand. Qualifications for incentive mechanisms applied to investments in renewable energy should be developed. The impact of the private sector on the installation of new plants must also be increased by quickly completing the privatization process.

  9. Assessment of Renewable Energy Sources & Municipal Solid Waste for Sustainable Power Generation in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderoju, Olaide M.; Dias, Guerner A.; Echakraoui, Zhour

    2017-12-01

    The demand for Energy in most Sub-Saharan African countries has become unimaginable despite its high potential of natural and renewable resources. The deficit has impeded the regions’ economic growth and sustainability. Nigeria as a nation is blessed with fossil fuels, abundant sunlight, hydro, wind and many among others, but the energy output to its population (185 million) still remains less than 4000MW. Currently, the clamour for an alternative but renewable energy source is the demand of the globe but it is quite expensive to achieve the yield that meets the Nigeria demand. Hence, this study aims at identifying and mapping out various regions with renewable energy potentials. The study also considers municipal solid waste as a consistent and available resource for power generation. Furthermore, this study examines the drawbacks inhibiting the inability to harness these renewable, energy generating potentials in full capacity. The study will enable the authorities and other stakeholders to invest and plan on providing a sustainable energy for the people.

  10. Sustainable Solution for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Separation using Concentrated Solar Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Piyush; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Nath Mahendra, Som; Motahhir, Saad

    2017-08-01

    In today’s scenario to combat with climate change effects, there are a lot of reasons why we all should use renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels. Solar energy is one of the best options based on features like good for the environment, independent of electricity prices, underutilized land, grid security, sustainable growth, etc. This concept paper is oriented primarily focused on the use of Solar Energy for the crude oil heating purpose besides other many prospective industrial applications to reduce cost, carbon footprint and moving towards a sustainable and ecologically friendly Oil & Gas Industry. Concentrated Solar Power technology based prototype system is proposed to substitute the presently used system based on natural gas burning method. The hybrid system which utilizes the solar energy in the oil and gas industry would strengthen the overall field working conditions, safety measures and environmental ecology. 40% reduction on natural gas with this hybrid system is estimated. A positive implication for an environment, working conditions and safety precautions is the additive advantage. There could also decrease air venting of CO2, CH4 and N2O by an average of 30-35%.

  11. Nuclear power in Canada : an examination of risks, impacts and sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, M.; Jamison, A.; Wong, R.; Czajkowski, P.

    2006-12-15

    This study examines the environmental impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity generation in Canada through each of the four major stages of nuclear energy production: uranium mining and milling; uranium refining, conversion and fuel fabrication; nuclear power plant operation; and waste fuel management. It is intended to inform public debate over the future role of nuclear energy in Canada, and to facilitate comparisons of nuclear energy with other potential energy sources. The study examines waste generation, atmospheric releases, impacts on water quality and water use, and landscape and ecosystem impacts of nuclear energy production. It also examines the occupational and community health impacts of nuclear power and key long-term challenges to its sustainability, including security and weapons proliferation risks. Specific environmental impacts are examined in the context of CANDU nuclear technology, the only reactor type currently in use in Canada. The study findings likely underestimate the overall impacts of the use of nuclear energy for electricity production in Canada. This is a result of significant gaps in the publicly available information on releases of pollutants and contaminants, as well as on the fate of certain waste streams related to the nuclear industry. In addition, the study relies on what are likely conservative estimates in a number of key areas, particularly with respect to the generation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

  12. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Habitat Design group discussed principles and concepts for a minimum base that would start with 4-10 crew, allowing a later evolution to 50 crew and elements contributed by Moon Village partners at large. Various aspects were assessed including habitats, laboratories, EVAs, pressurized vehicles, core modules, inflatable extensions, power systems, life support systems and bioreactors, ISRU using regolith, emergency, services, medical, escape, shelters. The Science and Technology group analyzed the importance and readiness level of technologies needed for lunar robotic landers and for the Moon Village. The current ESA lunar exploration activities focus on the contribution within ISS operations barter of the ESA service module to bring Orion capsule to the Moon starting with an automatic demonstration in 2018. It is encouraged to consolidate this path for using the ser-vice module for crewed missions EM2 and EM3 giving also the possibility of an ESA astronaut, together with advanced technology, operations and science utilization. They noted the interesting contribution of instruments, drill, communications, and landing in support to Russian lunar polar lander missions Luna 27. The Engaging Stakeholders working group started by identifying the main stakeholders and groups that play a role or that could play a role towards the Moon Village project. These stakeholders were classified on their influence towards the programme, and their attitude towards it. One clear conclusion was that most of the stakeholders showed a positive view towards the Moon Village programme, and that the most important step within a short term strategy should focus on the actions to be taken to engage stakeholders for the next ESA Ministerial to support the programme. Finally the group came up with some recommendations on which should be the actions to be taken by the ESA DG to engage the most direct stakeholders: ESA delegations, media, national governments, citizens, taxpayers, and to invite partners

  13. Sustainability for power generation exemplarily shown by regenerative energy systems. Final report; Nachhaltigkeit am Beispiel regenerativer Energiesysteme zur Stromerzeugung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, T.J.; Wagner, H.J.

    2005-07-01

    Since the energy sector plays a key role in the concept of sustainable development, aspects of sustainability should be addressed within the scope of technology assessments. This applies particularly to new energy systems and new technological solutions. To evaluate sustainability, indicators are needed. A system of indicators was designed within a research project carried out by the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics of the Ruhr-University Bochum. At first, the Brundtland-Definition for sustainable development was put in terms for energy conversion systems. Secondly, indicators were selected. For this purpose, a standardized procedure was developed that allows quantified multi criteria analysis. Overall objective was to cover all significant issues of sustainability by a minimum number of indicators. Seven appropriate indicators were identified: cumulated energy demand, power production costs, demand of air, water and area, as well as two new developed indicators to describe risks related to the security of energy supply, and employment effects. To prove the applicability of the indicator system, sample calculations were made for several solar and wind energy systems as well as for a natural gas fired power plant. Beside these examples, the indicator set in principle is applicable to any other technological pathway. It enables comparisons between conventional power generation technologies and innovative (renewable) energy systems. (orig.)

  14. Traditional and modern use of fuelwood in Indian villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, N.H.; Chanakya, H.N.

    1994-09-01

    Traditional methods of using fuelwood can be improved to benefit the quality of life of village inhabitants as well as the environment. Modern bioenergy systems offer potential to meet the heating (cooking) and shaft power (and electricity) requirements of villages through a combination of biogas and producer gas systems. These technologies are available indigenously in India and their feasibility in the villages has been demonstrated. Bioenergy options using locally produced feedstocks lead to self reliance, local employment generation, reclamation of degraded and waste lands, enhancing biodiversity, substitution of fossil fuels with concomitant reduction in carbon emissions, etc.

  15. MODEL OF VILLAGE HEAD ELECTION ARRANGEMENT IN VILLAGE GOVERNANCE LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekar Anggun Gading Pinilih

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the right model in the arrangement of village head elections after the stipulation of Law No. 6 year 2014 on Village. This research is a normative law research by laws, historical, and conceptual approach. The result shows that a direct and simultaneous election model shall be the solution for the next Village Head Election. Simultaneous election model is designed since it is philosophically considered to make efficiency of the Village Head Elections, in terms of efficiency of budget, time and effort. The principle of this policy is an attempt to create a more equitable simultaneous democratization to minimize the chances of cheating. Since if the elections were not held simultaneously, it would give chance to the outsider to involve. The simultaneous election requires a coherent policy. This coherence will produce an effective synchronization of all types of elections implementation in Indonesia. Keywords: head of village, model, election, arrangement

  16. Sustainability performance for Brazilian electricity power industry: An assessment integrating social, economic and environmental issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, S.; Witjes, S.; Campos, L.M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The increased pressure on companies to address sustainability issues has resulted in the development of several voluntary corporate sustainability integration approaches. The array of existing approaches is large and overwhelming, resulting in companies not understanding what corporate

  17. IN VOZDVIZHENSKOE VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetyrina Natalya Arkadevna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers civil engineering in retrospect. The paper presents the records of the two contracts that date back to 1837 and 1838. The contracts cover the two stages of construction of a famous church in Vozdvizhenskoe Village in the Moscow Province. These documents were stored in the Central Historic Archive, namely, in the collection of the town hall of Sergievskij Possad. These records of the two agreements in the collection of the brokers notes (or in other books of the same type are of particular value, as the majority of authentic contracts have been lost. One of the contracts covers the organizational procedure and pre-construction works, while the other one covers the construction of the church. The first document gives the idea of environmental protection, employment of ecological technologies, and safe disposal and recycling of human biowaste in the course of dismantling of an old structure in Vozdvizhenskoe village. The second document that dates back to 1838 covers the sequence of construction works, starting from the foundation and ending with the arches, the types of building materials used, and peculiarities of stone masonry. The information recorded in the contract includes the names of the counterparties, day-to-day mode of life of seasonal workers, remuneration of labour and procedures that assure the quality of construction. This agreement makes it possible to outline the construction process that includes workers, bricklayers, the foreman, the contractor, the architect, and the customer. On the whole, both documents help us outline and assess some of the building practices of the 19th century. This issue is relevant nowadays, as our society has entered the phase of the market economy, while the experience accumulated by the past generations is of undeniable value.

  18. World Heritage Site Designation Impacts on a Historic Village: A Case Study on Residents’ Perceptions of Hahoe Village (Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonki Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between World Heritage Site (WHS designation and the community sustainability of a historic village, focusing on Hahoe Village, Korea, which was inscribed in 2010. It examines residents’ perceptions of increasing tourism at Hahoe Village by adopting a questionnaire and using an interview as research methods. This study examined both the positive and negative impacts that Hahoe Village’s WHS designation has had on its sustainability. Of all of the impacts examined in this research, the three most noteworthy issues are identified: (1 the acceleration of the change of the village’s industrial base and the influx of strangers; (2 the degradation of quality of life (in the physical aspects caused by increasing tourism; and (3 the collision predicated by the tension between conserving the village’s historic environments and developing tourism. In conclusion, the WHS designation impacts on Hahoe Village, which local residents perceived, have both positive and negative aspects. WHS designation needs to be accompanied by a management plan that is more concerned about the impact from tourism after the designation. In this context, Hahoe Village must not only have a comprehensive preservation plan that balances with the demand for tourism development, but also secure the village’s community sustainability as a living place other than a tourist destination.

  19. Ethanol used as an environmentally sustainable energy resource for thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, V. A.; Biryukov, V. V.; Kas'kov, S. I.

    2016-09-01

    Justification of using renewable energy sources and a brief analysis of their application prospects is given. The most common renewable energy sources for mobile thermal power plants are presented. The possibilities and ways of using ethanol as an energy source for such plants with diesel engines are analyzed. It is shown that it is feasible to add small amounts of ethanol to oil diesel fuel (DF) for obtaining an environmentally sustainable energy source for diesel engines. Therewith, a stable mixture of components can be obtained by adding anhydrous (absolute) ethanol to the oil fuel. The authors studied a mixture containing 4% (by volume) of absolute ethanol and 96% of oil DF. The physicochemical properties of the mixture and each of its components are presented. Diesel engine of the type D-245.12S has been experimentally studied using the mixture of DF and ethanol. The possibility of reducing the toxicity level of the exhaust emissions when using this mixture as an energy source for diesel engines of mobile power plants is shown. Transition of the studied diesel engine from oil DF to its mixture with ethanol made it possible to reduce the smoke capacity of the exhaust gases by 15-25% and to decrease the specific mass emissions of nitrogen oxides by 17.4%. In this case, we observed a slight increase in the exhaust gas emissions of carbon monoxide and light unburned hydrocarbons, which, however, can easily be eliminated by providing the exhaust system of a diesel engine with a catalytic converter. It is noted that the studied mixture composition should be optimized. The conclusion is made that absolute ethanol is a promising ecofriendly additive to oil diesel fuel and should be used in domestic diesel engines.

  20. Sustainable Modular Adaptive Redundancy Technique Emphasizing Partial Reconfiguration for Reduced Power Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Al-Haddad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As reconfigurable devices' capacities and the complexity of applications that use them increase, the need for self-reliance of deployed systems becomes increasingly prominent. Organic computing paradigms have been proposed for fault-tolerant systems because they promote behaviors that allow complex digital systems to adapt and survive in demanding environments. In this paper, we develop a sustainable modular adaptive redundancy technique (SMART composed of a two-layered organic system. The hardware layer is implemented on a Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA to provide self-repair using a novel approach called reconfigurable adaptive redundancy system (RARS. The software layer supervises the organic activities on the FPGA and extends the self-healing capabilities through application-independent, intrinsic, and evolutionary repair techniques that leverage the benefits of dynamic partial reconfiguration (PR. SMART was evaluated using a Sobel edge-detection application and was shown to tolerate stressful sequences of injected transient and permanent faults while reducing dynamic power consumption by 30% compared to conventional triple modular redundancy (TMR techniques, with nominal impact on the fault-tolerance capabilities. Moreover, PR is employed to keep the system on line while under repair and also to reduce repair time. Experiments have shown a 27.48% decrease in repair time when PR is employed compared to the full bitstream configuration case.

  1. The greenhouse index of sustainable development for metallurgical processes of production in aspect of green power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisienko Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accounting of greenhouse gases (GHG according to plans of the Russian Federation becomes obligatory since 2016 for the enterprises with issue of GHG not less than 150 thousand tons of CO2, since 2017 – from 50 thousand tons of CO2. Introduction of a carbon tax (15 dollars/t of CO2 is planned. Voluntary inventory of GHG of the enterprises and territories which in the long term apply is carried out to be called clever. According to University of Cambridge (USA about 45% depreciation of joint-stock portfolios in the world markets, the expected climate change connected with are expected. Parameter for an assessment of the clever city with the developed metallurgy and need of decrease in greenhouse emissions in the atmosphere – the indicator of a sustainable development considering emission of carbon dioxide, prime cost of steel and its power consumption is offered. Its values for tandems blast furnace (BF + oxygen converter (OC, BF, Corex, Romelt, Midrex, Hyl-3 everyone with arc furnace (AF are defined.

  2. MoonVillage: Frame & Opportunity for Space Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.

    2017-09-01

    We shall discuss the frame and opportunity for space economy in the context of elaborating the concept of a Moon Village with the goal of a sustainable human presence and activity on the lunar surface as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. This enterprise can federate all interested Nations and partners, in particular from terrestrial and non space commercial sectors .

  3. A self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment system using solar-bio-hybrid power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Liao, Wei

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on system analysis of a self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment concept combining solar technologies, anaerobic digestion, and aerobic treatment to reclaim water. A solar bio-hybrid power generation unit was adopted to power the wastewater treatment. Concentrated solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) were combined with biogas energy from anaerobic digestion. Biogas is also used to store the extra energy generated by the hybrid power unit and ensure stable and continuous wastewater treatment. It was determined from the energy balance analysis that the PV-bio hybrid power unit is the preferred energy unit to realize the self-sustaining high-strength wastewater treatment. With short-term solar energy storage, the PV-bio-hybrid power unit in Phoenix, AZ requires solar collection area (4032m2) and biogas storage (35m3), while the same unit in Lansing, MI needs bigger solar collection area and biogas storage (5821m2 and 105m3, respectively) due to the cold climate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Empowering electricity: co-operatives, sustainability, and power sector reform in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacArthur, Julie L

    2016-01-01

    .... Empowering Electricity offers an illuminating analysis of these co-ops within the context of larger debates over climate change, renewable electricity policy, sustainable community development...

  5. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

    2008-12-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure

  6. Sustainability Assessment of Coal-Fired Power Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Butner, R. Scott; Elliott, Michael L.; Freeman, Charles J.

    2011-11-30

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has the ability to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power production. Most studies find the potential for 70 to 80 percent reductions in CO2 emissions on a life-cycle basis, depending on the technology. Because of this potential, utilities and policymakers are considering the wide-spread implementation of CCS technology on new and existing coal plants to dramatically curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the power generation sector. However, the implementation of CCS systems will have many other social, economic, and environmental impacts beyond curbing GHG emissions that must be considered to achieve sustainable energy generation. For example, emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and particulate matter (PM) are also important environmental concerns for coal-fired power plants. For example, several studies have shown that eutrophication is expected to double and acidification would increase due to increases in NOx emissions for a coal plant with CCS provided by monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing. Potential for human health risks is also expected to increase due to increased heavy metals in water from increased coal mining and MEA hazardous waste, although there is currently not enough information to relate this potential to actual realized health impacts. In addition to environmental and human health impacts, supply chain impacts and other social, economic, or strategic impacts will be important to consider. A thorough review of the literature for life-cycle analyses of power generation processes using CCS technology via the MEA absorption process, and other energy generation technologies as applicable, yielded large variability in methods and core metrics. Nonetheless, a few key areas of impact for CCS were developed from the studies that we reviewed. These are: the impact of MEA generation on increased eutrophication and acidification from ammonia emissions and increased toxicity

  7. Self-sustainable, high-power-density bio-solar cells for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Choi, Seokheun

    2017-11-07

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip system that generates its own power is essential for stand-alone, independent, self-sustainable point-of-care diagnostic devices to work in limited-resource and remote regions. Miniaturized biological solar cells (or micro-BSCs) can be the most suitable power source for those lab-on-a-chip applications because the technique resembles the earth's natural ecosystem - living organisms work in conjunction with non-living components of their environment to create a self-assembling and self-maintaining system. Micro-BSCs can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities over day-night cycles, offering a clean and renewable power source with self-sustaining potential. However, the promise of this technology has not been translated into practical applications because of its relatively low power (∼nW cm -2 ) and current short lifetimes (∼a couple of hours). In this work, we enabled high-performance, self-sustaining, long-life micro-BSCs by using fundamental breakthroughs of device architectures and electrode materials. A 3-D biocompatible, conductive, and porous anode demonstrated great microbial biofilm formation and a high rate of bacterial extracellular electron transfer, which led to greater power generation. Furthermore, our micro-BSCs promoted gas exchange to the bacteria through a gas-permeable PDMS membrane in a well-controlled, tightly enclosed micro-chamber, substantially enhancing sustainability. Through photosynthetic reactions of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 without additional organic fuel, the 90 μL single-chambered bio-solar cell generated a maximum power density of 43.8 μW cm -2 and sustained consistent power production of ∼18.6 μW cm -2 during the day and ∼11.4 μW cm -2 at night for 20 days, which is the highest and longest reported success of any existing micro-scale bio-solar cells.

  8. The Power of Urban Planning on Environmental Sustainability: A Focus Group Study in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva-Sofia Säynäjoki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable communities are promoted as a desirable policy goal and, in particular, local authorities are encouraged to contribute to climate change mitigation through urban planning. Furthermore, recent research takes a broad perspective on the environmental sustainability of urban areas and considers the environmental impact of all consumption. A focus group study was conducted in Finland for the purpose of examining how increased environmental awareness influences urban land use. The 32 participants of three focus groups were professionals of urban planning and environmental sustainability, at both a municipal and a state level. The main finding was that urban planning is viewed as being unable to support environmental sustainability in the broader sense. In general, the participants did not see a connection between urban structure and sustainable lifestyles and only the influence of planning on housing and daily journeys was recognised. Three main reasons for this were identified. Firstly, environmental sustainability in its broader definition is seen as too complex for urban planners to influence alone. Secondly, the dominance of short-term economic issues in decision-making and the lack of co-operation from other stakeholders to achieve environmental aims demotivate land use planners. Thirdly, the prioritisation of urban density may overrule alternative means of promoting environmental sustainability, such as the encouragement of sustainable suburban or non-urban lifestyles.

  9. Intrinsic efficiency and critical power deposition in the e-beam sustained Ar:Xe laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, H.; Botma, H.; Peters, P.J.M.; Witteman, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental investigations on an e-beam sustained near infrared Ar:Xe laser have been carried out to determine the intrinsic efficiency at optimized conditions. A parametric study at different sustainer currents reveals a maximum output energy depending on current density. Up to 8 bar the optimized

  10. OLGA. Flexible tar removal for high efficient production of clean heat and power as well as sustainable fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwart, R.W.R. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The content of the paper lists the following subjects: The tar problem; The OLGA technology; The development with Step 1: Demonstration of high-efficient production of clean heat and power, Step 2: Developing high-efficient production of sustainable fuels and chemicals, and Step 3: Demonstrating the flexibility of the OLGA tar removal technology. Further, attention is paid to Commercial gasification projects, and finally Conclusions are formulated and an Outlook is given.

  11. Rural architectural state in Sfântu Gheorghe village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORUNCIA Alina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of cultural patrimony regarding the rural landscape in Danube Delta's localities focus on cultural landscape that reflects traditional lifestyle of local people, activities that confer sustainable use of natural resources, all these aspects creating visual elements for rural landscape. For this research, traditionalarchitecture represents the main assumption in order to identify and preserve traditional architecture line, generally in Danube Delta localities and especially in Sfântu Gheorghe village. Field research enabled us to distinguish favourable and restrictive factors that leaded to the architectural transformation in Sfântu Gheorghe village, and also to know in what measures the traditional architecture is preserved.

  12. A Rhetorical Analysis of Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Pynt

    2011-01-01

    The award-winning TV spot Village is a creative example of NGO advertising using condensed visual stprytelling. The spot is analysed using rhetorical concepts and communication theory, and potential effects are discused in relation to contexts, strategy and communication ethics.......The award-winning TV spot Village is a creative example of NGO advertising using condensed visual stprytelling. The spot is analysed using rhetorical concepts and communication theory, and potential effects are discused in relation to contexts, strategy and communication ethics....

  13. Generating power at high efficiency combined cycle technology for sustainable energy production

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffs, E

    2008-01-01

    Combined cycle technology is used to generate power at one of the highest levels of efficiency of conventional power plants. It does this through primary generation from a gas turbine coupled with secondary generation from a steam turbine powered by primary exhaust heat. Generating power at high efficiency thoroughly charts the development and implementation of this technology in power plants and looks to the future of the technology, noting the advantages of the most important technical features - including gas turbines, steam generator, combined heat and power and integrated gasification com

  14. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting: A Green and Clean Alternative for Sustained Power Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Chennault, Kimberly Ann; Thambi, Nithya; Bitetto, Mary Anne; Hameyie, E. B.

    2008-01-01

    Providing efficient and clean power is a challenge for devices that range from the micro to macro in scale. Although there has been significant progress in the development of micro-, meso-, and macro-scale power supplies and technologies, realization of many devices is limited by the inability of power supplies to scale with the diminishing sizes…

  15. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in the Energy Sector: A Perspective from a Brazilian Power Utility Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira Brasil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The key question in this article consists of identifying the conditions under which the social projects developed by the firm Alpha are really promoting the sustainable development in the state of Ceará, located in Northeast Brazil. The general goal is to discuss if the firm’s social projects are related to the sustainable corporate entrepreneurship (SCE. This paper intends to stimulate the scientific community to advance knowledge on entrepreneurial, innovation and sustainability. This case study focuses on four Alpha’s projects: Ecological Initiative, Efficient Exchange, Social Energy, and School of Efficient Paths. The thematic content’s analysis methodology was used in this article. The documental research served as primary data source and helped to better elucidate the studied object. The researcher obtained 12 questionnaires answered. It was found an agreement of respondents to the categories: values, transparency and governance, workforce, environment, suppliers, consumers and customers and community. For the theme government and society, the results showed a disagreement with the category and for the last theme, innovation, the respondents are indifferent. After lexical analysis of data the results confirm in accordance with state of art of literature the existence of triple bottom line in the social projects of Alpha, by the categories resulted (profit, planet, people from content’s analysis of open questions. Alpha is a strong example of social commitment with poverty and environment. In conclusion, the research confirms that the firm promotes sustainable entrepreneurship and innovativeness leading to sustainable development.

  16. Self-sustaining emergency power supply for the nuclear power plant Beznau. Project AUTANOVE; Autarke Notstrom-Versorgung fuer das Kernkraftwerk Beznau (KKB). Projekt AUTANOVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeser, Roland [Axpro AG - Kernenergie, Beznau (Switzerland). Kernkraftwerk Beznau

    2010-05-15

    The NPP Beznau is sited close to the Aare with sufficient cooling water supply so that no cooling tower is necessary. The author describes the project AUTANOVE, an self-sustaining emergency power supply for the NPP Beznau, including an evaluation of the reliability for the accidental situations fire and internal flooding, external flooding and low-water, air plane crash and safety earthquake. The new system includes two new seismic qualified, physically separated emergency diesel generators, for each unit. Deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses show further increase of the already high safety level.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Power Uprate Research and Development Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongbin Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The economic incentives for low-cost electricity generation will continue to drive more plant owners to identify safe and reliable methods to increase the electrical power output of the current nuclear power plant fleet. A power uprate enables a nuclear power plant to increase its electrical output with low cost. However, power uprates brought new challenges to plant owners and operators. These include equipment damage or degraded performance, and unanticipated responses to plant conditions, etc. These problems have arisen mainly from using dated design and safety analysis tools and insufficient understanding of the full implications of the proposed power uprate or from insufficient attention to detail during the design and implementation phase. It is essential to demonstrate that all required safety margins have been properly retained and the existing safety level has been maintained or even increased, with consideration of all the conditions and parameters that have an influence on plant safety. The impact of the power uprate on plant life management for long term operation is also an important issue. Significant capital investments are required to extend the lifetime of an aging nuclear power plant. Power uprates can help the plant owner to recover the investment costs. However, plant aging issues may be aggravated by the power uprate due to plant conditions. More rigorous analyses, inspections and monitoring systems are required.

  18. Sustainable power production in a membrane-less and mediator-less synthetic wastewater microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrovandi, Aba; Marsili, Enrico; Stante, Loredana; Paganin, Patrizia; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Giordano, Andrea

    2009-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) fed with wastewater are currently considered a feasible strategy for production of renewable electricity. A membrane-less MFC with biological cathode was built from a compact wastewater treatment reactor and fed with synthetic wastewater. When operated with an external resistance of 250 Omega, the MFC produced a long-term power of about 70 mW/m(2) for 10 months. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the cathode biomass when the MFC was closed on a 2100 Omega external resistance showed that the sequenced bands were affiliated with Firmicutes, alpha-Proteobacteria,beta-Proteobacteria, gamma-Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes groups. When the external resistance was varied between 250 and 2100 Omega, minimum sustainable resistance decreased from 900 to 750 Omega, while maximum sustainable power output decreased from 32 to 28 mW/m(2). It is likely that these effects were caused by changes in the microbial ecology of anodic and cathodic biomass attached to the electrodes. Results suggest that cathodic biomass enrichment in "electroactive" bacteria may improve MFCs power output in a similar fashion to what has been already observed for anodic biomass.

  19. Sustainable energy recovery in wastewater treatment by microbial fuel cells: stable power generation with nitrogen-doped graphene cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Chuan; Hou, Shuang-Xia; Yang, Nuan

    2013-12-03

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) recover energy sustainably in wastewater treatment. Performance of non-noble cathode catalysts with low cost in neutral medium is vital for stable power generation. Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) as cathode catalyst was observed to exhibit high and durable activity at buffered pH 7.0 during electrochemical measurements and in MFCs with respect to Pt/C counterpart. Electrochemical measurements showed that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on NG possessed sustained activity close to the state-of-art Pt/C in terms of onset potential and electron transfer number. NG-MFCs displayed maximum voltage output of 650 mV and maximum power density of 776 ± 12 mW m(-2), larger than 610 mV and 750 ± 19 mW m(-2) of Pt/C-MFCs, respectively. Furthermore, long-time test lasted over 90 days, during which the maximum power density of NG-MFCs declined by 7.6%, with stability comparable to Pt/C-MFCs. Structure characterization of NG implied that the relatively concentrated acidic oxygen-containing groups improved such long-time stability by repelling the protons due to the same electrostatic force, and thus the C-N active centers for ORR were left undestroyed. These findings demonstrated the competitive advantage of NG to advance the application of MFCs for recovering biomass energy in treatment of wastewater with neutral pH.

  20. Governing "Eco-Certified Children" through Pastoral Power: Critical Perspectives on Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses how "eco-certified children" are constructed as desirable subjects in teaching materials addressing education for sustainable development. We are interested in how discourses structure this cherished practice and how this practice has become "natural" and obvious for us. A discourse analysis is carried out…

  1. The Struggle to Survive: The Power of Partnerships in the Quest for Nonprofit Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Besel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides information about a Youth Service Bureau’s (YSB experience in collaborating with court officials to expand services and a subsequent funding base. YSBs, like many other nonprofit human service agencies, have found that partnering with local governmental officials, especially judges, can enhance sustainability. Implications for strengthening partnerships between local nonprofits and county judges are discussed.

  2. The Power of One: The Impact of Family and Consumer Sciences Education on Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    The issues related to environmental sustainability can be overwhelming. It is difficult to imagine that actions of one person could make a difference. This article addresses that perception and illustrates the impact of one person, a family and consumer sciences educator, on the lives of others and on environmental resources. Making a difference…

  3. Shared Services: A Powerful Strategy to Support Sustainability of ECE Businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Louise

    2009-01-01

    As Co-Founder of the Alliance for Early Childhood Finance, it is the author's job to think about how they pay for early care and education (ECE) services in the United States. Generating the operating revenue needed to establish and sustain a high-quality ECE program has never been easy--and in a recession economy it is becoming even more…

  4. Sustainability in Oceans Governance : Small Islands, Emerging Powers, and Connecting Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larik, J.E.; Singh, A.

    2017-01-01

    As evidenced by Goal No. 14 of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, the importance of oceans governance as a matter of global policy can hardly be overstated. The unsustainable uses of their resources could lead to serious consequences, not only for coastal communities, but remote landlocked

  5. Tackling malaria, village by village: a report on a concerted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Can an information intervention facilitated by information technology and carried out by an interdisciplinary ... In Mifumi village in Eastern Uganda, MIFUMI Project, Makerere University College of Health Sciences Community Based ... insecticide treated nets (ITNs) using a digital pen application.

  6. Analysis and Optimization of Power Supply Structure Based on Markov Chain and Error Optimization for Renewable Energy from the Perspective of Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomin Xu; Dongxiao Niu; Jinpeng Qiu; Peng Wang; Yanchao Chen

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of renewable energy, power supply structure is changing. However, thermal power is still dominant. With the background in low carbon economy, reasonable adjustment and optimization of the power supply structure is the trend of future development in the power industry. It is also a reliable guarantee of a fast, healthy and stable development of national economy. In this paper, the sustainable development of renewable energy sources is analyzed from the perspective of...

  7. Probabilistic stability analysis: the way forward for stability analysis of sustainable power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Jovica V

    2017-08-13

    Future power systems will be significantly different compared with their present states. They will be characterized by an unprecedented mix of a wide range of electricity generation and transmission technologies, as well as responsive and highly flexible demand and storage devices with significant temporal and spatial uncertainty. The importance of probabilistic approaches towards power system stability analysis, as a subsection of power system studies routinely carried out by power system operators, has been highlighted in previous research. However, it may not be feasible (or even possible) to accurately model all of the uncertainties that exist within a power system. This paper describes for the first time an integral approach to probabilistic stability analysis of power systems, including small and large angular stability and frequency stability. It provides guidance for handling uncertainties in power system stability studies and some illustrative examples of the most recent results of probabilistic stability analysis of uncertain power systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Transmission expansion planning under increased uncertainties, towards efficient and sustainable power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciupuliga, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing liberalization process around the world has led to the emergence of energy markets, facilitating more international trade between countries making the best use of energy resources and optimizing overall power systems. Consequently, inter-area power exchanges have significantly increased

  9. Sustainable energy management in industry of Republic of Serbia: Biogas power plants advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golušin Mirjan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the specifics of energy policy in Serbia on the example of designing a biogas power plant. The biogas power plant is designed in accordance with the existing energy policy that recognizes producers of energy from renewable sources as This paper reviews the previously performed analysis in the sphere of energy consumption, which served as the basis for creating a new corporate energy policy. The paper presents an analysis of biogas power plant output (electrical and thermal energy, potential prices on the market, that are consistent with the incentives of energy policy of Serbia. In addition, special emphasis is given to the revenues that a biogas power plant realizes by using mechanism of energy policy, which promotes gaining revenues by reducing pollution of the atmosphere. The authors also show the procedure, costs and expected effects for the qualification of this power plant project (CDM project categories.

  10. Forty candles for the Rance River TPP tides provide renewable and sustainable power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, Roger H. [Free University of Brussels (V.U.B.), Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    Prices of oil and other fossil fuels have proven a powerful incentive for the alternative energy hunters. The alternatives include the various forms of ocean energy that, often considered uneconomical for electricity generation, have become attractive and competitive. Many sites throughout the world have been considered, at one time or another, suitable for implantation of a tidal power station, but very few have witnessed implementation of often ambitious plans. The Rance River tidal power plant, near St Malo in Brittany (France) is an exception. It is celebrating in 2006, 40 years of durable, loyal and productive service. (author)

  11. Sustainable Low-Carbon Expansion for the Power Sector of an Emerging Economy: The Case of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Juan-Pablo; Shaw, Brittany J; Avila, Nkiruka I; Kammen, Daniel M

    2017-09-05

    Fast growing and emerging economies face the dual challenge of sustainably expanding and improving their energy supply and reliability while at the same time reducing poverty. Critical to such transformation is to provide affordable and sustainable access to electricity. We use the capacity expansion model SWITCH to explore low carbon development pathways for the Kenyan power sector under a set of plausible scenarios for fast growing economies that include uncertainty in load projections, capital costs, operational performance, and technology and environmental policies. In addition to an aggressive and needed expansion of overall supply, the Kenyan power system presents a unique transition from one basal renewable resource-hydropower-to another based on geothermal and wind power for ∼90% of total capacity. We find geothermal resource adoption is more sensitive to operational degradation than high capital costs, which suggests an emphasis on ongoing maintenance subsidies rather than upfront capital cost subsidies. We also find that a cost-effective and viable suite of solutions includes availability of storage, diesel engines, and transmission expansion to provide flexibility to enable up to 50% of wind power penetration. In an already low-carbon system, typical externality pricing for CO 2 has little to no effect on technology choice. Consequently, a "zero carbon emissions" by 2030 scenario is possible with only moderate levelized cost increases of between $3 and $7/MWh with a number of social and reliability benefits. Our results suggest that fast growing and emerging economies could benefit by incentivizing anticipated strategic transmission expansion. Existing and new diesel and natural gas capacity can play an important role to provide flexibility and meet peak demand in specific hours without a significant increase in carbon emissions, although more research is required for other pollutant's impacts.

  12. The economics of hybrid power systems for sustainable desert agriculture in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamel, S.M.; Dahl, C.

    2005-01-01

    priority. This heavy reliance on diesel generation has negative effects on the surrounding environment including soil, groundwater, and air pollution. Although good solar and wind resource prospects exist for the use of cleaner hybrid power systems in certain desert locations, little research has been done...... to investigate the economic potential of such systems in Egypt’s desert agriculture sector. Using optimization software, we assess the economics of hybrid power systems versus the present diesel generation technology in a remote agricultural development area. We also consider the emission reduction advantages......Egypt has embarked on an ambitious desert land reclamation program in order to increase total food production. Energy planners for these desert agriculture locations have chosen diesel generation power technology because minimization of the initial capital cost of a power supply system is their top...

  13. Combined Heat and Power Systems for the Provision of Sustainable Energy from Biomass in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortwein Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of greenhouse gases causing climate change, combined heat and power (CHP systems fueled by biomass can efficiently supply energy with high flexibility. Such CHP systems will usually consist of one or more thermo-chemical conversion steps and at least one (the more or less separated electric power generation unit. Depending on the main products of the previous conversion steps (e.g. combustible gases or liquids, but also flue gases with sensible heat, different technologies are available for the final power conversion step. This includes steam cycles with steam turbines or engines and different working fluids (water, organic fluids, but also combustion based systems like gas turbines or gas engines. Further promising technologies include fuel cells with high electric efficiency. When integrating such CHP systems in buildings, there are different strategies, especially concerning electric power generation. While some concepts are focusing on base load production, others are regulated either by thermal or by electric power demand. The paper will give a systematic overview on the combination of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass and combined heat and power production technologies. The mentioned building integration strategies will be discussed, leading to conclusions for further research and development in that field.

  14. SOCIO-POLITICAL DYNAMICS TAKING PLACE AT KUTA TRADITIONAL VILLAGE, BALI: FROM DESA ADAT (TRADITIONAL VILLAGE TO DESA PEKRAMAN (ANOTHER TYPE OF TRADITIONAL VILLAGE IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF CULTURAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Wesna Astara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the socio-political dynamics taking place at KutaTraditional Village, Bali: from desa adat (traditional village to desa pekraman (anothertype of traditional village in the perspective of cultural studies. There are three problemsformulated in this research. The first problem is how the socio-political dynamics fromdesa adat (traditional village to desa pekraman (another type of traditional village tookplace at Kuta? The next problem is how the traditional village interacted with theadministrative village at Kuta? And the last problem, which is the third, is what were theimpacts and meanings of the change from desa adat to desa pekraman? In this studyqualitative method was employed. And the data needed was obtained by employing thetechnique of in-depth interview, the technique of participatory observation, anddocumentation study. To give responses to the problems mentioned above, the theory ofhegemony, the theory of deconstruction, the theory of conflict, the theory of power andknowledge and the theory of eclectically symbolic interaction were applied.The findings show that the socio-political dynamics taking place Kuta TraditionalVillage resulted in turbulence among the villagers. This is indicated by the Local Rulesand Regulations (Perda issued by Desa Pekraman of Number 3 of Year 2001. Thiscould be responsible for the factors of pro’s and con’s in various aspects. Clause (6 ofArticle 3 of the Perda of Number 3 of Year 2001 was reversed by the leaders of KutaTraditional Village. They did not agree that non-Hindu people were included as thetraditional village members.As far as the interaction between the traditional village and the administrativevillage is concerned, the governmental hegemony took place. The government appliedhegemony to the traditional village through the administrative village in the form of rulesand regulations. The local rules and regulations issued by the desa pekraman, as a legalproduct in Bali

  15. Ending ethnic conflict : can power sharing contribute to sustained peace in Burundi?

    OpenAIRE

    Lothe, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Power sharing institutions are currently being established to end war and lay the foundations for peace and democracy in a number of states emerging from civil war, such as Burundi, Rwanda, Sudan and Côte d’Ivoire. While a number of authors have contributed to develop theory on power sharing and have drawn attention to the strengths and weaknesses of such systems of governance (Lijphart, 1990; Lake and Rotchild, 1996; Snyder and Jervis, 1999; Paris, 2004 etc.), little empirical evidence has b...

  16. Virtual Power Plants of Electric Vehicles in Sustainable Smart Electricity Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Kahlen (Micha)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe batteries of electric vehicles can be used as Virtual Power Plants to balance out frequency deviations in the electricity grid. Carsharing fleet owners have the options to charge an electric vehicle's battery, discharge an electric vehicle's battery, or keep an electric vehicle

  17. The power of research in finance to enhance sustainability – Applied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the following story on the power of research in finance unfolds, let me tell you that it is based on true experiences and strategic analysis. Final conclusions are based on my own evaluation. But let me introduce myself. I am originally from Austria, but currently live and work in Tallinn, Estonia. I am Finance. Manager at ...

  18. Life under the source : Sustainable housing using low-voltage DC power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedeman, M.; Van Timmeren, A.; Boelman, E.; Schoonman, J.; Van der Graaf, A.

    2003-01-01

    Emergency phone systems, yachts, and caravans increasingly use solar panels to generate the energy they require to operate. The Dutch government offers generous grant schemes for solar panels on houses and offices. Solar energy is the power of the future. There is however a slight drawback because

  19. Entrepreneurship in tourism on the example of good practice: Ethno villages Latkovac in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has become a generator of economic development in many countries of the world. Serbia is becoming increasingly requested destination on the tourist map of Europe. The aim of this paper is to show on the example of a good business practice - Ethno village Latkovac, that entrepreneurship in tourism Serbia should be based on the concept of economic, sociological and social sustainable development with achieving the full satisfaction of the consumers - tourists. The subject of the paper is original and diverse content offers as an example of creative entrepreneurship that has helped to accelerate the development of the local villages. Method of the work - Case Study 'Ethno Village Latkovac'.

  20. Village microgrids: The Chile project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a village application in Chile. The objective was to demonstrate the technical, economic and institutional viability of renewable energy for rural electrification, as well as to allow local partners to gain experience with hybrid/renewable technology, resource assessment, system siting and operation. A micro-grid system is viewed as a small village system, up to 1200 kWh/day load with a 50 kW peak load. It can consist of components of wind, photovoltaic, batteries, and conventional generators. It is usually associated with a single generator source, and uses batteries to cover light day time loads. This paper looks at the experiences learned from this project with regard to all of the facets of planning and installing this project.

  1. Coupling the Leidenfrost effect and elastic deformations to power sustained bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitukaitis, Scott R.; Zuiderwijk, Antal; Souslov, Anton; Coulais, Corentin; van Hecke, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The Leidenfrost effect occurs when an object near a hot surface vaporizes rapidly enough to lift itself up and hover. Although well understood for liquids and stiff sublimable solids, nothing is known about the effect with materials whose stiffness lies between these extremes. Here we introduce a new phenomenon that occurs with vaporizable soft solids--the elastic Leidenfrost effect. By dropping hydrogel spheres onto hot surfaces we find that, rather than hovering, they energetically bounce several times their diameter for minutes at a time. With high-speed video during a single impact, we uncover high-frequency microscopic gap dynamics at the sphere/substrate interface. We show how these otherwise-hidden agitations constitute work cycles that harvest mechanical energy from the vapour and sustain the bouncing. Our findings suggest a new strategy for injecting mechanical energy into a widely used class of soft materials, with potential relevance to fields such as active matter, soft robotics and microfluidics.

  2. The Power of Micro Urban Structures, Theory of EEPGC - the Micro Urban Energy Distribution Model as a Planning Tool for Sustainable City Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkáč Štefan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the smart growth and equitable development in the region, urban planners should consider also lateral energies represented by the energy urban models like further proposed EEPGC focused on energy distribution via connections among micro-urban structures, their onsite renewable resources and the perception of micro-urban structures as decentralized energy carriers based on pre industrialized era. These structures are still variously bound when part of greater patterns. After the industrial revolution the main traded goods became energy in its various forms. The EEPGC is focused on sustainable energy transportation distances between the villages and the city, described by the virtual “energy circles”. This more human scale urbanization, boost the economy in micro-urban areas, rising along with clean energy available in situ that surely gives a different perspective to human quality of life in contrast to overcrowded multicultural mega-urban structures facing generations of problems and struggling to survive as a whole.

  3. Dimensions of Community and Local Institutions’ Support: Towards an Eco-Village Kelurahan in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nany Yuliastuti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the Global Eco-village Network (GEN is to create and promote sustainable human settlements that allow people to live more comfortably. However, an eco-village cannot exist without the support of the local government and the community. A village (kelurahan is expected to recognize and implement a settlement’s environmental management by maintaining environmentally friendly behavior in daily activities. Gayamsari is a kelurahan in Semarang City that has been implementing the eco-village concept. This study aims to explain, through quantitative descriptive analysis, the extent at which the eco-village aspects are achieved by local and institutional participation in Gayamsari. The idea of an eco-village is to bring harmony to the three pillars of sustainable development—the social, economic, and ecological components—to create a sustainable living environment. However, the results show that Gayamsari needs improvement, especially in terms of ensuring a safe and comfortable environment, which can be achieved through strengthening the participation of both the community and local institutions.

  4. New Energy Villages in Taiwan and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. S.; Wang, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan locates in the active tectonic subdution and collision belts, therefore, the geothermal gradient is very high and have found 128 sites of high geothermal areas; 20% of them have the temperature between 75 - 200 degree C in which they can be directly used for the electricity generation; 50% of them are in 50 - 74 degree C and the rest 30% are below 50 degree C. These areas need the deep drillings to get into higher temperature for power energy. The first 20% high temperature areas are mostly located in the coastal or mountain regions. The government is interesting to develop these areas as the "New Energy Villages" so that they can not only become self-energy sufficient sites, but also to protect themself from being the loss of electricity and water during the typhoon and earthquake hazards. The multiple usages of hot water (such as the first power generation and then the hot spring utilization) have its merits. China, in the other hand, is not within the present-day active tectonic zone. However, the recent Sino Probe Experiments (Deep Exploration in China) have mapped the Cetaceous plate boundaries in the coast of China. The heat is still possibly migrating to near the surface through the existing structures. For example, the Feng Shun Geothermal Power Station in north of Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, used the 96 degree C hot water from a well of 800 m producing a small amount of 300 KW power since 1984. The Guangdong Province is located in the edge of Mesozoic South China Plate. Further in land, the Huang Mountain, one of the world heritage sites, is located at the boundary of another Mesozoic Yangtze River Plate. There is not a geothermal power plant; however, a number of hot springs are in a booming tour business at the foot hill of the mountain. The electricity has to come from a long way of net working. If China develops the local, small, but sufficient power plants by using the modern geothermal exploration and drilling techniques. The "New Energy

  5. Wireless Sensor Network Powered by a Terrestrial Microbial Fuel Cell as a Sustainable Land Monitoring Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pietrelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at investigating the possibility of a wireless sensor network powered by an energy harvesting technology, such as a microbial fuel cell (MFC. An MFC is a bioreactor that transforms energy stored in chemical bonds of organic compounds into electrical energy. This process takes place through catalytic reactions of microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. An anode chamber together with a cathode chamber composes a conventional MFC reactor. The protons generated in the anode chamber are then transferred into the cathode chamber through a proton exchange membrane (PEM. A possible option is to use the soil itself as the membrane. In this case, we are referring to, more properly, a terrestrial microbial fuel cell (TMFC. This research examines the sustainability of a wireless sensor network powered by TMFC for land monitoring and precision agriculture. Acting on several factors, such as pH, temperature, humidity and type of soil used, we obtained minimum performance requirements in terms of the output power of the TMFC. In order to identify some of the different network node configurations and to compare the resulting performance, we investigated the energy consumption of the core components of a node, e.g., the transceiver and microcontroller, looking for the best performance.

  6. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  7. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  8. Engineered and Laser-Processed Chitosan Biopolymers for Sustainable and Biodegradable Triboelectric Power Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoxing; Gao, Shengjie; Yang, Zhen; Li, Yule; Chen, Weinong; Wu, Benxin; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2018-01-19

    Recent advances achieved in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) focus on boosting power generation and conversion efficiency. Nevertheless, obstacles concerning economical and biocompatible utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being an abundant natural biopolymer from marine crustacean shells, chitosan enables exciting opportunities for low-cost, biodegradable TENG applications in related fields. Here, the development of biodegradable and flexible TENGs based on chitosan is presented for the first time. The physical and chemical properties of the chitosan nanocomposites are systematically studied and engineered for optimized triboelectric power generation, transforming the otherwise wasted natural materials into functional energy devices. The feasibility of laser processing of constituent materials is further explored for the first time for engineering the TENG performance. The laser treatment of biopolymer films offers a potentially promising scheme for surface engineering in polymer-based TENGs. The chitosan-based TENGs present efficient energy conversion performance and tunable biodegradation rate. Such a new class of TENGs derived from natural biomaterials may pave the way toward the economically viable and ecologically friendly production of flexible TENGs for self-powered nanosystems in biomedical and environmental applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Jesus the village psychiatrist: A summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Capps

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper was a response to a panel discussion on the author’s book, Jesus the village psychiatrist, published by Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville, KY, 2008 which formed part of the Society of Biblical Literature’s Psychology and Biblical Studies Section, 21–24 November 2009, New Orleans, LA. The response consisted of an explanation of somatoform disorders, a summary of the book and the following case studies: the case of Fraulein Elisabeth, the case of paralytics, the case of blind persons, the demon-possessed boy, the case of the woman with a haemorrhage, the healings of lepers and the woman who cared for Jesus. The paper concluded with a discussion on words and their power to cure. It illustrated how symptomatology had changed from paralysis in the 19th century to chronic fatigue in the first half of the 20th century to stress today.

  10. Coalmines as Underground Pumped Storage Power Plants (UPP) - A Contribution to a Sustainable Energy Supply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luick, H.; Niemann, A.; Perau, E.; Schreiber, U.

    2012-04-01

    In Europe, electrical power generation from renewable energy sources rose by about 50% in the last 20 years. In Germany, renewable electricity is mainly provided by wind power and photovoltaic. Energy output depends on weather conditions like wind speed or solar radiation and may therefore vary considerably. Rapid fluctuations in power generation already require regulation of conventional power plants by the distribution network operators to stabilize and ensure grid frequency and overall system stability. In order to avoid future blackouts caused by intermittent energy sources, it is necessary to increase the storage capacity for electric power. Theoretically, there are many technologies for storing energy, like accumulators, hydrogen storage systems, biomethane facilities (hydrocarbon synthesis) or compressed air storage. Only a few technologies combine sufficient capacity, fast response, high efficiency, low storage loss and long-term application experience. A pumped storage power plant (PSPP) is a state of the art technology which combines all of these aspects. Energy is stored in form of potential energy by pumping water to an upper reservoir in times of energy surplus or low energy costs. In times of insufficient power supply or high energy costs, the water is released through turbines to produce electric energy. The efficiency of state-of-the-art systems is about 70-80%. The total head (geodetic height between upper and lower reservoirs) and the storage capacity of the reservoirs as given in a mountainous terrain, determine the energy storage capacity of a PSPP. An alternative is the use of man-made geodetic height differences as given in ore, coal or open cast lignite mines. In these cases, the lower reservoir of the plant is located in the drifts or at the bottom of the mine. Energieforschungszentrum Niedersachsen (EFZN) has already explored the installation of a PSPP in abandoned ore mines in the Harz-region/Germany (Beck 2011). In 2011/2012 a basic

  11. Energy storage in remote area power supply (RAPS) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Patrick T.

    Preliminary cost analyses indicate that hybrid RAPS systems are more economically attractive as a means to provide electricity to remote villages than are alternatives such as 24 h diesel generation. A hybrid remote area power supply (RAPS) system is being deployed to provide 24 h electricity to villages in the Amazon region of Peru. The RAPS system consists of modules designed to provide 150 kWh per day of utility grade ac electricity over a 24 h period. Each module contains a diesel generator, battery bank using heavy-duty 2 V VRLA gelled electrolyte batteries, a battery charger, a photovoltaic array and an inverter. Despite early difficulties, the system in the first village has now commenced operation and the promise of RAPS schemes as a means for providing sustainable remote electrification appears to be bright.

  12. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Purnomo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial resources of the village that are sourced from a country or a Regional Finance Financial based Law Number 6 Year 2014 of The Village is the mandate of the law that must be allocated to the village. The interconnectedness of the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or Region concerned the Financial administrative and territorial relations, and there is no setting directly regarding the finances of the village as part of the financial system of the country or the financial area. In respect of the elements of the crime of corruption deeds against financial irregularities of the village there are still disagreements on the interpretation of the law in trapping the perpetrators of corruption on the village chief that implies not satisfy the principle of legality and legal certainty in the ruling of the matter of financial irregularities. In fact, many of the village chief or Councilor caught the criminal offence of corruption over the use of financial irregularities. This research analyzes How the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or region, as well as whether the financial resources of the village is derived from the state budget or region budget managed in village budget belongs to the category of village finances and whether tort against the financial management of the village can be categorized as a criminal act corruption. How To Cite: Purnomo, H. (2015. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System. Rechtsidee, 2(2, 121-140. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v2i2.81

  13. Thin-film composite pressure retarded osmosis membranes for sustainable power generation from salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Tiraferri, Alberto; Phillip, William A; Schiffman, Jessica D; Hoover, Laura A; Kim, Yu Chang; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-05-15

    Pressure retarded osmosis has the potential to produce renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. This work presents the fabrication of thin-film composite membranes customized for high performance in pressure retarded osmosis. We also present the development of a theoretical model to predict the water flux in pressure retarded osmosis, from which we can predict the power density that can be achieved by a membrane. The model is the first to incorporate external concentration polarization, a performance limiting phenomenon that becomes significant for high-performance membranes. The fabricated membranes consist of a selective polyamide layer formed by interfacial polymerization on top of a polysulfone support layer made by phase separation. The highly porous support layer (structural parameter S = 349 μm), which minimizes internal concentration polarization, allows the transport properties of the active layer to be customized to enhance PRO performance. It is shown that a hand-cast membrane that balances permeability and selectivity (A = 5.81 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), B = 0.88 L m(-2) h(-1)) is projected to achieve the highest potential peak power density of 10.0 W/m(2) for a river water feed solution and seawater draw solution. The outstanding performance of this membrane is attributed to the high water permeability of the active layer, coupled with a moderate salt permeability and the ability of the support layer to suppress the undesirable accumulation of leaked salt in the porous support. Membranes with greater selectivity (i.e., lower salt permeability, B = 0.16 L m(-2) h(-1)) suffered from a lower water permeability (A = 1.74 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1)) and would yield a lower peak power density of 6.1 W/m(2), while membranes with a higher permeability and lower selectivity (A = 7.55 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), B = 5.45 L m(-2) h(-1)) performed poorly due to severe reverse salt permeation, resulting in a similar projected peak power density of 6.1 W/m(2).

  14. Thin-Film Composite Pressure Retarded Osmosis Membranes for Sustainable Power Generation from Salinity Gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Yip, Ngai Yin

    2011-05-15

    Pressure retarded osmosis has the potential to produce renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. This work presents the fabrication of thin-film composite membranes customized for high performance in pressure retarded osmosis. We also present the development of a theoretical model to predict the water flux in pressure retarded osmosis, from which we can predict the power density that can be achieved by a membrane. The model is the first to incorporate external concentration polarization, a performance limiting phenomenon that becomes significant for high-performance membranes. The fabricated membranes consist of a selective polyamide layer formed by interfacial polymerization on top of a polysulfone support layer made by phase separation. The highly porous support layer (structural parameter S = 349 μm), which minimizes internal concentration polarization, allows the transport properties of the active layer to be customized to enhance PRO performance. It is shown that a hand-cast membrane that balances permeability and selectivity (A = 5.81 L m-2 h-1 bar-1, B = 0.88 L m-2 h-1) is projected to achieve the highest potential peak power density of 10.0 W/m2 for a river water feed solution and seawater draw solution. The outstanding performance of this membrane is attributed to the high water permeability of the active layer, coupled with a moderate salt permeability and the ability of the support layer to suppress the undesirable accumulation of leaked salt in the porous support. Membranes with greater selectivity (i.e., lower salt permeability, B = 0.16 L m-2 h-1) suffered from a lower water permeability (A = 1.74 L m-2 h-1 bar-1) and would yield a lower peak power density of 6.1 W/m2, while membranes with a higher permeability and lower selectivity (A = 7.55 L m-2 h-1 bar-1, B = 5.45 L m-2 h-1) performed poorly due to severe reverse salt permeation, resulting in a similar projected peak power density of 6.1 W/m2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Power to the poor: sustainable energy at the base of the pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarsky, Lyuba [Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA (United States); Wilson, Emma

    2009-11-15

    Four billion people – over half of humanity – live on less than US$2 a day, effectively forming the bottom of the world economic pyramid. This majority may have minimal access to cash but they need, and will pay for, essential goods and services – including energy. 'The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid,' a 2002 article, argues that if global corporations target this 4 billion, they can reduce poverty and make profit. That the private sector is already playing a key role in meeting development challenges, such as energy poverty, is increasingly recognised. 'Inclusive' and 'shared value' business approaches have begun to multiply. International energy companies, including hydrocarbon and renewable energy producers, can (and do) facilitate local access to energy in poorer regions of the world. To reach the poorest and to effectively contribute to sustainable local development in the long term, however, standard business models need to be modified, and alliances forged with government, local enterprises, donors and NGOs. Smaller local firms are often the ones that reach the poor more effectively. They just need the right support.

  16. The power of competition: Effects of social motivation on attention, sustained physical effort, and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMenichi, Brynne C; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Competition has often been implicated as a means to improve effort-based learning and attention. Two experiments examined the effects of competition on effort and memory. In Experiment 1, participants completed a physical effort task in which they were rewarded for winning an overall percentage, or for winning a competition they believed was against another player. In Experiment 2, participants completed a memory task in which they were rewarded for remembering an overall percentage of shapes, or more shapes than a "competitor." We found that, in the physical effort task, participants demonstrated faster reaction times (RTs)-a previous indicator of increased attention-in the competitive environment. Moreover, individual differences predicted the salience of competition's effect. Furthermore, male participants showed faster RTs and greater sustained effort as a result of a competitive environment, suggesting that males may be more affected by competition in physical effort tasks. However, in Experiment 2, participants remembered fewer shapes when competing, and later recalled less of these shapes during a post-test, suggesting that competition was harmful in our memory task. The different results from these two experiments suggest that competition can improve attention in a physical effort task, yet caution the use of competition in memory tasks.

  17. The power of competition: Effects of social motivation on attention, sustained physical effort, and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMenichi, Brynne C.; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Competition has often been implicated as a means to improve effort-based learning and attention. Two experiments examined the effects of competition on effort and memory. In Experiment 1, participants completed a physical effort task in which they were rewarded for winning an overall percentage, or for winning a competition they believed was against another player. In Experiment 2, participants completed a memory task in which they were rewarded for remembering an overall percentage of shapes, or more shapes than a “competitor.” We found that, in the physical effort task, participants demonstrated faster reaction times (RTs)—a previous indicator of increased attention—in the competitive environment. Moreover, individual differences predicted the salience of competition’s effect. Furthermore, male participants showed faster RTs and greater sustained effort as a result of a competitive environment, suggesting that males may be more affected by competition in physical effort tasks. However, in Experiment 2, participants remembered fewer shapes when competing, and later recalled less of these shapes during a post-test, suggesting that competition was harmful in our memory task. The different results from these two experiments suggest that competition can improve attention in a physical effort task, yet caution the use of competition in memory tasks. PMID:26388801

  18. Sustainable power generation in microbial fuel cells using bicarbonate buffer and proton transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanzhen; Hu, Hongqiang; Liu, Hong

    2007-12-01

    Phosphate buffer solution has been commonly used in MFC studiesto maintain a suitable pH for electricity-generating bacteria and/or to increase the solution conductivity. However, addition of a high concentration of phosphate buffer in MFCs could be expensive, especially for wastewater treatment. In this study, the performances of MFCs with cloth electrode assemblies (CEA) were evaluated using bicarbonate buffer solutions. A maximum power density of 1550 W/m3 (2770 mW/ m2) was obtained at a current density of 0.99 mA/cm2 using a pH 9 bicarbonate buffer solution. Such a power density was 38.6% higher than that using a pH 7 phosphate buffer at the same concentration of 0.2 M. Based on the quantitative comparison of free proton transfer rates, diffusion rates of pH buffer species, and the current generated, a facilitated proton transfer mechanism was proposed for MFCs in the presence of the pH buffers. The excellent performance of MFCs using bicarbonate as pH buffer and proton carrier indicates that bicarbonate buffer could be served as a low-cost and effective pH buffer for practical applications, especially for wastewater treatment.

  19. Contesting legitimacy of voluntary sustainability certification schemes: valuation languages and power asymmetries in the roundtable on sustainable palm oil in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin-Burgos, V.; Clancy, Joy S.; Lovett, Jonathan Cranidge

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary certification schemes aimed at assuring producer compliance with a set of sustainability criteria have emerged as market-based instruments (MBIs) of sustainability governance. However, the impacts they tackle can be part of a complex arena of socio-environmental conflict, where values and

  20. Thermal power transfer system using applied potential difference to sustain operating pressure difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep (Inventor); Fujita, Toshio (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermal power transfer system using a phase change liquid gas fluid in a closed loop configuration has a heat exchanger member connected to a gas conduit for inputting thermal energy into the fluid. The pressure in the gas conduit is higher than a liquid conduit that is connected to a heat exchanger member for outputting thermal energy. A solid electrolyte member acts as a barrier between the gas conduit and the liquid conduit adjacent to a solid electrolyte member. The solid electrolyte member has the capacity of transmitting ions of a fluid through the electrolyte member. The ions can be recombined with electrons with the assistance of a porous electrode. An electrical field is applied across the solid electrolyte member to force the ions of the fluid from a lower pressure liquid conduit to the higher pressure gas conduit.

  1. Green Power Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPCs are towns, villages, cities, counties, or tribal governments in which the local government, businesses, and residents collectively use green power in amounts that meet or exceed EPA's Green Power Community purchase requirements.

  2. Sustainable power generation from floating macrophytes based ecological microenvironment through embedded fuel cells along with simultaneous wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Mohanakrishna, G; Chiranjeevi, P

    2011-07-01

    Miniatured floating macrophyte based ecosystem (FME) designed with Eichornia as the major biota was evaluated for bioelectricity generation and wastewater treatment. Three fuel cell assemblies (non-catalyzed electrodes) embedded in FME were evaluated with domestic sewage and fermented distillery wastewater in continuous mode for 210 days. Fermented distillery effluents from biohydrogen production (dark-fermentation) process exhibited effective power generation with simultaneous waste remediation. Two fuel cell assemblies (A1 and A2) showed effective bioelectricity generation. Increasing the organic load of wastewater showed good correlation with both power generation (A1, 211.14 mA/m(2); A2, 224.93 mA/m(2)) and wastewater treatment (COD removal, 86.67% and VFA removal 72.32%). Combining A1 and A2 assemblies depicted stabilized performance with respect to current and voltage along with significant decrease in ohmic and activation losses. FME also exhibited effective removal of nitrates, colour and turbidity from wastewater. The studied miniatured ecological system facilitates both energy generation and wastewater treatment with a sustainable perspective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two energy storage alternatives for a solar-powered sustainable single floor desert home

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-09-30

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic analysis of a totally solarpowered desert home. The home is air-conditioned and provides all modern comforts and facilities. It features closely spaced, roof mounted photovoltaic modules, which collect the solar energy driving the whole energy system. During the day time, the modules form an elevated horizontal surface above the roof, shielding it from direct solar radiation. After sunset, the photovoltaic modules are flipped vertically upwards to expose the roof to the sky, thus enhancing night-time cooling. Two methods of energy storage are proposed and compared, one using solely battery storage of electrical output, and the other employing a combination of cold water storage and battery storage. The analysis is based on detailed dynamic heat transfer calculations for the entire building envelope, coupled with a solar radiation model, and followed by energy balances. The results reveal that indeed it is feasible to employ solar energy as the only source of energy to power the home, and that each storage system has its own merits and shortcomings. © 2010 WIT Press.

  4. Analyses of optimum generation scenarios for sustainable power generation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert K. Awopone

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines optimum generation scenarios for Ghana from 2010 to 2040. The Open Source Energy Modelling System (OSeMOSYS, an optimisation model for long term energy planning, which is integrated in Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP tool, was applied to model the generation system. The developed model was applied to the case study of the reference scenario (OPT which examines the least cost development of the system without any shift in policy. Three groups of policy scenario were developed based on the future possible energy policy direction in Ghana: energy emission targets, carbon taxes and transmission and distribution losses improvements. The model was then used to simulate the development of technologies in each scenario up to 2040 and the level of renewable generation examined. Finally, cost benefit analysis of the policy scenarios, as well as their greenhouse gas mitigation potential were also discussed. The results show that: suitable policies for clean power generation have an important role in CO2 mitigation in Ghana. The introduction of carbon minimisation policies will also promote diversification of the generation mix with higher penetration of renewable energy technologies, thus reducing the overall fossil fuel generation in Ghana. It further indicated that, significant greenhouse emissions savings is achieved with improvement in transmission and distribution losses.

  5. Enhanced power generation and wastewater treatment in sustainable biochar electrodes based bioelectrochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binwei; Wang, Zhifen; Jiang, Yong; Tan, Guangcai; Xu, Nan; Xu, Yang

    2017-10-01

    Corn-straw biochar (BC500 and BC900) and KOH modified biochar (BAC) were used as the electrode materials of bioelectrochemical system (BES). Compared to carbon felt (CF) electrodes BES, the maximum power density of BC500, BC900 and BAC anodes BES increased by 10.7%, 56.0% and 92.0%, and that of BC500, BC900 and BAC cathodes BES increased by 3.1, 5.2 and 4.8 times, respectively. The CF electrodes BES was optimized to decolor the AO7 simulated wastewater and 97% of AO7 was quickly degraded within 2h. When using biochar anodes, the decoloration rates were enhanced. The apparent rate constant (kapp) increased from 2.93h(-1) for CF anode BES to 3.58, 4.35 and 5.33h(-1) for BC500, BC900 and BAC anode system, respectively. AO7 could also be effectively decolored in biochar cathode systems, which was mainly due to adsorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Techno-Economic Investigation of Solar Powered Electric Auto-Rickshaw for a Sustainable Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Reddy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Technologies influencing alternative means of transportation have been expanding in recent years due to increasing urbanization and motorization. In this paper, a solar powered electric auto-rickshaw (SPEA is designed and developed for Indian conditions. The vehicle developed is comprehensively analyzed techno-economically for its viability in the Indian market. The performance analysis of SPEA results in an optimal charging rate of 2 kWh per day with an average solar irradiance of 325 W/m2 on a typical sunny day. The discharging characteristics are studied based on different loading conditions. The vehicle achieved a maximum speed of 21.69 km/h with battery discharge rate of 296 W at 90 kg load and also reached a maximum discharge rate of 540 W at 390 kg loading with a maximum speed of 12.11 km/h. Environmental analysis of SPEA indicated that the yearly CO2 emissions of 1777 kg, 1987 kg and 1938 kg from using Compressed Natural Gas, Liquefied Petroleum Gas and gasoline engines respectively can be mitigated using SPEA. The financial analysis of SPEA concluded that the investor’s payback duration is 24.44% less compared to a gasoline-run vehicle. Socio-Economic analysis of SPEA discussed its significant advantages and showed 15.74% and 0.85% increase in yearly income over gasoline driven and battery driven vehicles.

  7. Multi-Generation Concentrating Solar-Hydrogen Power System for Sustainable Rural Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krothapalli, A.; Greska, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes an energy system that is designed to meet the demands of rural populations that currently have no access to grid-connected electricity. Besides electricity, it is well recognized that rural populations need at least a centralized refrigeration system for storage of medicines and other emergency supplies, as well as safe drinking water. Here we propose a district system that will employ a multi-generation concentrated solar power (CSP) system that will generate electricity and supply the heat needed for both absorption refrigeration and membrane distillation (MD) water purification. The electricity will be used to generate hydrogen through highly efficient water electrolysis and individual households can use the hydrogen for generating electricity, via affordable proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and as a fuel for cooking. The multi-generation system is being developed such that its components will be easy to manufacture and maintain. As a result, these components will be less efficient than their typical counterparts but their low cost-to-efficiency ratio will allow for us to meet our installation cost goal of $1/Watt for the entire system. The objective of this paper is to introduce the system concept and discuss the system components that are currently under development. (auth)

  8. CULTURAL CAPITAL AS TOURISM DEVELOPMENT BASIS IN TRADITIONAL VILLAGE OF KUTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Sumadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a favourite sector in improving Bali revenue and kind of tourismdeveloped is cultural one. In cultural tourism, it takes place meaning modification ofcultural practice by krama (member of traditional village in order to cultural capitalcan survive in the middle of tourism dynamic condition. This research entitled“Cultural capital as tourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta”, byproposing three problems, namely how is the process of cultural capital as tourismdevelopment basis, what factors can motivate tourism capital as tourism developmentbasis, and what is the meaning of cultural capital as tourism development basis.The research is conducted using qualitative method and cultural studiesapproach, so data analysis is conducted in descriptive qualitative and interpretativeones. Selection of traditional village of Kuta as research location based onconsideration that traditional village of Kuta having integrated tourism facilities forfacilities addressed to member of traditional village. The review about culturalcapital as the tourism development basis in this traditional village of Kuta, eclecticstheories consisting of Hegemonic theory of Gramsci, co-modification theory of KarlMarx and Adorno, discourse-power/knowledge and truth theory of Foucoult anddeconstruction theory of Derrida.Based on the research output, it can be known: (1 Cultural capital process astourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta is inseparable fromforeigners arrival in traditional village of Kuta, the entrance of Military (TheCooperative Center of Arm Force in managing Kuta beach and the occurrence ofBali bombing tragedy on October 12th, 2002; (2 The factors that motivate culturalcapital as the tourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta, such asmotivation and the necessity of tourists visiting traditional village of Kuta, tourismhegemony, changing of life philosophy of member of traditional village fromidealism into

  9. Multicultourism in Mexico’s Magical Village Cuetzalan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Casper

    into the identity and power configurations that are produced by and in relation to the program.Combining recent readings on the Foucauldian concept of governmentality and sociologist Erving Goffman's ideas on conceptual frames, the thesis shows how the MagicalVillages program conducts and organizes political...... capital Cuetzalan (Puebla) and surrounding indigenous Nahua communities and through analysis of government and program documents, press releases, newspaper articles, institutional interaction, public space and ritual, tourism magazine texts, field notes, and interviews, the analysis tunes...

  10. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, J. E-mail: jtakada@ipc.hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Hoshi, M.; Endo, S.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Kondrashov, A.E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Ivannikov, A.; Tikounov, D.; Gavrilin, Y.; Snykov, V.P

    2000-05-15

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m{sup 2} of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 {mu}Sv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  11. Concentrating solar power. Its potential contribution to a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This report summarises the findings and recommendations of a study of concentrating solar power (CSP). The study has examined the potential contribution of CSP in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (the MENA region) over the period to 2050, and the scientific and technical developments that will be required to realise that potential. This study critically reviews existing work and describes the scientific consensus on the status and prospects of this technology. It also identifies key outstanding issues and where knowledge gaps need to be filled for CSP to fulfil its potential contribution in Europe and the MENA region. Based on these findings, the study makes recommendations on how to improve national and European support programmes for CSP development and deployment. Specific aims of the study have been the following: (1) to review the current status of CSP technologies and identify the technological developments and research and development (R and D) needed to achieve reliable operation and cost competitiveness with fossil fuelled electricity generation; (2) to consider how issues associated with the intermittent nature of CSP for electricity generation due to the daily pattern of insolation and the potential for cloudy days can best be addressed; (3) to identify the environmental impacts and infrastructure requirements of CSP, and comment on the significance of these in relation to other options for electricity supply; and, consequently, (4) to develop a view of the potential contribution that CSP located in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa could make to the energy mix in those regions by 2020 and 2050. This report focuses primarily on the generation of electricity from CSP, but it is recognised that there are other potentially significant 'products' from CSP such as process steam for industry, water desalination, alternative energy carriers such as hydrogen and syngas, and decontamination of water supplies. Although not discussed in

  12. Emerging Transnational migration from Romanian villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Sandu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first results of a community census (December 2001 on temporary external migration at the level of all Romanian villages. Local key informants filled in the questionnaire on international temporary migration and its sociodemographic profile. As function of the key destinations, the Romanian villages cluster into six major migration fields: Germany, Hungary, Italy, Turkey, Yugoslavia and Spain. At a more detailed level, considering multiple destinations, those fields break into 15 regions of migration.Village-level analysis of the phenomenon indicates a strong selectivity of migration depending on village characteristics. About 4 percent of the total villages of the country account for more than 60 percent of the total return migration from abroad. These are villages of a high probability of transnationalism. Circular or transnational migration is shown to be connected with the basic characteristics of the migration system of the country: the villages where village to city commuting declined sharply after 1990 and where return migration from cities was high recorded a higher propensity for circular migration abroad. A set of about 2700 villages of high migration prevalence is described as «probable transnational communities».

  13. Power

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, Samuel; Gintis, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    We consider the exercise of power in competitive markets for goods, labour and credit. We offer a definition of power and show that if contracts are incomplete it may be exercised either in Pareto-improving ways or to the disadvantage of those without power. Contrasting conceptions of power including bargaining power, market power, and consumer sovereignty are considered. Because the exercise of power may alter prices and other aspects of exchanges, abstracting from power may miss essential a...

  14. Teens, Power Tools, and Green Schools: Education for Sustainability through a University Environmental Design Program and Middle School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the role of green schools in promoting education for sustainability by reflecting on a university-middle school partnership focused on sustainable design. Undergraduates and middle school students met weekly for a semester to learn about sustainability through simple design projects and activities that focused on…

  15. Perceptions of Village Dogs by Villagers and Tourists in the Coastal Region of Rural Oaxaca, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the village dog-keeping system, and of perceptions of dog-related problems by villagers and tourists, in the coastal region of Oaxaca, Mexico. We conducted a survey of the inhabitants of three villages (Mazunte, Puerto Angel, and Río Seco),

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-Based Procedures for Field Activities: Results from Three Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. Nearly all activities in the nuclear power industry are guided by procedures, which today are printed and executed on paper. This paper-based procedure process has proven to ensure safety; however, there are improvements to be gained. Due to its inherent dynamic nature, a CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. Compared to the static state of paper-based procedures (PBPs), the presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps.

  17. Use of market data to assess bushmeat hunting sustainability in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allebone-Webb, S M; Kümpel, N F; Rist, J; Cowlishaw, G; Rowcliffe, J M; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2011-06-01

    Finding an adequate measure of hunting sustainability for tropical forests has proved difficult. Many researchers have used urban bushmeat market surveys as indicators of hunting volumes and composition, but no analysis has been done of the reliability of market data in reflecting village offtake. We used data from urban markets and the villages that supply these markets to examine changes in the volume and composition of traded bushmeat between the village and the market (trade filters) in Equatorial Guinea. We collected data with market surveys and hunter offtake diaries. The trade filters varied depending on village remoteness and the monopoly power of traders. In a village with limited market access, species that maximized trader profits were most likely to be traded. In a village with greater market access, species for which hunters gained the greatest income per carcass were more likely to be traded. The probability of particular species being sold to market also depended on the capture method and season. Larger, more vulnerable species were more likely to be supplied from less-accessible catchments, whereas there was no effect of forest cover or human population density on probability of being sold. This suggests that the composition of bushmeat offtake in an area may be driven more by urban demand than the geographic characteristics of that area. In one market, traders may have reached the limit of their geographical exploitation range, and hunting pressure within that range may be increasing. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to model the trade filters that bias market data, which opens the way to developing more robust market-based sustainability indices for the bushmeat trade. ©2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. On Stability of Sustainable Power Systems : Network Fault Response of Transmission Systems with Very High Penetration of Distributed Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boemer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Power systems are undergoing a historic structural and technological transformation. The increase of distributed generation (DG), recently mostly wind power park modules (WPPMs) and photovoltaic power park modules (PVPPMs), is already changing the way power systems are structured and operated.

  19. AHP 1: SEATING, MONEY, AND FOOD AT AN AMDO VILLAGE FUNERAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rin chen rdo rje རིན་ཆེན་རྡོ་རྗེ།

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Seating, food, and money are discussed in the context of funerals held in the Amdo Tibetan village of Lo khog, located in Mar khu thang Town, Gcan tsha County, Rma lho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province, PR China. An analysis of these three elements, combined with an intimate personal account of the funeral of the first author's close relative in 2005, offer insights into villagers' social status, and power and gender roles in their everyday lives.

  20. Targeting Villages for Rural Development Using Satellite Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Kush R; Chen, George H; Abelson, Brian; Nowocin, Kendall; Sakhrani, Vivek; Xu, Ling; Spatocco, Brian L

    2015-03-01

    Satellite imagery is a form of big data that can be harnessed for many social good applications, especially those focusing on rural areas. In this article, we describe the common problem of selecting sites for and planning rural development activities as informed by remote sensing and satellite image analysis. Effective planning in poor rural areas benefits from information that is not available and is difficult to obtain at any appreciable scale by any means other than algorithms for estimation and inference from remotely sensed images. We discuss two cases in depth: the targeting of unconditional cash transfers to extremely poor villages in sub-Saharan Africa and the siting and planning of solar-powered microgrids in remote villages in India. From these cases, we draw out some common lessons broadly applicable to informed rural development.

  1. Design for sustainability: rural connectivity with village operators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available -50, 2009. [2] D. P. Conradie et al. .? Using information and communication technologies (ICTs) for deep rural development in South Africa, ? COMMUNICATIO, vol. 29, p. 199, February 2003. [3] M. Chetty, et al. , ?VoIP Deregulation in South Africa...

  2. Benefits from a renewable energy village electrification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Alex [Kathmandu University, School of Mechanical Engineering, and RIDS-Nepal - ISIS Humla Project Director (Nepal); Kimber, Haddix McKay [University of Montana and The ISIS Foundation, Missoula, Montana (United States)

    2009-02-15

    More than 100 years after Edison's life changing discovery, 1.6-2 billion people around the globe still live without light, in dark and smoke filled homes. The remote and impoverished Himalayan villages of upper Humla, in north-west Nepal, belong to some of the 2.4 billion people who still depend on the use of traditional biomass for their daily energy services such as cooking, heating and light. These activities on open fireplaces have a direct chronic impact on the health and extremely low life expectancy of the women and children along with devastating deforestation. There is a strong relationship between prosperity and access to electricity. The more remote and isolated communities in Nepal generally live in great poverty. Eighty percent of Nepal's 28.5 million people live in rural areas, with around half of these so remote, that neither a road, nor the national grid is ever likely to reach them. While Nepal has no fossil fuel resources, it is a country that is rich in renewable energy resources such as hydropower and solar energy. These abundant and locally available renewable energy resources can be tapped into with appropriate locally developed technologies. Generating and storing electrical energy derived from these rich local energy resources can provide for appropriate and sustainable lighting, which brings potential health, education, social and economic benefits to the people who have previously lived in homes with excessive indoor air pollution. This paper describes the living conditions of some villages in upper Humla, and the possible benefits of a simple village electrification system that provides basic lighting for the homes and the consequent improvements in the living conditions of the villagers. (author)

  3. Sustainability Evaluation of Power Grid Construction Projects Using Improved TOPSIS and Least Square Support Vector Machine with Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxiao Niu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric power industry is of great significance in promoting social and economic development and improving people’s living standards. Power grid construction is a necessary part of infrastructure construction, whose sustainability plays an important role in economic development, environmental protection and social progress. In order to effectively evaluate the sustainability of power grid construction projects, in this paper, we first identified 17 criteria from four dimensions including economy, technology, society and environment to establish the evaluation criteria system. After that, the grey incidence analysis was used to modify the traditional Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS, which made it possible to evaluate the sustainability of electric power construction projects based on visual angle of similarity and nearness. Then, in order to simplify the procedure of experts scoring and computation, on the basis of evaluation results of the improved TOPSIS, the model using Modified Fly Optimization Algorithm (MFOA to optimize the Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM was established. Finally, a numerical example was given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  4. Sustainability and power in health promotion: community-based participatory research in a reproductive health policy case study in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rosilda; Plaza, Veronica; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-03-01

    Health promotion programs are commonly viewed as value-free initiatives which seek to improve health, often through behavior change. An opposing view has begun to emerge that health promotion efforts, especially ones seeking to impact health policy and social determinants of health, are vulnerable to political contexts and may depend on who is in power at the time. This community-based participatory research study attempts to understand these interactions by applying a conceptual model focused on the power context, diverse stakeholder roles within this context, and the relationship of political levers and other change strategies to the sustainability of health promotion interventions aimed at health policy change. We present a case study of a health promotion coalition, New Mexico for Responsible Sex Education (NMRSE), as an example of power dynamics and change processes. Formed in 2005 in response to federal policies mandating abstinence-only education, NMRSE includes community activists, health promotion staff from the New Mexico Department of Health, and policy-maker allies. Applying an adapted Mayer's 'power analysis' instrument, we conducted semi-structured stakeholder interviews and triangulated political-context analyses from the perspective of the stakeholders.We identified multiple understandings of sustainability and health promotion policy change, including: the importance of diverse stakeholders working together in coalition and social networks; their distinct positions of power within their political contexts; the role of science versus advocacy in change processes; the particular challenges for public sector health promotion professionals; and other facilitators versus barriers to action. One problem that emerged consisted of the challenges for state employees to engage in health promotion advocacy due to limitations imposed on their activities by state and federal policies. This investigation's results include a refined conceptual model, a power

  5. Barriers to Local Residents’ Participation in Community-Based Tourism: Lessons from Houay Kaeng Village in Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sangkyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the barriers to local residents’ participation in the process of community-based tourism planning and development in a developing country. Focusing on the case of Houay Kaeng Village in Sayabouly Province, Laos, a qualitative exploratory study was conducted by adopting in-depth interviews with the various levels of local community’s members. The key barriers to local community participation identified in this research include: (1 low education levels and lack of knowledge about tourism; (2 poor living conditions and lack of financial support; (3 busy daily routine and lack of time for tourism participation; (4 local community’s perception of tourism as a seasonal business with low income; and (5 power disparities, institutional disincentives and local’s distrust in authorities. The results suggest that only a small number of the local residents in the village were satisfied with their current and on-going participation expressing their strong willingness to continue in participating in the process of tourism planning and development, whereas a large group of the residents were not willing to do it at all in the future. The paper further discusses implications for the government and communities in regard to community-based sustainable tourism development.

  6. Life cycle assessment of village electrification based on straight jatropha oil in Chhattisgarh, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuender, Simon Michael; Zah, Rainer; Widmer, Rolf [Technology and Society Lab, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Ueberlandstr. 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bhatacharjee, Somnath [Winrock India International, New Delhi (India); Classen, Mischa [First Climate AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mukherjee, Prodyut [Sir Dorabji Tata Trust and Allied Trusts, New Delhi (India)

    2010-03-15

    A decentralized power generation plant fuelled by straight jatropha oil was implemented in 2006 in Ranidhera, Chhattisgarh, India. The goal of this study was to assess the environmental sustainability of that electrification project in order to provide a scientific basis for policy decisions on electrifying remote villages. A full Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was conducted on jatropha-based rural electrification and then compared with other electrification approaches such as photovoltaic (PV), grid connection and a diesel-fuelled power generator. In summary, the jatropha-based electrification in Ranidhera reduces greenhouse gas emissions over the full life cycle by a factor of 7 compared to a diesel generator or grid connection. The environmental performance is only slightly improved, mainly due to the high air pollution from pre-heating the jatropha seeds. With additional measures oil extraction and overall efficiency could be further improved. However, environmental benefits can only be achieved if jatropha is cultivated on marginal land and land use competition can be excluded. Under these conditions, jatropha-based electricity generation might be a useful alternative to other renewable electrification options, as the technology is very sturdy and can be maintained even in remote and highly under-developed regions. (author)

  7. Development of a 1 D hydrodynamic habitat model for the Hippopotamus amphibious as basis for sustainable exploitation of hydroelectric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manful, D. Y.; Kaule, G.; Wieprecht, S.; Rees, J.; Hu, W.

    2009-12-01

    operating rules of the reservoir in the post-construction phase of the dam. A great deal of work has been done on the effects of stream flow changes on fish especially salmonids. Very little work however has been done assessing the impact of hydropower schemes on aquatic mammals especially in Africa. HIPStrA is the first attempt at developing a computer-based habitat model for a large aquatic megaherbivore. The need for energy for development, the availability of large rivers and a rich biodiversity base in Africa makes a case for careful and ecological smart exploitation. The overarching aim of the study is the sustainable development of hydroelectric power through the use of methodologies and tools to rigorously assess changes in instream conditions that impact aquatic mammals.

  8. Population message from the village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibler, M

    1979-06-01

    According to a number of participants at the population conference in Ontario, sponsored by the School of Journalism of the Univesity of Western Ontario and the Canadian International Development Agency, the villages, in developing countries, have sent a message to population experts, declaring that the most effective way to motivate individuals toward reducing family size is to improve basic educational and health care services. It has been demonstrated that improvements in these areas, by providing women with educational opportunities and by reducing infant mortality, have a direct impact on fertility. Efforts should be directed toward discovering similar direct correlates. The message dismissed as irrelevant the battle raging between those who advocate that population growth must be halted before poverty can be eliminated, between the developmentalists, who believe that fundamental changes in economic and political conditions will automatically solve the population problem, and between those who declare that family planning and development must be dealt with simultaneously for either to be effective. Despite evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of the 'direct correlate' approach, most developing countries continue to accord top priority to family planning programs and neglect educational and health care services.

  9. Espaces centrés et pouvoirs décentrés : l’exemple des fédérations villageoises dogon au XIXe siècle Centered territorial units and decentered powers: Dogon village federations in the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Jolly

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Au xixe siècle, le Sud du pays dogon se caractérisait par un paysage politique singulier avec une mosaïque de petites fédérations villageoises regroupant chacune, sur un même territoire, une douzaine de localités non apparentées. Selon les indices rassemblés, la création de ces formations originales remonterait à la seconde moitié du xviiie siècle et résulterait d’un nouveau rapport à l’espace imposé à la fois par la multiplication des guerres ou des razzias et par un peuplement local de plus en plus dense et diversifié. Face à la pression militaire des États voisins, l’objectif des groupes résidents n’est plus de s’approprier un territoire, mais de le défendre en construisant son unité au centre, à l’endroit présumé de sa fondation. Carrefour politico-religieux, ce centre prenait la forme d’une place publique servant de lieu de rassemblement unitaire, mais aussi d’axe de distribution égalitaire des pouvoirs entre tous les villages installés sur le même territoire.In the 19th century, the southern part of the land of the Dogon stood out owing to its unusual political landscape, a mosaic of small village federations each of which grouped, in a territorial unit, a dozen or so localities unrelated by kinship. These original federations emerged out of a new relation to space during the second half of the 18th century as a result of increasing warfare and raiding in the context of a denser, more diversified local population. Given mounting military pressure from neighboring states, resident groups no longer sought to appropriate a territory but to defend it by establishing its unity in the center, at the presumed place of foundation. As a political and religious crossroads, this center was not only a public meeting place expressing unity but also the axis of an egalitarian distribution of power between all villages located in the same territory.

  10. Tele-economics of Village Telco

    OpenAIRE

    Innset, Marte Berg

    2014-01-01

    This master s thesis is written in collaboration with Village Telco. VillageTelco is a grass root solution for establishing communication whereno other can or are willing to do so. The business has developed theMeshPotato, a wireless access point, which uses standard Wi-Fi technologycombined with open-source telephony software and a state of the artmesh protocol, to provide low-cost telephony. Today, Village Telco serveas a hardware provider. The master s thesis provides a background studyof ...

  11. Desa wisata sebagai aset soft power Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, Machya; Issundari, Sri

    2016-01-01

    Tourism village plays significant role for strengthening Indonesia soft power. The experience of Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (DIY) province proves that the development of tourism villages contribute in promoting “the power” of Indonesia through art, culture, custom and food to international society. Tourism Villages that located at Sleman, Bantul, Gunungkidul, Kulonprogo and city of Yogyakarta (called as tourism kampong) succeeded in attracting foreigners to stay and live as villagers, enjoy v...

  12. Need of independent rural power producers in India - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojha, Kuldeep [KCB Technical Academy, Mechanical Engineering Department, Indore, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2010-11-15

    The current scenario of heavy power crisis in India particularly in rural areas and small towns requires urgent solution. There is a need to look for innovative and sustainable ways for promoting equitable development in India. The centralized energy planning model currently used ignores energy needs of the rural areas and poor and has also led to environmental degradation, whereas decentralized energy planning model is in the interest of efficient utilization of resources. Energy planning at the village level is the bottom limit of the application of decentralized planning principle. The individual villages are the smallest social units where the energy consumption occurs. Renewable energy is energy derived from sources that are being replaced by nature, such as water, wind, solar, or biomass. Renewable sources are essentially non-polluting, if applied correctly. This article presents a review of the important decentralized renewable energy options. Also, this article discusses about current power scenario in India particularly in rural sector. Taking into consideration the limitations of conventional power policy and benefits decentralized power potential in India, this article presents the need to setup independent rural power producers (IRPPs) as an instrument to promote sustainable and socially equitable rural power sector development. (orig.)

  13. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  14. Development Planning of Tourist Village Using Participatory Mapping (Case study: Mambal Village, Badung Regency, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, I. N. S.; Wiguna, P. P. K.; Narka, I. W.; Febrianti, N. K. O.

    2017-12-01

    Tourism sector is the highest source of income in Badung Regency so it is interesting to see the development of tourist village as one of the alternative tourist destinations in Badung Regency. Most of the village areas in Badung Regency do not have policies, vision and mission as an effort to develop the village into a tourist village. As a result the role of tourist village does not grow in terms of economic and social community. The purpose of this research is to determine and to map the tourism development plan using participatory mapping. The methodology used in this research is field surveys and interviews for data collection and participatory mapping to map the development plan to support tourism. Mambal village is located in Sub-district of Abiansemal, Badung Regency, Indonesia. Mambal village has the potential to become a tourism village because it is supported by the uniqueness of nature and tradition. Mambal village passed by Ayung river, where along the river there are beautiful cliffs which potential to develop as adventure tourism. There is also Senaung Pengibul Cave with a length of more than 15 meters and is wide enough to pass. Mambal village also has a spiritual tour of Pura Demung and Pancoran Pitu, which has a magical story. Currently farmers in Mambal Village are focusing on developing organic farming, of which 38% of the rice fields present in Mambal are pure organic that produces organic rice. Around the rice field area is also created a jogging track for visitors while enjoying the natural beauty of rice fields. Farmers also cultivate oyster mushrooms. In addition, Mambal Village Community also produces handicraft products that are woven in the form of symmetrical Endek (traditional fabrics) and processed products from used goods such as bags, wallets, pencil boxes and others.

  15. Examining the market potential for natural-gas-powered trucks : barriers and opportunities for promoting environmental sustainability and economic prosperity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, public concerns have grown over America's energy use and production. Pushes : towards more environmentally friendly and sustainable sources of energy have moved out of fringe politics : and into mainstream political discourse. A...

  16. Tackling malaria, village by village: a report on a concerted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leveraging the power of information technology and interdisciplinary teamwork, medical students and the denizens of a rural community were able to engage in an interactive experience of health education and promotion. Conclusion: Preliminary observations suggest that a health information intervention in concert with a ...

  17. Network-independent electrification ranging from the Solar Home System via Alps Association Houses up to electric power supply of a whole village; Netzferne Elektrifizierung vom Solar Home System ueber Alpenvereinshaeuser bis hin zur Dorfstromversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bopp, G.; Holz, F.; Sauer, D.U. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    According to assessment of the European Union approximately two billion people live worldwide without having a connection to a public electric power grid, half of them even live in areas without any access to electricity at all. In the medium term, high investment costs along with a simultaneously low electric power demand (smaller than 1 KWh/day) will impede grid connection of these isolated, scattered populated areas for economic reasons. Photovoltaic plants are one of the most interesting technical options for the solution of this energy supply task. However, a lot painful experience gained in pilot projects, has shown, that various frame conditions must be taken into consideration for planning these plants. Apart from technical aspects, cultural, social, economic and financial aspects must be taken into account. While the pure electric power supply is improved, other central areas of living like food and water supply, the health system, education system and infrastructure measures must be improved as well in order to achieve lasting improvement of the living standard of the people living away from grid supply. (orig.)

  18. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the dynamics of power in processes of creativity, and show its paradoxical nature as both a bridge and a barrier to creativity in organisations. Recent social psychological experimental research (Slighte, de Dreu & Nijstad, 2011) on the relation between power...... and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable...... and floating source for empowering people in the organisation. We will explore and discuss here the potentials, challenges and pitfalls of power in relation to creativity in the life of organisations today. The aim is to demonstrate that power struggles may be utilised as constructive sources of creativity...

  19. The Norochcholai power plant project (Sri Lanka): an example of sustainable economic development by utilisation of seawater for power island and emission control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrea, E.; Zimmermann, H. [Poeyry Energy, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    The paper describes how the Norochcholai project will meet Sri Lanka's energy expansion programme by realising a 3 3 300 MW coal-fired power island using solely seawater for the power plant processes and auxiliary needs. The strategic project development approach towards a coal-fired power plant is outlined, followed by an overview of the core processes utilising seawater: desalination, demineralisation, on-site hypochlorite production and chlorination, seawater flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) and waste water management. (orig.)

  20. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11... VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock shall... owner of the animal, if known, by certified mail or by posting in the village square. The notice shall...

  1. Measuring the Development Patterns of Urban Villages in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Urban villages are widespread in many Chinese cities, providing affordable and accessible housing for rural migrants. These urban villages are developed by the indigenous village population base on a self-help approach and in an unauthorized style. Consequently, urban villages are characterized by

  2. Introduction to EGU session "Lunar Science and Exploration Towards Moon Village"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    The EGU PS2.2 session "Lunar Science and Exploration" Towards Moon Village" will address: - Recent lunar results: geochemistry, geophysics in the context of open planetary science and exploration - Synthesis of results from SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'e 1, 2 and 3, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LADEE, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and, Artemis and GRAIL - Goals and Status of missions under preparation: orbiters, Luna-Glob, Google Lunar X Prize, Luna Resurs polar lander, SLIM, Chandrayaan2, Chang'E 4 & 5, Lunar Resource Prospector, Future landers, Lunar sample return missions - Precursor missions, instruments and investigations for landers, rovers, sample return, and human cis-lunar activities and human lunar surface sorties - Preparation for International Lunar Decade: databases, instruments, missions, terrestrial field campaigns, support studies - ILEWG and Global Exploration roadmaps towards a global robotic/human Moon village - Strategic Knowledge Gaps, and key science Goals relevant to Lunar Global Exploration Lunar science and exploration are developing further with new and exciting missions being developed by China, the US, Japan, India, Russia, Korea and Europe, and with new stakeholders. The Moon Village is an open concept proposed by ESA DG with the goal of a sustainable human and robotic presence on the lunar surface as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. Multiple goals of the Moon Village include planetary science, life sciences, astronomy, fundamental research, resources utilisation, human spaceflight, peaceful cooperation, economical development, inspiration, training and capacity building. ESA director general has revitalized and enhanced the original concept of MoonVillage discussed in the last decade. Space exploration builds on international collaboration. COSPAR and its ILEWG International Lunar Exploration Working Group (created in 1994) have fostered collaboration between lunar missions [4-8]. A flotilla of lunar orbiters has

  3. Radiation power control of the industrial CO2 lasers excited by a nonself-sustained glow discharge with regard to dissociation in a working gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemyakin, Andrey N.; Rachkov, Michael Yu.; Solovyov, Nikolay G.; Yakimov, Mikhail Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The action of a working gas mixture degradation related to the plasma chemical reactions in a glow discharge on the laser output power of the molecular laser excited by a nonself-sustained glow discharge has been studied by the example of an industrial laser of ;Lantan; CO2 laser series. It was found that the laser power overshoot when operating on a fresh gas mixture may exceed 3 times power level set in a steady-state regime. The working algorithm for the control system was proposed and developed setting standard fresh CO2/N2/He laser gas mixture to plasma chemical equilibrium composition during the laser turn-on procedure after full refill of a working gas mixture.

  4. Power

    OpenAIRE

    Hafford-Letchfield, Trish

    2015-01-01

    This chapter looks at the concept of power in social work by focusing on what this means as a ‘professional’ and theorizes competing discourses of empowerment in social work and its key concepts, drawing in particular on the explanatory powers of critical theorist Michel Foucault (1991). The chapter problematizes the concept of power by explicitly drawing on both users’ and carers’ accounts from the literature to demonstrate different external and internal influences on the root causes of dis...

  5. Development of Micro-sized Microbial Fuel Cells as Ultra-Low Power Generators Using Nano-engineered Materials and Sustainable Designs

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-12-01

    Many of the most pressing global challenges today and in the future center around the scarcity of sustainable energy and water sources. The innovative microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology addresses both as it utilizes bacteria to convert wastewaters into electricity. Advancing this technology requires a better understanding of the optimal materials, designs and conditions involved. The micro-sized MFC was recently developed to serve this need by providing a rapid testing device requiring only a fraction of the materials. Further, development of micro-liter scale MFCs has expanded into potential applications such as remote and self-sustained power sources as well as on-chip energy generators. By using microfabrication, the fabrication and assembly of microsized MFCs is potentially inexpensive and mass produced. The objective of the work within this dissertation was to explore and optimize the micro-sized MFC to maximize power and current generation towards the goal of a usable and application-oriented device. Micro-sized MFCs were examined and developed using four parameters/themes considered most important in producing a high power generating, yet usable device: Anode- The use of nano-engineered carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes and graphene, as anode as well as testing semiconductor industry standard anode contact area materials for enhanced current production. 5 Cathode- The introduction of a membrane-less air cathode to eliminate the need for continuous chemical refills and making the entire device mobile. Reactor design- The testing of four different reactor designs (1-75 μLs) with various features intended to increase sustainability, cost-effectiveness, and usability of the microsized MFC. Fuels- The utilization of real-world fuels, such as industrial wastewaters and saliva, to power micro-sized MFCs. The micro-sized MFC can be tailored to fit a variety of applications by varying these parameters. The device with the highest power production here was

  6. Sustaining Collective Action in Urbanizing China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, Xianwen; Goebel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The recent years have seen a proliferation of scholarship on protests and other forms of collective action in China. Important insights have been gained into how conflicts between social groups and local governments begin, which strategies and instruments protesters apply, and under which...... challenges of sustaining collective action in China: the continuing existence of substantial grievances, the re-activation of strong social ties, the presence of unifying frames and an adaptive protest leadership. The comparison shows that especially the last factor is crucial: while the two villages were...... similar in all other respects, leadership in Village B was far more adaptive in Village A, which goes a long way towards explaining why collective action could be sustained twice as long in Village B....

  7. [Agricultural policies and farming systems: A case study of landscape changes in Shizuitou Village in the recent four decades].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-jun; Zhou, Yang; Yan, Yan-bin; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural policy in China's rural heartland is driving profound changes to traditional farming systems. A case study covering four decades mapped and recorded farming patterns and processes in Shizuitou Village, a rural village in northwest Shanxi. An integrated geospatial methodology from geography and anthropology was employed in the case study to record the changing dynamics of farming systems in Shizuitou Village to discover the long-term impacts of China's agricultural policies on village farming systems. Positive and negative impacts of agricultural policies on village farming systems were mapped, inventoried and evaluated using Participatory Geographic Information Systems (PGIS). The results revealed traditional polycultures are being gradually replaced by industrialized monocultures. The driving forces behind these farming changes come from a series of government agricultural policies aiming at modernization of farming systems in China. The goal of these policies was to spur rapid development of industrial agriculture under the guise of modernization but is leading to the decay of traditional farming systems in the village that maintained local food security with healthy land for hundreds of years. The paper concluded with a recommendation that in future, agricultural policy makers should strike a more reasonable balance between short-term agricultural profits and long-term farming sustainability based on the principles of ecological sustainable development under the context of global changes.

  8. Hybrid Off-Grid SPV/WTG Power System for Remote Cellular Base Stations Towards Green and Sustainable Cellular Networks in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Alsharif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address the sustainability of power resources and environmental conditions for telecommunication base stations (BSs at off-grid sites. Accordingly, this study examined the feasibility of using a hybrid solar photovoltaic (SPV/wind turbine generator (WTG system to feed the remote Long Term Evolution-macro base stations at off-grid sites of South Korea the energy necessary to minimise both the operational expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions. Three key aspects have been discussed: (i optimal system architecture; (ii energy yield analysis; and (iii economic analysis. In addition, this study compares the feasibility of using a hybrid SPV/WTG system vs. a diesel generator. The simulation results show that by applying the proposed SPV/WTG system scheme to the cellular system, the total operational expenditure can be up to 48.52% more efficient and sustainability can be ensured with better planning by providing cleaner energy.

  9. Long-lived coherences: Improved dispersion in the frequency domain using continuous-wave and reduced-power windowed sustaining irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadet, A.; Fernandes, L.; Kateb, F., E-mail: fatiha.kateb@parisdescartes.fr, E-mail: balzan.riccardo@parisdescartes.fr; Balzan, R., E-mail: fatiha.kateb@parisdescartes.fr, E-mail: balzan.riccardo@parisdescartes.fr; Vasos, P. R. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biochimie Toxicologiques et Pharmacologiques UMR-8601, Université Paris Descartes - CNRS, PRES Paris Sorbonne Cité, 75006 Paris (France)

    2014-08-07

    Long-lived coherences (LLC’s) are detectable magnetisation modes with favourable relaxation times that translate as sharp resonances upon Fourier transform. The frequency domain of LLC's was previously limited to the range of J-couplings within pairs of homonuclear spins. LLC evolution at high magnetic fields needs to be sustained by radio-frequency irradiation. We show that LLC-based spectral dispersion can be extended beyond the J-couplings domain using adapted carrier offsets and introduce a new reduced-power sustaining method to preserve LLC's within the required range of offsets. Spectral resolution is enhanced as the natively narrow lines of LLC's are further dispersed, making them potential probes for the study of biomolecules featuring strong resonance overlap and for media where NMR spectroscopy is commonly hindered by line broadening.

  10. SOSPO-SP: Secure Operation of Sustainable Power Systems Simulation Platform for Real-Time System State Evaluation and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Vancraeyveld, Pieter; Pedersen, Allan Henning Birger

    2014-01-01

    New challenges are arising in managing power systems as these systems become more complex due to the use of high levels of distributed generation, mainly based on renewable energy sources, and due to the competitive environment within the power sector. At the same time, the use of Phasor Measurem......New challenges are arising in managing power systems as these systems become more complex due to the use of high levels of distributed generation, mainly based on renewable energy sources, and due to the competitive environment within the power sector. At the same time, the use of Phasor...

  11. Concept of co-firing coal with biomass and natural gas: On track of sustainable solution for future thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodžić Nihad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents R&D project of multi fuel concept (MFC for future coal-based power plants, demonstrated on example of cofiring Middle-Bosnia brown coal with waste woody biomass and natural gas. Pulverised Combustion (PC lab-scale furnace has been used for the cofiring tests, varying up to 20%w portion of biomass and up to 10%th portion of natural gas in the fuel mix. Tests were purposed to optimize the combustion temperature, air distribution, including Over Fire Air System (OFAS, fuel combination and fuel distribution, including reburning concept, as function of emissions and combustion efficiency estimated through the ash deposits behaviours and unburnt. Considering application of proposed MFC in case of TPP Kakanj unit 6 (118 MWe set here as a referent power plant, temperature levels and fuel distributions for lowest emissions of CO2 and NOx were found during lab tests, provided that combustion efficiency is at an acceptable level. Derived research results yield input data for calculation sustainability indicators of MFC for the referent power plant, considering 6 fuel options - different combinations of coal, biomass and natural gas. Single criteria analysis and multicriteria sustainability assessment have been done, giving an advantage to the options of cofiring coal with woody biomass and natural gas in the case demonstrated.

  12. New energy vision drawn up for Hoshino Village; Hoshino shin energy vison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The energy that the village in Fukuoka Prefecture consumes every year, as converted into the number of drums of heavy oil, is 13,150 for electricity (lighting and motive power); 4410 for kerosene (heating); 4440 for heavy oil (tea manufacture, etc.); and 2580 for propane (cooking, etc.). As for new energy for substitution in existence, it is estimated, again in terms of the number of drums of heavy oil, that there is 53,315 for electricity (photovoltaic and wind power); 2041 for kerosene (solar heat); and 41,732 for heavy oil (utilizing thinnings out of forestry). As a whole, the amount of new energy in existence is far greater than the amount of energy that the village requires. Studies are conducted and a basic principle of village rebuilding is defined, full of ideals and vitality and reflecting the characteristics of the village. Under the short-term program, facilities relatively small in capacity and therefore easier to adopt will be introduced for collecting the results of their operation and for the construction of a base on which future efforts to diffuse new energy will be exerted. Under the medium- and long-term program, the cost of new energy and other circumstances will be reviewed for the execution of full-scale introduction, and further efforts to popularize new energy among the villagers will be exerted. (NEDO)

  13. Optimal Time to Enter a Retirement Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the financial planning problem of a retiree wishing to enter a retirement village at a future uncertain date. The date of entry is determined by the retiree’s utility and bequest maximisation problem within the context of uncertain future health states. In addition, the retiree must choose optimal consumption, investment, bequest and purchase of insurance products prior to their full annuitisation on entry to the retirement village. A hyperbolic absolute risk-aversion (HARA utility function is used to allow necessary consumption for basic living and medical costs. The retirement village will typically require an initial deposit upon entry. This threshold wealth requirement leads to exercising the replication of an American put option at the uncertain stopping time. From our numerical results, active insurance and annuity markets are shown to be a critical aspect in retirement planning.

  14. The exercise of power through multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable agriculture and its inclusion and exclusion outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheyns, Emmanuelle; Riisgaard, Lone

    2014-01-01

    . We discuss some of the main paradoxes of MSIs related to their willingness to be 'inclusive' and at the same time their exclusionary or 'closure' effects, due to interactions with existing political economic contexts and embedded power inequalities and due to more subtle manifestations of power...

  15. Teaching Sustainable Energy and Power Electronics to Engineering Students in a Laboratory Environment Using Industry-Standard Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, David S.; Miller, Ruth Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Power electronics and renewable energy are two important topics for today's power engineering students. In many cases, the two topics are inextricably intertwined. As the renewable energy sector grows, the need for engineers qualified to design such systems grows as well. In order to train such engineers, new courses are needed that highlight the…

  16. The Restoration of a Local Energy Regime Amid Trends of Power Liberalization in East Asia: The Seoul Sustainable Energy Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jung-Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, power sector liberalization has been embraced at different levels in the East Asian countries of China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. The dominant rationale underlying power liberalization has been a quest for efficiency improvements, to be achieved by substituting private market activity for public regulations and by opening…

  17. Astronomy Village: Investigating the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey; Croft, Steven; McGee, Steven

    1998-04-01

    The Astronomy Village: Investigating the Solar System is a new product aimed at astronomy instructional materials for middle school audiences. This multimedia development, funded by the NSF, will be suitable for curriculum supplement, presentations, and public outreach in Earth and planetary science. The presentation will highlight one of the research paths from the Village: Is there life on Mars? Students using this curriculum will solve problems in a rich environment that includes images, hands on labs, simulations, presentations, articles, and web pages. The research questions will be presented using multiple working hypothesis format.

  18. La gestion des conflits sur les pompes à main dans les villages du ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    9 févr. 2011 ... Ces conflits et d'autres différends au sujet des ressources en eau sont typiques des villages entourant le bassin hydrographique du fleuve Nakanbé (autrefois la .... Improving Water Demand Management Addressing Socioeconomic Inequalities and Power Asymmetries The case of Yemen and Jordan.

  19. Communication Skills, Cultural Sensitivity, and Collaboration in an Experiential Language Village Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allen; Minami, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses five college students' experiences in a simulated full-immersion, Arabic-speaking language village and the impact of that experience on learners' beliefs about the power of collaborative learning, the critical importance of cultural awareness, the efficacy of learning languages within a functioning community of practice, and…

  20. Macro Study of Spatial Development Area on Tourism Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widhianthini Widhianthini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro study is one approach that combines the rational method based on the results of previous studies by the authority with the empirical method utilizing the survey techniques. The purpose of this macro study is to identify and analyze the potentials, problems, and the limiting factors, and the needs of the regency; and to recommend the programs and models required by the community to achieve the sustainable development. This research uses the Participatory Rural Appraisal method, the  interview techniques (Semi Structured Interview, the technique of focused group discussion (FGD, the Rapid District Appraisal (RDA, then it is analyzed by the empirical and dynamical systems. The overview of macro studies is particularly relevant in developing the regions, especially the rural areas, based on the existing advantages, such as in Tabanan Regency. Tabanan Regency is a granary in Bali Province and the zoning of agricultural commodities in quadrant III,which is the rural farming area with combined functions between the cultivated and rural areas supported by the tourism department. The studies of the areas in the form of potential analysis, problem analysis, requirement analysis become the guidelines for preparing the development scenarios and program formats. The studies will then constitute the factors driving the realization of sustainable development of tourism villages in supporting the sustainable agriculture.

  1. The voluntary work based village activism in contemporary Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Kopoteva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the voluntary based village activism in contemporary Finland. The author sees the roots of nowadays village activism in the traditional voluntary work: cultivation of common fields called for cooperation, and decision making on common issues required organisation of village meetings to make a collective decision. As a large social movement the village activism started in 1970s in the course of protest actions driven by the diminishing rural population and abandonment of arable lands. A large-scale establishment of village committees was also determined by the reduction of importance of traditional rural productive cooperation and by the changing role of countryside in the era of industrialisation. Nowadays Finland has a well-developed system of village associations, and its structure consists of three levels: village level, regional level and national level. At the local level, there are more than 4200 villages. In 2013, about 3100 villages had a registered village association and about 930 villages had a non-registered village association. Approximately 200 villages in Finland still do not perform any village activities of the considered type. As a rule, village activism generates in response to the specific needs of the village and aims to guarantee its residents’ well-being. At the regional level, there are 19 regional village associations. The most important tasks for the regional rural organisations are to ensure the villages’ interests and to work as a cooperative body for the rural development at the regional level. The top of the system under consideration is the Village Association of Finland. It is an umbrella organisation for the state, regional and local rural actors. The current development of rural movement in Finland could be evaluated in the framework of several theoretical conceptions: social capital and networking, entrepreneurial culture, and institutionalisation.

  2. THE PATEMBAYAN CONCEPT TO SPATIAL CHANGES OF CANDIREJO TOURISM VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARI Suzanna Ratih

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Candirejo village is one of villages that had been neglected in Borobudur the famous Buddhist Temple in Indonesia. Since it began to be visited by tourists, the community responded by conducting tourism village space consolidation based on patembayan concept. The process of space consolidation is involving the whole tourist village community and rural assets. The participation of the community in supporting the space consolidation of tourism village has brought a change in the shape of social value and village spatial. The concept of social organization that experienced a shift from community groups into patembayan groups has changed the way people think.

  3. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saunders, Richard J; Paul, Nicholas A; Hu, Yi; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-01-01

    .... We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal...

  4. Characterization of village chicken production performance under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Village chicken production was characterized using retrospective and crosssectional methods, where 280 households rearing local chickens in Halaba district of southern Ethiopia were used for data collection. The study revealed that the average flock size was 8.5 chickens (95% CI=7.98 – 9.08). The average number of ...

  5. Homesick vulture moves into retirement village

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-03-01

    Mar 1, 2007 ... Residents of Pietermaritzburg's. Evergreen Retirement Village had a bit of a turn recently when a rare and homesick vulture took up residence in a pine tree in their garden. Believing it to be a harbinger of bad news, one resident apparently turned to another and said,. “We had better do a head count to see.

  6. Agroforestry practice in villages surrounding Nyamure former ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    Abstract. An assessment of fuel wood situation and the contribution of agroforestry and woodlot resources to the supply of household fuel wood requirements were carried out in ten villages surrounding Nyamure former refugee camp, Nyanza District in the Southern. Province. A total of 158 households were surveyed in ...

  7. Shrinking villages – trajectories for local development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Helle

    and services e.g. schools as well as investment. Rural municipalities are challenged due to shrinking villages but by focussing on place bound resources there is a risk of reinforcing disparities between ‘weak’ and ‘strong’ communities as placed bound resources are unevenly distributed. This paper will address...

  8. Agroforestry practice in villages surrounding Nyamure former ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of fuel wood situation and the contribution of agroforestry and woodlot resources to the supply of household fuel wood requirements were carried out in ten villages surrounding Nyamure former refugee camp, Nyanza District in the Southern Province. A total of 158 households were surveyed in February ...

  9. Spatial Evolution of Urban Villages in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.

    2012-01-01

    Post-reform China has experienced a huge influx of people into cities coupled with massive urban expansion. As a by-product of these processes, urban villages have emerged and evolved rapidly to satisfy the increasing demand for low-cost housing and a variety of social and economic activities. In

  10. Communicative and narrative sound in Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben

    2010-01-01

    The soundtrack of the TV spot Village tells a story of its own. Some of the sounds communicate meaning very close to the visuals, for example by creating an African soundscape. But the soundtrack also supplies narrative elements of its own, which is most remarkable when it adds a happy ending...

  11. Evaluation of Livonian Village Landscapes in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Nitavska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Latvian landscape identity is related to many territories, but as far as the coastal landscapes are concerned, they have some special features. It is important to note that due to storms and coastal erosion living conditions here are frustrating. However the coastal area has some positive magnetism, which is often related to unusual natural conditions, a special aura and unique feelings, because the coastal area is unique on the Latvian scale. One of such places is the Livonian coast. For detailed evaluation of eleven Livonian villages, the method of analysis of the existing situation has been chosen, which also includes the evaluation of the village yard, buildings and infrastructure. The quality and condition evaluation method for rural villages with low level of development by F. G. L. Gremliza (1965 has been also applied as a basis for this evaluation method. Then, according to the results obtained, the villages have been compared and classified. In addition to this, using the evaluation of each rural yard it is possible to mark valuable structures and typical rural yards in the schematic model of the Livonian coast.

  12. Characterization of village chicken production performance under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Village chicken production was characterized using retrospective and cross- sectional methods, where 280 households rearing local chickens in Halaba district of southern Ethiopia were used for data collection. The study revealed that the average flock size was 8.5 chickens (95% CI=7.98 – 9.08). The average number of ...

  13. Autour de Montaillou, un village occitan

    OpenAIRE

    Guillot, Florence

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Occupation du sol au Moyen Âge en haute Ariège : naissance d'une forme d'habitat groupé particulière, les villages casaliers, densification des habitats groupés avant l'an Mil.

  14. Techno-economic analysis of hybrid power system sizing applied to small desalination plants for sustainable operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nagaraj

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Water and energy are two inseparable commodities that govern the lives of humanity and promote civilization. Energy can be used to produce water in case of scarcity in water. Ironically most of the places that are water stressed are also energy stressed. The cost of extending grid power may be prohibitively high in those cases. Rural/remote locations like hills and islands multiply the problem to a larger magnitude. Use of renewable sources like solar, wind, biomass and other locally available energy sources is the only solution. But these renewable sources are of intermittent nature and have poor availability. Hence, it is practically difficult to produce water with a single source of energy. Naturally, combining two or more sources of energy, known as hybrid power system, is the next available option. This paper carries out a techno-economic analysis of various sizing combinations of systems with solar photo voltaic, wind energy and stored energy in batteries for production of drinking water from a brackish water source. The system can operate the RO plant whenever the power is available, produce drinking water and store in a tank. This paper analyses the model of the entire hybrid power system in MATLAB to simulate the performance of the hybrid power system for different combinations of capacities. Results of the analysis under various input conditions are analyzed.

  15. Increased energy harvesting from backpack to serve as self-sustainable power source via a tube-like harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Longhan; Li, Xiaodong; Cai, Siqi; Huang, Ledeng; Li, Jiehong

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing demand for portable power sources because of the rapid development of portable and wearable electronic devices. This paper describes the development of a backpack-based energy harvester to harness the biomechanical energy of the human body during walking. The energy harvester was embedded into a backpack and used a spring-mass-damping system to transfer the energetic motion of the human body into rotary generators to produce electricity. In the oscillation system, the weight of the harvester itself and the load contained in the backpack serve together as the seismic mass; when excited by human trunk motion, the seismic mass drives a gear train to accelerate the harvested energetic motion, which is then delivered to a generator. A prototype device was built to investigate its performance, which has a maximum diameter of 50 mm, a minimum diameter of 28 mm, a length of 250 mm, and a weight of 380 g. Experiments showed that the proposed backpack-based harvester, when operating with a 5 kg load, could produce approximately 7 W of electrical power at a walking velocity of 5.5 km/h. The normalized power density of the harvester is 0.145 kg/cm3, which is 7.6 times as much as that of Rome's backpack harvester [26]. Based on the results of metabolic cost experiments, the average conversion efficiency from human metabolic power to electrical power is approximately 36%.

  16. Village operator feasibility framework: A recommended method for assessing the viability of village operator sites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Von Staden, R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available guidelines for investigation. To provide a basis for decision-making and comparison, a Feasibility Scorecard is included. The scorecard compares the Village Operator against a standard set of statements that are considered universal characteristics of viable...

  17. Exergy sustainability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  18. PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES IN VILLAGE INSTITUTES: A CASE OF CIFTELER VILLAGE INSTITUTE

    OpenAIRE

    Bayrak, Coşkun; Çelik, Veli

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The current study aims at examining the content, objectives and applications of the course titled “Physical Education and National Folklore Dances”, one of the culture courses available in the curriculum of Village Institutes focusing on daily physical activities. For the purposes of the study, a qualitative study was designed, in which a number of interviews were carried out with six teachers who graduated from village institutes in various years and a t...

  19. Progress of nuclear safety for symbiosis and sustainability advanced digital instrumentation, control and information systems for nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced methods of computational and information systems allowing readers to better understand the state-of-the-art design and implementation technology needed to maintain and enhance the safe operation of nuclear power plants. The subjects dealt with in the book are (i) Full digital instrumentation and control systems and human?machine interface technologies (ii) Risk? monitoring methods for large and? complex? plants (iii) Condition monitors for plant components (iv) Virtual and augmented reality for nuclear power plants and (v) Software reliability verification and val

  20. Developing a Mystery Shopping Measure to Operate a Sustainable Restaurant Business: The Power of Integrating with Corporate Executive Members’ Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J. C. Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mystery shopping has been used to objectively measure whether employees follow the visions of a company’s quality service standards. It then creates a feedback loop that allows companies to train their employees to consistently deliver quality services. The main purposes of this project are aimed at examining (1 the overall benefits of mystery shopper projects in the hospitality business through literature reviews; and (2 the importance of how a company can work with an outside agency (consultant, academic institution, etc. to develop a mystery shopping program that can enhance and complement ongoing service quality programs. A casual steakhouse restaurant in the Eastern U.S. was selected as our pilot project. The basic concept of using secret shoppers is to have individuals experience real-time and onsite quality of services and record how the mystery shoppers felt about the quality of services and if the employees met or exceeded the company’s standards. For this reason, the authors believe that mystery shopping, especially in hospitality, is an important means of developing and maintaining a sustainable business. While the sustainability of a business is largely dependent upon “people, profits and planet” in the hospitality industry, it is also dependent upon meeting service standards and developing a feedback loop. Mystery shopping programs have demonstrated their ability to contribute to organizations in this regard.

  1. Sustainable renewable energy projects for intelligent rural electrification in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Brisa; Vetter, Matthias [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany); Bourg, Catherine [Fondation Energies pour le Monde (France); Crehay, Romain [Centre Wallon de Recherches Agronomiques (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The project ''Renewable Energy Sustainable Programs for Intelligent Rural Electrifrication'' RESIREA has been looking for the creation of conditions that make possible the establishment of Renewable Energy Technologies (RET) markets in targeted provinces to Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam. As a main result of the project, in three different selected provinces (one in each country) have been proposed villages as ''ready to implement''. The ''ready to implement'' villages are specific RET projects resulted from applying developed methodologies. One methodology is a deeply well structured cross-analysis of technical and economic parameters and the results have been integrated in a Geographical Information System GIS. Based on the least-cost methodology, off-grid biomass and photovoltaic PV power supply systems have been designed and asset for the proposed villages. In the case of PV system designs, a detailed study has been carried out by means of simulations tools and extensive field data. The PV system design looks to contribute to an ''easy scale-up'' concept for off-grid power supply systems, especially when rural communities are too diverse. Further expected benefits besides the supply of electricity services are the improvement of the living and health conditions of the populations, the stimulation of local markets for RET and economic activities. (orig.)

  2. What Drives the Spatial Development of Urban Villages in China?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341235814; Hooimeijer, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073398578; Sliuzas, R.; Geertman, S.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072392924

    2013-01-01

    China’s dramatic urban expansion has encompassed many peri-urban villages and turned them into so-called urban villages that provide a niche housing market for rural migrants for whom the formal housing market is unaffordable. Yet urban villages are very distinct from informal settlements elsewhere,

  3. Spatial diversity of urban village development in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic urbanization in China during the reform period has led to the emergence and proliferation of so-called urban villages in many cities. The development of urban villages, based on a self-help approach of indigenous villagers, has been satisfying great demand for migrant housing and space for

  4. PV-hybrid village power systems in Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.L.; Taylor, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Ribeiro, C.M. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energie Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The Brazilian Amazon region is an ideal location for isolated mini-grid systems. Hundreds of diesel systems have been installed to supply electricity to this sparsely populated region. However, the availability of renewable energy resources makes the Amazon well-suited to renewable energy systems. This paper describes the technical aspects of two hybrid systems being installed in this region through the cooperative effort of multiple partners: U.S. Department of Energy, through NREL, and Brazilian CEPEL/Eletrobras and state electric utilities.

  5. The Role of Villages and Townships in Informal Land Development in China: An Investigation on the City Fringe of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengjun Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The past decades have witnessed a number of informal land developments on the urban fringe in China although many strict state regulations have been made to control this. The dual urban rural land system is widely believed to be one major determinant of informal developments in the existing literature. However, the important role of local villages and townships are often neglected. This paper aims to shed light on this by looking at the gated informal housing communities in Beijing as a case study. It investigates the role of villages and townships in informal land development and the conflicts of interest that arise with state regulations in the context of political decentralization. The results of analysis show that township governments have an ambivalent attitude or even give tacit approval to informal land development in villages since these informal developments actually bring economic benefits to local villagers and themselves. The situation seems to be worse as townships have poor fiscal capacity and a growing administrative responsibility for improvement of local development in the context of decentralization. Villages are keen to capture economic benefits from informal land development with help from private developers. As a result, a local, informal coalition between townships, villages, and private developers emerged at the grass roots level. This presents a major challenge to the state regulations designed for sustainable urban growth management.

  6. Sustainable Power Generation in Continuous Flow Microbial Fuel Cell Treating Actual Wastewater: Influence of Biocatalyst Type on Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m2 obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  7. Sustainable power generation in continuous flow microbial fuel cell treating actual wastewater: influence of biocatalyst type on electricity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Jaeel, Ali Jwied

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m(2) obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  8. Development of village doctors in China: financial compensation and health system support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Zhu, Weiming; Fu, Yaqun; Zhang, Minmin; Zhao, Yang; Hanson, Kara; Martinez-Alvarez, Melisa; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2017-07-01

    Since 1968, China has trained about 1.5 million barefoot doctors in a few years' time to provide basic health services to 0.8 billion rural population. China's Ministry of Health stopped using the term of barefoot doctor in 1985, and changed policy to develop village doctors. Since then, village doctors have kept on playing an irreplaceable role in China's rural health, even though the number of village doctors has fluctuated over the years and they face serious challenges. United Nations declared Sustainable Development Goals in 2015 to achieve universal health coverage by 2030. Under this context, development of Community Health workers (CHWs) has become an emerging policy priority in many resource-poor developing countries. China's experiences and lessons learnt in developing and maintaining village doctors may be useful for these developing countries. This paper aims to synthesis lessons learnt from the Chinese CHW experiences. It summarizes China's experiences in exploring and using strategic partnership between the community and the formal health system to develop CHWs in the two stages, the barefoot doctor stage (1968 -1985) and the village doctor stage (1985-now). Chinese and English literature were searched from PubMed, CNKI and Wanfang. The information extracted from the selected articles were synthesized according to the four partnership strategies for communities and health system to support CHW development, namely 1) joint ownership and design of CHW programmes; 2) collaborative supervision and constructive feedback; 3) a balanced package of incentives, both financial and non-financial; and 4) a practical monitoring system incorporating data from the health system and community. The study found that the townships and villages provided an institutional basis for barefoot doctor policy, while the formal health system, including urban hospitals, county health schools, township health centers, and mobile medical teams provided training to the barefoot

  9. Heterogeneity and Risk Sharing in Village Economies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappori, Pierre-André; Samphantharak, Krislert; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Townsend, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We show how to use panel data on household consumption to directly estimate households’ risk preferences. Specifically, we measure heterogeneity in risk aversion among households in Thai villages using a full risk-sharing model, which we then test allowing for this heterogeneity. There is substantial, statistically significant heterogeneity in estimated risk preferences. Full insurance cannot be rejected. As the risk sharing, as-if-complete-markets theory might predict, estimated risk preferences are unrelated to wealth or other characteristics. The heterogeneity matters for policy: Although the average household would benefit from eliminating village-level risk, less-risk-averse households who are paid to absorb that risk would be worse off by several percent of household consumption. PMID:24932226

  10. Heterogeneity and Risk Sharing in Village Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappori, Pierre-André; Samphantharak, Krislert; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Townsend, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    We show how to use panel data on household consumption to directly estimate households' risk preferences. Specifically, we measure heterogeneity in risk aversion among households in Thai villages using a full risk-sharing model, which we then test allowing for this heterogeneity. There is substantial, statistically significant heterogeneity in estimated risk preferences. Full insurance cannot be rejected. As the risk sharing, as-if-complete-markets theory might predict, estimated risk preferences are unrelated to wealth or other characteristics. The heterogeneity matters for policy: Although the average household would benefit from eliminating village-level risk, less-risk-averse households who are paid to absorb that risk would be worse off by several percent of household consumption.

  11. Human–dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacán, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Ortolani, A.; Ortega-Pacheco, A.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs’ behavioural responses towards familiar and

  12. SERVIR Town Hall - Connecting Space to Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Searby, Nancy D.; Irwin, Daniel; Albers, Cerese

    2013-01-01

    SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID project, strives to improve environmental decision making through the use of Earth observations, models, and geospatial technology innovations. SERVIR connects these assets with the needs of end users in Mesoamerica, East Africa, and Hindu Kush-Himalaya regions. This Town Hall meeting will engage the AGU community by exploring examples of connecting Space to Village with SERVIR science applications.

  13. Financial Impacts of Foot-and-Mouth Disease at Village and National Levels in Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampanya, S; Khounsy, S; Abila, R; Young, J R; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2016-10-01

    To assist policies on Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) control in Laos and the Mekong region, the financial impact of recent outbreaks at village and national levels was examined. Village-level impacts were derived from recent research on financial losses due to FMD per smallholder household and number of households with FMD-affected livestock in the village. National-level impacts of FMD were determined from examination of 2011-2013 FMD reported to the Lao Department of Livestock and Fisheries (DLF), with the 2011 epidemic reported separately due to the large number and size of outbreaks of FMD in that year. Estimates of the national financial impact of FMD were based on (i) total FMD financial losses at the village level and (ii) the costs of FMD responses and other related costs at the DLF, provincial and district levels where FMD was reported, but excluding the costs of revenue forgone. A Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to account for likelihood of FMD over- and under-reporting. Foot-and-mouth disease was recorded in four provinces of Phonsaly, Bokeo, Xayyabouli and Champasak in three consecutive years from 2011 to 2013. However, the FMD epidemic in 2011 was more widely distributed and involved 414 villages in 14 provinces, with thousands of cases of morbidity in cattle and buffalo and some mortalities. The estimated financial losses due to FMD in 2011 were USD 30 881(±23 176) at the village level and USD 13 512 291 at the national level based on the number of villages with FMD outbreaks reported. However, when the likelihood of FMD under-reporting was accounted for, the estimated financial losses at the national level could potentially increase to USD 102 094 464 (±52 147 261), being almost 12% of the estimated farm gate value of the national large ruminant herd. These findings confirm that FMD causes substantial financial impacts in villages and to the national economy of Laos, providing justification for sustained investments in FMD control

  14. Encouraging girl child education in my village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Entongwe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available My critical reflection will be drawn from an experience I had just a year after my graduation from the university where I was appointed as one of the X-students to lead a student cultural week in my village with the theme “raising awareness on education”. At the university, I was a member of my association in which students from my tribe generally come together to promote unity and encourage others in education. My role was to present a discourse on girl child education all the entire villagers who were gathered at the village square that evening. A high dropout rate at school and illiteracy are major problems in my region, in which there is still a great deal of gender disparity when it comes to educating children, especially the girl child. This programme is in line with the government’s policy of promoting education in my country, whose priority is for education to reach the grass-roots communities.

  15. The Solodamu Surveys: determining fossil fuel use and sea transport need in a coastal village in Fiji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Patricia Newell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Domestic sea transport is critical to all aspects of life in the Pacific, providing access to markets and health and education services, as well as enabling cultural and social connectivity. Current sea transport services are entirely dependent upon use of increasingly expensive fossil fuels. Whilst there has been increasing research on international shipping, very little focus has been given to date to domestic shipping in the Pacific, and in particular at the local, village level. Recent studies have highlighted lack of data, particularly at a village level, as being a major impediment to progressing a shift to more sustainable transport.The importance of transport in achieving sustainable development and green growth is being increasingly highlighted by Pacific Leaders as a key priority, and particularly the need to find alternatives to reduce the region’s crippling dependency on imported fossil fuels. Small Island Developing States (SIDS in other regions also face similar challenges.This paper provides a summary of the findings of a village-based assessment of transport and fossil fuel use in Solodamu Village, Kadavu, Fiji carried out in 2009 and 2011. The objectives of the surveys were to gauge the overall sea, land and air transport use by the village and the fossil fuel footprint of the village by collecting data on a household by household basis. We then go on to outline how this assessment methodology has been expanded for an island group and highlight the potential of using this in other SIDS, so building the data sets available for more accurate analysis of both transport need and fossil fuel use to better address the issues of fossil fuel dependency and sustainable transport for the Pacific.

  16. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchuli, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B. G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-01-01

    The social and economic impact of photovoltaic power on a small, remote native American village is studied. Village history, group life, energy use in general, and the use of photovoltaic-powered appliances are discussed. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  17. Optimal allocation of fault current limiters for sustaining overcurrent relays coordination in a power system with distributed generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elmitwally

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of overcurrent relays (OCRs coordination in the presence of DGs. OCRs are optimally set to work in a coordinated manner to isolate faults with minimal impacts on customers. The penetration of DGs into the power system changes the fault current levels seen by the OCRs. This can deteriorate the coordinated operation of OCRs. Operation time difference between backup and main relays can be below the standard limit or even the backup OCR can incorrectly work before the main OCR. Though resetting of OCRs is tedious especially in large systems, it cannot alone restore the original coordinated operation in the presence of DGs. The paper investigates the optimal utilization of fault current limiters (FCLs to maintain the directional OCRs coordinated operation without any need to OCRs resetting irrespective of DGs status. It is required to maintain the OCRs coordination at minimum cost of prospective FCLs. Hence, the FCLs location and sizing problem is formulated as a constrained multi-objective optimization problem. Multi-objective particle swarm optimization is adopted for solving the optimization problem to determine the optimal locations and sizes of FCLs. The proposed algorithm is applied to meshed and radial power systems at different DGs arrangements using different types of FCLs. Moreover, the OCRs coordination problem is studied when the system includes both directional and non-directional OCRs. Comparative analysis of results is provided.

  18. Community renewable energy in Panama: a sustainability assessment of the “Boca de Lura” PV-Wind-Battery hybrid power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madriz-Vargas Rolando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of a community renewable energy project implemented in the community of “Boca de Lura” located in rural Panama. This is a 2.17 kW stand-alone PV-Wind-Battery hybrid power system supplying energy to a local school also serving as a community facility. A novel sustainability assessment framework is used to examine the Boca de Lura experience and future perspectives for the power system and the project as a whole. The main challenges for Boca de Lura are discussed and recommendations to overcome some of the obstacles encountered are provided. Findings suggest that, even though the project was successfully implemented, its long-term operation is jeopardized due to non-technical aspects rather than technical ones. A potential solution is upgrading the stand-alone system into a minigrid; however, more studies and external advice are required to understand the implications for Boca de Lura, local institutions and possible national and international sponsors.

  19. Life cycle assessment and evaluation of sustainable product design strategies for combined cycle power plants; Lebenszyklusanalyse und Bestimmung von Einflussfaktoren zur nachhaltigen Produktgestaltung von GuD-Kraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Falko

    2010-03-26

    The growth of the national GDP on a worldwide level and the associated increasing demand for primary energy inevitably result in higher emissions levels. According to recent international scientific studies the energy sector (including electricity generation, industrial activities and traffic) contributes up to 83 % to the worldwide greenhouse gas emissions. Climate change and the projection of its impacts have been acknowledged also on the political level and concise measures are being considered. Since access to electricity and sustainable development are inseparable, the question arises whether and how adequate answers can be given within the coming years. Furthermore, the definite lifetime of the existing power plant fleet will result in a gap of up to 12.000 MWh in 2020, depending on the scenario. One part of the answer lies in the sustainable design of power plants. The main contribu-tion of this work is therefore the life cycle analysis of a combined cycle power plant from of a manufacturer's perspective. The visualisation of the entire product system and the re-sults of the impact assessment facilitate the determination of improvement potential. The system boundaries for this study include all relevant phases of the product life cycle (materials, manufacturing, transport, operation, service and end of life). The life cycle inventory consists of all bills of materials and energy consumption for all components and life cycle phases. The interpretation of the results of the impact assessment showed the expected significant contribution in kg CO{sub 2}e for the emission of the full load operation. Nevertheless, the results for all impact categories over the entire lifecycle are given. Various operation scenarios and configurations can now be analysed based on the elaborated modules, and can now serve as decision support already during product development. The visualisation of impacts of design decisions on the ecological footprint of the product system in

  20. SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the image of the international business environment has changed significantly. Studies conducted by UNCTAD shows that corporate phenomenon developments in the world economy is growing. Without claiming to present an exhaustive topic so vast we tried to capture some "facets" of sustainable development from the perspective of multinational corporations, given the expansion of these economic entities and strengthening their power in the global economy. We present more negative aspects of the actions of multinational corporations in terms of sustainable development, it is very important to know both sides of the coin, which will not only help transnational giants including release. Based on issues such as corporate social responsibility, environmental pollution and workers' rights, we sought to counter official statements. The conclusion is that these economic entities are real forces that can not be ignored in today's world and the obvious problem of sustainable development can not be addressed independently of the phenomenon, context we also identified some possible solutions to conflict of corporations and essence of the concept of sustainable development.

  1. A feasibility assessment for the application of biogas and wind power in the farm environment as sustainable sources of energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbo, Laura C.

    The depletion of energy sources and the ever-increasing energy demand---and consequently price escalation---is a problem that concerns the global population. Despite the concept of energy crisis being widely accepted nowadays, there is a lot of scepticism and misinformation on the possible alternatives to alleviate the environmental and economic impacts of conventional energy generation. Renewable energy technologies are constantly experiencing significant innovation and improvements. This thesis sought to assess the potential of small dairy farms to make an energy shift and identify the practical benefits and possible downfalls of this shift. Wind power and biogas digestion were analysed in this thesis, and a model to assess these technologies at any given farm was developed on VBA. For the case studied in this research both technologies were concluded to be feasible from an economic point of view. Although the initial investment can seem costly, considering the relatively low payback period and the currently available subsidies the economic implications are not an obstacle. The model developed on VBA is applicable to any region, given the right data is put into the programme. Considering the global energy concern, models such as the one developed in this thesis are an appropriate tool to identify potential shifts to greener solutions and prove to users that it can be economically profitable for them as well as environmentally beneficial.

  2. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Richard J; Paul, Nicholas A; Hu, Yi; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass). Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg(-1) DW and 137 mg.kg(-1) DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn) were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation.

  3. Primacy of wind power. Deliberations on a sustainable renewable energy supply; Primat Wind Energie. Betrachtung einer nachhaltigen regenerativen Energieversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Gerd A.

    2008-07-01

    Time and again the author has felt his adrenaline rise on listening to reports or talk shows in the media (radio, television, newspapers) that were based on nothing but misinformation and subjective sentiment. In this publication he has therefore endeavoured to give a popular scientific overview of the advantages of using wind power for the public energy supply. In the introduction he expresses his heart-felt thanks to the diploma'd journalist Anke Baars for her amiable support. The explanatory calculations are given as examples with the intention of clarifying the relationships and orders of magnitude involved. The numerical examples are presented with the intent of explaining target figures and assumptions. All information was collected through scrupulous research. The reader is encouraged to check on the numerical examples given. These have been presented to give a rough idea of the orders of magnitude and global relationships involved. This publication stands somewhat apart from the mainstream. The author hopes that the reader will gain instructive insights into the energy era, find food for thought and feel encouraged to participate and take action.

  4. Biomass and energetics of non-timber forest resources in a cluster of tribal villages on the Eastern Ghats of Orissa, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, M.K.; Dash, S.S. [Berhampur University, Orissa (India). Dept. of Botany

    2000-07-01

    An empirical study on the non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in three tribal villages on the Eastern Ghats of India was made during 1994-95. These village ecosystems - Rajikakhola, Nediguda and Badruguda - are situated in the Phulbani district of Orissa and are inhabited by the Kondh tribe. The average annual production of important non-timber forest products (NTFPs) was 1.87 t (26.78 GJ) of mohua flower, 2.96 t (54.41 GJ) of siali leaf, 6.73 t (107.06 GJ) of thatch grass, 4.2 t (8.01 GJ) of sago palm sap and 0.93 t (11.39 GJ) of tamarind pulp per village. Total production of NTFPs was 253.55 GJ per village. Total consumption of NTFPs was 190.57 GJ per village. However, average household consumption was 9.60 GJ. Annual country liquor consumption was 2287 1 per village, out of which a total of 762 1 was prepared locally and the rest imported. Total annual export of NTFPs was 3.69 t (61.47 GJ) per village, maximum being by Rajikakhola. Among the exported products siali leaf ranked highest. Total human energy expended for collection of NTFP was 16.1 GJ per village, out of which men contributed 37.3%, women 53.8% and children 8.9% in these villages. The average input-output ratio of energy for NTFP was 16.56. For sustainable development of tribal villages, conservation and proper management of existing forests, minimisation of waste and increase of the value of products through efficient processing are highly essential. (author)

  5. Agricultural production in Kikwawila village, southeastern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, A; Jeje, B; Tanner, M; Freyvogel, T A

    1987-06-01

    Food production, land utilisation and agricultural structures were surveyed at Kikwawila village, north of Ifakara (Kilombero District, Morogoro Region) in 1984. This study was part of a more comprehensive, longitudinal programme to investigate the health status of a rural community, aiming in particular at the interrelations between nutrition, parasitic infections, immunity and the environment. Out of 340 households, 100 were interviewed and their subsistence farming activities recorded. The soil was found to be of great variability, being fertile where it was of alluvial origin but of reduced potential where it was non-alluvial. In all, 70 plant species were registered as being cultivated, with rice, maize, cassava and beans providing the main staple food. Apart from a few exceptions, the fields were cultivated without any mechanization. The seasonal distribution of agricultural work is described, but no detailed workload analysis of the villagers with regard to age and sex has been performed. At the foot of the mountains, where artificial irrigation has been introduced, dry season cropping was practised in addition to the prevailing wet season farming, which rendered the cultivation of marketable crops (mainly tomatoes) possible. The farmers were found to be imaginative and capable of adapting to various conditions, irrespective of their tribal origins. Alternatively, the quality of the soil and the unreliable availability of water set limits to the potential of food production in the area. Although land is still available, it is becoming more scarce as the human population increases. The further impoverishment of the land represents an imminent danger. Therefore, top priority ought to be given to soil conservation, followed by intercropping and/or crop rotation, seed production and crop protection against game and pests. Means of implementing such measures are discussed. It is suggested that Community Agricultural Workers be installed, elected by the villagers

  6. Ritual Change in a Turkish Alevi Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas McElwain

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a documentation and analysis of change in ritual in the village of Sarilar, on the west bank of the Euphrates River near Yavuseli, Gaziantep. The research problem posed was identification of ritual change within the consultants' memory and some tentative ways of situating such change within the socio-economic context. The mysticism of the dervish lodge remains as a certain life attitude along with the new views of modernization that have been so well inculcated. Although modernization, at least in the Turkish Alevi context, tends to conflict with the mystical experience of the Bektashi dervish in some areas, a democratized inner core remains.

  7. Attitudes of local residents towards sustainable ecotourism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates indigenous communities' attitudes towards sustainable ecotourism development in Olumirin Waterfall Southwestern Nigeria. A field survey via structured questionnaire was conducted on 150 village respondents living in the vicinity of Olumirin waterfall of which fifty questionnaires were randomly ...

  8. Crop farmers use of environmentally sustainable agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to assess crop farmers' use of environmentally sustainable agricultural practices in Ogun State. Multi – Stage-sampling and simple random sampling procedure was employed to select two hundred (200) farmers from villages selected from the four agricultural zones of Ogun State Agricultural ...

  9. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    research, climate research, tsunami warning/ verification, and seismic /earthquake monitoring. The littoral nature of Navy training ranges and the unique...Mountainside Village) and 2 (Hillside Tunnels ) of four-phase urban training complex plan. Ongoing Progress continuing into 2014. 252014 Sustainable

  10. Application of the analytic hierarchy process to a sustainability assessment of coastal beach exploitation: a case study of the wind power projects on the coastal beaches of Yancheng, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Sun, Huimei; Zhao, Yangguo

    2013-01-30

    Sustainability assessments of coastal beach exploitation are difficult because the identification of appropriate monitoring methodologies and evaluation procedures is still ongoing. In particular, the most suitable procedure for the application of sustainability assessment to coastal beaches remains uncertain. This paper presents a complete sustainability assessment process for coastal beach exploitation based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). We developed an assessment framework consisting of 14 indicators derived from the three dimensions of suitability, economic and social value, and ecosystem. We chose a wind power project on a coastal beach of Yancheng as a case study. The results indicated that the wind power farms on the coastal beach were not completely in keeping with sustainable development theory. The construction of the wind power farms had some negative impacts. Therefore, in the design stage, wind turbines should be designed and planned carefully to minimize these negative impacts. In addition, the case study demonstrated that the AHP was capable of addressing the complexities associated with the sustainability of coastal beaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Educational Approach for Sustainable Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Suparman Abdullah; Dwia A. Tina Pulubuhu; Arsyad Genda; Syaiful Cangara; Muh. Irfan Said; Ria Renita Abbas; Seniwati

    2017-01-01

    - This study focuses on the educational approaches for sustainable agriculture through the development, application and research of teaching and learning practices. These approaches serve and connect educators such as lecturers, students; decision makers such as regent, mayor or village head and local people who focus on the teaching and learning of sustainable agriculture. This research conducted in Turatea District, Jeneponto Region, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. People of the district in g...

  12. Model strategy for village development in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav ROLÍNEK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The model strategies discussed in this article represent different ways of possible village development in the Czech Republic. We used typologies of strategies from business strategic management for their definition. Twenty municipalities, where structured interviews were carried out with their mayors, were chosen randomly from among 100 villages where a questionnaire survey was conducted in 2012 (Faltová Leitmanová, et al., 2012. Based on the qualitative analysis of the structured interview summaries, eight model strategies were ascertained. These include integration strategy, service differentiation, spending cuts, usage of municipal property, stabilization of village population, business support, fundraising, and identification of the inhabitants with the village (village pride. The most commonly applied model strategy is integration, followed by village population stabilization.

  13. Monitoring of "urban villages" in Shenzhen, China from high-resolution GF-1 and TerraSAR-X data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunzhu; Blaschke, Thomas; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2015-10-01

    Urban villages comprise mainly low-rise and congested, often informal settlements surrounded by new constructions and high-rise buildings whereby structures can be very different between neighboring areas. Monitoring urban villages and analyzing their characteristics are crucial for urban development and sustainability research. In this study, we carried out a combined analysis of multispectral GaoFen-1 (GF-1) and high resolution TerraSAR-X radar (TSX) imagery to extract the urban village information. GF-1 and TSX data are combined with the Gramshmidt spectral sharpening method so as to provide new input data for urban village classification. The Grey-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) approach was also applied to four directions to provide another four types (all, 0°, 90°, 45° directions) of TSX-based inputs for urban village detection. We analyzed the urban village mapping performance using the Random Forest approach. The results demonstrate that the best overall accuracy and the best producer accuracy of urban villages reached with the GLCM 90° dataset (82.33%, 68.54% respectively). Adding single polarization TSX data as input information to the optical image GF-1 provided an average product accuracy improvement of around 7% in formal built-up area classification. The SAR and optical fusion imagery also provided an effective means to eliminate some layover, shadow effects, and dominant scattering at building locations and green spaces, improving the producer accuracy by 7% in urban area classification. To sum up, the added value of SAR information is demonstrated by the enhanced results achievable over built-up areas, including formal and informal settlements.

  14. Community Leadership in Rural Tourism Development: A Tale of Two Ancient Chinese Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshuai Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are paying increasing attention to questions of community leadership and rural tourism development. Based on leadership theories and the literature on community leadership and tourism development, this study developed a framework for community leadership in rural tourism development and used it to examine two ancient Chinese villages. We used the longitudinal case study method to collect data, and we used textual analysis to analyze these data. The results show that the rebel leadership characteristic of confrontational actions played an important role in starting the tourism industry in both villages. However, this leadership was difficult to maintain because community leaders and residents had limited power compared to that of outsiders. Losing control of tourism development in the two villages led to banal management, which prevented the emergence of strong community leadership. In the future, we argue that resilient community leadership should be nurtured in the two villages to address more complex problems occurring in tourism development, such as those characterized by vision tensions and conflicts of interest among the stakeholders affected by tourism development. Finally, we suggest that, based on the longitudinal method, future research can focus on the relationship between resilient leadership and the resilience of tourism communities.

  15. livestock husbandry and economic-sustainability of small farmers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The study attempts livestock husbandry and sustainability of small farmers in West Gojjam region, Ethiopia where a ... and their engagement in different operations of livestock husbandry for economic sustainability. Systematic random sampling was ..... sell and purchase livestock from the livestock markets and within village ...

  16. The Ohrberg solar village; Solarsiedlung am Ohrberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanoli, K.; Christoffers, D.; Rockendorf, G. [Institut fuer Solarenergieforschung GmbH Hameln/Emmerthal (ISFH), Emmerthal (Germany). Abt. Systemtechnik von Solarenergieanlagen; Kranz, R. [Elektrizitaetswerke Wesertal GmbH, Hameln (Germany). Abt. Energieberatung/Energiekonzepte

    1998-02-01

    As an officially approved regional project of the EXPO 2000, the Ohrberg Solar Village will demonstrate an integrated energy concept - combining customer information and counseling, modern energy technologies and energy services rendered by utilities - which reduces the consumption of conventional energy ressources and the CO{sub 2}-emissions. The local utility Wesertal GmbH will equip the 82 low-energy solar houses of the village with reliable, cost-effective and innovative energy technologies and will provide energy services on the basis of a user-friendly contract. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Solarsiedlung am Ohrberg demonstriert als registriertes Regionalprojekt der EXPO 2000, wie ein integriertes Energiekonzept - bestehend aus umfassender Energieberatung, Einsatz moderner Energietechnologien und einem Nutz-Energie-Dienstleistungsangebot der Energieversorger - einen substantiellen Beitrag zur Ressourcenschonung und zur Reduzierung der klimarelevanten Umweltbelastung leisten kann. Das regionale Energieversorgungsunternehmen Wesertal GmbH wird innovative, erprobte, kostenguenstige, rationelle und regenerative Energieversorgungstechniken in den 82 solaren Niedrigenergiehaeusern dieser Siedlung installieren und die Waermeversorgung im Rahmen eines Waermedienstleistungskonzeptes uebernehmen. (orig.)

  17. International Lifestyle Migration and Social Marginalization on the Tourism Village

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kolopaking, Lala

    2016-01-01

    By conducting qualitative research that supported with quantitative data analysis, it has founded that International lifestyle migration which committed by Middle East citizens (Saudi Arabian and Qatar) at South Tugu Village, Cisarua in East Java Indonesia as the destination for village tourism - have been raising social unequality. International lifestyle migration process on this village had occured along with International refugee resettlement from Asian country (Pakistan, Afganistan, Moro...

  18. Related factors for defecation behaviour at Bandar Village

    OpenAIRE

    Dwiana, Anna; Herawaty, Lucky

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bandar Batauga village is the village which implements STBM program pillar 1 related stop open defecation but in practice has not been in line with expectations. Besides diarrhea cases recorded in Batauga health center is also very high, as many as 304 cases. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors associated with Community attitudes in defecation in Bandar Batauga village Batauga district South Buton Regency. Method: This study is study with mixed method, with conve...

  19. The physical impoverishment and decay of Danish villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    For the latest 30 years the physical environment (buildings, gardens, roads and spaces, etc.) in the Danish villages has undergone drastic changes. Many villages near the large towns are drowned in growth and modern buildings, and other villages in the Danish outskirts are hit by decline and phys......, a regional and local authority level as well as the local level, including a discussion of the Danish rural district policy before and after the re-adjustment of the farm subsidypolicy in the EU....

  20. Thermodynamics and sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Rene

    1997-01-01

    It is the objective of this thesis to demonstrate exergy analysis as a powerful instrument to obtain sustainable development. An important aspect of sustainable development is the minimisation of irreversibilities caused by the use of non-renewables. In order to limit the scope of this thesis

  1. Sustainability at BPA 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    BPA’s Sustainability Action Plan is grounded in our commitment to environmental stewardship and Executive Order 13514 that calls on the federal agencies to “lead by example” by setting a 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target, increasing energy efficiency; reducing fleet petroleum consumption; conserving water; reducing waste; supporting sustainable communities; and leveraging federal purchasing power to promoting environmentally responsible products and technologies.

  2. Sustaining Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak; Mary Heather Noble

    2003-01-01

    The significance of the urban forest resource and the powerful forces for change in the urban environment make sustainability a critical issue in urban forest management. The diversity, connectedness, and dynamics of the urban forest establish the context for management that will determine the sustainability of forest structure, health, functions, and benefits. A...

  3. Implementation of village empower program in supporting form of institutions of village business institutions (BUMDes (Study on Dayang Suri Village Bungaraya Sub District Siak Regency Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiah Sufi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate the implementation of village empowerment program in support of institutional formation of Village Owned Enterprise (BUMDes. The research carried out at Dayang Suri Village, Bungaraya Subdistrict, Siak Regency at UED-SP Karya Bersama. The data used consist of secondary data in the form of documents relating to the implementation of village empowerment program in support of the formation of BUMDes and primary data in the form of direct observation of research location and interview with key informant. Data analysis employed in descriptively qualitative. Based on the result, it mentioned that into the preparation stage, implementation and principles of management of UED-SP Karya Bersama program has been relatively good. However, there are still less maximal aspects such as lack of socialization conducted by village government, lack of transparency or clarity of information by village fund managers and lack of village facilitators as facilitators in decision making. Keywords: poverty, community empowerment, savings and loans, transparency

  4. The Influence of Environmental Change on Village Safety in Mountain Area: A Case Study of Haucha Village in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Shang; Huang, Wen-Shun; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Yeh, Nai-Ching

    2015-04-01

    Haucha Village is an indigenous tribe of Rukai people in Pingtung County, Taiwan. Due to the difficulty of providing transportation, education, medical services and jobs, residents were migrated from "Kochapongan" to Haucha village by local authorities in 1980. The site of the relocation is located three km away from Haucha. The new residents in Haucha village lived safely and peacefully before 1996. However, Typhoon Herb brought the first debris flow hazard in 1996, and it caused four deaths. Then, several typhoons caused some damage to the village. Recently, Haucha village was destroyed during typhoon Morakot in 2009 when 128 buildings were buried by sediments. In this study, we used historical map, typhoon records, rainfall data, and the change of river bed elevation to determine the environmental change and the safety of Haucha village. Our results show that Haucha village was located on sand bar of Southern Ailiao stream before 1924, and formed a river terrace between 1925~1960 that was 30m higher than the river bed. Local authorities decided to move Rukai people from Kochapongan to Haucha in 1970. After 30 years, the elevation of Haucha village was equal to the river bed, in other words, the village formed a flood plain of Southern Ailiao stream after typhoon Morakot in 2009. The present landscape of Haucha village looks similar to the one 100 years ago. Morphological changes of mountain area is more rapid than plain changes, hence, we should considered larger temporal and spatial scales to evaluate the village`s safety in the mountain area.

  5. Renewable Energy for Water Pumping Applications In Rural Villages; Period of Performance: April 1, 2001--September 1, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, N.; Foster, R.; Ellis, A.

    2003-07-01

    This report introduces conventional and renewable energy sources for water pumping applications in rural villages by reviewing the technologies and illustrating typical applications. As energy sources for water pumping, the report discusses diesel/gasoline/kerosene engines, grid power supplies, traditional windmills, electrical wind turbines, and PV.

  6. A ‘LANGUAGE’ OF MODERNIZATION: CULTURE AND ART EDUCATION IN THE VILLAGE INSTITUTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan AK

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Village Institutes were originally-designed in-place-training institutions of the Turkish education history. They had been a very significant and unique educational-product of Turkey which were gifted to all secular [modern] world education systems. Because these Institutes were explored in line with thoroughly native considerations and foresights. Thus the Institutes punched their latterday principles and values not only in the Turkish, but also in many contemporary world education systems. Although the Institutes were shut down by some reactionary political approaches, their impacts, educational power and pedagogic wealth had reached until today. The main reason for that could be defined with various aspects. First of all, these institutions had adopted an unique educational model which was directly based on the universal science, culture and fine arts. This approach ensured authentic innovative styles for tudents of the Institutes, not only in the village field, but also in every educational level. Thus it should be emphasized that one of the most important aspects with this innovative education method was that the Village Institutes were conceived with a ‘revolutionary’ and ‘enlightenment’ understanding. This noteworthy aspect was what made them unique at first. Thus the aim of this research will firstly become to analyze educational model and system of the Village Institutes stemming from their unique, native, humanist and secular educational methods; and secondly explore how much innovative the Village Institutes were in the fields of science, culture and art. This study is based on the hypothesis-deduction method. Thus findings method for the study will follow a from-general-to-specific case approach. In this study, literature review and content analysis research methods will mainly be used.

  7. BERCENI VILLAGE - A SOCIAL-ECONOMICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina IORGA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rural modernization aims at maintaining rural societies through occupational diversification that will improvequality of life and avoid rural exodus. It aims to acquire some features of the modern world such as those related totechnical, increased productivity, infrastructure, whereby rural community enriches its identity, acquiring newmeanings.This study is a close social-economical analysis of the countryside households of Berceni village. Berceniis in the southern county of Ilfov near Bucharest. It is based on the statistical data provided by National Institute ofStatistics. The data have been processed into the following indicators:age structure and gender, births and deaths,feminization, migration .Considering that human resources is the main factor in developing and moderinization ofrural space, this study is aimed to investigate as well, the posibility of diversifying inhabitants’ occupationsaccording to pshicologycal, social and economical resources.

  8. Green Architecture Approach on Mosque Design in Cipendawa Village, Cianjur, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purisari, Rahma; Safitri, Ratna; Permanasari, Eka; Hendola, Feby

    2017-06-01

    Climate change has been a global concern as many buildings are constructed and maintained without considering environmental impacts. Global warming, flood and environmental damage have become everyday phenomena. Architecture plays a vital role to in shifting design paradigm green architecture that is sustainable and environmental friendly. This research-based design investigates the implementation of green architectural approach on a mosque design at a waqf land in Cipendawa Village, Cianjur. The site is located on the hill where water catchment is required. Green architecture approach is expected to minimize negative environmental impacts and provide solution for low budget mosque.

  9. Moving Towards Eco Cultural Tourism Village (A Case Study of Pondok Cabe Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Kurniawati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies some eco-cultural tourism attraction potentials that exist in PondokCabeUdik Village Tangerang Selatan Indonesia. In addition, it investigates local people’s opinion on tourism development. The objective is to provide a preliminary overview of eco-tourism development. This study is a descriptive study that uses three types of instrument in data collection method, including questionnaire, interview and field observation. The data is then analyzed using SWOT analysis. The result indicated that natural potential include farming, lake and fish pond, and chicken hatchery. Cultural potentials include cultural diversity that depicted in praying houses and culinary. 194 respondents involved are the locals. The result showed thatthere is positive view from the local community on the availability of tourism potentials and development in the future. It is proposed that environmental awareness, education, ecotourism development, and consensus buildingare needed to implement eco cultural tourism concept. Keywords: Tourism, Eco-Cultural, Village, Planning and Development

  10. Look Who's Talking. Explaining Water-Related Information Sharing and Demand for Action Among Ugandan Villagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Nathalie; Dewachter, Sara; Molenaers, Nadia

    2016-11-01

    Many national water policies propagate community-based participatory approaches to overcome weaknesses in supply-driven rural water provision, operation, and maintenance. Citizen involvement is thought to stimulate bottom-up accountability and broaden the information base, which may enrich design and implementation processes and foster improved water accessibility and sustainability. Practices on the ground, however, are embedded in socio-political realities which mediate possible beneficial effects of participatory approaches. This paper builds on full social network data collected in a Ugandan village to study the social and political reality of two distinct levels of participation, i.e. local information sharing among citizens and a more active appeal to fellow citizens to improve water services. We use Logistic Regression Quadratic Assignment Procedure to explore what type of actor and network traits influence information sharing and whether the same factors are in play in the demand for action to remedy water-related problems. Whereas social aspects (social support relations) and homophily (using the same water source, the same gender) play an important role in information sharing, it is the educational level, in particular, of the villager who is called upon that is important when villagers demand action. Our findings also demonstrate that those most in need of safe water do not mobilize their information sharing ties to demand for action. This indicates that building local water policies and practice exclusively on locally existing demand for action may fail to capture the needs of the most deprived citizens.

  11. Irrigation quality of ground water of twenty villages in Lahore district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available study was conducted in twenty villages of Lahore district to assess the suitability of ground water for irrigation. Three water samples were collected from each of twenty villages and were analyzed for electrical conductivity (EC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, residual sodium carbonate (RSC and chloride concentration. Out of total 60 water samples, 7 (11.7% were fit, 7 (11.7% were marginally fit, and remaining 46 (76.6% were unfit for irrigation. Twenty eight samples (46.6% had electrical conductivity higher than permissible limit (i.e. >1250 µS cm-1, 19 samples (31.6% were found with high SAR (i.e. >10 (m mol L-10. 5, 44 samples (73.3% had high RSC (i.e. >2.5 me L-1 and 10 samples (16.6% were found unfit for irrigation due to high concentration of chloride (i.e. >3.9 me L-1. It can be inferred from data that quality of available ground water in most ofthe villages is not suitable for sustainable crop production and soil health.

  12. The basotho cultural village: Cultural tourism enterprise or custodian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extent to which the Basotho Cultural Village manages to conserve indigenous knowledge systems was investigated. The research was conducted making use of a knowledge audit. Structured interviews were administered to employees as well as to visitors to the Basotho Cultural Village. The investigation was inspired ...

  13. The Village Green Project: Lesson Plans for K-8 Educators ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains lesson plans spanning kindergarten through 8th grade, that are written to connect next-generation science standards (USA) to the Village Green Project and related air quality topics. This document contains a series of classroom lesson plans to support connections between the Village Green Project and the USA National Science Standards at various education levels.

  14. Fertility Status of Fadama Soils in Gantsare Village, Wamakko Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in Gantsare village, Wamakko local government, Sokoto state to determine the effect of cement dust emitted from Sokoto cement factory on the fertility of fadama soils. Soil samples were collected in June, 2008 from the eastern, northeastern, and southeastern parts of the village and Girabshi; ...

  15. Sleeping sickness surveys: game reserve adjacent villages in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    87 in~ividuals traced 2 years after hospital discharge were found well and active in their villages. 4 died in villages after hospital treatment. 3 relapsed and were readmitted to hospital. Sera from 160 game ranger volunteers and from 82 suspected cases_of Rhodesian sleeping sickness were tested by use of ELISA, IF AT ...

  16. Fertility Status of Fadama Soils in Gantsare Village, Wamakko Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: A study was conducted in Gantsare village, Wamakko local government, Sokoto state to determine the effect of cement dust emitted from Sokoto cement factory on the fertility of fadama soils. Soil samples were collected in June, 2008 from the eastern, northeastern, and southeastern parts of the village and ...

  17. Distributions of soil phosphorus in China's densely populated village landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaguo Jiao; Erle C. Ellis; Ian Yesilonis; Junxi Wu; Hongqing Wang; Huixin Li; Linzhang. Yang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Village landscapes, which integrate small-scale agriculture with housing, forestry and a host of other land use practices, cover more than 2x106 km2 across China. Village lands tend to be managed at very fine spatial scales (≤30 m), with managers altering soil fertility and even terrain by terracing,...

  18. SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF FOREST VILLAGES IN ARTVIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlet Toksoy

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Forest villages have been considered apart from the villagers who live on the other rural areas in Turkey since the last quarter of the XIX th century. This type of villagers is supported to the priority for the forest works and to purchase reduced prize for the forest products. On the other hand these villagers are also instructed and exhorted about the subjects like animal husbandry, carpet business etc. However, these villagers are the poorest part of the society at the moment. This study is based on a direct interview survey which was performed to 100 householders from 15 villages to determine the demographic, social, cultural, economic etc. characteristics of villagers and to assist in reaching positive results by using these characteristics in prepared various plans. According the results, the rate of university education is 4% and the active population corresponds to 70%. The 31% of forest villagers are get along with agriculture, only 1 % of the sampled people are get along with forestry. Furthermore, none of the people thinks that forestry is the first level job opportunity for their future.

  19. The land use diversity of urban villages in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2012-01-01

    China’s dynamic urbanisation since 1978 has led to the proliferation of so-called ‘urban villages’ in many cities. Their development, via a self-help approach by indigenous villagers, delivers low-cost housing and various other social and economic activities. Consequently, urban villages are

  20. The Concept of Village Autonomy in Indonesia (Indonesian Constitution Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifqi Ridlo Phahlevy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia was introduced to the term, “village autonomy” in 1970s; however, throughout the past years of establishing autonomous villages in Indonesia, the legislators have not been able to provide any clarity about this concept. Villages, as a legal entity, do not have enough independence to represent themselves as an autonomous unit of community in the state administration system of Indonesia. Article 18B and 28I of the second amendment of The 1945 Constitution of The State of Republic of Indonesia (UUD 45 state that the villages can have independent governments, by giving the alternative of village autonomy. Implementation the Law No. 6 Year 2014 is a part of the effort to realize the message of constitution and hence conception of autonomous villages is expected to be the catalyst for this concept. The presence of this law had a considerable impact on the 2014 presidential elections. Because of this people are concerned that political interests may try to drive and turning the direction and purpose of the law. This study is a part of the research on the implementation of village autonomy policies in Indonesia, and is compiled by using statute and conceptual approach. How To Cite: Phahlevy, R. (2016. The Concept of Village Autonomy in Indonesia (Indonesian Constitution Perspective. Rechtsidee, 3(1, 27-40. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v3i1.151

  1. Astronomy Village: Innovative Uses of Planetary Astronomy Images and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.; Pompea, S. M.

    2008-06-01

    Teaching and learning science is best done by hands-on experience with real scientific data and real scientific problems. Getting such experiences into public and home-schooling classrooms is a challenge. Here we describe two award-winning multimedia products that embody one successful solution to the problem: Astronomy Village: Investigating the Universe, and Astronomy Village: Investigating the Solar System. Each Village provides a virtual environment for inquiry-based scientific exploration of ten planetary and astronomical problems such as ``Mission to Pluto'' and ``Search for a Supernova.'' Both Villages are standards-based and classroom tested. Investigating the Solar System is designed for middle and early high school students, while Investigating the Universe is at the high school and introductory college level. The objective of both Villages is to engage students in scientific inquiry by having them acquire, explore, and analyze real scientific data and images drawn from real scientific problems.

  2. Changing cultural landscape in post-productivism of rice field in Nyuh Kuning Village Bali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulidi, C.; Wulandari, L. D.

    2017-06-01

    sustainable way in conserving cultural landscape. Learning from Nyuh Kuning case, new ideas need to conserve cultural landscape and at the same time increased the economic villagers. Through considering rice fields renters preferences and attachment land in Nyuh Kuning, rice field is an important element for their preferences to stay at Nyuh Kuning. Villas in Nyuh Kuning retaining rice field map as part of the villa’s character. Here we can see rice field not only culturally valuable but also as a tourist attraction, which can be sustained if the communities themselves manage it.

  3. Paradigms of rural tourism in Serbia in the function of village revitalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovo Medojevic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rural regions in Serbia differ considerably in social, economic and demographic characteristics. Basic problems and trends almost all the rural regions share are migrations, poor diversification of economic activities, extensive agriculture, high level of unemployment, lack of employment possibilities, poor and underdeveloped infrastructure, low GDP per capita in comparison to the urban regions and unpolluted environment faced with potential threats . The subject of this paper is to point to the potentials of the rural tourism in Serbia with the aim of village revitalization, as well as its prevention from dying out. Also, the aim of the paper is to stress the fact that the rural tourism is a sustainable model of development and preservation of Serbian village and Serbian peasant from more aspects: economic, tourist, sociological, the spatial planning and ecological ones. Finally, the aim of the paper is to emphasize that it is possible to save village identity by its transformation into ethno village adopting the idea of European ethno villages. Rural tourism in Serbia must become `main` industry` and a generator of sleeping national economy. The main benefits belong to the rural households. Tourist agencies must be engaged in enabling a dialogue between their employees and local representatives. Clients must not only be observers but also critics in the spirit of trust and transparency. A full and true comprehension of the rural tourism role is realized through revealing habits of the host, traditional values rooted in the existing culture, establishment of relations amongst population at the local level. Serbia has favourable conditions for developing rural tourism. It has, in the first place, preserved nature, mild climate, clean air, unpolluted rivers and lakes, rich flora and fauna. At the moment, 11 regional centres (comprising 10-15 municipal offices are engaged in collecting and spreading relevant information for respective target

  4. Contribution of district heating to a sustainable power supply. Pipe manufacturer supports a decentral supply; Beitrag der Fernwaerme zur nachhaltigen Energieversorgung. Rohrhersteller unterstuetzt dezentrale Versorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henss, Thorsten [Isoplus Fernwaermetechnik Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH, Rosenheim (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The term sustainability is used in an almost inflationary way. What is sustainability? What contribution is made by the district heating? The author of the paper under consideration attempts to answer these questions. Two regional district heating projects have been evaluated on the basis of a multi-criteria analysis. Additionally, the author presents possibilities of how a producer of pipes may contribute to the success of sustainable local heating projects and district heating projects.

  5. Relégation au village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Renahy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Les thèses de l’individualisation des sociétés occidentales, ou de l’exclusion de ceux qui resteraient en marge d’une vaste classe moyenne aux modes de vie homogénéisés, ont sans doute permis de sortir d’une grille de lecture rigide héritée du marxisme. Mais elles résistent aujourd’hui mal aux faits et sont vivement contredites par le renouvellement des études sur les inégalités sociales pensées en termes de stratification. Enquêtant la population ouvrière d’un village industriel de Bourgogne au cours des années 1990, l’auteur a pu mesurer tout autant la force socialisatrice continue du groupe ouvrier sur sa jeunesse que le lent processus de délitement de ses cadres de références, longtemps stabilisés autour d’une mono-industrie métallurgique, provoquant une crise dans la reproduction de ce monde ouvrier. C’est cette crise de reproduction qui est évoquée ici. Dans un premier temps sont explicitées les formes passées de la présence industrielle au village, qui n’a jamais été celle d’un bastion de la grande industrie – la population locale n’est pas structurellement différenciée de celle de son environnement rural immédiat. L’exemple d’une lignée familiale d’artisans montre pour finir l’étroit maillage entre usine et structures sociales plus classiquement rurales, favorisant la constitution d’un capital d’autochtonie, déclinaison populaire du capital social.Relegation to the villageArguments demonstrating the individualisation of western societies, or the exclusion of those who stay on the margins of a vast middle class homogeneous life style, have no doubt allowed the move away from the rigid interpretations inherited from Marxism. However, these arguments resist today in spite of the facts and they are even keenly contradicted by the renewal of stratification studies on social inequalities. Analyzing the working population of an industrial village in Bourgogne during the

  6. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  7. Astronomy Village Reaches for New Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.; Pompea, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    We are developing a set of complex, multimedia-based instructional modules emphasizing technical and scientific issues related to Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope project. The modules" pedagogy will be open-ended and problem-based to promote development of problem-solving skills. Problem- based-learning modules that emphasize work on open-ended complex real world problems are particularly valuable in illustrating and promoting a perspective on the process of science and engineering. Research in this area shows that these kinds of learning experiences are superior to more conventional student training in terms of gains in student learning. The format for the modules will be based on the award-winning multi-media educational Astronomy Village products that present students with a simulated environment: a mountaintop community surrounded by a cluster of telescopes, satellite receivers, and telecommunication towers. A number of "buildings" are found in the Village, such as a library, a laboratory, and an auditorium. Each building contains an array of information sources and computer simulations. Students navigate through their research with a mentor via imbedded video. The first module will be "Observatory Site Selection." Students will use astronomical data, basic weather information, and sky brightness data to select the best site for an observatory. Students will investigate the six GSMT sites considered by the professional site selection teams. Students will explore weather and basic site issues (e.g., roads and topography) using remote sensing images, computational fluid dynamics results, turbulence profiles, and scintillation of the different sites. Comparison of student problem solving with expert problem solving will also be done as part of the module. As part of a site selection team they will have to construct a case and present it on why they chose a particular site. The second module will address aspects of system engineering and optimization for a GSMT

  8. Characterization of the village goat production systems in the rural communities of the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West Provinces of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdladla, Khanyisile; Dzomba, Edgar Farai; Muchadeyi, Farai Catherine

    2017-03-01

    Expansion of goat improvement programs requires exploration of the factors that influence the production system and breeding initiatives. Characterization of goat breeds or populations is crucial in providing information on prevalent goat types and their attributes and may suffice as a guideline on conservation, development, and selection for improved productivity. This study investigated the existing village goat production system and phenotypic diversity of the different village populations from four South African provinces. The study further investigated the use of phenotypic attributes to classify goats to breeds or populations. Data was collected from 142 households in 26 villages of the Eastern Cape (n = 2 villages), KwaZulu-Natal (n = 6 villages), Limpopo (n = 13 villages), and North West (n = 5 villages) provinces through a survey. Individual interviews and focus group discussions revealed that the mean goat herd size per household was least in Limpopo at 13.2 ± 12.40 and highest in Eastern Cape (34.18 ± 28.36). Flocks had more (p Goats were kept mainly for meat, for selling, and for ritual ceremonies. The goat production system was mainly scavenging. Goat health was a major challenge across households and villages. Qualitative traits such coat, horn, ears, and wattle characteristics were recorded for populations of village goats (n = 319) and a feral Tankwa breed (n = 50). The dominant coat pattern was plain (74.53%) with black as the most common coat color (31.98%). Across breeds, a majority (88.08%) of the goats had horns, and 7.59% had wattles while 56.64% had beard. Adult goats (power to separate breeds or populations. Significant traits were then subjected to canonical discriminant analysis for principle component analysis. Based on the quantitative traits, the Tankwa, Xhosa, and Tswana goats formed their own cluster separated from commercial meat type breeds and the Venda and Zulu ecotypes. The discriminant

  9. Sustainable Food & Sustainable Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Mavis Dora

    2012-01-01

    Cuba today is immersed in a very intense process of perfecting its agricultural production structures with the goal of making them more efficient and sustainable in their economic administration and in their social and environmental management. Agricultural cooperatives in Cuba have the responsibility of producing on 73% of the country's farmland. Their contributions are decisive to developing agricultural production and to ensuring more and better food for the population, in addition to redu...

  10. TOURISM WAS BORN IN THE VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela-Liliana CIOBAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical data certifies that tourism is one of the most profitable and dynamic sectors of the economy, occupying the second position in international trade, after oil. By extrapolation results that rural tourism also has major implications for the economic, social and cultural development of the villages. This study presents an analysis of the factors contributing to the practice of rural tourism in Romania during 2000-2015. Using data provided by the National Statistics Institute was possible to analyze the number of employees and number of units specific to rural tourism. In the structure of this study, the methods of improving and developing rural tourism are defined by the concept of volunteer tourism by developing national portals presenting the vacant jobs in tourism and developing human capital by attracting European Funds 2014-2010. The importance of these methods have as a starting point the alignment with the current requirements of tourists and human resources due to the fact that workers in tourism are the main connection point between services and tourist.

  11. Report on the project for working out the new energy vision of the Chinen Village area in FY 2001; 2001 nendo Chinen son chiiki shin energy vision sakutei tou jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    For the purpose of promoting the introduction of new energy and enhancing the awareness of it in Chinen Village, Okinawa Prefecture, an investigational study was conducted of the trend of energy consumption of the village, existence amount of new energy, case study for new energy introduction, etc., and a vision was worked out. The energy consumption amount of Chinen Village in FY 1999 was estimated at 591,935 x 10{sup 3} MJ/y. By sector, the consumption amount in the transportation sector was the highest, approximately 40%, followed in order by the household sector, business sector and industrial sector. The rate of energy source was 49.2% of petroleum, 42.3% of electric power and 8.5% of gas. As the case study for new energy introduction, the following were studied: introduction of photovoltaic power generation to the village office/Azama Sun Beach/hydroponics/JA branch office/prawn farm, introduction of photovoltaic power generation/wind power generation to the village gymnasium/village drainage pump/refrigerating facilities of the fisheries cooperative association, etc. Further, as the new project, the following were studied: introduction of photovoltaic power generation/wind power generation to the agricultural irrigation project/comprehensive sports park, introduction of photovoltaic power generation to the new building of Chinen Elementary School/maker of processed medicinal herbs. (NEDO)

  12. Biomass based energy system for a south Indian village

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, N.H.; Chanakya, H.N.

    1986-01-01

    The biomass resources, existing utilization levels and the efficiency of its use have been analyzed for a South Indian village. A biomass based energy efficient strategy has been devised to meet all the energy needs of the village, including substitution of fuels such as electricity and kerosene used in specific activities. Results indicate that the potential as well as the technologies exist for such substitutions. The proposed strategy will lead to an increase in the efficiency of energy use, reduce human drudgery and make villages more self reliant. 19 references.

  13. Changing Traditions and Village Development in Kalotaszentkirály

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Kraft

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuity of village traditions depends on the stability and cohesion of village communities. Since the opening of Transylvania after the fall of Nicolae Ceauşescu, there has been a sort of revival of Hungarian village dance and music, on the one hand, but, on the longer term, the communities themselves are threatened by economic challenges and by consequent demographic changes. This essay is based on field research conducted in Kalotaszentkirály (Sincraiu from 1995 to 2010.

  14. Barriers to utilization of postnatal care at village level in Klaten district, central Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probandari, Ari; Arcita, Akhda; Kothijah, Kothijah; Pamungkasari, Eti Poncorini

    2017-08-07

    Maternal health remains a persisting public health challenge in Indonesia. Postnatal complications, in particular, are considered as maternal health problems priority that should be addressed. Conducting adequate care for postnatal complications will improve the quality of life of mothers and babies. With the universal health coverage implementation, the Indonesian government provides free maternal and child health services close to clients at the village level, which include postnatal care. Our study aimed to explore barriers to utilization of postnatal care at the village level in Klaten district, Central Java Province, Indonesia. A qualitative study was conducted in March 2015 - June 2016 in Klaten district, Central Java, Indonesia. We selected a total of 19 study participants, including eight mothers with postnatal complications, six family members, and five village midwives for in-depth interviews. We conducted a content analysis technique on verbatim transcripts of the interviews using open code software. This study found three categories of barriers to postnatal care utilization in villages: mother and family members' health literacy on postnatal care, sociocultural beliefs and practices, and health service responses. Most mothers did not have adequate knowledge and skills regarding postnatal care that reflected how they lacked awareness and practice of postnatal care. Inter-generational norms and myths hindered mothers from utilizing postnatal care and from having adequate nutritional intake during the postnatal period. Mothers and family members conducted unsafe self-treatment to address perceived minor postnatal complication. Furthermore, social power from extended family influenced the postnatal care health literacy for mother and family members. Postnatal care in the village lacked patient-centered care practices. Additionally, midwives' workloads and capacities to conduct postnatal information, education and counseling were also issues. Despite the

  15. Local Knowledge About The Structure, Function And Conversion Of Landscape In The Karangwangi Village, Cianjur, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfa Dwi Amelia, Fatiya; Iskandar, Johan

    2017-10-01

    Karangwangi people is one of indigenous people in West Java who has local knowledge about their nature thoroughly. They have local tradition about landscape ecosystem arrangement that based on sakral (sacred) norm. With this rule, local people will always try to preserve the sustainability of their natural environment. However, modernization, increasing population, decreasing forest, and increasing market economic penetration, causing this rule and structure of landscape in Karangwangi village has changed. Land conversion in Karangwangi was occur because of settlement and land investment by people outside the village. These behavior changes in tradition and landscape (structure, function and conversion) in Karangwangi may impact on their daily activities, and so do the changes in daily activities can change their behavior in tradition and landscape. This research was undertaken in the Village of Karangwangi, Sub-district of Cidaun, District of Cianjur, Province of West Java, Indonesia. This paper aims to identify how indigenous people in Karangwangi understand kinds of landscape and another conversion that was happen as a result of management. The method used in this paper is qualitative with ethno ecological approach. The resulted of the study show that local people in Karangwangi Village understand how chronological of landscape structure, function and conversion.

  16. Local Community Versus Globalization Tendencies: Case Study of Czech Villages in Romanian Banat Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šantrůčková Markéta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The research question is the relationship between the local community and globalization tendencies and transformation or maintenance of local traditions. The research area is a specific locality of a Czech village in Romanian Banat. The local community has evolved in a relative isolation. Agriculture was the most important activity despite the fact that a mining factory was opened there. Agriculture was and in many features still is traditional, self-supplying, and hard-work. The life-style has always been environmentally friendly as it has been without modern technologies. Nevertheless, modernization exploded dramatically in these villages after 1989, when the communist policies collapsed along with Romania's isolation. People from the Czech Republic have rediscovered Romanian Banat and a rather busy (agro tourism has developed there. The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs supports development projects for making living conditions in the village better. Simultaneously, strong migration from Banat to the Czech Republic has started. People find living conditions in the Czech Republic easier and leave hard work, poverty and unemployment. It brings huge land cover changes because people who remain cannot use all arable land, which is thus abandoned and left for the natural process. One of the distinct manifestations of globalization tendencies is the build-up of wind power plants.

  17. Hadiboh: From Peripheral Village to Emerging City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge D.Elie

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Hadiboh is Soqotra Island's main urban formation. It was the capital until 1999, when the island was administratively divided into two districts: the Eastern District (mudîriyya sharqiya with Hadiboh as its capital, and the Western District (mudîriyya gharbiya with Qalansiyah as its capital. The article retraces the evolution of Hadiboh from the 1st century BC, when it was named Panara Tamara, as the main settlement of the island of Panchia, one of the many ancient names of Soqotra. Subsequently, the village of Suq (Shiq in Soqotri became the main settlement as well as anchorage point for all ships until the end of the 15th century. In early 16th century, when the Sultan of Mahra sought to establish a more permanent presence on the island, Hadiboh regained its status as main settlement. Henceforth Hadiboh was commonly known as Tamarida until the end of the British Protectorate in 1967. The constitution of Hadiboh as a mosaic town is discussed through different phases of immigration starting toward the end of the 19th century until the dawn of the 21st century. Its spatial configuration around three formally constituted neighborhoods symbolizing the town's attachment to the major events in Yemen's modern history is discussed. Its social organization into an ascriptive status hierarchy and the subsequent changes are described. The evolution of the economy from autarkic subsistence based on food bartering and minimal external trade to international ecotouristic desti-nation is explained. Finally, the article briefly highlights Hadiboh's pivotal role in the island's political history, and considers the dilemmas confronting its transformation as well as that of the island.

  18. Sustainable development and nuclear power: a battle that is one and the same; Le developpement durable et le nucleaire, meme combat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Maurice

    2012-02-15

    In highlighting the relentless march of climate change the author supports the use of nuclear energy as the right response to the problem, probably the only response possible in the face of safe and sustainable development on our planet

  19. PRIMARY MILK OFFER IN CASTRANOVA VILLAGE, DOLJ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lucian PÂNZARU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Castranova village is situated in the south-eastern county of Dolj on county road Leu - Visina (35 km from Craiova, limited in the north by the commune Leu, Apele Vii to the east of village, south and west by the commune Marsani and Bratovoieşti. Commune is composed of villages and wells Castranova. In the village there are 12 agricultural companies and two companies. Specific of the area is agriculture, mainly large crop: wheat and maize farming. Simultaneously develop livestock sector, and milling and bakery activities. Elucidating the communal potential, of milk production is based on use of an appropriate set of indicators: effective in exploitation (by species, total production and average yield per head. The study covers the period 2010-2012, taken as a starting point for developing a strategy of reviving the sector of production.

  20. Villages in Nepal prepare for weather extremes | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-03-22

    . Researchers are working with villagers to identify and meet the local challenges in six Nepali communities. Research focus To assess the vulnerability of rural communities in Nepal's diverse ecological regions to help them ...

  1. Notes on village economies and wildlife utilization in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Visits were made to 12 Eskimo villages in Arctic Alaska during the spring of 1954. At each settlement information was collected regarding the economy and the...

  2. Adaption of the power distribution system to a sustainable energy system - Smart meters and intelligent nets; Anpassning av elnaeten, till ett uthaalligt energisystem - Smarta maetare och intelligenta naet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollen, Math

    2010-11-15

    The conversion of the energy system towards sustainability is a major challenge for society. The conversion includes a large-scale introduction of renewable electricity and the electrification of transport. Adaptations of the grid are needed in order to cope with this development: - Facilitate an increased introduction of renewable electricity; - Enabling power reduction at peak load; - Improve incentives for energy efficiency; - Creating conditions for more active purchasers of electricity. Security of supply must be high, although the new production affects the electricity grid in a different way than today. Therefore, new technical solutions, a so-called smart grid, is necessary in order to, inter alia, prevent congestion and over voltages, but also to enhance the operational safety in general. There is new technology that can help adjust the grid in an efficient and flexible way. Intelligent networks, or smart grids, is the collection of new technology, function and regulatory framework in the electricity market, etc. that cost-effectively facilitate introduction and utilization of renewable electricity generation, leading to reduced energy consumption, contributes to power reduction in peak load and creates conditions for active electricity customers. Sweden is one of the countries that score high in terms of active electricity customers and feedback of consumption for electricity customers. There is a direct consequence of introduction of the metering reform and installation of the AMR, in which Sweden was one of the first countries in Europe. As for modern technology to increase transmission capacity of transmission networks such as HVDC and FACTS technology, Sweden is a world leader. This technology will play an important role in enabling large-scale use of renewable electricity generation on European level. The investigation has resulted in the following proposals: - A knowledge platform created to be collect and disseminate relevant knowledge of research

  3. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of villagers in rural Botswana about the everyday life burden and impact of their musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months included 55 in-depth interviews with 34 villagers. Interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with ...... country settings. Community-engaged partnerships are needed to develop rehabilitation programmes to ease the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in rural Botswana....

  4. Advantageous and disadvantageous impacts of tourism development on the living of Li ethnic minority villagers in Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing-yu; Umezaki, Masahiro; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro

    2003-06-01

    Around the Mt. Wuzhishan in Hainan Island, China, tourism development has been rapidly progressed by the government and private companies since the 1980s, especially since the late 1990s, and consequently the living conditions of the Li ethnic minority people in Shuiman village, located in its center, have been drastically changing. As expected by the government, the villagers' income has increased by means of wage labors, selling the local products to the tourists, and compensatory payments for crops grown in the customary land when its use right was transferred to the company. Various changes in their lifestyle have contributed to the release from poverty and the overall improvement in basic human needs and primary health care. The villagers' flexible decision-makings on their living and environment use, with application of their traditional knowledge for resource uses, have been effective for sustainable human-environment relations, though further changes due to orders and requests of the government and companies may lead to environmental deterioration. Furthermore, inter-household differentiation in income and the perception on tourism development and agricultural development has been enlarged. These situations are discussed from the viewpoint of community-based sustainable development.

  5. Communicating new ideas to traditional villagers (an Indonesian case).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muis, A

    1984-01-01

    Recent cases derived from a series of communication research projects conducted in remote villages on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia, are presented. These cases, which indicate the tremendously complex problem of communicating new ideas to traditional villages, also reflect the equally complex problem of social marketing. Indonesian, villagers remain very traditional, but their communication environment has been undergoing marked changes over the past decade or so. Overwhelming media exposure has pushed these people towards a modern environment filled with new knowledge and experiences. In view of the importance of changing attitudes and behavior of traditional villagers -- to realize modernization for the rural society -- the government of Indonesia has been using a host of communication means and channels. These include all the viable traditional or indigenous communication systems, but mainly face-to-face communication. Traditional dances, story-telling, and music are no longer interesting to the rural people themselves, and, apparently, no real developmental message can be transmitted by traditional "mass media." Among the 50 respondents randomly selected from the isolated village of Gelang (Case I), only 17% claimed to have listened to news in addition to music and songs. 67% of the respondents explained that information carrying novel ideas or methods usually attract them, but they are always reluctant to accept the new ideas for real application. Case II is about the effect of movie exposure on traditional villagers. As many as 73% of 50 respondents explained that the knowledge of the peasant-fisherman has increased considerably with regard to the urban way of life, as a result of movie attendance. The informants indicated that many villagers were disgusted by feature films or theatrical ones and that 62% of the villagers had yet to go to a movie. Case III involved the communication of new methods of medication to rural societies, including traditional

  6. Sustainable agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 Part I CLIMATE CHANGE Soils and Sustainable Agriculture: A Review : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Rattan Lal 15 Soils and Food Sufficiency...

  7. Feasibility Analysis and Simulation of a Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Energy System for Electricity Generation and Environmental Sustainability – equivalent to 650VA fuel-powered generator - popularly known as I pass my neighbour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anayochukwu Ani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV power system can be used to replace wholly 650VA generator for electricity generation for household use in Nigeria. This paper presented the feasibility analysis of load data and simulation study of a stand-alone PV power system that produced the electrical needs of a household. This study is based on designing of PV energy system for household use. The patterns of load consumption within the household were studied and suitably modeled for simulation. The simulation study indicates that energy requirements to provide electricity which is equivalent to 650VA generator for household use in Nigeria can be accomplished by 520W solar PV array, 2312 Ah nominal capacity battery, and a 1kW DC/AC inverter. This would be suitable for deployment of 100% clean energy for environmental sustainability and uninterruptable power performance in the household. The results of this research show that, with a low-power consuming appliances, it is possible to meet the entire annual electricity demand of a single household solely through a stand-alone PV energy supply. Installing solar panels by most Nigerian home can significantly reduce home reliance on government power thereby reduce the strain on the current capacity of our power generation infrastructure. A detailed design and description of the system were presented in this paper.

  8. Social-ecological memory in an autobiographical novel: ecoliteracy, place attachment, and identity related to the Korean traditional village landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GoWoon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our study discusses how literature, in particular an autobiographical novel, can be approached as a valuable reservoir of social-ecological memory (SEM. Through our analysis of acclaimed Korean writer Park Wan-suh's autobiographical novel Who Ate Up All the Shinga?, we discuss how an individual (the author manifests ecoliteracy, place attachment, and identity in relation to Korea's traditional village landscape that can serve as a suitable setting for understanding Korea's local social-ecological contexts. We find a rich account of knowledge and practices related to living and ecological components, resource and landscape management systems, social institutions, and worldviews. The author's descriptions of her native village landscape show the role of village resource and landscape management practices in enhancing local biodiversity and developing ecoliteracy in relation to indigenous ecosystem-like concepts. In addition, several social capitals are mentioned as key to sustaining the village community. The author's knowledge of local plants is the result of her childhood experiences in nature, and her place attachment is tightly linked with her worldview that is cultivated through intricate human-nature relationships within the Korean traditional village landscape. Furthermore, the novel contributes to comprehending resilience thinking by providing a narrative of social changes and interactions between humans and nature. Thus, SEM retained in literature can facilitate a meaningful understanding of social-ecological contexts in a given social-ecological system. Our study therefore suggests new functions of autobiographical memory in literary work for delivering SEM, and informs the study of SEM across the fields of humanities, social sciences, and natural resources management.

  9. ASSESSING FACTORS AFFECTING the REPAYMENT RATE OF MICROFINANCE INSTITUTIONS: A Case Study of Village Credit Institutions of Gianyar, Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincolin Arsyad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to assess the influence of several factors on the repayment rate of the Village Credit Institutions (Lembaga Perkreditan Desa or simply LPDs in Gianyar district in Bali. Using a quantitative approach (logistic model the findings of this study indicate that the Balinese social custom, including social values, norms, and sanctions (informal institutions have an influence on sustaining the high repayment rate of the LPDs. This finding conforms to the some previous studies using institutional approach that reveal the high repayment rate of the LPDs in Gianyar district is influenced by their institutional arrangement that based on custom regulation which includes social norms, sanctions, and involvement of custom village leader in screening process and contractual enforcement of loan (informal institutions, by regulations set up by the Central Bank (formal institutions, and by the mechanism of collecting loan repayments applied by the LPDs management.

  10. Sustainable Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, three different conceptions of sustainable marketing are discussed and compared. These different conceptions are referred to as social, green, and critical sustainable marketing. Social sustainable marketing follows the logic of demand-driven marketing management and places the

  11. Study benefit value of utilization water resources for energy and sustainable environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniah, Restu; Sastradinata, Marwan

    2017-11-01

    Referring to the concept of sustainable development, the environment is said to be sustainable if the fulfillment of three pillars of development that is economic, social and ecological or the environment itself. The environment can sustained in the principle of ecology or basic principles of environmental science, when the three environmental components, namely the natural environment, the artificial environment (the built environment) and the social environment can be aligned for sustainability. The natural environment in this study is the water resources, the artificial environment is micro hydroelectric power generation (MHPG), and the social environment is the community living around the MHPG. The existence of MHPG is intended for the sustainability of special electrical energy for areas not yet reached by electricity derived from the state electricity company (SEC). The utilization of MHPG Singalaga in South Ogan Komering Ulu (OKUS) district is not only intended for economic, ecological, and social sustainability in Southern OKU district especially those who live in Singalaga Village, Kisam Tinggi District. This paper discusses the economic, ecological and social benefits of water resources utilization in Southern OKU District for MHPG Singalaga. The direct economic benefits that arise for people living around MHPG Singalaga is the cost incurred by the community for the use of electricity is less than if the community uses electricity coming from outside the MHPG. The cost to society in the form of dues amounting to IDR 15,000 a month / household. Social benefits with the absorption of manpower to manage the MHPG is chairman, secretary and 3 members, while the ecological benefits of water resources and sustainable energy as well as the community while maintaining the natural vegetation that is located around the MHPG for the continuity of water resources.

  12. Customary Right Compensation and Forest Villages Development Programs of Mangrove Company at Bintuni Bay Papua Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Wahyudi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove at Bintuni bay offers various services to indigenous communities from ecology, social, and economic. Mangrove also could be harvested accordingly to optimize contributions to indigenous communities welfares. This paper highlights implementation of customary right compensation (CRC, and Forest Villages Development programs (FVDP of mangrove company at Bintuni Bay, Papua Barat. Company reports and documents related to CRC and FVDP from 1988 to June 2013 were reviewed and analyzed. Field works were conducted to examine the implementation of both programs at four villages of two districts. Sustained mangrove harvest for chipwood production in Bintuni bay for more than 25 years is the most outstanding achievement of mangrove utilization and management in Indonesia. Huge amount of expenditure have been spent out, and given to indigenous communities through the CRC and FVDP programs, respectively. These cover from economic, social, and environmental related programs, manufactured public facilities, scholarships, and others. However, the indigenous communities are remained poor, and failed of being self-sufficient community. It clearly impresses that the main goals to improve the welfare, prosperity of indigenous people are considerable failed. It is presumably that social culture systems, and subsistence agriculture practices contribute to the failing these programs. Mostly, forest communities in Papua are practicing subsistence agriculture, hunting, heavily relying on their surrounding natural resources, and spending all their cash or money instantly for consumption, not for saving, investments or even productive activities. Therefore, several program could be initiated to improve in achieving the CRC and FVDP missions, such as building capacity, providing counselors and strengthen local community governance, which could accelerate of being self-reliant community.Keywords: customary right compensation, forest villages development, mangrove

  13. An Environmentally-Friendly Tourist Village in Egypt Based on a Hybrid Renewable Energy System––Part Two: A Net Zero Energy Tourist Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahd Diab

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to discuss the economical and the environmental analysis of a net zero energy (NZE tourist village in Alexandria, Egypt, by maximizing the renewable energy fraction and minimizing the greenhouse gases (GHG emissions. The hybrid photovoltaics (PV/wind/diesel/battery system is found to be the optimum hybrid renewable energy system (HRES for the proposed tourist village under the study. The optimum HRES consists of 1600 kW of PV panels (58.09% solar energy penetration, 1000 kW of wind turbines (41.34% wind energy penetration, 1000 kW of power converters, 200 kW diesel generator (only 0.57% diesel generator penetration in addition to 2000 batteries with the capacity of 589 Ah each. The levelized cost of energy (COE from the optimum HRES is $0.17/kWh and the total net present cost (NPC of this system is $15,383,360. Additionally, the maximum renewable energy fraction is 99.1% and the amount of GHG emitted from the optimum HRES is only 31,289 kg/year, which is negligible in comparison with the other system configurations, therefore the optimum HRES can be considered as a green system. In addition to this, the achieved percentage of the capacity shortage and the unmet load in the optimal HRES is only 0% for both.

  14. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchulik, Arizona. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B.G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-10-01

    Schuchuli, a small remote village on the Papago Indian Reservation in southwest Arizona, is 27 kilometers (17 miles) from the nearest available utility power. In some respects, Schuchuli resembles many of the rural villages in other parts of the world. For example, it's relatively small in size (about 60 residents), composed of a number of extended family groupings, and remotely situated relative to major population centers (190 km, or 120 miles, from Tucson). Its lack of conventional power is due to the prohibitive cost of supplying a small electrical load with a long-distance distribution line. Furthermore, alternate energy sources are expensive and place a burden on the resources of the villagers. On December 16, 1978, as part of a federally funded project, a solar cell power system was put into operation at Schuchuli. The system powers the village water pump, lighting for homes ad other village buildings, family refrigerators and a communal washing machine and sewing machine. The project, managed for the US Department of Energy by the NASA Lewis Research Center, provided for a one-year socio-economic study to assess the impact of a relatively small amount of electricity on the basic living environment of the villagers. The results of that study are presented, including village history, group life, energy use in general and the use of the photovoltaic-powered appliances. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  15. Desa wisata sebagai aset soft power Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machya Astuti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tourism village plays significant role for strengthening Indonesia soft power. The experience of Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (DIY province proves that the development of tourism villages contribute in promoting “the power” of Indonesia through art, culture, custom and food to international society. Tourism Villages that located at Sleman, Bantul, Gunungkidul, Kulonprogo and city of Yogyakarta (called as tourism kampong succeeded in attracting foreigners to stay and live as villagers, enjoy villagers daily live and learn Javanese culture. The study was conducted by observation and interviews. Data were analyzed with descriptive qualitative techniques. Data categorized and given a qualitative analysis of narrative. This research showed that tourism village is a new kind of tourism object that produce a new close relationship between Indonesian people and foreigners, functioned as a tool to make foreigners love Indonesia, prolong their stay in Indonesia, and promote Indonesian culture when they come back to their country. DIY’s experience is a best practice for other provinces in Indonesia to develop and promote its own distinctive tradition and culture through tourism villages. Finally, this effort will contribute in supporting Indonesia soft power.

  16. The unifying power of sustainable development; towards balanced choices between people, planet and profit in agricultural production chains and rural land use: the role of science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, M.A.; Klijn, J.A.; Jongman, R.H.G.; Schans, van der J.W.

    2003-01-01

    This position paper presents an overview of the origin and meaning of the concept of sustainable development in various domains and their interrelationships, expressed as the People-Profit-Planet triangle. The role of Wageningen UR and its position in society is clarified: the three P domains are

  17. Village voice: towards inclusive information technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garside, Ben

    2009-04-15

    A decade ago it was dubbed the 'digital divide'. Now, the gap in information and communications technologies (ICTs) between North and South is gradually shrinking. The developing world accounts for two-thirds of total mobile phone subscriptions, and Africa has the world's fastest growing mobile phone market. By gaining a toehold in affordable ICTs, the poor can access the knowledge and services they need, such as real-time market prices, to boost their livelihoods. But to be sustainable, technologies need to factor in social realities. These include how people already share knowledge, and adapt to introduced technologies: mobile phones, for instance, confer status but can eat into much-needed income. Many development agencies opt for technology-led solutions that fail to 'take'. Approaches that keep development concerns at their core and people as their central focus are key.

  18. Socio-Cultural Impacts in the Formation of Urban Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpaung, B. O. Y.

    2017-03-01

    In Indonesia, a group of village people tends to move from one place to another and develops a living space to create a settlement. This research is conducted by taking an example of a particular ethnic group that leaves the forestry area to a new place in the city. After some time, this group of people creates a similar or adapted socio-cultural system adapted from their origin place. The purpose of this research is to examine the socio-cultural aspects that significantly influence the emergence of urban village. This influence is interpreted as social and cultural relations with the establishment of space and significance of urban village. By focusing on this issue, this research will trace the process of how a new and unplanned settlement could emerge. The process and elements are indispensable from social and cultural factors. Essentially, the shape of bulit space is a non-physical manifestation of local people, which is established from time to time. In this case, the research’s challenge lies on the circumstance in Indonesia where society and culture influence the emergence of urban village. Physical appearance can be identified as a tipology of settlement and morphology of urban village.

  19. Elements of an Alternative to Nuclear Power as a Response to the Energy-Environment Crisis in India: Development as Freedom and a Sustainable Energy Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Manu V.

    2009-01-01

    Even as the conventional energy system is fundamentally challenged by the "energy-environment crisis," its adherents have presented the prospect of "abundant" and purportedly "green" nuclear power as part of a strategy to address the crisis. Surveying the development of nuclear power in India, this article finds that…

  20. Empowering Women for Development through Community-Driven Sustainable Programmes: A Response to Traditional Patriarchal Power in the Southern African Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimoh, Dele; Lekoko, Rebecca; Alade, Eunice B.

    2004-01-01

    In the Southern Africa region, the act of prejudice against women mostly occurs where patriarchal power reigns. This type of power is felt in areas such as inheritance right, division of labour, access to political and economic resources and legal and social matters. Other areas of discrimination against women include access to educational and…

  1. Agile sustainable communities. On-site renewable energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Woodrow W. II. [A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management, University of California, Riverside (United States); Eisenberg, Larry [Los Angeles Community College District (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Smart and sustainable campuses demand three components. First, there is the need to have a Strategic Master Plan (SMP) for all infrastructures that include energy, transportation, water, waste and telecommunications along with the traditional dimensions of research, curricula, outreach and assessments. Secondarily, there is the array of issues pertaining to the sitting of buildings and overall facility master planning which must be addressed from the perspective of 'green' energy, efficient orientation and be designed for multiple-use by the academic and local community. Thirdly, the development of sustainable buildings in one area that is compact and walkable campuses thus enable a range of transportation choices leads to reduced energy consumption. Historically, college campuses were often like towns and villages in that they are self-sustaining for family, business and recreational activities. Any sustainable smart campus is a vibrant, 'experiential' applied educational model that should catalyze creative learning. More significantly, today, campuses and communities must be secure in terms of not only their own energy use and needs, but also for the resource demands of their power. Otherwise, the community(s) will never be secure economically or politically. Recognizing global warming and climate change, in the spring of 2001, the Board of Trustee (BOT) for the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) took the critical initial policy steps to turn these sustainable developments into goals. For example, the LACCD decided to have new 'green' buildings to replace or renovate existing ones. The building program led to sustainable communities that included recycling, product reuse from waste as well as smart growth in terms of reduced energy use, efficiency and the use of telecommunication and wireless systems. The paper focuses primarily on the energy programs for the LACCD campuses. The paper considers the overall energy

  2. Government installation guidelines for the sustainable development of wind power; Les orientations du gouvernement en matiere d'amenagement pour un developpement durable de l'energie eolienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    The Government of Quebec has made a commitment to clean renewable energy, including wind power, as part of its sustainable development strategy. However, any proposed projects are subject to conditions imposed by regional municipalities. Municipalities are responsible for urban planning laws with jurisdiction over landscape, noise, public safety, and wildlife. Project proponents must meet both social and environmental criteria to ensure the preservation of the municipal territory and the quality of life. Regulations are in place to ensure economic development occurs in tandem with meeting the energy needs of local and regional communities. 16 refs.

  3. West Village Community: Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. The project when complete will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community's impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  4. West Village Community. Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. When complete, the project will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community’s impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  5. Ethnomedicinal study of plants used in villages around Kimboza forest reserve in Morogoro, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amri Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document medicinal plants used in the treatment of ailments in villages surrounding Kimboza forest reserve, a low land catchment forest with high number of endemic plant species. Methods Ethnobotanical interviews on medicinal plants used to treat common illnesses were conducted with the traditional medical practitioners using open-ended semi -structured questionnaires. Diseases treated, methods of preparation, use and habitat of medicinal plants were recorded. Results A total of 82 medicinal plant species belonging to 29 families were recorded during the study. The most commonly used plant families recorded were Fabaceae (29%, Euphorbiaceae (20%, Asteraceae and Moraceae (17% each and Rubiaceae (15% in that order. The most frequently utilized medicinal plant parts were leaves (41.3%, followed by roots (29.0%, bark (21.7%, seeds (5.31%, and fruits (2.6%. The study revealed that stomach ache was the condition treated with the highest percentage of medicinal plant species (15%, followed by hernia (13%, diarrhea (12, fever and wound (11% each, and coughs (10%. Majority of medicinal plant species (65.9% were collected from the wild compared to only 26.7% from cultivated land. Conclusions A rich diversity of medicinal plant species are used for treating different diseases in villages around Kimboza forest reserve, with the wild habitat being the most important reservoir for the majority of the plants. Awareness programmes on sustainable utilization and active involvement of community in conservation programmes are needed.

  6. Village demonstration of biogas technology: an Egyptian case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Halwagi, M.M.; Abdel Dayem, A.M.; Hamad, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Biomass is among the principal renewable energy resources available to Egyptian villages; in addition to converting wastes into useful energy (biogas), the anaerobic digestion of biomass wastes produces a slurry that can be used as a fertilizer, improves sanitation, and can be easily adapted using locally available materials and labor. After a preliminary sociological survey, the NRC selected Al Manawat, a traditional Egyptian village, for the first demonstration site. Concomitant with the family energy requirements, availability of digester feed materials, and site characteristics, a modified Indian-type family size unit was designed and erected. The digester, with an effective volume of 320 ft/sub 3/, is connected to both a latrine and an animal shed. A preliminary technoeconomic appraisal and an assessment of the social impact indicate that under village conditions and particularly with the heavily subsidized fuel prices, the digester's main benefit to the farmer is the considerable saving in manure transport.

  7. Political ecology as perspective in analyses of crises in sustainable transition: The case of on-shore wind power in a front runner country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard Jørgensen, Michael; Borch, Kristian; Nyborg, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    constraints at the local level (e.g. internal stability agreement) and the reduction of the budget available due to the economic crisis. For this reason there is a need to develop tools able to assess the effects of environmental and energy policies on the socioeconomic system and to assist policymakers......This paper investigates the societal implications of Sustainable Energy Action Plans (SEAP) at the local community level on the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustain- ability. SEAP is based on the Covenant of Mayors that is the mainstream European movement involving local...... and regional authorities, voluntarily committing to increasing energy efficiency and use of renewable energy sources on their territories. By their commitment, Covenant sig- natories aim to meet and exceed the European Union 20% CO2 reduction objective by 2020. However, the local governments have trouble...

  8. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  9. Village Fund in the Light of New Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Wójcik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses legal conditionality particular form of participatory budgeting which is village fund. His five-year term of office gave rise to a positive evaluation of the project and to make specific legislative changes in this area. This was done in the new law of the village fund of 21 February 2014, which regulates the formation of the fund and reimbursement of expenses. This work research to both the old and the new provisions of the act and the exegesis of the regulations of the year.

  10. EcoVillage: A Net Zero Energy Ready Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Faakye, O. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-02-01

    CARB is working with the EcoVillage co-housing community in Ithaca, New York, on their third neighborhood called the Third Residential EcoVillage Experience (TREE). This community scale project consists of 40 housing units --15 apartments and 25 single family residences. The community is pursuing certifications for DOE Zero Energy Ready Home, U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold, and ENERGY STAR for the entire project. Additionally, seven of the 25 homes, along with the four-story apartment building and community center, are being constructed to the Passive House (PH) design standard.

  11. Tempe as Language: An Indonesian Village Revitalisation Mini-project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Kandangan, a village in the Temmanggung Regency (Kabupaten Temanggung in the Province of Central Java, tempe bunguk used to be a daily food—using locally grown bunguk beans—and made in many households. But imported blocks of tempe from China made with industrially grown soy beans have slowly crept in and replaced it. As part of her food skills mapping (a part of the Spedagi Project, Francisca Callista (Siska went searching for what used to be eaten in her village, and for those who could remember how to make it.

  12. Computational sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Morik, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The book at hand gives an overview of the state of the art research in Computational Sustainability as well as case studies of different application scenarios. This covers topics such as renewable energy supply, energy storage and e-mobility, efficiency in data centers and networks, sustainable food and water supply, sustainable health, industrial production and quality, etc. The book describes computational methods and possible application scenarios.

  13. Smart Morning in an African Village: Diversifying Technologies within a Tanzanian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Vesisenaho

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Information technology (IT can make a difference in a developing country only if it is designed in close collaboration with its users. The experiences from an ethnocomputing-based IT education initiative at Tumaini University, located in the rural area of Southern Tanzania, indicates promising opportunities for engaging children and students as creative co-designers and users for diversifying, novel information technologies. The local context with its needs was taken into account when using robotics (I-Blocks and culture-based learning materials and implementing students’ village outreach projects in local schools and hospitals. The CATI model suggests the steps Contextualize, Apply, Transfer, and Import for sustainable, inductive IT design. Together with the concept of ethnocomputing, the CATI model proved useful for building and starting a new needs-based, contextualized IT undergraduate program at Tumaini University in Tanzania in 2007. 

  14. Concept of co-firing coal with biomass and natural gas: On track of sustainable solution for future thermal power plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodžić Nihad; Smajević Izet; Kazagić Anes

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents R&D project of multi fuel concept (MFC) for future coal-based power plants, demonstrated on example of cofiring Middle-Bosnia brown coal with waste woody biomass and natural gas...

  15. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuilt...... theoretical lenses. It is proposed that three parameters concerning the ꞌtransformabilityꞌ of the building can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of sustainable transformation: technical aspects, programmatic requirements and narrative value. It is proposed that the concept of ꞌsustainable...

  16. A Resilience Pattern in Village level: The Case Babalan Village, Pati, Central Java Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurwahyudi Ragil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Indonesia Disaster Prone Index 2013, Pati Regency is a high risk area of disaster and is ranked 11th level Central Java province while nationally ranked 156. Babalan Village located on the edge of Juwana River has disaster history from 2006-2014 shows flood disaster Giving the greatest probability and impact followed by rat pest, tornado, drought, fire. The public recognizes the signs of a continuous flooding of heavy rains accompanied by clouds all over the edge, the continuous rise of the Juwana River surface to overflow, ants, isoptera, and animals out of its nest, “Yuyu Bule”, earthworms out, clear water for “Rowo floods ”, Brownish water for the flash floods. Most residents have boats and can make rafts from makeshift materials (jerry cans, bamboo, banana stems. Make “Ranggon” at home for those who do not evacuate for a place to stay during the flood. Citizens elevate the kitchen (to evacuate people and goods / household furniture. Breeding Tyto Alba owl for rats pest control post-flood and controllers in the fields. Develop vegetable crops in the yard with viticulture pattern (upstairs if flood can be moved and can eat vegetables during flood. Have food reserves for stock before outside help comes. Citizens initiate “Water Bath honesty” to meet the water needs during the dry season.

  17. A Resilience Pattern in Village level: The Case Babalan Village, Pati, Central Java Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwahyudi, Ragil; Maryono

    2018-02-01

    Based on the Indonesia Disaster Prone Index 2013, Pati Regency is a high risk area of disaster and is ranked 11th level Central Java province while nationally ranked 156. Babalan Village located on the edge of Juwana River has disaster history from 2006-2014 shows flood disaster Giving the greatest probability and impact followed by rat pest, tornado, drought, fire. The public recognizes the signs of a continuous flooding of heavy rains accompanied by clouds all over the edge, the continuous rise of the Juwana River surface to overflow, ants, isoptera, and animals out of its nest, "Yuyu Bule", earthworms out, clear water for "Rowo floods ", Brownish water for the flash floods. Most residents have boats and can make rafts from makeshift materials (jerry cans, bamboo, banana stems). Make "Ranggon" at home for those who do not evacuate for a place to stay during the flood. Citizens elevate the kitchen (to evacuate people and goods / household furniture). Breeding Tyto Alba owl for rats pest control post-flood and controllers in the fields. Develop vegetable crops in the yard with viticulture pattern (upstairs) if flood can be moved and can eat vegetables during flood. Have food reserves for stock before outside help comes. Citizens initiate "Water Bath honesty" to meet the water needs during the dry season.

  18. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...

  19. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  20. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    . Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...... campus performance....

  1. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Søndergård, Bent

    2014-01-01

    of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...

  2. Sustainable Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  3. A Wiki-based Key to Garden and Village Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Trilar, Tomi

    2010-01-01

    A Wiki-based Key to Garden and Village Birds is available in two versions: a dichotomous, hyperlinked and printable version, and as step-bystep identification version. It is supported by jKey Player in English, Slovenian, Spanish, Romanian and German.

  4. Appraisal of Village Chickens Potential in Egg Production | Bebora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parameter of egg-production capacity was estimated by the pliability of bones, especially the pubic bone spread and the space between the pubic bone and ... This observation indicates that, with a little extra effort in management and genetic selection, these village birds have a potential of increasing their egg yields.

  5. STUDY ON INTESTINAL PROTOZOA IN SEVEN VILLAGES OF BANDARABASS

    OpenAIRE

    J.Sheiban; M.Rezaian

    1981-01-01

    A survey was carried out in seven villages around Bandarabass, on Persion Gulf, to determine the prevalence of the intestinal protozoa infections. Out of the 835 stool specimens examined, 676 samples were positive with single and multiple infections. The most prevalent of intestinal protozoa in Bandarabass were Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lambia and Iodamoeba butschlii.

  6. Review and assessment of mechanic village potentials for small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    importation of used motor vehicles to Nigeria from less than 500 in 1988 to about 30,000 in 2000. The degree of ... on the total vehicle registrations in the country. Data from the Federal Road Safety Commission ... in oil change such as motorcycle and electrical generator mechanics to mechanic villages. It is time also for ...

  7. The Role of Libraries in the Global Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Donna Weiss

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and evolution of the term "global village" by author Marshall McLuhan, and presents findings from literature that associate libraries and education with society's technological advancements such as telecommunication and computerized services. Examines the role of libraries, librarians, commerce, and global…

  8. Ekspansif soil solution in the villages at Trenggalek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triastuti, Nusa Setiani

    2017-11-01

    District 2/3 hills with easy sliding and land survey results showed the soil because it consists of expansive soil Survey some villages who experience insatiability or failure, a secondary analysis of the data gathered from the expert on geology, Trenggalek geological map, Trenggalek geography. Ground location researched several villages, the Terbis village of focus discussion of the landslides and plan of relocation. In the watching a black. Colored soil and easily slide, showed very expansive soil due to montmorrelite. While soil relocation contour relative is more stable because the land of kaolin and invisible water sources that could push the land. Expansive soil in the village of solution should be cheap, easily obtainable, not damaging the fertility of the soil, groundwater should be awake to the source of life, ease of implementation, utilizing local materials and use modest tools and equipment. Under the soil surface do not get there water stored in the soil until deep the water because it will slide the ground. The analysis must meet the 7 items above and steady the contour. Design of building installed sub drain, the shallow bore foundations tied tie beam, floor plate into the unity of the structure.

  9. Morphological diversity in fourteen cultivars Tiron village, Kediri, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Azis Fuad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiron village, Kediri is one of central mangoes in Indonesia. Many cultivar of mangoes encountered at this location. This study aims to look at the diversity of mango cultivars in the Tiron Village, Kediri, Indonesia. Mangoes diversity is based on qualitative and quantitative character of each cultivar. The diversity among cultivar indicated by the standard deviation and variance in the eleven quantitative characters of mango. Mango cultivars categorized by phylogeny morphological characters. The method used for phylogeny analysis is an UPGMA method (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Phylogenic analysis is based by the qualitative character of the plant. The results showed there were fourteen cultivars of mango in the village of Tiron Kediri have high diversity. Fourteen mango cultivars were categorized four groups. Based on a qualitative character, there are four classes of mango. The first group is the Katul, Podang Urang, and Podang Lumut. The second group is the Gadung, Jaran, Madu, Endog, Pakel, Dodonilo, Ireng, Lanang and Cantek. Santok Kapur into groups to form groups of three and Kopyor fourth. The high diversity in the village mango Tiron Kediri potential for resource in situ germplasm.

  10. An information needs assessment in Oribi Village, Pietermaritzburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... also examined. The results of the study indicated a significant need for information concerning fundamental issues such as housing, health and education. Finally, a few suggestions are made as to ways to improve the information availability and general information literacy of Oribi Village. Innovation No.29 2004: 13-23 ...

  11. Entrepreneurial Management Coastal Muslim In The Village Bongo Gorontalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahmat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research activities to proving the entrepreneurial management of the coastal Muslim community in the village of Bongo. Experimental design used in this research is quasi experiment with the design of "The One-group pre-test - Post-test Design". The results showed that the model of functional skills for women of fishermen in the village of Bongo district of Gorontalo, can be seen from several aspects, namely: (1 The control / understanding of learners (female fisherman in the village of Bongo of the learning materials functional skills wives of the fishermen in the form of entrepreneurship, practice makes kolombengi taste of fish, practice makes fish nuggets and practice makes sticks corn fish. (2 understanding wives of the fishermen village of Bongo towards community empowerment programs and Improved skills of students in the field of entrepreneurship, especially in terms of business development and business administration, and (3 the ability of learners work together in a business group that can produce a product with the criteria and processes in place.

  12. Understanding local attitudes towards dogs in villages surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Exotic carnivores, particularly feral and domestic dogs, represent a serious threat to Madagascar's endemic fauna. We obtained information from the local community about dogs in villages in and around Ranomafana National Park (RNP), Madagascar. Sur- veys were conducted (N=359) to assess local ...

  13. Burkina Faso: Managing conflict at the village handpump and beyond

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-09

    Feb 9, 2011 ... These conflicts become visible when clay water jugs are smashed or women get into shoving matches. At other times, the conflict remains invisible, but is felt nonetheless, says Karidia Sanon, an economist on the project team. She cites the case of a village chief's wife who went to the head of the line while ...

  14. Votian Village Feasts in the Context of Russian Orthodoxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergo-Hart Västrik

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article considers Votian village feasts that evidently belong to the sphere of Christian folk religion. Village feasts are analysed as expressions of collective activity in pre-industrial rural society that enclosed certain religious, social and economic functions. This phenomenon of celebrating collectively certain days of church calendar, which included ritual activities in village chapels or other local sanctuaries, common meals and heavy drinking as well singing and dancing in the course of 3–4 days, was a part of common Russian Orthodox tradition shared by several ethnic groups throughout North-West Russia in the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Despite the fact that this phenomenon was familiar to the wider community of Russian Orthodox believers, there were obviously certain local characteristics and variation typical to Votian tradition. However, Votain village feasts are studied in the article in the context of Russian Orthodoxy, without favouring assumed pre-Christian elements of the Finno-Ugric religions.

  15. Votian Village Feasts in the Context of Russian Orthodoxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergo-Hart Västrik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article considers Votian village feasts that evidently belong to the sphere of Christian folk religion. Village feasts are analysed as expressions of collective activity in pre-industrial rural society that enclosed certain religious, social and economic functions. This phenomenon of celebrating collectively certain days of church calendar, which included ritual activities in village chapels or other local sanctuaries, common meals and heavy drinking as well singing and dancing in the course of 3–4 days, was a part of common Russian Orthodox tradition shared by several ethnic groups throughout North-West Russia in the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Despite the fact that this phenomenon was familiar to the wider community of Russian Orthodox believers, there were obviously certain local characteristics and variation typical to Votian tradition. However, Votain village feasts are studied in the article in the context of Russian Orthodoxy, without favouring assumed pre-Christian elements of the Finno-Ugric religions.

  16. Medicinal plant use of villagers in the Mopani district, Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results of the survey indicate that plants play a significant role in primary healthcare of the community of Mashishimale Village. It would seem that a number of major diseases/ailments are treated by traditional methods. Scientific investigation is therefore needed to isolate active compounds and to determine ...

  17. Assessment of Services Provided By Village Alive Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Services Provided By Village Alive Women Association to Rural Women in Ifelodun Local Government Area of Kwara State, Nigeria. ... hardworking Rural women of Nigeria by different NGOs and Voluntary organizations so that they can increase their productivity those government organs or agencies (ADP, ...

  18. Village Health Volunteers: Key Issues Facing Agencies in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cruitment, support and supervision, working conditions, and hours for village health volunteers. There is a sound public health policy established in Malawi although there are not enough trained people (or other resources) to teach, counsel, treat, and motivate the community to good health. It has been shown elsewhere that ...

  19. Assessment of Population Density and Disparity of Village ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of Village weaverbirds Ploceus cucullatus along the roads was necessary in order to provide prospect of their population, density and platform for monitoring their distribution. Data were collected through on-site observations and pointcount method at thirty-four (34) point-count stations. Collected data were subjected ...

  20. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used in villages under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medicinal plants remain an integral part of the lives of people in rural areas. The aim of this study was to document information about the medicinal plants used by Shangaan people in villages under Jongilanga tribal council, Bushbuckridge municipality, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. Materials and ...