WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainable microfinance organizations

  1. Micro-Finance And Sustainable Development: Evidence From Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ajmal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to look into the microfinance sector of Pakistan, its effectiveness and outreach and will further explore if microfinance has been effective enough to ensure sustainable development in the country. The purpose of the study is to examine the extent and efficiency of the microfinance sector, identify the lags in the system and propose feasible recommendations. The study examines microfinance at micro, meso and macro levels. The study highlights the performance of microfinance sector, outreach and efficiency of micro-savers, micro-insurance and assets and liabilities of the sector. Financial infrastructure and challenges to the sector are also indicated. The microfinance market lacks competition and only a few institutes can be tagged as operationally sustainable and have achieved the economies of scale. The study concluded that microfinance in Pakistan is perceived more like a social service rather a financial service. This calls for new techniques and more sustainable models to enable microfinance sector to prevail.

  2. Microfinance : Its Impact, Outreach, and Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels; Lensink, Robert

    This symposium brings together recent empirical contributions with respect to a number of related and highly relevant issues on the economics of microfinance. In particular, the contributions provide answers to the following two main questions: (1) does microfinance have an impact on the social and

  3. Human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analyzes some of the provisions of the Microfinance Policy, Regulatory and Supervisory Framework for Nigeria (2005) to explain in simple terms the human resource implications of some of the roles stipulated for key stakeholders of the microfinance institutions. The paper discovers that some of the factors that ...

  4. Sustainable Rural Development in Nigeria through Microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... however, calls for concerted informed efforts to eradicate poverty on the scale called for by the Millennium Development Goals through the promotion of microfinance institutions to empower the poor particularly the women. Key words: development, empower, poverty, dehumanizing, institutions, goals, microeconomic etc.

  5. Agent-based mapping of credit risk for sustainable microfinance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-Hun Lee

    Full Text Available By drawing analogies with independent research areas, we propose an unorthodox framework for mapping microfinance credit risk--a major obstacle to the sustainability of lenders outreaching to the poor. Specifically, using the elements of network theory, we constructed an agent-based model that obeys the stylized rules of microfinance industry. We found that in a deteriorating economic environment confounded with adverse selection, a form of latent moral hazard may cause a regime shift from a high to a low loan payment probability. An after-the-fact recovery, when possible, required the economic environment to improve beyond that which led to the shift in the first place. These findings suggest a small set of measurable quantities for mapping microfinance credit risk and, consequently, for balancing the requirements to reasonably price loans and to operate on a fully self-financed basis. We illustrate how the proposed mapping works using a 10-year monthly data set from one of the best-known microfinance representatives, Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. Finally, we discuss an entirely new perspective for managing microfinance credit risk based on enticing spontaneous cooperation by building social capital.

  6. Agent-based mapping of credit risk for sustainable microfinance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Hun; Jusup, Marko; Podobnik, Boris; Iwasa, Yoh

    2015-01-01

    By drawing analogies with independent research areas, we propose an unorthodox framework for mapping microfinance credit risk--a major obstacle to the sustainability of lenders outreaching to the poor. Specifically, using the elements of network theory, we constructed an agent-based model that obeys the stylized rules of microfinance industry. We found that in a deteriorating economic environment confounded with adverse selection, a form of latent moral hazard may cause a regime shift from a high to a low loan payment probability. An after-the-fact recovery, when possible, required the economic environment to improve beyond that which led to the shift in the first place. These findings suggest a small set of measurable quantities for mapping microfinance credit risk and, consequently, for balancing the requirements to reasonably price loans and to operate on a fully self-financed basis. We illustrate how the proposed mapping works using a 10-year monthly data set from one of the best-known microfinance representatives, Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. Finally, we discuss an entirely new perspective for managing microfinance credit risk based on enticing spontaneous cooperation by building social capital.

  7. Micro-Finance And Sustainable Development: Evidence From Pakistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamza Ajmal; Taimoor Qureshi

    2011-01-01

    .... The study examines microfinance at micro, meso and macro levels. The study highlights the performance of microfinance sector, outreach and efficiency of micro-savers, micro-insurance and assets and liabilities of the sector...

  8. Efficiency in Microfinance Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTARSKA, Valentina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of cooperatives’ contribution to the socio-economic well-being of their participants, the United Nations has declared 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. Microfinance cooperatives make a large part of the microfinance industry. We study efficiency of microfinance cooperatives and provide estimates of the optimal size of such organizations. We employ the classical efficiency analysis consisting of estimating a system of equations and identify the optimal size of microfinance cooperatives in terms of their number of clients (outreach efficiency, as well as dollar value of lending and deposits (sustainability. We find that microfinance cooperatives have increasing returns to scale which means that the vast majority can lower cost if they become larger. We calculate that the optimal size is around $100 million in lending and half of that in deposits. We find less robust estimates in terms of reaching many clients with a range from 40,000 to 180,000 borrowers.

  9. Human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microfinancing in Nigeria has developed from the traditional informal groups through direct government intervention to domination by private sector owned and managed institutions. Despite its long history, the sector has not witnessed the existence of sustainable institutions. This prompted the Obasanjo regime to adopt a ...

  10. The effects of asset securitization on sustainability & profitability of microfinance institutions in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Quacoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Asset Securitization is a process that involves repackaging portfolios of cash-flow-producing financial instruments into securities or tradable capital market instruments for transfer to investors. There have been a number of studies on asset securitization and microfinance but most of these studies did not focus on the effects of asset securitization on sustainability and profitability of microfinance institutions. These studies were conducted in developed economies and little has been done in Africa and for that matter Ghana. This study therefore sought to explore the effects of asset securitization on sustainability and profitability of MFIs in Ghana knowing the important role they play in the Ghanaian economy. The objectives were to determine whether asset securitization is being practiced in Ghana, to determine whether asset securitization will improve the sustainability and profitability of microfinance institutions (MFI’s as well as challenges that may arise. As a qualitative research, the case study approach was employed in the research design. Questionnaires were administered to a sample size of 200 respondents from a population of 517 who were drawn from the management and staff of five microfinance companies selected through convenience and purposeful sampling techniques. The findings are that asset securitization in microfinance is currently not being practiced in Ghana but if implemented, it will have a positive effect on the sustainability and profitability of microfinance companies in Ghana. The study identified some challenges that microfinance institutions may face in the introduction of asset securitization in Ghana.

  11. Channeling Local Culture into Sustainable Microfinance Solutions by Akhuwat: From Borrowers to Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Rabia; Bajwa, Sami; Mamoon, Dawood

    2017-01-01

    This study is carried out to analyze the factors that results in conversion of borrowers into donors. The findings assist the microfinance institutions in coming up with the most appropriate measures to apply in order to eliminate not only defaults but also gain some financial sustainability by improving its donor profile. The study establishes that religious education and organizational religious philosophy influence borrower’s prosocial behaviors. Through religious teaching Akhuwat inculca...

  12. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  13. La microfinanza in Europa (Microfinance in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Botti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available So far, the lack of consistent and reliable data on microfinance in Europe prevented the conduct a comprehensive analysis of the performance of Microfinance institutions (MFIs, especially their capacity to meet policy expectation in terms of social objectives and financial sustainability in the long term. We constructed an original longitudinal dataset of 357 European MFIs observed between 2006 and 2015, based on raw data from the European Microfinance Network (EMN overview survey. We use this data to carry out the first in-depth analysis of trends in European microfinance and the interaction between social and financial performance during the period 2006-2013. It emerges that microfinance in Europe is a highly segmented and heterogeneous industry, both in terms of providers’ institutional characteristics and regional business models.JEL codes: G21; A13

  14. Microfinance and Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Hisako, KAI; Shigeyuki, HAMORI

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship microfinance and inequality by providing a cross-country empirical study of 61 developing countries. Microfinance plays an important role in the financial market in many developing countries. Although microfinance is expected to significantly affect macro variables, we lack enough empirical research on Impact Analysis at the macro level, such as the effect of microfinance on inequality. We expect microfinance to have an equalizing effect, and provide a fir...

  15. Sustainability & Organization Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Bygvraa; Obel, Børge; Kallehave, Pernille

    of global governance to match the new dynamics and consequences of globalization. Governments are re-examining corporate accountability to society and how companies earn their license to operate. Furthermore companies are re-examining their code of conduct and leadership values. Thus, sustainability...... is an important driver in organizations and its impact and effect on organization design is critical. Development of organization design, structure, processes, and human skills and values are needed to create the sustainable organization for the future. This paper discusses the requirements to be a sustainable...... organization. Here we follow the Global Compact criteria. The consequences for processes, structure, and human skills and values are analyzed. In particular the analysis will investigate exploration and exploitation from a holistic perspective using the principles of requisite variety and information...

  16. Overcoming access barriers to health services through membership-based microfinance organizations: a review of evidence from South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somen; Annear, Peter Leslie

    2014-06-30

    It is a challenge for the poor to overcome the barriers to accessing health services. Membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes can improve health outcomes for the poor. This study reviewed the evidence published between 1993 and 2013 on the role of membership-based microfinance with associated health programmes in improving health outcomes for the poor in South Asia. A total of 661 papers were identified and 26 selected for inclusion, based on the relevance and rigour of the research methods. Of these 26, five were evidence reviews. Of the remaining 21 papers, 12 were from India, seven from Bangladesh, and one each from Sri Lanka and Indonesia. Three papers addressed more than one theme. Five key themes emerged from the review: (i) the impact of microfinance programmes on the social and economic situation of the poor; (ii) the impact of microfinance programmes on community health; (iii) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on raising client awareness; (iv) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on financing health care; and (v) the impact of integrated microfinance health programmes on affordable health-care products and services. The review provides new evidence on the pathways through which microfinance helps to improve population health and value for money for such programmes. Among countries with large populations in the informal sector, there is a strong case for policy-makers to support these groups in providing access to life-saving health care among the poor.

  17. Microfinance Self-Sustainability and Outreach in Uganda: A Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, this calls for better governance and efficiency in running the MFIs if they are to be self-sustainable and improve on their outreach. As more MFIs get registered and regulated by the central bank, they will invariably in the long-run have to shift to higher degrees of financial self-sufficiency and outreach.

  18. International diversification and Microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, Rients; Lensink, Robert; Spierdijk, Laura

    International commercial banks, institutional investors, and private investors have become increasingly interested in financing microfinance institutions (MFIs). This paper investigates whether adding microfinance funds to a portfolio of risky international assets yields diversification gains. By

  19. Factors influencing Sudanese microfinance intention to adopt mobile banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ammar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to financial service has become a key phenomenon for economic development and poverty alleviation .Microfinance is one way of fighting poverty in Sudan, where most citizens are in need of it. However, despite the initial results showing a positive impact of microfinance on the livelihood of low-income people in Sudan, around 8 million of the Sudanese poor people are excluded from microfinance services. One potential remedy for the limited outreach of microfinance in Sudan may lie within enhancing the capacity of microfinance services providers (MFPs in the utilization of modern technology. Recent innovation in providing financial services in a convenient and efficient way is the use of mobile banking (m-banking technology in microfinance. M-banking promises to increase the efficiency and outreach of microfinance services in developing countries. This paper tries to examine the factors that influence the adoption of m-banking by microfinance sector in Sudan. In this respect, hypotheses were developed guided by Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and Technology-organization-Environment (TOE models. Primary data were collected from MFPs and microfinance customers in Sudan using questionnaires and interviews. The study contributes to knowledge in terms of methods used by extending aforementioned theories through adding new variables to both models by putting both models in one study to fill the gaps in past studies; via examination of the demand (customers and supply (institutions through modifying them to include new variables related to m-banking in microfinance.

  20. Managing growth of microfinance institutions (MFIs): Balancing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overriding objective of MFIs in Ethiopia is to provide a broad range of microfinance services to large numbers of poor households. This is realized by developing capable and sustainable MFIs. A large number of MFIs have achieved significant progress in terms of both outreach and sustainability. As of June 2005, the ...

  1. Organizing for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  2. Entrepreneurship and Microfinance-A tool for empowerment of poor-Case of Akhuwat, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Zahid; Ismailov, Nodirbek

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Our main purpose is to carry out a research on combining microfinance with entrepreneurship for poverty alleviation, empowerment of poor and sustainable development. Target group: Students, researchers in Microfinance field, MFI’s, NGO’s and Governmental structures. Research Question: How do micro entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship and microfinance serve as a combined tool to reduce poverty, empower people, and contribute to sustainable development in Pakistan? Approach: We us...

  3. Essays on microfinance in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servin Juarez, R.

    2012-01-01

      In the early 1970s, microfinance came to public attention as a promising tool to reduce poverty. However, some people began to claim that microcredit is unsuitable for sustainable development. Nevertheless, the lack of scientific support for both viewpoints has created a need for empirical

  4. Performance Analysis of Microfinance Institutions of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azhar Ikram Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of Microfinance Institutions-MFIs of India. It includes analysis of MFIs of India. This study includes analysis of performance of microfinance institutions with reference to both financial and non-financial ways. Performance of microfinance institutions is measured using four parameters, which are sustainability/profitability, outreach, operational and financial efficiency. Data is taken of 99 Microfinance Institutions of India from the Microfinance Information Exchange for a period of 11 years. Variables of this study are both in absolute and relative terms. The endogenous variables are Return on Assets and Return on Equity for sustainability, Number of Borrowers per Staff Member for operational efficiency, Cost per Borrower for financial efficiency, and Number of Active Borrowers for outreach. Panel data analysis is done after checking the assumptions of the model. Hausman Test is applied to find out the suitability of Fixed or Random Effect Model. Both random and fixed effect were found suitable for application. In addition to this descriptive analysis of the variables is also done. The results show that most of the variables used in the study are significant in outreach model; other than rank, financial revenue to assets ratio, portfolio at risk, deposits, and capital to assets ratio all other variables are significant in case of sustainability using ROA model and same variables are found insignificant in ROE model except financial expense to assets ratio; in financial efficiency model both significant and insignificant variables are found; and in case of operational efficiency all variables are found significant.

  5. Towards Sustainable Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro ROMANELLI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations have to develop a sustainable path for creating public value by seeking legitimacy for building and maintaining public trust with patients as social and economic institutions creating value and sustaining both health and wealth for people and communities within society. Health care organizations having at disposal decreasing resources and meeting increasing demands of citizens are following an unsustainable path. Designing sustainable health care systems and organizations is emerging as a strategic goal for developing the wealth of people and communities over time. Building sustainable organizations relies on valuing human resources, designing efficient and effective processes, using technology for better managing the relationships within and outside organizations. Sustainable health care organizations tend to rediscover the importance of human resource management and policies for effectively improving communication with patients and building trust-based relationships. While processes of accreditation contribute to legitimizing effectiveness and quality of health care services and efficient processes, introducing and using new information and communication technologies (ICTs and informatics helps communication leading to restore trust-based relationships between health care institutions and patients for value creation within society.

  6. Islamic Microfinance: an Interest free Microfinance Model for Poverty Alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Chakrabarty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper deals with Islamic microfinance and its rationality in Indian context as a panacea of Muslim poverty. Conventional microfinance system is very effective to alleviate poverty of developing countries. But it could not touch all community of people because of ‘interest’ component in debt and high degree of interest. Muslims dislike that microfinance which is based on ‘interest’ as it is strictly prohibited in Islam. Therefore the motto of financial inclusion is out of reach through conventional microfinance. An alternative interest free microfinance model has been developed in some part of world to include all Muslim poor people within the banking system. India is yet to adopt Islamic microfinance though 20% of total population is Muslim. The author strongly opines that India should adopt Islamic microfinance as a tool for poverty alleviation of Muslims as well as other communities.

  7. Akhuwat Microfinance: Participation, Impact and Gender-Based Heterogeneity in Business Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Maazullah

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractWe conducted this research in collaboration with Akhuwat – a microfinance organization in Pakistan which provides interest free loans to the poor. The research findings are reported in three core essays. __The first essay__ explores reasons of non-participation in Akhuwat mi-crofinance. Overall, microfinance has played an important role in provid-ing basic financial services to the poor. Nonetheless, despite being a popular and well funded innovation, a large number of margina...

  8. [Organic agriculture and sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Gang

    2004-12-01

    Basing on the research and practice of organic agriculture at home and abroad, this paper discussed the objectives of developing green food and the principles that must be persisted in the practice in China. In the light of the arguments concerning with sustainable agriculture, we also discussed the significance of "alternative agriculture" in theory and practice. Compared with conventional high-intensity agriculture, the production approaches of organic alternatives can improve soil fertility and have fewer detrimental effects on the environment. It is unclear whether conventional agriculture can be sustained because of the shortcomings presented in this paper, and it has taken scientists approximately one century to research and practice organic farming as a representative of alternative agriculture. The development of green food in China has only gone through more than ten years, and there would be some practical and theoretical effects on the development of China's green food if we exploit an environment-friendly production pattern of organic agriculture which majors in keeping human health and maintaining sustainable agriculture.

  9. Aid and microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels; Lensink, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Microfinance institutions (MFIs) focus on providing financial services to poor households who are excluded from the formal financial system. Having access to finance is crucial for the poor as this helps them to smooth their consumption, generate business opportunities, and improve their inclusion

  10. Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic

  11. THE ROLE OF MICROFINANCE IN RIGHT-BASED APPROACH TO FOOD IN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mago Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of microfinance to food security using the lens of the Right-Based Approach to food. The paper adopts a qualitative research methodology, following an exploratory research design. The research findings show that microfinance has a positive contribution towards rights to food and food security. However, in other African contexts, microfinance worsening the status of the poor. It was thus established that proper management of microfinance programs is likely to bring more benefits than problems. Making the ‘right to food’ and the ‘right to credit’ aspects of human rights will strengthen the productive systems of food to ensure sustainable supplies for effective food security mechanisms. The paper recommends that the linkage between microfinance and food rights be escalated to policy level discussions. Policies that promote a combination of the two rights need to be developed.

  12. Does Microfinance Reduce Income Inequality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether participation of the poor in microfinance contributes to reducing a country’s level of income inequality. Using data from 70 developing countries, we show that higher levels of microfinance participation are indeed associated with a reduction of the income

  13. Efficiency of microfinance institutions in sub – Saharan Africa: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The push for microfinance institutions (MFIs) to achieve sustainability in recent years has made efficiency a prerequisite. Assessment of efficient operations of MFIs is vital for both policy and investment decision making and guaranteeing financial access to the poor. This study investigates the cost efficiency of MFIs operating ...

  14. Sustainability in organizations: advantages and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Josende Paz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are currently seeking to adopt sustainable policies and practices, causing a greater search for and use of sustainable models. This article therefore aims to evaluate the advantages of using sustainability principles in organizations, as well as to detect the main difficulties in implementing a sustainable model, identifying the existence of the principles described by Oliveira et al. (2012 and other authors. Bibliographic research was used to understand the “state of the art” in relation to sustainability in organizations, and the data was collected from articles published in journals in the last eight years. The importance of sustainability to organizations, better financial performance, stimulus for innovation, better management and the involvement of stakeholders in their processes were all evident as advantages of using this methodology. Finally, the following challenges were identified: the need for an investigation into the organization’s maturity in the use of sustainable methods and preparation of human resources for organizational change.

  15. Adopting Sustainability in the Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sanne; Morsing, Mette; Vallentin, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between sustainability adoption and internal legitimacy construction. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is designed as a critical inquiry into existing research and practice on sustainability adoption, illustrated by two...... result in the illegitimacy of such programs. Originality/value – The authors suggest that a loosely coupled approach to sustainability adoption is a productive way to understand internal legitimacy construction, as it appreciates complexity and polyphony....

  16. Introduction to Micro-finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam SANGARÉ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-finance appears today as the most promising tool in the struggle against poverty and banking exclusion. By providing micro-credit, collecting saving and supplying microinsurance, microfinance institutions (MFIs are renewing the banking activity by practices as innovative as the group lending method. However, the real impacts of the microfinance on target populations are to be confirmed, theirevaluation colliding with numerous difficulties. Nevertheless, the future development of micro-finance depends on its superiority over other tools in achieving its objectives. Hence, the need to develop more rigorous studies on the impacts, and mature reflection on sources of funding for MFIs in a context of growing of ethical finance and socially responsible investment.

  17. Foreign Aid and Microfinance: A new policy proposal for financing development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacalle-Calderón, Maricruz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review and compare the potential and limitations of foreign aid and microfinance as a top-down and bottom-up approaches to financing the development process in poor countries. We not only sustain that reviewing foreign aid is a must for the future of the least-developed countries but also posit that microfinance is a complementary and financially sustainable approach that creates better incentives for development. After calculating the potential effects of microfinance over employment and GDP through a simple empirical exercise, we propose a policy recommendation of redirecting a very small share of official development aid (ODA resources to microfinance in order to provide options for the most underprivileged populations.

  18. International For-Profit Investments in Microfinance Institutions Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodriguez Monroy

    2013-07-01

    . Therefore the published literature on the characteristics and performance of the listed equity of the Microfinance Institutions is extremely reduced. But microfinance assets are rapidly growing and MFIs will need to list their equity in stock exchanges to sustain this expansion.

  19. Evaluation of microfinance projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S

    1999-08-01

    This paper criticizes the quick system proposed by Henk Moll for evaluating microfinance projects in the article ¿How to Pre-Evaluate Credit Projects in Ten Minutes¿. The author contended that there is a need to emphasize the objectives of the project. The procedure used by Moll, he contended, is applicable only to projects that have only two key objectives, such as credit operations, and the provision of services. Arguments are presented on the three specific questions proposed by Moll, ranging from the availability of externally audited financial reports, the performance of interest rate on loans vis-a-vis the inflation rate, and the provision of loans according to the individual requirements of the borrowers. Lastly, the author emphasizes that the overall approach is not useful and suggests that careful considerations should be observed in the use or abuse of a simple scoring system or checklist such as the one proposed by Moll.

  20. Islamic Microfinance Branchless Banking Model in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedjo Santoso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ICT has been recently developed into a digital sustainable collaborative networking (DCN platform, and it is expected to be capable of demonstrating the building of social and economic welfare, particularly in crafting innovations to facilitate marginal society.This research attempts to develop an innovative platform of an empirical ICT application a branchless banking form based on ICT Model. The application of Branchless banking model is expected to address the poverty problem which is significantly high in Indonesia. Indonesia is known for it’s heterogeneous values in terms of its areas, ethics, traditions, customs, communities, and local wisdom. The newly introduced application of a mobile payment system is parallel to the vision, and mission upheld by the government. Currently, most literature and practices are just partial. The community model based on Islamic microfinance and Cooperatives is neglected. Therefore, this research aims to design branchless banking in terms of financial inclusion involving Islamic microfinance and Cooperatives. Furthermore, this paper also attempts to test to what extent the proposed model is viable in the current system. This study employs a qualitative approach by conducting an interview with the stakeholders and a deductive method is used to explore and design the proposed model. The finding exhibit that branchless banking based on an Islamic microfinance and a Cooperative model is more flexible and easily acceptable while crafting a deal with Indonesian. In addition, the proposed model is viable in the current system. By implementing this model, the economy can be strengthened toward national unity and a welfare state.

  1. Organizing Open Innovation for Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Backus, G.B.C.

    2015-01-01

    Literature on open innovation has thus far predominantly focused on high technology contexts. Once an industry reaches the limits of a closed innovation model, open innovation may, however, also promise opportunities for sustainable development in a low-tech environment. Because in low-tech

  2. A Three-Dimensional Model of Women's Empowerment : Implications in the Field of Microfinance and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Marloes A.; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Women's empowerment is an important goal in achieving sustainable development worldwide. Offering access to microfinance services to women is one way to increase women's empowerment. However, empirical evidence provides mixed results with respect to its effectiveness. We reviewed previous research

  3. Protecting The Environment: Green Microfinance Or Green Micro Finance Institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Daneri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a critical review of several papers and books written on the subjects of microfinance, poverty and environmental protection. It aims at linking the different themes and also to offer specific suggestions on how microfinance can provide solutions which are beneficial to the environment. The paper also concentrates on the disparities between rich and poor and how they influence the implementation of environmentally damaging activities. These activities are in fact implemented with a clear damage to the poor, especially at local level, where the poor has difficulties to protect itself due to the differences in power between the rich and the poor. Particular attention is also dedicated to the issue of environmental sustainability vs. Microfinance Institutions’ sustainability since the promotion of environmental activities implies costs to be born by Micro Finance Institutions. In fact, it must be highlighted that sustainability is a fundamental issue for MFis. The majority of MFIs normally struggle for their existence, since their objective is to work with poor and difficult clients and they mainly operate in very difficult business environments. The financial sustainability of MFIs is therefore a crucial prerequisite for the provision of financial services to the poor layers of the population. Additional costs concerning environmental protection can be born only if adequate financial support is provided by external donors

  4. Discourse, complexity and sustainability ambiental in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Ricardo Montenegro de Lima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we seek to conduct an investigation into the dynamics of internalization of environmental sustainability in a productive organization of the sugarcane industry. The theoretical discussion is developed from the criticism of Jurgen Habermas to systemic functionalism of Niklas Luhmann. Also, we discuss the theme environmental public sphere and administration of environmental sustainability as a way of adapting organizations to new quality standards required and demanded by the State, Market and Society. The methodological procedures used were: interviews, document analysis and closed questionnaire application. The questionnaire used with 12 representatives of the plant has thirty (30 assertive, accompanied each of two extreme scenarios. The results show that the organization started to internalize environmental sustainability in their organizational system from a Conduct Adjustment Term, prepared by the Public Ministry State. As well as to internalize sustainable practices were adapted in different areas such as: organizational management, procurement, production management, people management and marketing management.

  5. The diffusion of microfinance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  6. Men's response to their wives' participation in microfinance: perpetration and justification of intimate partner violence in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, N S

    2016-12-01

    The present study adds to extant literature on the association between microfinance participation and intimate partner violence (IPV) by assessing a national sample of men married to microfinance participants. The key objective was to assess whether there was a positive association between wives' microfinance participation and men's perpetration and justification of IPV in urban areas of Bangladesh. This study is based on a population-based secondary data analysis. In this cross-sectional study, data from a national sample of men from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey were analysed using logistic regression analyses. IPV perpetration was measured using a modified Conflict Tactics Scale and justification of IPV was measured based on 'justification of wife beating' statements with which men agreed or disagreed. Men married to microfinance participants were not significantly different from men married to non-participants of microfinance in terms of IPV perpetration in both urban and rural areas. However, the interaction effect of wives' microfinance participation and urban living on men's justification of IPV revealed a significant and positive beta coefficient. Specifically, wives' participation in microfinance was positively associated with men's justification of IPV in urban areas (β = 0.51, P Microfinance organizations in urban areas should bundle microfinancial services with IPV screening and intervention geared toward men and women. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microfinance in a Developed Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barinaga, Ester

    2014-01-01

    Although microfinance is often thought of as a tool to address poverty in developing countries, it is also being introduced in a number of countries in the developed world. The paper presents a qualitative study of the first year of the introduction of microfinance to address vulnerable groups...... in Sweden. Savings banks and nonprofit organisations collaborated in the introduction of microfinance as microcredit for micro-enterprise. The paper argues that the rationalities behind actors' participation in microfinance differed, with banks adopting a market rationality and nonprofits mainly...

  8. Microfinance: untapped potential for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak B

    2014-11-01

    Microfinance has recently come under criticism for not meeting its potential for poverty reduction and its exploitation by for-profit entities. Access to finance still remains limited for many of the world’s poor. This re-examination of microfinance should not impede its proliferation and development into a tool to improve health for the underserved. There are significant returns on microfinance investments in health at the household level. Microfinance that allows the consumption of goods and services that can improve health can also lead to increased savings and productivity making it a financially viable and powerful tool for both health improvement and development.

  9. Circular Thermodynamics of Organisms and Sustainable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mae-Wan Ho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A circular thermodynamics of organisms and sustainable systems is presented based on dynamic closures in nested space-time domains that enable the system to approach the ideal of zero entropy production simultaneously at equilibrium and far from equilibrium conditions.

  10. Sustainable Materials for Sustainable Energy Storage: Organic Na Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Viorica-Alina; Renault, Stéven; Valvo, Mario; Brandell, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we summarize research efforts to realize Na-based organic materials for novel battery chemistries. Na is a more abundant element than Li, thereby contributing to less costly materials with limited to no geopolitical constraints while organic electrode materials harvested from biomass resources provide the possibility of achieving renewable battery components with low environmental impact during processing and recycling. Together, this can form the basis for truly sustainable electrochemical energy storage. We explore the efforts made on electrode materials of organic salts, primarily carbonyl compounds but also Schiff bases, unsaturated compounds, nitroxides and polymers. Moreover, sodiated carbonaceous materials derived from biomasses and waste products are surveyed. As a conclusion to the review, some shortcomings of the currently investigated materials are highlighted together with the major limitations for future development in this field. Finally, routes to move forward in this direction are suggested.

  11. Sustainable Materials for Sustainable Energy Storage: Organic Na Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica-Alina Oltean

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize research efforts to realize Na-based organic materials for novel battery chemistries. Na is a more abundant element than Li, thereby contributing to less costly materials with limited to no geopolitical constraints while organic electrode materials harvested from biomass resources provide the possibility of achieving renewable battery components with low environmental impact during processing and recycling. Together, this can form the basis for truly sustainable electrochemical energy storage. We explore the efforts made on electrode materials of organic salts, primarily carbonyl compounds but also Schiff bases, unsaturated compounds, nitroxides and polymers. Moreover, sodiated carbonaceous materials derived from biomasses and waste products are surveyed. As a conclusion to the review, some shortcomings of the currently investigated materials are highlighted together with the major limitations for future development in this field. Finally, routes to move forward in this direction are suggested.

  12. The role of a microfinance program on HIV risk behavior among Haitian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Molly S; Seavey, Brian K; Jules, Reginal; Kershaw, Trace S

    2011-07-01

    Microfinance loans targeted at vulnerable female populations have the potential to foster female economic independence, possibly leading to the negotiation of safer sexual practices and reduced HIV risk. This study assessed the relationship between experience with microfinance loans and HIV risk behavior among 192 female clients of the Haitian microfinance organization Fonkoze. Clients with longer microfinance experience were generally found to have lower indicators of HIV risk behavior and higher indicators of relationship power compared to those with shorter experience. In particular, those with longer memberships were 72% less likely to report partner infidelity, were 3.95 times more likely to use condoms with an unfaithful partner, and had higher average general power index scores compared to those with shorter experience. This study provides evidence that long-term exposure to microfinance is associated with reduced HIV risk behavior in Haitian women and that this reduction may be partly regulated by influencing relationship power. These results suggest the need to further explore the use of microfinance as a tool to prevent the spread of HIV.

  13. Improving maternal healthcare utilisation in sub-Saharan Africa through micro-finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abekah-Nkrumah, Gordon; Abor, Patience Aseweh; Abor, Joshua; Adjasi, Charles K D

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine links between women's access to micro-finance and how they use maternal healthcare services in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The authors use theoretical and empirical literature to propose a framework to sustain and improve women's access to maternal healthcare services through micro-financing. It is found that improved access to micro-finance by women, combined with education may enhance maternal health service uptake. The paper does not consider empirical data in the analysis. The authors advocate empirically testing the framework proposed in other SSA countries. It is important to empower women by facilitating their access to education and micro-finance. This has implications for improving maternal healthcare utilization in SSA. The paper moves beyond poor access to maternal health services in SSA and proposes a framework for providing sustainable solutions.

  14. Book Review Microfinance: Perils and Prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review. Microfinance: Perils and Prospects. Jude L. Fernando (ed), 2012Routledge, London and New York, 242 pp. ISBN - 978 04156 5012 0 Paperback. Reviewed by Kim Shanna Neverson. Aboriginal Health Service Organisation, Montreal, Canada. Microfinance gained tremendous popularity in the 90's, following ...

  15. Book Review Microfinance: Perils and Prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microfinance gained tremendous popularity in the 90's, following the unprecedented success of the Grameen Bank which continues to provide millions of dollars in loans to poor people in Bangladesh via their internationally recognized microfinance program. Some important characteristics associated with microcredit are ...

  16. Do Powerful CEOs Determine Microfinance Performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, Rients; Lensink, Robert; Mersland, Roy

    Recently, microfinance has been coming under public and media attacks. The microcredit crisis following from microfinance-induced suicides in 2010 in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh indicates that weak corporate governance and imprudent risk taking have far-reaching consequences. Yet, analyses of

  17. Do Powerful CEOS Determine Microfinance Performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, R.; Lensink, B.W.; Mersland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, microfinance has been coming under public and media attacks. The microcredit crisis following from microfinance-induced suicides in 2010 in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh indicates that weak corporate governance and imprudent risk taking have far-reaching consequences. Yet, analyses of

  18. Microfinance Dilemma : the case of Bandung, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.W.; Dijkema, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on microfinance by examining a relatively new microfinance programme that was started in 1996 at the Parahyangan Catholic University Centre for Community Services. Most of the data for this research was collected during a three-month stay in Bandung,

  19. Microfinance and Entrepreneurial Development in Nigeria | Osunde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study investigates the impact of microfinance on entrepreneurial development of small scale enterprises in Nigeria and its global significance. Microfinance institutions world over and especially in Nigeria are identified to be one of the key players in the financial industry that have positively affected individuals, ...

  20. Sustainable competitive advantage for accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Michael Alex

    2014-01-01

    In the current period of health industry reform, accountable care organizations (ACOs) have emerged as a new model for the delivery of high-quality and cost-effective healthcare. However, few ACOs operate in direct competition with one another, and the accountable care business model has yet to present a means of continually developing new marginal value for patients and network partners. With value-based purchasing and patient consumerism strengthening as market forces, ACOs must build organizational sustainability and competitive advantage to meet the value demands set by customers and competitors. This essay proposes a strategy, adapted from the disciplines of agile software development and Lean product development, through which ACOs can engage internal and external customers in the development of new products that will provide sustainability and competitive advantage to the organization by decreasing waste in development, promoting specialized knowledge, and closely targeting customer value.

  1. Global Financial Partnerships in Microfinance: India, Peru and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUBARO, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the ‘wholesale’ market through which microfinance institutions operating in three contexts (Peru, Tanzania and the state of Tamil Nadu in India obtain loans from a variety of domestic and international funding bodies. The nature and characteristics of the relationships between them are captured through network analysis and visualization tools, with a dataset comprising inter-organisational lending relationships and organisations’ attributes over the years 2006-8. Focus is on the extent to which patterns in wholesale lending relationships relate to the legal status and characteristics of microfinance institutions; to the regulatory, business and social environment in which they operate; and to shifts in the balance between social and commercial interests of diverse types of lenders.The analysis brings to light considerable cross-country variation in the structure and features of wholesale lending relationships, and relates it primarily to differences in governance and regulation. On this basis, it makes the case that building a more enabling regulatory environment for funding partnerships may improve the capacity of microfinance to achieve its dual goals of poverty alleviation and financial sustainability.

  2. Sustainability of organic, integrated and conventional farming systems in Tuscany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacini, C.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Vazzana, C.; Wossink, G.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural researchers widely recognise the importance of sustainable agricultural production systems and the need to develop appropriate methods to measure sustainability. The principal purpose of this paper is to evaluate the financial and environmental aspects of sustainability of Organic,

  3. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence and the Continuously Relevant and Responsible Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Bøllingtoft, Anne; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2013-01-01

    issues surrounding enterprise innovation and sustainability efforts and capabilities. Innovation and sustainability of the necessary trajectory, scale, and velocity are strategically integrated to deliver what we refer to as innovating sustainability. This provides an accelerated means path toward...... sustainable enterprise excellence, and hence toward the asymptotic aspiration of being a continuously relevant and responsible organization. Introduced are the concepts of innovating sustainability, sustainable enterprise excellence (SEE), and continuously relevant and responsible organizations (CRRO)....

  4. Sustainability Assessment Framework for VET Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Moldovan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new and innovative approach to assessing Vocational Education and Training (VET organizations institutional sustainability in terms of five key pillars: institutional capacity, environmental, economic, social, and training provision. In the five areas of the proposed new and original sustainability assessment framework, a total of 40 performance indicators are used to make the assessment. The assessment process is based on a novel approach for the couple values for performance and importance of the indicators, by using scales from 1 to 5 for both. There are five performance categories (awareness, measures, action, innovation and excellence and five importance categories for each indicator. The framework is innovative, both by its objective, which consists in impact determining and improvement on environmental, economic, social and quality of the training system and by development of a strategy based on performance indicators that integrates sustainable development. The implementation methodology is based on the newly developed framework and detailed application guidelines are provided. Exact results from a case study carried out and an analysis of the results for the environmental area are presented in order to validate the methodology in action. The results are used to establish a sustainability baseline, to identify possibilities for improvement, and to prioritize implementation.

  5. Is Rationing in the Microfinance Sector Determined by the Microfinance Type? Evidence from Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Serrano, Luis; Sackey, Frank Gyimah

    2015-01-01

    This study sets out to examine the extent to which access to credit and credit rationing are influenced by the microfinance type based on the major factors determining micro, small and medium enterprises' access to credit from microfinance institutions in the era of financial liberalization. The data for the study were gleaned from fourteen microfinance institutions' credit and loan records consisting of borrowers and credit characteristics. Our results are puzzling and show that credit ratio...

  6. Gender impact assessment in microfinance and microenterprise: why and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S

    2000-02-01

    This article discusses the reasons for conducting gender impact assessment in microfinance and microenterprise. Although women are increasingly being targeted in microfinance and microenterprise projects, this does not necessarily mean that gender relations are being taken into account. Rather, targeting women raises a host of questions about the context in which women are operating their businesses or handling finance. Assessing gender impact in microfinance and microenterprise can help answer the questions in order to understand whether women are able to use the services and make the anticipated improvements in their livelihoods. Moreover, several approaches are suggested: 1) establish a gender baseline; 2) consider the potential impacts of the project on gender relations; 3) establish the information and indicators required; and 4) collect and analyze the data using tools and techniques appropriate to the task. However, in the context of gender relations there remains much ground, which often cannot be openly discussed. The discussion of how people organize their financial and economic affairs inside the household is usually a delicate area. Hence, it is suggested that such matters should be handled very carefully and to consider the composition and dynamics of the research team itself.

  7. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at...

  8. Conventionalization, Civic Engagement, and the Sustainability of Organic Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Jessica R.

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed that organic farming is synonymous with sustainable agriculture. The broad goals of sustainable agriculture include economic profitability, environmental stewardship, and community vitality. However, the "question of sustainability" (Ikerd, 2008) can be asked of any type of farming, including organic production. One…

  9. Microfinance and female empowerment: Do institutions matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haile Hirut, Bekele; Folmer, H.; Bock, B.B.

    2012-01-01

    Microfinance programmes increasingly target poor women in developing countries with the expectation that, besides poverty reduction, having access to microcredit advances their empowerment. However, research provides conflicting evidence and shows that empowerment may not, or may only be partially

  10. Microfinance and female empowerment : Do institutions matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haile, Hirut Bekele; Bock, Bettina; Folmer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Microfinance programmes increasingly target poor women in developing countries with the expectation that, besides poverty reduction, having access to microcredit advances their empowerment. However, research provides conflicting evidence and shows that empowerment may not, or may only be partially

  11. Performances sociales : Une raison d'être des institutions de microfinance et pourtant encore peu mesurées. Quelques pistes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Lapenu; Manfred Zeller; Martin Greely; Renée Chao-Béroff; Koenraad Verhagen

    2004-01-01

    Historically, microfinance has been successful in reaching the population excluded from the classical financial system. In the 90’s, efforts have been concentrated towards financial and institutional sustainability of the microfinance institutions (MFIs). Tools to evaluate financial performances have been developed, but the social performances were taken for granted. However, nowadays, donors and social investors ask the MFIs to justify the fundings? Who are the clients reached ? How to combi...

  12. human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    institutions themselves and ineffective supervision and control of operators by the regulatory authorities. It is therefore ... O. M. Ikeanyibe, Department of Public Administration and Local Government Studies, University of. Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State ... different way that enlists personnel satisfaction and commitment.

  13. Sustainable Rural Development in Nigeria through Microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Based on its low Gross National Product (GNP) per capital, Nigeria has since. 1990 been classified as a “poor .... rural purchasing power to provide markets for the new urban products – these are among the most persuasive .... there are yet no established government policies and mechanisms for regulating and supervising.

  14. human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    2005) to explain in simple terms the human resource ... institutions themselves and ineffective supervision and control of operators by the regulatory authorities. It is therefore ... aspect of the problems of microfinancing in. Nigeria. Specifically, the ...

  15. Sustainable Rural Development in Nigeria through Microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    independence in Nigeria like most developing nations, extreme poverty remains widespread. This paper ... Despite significant improvements since attainment of independence in. Nigeria like many nations in the ... (UN), the development goals set out in the Millennium Declaration express the resolve of the world's political ...

  16. TAX FRAMEWORK AND SUSTAINABILITY OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Candia Hollnagel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Third Sector entities are relevant to attend to social issues, but the advance on the application of information technology in the public sector and the convergence of databases have brought new requirements for accounting professionals. Particularly, the fiscal framework of the National Classification of Economic Activities (NACE or CNAE in Portuguese is a matter with insufficient academic approach or professional regulation. This article analyzes the impact of incorrect framework for the sustainability of social assistance entities, due to changes introduced by Law No. 12.101/2009. This exploratory study is based on literature, field research (questionnaires with 102 entities in São Paulo, analysis of the codes of NCEA National Register of Legal Entities (CNPJ and their registration in the municipal councils. Initial results indicate that most organizations have not yet found the need to registering themselves, which can make it difficult for obtaining resources and enrollment in public agencies, including negative financial impact. The theme is noteworthy to avoid risk penalty for incorrect tax reporting, therefore it is relevant for accountancy professionals of that type of organization.

  17. Sustainability assessment tools for organic greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foresi, Lucia; Schmutz, U.; Anton, Assumpcio; Vieweger, Anja; Bavec, Martina; Meier, Matthias; Shadid, Muhammad; Pena, Nancy; Petrasek, Richard; Stajnko, Denis; Vukamaniĉ, T.; Landert, Jan; Weißhaidinger, Rainier; Meijer, R.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This booklet describes different tools currently employed for sustainability evaluation, according to the field of expertise and experience of the authors. Each method serves a different purpose and covers different aspects of sustainability (environmental, economic, social or all together). This

  18. The impact of microfinance bank credit on economic development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study found a weak positive relationship between microfinance banks' finance and long run economic growth in Nigeria, and between microfinance banks' finance and capital formation. There was large positive correlation between microfinance banks' finance and penetration ratio. The results suggest a net outflow of ...

  19. Microfinance and reducing poverty in Central Africa | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... to the role of microfinance institutions in the region, where the poor rely on microfinance for access to a livelihood, and micro-insurance to buffer risk. This grant will allow research centres in the four aforementioned countries to evaluate the contribution of microfinance institutions to economic growth and poverty reduction.

  20. Sustainable Development: Paradoxes, Misunderstandings and Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is, in itself, the idea of a harmonic answer to the dual nature of the most pressing problem for global society. Most of the problems dealing with sustainability concern its dual and contradictory nature. That paradoxical reality is in no way a unique feature of sustainability; its universal pervasiveness is demonstrated by…

  1. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at all the different levels going from the worker, to the group, to the organization, and also to inter-organizational processes. The possibilities for further research and interventions are also discussed.

  2. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at all the different levels going from the worker, to the group, to the organization, and also to inter-organizational processes. The possibilities for further research and interventions are also discussed. PMID:28974935

  3. Akhuwat Microfinance: Participation, Impact and Gender-Based Heterogeneity in Business Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maazullah

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractWe conducted this research in collaboration with Akhuwat – a microfinance organization in Pakistan which provides interest free loans to the poor. The research findings are reported in three core essays. __The first essay__ explores reasons of non-participation in Akhuwat

  4. Using microfinance to facilitate household investment in sanitation in rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Goldberg, Jeffrey; Leatherman, Sheila

    2016-11-01

    Improved sanitation access is extremely low in rural Cambodia. Non-governmental organizations have helped build local supply side latrine markets to promote household latrine purchase and use, but households cite inability to pay as a key barrier to purchase. To examine the extent to which microfinance can be used to facilitate household investment in sanitation, we applied a two-pronged assessment: (1) to address the gap between interest in and use of microfinance, we conducted a pilot study to assess microfinance demand and feasibility of integration with a sanitation marketing program and (2) using a household survey (n = 935) at latrine sales events in two rural provinces, we assessed attitudes about microfinance and financing for sanitation. We found substantial stated intent to use a microfinance institution (MFI) loan to purchase a latrine (27%). Five percent of current owners used an MFI loan for latrine purchase. Credit officers attended 159 events, with 4761 individuals attending. Actual loan applications were low, with 4% of sales events attendees applying for a loan immediately following the event (mean = 1.7 loans per event). Ongoing coordination was challenging, requiring management commitment from the sanitation marketing program and commitment to social responsibility from the MFI. Given the importance of improving sanitation coverage and concomitant health impacts, linking functional sanitation markets to already operational finance markets has the potential to give individuals and households more financial flexibility. Further product research and better integration of private vendors and financing modalities are necessary to create a scalable microfinance option for sanitation markets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Microfinance clients' awareness index: A measure of awareness and skills of microfinance clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Kalra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The promotion of financial education for poor people in developing countries calls for work on several fronts, one of which is to develop a measure to evaluate the outcome of financial education in relation to broader development goals. This paper proposes a Microfinance Clients' Awareness Index (MCAI to determine the level of financial awareness of microfinance clients. This index is a comprehensive measure that incorporates information on several aspects of financial awareness in one single number lying between 1 and 2, where 1 denotes complete ignorance and 2 indicates complete financial awareness of the microfinance product.

  6. Microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaas Molenaar; Julie-Marthe Lehman

    2016-01-01

    People want to participate and not remain on the side-lines. Most people have good ideas for how to participate, but making those ideas a reality requires money, as well as knowledge, information and an enabling environment. There are, in fact, people amongst the lesser fortunate in society who want

  7. RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING THE INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF MARKETING RESEARCH ACTIVITY IN ROMANIAN MICROCREDIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savescu Roxana Florenta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As they mature, microcredit organizations in Romania are becoming aware of the importance of marketing in their current activities. Although marketing interventions should be considered important on all types of markets, the reality is that micro-credit companies in Romania have a limited institutional capacity to develop and implement marketing programs. This implies that marketing efforts should be focused and marketing needs should be prioritized, according to the appropriate level of market development (developing markets, growth markets and mature markets. The paper presents the results of an exploratory marketing research study regarding the marketing activity performed by microfinance institutions in Romania. The purpose of the research was to identify courses of action to institutionalize marketing research in the current activity of the subjects analyzed. It has been our intention to give a very practical dimension to the recommendations regarding the marketing information useful for microcredit organizations and categories of marketing research needing to be conducted regularly, making them applicable within the specific Romanian environment. Given the fact that on a national level scientific concerns about microfinance in Romania, in general or about marketing in the field of microfinance in particular are almost nonexistent, this thesis can be regarded as an innovation. This conclusion comes both from the investigation of existing literature and from the author's interviews with managers of microfinance institutions who have argued that this was the first time when Romanian academic institutions got interested in this sector. Potential beneficiaries of the results of this study are: managers of microcredit organizations interested in the development and sustainability of the institutions they manage; various national and international organizations interested in designing technical assistance programs in the areas identified as being

  8. Microfinance participation and contraceptive use: does control over resources matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta; Ely, Gretchen E

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the association between microfinance and contraceptive use. A secondary purpose of the study was to assess the role of control over resources between microfinance participation and contraceptive use. Using secondary data from Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 the present study conducted logistic regression analysis to estimate the interaction effect of microfinance participation and control over resources on reported contraceptive use. Findings indicate that microfinance participants are 1.69 times more likely to use contraceptive (P microfinance participation and control over resources suggest that microfinance participants with control over resources are less likely to use contraceptive, but that finding is not significant. While control over resources matter the most in terms of women's use of contraceptive, this does not hold true for microfinance participants with control over resources.

  9. Microfinance safety net: back to basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Deborah; Shi, Qiuhu; Murthy, Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition among families living in poorer communities has increased in the past two decades. Initiatives advocated by the World Bank include microfinance programs. Research attributing the success of these programs however, has mixed results. In this article we investigate how additional income provided by microfinance is associated with increased consumption of nondurables for households in rural villages in Bangladesh. For our purposes we compare consumption or money expensed on food, medicine, doctor fees, and smoking. Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) procedure was used to address multiple comparison issues among households. Our findings reinforce the importance of microfinance credit as a safety net. Access to additional income for poor villagers improves the consumption of basic needs as expected, regardless of how many loans are taken; consumption of "bads" remains virtually the same.

  10. Process evaluation of the Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity (IMAGE) in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, James; Hatcher, Abigail; Strange, Vicki; Phetla, Godfrey; Busza, Joanna; Kim, Julia; Watts, Charlotte; Morison, Linda; Porter, John; Pronyk, Paul; Bonell, Christopher

    2010-02-01

    The Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity (IMAGE) combines microfinance, gender/HIV training and community mobilization (CM) in South Africa. A trial found reduced intimate partner violence among clients but less evidence for impact on sexual behaviour among clients' households or communities. This process evaluation examined how feasible IMAGE was to deliver and how accessible and acceptable it was to intended beneficiaries during a trial and subsequent scale-up. Data came from attendance registers, financial records, observations, structured questionnaires (378) and focus group discussions and interviews (128) with clients and staff. Gender/HIV training and CM were managed initially by an academic unit ('linked' model) and later by the microfinance institution (MFI) ('parallel' model). Microfinance and gender/HIV training were feasible to deliver and accessible and acceptable to most clients. Though participation in CM was high for some clients, others experienced barriers to collective action, a finding which may help explain lack of intervention effects among household/community members. Delivery was feasible in the short term but both models were considered unsustainable in the longer term. A linked model involving a MFI and a non-academic partner agency may be more sustainable and is being tried. Feasible models for delivering microfinance and health promotion require further investigation.

  11. Social network analysis of sustainable transportation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Studying how organizations communicate with each other can provide important insights into the influence, and policy success of different types of organizations. This study examines the communication networks of 121 organizations promoting sustainabl...

  12. Lessons from a microfinance recapitalisation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Angus

    2010-04-01

    Following a major disaster, microfinance institutions (MFIs) often face high levels of bad debt, which may require the institutions to be recapitalised. This paper describes a recapitalisation programme implemented by the SANASA movement of Sri Lanka in 390 microfinance societies following the December 2004 tsunami, and highlights lessons for other similar programmes. MFI recapitalisation is a good use of funds in post-disaster situations. To create successful programmes, donors should expect to relax some of their usual project requirements and MFIs should focus on maintaining credit discipline.

  13. Introducing Micro-finance in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barinaga, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The case describes the first year of efforts to introduce microfinance as a tool to work with vulnerable groups in Sweden, more particularly ex-convicts, former drug-addicts and longterm unemployed women of immigrant background. The teaching objective is to discuss whether micro-finance can be seen...... as a tool to catalyze social change in developed welfare states such as Sweden, or if it rather reinforces the very power structures it aims to subvert. The author uses the case to analyse the efforts to introduce a new concept to wellestablished economic and social actors, as well as to understand...

  14. Development of a culture of sustainability in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Bernardo; West, Daniel J; Costell, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the concept of sustainability in health care organizations and the key managerial competencies and change management strategies needed to implant a culture of sustainability. Competencies and management development strategies needed to engrain this corporate culture of sustainability are analyzed in this document. This paper draws on the experience of the authors as health care executives and educators developing managerial competencies with interdisciplinary and international groups of executives in the last 25 years, using direct observation, interviews, discussions and bibliographic evidence. With a holistic framework for sustainability, health care managers can implement strategies for multidisciplinary teams to respond to the constant change, fine-tune operations and successfully manage quality of care. Managers can mentor students and provide in-service learning experiences that integrate knowledge, skills, and abilities. Further empirical research needs to be conducted on these interrelated innovative topics. Health care organizations around the world are under stakeholders' pressure to provide high quality, cost-effective, accessible and sustainable services. Professional organizations and health care providers can collaborate with university graduate health management education programs to prepare competent managers in all the dimensions of sustainability. The newly designated accountable care organizations represent an opportunity for managers to address the need for sustainability. Sustainability of health care organizations with the holistic approach discussed in this paper is an innovative and practical approach to quality improvement that merits further development.

  15. Strategies for feeding the world more sustainably with organic agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Adrian; Schader, Christian; El-Hage Scialabba, Nadia; Brüggemann, Judith; Isensee, Anne; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Pete; Klocke, Peter; Leiber, Florian; Stolze, Matthias; Niggli, Urs

    2017-11-14

    Organic agriculture is proposed as a promising approach to achieving sustainable food systems, but its feasibility is also contested. We use a food systems model that addresses agronomic characteristics of organic agriculture to analyze the role that organic agriculture could play in sustainable food systems. Here we show that a 100% conversion to organic agriculture needs more land than conventional agriculture but reduces N-surplus and pesticide use. However, in combination with reductions of food wastage and food-competing feed from arable land, with correspondingly reduced production and consumption of animal products, land use under organic agriculture remains below the reference scenario. Other indicators such as greenhouse gas emissions also improve, but adequate nitrogen supply is challenging. Besides focusing on production, sustainable food systems need to address waste, crop-grass-livestock interdependencies and human consumption. None of the corresponding strategies needs full implementation and their combined partial implementation delivers a more sustainable food future.

  16. Aesthetic mediation of creativity, sustainability and the organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poldner, Kim; Dentoni, Domenico; Ivanova, Olga

    2017-01-01

    The literature on sustainability often focuses on its technical side, such as in studies of life cycle assessment, supply chain management and cleaner production systems. It traditionally assumes that creativity and sustainability are two separate entities in organizations. Contrasting with this

  17. Ecological Citizenship and Sustainable Consumption: Examining Local Organic Food Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfang, Gill

    2006-01-01

    Sustainable consumption is gaining in currency as a new environmental policy objective. This paper presents new research findings from a mixed-method empirical study of a local organic food network to interrogate the theories of both sustainable consumption and ecological citizenship. It describes a mainstream policy model of sustainable…

  18. Fostering organizational sustainability through dialogical interaction. The Learning Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.; Schwarzin, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to introduce and investigate dialogic interaction as a key element of achieving a transition towards sustainability in people, organizations and society as a whole. Furthermore “sustainability competence” as a potential outcome of such interaction is to be introduced,

  19. Repayment performance of microfinance institutions participants in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined repayment performance of microfinance institutions (MFIs) participants in fishing enterprise activity in Niger Delta, Nigeria. Data were collected with the aid of a structured questionnaire administered on the respondents involved in the study who 252 in number. Data collected were analyzed using ...

  20. Book Review: Microfinance: Perils and Prospects | Neverson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microfinance: Perils and Prospects Jude L. Fernando (ed), 2012 Routledge, London and New York, 242 pp. ISBN - 978 04156 5012 0 Paperback. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  1. agement techniques of microfinance firms in accra.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    One fundamental problem faced by the Microfinance industry in Ghana during the period 2003-. 2007 was the technique ... This problem prompted this deductive study which was to assess the effectiveness of the tech- niques adopted by the MFFs to ..... cial institutions: Canada in the global Environ- ment, 2nd Edition.

  2. Book Review Microfinance: Perils and Prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with increased empowerment, poverty reduction, and providing opportunities and capital for entrepreneurship are ... the propagation of the microfinance model, as a strategy for poverty reduction and empowerment of women. ... and began targeting poor rural women, with the desired impact of bringing about greater female ...

  3. Greener and Sustainable Trends in Synthesis of Organics and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trends in greener and sustainable process development during the past 25 years are abridged involving the use of alternate energy inputs (mechanochemistry, ultrasound- or microwave irradiation), photochemistry, and greener reaction media as applied to synthesis of organics and na...

  4. Design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health programme on microfinance clients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somen

    2013-10-12

    Microfinance is the provision of financial services for the poor. Health program through microfinance has the potential to address several access barriers to health. We report the design and baseline findings of a multi-site non-randomized evaluation of the effect of a health program on the members of two microfinance organizations from Karnataka and Gujarat states of India. Villages identified for roll-out of health services with microfinance were pair-matched with microfinance only villages. A quantitative survey at inception and twelve months post health intervention compare the primary outcome (incidence of childhood diarrhea), and secondary outcome (place of last delivery, toilet at home, and out-of-pocket expenditure on treatment). At baseline, the intervention and comparison communities were similar except for out-of-pocket expenditure on health. Low reported use of toilet at home indicates the areas are heading towards a sanitation crisis. This should be an area of program priority for the microfinance organizations. While respondents primarily rely on their savings for meeting treatment expenditure, borrowing from friends, relatives, and money-lenders remains other important source of meeting treatment expenditure in the community. Programs need to prioritize steps to ensure awareness about national health insurance schemes, entitlement to increase service utilization, and developing additional health financing safety nets for financing outpatient care, that are responsible for majority of health-debt. Finally we discuss implications of such programs for national policy makers.

  5. Global Masters in Microfinance: An International Survey Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco Cueva, Vladimir; Picquenot, Aude; Weldegiorgis, Fitsum

    The Foundation for Development Cooperation conducted a survey investigating the need for the development of a Global Masters degree in Microfinance. This survey was undertaken from 30 November 2009 to 7 January 2010, following two years of extensive desk research. This survey sought to; 1. Gauge ...... the level of interest for a postgraduate microfinance qualification within the global microfinance industry; and 2. Identify features of such a program of study which were deemed to be relevant or preferred by the sample group....

  6. Microfinance investments in quality at private clinics in Uganda: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiber, Eric E; Robinson, Amara L

    2007-10-18

    Small private-sector health care providers can play an important role in meeting the developing country health care needs, but a lack of credit can prove major constraint to small-provider expansion. This study examines the potential of small, microfinance loans to strengthen the private health sector and improve access to quality preventive and curative health services in Uganda. This study estimates logistic regressions using 2,387 client exit interviews to assess the impact of microfinance loans on perceived quality and the viability and sustainability of small, private clinics. The study finds perceived quality improved with loan recipients' clients being more likely to choose clinics on the basis of drug availability, fair charges, cleanliness, and confidentiality. In addition, the assessment found evidence of increased client flows, but the changes produced mixed results for sustainability with respondents being only half as likely to "always" visit a particular clinic. The results indicate that the microfinance program improved perceived quality at loan recipient clinics, especially as reliable drug outlets.

  7. A systematic review of microfinance-based interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Salcedo, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the scope of microfinance-based interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention. A systematic review was carried out of literature published between 1986 and 2012 from EBSCO, ProQuest, Science Direct, Emerald, and JSTOR. The search included original research articles that presented evaluated interventions. Books, dissertations, gray literature, and theoretical reviews were excluded. Findings revealed a total of fourteen studies focused on the evaluation of: the IMAGE project, female sex workers, life skills and risk behavior reduction, adherence to treatment, and children and their families. Most of these interventions have shown to have beneficial effects, although results depend on: the type of program, monitoring, sustainability of microcredits, and contextual conditions. The findings of this review should be complemented with interventions carried out by various NGOs and microfinance institutions in different countries that present their results in a dissimilar way.

  8. SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING SOLUTIONS FOR ORGANIC FRESH BERRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeta Elena TĂNASE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes and particularly global warming are topics carefully treated by specialists already since decades. The most pregnant factor that influences climate change is pollution, namely the high level carbon dioxide emissions. Besides other substances used by the most of the industries (oil, charcoal, fertilizers, etc., plastics are not to be ignored when talking about pollution. Plastic waste affects animals and humans, as well as their habitat. In this respect, food industry engages in preserving the good functioning of the environment by developing and using biodegradable and bio-based resources for food packaging. The aim of this literature review was to identify the optimal sustainable packaging solution used for berries. The results of the study pointed out that the most used environmentally friendly packaging technique is the one that involves modified atmosphere. In terms of packaging materials, the literature is limited when it comes to biodegradable/bio-based solutions. However, active packaging gains popularity among researchers, considering the endless possibilities to include sustainable compounds in a biopolymer based matrix, in order to prolong the shelf-life of berries or fruits in general.

  9. Community Empowerment through Islamic Microfinances: Perceptions in Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lathif Hanafir Rifqi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BMT (Islamic saving and loan cooperative has continuosly been one of the Islamic microfinance institutions playing a significant role in empowering economic society. There has been a number of research discussing on the effort, however none of them discussed on the perception between the empowers and the empowered group. Comparing these perceptions is a salient effort to find similarities or differencess of perceptions. This research seeks to compare empowerment perception between two organizations. One hand hand, the first party taking BMT BIF Ledok Timoho as the empowering organization and on the other hand focusing on a group of women's empowerment Ledok Timoho. Gathering data through doing observation and in-depth interview had been employed with selecting the purposive informants that contains a BMT BIF and four empowerment group representatives. To conclude, this research found that are similarities of perceptions on empowerment goals, process, outcomes and constraints.

  10. Organic versus Conventional Cropping Sustainability: A Comparative System Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany L. Fess

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We are at a pivotal time in human history, as the agricultural sector undergoes consolidation coupled with increasing energy costs in the context of declining resource availability. Although organic systems are often thought of as more sustainable than conventional operations, the lack of concise and widely accepted means to measure sustainability makes coming to an agreement on this issue quite challenging. However, an accurate assessment of sustainability can be reached by dissecting the scientific underpinnings of opposing production practices and crop output between cropping systems. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth and comprehensive evaluation of modern global production practices and economics of organic cropping systems, as well as assess the sustainability of organic production practices through the clarification of information and analysis of recent research. Additionally, this review addresses areas where improvements can be made to help meet the needs of future organic producers, including organic-focused breeding programs and necessity of coming to a unified global stance on plant breeding technologies. By identifying management strategies that utilize practices with long-term environmental and resource efficiencies, a concerted global effort could guide the adoption of organic agriculture as a sustainable food production system.

  11. Competing with the Cartels: How Mexico’s Government Can Reduce Organized Crime’s Economic Grip on its People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    DTOs grip on the economy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mexico, Economy, Poverty Reduction, Microfinance , Regulatory Reform, Drug Trafficking Organizations...financial infrastructure and “ microfinance ”, and economic policy reform.24 ECONOMIC CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES Historically poverty has been one of...the “Rural Microfinance Technical Assistance Project (PATMIR)” within its Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries, and

  12. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION PACKAGES FOR ORGANIC TURMERIC

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, Eagan; G. Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), a perennial rhizomatous herb has been regarded as an important spice in Asian cuisine. India is called as the “Spice bowl of the world” as it produces variety of spices with quality. Though India leads in production of turmeric, but average productivity is very low due to imbalanced and suboptimal dose of chemical fertilizers, organic manure, bio – fertilizers and micronutrients (Kandiannan and Chandragiri, 2008). Since, turmeric is a nutrient responsive crop and ...

  13. Learning for Sustainability Among Faith-Based Organizations in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Joanne M.; Sinclair, A. John; Diduck, Alan P.

    2014-08-01

    The complex and unpredictable contexts in which environmental and development work take place require an adaptable, learning approach. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a significant role in sustainability work around the world, and provide a unique setting in which to study learning. This paper explores individual learning for sustainability within two FBOs engaged in sustainability work in Kenya. Learning outcomes covered a broad range of areas, including the sustainability framework, environment/conservation, skills, community work, interpersonal engagement, and personal and faith development. These outcomes were acquired through embodied experience and activity, facilitation by the workplace, interpersonal interaction, personal reflection, and Bible study and worship. Grounded categories were compared to learning domains and processes described by Mezirow's transformative learning theory. The findings indicate that for learning in the sustainability field, instrumental learning and embodied learning processes are particularly important, and consequently they require greater attention in the theory when applied in this field.

  14. Learning for sustainability among faith-based organizations in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Joanne M; Sinclair, A John; Diduck, Alan P

    2014-08-01

    The complex and unpredictable contexts in which environmental and development work take place require an adaptable, learning approach. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a significant role in sustainability work around the world, and provide a unique setting in which to study learning. This paper explores individual learning for sustainability within two FBOs engaged in sustainability work in Kenya. Learning outcomes covered a broad range of areas, including the sustainability framework, environment/conservation, skills, community work, interpersonal engagement, and personal and faith development. These outcomes were acquired through embodied experience and activity, facilitation by the workplace, interpersonal interaction, personal reflection, and Bible study and worship. Grounded categories were compared to learning domains and processes described by Mezirow's transformative learning theory. The findings indicate that for learning in the sustainability field, instrumental learning and embodied learning processes are particularly important, and consequently they require greater attention in the theory when applied in this field.

  15. Conceptualizing Learning Organization towards Sustaining Learning Organization’s Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Faizal Iylia Mohd Ghazali; Norliya Ahmad Kassim; Lokman Hakim Khalib; Muhammad Nurjufri Jaafar; Muhammad Ariff Idris

    2015-01-01

    A learning organization is a place where people in the organization are powerfully learning collectively and by their own to expand their knowledge and skills so that they can enhance and optimize their organizational performance at the maximum. This paper reviews the literature that leads to developing a conceptual framework of a study on the factors of learning organization towards sustaining an organization’s performance. Based on the literature review, three main independent variables are...

  16. Consumer perception of sustainability attributes in organic and local food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Azzurra; Angela, Mariani

    2017-12-14

    Although sustainable food consumption is gaining growing importance on the international agenda, research on this subject is still quite fragmented and most studies analyse single aspects of sustainable food consumption with particular reference to environmental sustainability. In addition, the literature highlights the need to take account of the strong heterogeneity of consumers in studying sustainable behaviour. Identifying consumer segments with common profiles, needs and values is essential for developing effective communication strategies to promote sustainability in food consumption. Consumer segmentation based on the perception of the sustainability attributes of organic and local products was realized using descriptive data collected through a consumer online survey in southern Italy (Campania). K-means cluster analysis was performed to identify different consumer segments based on consumer perception of sustainable attributes in organic and local food. Results confirm the support of consumers for organic and local food as sustainable alternative in food choices even if occasional buying behaviour of these products still predominates. In addition, our results show that an egoistic approach prevails among consumers, who seem to attach more value to attributes related to quality and health than to environmental, social and economic sustainability. Segmentation proves the existence of three consumer segments that differ significantly in terms of perception of sustainability attributes: a large segment of individuals who seem more egocentric oriented, an environmental sustainability oriented segment and a small segment that includes sustainability oriented consumers. The existence of different levels of sensitivity to sustainability attributes in organic and local food among the identified segments could be duly considered by policy makers and other institutions in promoting sustainable consumption patterns. Consumers in the first cluster could be educated

  17. Assessing the Sustainability Performance of Organic Farms in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien M. de Olde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of organic agriculture in Denmark raises the interest of both producers and consumers in the sustainability performance of organic production. The aim of this study was to examine the sustainability performance of farms in four agricultural sectors (vegetable, dairy, pig and poultry using the sustainability assessment tool RISE 2.0. Thirty seven organic farms were assessed on 10 themes, including 51 subthemes. For one theme (water use and 17 subthemes, a difference between sectors was found. Using the thresholds of RISE, the vegetable, dairy and pig sector performed positively for seven themes and the poultry sector for eight themes. The performance on the nutrient flows and energy and climate themes, however, was critical for all sectors. Moreover, the performance on the economic viability theme was critical for vegetable, dairy and pig farms. The development of a tool, including decisions, such as the selection of themes and indicators, reference values, weights and aggregation methods, influences the assessment results. This emphasizes the need for transparency and reflection on decisions made in sustainability assessment tools. The results of RISE present a starting point to discuss sustainability at the farm-level and contribute to an increase in awareness and learning about sustainability.

  18. 139 THE IMPACT OF MICROFINANCE BANK CREDIT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from the Central Bank of Nigeria records, annual reports and statistical bulletin. The ordinary least square estimation technique was adopted using linear regression model. The study found a weak positive relationship between microfinance banks' finance and long run economic growth in Nigeria, and between microfinance ...

  19. Do leadership styles matter in microfinance performance? Empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study draws on the relevance of the full range leadership proposition by showing the relative ability of leadership styles to influence organisational performance in microfinance sector of Ghana. Ghanaian microfinance sector has been concerned with building vibrant institutions within the financial sector. In this direction ...

  20. The Impact of Microfinance on Household Welfare in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the impact of microfinance on household welfare in Botswana using a nationally representative sample of 503 households and an econometric model adapted from Coleman (1999). The results suggested that microfinance had no significant effect on household welfare, which is consistent with Okurut ...

  1. Microfinance and rural development: a long-term perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, H.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term perspective on microfinance starts with a discussion of three central issues: first, views and policies, with two opposing views: "credit for target group" and "pushing the financial frontier"; second, the performance of microfinance institutions measured via two objectives: outreach

  2. Benchmark – based review as a strategy for microfinance delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microfinance is one of the development tools for poverty reduction. The traditional supply-led subsidized credit delivery has led to increase in credit disbursements. However, there is shortage of model benchmark and indicators for evaluating and comparing performance of microfinance schemes. This study reviewed the ...

  3. Sustaining Participatory Design in the organization - Infrastructuring with Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolmsten, Johan

    2016-01-01

    IT management in order to relate the development of their local software support in an integrated infrastructure. The results of the action research report four interlinked improvements to sustain Participatory Design in the organization concerning structuring end-user influence in the organizational arena......, a participatory and evolutionary project management, and participatory tools and techniques appropriated for infrastructure development.......D thesis is about sustaining Participatory Design in the organization to enable users to influence the development of the IT infrastructure that supports their work practices. The empirical research is based on a long-term action research study, where this researcher works as an embedded researcher...

  4. Sustainability and Competitiveness of Romanian Farms through Organic Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ionela Aceleanu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the development of any sector involves respecting the principles of sustainability, which means economic, social and environmental development. Moreover, organic farming is a very important field for ensuring sustainable development. Romania has great potential for the development of organic agriculture, especially due to the large number of available farmland and reduced use of fertilizers and other chemicals. However, the development of organic farming in Romania is in an early stage, due to the numerous problems that Romanian agriculture is still facing. Concern for the environment should be reflected at the level of production processes and consumption. As market demand influences and stimulates production, we can ask the question to what extent stimulating the consumption of organic products through green marketing can boost organic agriculture development and competitiveness of Romanian farms. Using several methods of research, such as analysis, synthesis, comparison, statistical methods and by calling on studies, reports and data series on organic farming in the EU and Romania, this paper highlights Romania's position in terms of the level of development of organic agriculture and recommends several ways to improve the outcomes obtained by Romania in the field. Moreover, based on regression equations, the trend of convergence of Romanian organic agriculture development in relation to the EU countries is analysed. The paper demonstrates that one of the measures that can be taken by Romanian farms is green marketing strategy development that can stimulate both consumption and production of organic products. Therefore, with increasing interest in the development of organic agriculture in Romania, green marketing can play an increasingly important role in promoting the benefits of consuming organic products, thus contributing to business development of organic products as well as to the development of Romanian agriculture

  5. Towards a Model of Sustainable Competitiveness of Health Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Catalina Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, around the world, the concept of competitiveness was long debated by economists (and others, widely used and even sometimes overused. Although at the theoretical level, a number of determinant factors of health care organizations’ competitiveness have been proposed, their diversity and the little empirical data available argues for the need to create and validate a model of competitiveness of health organizations. The purpose of this paper is (considering the theoretical approach to shape a model of sustainable competitiveness of health organizations. In this respect, a 51 item questionnaire was designed and applied on a sample of 291 respondents from 12 Romanian health organizations. The exploratory factor analysis undertaken recovered more than 69% of the common variability of the initial 51 variables and revealed four factors/dimensions of sustainable competitiveness of health organizations (Economic Dimension, Quality Dimension, Social Dimension, and Strategic Dimension. Among the results of the exploratory factor analysis is also the empirical evidence on the contribution of leadership and managerial processes to enhance the influence of all other factors/dimensions in increasing the sustainable competitiveness of health organizations, thus bringing into focus the concept of sustainable management and leadership. Being just in the exploratory phase of our research, the proposed model can, and should, be improved, thus opening up further research directions.

  6. Sustainability of organic food production: challenges and innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Urs

    2015-02-01

    The greatest challenge for agriculture is to reduce the trade-offs between productivity and long-term sustainability. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse organic agriculture which is a given set of farm practices that emphasise ecological sustainability. Organic agriculture can be characterised as being less driven by off-farm inputs and being better embedded in ecosystem functions. The literature on public goods and non-commodity outputs of organic farms is overwhelming. Most publications address the positive effects of organic farming on soil fertility, biodiversity maintenance and protection of the natural resources of soil, water and air. As a consequence of focusing on public goods, organic agriculture is less productive. Meta-analyses show that organic agriculture yields range between 0·75 and 0·8 of conventional agriculture. Best practice examples from disadvantaged sites and climate conditions show equal or, in the case of subsistence farming in Sub-Saharan Africa, higher productivity of organic agriculture. Hence, organic agriculture is likely to be a good model for productive and sustainable food production. Underfunding in R&D addressing specific bottlenecks of organic agriculture are the main cause for both crop and livestock yield gaps. Therefore, the potential for improving the performance of organic agriculture through agricultural research is huge. Although organic farming is a niche in most countries, it is at the verge of becoming mainstream in leading European countries. Consumer demand has grown over the past two decades and does not seem to be a limiting factor for the future development of organic agriculture.

  7. Organization-level predictors of sustained social movement participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesdahl, Eric A; Speer, Paul W

    2015-03-01

    Long-term sustained participation represents one of the most important resources available to community organizations and social movement organizations (SMOs). The participatory literature on community and SMOs has identified a host of individual-level factors that influence participation beyond initial engagement, and has more recently identified contextual factors that influence participation. This study builds upon current understandings of participation in SMOs by examining how sustained participation in movement activities is affected by two qualities of SMO settings: repertoire of organizational activity, and equality of staff contact with organization members to cultivate and facilitate individual participation. To this end, we employ multi-level regression techniques to examine longitudinal data on participation within 50 local chapters of a national congregation-based community organizing federation. We find that the conduct of organizational activities previously shown to increase levels of participation among individual persons does not necessarily lead to increases in aggregate or organization-level participation. Further, we find that conditions of unequal staff contact among organization members represent a notable drag on organization-level participation over time. Our findings suggest that organizers and organizational leaders may well see greater levels of participation in their organizations by simply re-distributing resources and opportunities more equitably within their organizations.

  8. Biobased Organic Chemistry Laboratories as Sustainable Experiment Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Julian R.

    2016-01-01

    As nonrenewable resources deplete and educators seek relevant interdisciplinary content for organic chemistry instruction, biobased laboratory experiments present themselves as potential alternatives to petroleum-based transformations, which offer themselves as sustainable variations on important themes. Following the principles of green chemistry…

  9. Sustainability management for operating organizations of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibrit, Eduardo; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de, E-mail: ekibrit@ipen.br, E-mail: araquino@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. In a country like Brazil, where nuclear activity is geared towards peaceful purposes, any operating organization of research reactor should emphasize its commitment to social, environmental, economic and institutional aspects. Social aspects include research and development, production and supply of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation safety and special training for the nuclear sector. Environmental aspects include control of the surroundings and knowledge directed towards environment preservation. Economic aspects include import substitution and diversification of production. Institutional aspects include technology, innovation and knowledge. These aspects, if considered in the management system of an operating organization of research reactor, will help with its long-term maintenance and success in an increasingly competitive market scenario. About this, we propose a sustainability management system approach for operating organizations of research reactors. A bibliographical review on the theme is made. A methodology for identifying indicators for measuring sustainability in nuclear research reactors processes is also described. Finally, we propose a methodology for sustainability perception assessment to be applied at operating organizations of research reactors. (author)

  10. Can Microfinance Reach the Poorest: Evidence from a Community-Managed Microfinance Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonborg, J. H.; Rasmussen, O. D.

    2014-01-01

    as the income distribution among the poor. When applying this to a panel dataset from a community-managed microfinance intervention in Northern Malawi, we find regressive targeting: Participants are less poor than the general population in the area. In addition, we provide suggestions as to when and why...

  11. Sustaining without Changing: The Metabolic Rift of Certified Organic Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Alexander McGee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many proponents of organic farming claim that it is a sustainable alternative to conventional agriculture due to its reliance on natural agro-inputs, such as manure based fertilizers and organic pesticides. However, in this analysis we argue that although particular organic farming practices clearly benefit ecosystems and human consumers, the social context in which some organic farms develop, limit the potential environmental benefits of organic agriculture. Specifically, we argue that certified organic farming’s increased reliance on agro-inputs, such as organic fertilizers and pesticides, reduces its ability to decrease global water pollution. We review recent research that demonstrates the environmental consequences of specific organic practices, as well as literature showing that global organic farming is increasing its reliance on agro-inputs, and contend that organic farming has its own metabolic rift with natural water systems similar to conventional agriculture. We use a fixed-effects panel regression model to explore how recent rises in certified organic farmland correlate to water pollution (measured as biochemical oxygen demand. Our findings indicate that increases in the proportion of organic farmland over time increases water pollution. We conclude that this may be a result of organic farms increasing their reliance on non-farm agro-inputs, such as fertilizers.

  12. Analysis of Third Party Loan Guarantee and Performance of Non-Prime Household Loans in Microfinance Banks in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Ndirangu Wachira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Household loans remain the engine to productivity and economic growth globally. Non-prime household loan is essential, because it enables the borrowers with no collateral to access credit from Microfinance Banks. The survival and sustainability of non-prime household loans globally is therefore significant. Credit risk however remains the main deterrent of the soundness of Microfinance Banks. This leads to the poor performance of microfinance institutions in many economies in the world. Several countries globally are making inroad in reducing the credit risks, which lead to the poor performance of Microfinance Banks. It is still unknown why the credit risk affects the performance of non-prime household loans in the Microfinance Banks domiciled in Kenya. The reason for conducting this study is to determine the level at which the third party loan guarantee and the performance of non-prime household loans relate to the Microfinance Banks in Kenya. Particularly, this study is to determine how the amount secured by guarantee, recoveries from guarantors, percentage of loan secured, and percentage recoveries from guarantors relate to the performance of nonprime household loans in the Microfinance Banks in Kenya. The population was 516 senior management employees of the banks. The researcher conducted a multiple regression analysis for determining the relationship between the amount secured by guarantee—recoveries from guarantors, percentage granted, and percentage recoveries—and the performance of non-prime household loans. The R and R2 were used for determining the strength of the relationship and the coefficient of determination at 0.05 level of significance of variables. The result of this study reveals that there exists a strong relationship between the dependent and independent variables, thereby contradicting the null hypothesis, which states that the relationship does not exist. The percentage of the recoveries from the guarantors over the

  13. Factors Influencing Poverty Alleviation amongst Microfinance Adopting Households in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavhungu Abel Mafukata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors having the most influence on the alleviation of poverty amongst the households adopting microfinance in Zambia. Ninety nine (n=99 respondents were randomly and purposively selected from amongst 340 microfinance adopters of the so-called Micro Bankers Trust programme operating a microfinance business in the Makululu Compound of Kabwe, Zambia. Socio-demographic primary data were collected through face-to-face interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire instrument. The data were entered into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. The descriptive data were thereafter exported and fitted to an empirical model. The descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents were married, unemployed, fairly educated younger women from larger-sized poor households who drew their household income mainly from microfinance activities. The majority of the respondents thought microfinance had improved their well-being in some crucial areas. The results of the empirical model found that some respondents were indeed alleviated from poverty through microfinance. Conclusion drawn in this paper is that microfinance does alleviate poverty of the poor.

  14. Sustainable sunlight to biogas is via marginal organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2010-06-01

    Although biogas production from algae offers higher sunlight to biomass energy conversion efficiencies its production costs simply cannot compete with terrestrial plants. Unfortunately terrestrial plant cropping for biogas production is, in its own right, neither particularly sustainable nor profitable and its ongoing application is only driven by energy security concerns resulting in taxpayer subsidies. By comparison, scavenging the organic energy residual/wastes from food production offers a far more profitable and sustainable proposition and has an energy potential that dwarfs anything biogas production from dedicated energy crops can realistically offer. Thus researchers wanting to assist the development of sustainable biogas systems with viable process economics should forget about terrestrial and algal energy cropping and focus on the realm of scavengers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SUSTAINABILITY OF TURKISH GREY CATTLE IN ORGANIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya HANOĞLU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beef consumption has significantly increased in the last fifty years as a response to the increase in population size, whereas the sustainability of production systems has begun to be questioned. Because the residues left in the animal feed additives used in conventional food production constitute major health problems in consumers. Therefore, an interest in organic farming methods based on natural grazing and feed production without the use of chemicals is increasing. One of the most important examples of organic beef production in Turkey is the project carried out in the villages of Ayvacık district in Çanakkale. This region has an ecological structure which does not allow an extensive production of culture cattle. The most important advantages of the Turkish grey cattle living in the pastures in the region covered with bushes are that they have less needs of shelter, they do not need supplementary feeding throughout the year and labor costs for their production for beef are low. Breeders in this region maintained a market price for their products by shifting to organic system and thus allowed the sustainable production of the Turkish grey cattle. In this study, Ayvacık Organic Beef Production Project which sets an example for the sustainability of Turkish grey cattle production by featuring its surplus values was evaluated.

  16. Microfinance Participation and Marital Violence in Bangladesh: A Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta; Zippay, Allison

    2016-09-15

    This study explores the experiences of marital violence within the context of microfinance participation among a sample of women living in poverty in Bangladesh. Status inconsistency theory suggests that the higher incomes and female independence that may occur with microfinance participation may threaten or destabilize marital norms in Bangladesh, and have implications in terms of increased violence. We use qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 30 women residing in a slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh, to assess the circumstances in which there may be an association between microfinance participation and marital violence and elucidate the context in which this interaction occurs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. The exposure of microfinance institutions to financial risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gietzen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the exposure of microfinance institutions to liquidity-, interest rate and foreign exchange (FX risk. Using manually collected data from microfinance institutions’ financial reporting, I find that the microfinance sector faces minimal liquidity risk, high interest rate risk and a lower than commonly assumed exposure to FX risk. Linking risk exposure to institutional characteristics, the data shows that legal status and regional affiliation are correlated with risk exposure while regulatory quality is not. Results suggest that the development community may not expect large benefits from expanding the plethora of current measures taken to mitigate liquidity or FX risk.

  18. Sustainable Organic Farming For Environmental Health A Social Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijun Rijwan Susanto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study the researcher attempted 1 to understand the basic features of organic farming in The Paguyuban Pasundans Cianjur 2 to describe and understand how the stakeholders were are able to internalize the challenges of organic farming on their lived experiences in the community 3 to describe and understand how the stakeholders were are able to internalize and applied the values of benefits of organic farming in support of environmental health on their lived experiences in the community 4 The purpose was to describe and understand how the stakeholders who are able to articulate their ideas regarding the model of sustainable organic farming 5 The Policy Recommendation for Organic Farming. The researcher employed triangulation thorough finding that provides breadth and depth to an investigation offering researchers a more accurate picture of the phenomenon. In the implementation of triangulation researchers conducted several interviews to get saturation. After completion of the interview results are written compiled and shown to the participants to check every statement by every participant. In addition researchers also checked the relevant documents and direct observation in the field The participants of this study were the stakeholders namely 1 The leader of Paguyuban Pasundans Organic Farmer Cianjur PPOFC 2 Members of Paguyuban Pasundans Organic FarmersCianjur 3 Leader of NGO 4 Government officials of agriculture 5 Business of organic food 6 and Consumer of organic food. Generally the findings of the study revealed the following 1 PPOFC began to see the reality as the impact of modern agriculture showed in fertility problems due to contaminated soil by residues of agricultural chemicals such as chemical fertilizers and chemical pesticides. So he wants to restore the soil fertility through environmentally friendly of farming practices 2 the challenges of organic farming on their lived experiences in the community farmers did not

  19. Sustainability of Rural Nonprofit Organizations: Czech Republic and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Valentinov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of nonprofit organizations is a key concern for today’s nonprofit scholars and practitioners. Building upon the nonprofit economics literature, the present paper introduces the distinction between the demand-side and supply-side determinants of nonprofit sustainability and makes the case for the discrepancy between them. This discrepancy presents not only a generic conceptual explanation of the nonprofit sustainability problems but is also applicable to the context of the European rural nonprofit sector. Three arguments are advanced. First, the notorious implementation problems of LEADER partnerships can be explained as a manifestation of the above discrepancy. Second, and related, the rural context implies the tendency of the supply-side determinants of nonprofit sustainability to undermine the demand-side ones. Third, recent empirical findings from the Czech Republic show that this tendency does not necessarily imply the possibility of a clear classification of the demand-side and supply-side sustainability determinants. Rather, those features of rural areas and communities that significantly affect the size of the local nonprofit sector exhibit a controversial entanglement of demand-side and supply-side identities.

  20. Islamic microfinance and household welfare nexus: empirical investigation from Pakistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZahidMahmood, Hafiz; Abbas, Kausar; Fatima, Mehreen

    2017-01-01

    .... This study was conducted to gauge the impact of Islamic microfinance on the household welfare of the target clients by observing its impact on health, education, income, expenditures and assets...

  1. microfinance institutions and urban housing financing in addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trynos.Gumbo

    situation in Ethiopia and the historical development of MFIs. It goes on to present the concept of housing finance and presents the research findings, highlighting the valuable .... Evolution of housing microfinance. [. Since their inception in the ...

  2. ORGANIC FARMING AS A DEVELOPMENT FACTOR OF SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The market of organic products is now one of the fastest growing sectors of food production in the world and especially in the EU countries. The purpose of this article is to present the status of organic farming in Poland and in the EU countries and to show the impact of these products on sustainable consumption. The article uses data from FiBL, IFOAM and IJHARS. For the presentation of the data we used the time series, cluster analysis, and multidimensional clustering of features and objects. In Europe, in 2012, organic products were produced by approx. 320 thousand manufacturers with a total value of 22.8 billion euros, of which 250 thousand in the EU and its value amounted to 20.9 billion euros. In Poland 26 376 organic producers were registered and the value of organic products was valued at 650 thousand PLN. It is crucial for organic farming to invent capital into processing and distribution of organic products. This will provide for continual development and increase the consumer’s awareness of the importance of organic food for both their health and the environment.

  3. Female leadership, performance, and governance in microfinance institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Strøm, R. Øystein; D'Espallier, Bert; Mersland, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the relations between female leadership, firm performance, and corporate governance in a global panel of 329 Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) in 73 countries covering the years 1998–2008. The microfinance industry is particularly suited for studying the impact of female leadership on governance and performance because of its mission orientation, its entrepreneurial nature, diverse institutional conditions, and high percentage of female leaders. We find female leadershi...

  4. Microfinance bank and entrepreneurship development in an emerging market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeoye Amuda Afolabi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We determine how Microfinance Banks (MFBs impacts on entrepreneurship development in Nigeria. Data were collected through structured interview from entrepreneurs, Microfinance Bank managers and Regulators. The finding revealed that non-financial services of Microfinance Banks contribute to the survival of entrepreneurs and there is indication that Microfinance Banks enhance the productivity of entrepreneurship. This finding supports the evidence from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN that there is an increase in total assets, Investment and Deposit Liabilities of MFBs in recent times. Beside this, respondents claimed that influence and control over entrepreneurships financing by Microfinance Banks should be view as partially effective. This result suggest that although Microfinance Banks in Nigeria are trying their best, there is need to put more effort in order to meet total demand of financing the entrepreneurships in Nigeria. We recommend that MFBs should assist their clients by providing training on credit utilization and the government should urgently tackle the problem of infrastructure development and maintenance

  5. Transnational organizing: Issue professionals in environmental sustainability networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lasse Folke; Seabrooke, Leonard

    2016-09-01

    An ongoing question for institutional theory is how organizing occurs transnationally, where institution building occurs in a highly ambiguous environment. This article suggests that at the core of transnational organizing is competition and coordination within professional and organizational networks over who controls issues. Transnational issues are commonly organized through professional battles over how issues are treated and what tasks are involved. These professional struggles are often more important than what organization has a formal mandate over an issue. We highlight how 'issue professionals' operate in two-level professional and organizational networks to control issues. This two-level network provides the context for action in which professionals do their institutional work. The two-level network carries information about professional incentives and also norms about how issues should be treated and governed by organizations. Using network and career sequences methods, we provide a case of transnational organizing through professionals who attempt issue control and network management on transnational environmental sustainability certification. The article questions how transnational organizing happens, and how we can best identify attempts at issue control.

  6. Gamification - Environmental and Sustainable Development Organizations Could Do More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, C. R.; Miller, C. A.; Kilaru, V.; French, R. A.; Costanza, R.; Brookes, A.

    2013-12-01

    The use of digital games to foster sustainable development and environmental goals has grown over the last 10 years. Innovative thinking and the origins of 'serious games,' 'games for change' and 'gamification' are partly rooted in movies and science fiction. Existing games illustrate a spectrum of approaches: for example, World Food Programme's FoodForce and University of Washington's Foldit. Environmental organizations globally (e.g. US EPA) have dabbled with game development and gamification, but have only touched the tip of the iceberg, particularly when compared to the success of the commercial gaming industry. We explore: 1) the intersection of environmental organization mission statements in the context of gamification efforts , 2) some examples of existing games, from simple to complex, 3) business model approaches (e.g. game development partnerships with academia, private industry, NGOs, etc.), 4) barriers, and 5) benefits of a more concerted and technologically-advanced approach to gamification for environmental organizations.

  7. Sustaining effect of soil warming on organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixing; Ouyang, Zhu; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Wilson, Glenn; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Global warming affects various parts of carbon (C) cycle including acceleration of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition with strong feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite many soil warming studies showed changes of microbial community structure, only very few were focused on sustainability of soil warming on microbial activity associated with SOM decomposition. Two alternative hypotheses: 1) acclimation because of substrate exhaustion and 2) sustaining increase of microbial activity with accelerated decomposition of recalcitrant SOM pools were never proven under long term field conditions. This is especially important in the nowadays introduced no-till crop systems leading to redistribution of organic C at the soil surface, which is much susceptible to warming effects than the rest of the profile. We incubated soil samples from a four-year warming experiment with tillage (T) and no-tillage (NT) practices under three temperatures: 15, 21, and 27 °C, and related the evolved total CO2 efflux to changes of organic C pools. Warmed soils released significantly more CO2 than the control treatment (no warming) at each incubation temperature, and the largest differences were observed under 15 °C (26% increase). The difference in CO2 efflux from NT to T increase with temperature showing high vulnerability of C stored in NT to soil warming. The Q10 value reflecting the sensitivity of SOM decomposition to warming was lower for warmed than non-warmed soil indicating better acclimation of microbes or lower C availability during long term warming. The activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase, chitinase, sulphatase, reflecting the response of C, N and S cycles to warming, were significantly higher under warming and especially under NT compared to two other respective treatments. The CO2 released during 2 months of incubation consisted of 85% from recalcitrant SOM and the remaining 15% from microbial biomass and extractable organic C based on the

  8. Scalability of Sustainable Business Models in Hybrid Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jabłoński

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of change in modern business create new mechanisms for company management to determine their pursuit and the achievement of their high performance. This performance maintained over a long period of time becomes a source of ensuring business continuity by companies. An ontological being enabling the adoption of such assumptions is such a business model that has the ability to generate results in every possible market situation and, moreover, it has the features of permanent adaptability. A feature that describes the adaptability of the business model is its scalability. Being a factor ensuring more work and more efficient work with an increasing number of components, scalability can be applied to the concept of business models as the company’s ability to maintain similar or higher performance through it. Ensuring the company’s performance in the long term helps to build the so-called sustainable business model that often balances the objectives of stakeholders and shareholders, and that is created by the implemented principles of value-based management and corporate social responsibility. This perception of business paves the way for building hybrid organizations that integrate business activities with pro-social ones. The combination of an approach typical of hybrid organizations in designing and implementing sustainable business models pursuant to the scalability criterion seems interesting from the cognitive point of view. Today, hybrid organizations are great spaces for building effective and efficient mechanisms for dialogue between business and society. This requires the appropriate business model. The purpose of the paper is to present the conceptualization and operationalization of scalability of sustainable business models that determine the performance of a hybrid organization in the network environment. The paper presents the original concept of applying scalability in sustainable business models with detailed

  9. Measuring business performance using indicators of ecologically sustainable organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Charles G., Jr.; Snow, Charles C.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of ecology-based performance measures as a way of augmenting the Balanced Scorecard approach to organizational performance measurement. The Balanced Scorecard, as proposed by Kaplan and Norton, focuses on four primary dimensions; financial, internal-business-process, customer, and learning and growth perspectives. Recently, many 'green' organizational theorists have developed the concept of "Ecologically Sustainable Organizations" or ESOs, a concept rooted in open systems theory. The ESO is called upon to consider resource use and conservation as a strategy for long-term viability. This paper asserts that in order to achieve ESO status, an organization must not only measure but also reward resource conservation measures. Only by adding a fifth perspective for ecological dimensions will the entity be truly motivated toward ESO status.

  10. Greener and Sustainable Trends in Synthesis of Organics and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trends in greener and sustainable process development during the past 25 years are abridged involving the use of alternate energy inputs (mechanochemistry, ultrasound- or microwave irradiation), photochemistry, and greener reaction media as applied to synthesis of organics and nanomaterials. In the organic synthesis arena, examples comprise assembly of heterocyclic compounds, coupling and a variety of other name reactions catalyzed by basic water or recyclable magnetic nanocatalysts. Generation of nanoparticles benefits from the biomimetic approaches where vitamins, sugars, and plant polyphenols, including agricultural waste residues, can serve as reducing and capping agents. Metal nanocatalysts (Pd, Au, Ag, Ni, Ru, Ce, Cu, etc.) immobilized on biodegradable supports such as cellulose and chitosan, or on recyclable magnetic ferrites via ligands, namely dopamine or glutathione, are receiving special attention. These strategic approaches attempt to address most of the Green Chemistry Principles while producing functional chemicals with utmost level of waste minimization. Feature article for celebration of 25 years of Green Chemistry on invitation from American Chemical Society (ACS) journal, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

  11. Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting Well-Being, Meaningfulness, and Sustainability in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This contribution deals with the concept of healthy organizations and starts with a definition of healthy organizations and healthy business. In healthy organizations, culture, climate, and practices create an environment conducive to employee health and safety as well as organizational effectiveness (Lowe, 2010). A healthy organization thus leads to a healthy and successful business (De Smet et al., 2007; Grawitch and Ballard, 2016), underlining the strong link between organizational profitability and workers' well-being. Starting from a positive perspective focused on success and excellence, the contribution describes how positive organizational health psychology evolved from occupational health psychology to positive occupational health psychology stressing the importance of a primary preventive approach. The focus is not on deficiency and failure but on a positive organizational attitude that proposes interventions at different levels: individual, group, organization, and inter-organization. Healthy organizations need to find the right balance between their particular situation, sector, and culture, highlighting the importance of well-being and sustainability. This contribution discusses also the sustainability of work-life projects and the meaning of work in healthy organizations, stressing the importance of recognizing, respecting, and using the meaning of work as a key for growth and success. Finally, the contribution discusses new research and intervention opportunities for healthy organizations.

  12. Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting Well-Being, Meaningfulness, and Sustainability in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Di Fabio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the concept of healthy organizations and starts with a definition of healthy organizations and healthy business. In healthy organizations, culture, climate, and practices create an environment conducive to employee health and safety as well as organizational effectiveness (Lowe, 2010. A healthy organization thus leads to a healthy and successful business (De Smet et al., 2007; Grawitch and Ballard, 2016, underlining the strong link between organizational profitability and workers’ well-being. Starting from a positive perspective focused on success and excellence, the contribution describes how positive organizational health psychology evolved from occupational health psychology to positive occupational health psychology stressing the importance of a primary preventive approach. The focus is not on deficiency and failure but on a positive organizational attitude that proposes interventions at different levels: individual, group, organization, and inter-organization. Healthy organizations need to find the right balance between their particular situation, sector, and culture, highlighting the importance of well-being and sustainability. This contribution discusses also the sustainability of work-life projects and the meaning of work in healthy organizations, stressing the importance of recognizing, respecting, and using the meaning of work as a key for growth and success. Finally, the contribution discusses new research and intervention opportunities for healthy organizations.

  13. Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting Well-Being, Meaningfulness, and Sustainability in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This contribution deals with the concept of healthy organizations and starts with a definition of healthy organizations and healthy business. In healthy organizations, culture, climate, and practices create an environment conducive to employee health and safety as well as organizational effectiveness (Lowe, 2010). A healthy organization thus leads to a healthy and successful business (De Smet et al., 2007; Grawitch and Ballard, 2016), underlining the strong link between organizational profitability and workers’ well-being. Starting from a positive perspective focused on success and excellence, the contribution describes how positive organizational health psychology evolved from occupational health psychology to positive occupational health psychology stressing the importance of a primary preventive approach. The focus is not on deficiency and failure but on a positive organizational attitude that proposes interventions at different levels: individual, group, organization, and inter-organization. Healthy organizations need to find the right balance between their particular situation, sector, and culture, highlighting the importance of well-being and sustainability. This contribution discusses also the sustainability of work-life projects and the meaning of work in healthy organizations, stressing the importance of recognizing, respecting, and using the meaning of work as a key for growth and success. Finally, the contribution discusses new research and intervention opportunities for healthy organizations. PMID:29184517

  14. PRODUCTION AND MARKETABILITY OF CONVENTIONAL, SUSTAINABLE AND ORGANIC PRODUCED TOMATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean BAN

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional agricultural production is denoted by high levels of chemisation, strait specialised production, high yields and low costs per production unit, however this production causes risky interventions, which could affect negatively on environment and human health Research results indicate possibilities for growing vegetables in alternative systems, less risky for environment with satisfying economic success. The aim of this research was to determine economic success of organic, sustainable and conventional production of tomato in the Mediterranean area of Republic Croatia. Bianual research was conducted during 2002/2003. During vegetation we examined parameters of growth, marketable yields and costs for materials, work and machinery which are used in economic analysis. Economical analysis of tomatoes production indicate worst results in organic production system. Loses in tomatoes organic production were consequences of two main factors: lower marketed yield and equal product price for all three production types. Lower yields in organic production were expected, therefore bad financial results were caused by mainly low market prices, which do not validate quality and food safety. Therefore financial success is preconditioned by higher market validation, which can be obtained through market analysis and product development. Consumer awareness about organic agriculture is still very weak and this point requires further attention. The link between organic agriculture and the environment/nature protection is missing too. The purchase of organic food is influenced by the level of information and knowledge of consumers with reference to these products. Doubts about the truthfulness and significance of some data were raised by main places where organic food is purchased, since an excessive greatest limitations are high prices and a low level of information to consumers. Current standard of life of most Croatian consumers does not permit them to

  15. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. PMID:25994672

  16. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-06-07

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Microfinance and poverty reduction: evidence from a village study in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Shah

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the competing claims on the impact of microfinance programs on multidimensional poverty, a village study in Bangladesh was conducted where three microfinance programs had been operating for more than five years. The study found that microfinance has resulted in a moderate reduction in the poverty of borrowers, as measured by a variety of socio-economic indicators, but has not reached many of the poorest in the village. To make microfinance a more effective means of poverty reduction other services such as skills training, technological support, education and health related strategies should be included with microfinance.

  18. Sustainability of Open-Source Software Organizations as Underpinning for Sustainable Interoperability on Large Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulker, D. W.; Gallagher, J. H. R.

    2015-12-01

    OPeNDAP's Hyrax data server is an open-source framework fostering interoperability via easily-deployed Web services. Compatible with solutions listed in the (PA001) session description—federation, rigid standards and brokering/mediation—the framework can support tight or loose coupling, even with dependence on community-contributed software. Hyrax is a Web-services framework with a middleware-like design and a handler-style architecture that together reduce the interoperability challenge (for N datatypes and M user contexts) to an O(N+M) problem, similar to brokering. Combined with an open-source ethos, this reduction makes Hyrax a community tool for gaining interoperability. E.g., in its response to the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI), NASA references OPeNDAP-based interoperability. Assuming its suitability, the question becomes: how sustainable is OPeNDAP, a small not-for-profit that produces open-source software, i.e., has no software-sales? In other words, if geoscience interoperability depends on OPeNDAP and similar organizations, are those entities in turn sustainable? Jim Collins (in Good to Great) highlights three questions that successful companies can answer (paraphrased here): What is your passion? Where is your world-class excellence? What drives your economic engine? We attempt to shed light on OPeNDAP sustainability by examining these. Passion: OPeNDAP has a focused passion for improving the effectiveness of scientific data sharing and use, as deeply-cooperative community endeavors. Excellence: OPeNDAP has few peers in remote, scientific data access. Skills include computer science with experience in data science, (operational, secure) Web services, and software design (for servers and clients, where the latter vary from Web pages to standalone apps and end-user programs). Economic Engine: OPeNDAP is an engineering services organization more than a product company, despite software being key to OPeNDAP's reputation. In essence, provision of

  19. Microfinance: a general overview and implications for impoverished individuals living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Adolfo; Arteaga, Fernando; Muñoz, Maribel; Zeladita, Jhon; Albujar, Mayler; Bayona, Jaime; Shin, Sonya

    2010-08-01

    Microfinance among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) faces some opposition and remains understudied. This literature review examines microfinance's evolution and impact on a variety of social and health indicators and its emerging implementation as a primary prevention tool for HIV and economic intervention for PLWHA. There is an abundance of literature supporting the apparent utility of microfinance. However, our understanding of the subject remains clouded by the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of existing impact studies, and access limitations to microfinance curbs our understanding of microfinance for this population. Existing literature suggests PLWHA could attain economic stability from microfinance and achieve successful repayment rates in some settings. The precarious socioeconomic and health issues of PLWHA pose unique challenges to minimizing loan default risk. Carefully-designed clinical studies are needed to assess whether PLWHA can be as successful with microfinance as healthy individuals.

  20. Earthworm Is a Versatile and Sustainable Biocatalyst for Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhi; Chen, Yan-Li; Yuan, Yi; Song, Jian; Yang, Da-Cheng; Xue, Yang; He, Yan-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A crude extract of earthworms was used as an eco-friendly, environmentally benign, and easily accessible biocatalyst for various organic synthesis including the asymmetric direct aldol and Mannich reactions, Henry and Biginelli reactions, direct three-component aza-Diels-Alder reactions for the synthesis of isoquinuclidines, and domino reactions for the synthesis of coumarins. Most of these reactions have never before seen in nature, and moderate to good enantioselectivities in aldol and Mannich reactions were obtained with this earthworm catalyst. The products can be obtained in preparatively useful yields, and the procedure does not require any additional cofactors or special equipment. This work provides an example of a practical way to use sustainable catalysts from nature. PMID:25148527

  1. Innovative concepts towards sustainability in organic horticulture: testing a participatory technology design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M.; Keulen, van H.

    2008-01-01

    Horticulture in the Netherlands is an economically strong sector. However, current organic horticulture does not comply with the standards for sustainability, because of its contribution to environmental pollution and exhaustion of natural resources. Transition towards more sustainable

  2. SOCIAL ENTERPRISES AND MICROFINANCE AS TOOLS FOR POVERTY ALLEVIATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA-MIRELA COJOCARU (DIACONESCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poverty is a dangerous indicator that situates Romania in top positions in many EU statistics: 40% of the population is at risk of poverty or social exclusion and 29% have severe material deprivation. Even though it has been stated on several occasions that funds for the eradication of poverty in Romania do exist, the lack of interest and focus on solving this problem have led to the mismanagement of these funds. In contrast with the previous EU financing programme, a new perspective on the policy creation regarding poverty alleviation has been recently developed and is presented as an integrated package. This wishes to bring together disparate programmes/projects and different stakeholders. This proposal is a very different approach from institutional/methodological point of view, and it has been said to mark “the start of an effective capacity building effort”. The purpose of this literature exploration is focused on the potential Romanian social enterprises and microfinance have in poverty alleviation, taking into consideration that these tools have been created especially for poverty eradication. Our conclusion has been that policy makers have to sustain the development of social enterprises through microfinance, which most of the times can be the single financial instrument available to them.

  3. Education and microfinance: an alternative approach to the empowerment of the poor people in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Rizali; Wahyudin, Uyu; Ardiwinata, Jajat S; Abdu, Wamaungo Juma

    2015-01-01

    There is good reason to combine education with microcredit for poverty alleviation in the poor communities of the developing world, including in Indonesia. Poverty is dangerous, it deprives people of their right to education, their right to good health, their right to freedom of speech, their right to democracy, their right to financial services and of course their right to knowledge enhancement, which are all crucial to living a better life. We must therefore, provide services beyond, credits for the poor. In this case, education should be included to each and every development agenda for the poor since it is key to any positive change and sustainable development of people. If well planned and well integrated within the microcredit services, education can serve a good purpose in poverty alleviation. This paper describes how education and microfinance have been used in combination to alleviate poverty in Indonesia, especially in the areas studied. The study uses a multi-cases approach to examine the purposively selected baitul maal tamwil (BMTs) organisations, which are sharia based semiformal microfinance institutions regarded to be among those few integrating education with their financial services.

  4. Microfinance and Violence Against Women in Rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Isabel; Lacalle-Calderon, Maricruz; Torralba, Miguel

    2017-11-01

    Violence against Women (VaW) has come to be recognized as a serious human rights abuse with important consequences not only for women but for whole societies. Since VaW has several manifestations, it is possible to differentiate among different types of violence. In this article, a broad theoretical framework with different dimensions of gender violence was adapted to a Latin American social and cultural context to measure three out of the five main types of violence: economic violence, emotional psychological violence, and coercive control. The goal of this article is to provide empirical evidence to determine whether access to microfinance services plays a role in reducing VaW. To this end, we designed and performed a cross-sectional study with a treatment and a control group in rural Guatemala. A sample of 883 rural women in the "Altiplano" area of Guatemala (448 women with microfinance services and 435 without) was surveyed from May to November 2012. The results of the bivariate logistic regression showed evidence of association between access to microfinance services and reduction of VaW. After adjusting for covariates, global, economic, and emotional psychological violence maintained a negative and statistically significant association with microfinance, while only coercive control showed no statistical association with microfinance services. Access to microcredits showed a very clear relationship to reducing economic and emotional violence but not coercive control, a factor that may be determined by social and cultural norms. In contrast to Status Inconsistency Theory, which has been tested primarily in Asia, our study of Guatemala showed that increased status and economic independence of women due to their participation in microfinance services reduced VaW.

  5. GM Crops, Organic Agriculture and Breeding for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Ceccarelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing debate about the use of genetically-modified (GM crops in agriculture has largely focused on food safety and genetic contamination issues. Given that the majority of GM crops have been produced to respond to the problem of crop yield reductions caused by diseases, insects and weeds, the paper argues that in those cases, the currently used GM crops are an unstable solution to the problem, because they represent such a strong selection pressure, that pests rapidly evolve resistance. Organic agriculture practices provide a more sustainable way of producing healthy food; however, the lower yields often associated with those practices, making the resultant healthy food more expensive, open the criticism that such practices will not be able to feed human populations. Evolutionary plant breeding offers the possibility of using the evolutionary potential of crops to our advantage by producing a continuous flow of varieties better adapted to organic systems, to climate change and to the ever changing spectrum of pests, without depending on chemical control.

  6. Organically modified titania nanoparticles for sustained drug release applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Komal; Roy, Indrajit

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization of drug-doped organically modified titania nanoparticles, and their applications in sustained drug release. The drug-doped nanoparticles were synthesized in the hydrophobic core of oil-in-water microemulsion medium. Structural aspects obtained through TEM and FESEM depicted that organically modified titania nanoparticles are monodispersed with spherical morphology, with an average size of around 200 nm. Their polymorphic forms and porosity were determined using powder XRD and BET, respectively, which showed that they are present in the anatase form, with a surface area of 136.5 m(2)/g and pore-diameter of 5.23 nm. After synthesis and basic structural characterizations, optical properties were studied for both fluorophore and drug encapsulated nanoparticles. The results showed that though the optical properties of the fluorophore are partially diminished upon nanoencapsulation, it became more stable against chemical quenching. The nanoparticles showed pH-dependent drug release pattern. In vitro studies showed that the nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken by cells. Cell viability assay results showed that though the placebo nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic, the drug-doped nanoparticles show drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, such porous nanoparticles can be used in non-toxic drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attitudes of green organizations' personnel toward genuine sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allevato, Camillo

    2017-01-01

    Layman's summary: This thesis dissertation concerns the identification of the main factors that influence attitudes towards genuine sustainable development, in order to identify strategies that will be more effective in education for quality sustainable development. In the pursuit of genuine

  8. Utilizing Cocoa Rind as Organic Fertilizer to Support Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani Chaniago

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main key in choosing manure is the level of ripeness, the ratio of Carbon and Nitrogen (C/N and the Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium (NPPt contents. So far, the farmers have not effectively utilized organic materials as fertilizers in agricultural lands. Organic materials which can be used include agricultural waste and animal waste. The existence of alternative fertilizers and in order to support the development of sustainable agriculture, utilizing agricultural waste as the materials to make organic fertilizers is encouraged. Organic fertilizers can be in the forms of manure, compost, and the combination of both. The research was aimed to study the NPPt content in compost from cocoa rind and cow waste. This research was done in May – September 2015 in Sub-district Luwuk, District Banggai and in the Laboratory of Chemistry and Soil Fertility, Department of Soil Science Faculty of Agriculture, Hasanuddin University, Makassar. The experiment was conducted in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD. The experiment contained one factor with three treatments, which were repeated 3 times; thus, there were 9 treatments units. The treatments were comparison dosages of cocoa rind and cow waste, i.e. P1 = 50 kg of cocoa rind : 10 kg of cow waste; P2 = 50 kg of cocoa rind : 20 kg cow of waste; P3 = 50 kg of cocoa rind : 30 kg of cow waste. Data were analysed by comparing the average of NPPt element in cocoa rind compost and cow waste. Data was then analyzed statistically by One Way Anova (One Way Variant Analysis by using SPSS 19.0 for Windows and further analyzed by Least Significant Difference (LSD 1% by using Microsoft Excel Windows 7. The results showed that the highest macro nutrients content was in P2 with N = 0.25%; P = 3.91%; K = 5.23% and the lowest was in P3 with N = 0.19% and P = 3.33% as well as in P1 with K = 4.16%.

  9. How the Organic Food System Supports Sustainable Diets and Translates These into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassner, Carola; Cavoski, Ivana; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Kahl, Johannes; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Lairon, Denis; Lampkin, Nicolas; Løes, Anne-Kristin; Matt, Darja; Niggli, Urs; Paoletti, Flavio; Pehme, Sirli; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Schader, Christian; Stolze, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Organic production and consumption provide a delineated food system that can be explored for its potential contribution to sustainable diets. While organic agriculture improves the sustainability performance on the production side, critical reflections are made on how organic consumption patterns, understood as the practice of people consuming significant amounts of organic produce, may also be taken as an example for sustainable food consumption. The consumption patterns of regular organic consumers seem to be close to the sustainable diet concept of FAO. Certain organic-related measures might therefore be useful in the sustainability assessment of diets, e.g., organic production and organic consumption. Since diets play a central role in shaping food systems and food systems shape diets, the role of organic consumption emerges as an essential topic to be addressed. This role may be based on four important organic achievements: organic agriculture and food production has a definition, well-established principles, public standards, and useful metrics. By 2015, data for organic production and consumption are recorded annually from more than 160 countries, and regulations are in force in more than 80 countries or regions. The organic food system puts the land (agri-cultura) back into the diet; it is the land from which the diet in toto is shaped. Therefore, the organic food system provides essential components of a sustainable diet.

  10. How the Organic Food System Supports Sustainable Diets and Translates These into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassner, Carola; Cavoski, Ivana; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Kahl, Johannes; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Lairon, Denis; Lampkin, Nicolas; Løes, Anne-Kristin; Matt, Darja; Niggli, Urs; Paoletti, Flavio; Pehme, Sirli; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Schader, Christian; Stolze, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Organic production and consumption provide a delineated food system that can be explored for its potential contribution to sustainable diets. While organic agriculture improves the sustainability performance on the production side, critical reflections are made on how organic consumption patterns, understood as the practice of people consuming significant amounts of organic produce, may also be taken as an example for sustainable food consumption. The consumption patterns of regular organic consumers seem to be close to the sustainable diet concept of FAO. Certain organic-related measures might therefore be useful in the sustainability assessment of diets, e.g., organic production and organic consumption. Since diets play a central role in shaping food systems and food systems shape diets, the role of organic consumption emerges as an essential topic to be addressed. This role may be based on four important organic achievements: organic agriculture and food production has a definition, well-established principles, public standards, and useful metrics. By 2015, data for organic production and consumption are recorded annually from more than 160 countries, and regulations are in force in more than 80 countries or regions. The organic food system puts the land (agri-cultura) back into the diet; it is the land from which the diet in toto is shaped. Therefore, the organic food system provides essential components of a sustainable diet. PMID:26176912

  11. Implementing Islamic microfinance in Nigeria: a matter of equity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This contention is substantiated through constitutional analysis and also in light of a contemporary economic welfare theory – the Capability Approach. The article argues that this marginalized group has a right to Islamic microfinance. This right, it is further contended, places justiciable (positive and negative) duty on the ...

  12. Réglementation et supervision des institutions de microfinance en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-07-30

    Jul 30, 2016 ... Microfinance institutions (MFIs) work with a client base that is for the most part excluded from the formal banking system. Given that they operate by collecting the savings of the poor in rural areas, it is important to develop regulatory frameworks to protect the clients of these institutions. Two approaches are ...

  13. The Impact of Microfinance on Household Welfare in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that access to credit enables the rural poor households to enhance their productive capacity with potential implications ... in BRAC microfinance programme had more income and owned more assets than the non- participants. ... increased household expenditures, more assets and better coping mechanisms in lean periods.

  14. Credit Default Risk and its Determinants of Microfinance Industry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Industry in Ethiopia. Samuel Setargie*. Abstract. Despite the current enthusiasms in applying the concept of microfinance as a poverty alleviation tool in many countries, the risk management ... rate and the grounds of the observed trends. ..... The logistic and the normal CDFs are very similar in their shape except that the.

  15. implementing islamic microfinance in nigeria: a matter of equity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    indirect discrimination; constitutional law/human right, capability approach. .... LAW & POLICY. VOL. 7: 2: 2016 partly because it will play a key role in achieving real welfare advancements. Even more importantly, Islamic microfinance must be ...... an element of gambling (maysir).101 It is noteworthy that while pure loans and ...

  16. The Empirics of Microfinance: What do we Know?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.; Hermes, N.

    2007-01-01

    Microfinance has received a lot of attention recently, both from policy makers as well as in academic circles. Two of the main topics that have been hotly debated are explaining joint liability group lending and its implications for reducing information asymmetries, and the trade-off between the

  17. Social and Financial Exlusion: The Role of Microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becchitti, L.; Boot, A.; Lensink, B.W.; Zazzaro, A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional banks have proved to have severe limits in mitigating financial exclusion. The microfinance revolution is intended to address this problem by devising new approaches which ease credit access for poor and uncollateralized borrowers. In this introductory essay we present a special issue of

  18. Social and Financial Exclusion: The Role of Microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becchetti, L.; Boot, A.W.; Lensink, R.; Zazzaro, A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional banks have proved to have severe limits in mitigating fincancial exclusion. The microfinance revolution is intended to address this problem by devising new approaches which ease credit access for poor and uncollateralized borrowers. In this introductory essay we present a special issue

  19. An Extension Case Study in Institutional Innovation: Microfinance Intermediary Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    An institutional innovation process led by Extension created a statewide microfinance intermediary. The intermediary provides business technical assistance and microloans to entrepreneurs having difficulty securing conventional credit but having workable business plans. The process included (1) gathering indicators of a problem; (2) formation of a…

  20. The impact of microfinance institution in economic growth of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study seeks to examine the impact of microfinance institution on economic growth of a country, thus using Nigeria as a case study. The study employs the multiple regression analysis given that the data are cross-sectional and time series in nature. Secondary data of all commercial banks were extracted from the Central ...

  1. Microfinance Programs in Uganda: An Analysis of Household ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper identifies a model of low-income household participation in microfinance credit programs and the effects on investment behavior from repeated access to these institutions using evidence from household survey data. The primary focus is on changes in household investment behavior, not the assessment of ...

  2. An Assessment of the Performance of Microfinance Institutions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction of microfinance in the Nigerian financial system is an attempt to provide the poor with access to micro-financial services. Micro-banks that are supposed to provide these services are faced with many challenges. Among these are: inability to reach a greater number of the poor; funding of commercial sectors ...

  3. Impact of Debt Capital on Outreach and Efficiency Of Microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Financial and development economics researchers, practitioners, and donors are debating on the rightful effects of debt capital on the performance of MFIs in terms of outreach. Some argue that microfinance involvement in commercially procured funds is likely to cause the sector raise interest rates or increase loan sizes to ...

  4. Application of MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education in microfinance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abul Kalam Siddike

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to explore current borrowers’ financial education in microfinance and determine the possibilities of adopting massive open online courses (MOOCs for such individuals. We adopted a semi-structured interview research strategy. A total of 25 employees and borrowers in BRAC’s (Bangladesh Rehabilitation Assistance Committee and then Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, currently, BRAC does not represent an acronym microfinance program were interviewed and the data were analyzed qualitatively. The results show that BRAC’s microfinance program provides borrowers’ financial education in terms of a pre-disbursement orientation and four-day training through the creation of a new role of customer service assistant. The results also reveal that edu-entertainment, easy understanding, and more borrower participation are the main possible opportunities for adopting MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education. We identified infrastructure, Internet connection, and funding as possible hindrances to adopting MOOCs for financial education. Finally, we propose a framework for adopting MOOCs for borrowers’ financial education in microfinance.

  5. Microfinance, rural livelihoods, and women's empowerment in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakwo, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines in what ways and to what extent microfinance services facilitate the empowerment of married rural women in Nebbi district, northwestern Uganda. In particular, it examines the gender relations inherent in the livelihood practices of the community, the changes in well-being (if

  6. The importance of geographic access for the impact of microfinance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alimukhamedova, Nargiza; Filer, Randall K.; Hanousek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 35, September (2017), s. 645-657 ISSN 0950-6764 Grant - others:UK(CZ) GAUK 586912 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : geographic access * microcredit * microfinance institutions Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.700, year: 2016

  7. The importance of geographic access for the impact of microfinance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alimukhamedova, N.; Filer, R. K.; Hanousek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 35, September (2017), s. 645-657 ISSN 0950-6764 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31783S Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : geographic access * microcredit * microfinance institutions Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.700, year: 2016

  8. Vaporization inside a mini microfin tube: experimental results and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, A.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a comparison among the common R134a and the extremely low GWP refrigerant R1234yf during vaporization inside a mini microfin tube. This microfin tube has an internal diameter of 2.4 mm, it has 40 fins, with a fin height of 0.12 mm. Due to the high heat transfer coefficients shown by this tube, this technology can lead to a refrigerant charge reduction. Tests were run in the Heat Transfer in Micro Geometries Lab of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the Università di Padova. Mass velocities range between 375 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, heat fluxes from 10 to 50 kW m-2, vapour qualities from 0.10 to 0.99, at a saturation temperature of 30°C. The comparison among the two fluids is proposed at the same operating conditions, in order to highlight the heat transfer and pressure drop differences among the two refrigerants. In addition, two correlations are proposed to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop during refrigerant flow boiling inside mini microfin tubes. These correlations well predict the experimental values, and thus they can be used as a useful tool to design evaporators based on these mini microfin tubes.

  9. CONSEQUENCES OF ORGANIC FARMING ON THE SUSTAINABLE SOCIETY - ROMANIA AND EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURJA CAMELIA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A major trend adopted by the European Union member countries that are making efforts for sustainable development is the development of organic farming. The article studies the influences generated by the organic farming development in the EU countries, in the period 2006-2014, in terms of sustainable society. The statistical analysis is based on the use of certain variables that have a significant influence on the components of sustainable society. The identification of estimators for panelling data showed the favourable consequences of increasing the organic area for many indicators underpinning the economic, environmental and human wellbeing. The results confirm that the organic farming is a viable alternative to the conventional agriculture for raising the quality of life. The paper essentially quantifies the multiple effects of the organic farming for sustainable development and demonstrates that one of the directions to accelerate the development of the European economy on a sustainable basis is to stimulate the organic farming.

  10. Effect of doctoring on the performance of direct gravure printing for conductive microfine lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Hoang, Huu; Lim Ko, Sung

    2015-11-01

    Printed electronics on flexible thin film has challenged and inspired the motivation of scientists in many fields. Among traditional printing methods such as stamping, flexography, offset, screen-printing, and inkjet, the gravure method is expected to reduce costs and increase productivity for printed electronics applications. In this research, conductive microfine line patterns, which print out the layer as microelectrodes for organic thin film transistor (OTFT) or microcircuit lines, have been designed with different size widths and lengths according to the printing direction, MD (machine direction), and CMD (cross machine direction, or transverse direction, TD, which is popularly used in industry). These patterns were printed with nano-particle silver ink on PI thin film, but had some serious problems with discontinuity and less filling after doctoring and printing. To solve these problems, the doctoring effect is investigated and analyzed before ink transferring, mainly in the printing machine direction and CMD. The uniformity and accuracy of the microfine lines are controlled and improved in order to achieve the stability of the printed pattern lines. In this work, considering the effect of the deflection of the doctor blade in the CMD (transverse direction), a doctoring model in the CMD is proposed and compared with the experimental result. Experimentally, proper doctoring conditions like blade stiffness and doctoring pressure are sought.

  11. A Microfinance Program Targeting People Living with HIV in Uganda: Client Characteristics and Program Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Buzaalirwa, Lydia; Balya, James; Wagner, Glenn

    HIV has disproportionately affected economically vulnerable populations. HIV medical care, including antiretroviral therapy, successfully restores physical health but can be insufficient to achieve social and economic health. It may therefore be necessary to offer innovative economic support programs such as providing business training and microcredit tailored to people living with HIV/AIDS. However, microfinance institutions have shown reluctance to reach out to HIV-infected individuals, resulting in nongovernment and HIV care organizations providing these services. The authors investigate the baseline characteristics of a sample of medically stable clients in HIV care who are eligible for microcredit loans and evaluate their business and financial needs; the authors also analyze their repayment pattern and how their socioeconomic status changes after receipt of the program. The authors find that there is a significant unmet need for business capital for the sample under investigation, pointing toward the potentially beneficial role of providing microfinance and business training for clients in HIV care. HIV clients participating in the loans show high rates of repayment, and significant increases in (disposable) income, as well as profits and savings. The authors therefore encourage other HIV care providers to consider providing their clients with such loans.

  12. Adopting Zero Interest Financing Model (ZIFM in Islamic Microfinance Institutions: The Case of Shariah People Credit Bank (BPRS, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Thas Thaker Mohamed Asmy Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance has emerged as an important instrument to alleviate poverty in many countries including in developing countries. Despite being able to demonstrate successes in the activity, conventional microfinance is not without controversy. The findings from the existing studies revealed that conventional microfinance is less effective, fail to reach the poorest people and generally have a limited effect on income. In addition, conventional microfinance also has highly criticized for charging excessive interest rates and fees to the poor entrepreneur. In some Muslim countries, conventional microfinance has always been rejected, due to its non-compliance with the Islamic principles, particularly on the issue related to interest or riba. Islamic microfinance evolved and reckoned as an alternative to its counterpart. However, the outreach of Islamic microfinance is very limited where only there is very few Islamic microfinance institutions and Islamic banks involved in microfinance activity. Also, Islamic microfinance is having an issue of convergence of activity with the conventional practices. Thus, this paper aims to propose to adopt Zero Interest Financing Model (ZIFM for Islamic microfinance institutions. This study focuses on the case of Indonesian Islamic microfinance institution namely Shariah People Credit Bank (BPRS by observing their experience and some emerging issues. The proposed model is expected to address an emerging issue in Islamic microfinance institutions.

  13. STRATEGIES FOR ORGANIZING JOBS IN TERMS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OPREA MIHAELA CIOPI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the production process, the objectives of sustainable development are: the protecting human health and the environment, the technological restructuring and maintaining the risks under control, waste management, reducing losses. On this line, an important role have the strategies of management that aimed at better organizing of jobs, for assuring labor safety and ergonomics conditions, indicating priorities, understanding the performance indicators, better visibility of workflow and support, using the standards and increasing the visual control, providing feedback. To achieve these objectives can be successfully implemented a number of strategies such as: Kaizen, 5S and Maintenance autonomous, which will be developed in this paper

  14. DOES MICROFINANCE MODEL DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MICROFINANCE INTERVENTION IN ENHANCING MICROENTERPRISE PERFORMANCE? EVIDENCE FROM BANK RAKYAT INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weni Hawariyuni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of different microfinance model in enhancing the performance of microenterprises in terms of income, fixed assets, and household expenditures. By focusing on the case of Bank Rakyat Indonesia, one of the most successful commercial microfinance providers in the world, two types of microfinance products, namely KUPEDES and KUR are being compared. The KUPEDES is original product of BRI Unit, while the KUR is a micro-product subsidized by the Indonesian government. Based on the experience of BRI Unit in Medan city, Indonesia, we assess the impact of microfinance intervention on 400 clients. The findings demonstrated that KUPEDES as original microproduct is more successful compared to KUR product in enhancing the performance of microenterprise through income, fixed assets, and household expenditures as successful indicators. =========================================== Kajian ini bertujuan untuk menginvestigasi keefektifan beragam model pendanaan mikro dalam meningkatkan performa usaha kecil dari segi pemasukan, aset tetap, dan belanja rumah tangga. Dengan fokus pada kasus Bank Rakyat Indonesia, salah satu pemberi dana mikro paling berhasil di dunia, kajian ini membandingkan dua macam produk pendanaan mikro, yaitu KUPEDES dan KUR. KUPEDES adalah produk original BRI sementara KUR adalah sebuah produk mikro yang disubsisdi oleh pemerintah Indonesia. Berdasarkan pengalaman BRI cabang Medan, Indonesia, penulis menilai dampak campur tangan pendanaan mikro terhadap 400 orang klien. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa KUPEDES sebagai produk mikro original dinilai lebih berhasil dibandingkan dengan KUR dalam meningkatkan performa usaha kecil dengan indikator kesuksesan: pemasukan, asset tetap, dan belanja rumah tangga.

  15. GM organisms threaten organic systems: towards sustainability, coexistence and organic seed

    OpenAIRE

    Boelt, B.; Deleuran, L.C.; Phelps, B.

    2005-01-01

    Until now commercial genetically modified (GM) crops – soy, corn, canola and cotton - and their products have not been successfully segregated from organic or conventional non-GM production systems. Where GM crops are grown, GM contamination may be inevitable. However, physical and legal control measures imposed before the introduction of GM crops may help protect organic standards, supply chain integrity, certification and client confidence, but this is not yet fully tested. IFOAM’s approach...

  16. Sustainability Strategies for Regional Health Information Organization Startups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Ozturk, Pinar; Brown, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    HIOs that became operational during the SHIECAP grant period faced similar startup challenges, the two HIOs that demonstrated sustainability pursued distinct technology and sustainability strategies to develop HIE capabilities to fit their very different regional needs: an HIE capability to improve...... the population health of an underserved urban population, and an HIE capability to enable the transition to a healthcare landscape that rewards care coordination across suburban hospitals and physician practices. Conclusions: We propose two models of technology and sustainability strategies for developing bottom...

  17. How the organic food system supports sustainable diets and translates these into practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola eStrassner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic production and consumption provide a delineated food system that can be explored for its potential contribution to sustainable diets. While organic agriculture improves the sustainability performance on the production side, critical reflections are made on how organic consumption patterns, understood as the practice of people consuming significant amounts of organic produce, may also be taken as an example for sustainable food consumption. The consumption patterns of regular organic consumers seem to be close to the sustainable diet concept of FAO. Certain organic-related measures might therefore be useful in the sustainability assessment of diets, e.g. organic production and organic consumption. Since diets play a central role in shaping food systems and food systems shape diets, the role of organic consumption emerges as an essential topic to be addressed. This role may be based on four important organic achievements: organic agriculture and food production has a definition, well-established principles, public standards and useful metrics. By 2015 data for organic production and consumption is recorded annually from more than 160 countries, and regulations are in force in more than 80 countries or regions. The organic fo

  18. Sustainable Management of Resource Consumption Agriculture - Enlightenment from Organic Agriculture of Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Fang; Xu, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the content of organic agriculture, sustainable management of agriculture in Japan is analyzed from four aspects. Firstly, organization and management institutions and relevant laws and regulations of organic agriculture in Japan are introduced. Secondly, certification procedure of organic agricultural products is briefly described, that is, determining production plan, reorganizing cultivation and management records, making certification application, on-site inspection, offering cer...

  19. Evaluation of sustainability of organic, integrated and conventional farming systems: a farm and field-scale analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacini, G.C.; Wossink, G.A.A.; Vazzana, C.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Agricultural researchers widely recognise the importance of sustainable agricultural production systems and the need to develop appropriate methods to measure sustainability. The principal purpose of this paper is to evaluate the financial and environmental aspects of sustainability of organic,

  20. Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudshoorn, Frank W; Kristensen, Troels; van der Zijpp, A J

    2012-01-01

    , and social acceptability, i.e., its contribution to sustainable development. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate sustainability of AMS use on organic dairy farms in Denmark, by comparing results of a set of sustainability indicators for nine farms using AMS with nine farms using...... conventional milking systems (CMS). Sustainability indicators were quantified for economic performance of the farm, on-farm eutrophication, on-farm biodiversity, animal welfare (including health), grazing time, milk composition and labour time. Milk yield per cow per year was higher for AMS farms (9021 kg...... this quantification of selected sustainability indicators it can be concluded that organic dairy farms using AMS, in spite of the substantial decrease in grazing time, show the potential of economic and environmental sustainable development within the range of herd sizes investigated (65–157 cows per farm). Even...

  1. FINANCIAL STABILITY REVIEW OF THE MICROFINANCE SECTOR IN MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru CATAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to analyze the microfinance sector in Moldova, in terms of financial stability indicators. Thus, it highlights the main trends of development of microfinance institution in the last five years, as being reflected by the improvement of all indicators. Therefore in the paper the authors aim to present the most important methods of analyzing and assessing financial stability. Thus, ensuring financial stability constitutes lately a priority concern for the National Bank of Moldova (NBM, which is at the forefront of the national financial systems as well as the National Commission of Financial Market (NCFM. Indeed, with the responsibility of ensuring price stability, the central bank contributes to financial stability. A stable financial environment facilitates the achievement of price stability.

  2. Earthquake parametrics based protection for microfinance disaster management in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedayo, M. H.; Damanik, R.

    2017-07-01

    Financial institutions included microfinance institutions those lend money to people also face the risk when catastrophe event hit their operation area. Liquidity risk when withdrawal amount and Non Performance Loan (NPL) hiking fast in the same time could hit their cash flow. There are products in market that provide backup fund for this kind of situation. Microfinance institution needs a guideline too make contingency plan in their disaster management program. We develop a probabilistic seismic hazard, index and zonation map as a tool to help in making financial disaster impact reduction program for microfinance in Indonesia. GMPE was used to estimate PGA for each Kabupaten points. PGA to MMI conversion was done by applied empirical relationship. We used loan distribution data from Financial Service Authority and Bank Indonesia as exposure in indexing. Index level from this study could be use as rank of urgency. Probabilistic hazard map was used to pricing two backup scenarios and to make a zonation. We proposed three zones with annual average cost 0.0684‰, 0.4236‰ and 1.4064 for first scenario and 0.3588‰, 2.6112‰, and 6.0816‰ for second scenario.

  3. Making Microfinance Work Better in the Middle East and North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Laurence; Brandsma, Judith

    2004-01-01

    This report analyzes microfinance in the Middle East and North Africa, and offers recommendations on how to further develop the industry. Microfinance is the provision of financial services to the entrepreneurial poor, a definition with two important features: it emphasizes a range of financial services-not just credit-and it emphasizes the entrepreneurial poor. The region's emerging micro...

  4. The Effect of Credit Lines and Risks on Operations of Microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, the banks should follow strictly their code of conduct and monitor their customers' businesses and make sure that loans are used for the purpose for which they were given as this will reduce the number of non performing loans. Keywords: Microfinance, Microfinance banks, Credit lines, Credit risks, Banks' depositors

  5. La microfinance en Afrique centrale: Le défi des exclus | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-04-20

    Apr 20, 2015 ... Order the book. The rural poor face a major challenge in accessing financial services provided by the formal banking system. ... The project examined issues related to the market for microfinance, institutional considerations, efficiency and behaviour of key actors, and the impact of microfinance. The studies ...

  6. Entrepreneurial and business skills and loan repayment rates of microfinance clients in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbeko, Daniel; Block, Vincent; Omta, Onno; Velde, van der G.

    2016-01-01

    Entrepreneurial and business skills are generally considered key to microbusiness success, hence to Microfinance Institution (MFI) clients’ loan repayment as well. However, empirical evidence is largely lacking, and where present, it is inconclusive on the importance of these skills for microfinance

  7. Does Microfinance Make Households More Resilient to Shocks? Evidence From the Cyclone Phailin in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Thijmen; Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis; Ghosh, Namrata; Lensink, Robert; Meesters, Aljar

    2017-01-01

    This research note examines the relevance of microfinance as a means to cope with natural disasters, using the event of the cyclone Phailin, which struck India in 2013. The results indicate that microfinance helps reduce the negative effects of extreme weather-related shocks. In light of the

  8. Does microfinance reduce rural poverty? Evidence based on household panel data from Tigray, northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhane Tesfay, G.; Gardebroek, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term impact of microfinance credit from the intensity of participation in borrowing. We use a four-round panel data set on 351 farm households that had access to microfinance in northern Ethiopia. Over the years 1997-2006, with three-year intervals, households are

  9. Evaluating Mission Drift in Microfinance: Lessons for Programs with Social Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishigsuren, Gaamaa

    2007-01-01

    The article contributes to a better understanding of implications of scaling up on the social mission of microfinance programs. It proposes a methodology to measure the extent, if any, to which a microfinance program with a poverty alleviation mission drifts away from its mission during rapid scaling up and presents findings from a field research…

  10. Rethinking the Impact of Microfinance in Africa: ‘Business Change’ or Social Emancipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. de Haan (Leo); A. Lakwob (Alfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper questions received wisdom that the benefits of microfinance start with poverty reduction and are subsequently followed by social emancipation. Taking the case of Uganda and by using a consensual people-centred relevance test to assess the impact of microfinance on poverty

  11. Does Microfinance Make Households More Resilient to Shocks? Evidence From the Cyclone Phailin in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Thijmen; Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis; Ghosh, Namrata; Lensink, Robert; Meesters, Aljar

    2017-01-01

    This research note examines the relevance of microfinance as a means to cope with natural disasters, using the event of the cyclone Phailin, which struck India in 2013. The results indicate that microfinance helps reduce the negative effects of extreme weather-related shocks. In light of the

  12. Targeting married women in microfinance programmes: transforming or reinforcing gender inequalities? : evidence from Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekele, H.

    2010-01-01

    With the expansion of microfinance programmes in the low-income countries, millions of poor women in these countries have been able to access microfinancial services, particularly microcredit and savings. The provision of microfinance services to women has been largely premised on the assumption

  13. Consumers’ Attitudes towards Organic Products and Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Romania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camelia F Oroian; Calin O Safirescu; Rezhen Harun; Gabriela O Chiciudean; Felix H Arion; Iulia C Muresan; Bianca M Bordeanu

    2017-01-01

    Organic food consumption has increased during the last years as a consequence of its direct impact on consumer health, life style, and social convenience as well as on the environment and sustainable development...

  14. Sustainable conventional and organic vegetable flow to Europe: supply chain optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snels, J.C.M.A.; Westra, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to further develop successful supply chain concepts for sustainable export of qualitative high-grade export flow of, especially organic, vegetables from Argentina to Europe during the European winter season

  15. An Integrated Diagnostic Framework to Manage Organization Sustainable Growth: An Empirical Case

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jingxiao Zhang; Klaus Schmidt; Hui Li

    2016-01-01

      This research aims to develop a quantitative diagnostic framework by combining the Weisbord six-box model with the growth management model to focus on an organization's internally driven sustainable management system...

  16. The Sustainability of Organic Grain Production on the Canadian Prairies—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Snyder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Demand for organically produced food products is increasing rapidly in North America, driven by a perception that organic agriculture results in fewer negative environmental impacts and yields greater benefits for human health than conventional systems. Despite the increasing interest in organic grain production on the Canadian Prairies, a number of challenges remain to be addressed to ensure its long-term sustainability. In this review, we summarize Western Canadian research into organic crop production and evaluate its agronomic, environmental, and economic sustainability.

  17. The Malaysian microfinance system and a comparison with the Grameen Bank (Bangladesh and Bank Perkreditan Rakyat (BPR-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraya Hanim Mokhtar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance programme in Malaysia has been implemented since 1987 as one of the poverty eradication strategies in the country. There are three large microfinance institutions in Malaysia namely AIM, YUM and TEKUN that targeted to different groups of people. Each of the microfinance institution has its own lending systems and has been subsidised by the government since their existence. This paper compares the Malaysian subsidised microfinance institutions’ lending systems with the unsubsidised microfinance institutions such as the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh and People’s Bank (Bank Perkreditan Rakyat/BPR in Indonesia. This study found the Grameen Bank and BPR have more variety of microfinance services and flexible lending systems compared with Malaysian microfinance institutions.

  18. Consumer perceptions on sustainable practices implemented in foodservice organizations in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Seyoung; Chang, Hyeja

    2016-02-01

    Sustainable practices in foodservice organizations including commercial and noncommercial ones are critical to ensure the protection of the environment for the future. With the rapid growth of the foodservice industry, wiser usage of input sources such as food, utilities, and single use packaging should be reconsidered for future generations. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the customer's perceptions on sustainable practices and to identify the relationship among sustainable practices, social contribution and purchase intention. The study was conducted using content analyses by reviewing articles on sustainable food service practices published domestically and abroad. Thereafter, data were collected with a face-to-face survey using a questionnaire and analyzed with factor analyses and multiple regressions. Sustainable practices classified with factor analysis consisted of 6 dimensions of green food material procurement, sustainable food preparation, green packaging, preservation of energy, waste management, and public relations on green activity, with a total of 25 green activities in foodservice operations. Consumers were not very familiar with the green activities implemented in the foodservice unit, with the lowest awareness of "green food material procurement (2.46 out of 5 points)", and the highest awareness of "green packaging (3.74)" and "waste management (3.28). The factors influencing the perception of social contribution by foodservice organizations among 6 sustainable practice dimensions were found to be public relations on green activity (β = 0.154), waste management (β = 0.204) and sustainable food preparation (β = 0.183). Green packaging (β = 0.107) and the social contribution of the foodservice organization (β = 0.761) had strong relationships with the image of the organization. The purchase intentions of customers was affected only by the foodservice image (β = 0.775). The results of this study suggest that sustainable practices by

  19. The Impact of Civil Society Organizations on Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    wing organizations promote wartime militarism and racism through propagated public campaigns. Hirata (2002) concluded that these groups are by no means part of Japanese civil society (p. 19). On this premise, groups such as Odua Peoples' ...

  20. Human Aspect as a Critical Factor for Organization Sustainability in the Tourism Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ulus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations adopt diverse strategies to govern the technical and managerial aspects of sustainability implementation processes. The need for better leading and managing people-related issues emerges as companies aim for more effective change towards sustainability. The human aspect of the sustainability implementation process is mostly not paid enough attention, but it can significantly affect the success of a change management program by creating hurdles or easing the process. This study considers three human-related factors: resistance to change, internal communication, and employee engagement in sustainability activities of organizations. The aim of the study is to explore how these human factors are managed by tourism companies for organizational sustainability. For this purpose four companies from different sectors of tourism are chosen as case studies and the results are examined using qualitative data analysis techniques. The results indicate that the companies which are in a more advanced stage of sustainability implementation manage human factors using a greater number of channels and employ varied strategies. The results can provide insights into how organizations tackle the challenges of managing human aspect and display the practices that contribute to successful change management programs for achieving organizational sustainability through people.

  1. Mentoring: A Promising Strategy for Creating and Sustaining a Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, M. Alison

    2004-01-01

    Continuous learning at the systems level is increasingly essential as organizations of all types face a rapidly changing environment. The potential role of mentoring relationships in creating and sustaining a learning organization continues to be an important area for research. Mentoring as an organizational learning process can provide the…

  2. Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.; Kristensen, T.; Zijpp, van der A.J.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers in Denmark currently are implementing automatic milking systems (AMS) to save labour costs. As organic agriculture aims at sustainable production, the introduction of a new technology such as AMS should be evaluated regarding its economic viability, environmental impact, and

  3. The Bi-Modal Organization: Balancing Autopoiesis and Fluid Social Networks for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharicz, Carol Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assist an organization to restructure as a bi-modal organization in order to achieve sustainability in today's highly complex business world. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is conceptual and is based on relevant literature and the authors' research and practice. Findings: Although fluid…

  4. MARKETING ACTIVITY IN ROMANIAN MICROCREDIT ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Savescu Roxana Florenta

    2012-01-01

    Microfinance is the solution that ensures the provision of loans and other basic financial services to those entrepreneurs who have limited access to the banking sector. These financial services provided by microfinance institutions allow small business owners to take advantage of their entrepreneurship skills by developing small businesses capable of generating additional income. As they mature, Romanian microcredit organizations become gradually aware of the importance of marketing in their...

  5. Trends in Organic Farming Development in Bulgaria: Applying Circular Economy Principles to Sustainable Rural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov Dimitar K.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the development of organic farming in Bulgaria through the viewpoint of its links to circular economy concept and its potential to contribute to sustainable rural development. The significant increase in the number of organic operators and areas is analyzed in the context of stable growth in the European sector and worldwide and the increase in consumer demand. Main indicators reported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Food of the Republic of Bulgaria and the support provided by the National Rural Development Program are used to present the characteristics of organic production and agricultural holdings. The advantages of Bulgaria are underlined as a country offering the necessary conditions, along with the main problems in production and marketing. Recommendations are provided for organic sector encouragement as a sustainable business model and an entrepreneurial initiative for sustainable rural development putting a special accent on networking and capacity building activities in connection to potential solutions and policy development.

  6. From Learning Organization to Learning Community: Sustainability through Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Judith; Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to: extend the concept of "The learning organization" to "The learning community," especially disadvantaged communities; demonstrate how leaders in a migrant community can achieve positive change at the personal, professional, team and community learning levels through participatory action learning and…

  7. The Impact of Civil Society Organizations on Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Civil society groups are agents of development in any nation. Civil society organizations appear to play important role in social, political and economic development activities. The transformation of any society or system, particularly the developing societies like Nigeria depend on the effectiveness and efficiency of its civil ...

  8. Towards sustainable management of rodents in organic animal husbandry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Bonde, M.; Brom, F.W.A.; Endepols, S.; Jensen, A.N.; Leirs, H.; Lodal, J.; Singleton, G.R.; Pelz, H.J.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Kijlstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    From 26 to 28 May 2004 an international seminar was held in Wageningen, the Netherlands, about current knowledge and advice on rodent management on organic pig and poultry farms in Western Europe. This paper summarizes the discussions. Rodent management is necessary to protect the food production

  9. Biodiversity management of organic farming enhances agricultural sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Meng, Jie; Bo, Wenjing; Cheng, Da; Li, Yong; Guo, Liyue; Li, Caihong; Zheng, Yanhai; Liu, Meizhen; Ning, Tangyuan; Wu, Guanglei; Yu, Xiaofan; Feng, Sufei; Wuyun, Tana; Li, Jing; Li, Lijun; Zeng, Yan; Liu, Shi V; Jiang, Gaoming

    2016-04-01

    Organic farming (OF) has been believed to be capable of curtailing some hazardous effects associated with chemical farming (CF). However, debates also exist on whether OF can feed a world with increasing human population. We hypothesized that some improvements on OF may produce adequate crops and reduce environmental pollutions from CF. This paper makes comparative analysis of crop yield, soil organic matter and economic benefits within the practice on Biodiversity Management of Organic Farming (BMOF) at Hongyi Organic Farm (HOF) over eight years and between BMOF and CF. Linking crop production with livestock to maximal uses of by-products from each production and avoid xenobiotic chemicals, we have achieved beneficial improvement in soil properties, effective pest and weed control, and increased crop yields. After eight years experiment, we have obtained a gradual but stable increase in crop yields with a 9.6-fold increase of net income. The net income of HOF was 258,827 dollars and 24,423 dollars in 2014 and 2007 respectively. Thus, BMOF can not only feed more population, but also increase adaptive capacity of agriculture ecosystems and gain much higher economic benefits.

  10. Characteristics of a micro-fin evaporator: Theoretical analysis and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hui-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical analysis and experimental verification on the characteristics of a micro-fin evaporator using R290 and R717 as refrigerants were carried out. The heat capacity and heat transfer coefficient of the micro-fin evaporator were investigated under different water mass flow rate, different refrigerant mass flow rate, and different inner tube diameter of micro-fin evaporator. The simulation results of the heat transfer coefficient are fairly in good agreement with the experimental data. The results show that heat capacity and the heat transfer coefficient of the micro-fin evaporator increase with increasing logarithmic mean temperature difference, the water mass flow rate and the refrigerant mass flow rate. Heat capacity of the micro-fin evaporator for diameter 9.52 mm is higher than that of diameter 7.00 mm with using R290 as refrigerant. Heat capacity of the micro-fin evaporator with using R717 as refrigerant is higher than that of R290 as refrigerant. The results of this study can provide useful guidelines for optimal design and operation of micro-fin evaporator in its present or future applications.

  11. Assessing the impact of microfinance programming on children: an evaluation from post-tsunami Aceh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lindsay; Kassim, Nafessa; Sparling, Thalia; Buscher, Dale; Yu, Gary; Boothby, Neil

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the long-term impact of microfinance programmes on Acehnese children during the post-tsunami recovery. The study, conducted from June to August 2010, examined the impact of microfinance programming six years after the tsunami. The sample consisted of 185 microfinance participants, with a comparison group of 192 individuals who did not participate in microfinance programmes. All respondents were parents, interviewed through a structured survey. The study used four child protection indicators-diet, health, childcare and education-in contrast to traditional repayment rate indicators. The primary results were insignificant with respect to all four child protection indicators, suggesting that, with respect to these indicators, there was no long-term difference between the impact of microfinance on beneficiaries' children and non-beneficiaries' children. These findings signify a need for microfinance actors to move beyond traditional indicators of economic success to evaluate the social changes microfinance programmes are presumed to effect. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  12. Team Organization Method Using Salary Auction Game for Sustainable Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyun Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In performing team-based projects in engineering class, students usually face many problems, such as free-riding, lack of responsibility, boredom, and insufficient initiative. This papers proposes a new method for performing team-based projects in engineering class—specifically, a gamified method for team organization using a salary auction game. On the description of the design and use of a salary auction game in engineering class, a case study conducted using a survey method is reported to validate the practical value of the proposed auction game. The salary auction game proposed in this paper demonstrates that a gamified team organization method in engineering class could be used as an effective tool to enhance motivation and to improve learning outcomes of engineering students.

  13. Economic sustainability of organic dairy sheep systems in Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Toro-Mujica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheep production systems in regions with a Mediterranean climate are important in social, economic and environmental terms. Modeling these systems allows, among others, evaluation of the costs efficiencies which in turn permits assessing the expected effects of changes in production variables. This paper presents a prototype analysis of the economic sustainability of ecological dairy sheep systems of Castilla-La Mancha, Central Spain evaluated through the estimation of costs efficiencies. Costs functions were developed using data from 31 farms. Rate of supplementary feeding, labour use, and flock size were used to measure the cost efficiency. On average, cost efficiency was 61.7±15.5%, with significant differences among typological groups. High efficiency was found in only 29% of the farms. The economic analyses performed suggest that the continued existence of economically unsustainably farms is explained by the available subsidies, lack of amortization of fixed assets leading to progressive decapitalization, and subsistence incomes by family groups (gross family income.

  14. Shaded Coffee: A way to Increase Sustainability in Brazilian Organic Coffee plantations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Cassio Franco; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.; Tagliaferro, Fábio Sileno

    2008-01-01

    Consumption of specialty coffee, mainly organic coffee, increases worldwide following the tendency of consuming social and ecological sustainable products. Brazil is the world largest coffee producer, with an average of 2,300,000 tons of green coffee in the last 5 years. Cultivation of organic coffee and shaded coffee are common in Central America, while in Brazil both conventional and organic coffee are cultivated in the full sun system. The full sun system is criticized due to the lack of b...

  15. Transition towards sustainable consumption and production? The case of organic food in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    The chapter discusses the mechanisms in the shaping of organic food as strategy in the Danish food sector since the 1980’ies as a contribution to the discussion of strategies for the development of a more sustainable production and consumption of food. The background of the chapter is the major...... achievements in Denmark within organic food since the 1980’ies, but also the recent years’ reduction in organic agricultural area....

  16. Sustainment of smoking cessation programs in substance use disorder treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Muilenburg, Jessica; Eby, Lillian T

    2013-06-01

    The majority of individuals who enter substance use disorder (SUD) treatment also use tobacco. Integrating smoking cessation services into SUD treatment may have substantial public health benefits, but few studies have examined whether organizations offering counseling-based smoking cessation programs sustain them over time. This study examines sustainment of smoking cessation programs using 2 waves of data collected from 150 SUD treatment organizations. Data were collected in 2006-2008 and 2009-2010 using face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, and mailed surveys. Logistic regression models of sustainment were estimated with administrators' attitudes toward smoking cessation and organizational barriers as covariates. About 60.2% of these SUD treatment organizations sustained their counseling-based smoking cessation programs at follow-up. Sustainment was significantly more likely when administrators' baseline attitudes about the impact of smoking cessation on recovery were more supportive (odds ratio, OR = 1.84; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.13-3.01; p =.015) and when programs were accredited (OR = 3.95, 95% CI = 1.65-9.50, p =.002). Worsening over time of barriers encompassing staff interest, staff skills, and competing treatment demands were negatively associated with sustainment (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.42-0.81, p =.001). These findings provided empirical support for theoretical perspectives regarding the importance of leadership and staff expertise in promoting sustainment of innovations over time. Although the majority of SUD treatment organizations sustained their smoking cessation programs, the 40% rate of discontinuation is concerning and highlights the ongoing challenges faced by tobacco control efforts in substance abuse treatment.

  17. Réglementation et supervision des institutions de microfinance en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 juil. 2016 ... Les institutions de microfinance (IMF) interviennent auprès d'une clientèle qui est dans la majorité exclue du système bancaire formel. Étant donné qu'elles opèrent dans la collecte de l'épargne des pauvres en milieu rural, il est important de développer des cadres réglementaires qui protègent les clients ...

  18. Microfinance and loan officers’ work experiences: perspectives from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Siwale, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The article studies the challenges faced by microfinance institutions in Zambia, whose remit it is to provide financial services to the poor. It focuses on loan officers – the agents of delivery on the ground. With reference to loan officers’ experiences and words, the paper examines how gender and class shape and structure their day to day encounters. The study finds that different social spaces -‘the office’ and ‘the field’ – and wider context explains the gendered, culturally complex and m...

  19. economic analysis of the role of microfinance banks in funding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    agricultural sector. Adewumi, et al: Economic Analysis of the Role of Microfinance Banks in Funding Agriculture in Rural Areas .... 2,269.6a. Trade and Commerce. 14,048b. 11,22.7b. 26,644b. 24,152b. Transport. 1,042.3a. 1,2102a. 1,218.7a. 2,204.1a. Real estate. 403.8a. 364.9a. 536.2a. 572.5a. Health. 991.2a. 1,571.6a.

  20. Organic waste as a sustainable feedstock for platform chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, E.; Abeln, F.; Raikova, S.; Donnelly, J.; Arnot, T. C.; Allen, M. J.; Hong, D. D.; Chuck, C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Biorefineries have been established since the 1980s for biofuel production, and there has been a switch lately from first to second generation feedstocks in order to avoid the food versus fuel dilemma. To a lesser extent, many opportunities have been investigated for producing chemicals from biomass using by-products of the present biorefineries, simple waste streams. Current facilities apply intensive pre-treatments to deal with single substrate types such as carbohydrates. However, most organic streams such as municipal solid waste or algal blooms present a high complexity and variable mixture of molecules, which makes specific compound production and separation difficult. Here we focus on flexible anaerobic fermentation and hydrothermal processes that can treat complex biomass as a whole to obtain a range of products within an integrated biorefinery concept. PMID:28654113

  1. Sustained activity in hierarchical modular neural networks: self-organized criticality and oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Jun Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cortical brain networks possess a number of conspicuous features of structure and dynamics. First, these networks have an intricate, non-random organization. They are structured in a hierarchical modular fashion, from large-scale regions of the whole brain, via cortical areas and area subcompartments organized as structural and functional maps to cortical columns, and finally circuits made up of individual neurons. Second, the networks display self-organized sustained activity, which is persistent in the absence of external stimuli. At the systems level, such activity is characterized by complex rhythmical oscillations over a broadband background, while at the cellular level, neuronal discharges have been observed to display avalanches, indicating that cortical networks are at the state of self-organized criticality. We explored the relationship between hierarchical neural network organization and sustained dynamics using large-scale network modeling. It was shown that sparse random networks with balanced excitation and inhibition can sustain neural activity without external stimulation. We find that a hierarchical modular architecture can generate sustained activity better than random networks. Moreover, the system can simultaneously support rhythmical oscillations and self-organized criticality, which are not present in the respective random networks. The underlying mechanism is that each dense module cannot sustain activity on its own, but displays self-organized criticality in the presence of weak perturbations. The hierarchical modular networks provide the coupling among subsystems with self-organized criticality. These results imply that the hierarchical modular architecture of cortical networks plays an important role in shaping the ongoing spontaneous activity of the brain, potentially allowing the system to take advantage of both the sensitivityof critical state and predictability and timing of oscillations for efficient

  2. International Trade and Sustainable Development: Reflections on the Regulation Through the International Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênia Cristina Nilsen Ribeiro Barza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the link between international trade and development. The regulation of international trade by international organizations will be explored. In the post-WTO scenario, there is the formation of a new governance in relation to international trade, with a tendency to appreciation of international relations at the Westphalian style. This phenomenon is worrying , especially in light of Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals established by the UN, which require a multilateral regulation of trade and participation of international organizations , particularly the WTO , for implementation their goals.

  3. Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M; Alston, Farnum K

    2011-01-01

    Based on John Bryson's acclaimed comprehensive approach to strategic planning, the Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan workbook provides a step-by-step process, tools, techniques, and worksheets to help successfully implement, manage, and troubleshoot an organization's strategy over the long haul. This new and immensely practical workbook helps organizations work through the typical challenges of leading implementation for sustained change. It spotlights the importance of effective leadership for long-term successful strategic plan implementation. The authors include a wealth of to

  4. Sustainable development induction in organizations: a convergence analysis of ISO standards management tools' parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Fabrício Kurman; Pereira, Vera Lúciaduarte do Valle; Pacheco, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are part of an environment in which they are pressured to meet society's demands and acting in a sustainable way. In an attempt to meet such demands, organizations make use of various management tools, among which, ISO standards are used. Although there are evidences of contributions provided by these standards, it is questionable whether its parameters converge for a possible induction for sustainable development in organizations. This work presents a theoretical study, designed on structuralism world view, descriptive and deductive method, which aims to analyze the convergence of management tools' parameters in ISO standards. In order to support the analysis, a generic framework for possible convergence was developed, based on systems approach, linking five ISO standards (ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, ISO 31000 and ISO 26000) with sustainable development and positioning them according to organization levels (strategic, tactical and operational). The structure was designed based on Brundtland report concept. The analysis was performed exploring the generic framework for possible convergence based on Nadler and Tushman model. The results found the standards can contribute to a possible sustainable development induction in organizations, as long as they meet certain minimum conditions related to its strategic alignment.

  5. Enhancing learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability in health care organizations: the ELIAS performance management framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, D David

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable health care organizations that provide high-quality accessible care is a topic of intense interest. This article provides a practical performance management framework that can be utilized to develop sustainable health care organizations. It is a cyclical 5-step process that is premised on accountability, performance management, and learning practices that are the foundation for a continuous process of measurement, disconfirmation, contextualization, implementation, and routinization This results in the enhancement of learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability (ELIAS). Important considerations such as recognizing that health care organizations are complex adaptive systems and the presence of a dynamic learning culture are necessary contextual factors that maximize the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Importantly, the ELIAS framework utilizes data that are already being collected by health care organizations for accountability, improvement, evaluation, and strategic purposes. Therefore, the benefit of the framework, when used as outlined, would be to enhance the chances of health care organizations achieving the goals of ongoing adaptation and sustainability, by design, rather than by chance.

  6. Econometric analyses of microfinance credit group formation, contractual risks and welfare impacts in Northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhane Tesfay, G.

    2009-01-01

    Key words Microfinance, joint liability, contractual risk, group formation, risk-matching, impact evaluation, Panel data econometrics, dynamic panel probit, trend models, fixed-effects, composite counterfactuals, propensity score matching, farm households, Ethiopia. Lack of access to credit is a

  7. PROPOSAL FOR STRATEGIES TO BUILD MISSING FOUNDATIONS OF THE CURRENT MICROFINANCE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINA DRAŠAROVÁ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As microfinance approaches the status of mainstream asset class, it inevitably starts to entice Socially Responsible Investment. However, precoscious capital inflow can be detrimental to all players involved. The industry is unprepared for global SRI arena. The gap between different microfinance concepts is widening, while identic terms are being used to describe different contents. The term „microfinance“ continues losing its informative value as divergent development foments nomenclative disorder. Microfinance is becoming too varied to be presented under a single term. MIVs, States and multilateral institutions must therefore in a concerted action impose basis of unified definitions, methodologies and coordinates, otherwise different concepts might mislead international public. The lack of standartized set of definitions, social impact reporting, bankruptcy procedures and evaluation infrastructure, while overstating development benefits can discredit microfinance, once SRI systems open their gates.

  8. Employee Engagement for Sustainable Organizations: Keyword Analysis Using Social Network Analysis and Burst Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woocheol Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is a vital long-term goal for organizations and as such has formed the basis of much academic research over the last two decades. Organizational sustainability is defined as the ability for an organization to accomplish a range of economic, environmental, and human performance objectives. As one of the most studied topics in organizational science, employee engagement at work is seen as a critical component to achieving sustainable organizational success. In order to better understand the employee engagement discourse, this study examined the keywords that appear in the titles and abstract of the employee engagement research domain using the burst detection and social network analysis techniques. A total of 1406 employee engagement relevant articles that were published from 1990 to 2015 were included and investigated in the study. The results revealed the fading, emerging, and central themes within the employee engagement domain.

  9. Choice Between Microfinance System Operating on the Basis of Individual Liability Loan Contract or Through Joint Liability Loan Contract

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Amit

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider that a representative of a not so affluent rural household has three options. He (she) may join in a microfinance system operating on the basis of individual liability credit contract, or on the basis of joint liability loan contract through forming self-help group or may not participate in any type of microfinance system. This paper establishes that wealthier among the not so affluent rural household prefers to join microfinance system operating on the basis of indi...

  10. Food, Fairness & Ecology: An organic research agenda for a sustainable future

    OpenAIRE

    Niggli, Urs; Slabe, Anamaija; Schmid, Otto; Halberg, Niels; Schlüter, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The European Union Group of the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM EU Group) and the International Society of Organic Agriculture Research (ISOFAR) are developing a strategic research agenda focussing on ecological intensification, on sustainable rural regions, on high quality food for healthy nutrition and on ethical values of people vis-à-vis technology development in food production. The strategic research agenda (currently in its second draft, Niggli et al., ...

  11. Les institutions de microfinance et la réduction de la pauvreté en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    De multiples recherches ont tenté de cerner les facteurs qui favorisent la croissance économique et la réduction de la pauvreté dans la région. Toutefois, on n'a porté que peu d'attention au rôle des institutions de microfinance dans la région; or, les pauvres comptent sur la microfinance pour avoir accès à un moyen de ...

  12. What should regulation do in the field of micro-finance?

    OpenAIRE

    Renuka Sane; Susan Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Recent events in India have brought a fresh focus on the appropriate regulatory stance towards micro-finance. In this paper, we review facts and recent experience about Indian microfinance. We analyse the puzzles of financial regulation in this field from first principles, and argue that the mainstream mechanisms of consumer protection and micro-prudential regulation need to be modified owing to joint-liability groups. From this perspective, we suggest regulatory strategies that need to be ad...

  13. Evaluating the effect of integrated microfinance and health interventions: an updated review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Lara M J; Leatherman, Sheila; Flax, Valerie L

    2017-06-01

    Solutions delivered within firm sectoral boundaries are inadequate in achieving income security and better health for poor populations. Integrated microfinance and health interventions leverage networks of women to promote financial inclusion, build livelihoods, and safeguard against high cost illnesses. Our understanding of the effect of integrated interventions has been limited by variability in intervention, outcome, design, and methodological rigour. This systematic review synthesises the literature through 2015 to understand the effect of integrated microfinance and health programs. We searched PubMed, Scopus, Embase, EconLit, and Global Health databases and sourced bibliographies, identifying 964 articles exclusive of duplicates. Title, abstract, and full text review yielded 35 articles. Articles evaluated the effect of intentionally integrated microfinance and health programs on client outcomes. We rated the quality of evidence for each article. Most interventions combined microfinance with health education, which demonstrated positive effects on health knowledge and behaviours, though not health status. Among programs that integrated microfinance with other health components ( i.e. health micro-insurance, linkages to health providers, and access to health products), results were generally positive but mixed due to the smaller number and quality of studies. Interventions combining multiple health components in a given study demonstrated positive effects, though it was unclear which component was driving the effect. Most articles (57%) were moderate in quality. Integrated microfinance and health education programs were effective, though longer intervention periods are necessary to measure more complex pathways to health status. The effect of microfinance combined with other health components was less clear. Stronger randomized research designs with multiple study arms are required to improve evidence and disentangle the effects of multiple component

  14. An adult learning perspective on disability and microfinance: The case of Katureebe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuwagaba, Ephraim L; Rule, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Despite Uganda's progress in promoting affirmative action for persons with disabilities and its strategy of using microfinance to fight poverty, access to microfinance services by persons with disabilities is still problematic due to barriers, characterised by discrepancies between policies and practices. Regarding education, the affirmative action in favour of learners with disabilities has not translated into actual learning opportunities due to personal and environmental barriers. The study on which this article is based investigated the non-formal and informal adult learning practices regarding microfinance that persons with disabilities engaged in. This article seeks to illuminate the barriers that a person with a visual impairment encountered while learning about and engaging with microfinance and the strategies that he developed to overcome them. This was a case study, framed within the social model of disability and critical research paradigm. Data were collected through in-depth interviews of a person with visual impairment and observations of the environment in which adult learning and engagement with Savings and Credit Cooperative Organisations (SACCOs) occurred. Findings indicate that the person with a visual disability faced barriers to learning about microfinance services. He experienced barriers in an integrated manner and developed strategies to overcome these barriers. The barriers and strategies are theorised using the social model of disability. The case of a person with visual impairment suggests that persons with disabilities face multiple barriers regarding microfinance, including social, psychological and educational. However, his own agency and attitudes were also of importance as they influenced his learning. Viewing these barriers as blockades can lead to non-participation in learning and engagement with microfinance whereas viewing them as surmountable hurdles can potentially motivate participants to succeed in learning about and engaging

  15. Perceived Usefulness of a Microfinance Intervention on Health Awareness and Practices in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Bharat Ram; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Acharya, Dilaram; Gautam, Salila; Paudyal, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Economic constraints may lead to poor health among people from the developing world. Microfinance has proven to be useful in improving health outcomes elsewhere, but it still remains a neglected issue in Nepal. This study aims to assess perceived usefulness of the microfinance on health awareness and practices among different ethnic groups of Nepal. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in four districts of western Nepal. A total of 500 microfinance clients representing different ethnic groups (upper caste, aadibasi and janajati, and dalit) were selected by using systemic random sampling. Health awareness and practices among different ethnic groups were compared by logistic regression after adjustment for age, level of education, sex of household heads, occupation, and place of residence. Since participants were asked about their health awareness and practices, before and after microfinance intervention, during a single interview, there was a strong possibility of recall bias with respect to their preintervention awareness and other measures. Microfinance intervention positively influenced self-reported health awareness and practices among different ethnic groups in Nepal, which was highest among the upper caste group (77-92%, rate ratios around 1.7-2.6), followed by the aadibasi/janajati (60-76%, rate ratios around 1.4-1.8) and dalit group (33-52%, reference group). Self-reported awareness about environment and sanitation, family planning methods, and available health services at local level improved from 11.2 to 69.2, 9.2 to 65.0, and 3.8 to 59.8%, respectively, among the clients after microfinance intervention (p microfinance on self-reported health awareness and practices among different ethnic groups of Nepal. This finding supports further implementation and evaluation of equity-based microfinance to improve health and economic conditions of Nepalese people.

  16. Cash transfer and microfinance interventions for tuberculosis control: review of the impact evidence and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, D; Hargreaves, J; Lönnroth, K; Jaramillo, E; Weiss, J; Uplekar, M; Porter, J D H; Evans, C A

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the impact of cash transfer and microfinance interventions on a selected list of tuberculosis (TB) risk factors and assess their potential role in supporting TB control. Published and unpublished references identified from clinical and social electronic databases, grey literature and web sites. Eligible interventions had to be conducted in middle- or low-income countries and document an impact evaluation on any of the following outcomes: 1) TB or other respiratory infections; 2) household socio-economic position; and 3) factors mediating the association between low household socio-economic position and TB, including inadequate health-seeking behaviours, food insecurity and biological TB risk factors such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and adult malnutrition. Interventions targeting special populations were excluded. Fifteen cash transfer schemes (four unconditional and 11 conditional) and seven microfinance programmes met the eligibility criteria. No intervention addressed TB or any other respiratory infection. Of 11 cash transfer and four microfinance interventions, respectively seven and four reported a positive impact on indicators of economic well-being. A positive impact on household food security was documented in respectively eight of nine and three of five cash transfer and microfinance interventions. Improved health care access was documented respectively in 10 of 12 cash transfer and four of five microfinance interventions. The only intervention evaluating impact on HIV incidence was a microfinance project that found no effect. No cash transfer or microfinance interventions had an impact on adult malnutrition. Cash transfer and microfinance interventions can positively impact TB risk factors. Evaluation studies are urgently needed to assess the impact of these social protection interventions on actual TB indicators.

  17. An adult learning perspective on disability and microfinance: The case of Katureebe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim L. Nuwagaba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite Uganda’s progress in promoting affirmative action for persons with disabilities and its strategy of using microfinance to fight poverty, access to microfinance services by persons with disabilities is still problematic due to barriers, characterised by discrepancies between policies and practices. Regarding education, the affirmative action in favour of learners with disabilities has not translated into actual learning opportunities due to personal and environmental barriers.Objectives: The study on which this article is based investigated the non-formal and informal adult learning practices regarding microfinance that persons with disabilities engaged in. This article seeks to illuminate the barriers that a person with a visual impairment encountered while learning about and engaging with microfinance and the strategies that he developed to overcome them.Methods: This was a case study, framed within the social model of disability and critical research paradigm. Data were collected through in-depth interviews of a person with visual impairment and observations of the environment in which adult learning and engagement with Savings and Credit Cooperative Organisations (SACCOs occurred.Results: Findings indicate that the person with a visual disability faced barriers to learning about microfinance services. He experienced barriers in an integrated manner and developed strategies to overcome these barriers. The barriers and strategies are theorised using the social model of disability.Conclusion: The case of a person with visual impairment suggests that persons with disabilities face multiple barriers regarding microfinance, including social, psychological and educational. However, his own agency and attitudes were also of importance as they influenced his learning. Viewing these barriers as blockades can lead to non-participation in learning and engagement with microfinance whereas viewing them as surmountable hurdles can

  18. Creating sustainability : the social construction of the market for organic products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miele, M.

    2001-01-01

    Creating Sustainability: The Social Construction of the Market for Organic Products

    Chapter N. 1: Reflections on globalisation

    This chapter starts with some reflection on the concept of globalisation and reviews the literature

  19. Reinventing Strategic Philanthropy: the sustainable organization of voluntary action for impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.P.M. Meijs (Lucas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPhilanthropic organizations have recently started to focus on how to invest their resources in a way that will really make a difference to society. Strategic philanthropy is the new concept for voluntary action for the public good to create a valuable sustainable impact! This inaugural

  20. Sustainability of Our Planet and All Species as the Organizing Principle for SLCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskes, Kevin; Joyalle, Jennifer; Elliott, Erin; Sherman, Jacob D. B.

    2017-01-01

    We may define and prioritize them differently, but few would deny that our human community is facing intractable problems at local, national, and global scales. The authors call on higher education institutions (HEIs) around the world to work collectively and with strategic intent and action to use sustainability as an organizing principle to…

  1. Sustainability, natural and organic cosmetics: consumer, products, efficacy, toxicological and regulatory considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Corrêa, Marcos Antonio; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    .... Many cosmetic products have in their formulation natural products that perform a specific biological function, but these products should be evaluated on efficacy and toxicological aspects. The aim of this article is to approach sustainability, natural and organic cosmetics, considering the consumer and the efficacy, toxicological and regulatory aspects.

  2. Sustainable valorisation of organic urban wastes : insights from African case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinberg, A.; Agathos, N.; Gachugi, J.W.; Kirai, P.; Alumasa, V.; Shah, B.; Woods, M.; Waarts, Y.R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the problems and potentials of the organic waste stream is perhaps the single most important step that city authorities in Africa could take in moving towards sustainable, affordable, effective and efficient waste management. This publication presents four examples of recent attempts

  3. Persisting in papyrus: size, oxidative stress, and fitness in freshwater organisms adapted to sustained hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Chapman, Lauren J

    2013-08-01

    Aquatic hypoxia is generally viewed as stressful for aerobic organisms. However, hypoxia may also benefit organisms by decreasing cellular stress, particularly that related to free radicals. Thus, an ideal habitat may have the minimum O2 necessary to both sustain aerobic metabolism and reduce the need to scavenge free radicals and repair free radical damage. The ability of aquatic organisms to sustain aerobic metabolism relates in part to the ability to maximize gas diffusion, which can be facilitated by small body size when O2 uptake occurs across the body surface, by a large gill surface area, or by the ability to use atmospheric air. We use water-breathing organisms in chronically hypoxic papyrus (Cyperus papyrus) swamps of East Africa to test the hypothesis that cellular-level benefits of hypoxia may translate into increased fitness, especially for small organisms. A review of recent studies of fingernail clams (Sphaerium sp.) shows that clams living in sustained hypoxia have minimized oxidative stress and that these cellular-level benefits may lead to increased fitness. We suggest that organisms in the extreme conditions in the papyrus swamps provide a unique opportunity to challenge the conventional classification of hypoxic habitats as 'stressful' and normoxic habitats as 'optimal.' Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation of Financial Sustainability in Organizations through Valuation of Financial Leverage Effect in Russian Practice of Financial Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmarina, Svetlana I.; Zotova, Anna S.; Smolina, Ekaterina S.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the need of ensuring the sustainable development of organizations in the unstable external environment; financial sustainability which is understood as the optimal structure of funding sources of a business entity is proved to be the most significant factor of sustainable development. The article proves that the index of…

  5. A systematic review of microfinance and women's health literature: Directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, T L; Burke, J G

    2017-11-01

    While growing evidence suggests that microfinance is an effective approach for improved women's health, a significant gap remains in our understanding. The objective of this review is to synthesise the findings from published literature focused on microfinance and health issues particularly affecting women, including HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, mental health, and violence. Forty-one articles that examine the impact of microfinance participation on women's health were identified through a systematic search of electronic databases, coded using a structured abstraction form, and synthesised. Review results indicate that the impact of microfinance on women's health is an area in great need of research and publication attention. Varied quality and reporting in the identified articles restricted the ability to draw concrete conclusions regarding the relationship between microfinance participation and women's health, but led to the identification of current gaps in existing published research. Future research should work to address the recommendations provided in order to offer additional evidence to better understand the use of microfinance programming as a structural intervention to improve women's health.

  6. Microfinance Participation and Domestic Violence in Bangladesh: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta; Akincigil, Ayse; Zippay, Allison

    2016-05-01

    This article examines domestic violence among women who participate in microfinance in Bangladesh. Secondary analysis of survey data from nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey was used to investigate the association between microfinance participation and domestic violence of 4,163 ever-married women between the ages of 18 and 49 years. Outcome measure is experience of domestic violence as measured by a modified Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) and predictor variables include microfinance, binary indicator of relatively better economic status, autonomy, decision-making power, and demographic variables. The likelihood of experiencing domestic violence was not found to vary with microfinance participation. However, the interaction effect of microfinance and better economic status was found to be significantly associated with domestic violence (9% increased probability). Experience of domestic violence was negatively associated with older age, higher education of the husband, and autonomy. In Bangladesh, microfinance participation may be associated with a higher probability of experiencing domestic violence for women with relatively better economic status, but not for the poorest of the poor. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Microfinance participation and contraceptive decision-making: results from a national sample of women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, N S; Ely, G E

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to assess whether microfinance participation affords greater contraceptive decision-making power to women. Population based secondary data analysis. In this cross-sectional study using nationally representative data from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 we conducted multinomial logistic regression to estimate the odds of contraceptive decision-making by respondents and their husbands based on microfinance participation. Microfinance participation was measured as a dichotomous variable and contraceptive decision-making was conceptualized based on who made decisions about contraceptive use: respondents only; their partners or husbands only; or both. The odds of decision-making by the respondent, with the reference case being joint decision-making, were higher for microfinance participants, but they were not significant. The odds of decision-making by the husband, with the reference case again being joint decision-making, were significantly lower among men who were partnered with women who participated in microfinance (RRR = 0.70, P Microfinance participation by women allowed men to share decision-making power with their wives that resulted in higher odds of joint decision-making. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing conventional and organic agriculture in Karnataka, India: Where and when can organic farming be sustainable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, S.; Reidsma, P.; Shah, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Wolf, J.

    2014-01-01

    Karnataka is one of the south-western Indian states where agrarian distress as a major problem. Crop yields have been stagnant in the last decade, and coupled with increased input costs, this has led to reduced incomes and debts. There is an urgent need to study options to improve the sustainability

  9. Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting Well-Being, Meaningfulness, and Sustainability in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Annamaria Di Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This contribution deals with the concept of healthy organizations and starts with a definition of healthy organizations and healthy business. In healthy organizations, culture, climate, and practices create an environment conducive to employee health and safety as well as organizational effectiveness (Lowe, 2010). A healthy organization thus leads to a healthy and successful business (De Smet et al., 2007; Grawitch and Ballard, 2016), underlining the strong link between organizational profita...

  10. Exploring Reasons for the Resistance to Sustainable Management within Non-Profit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Heinrich Daub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The numerous empirical and conceptual studies that have been conducted over recent years concerning the social responsibility of enterprises and their contributions towards sustainable development have given very little consideration to non-profit organizations (NPOs. This is surprising, because NPOs are confronted with very similar challenges to profit-orientated enterprises regarding their evolution into sustainable organizations. This paper is a preliminary conceptual study and explores the question of why the corporate social responsibility, or corporate sustainability, of NPOs has to date been both neglected by research establishments and also extensively ignored by the NPOs during their day-to-day practical management. The example of church and pastoral institutions in Germany is used to demonstrate the extent to which they take account of ecological and social aspects in their management systems and processes and, thus, implement sustainable management within their day-to-day practice. The paper concludes with some proposals for further empirical and conceptual research projects, which are designed to analyze developments within NPOs with relation to the integration of sustainability into their management systems and processes.

  11. Towards a Sustainable Spatial Organization of the Energy System: Backcasting Experiences from Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Knoflacher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The transition to a sustainable energy system faces more challenges than a simple replacement of fossil energy sources by renewable ones. Since current structures do not favor sustainable energy generation and use, it is indispensable to change the existing infrastructure. A fundamental change of the energy system also requires re-organizing spatial structures and their respective institutions and governance structures. Especially in Austria, urban sprawl and unsustainable settlement structures are regarded as one of the main developments leading to increased energy demand. One of the aims within the project E-Trans 2050 was to identify socio-economic constellations that are central to the further transformation of the energy system and to focus on actors and their socio-technical framework conditions. Based on a sustainable future vision for the year 2050 a backcasting workshop was conducted to identify necessary steps for the envisaged transition to a more sustainable energy system. The results shed light on the necessary changes for a transformation towards sustainability in the specific Austrian situation. Critical issues are region-specific production of energy and its use, settlement and regional structures and values and role models, which all have a determining influence on energy demand. Combining the knowledge of extensive energy use with available energy resources in spatial planning decisions is a main challenge towards a long term sustainable energy system.

  12. Productivity, quality and sustainability of winter wheat underlong-term conventional and organic management in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Jochen; Gunst, Lucie; Mäder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Long-term sustainability and high resource use efficiency are major goals for high quality baking wheatproduction throughout the world. Present strategies are low input systems such as organic agriculture orimproved conventional systems (integrated). The fertilisation level and strategy, crop......-bers of ears per m2and the thousand kernel weight. The apparent nitrogen use efficiency decreased withincreasing N fertilisation. Doubling the organic fertilisation in the organic systems only slightly improvedwheat grain yields but was not able to improve grain baking quality, due to low mineral N additions...... organic systems with standard fertilisation. However, all systems, organic and conventional, with thelow or zero organic fertiliser inputs performed poorly considering the long-term soil quality parameters,indicating a degradation of soil quality. The DOK long-term experiment allows an integrated view...

  13. ISLAMIC MICROFINANCE AND POVERTY ALLEVIATION PROGRAM: PRELIMINARY RESEARCH FINDINGS FROM INDONESIA

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    Yasushi Suzuki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Poverty should be defined, measured, and scrutinized its root causes from a multi-dimension perspectives. Therefore, in designing and implementation of poverty alleviation program, it should consider economic factors, social and political contexts surrounding the poor. Sen (1982; 1999 views poverty as a multifaceted world and ethical dimension essentially should be placed underpinning it as a vital economic problem. The paper takes the stance that the poor themselves have potential capacity to alleviate their condition in resolving poverty trap. Community development program is one of the strategies to deal with the poverty problem. Islamic microfinance can play an important role in combating poverty dilemma especially in Muslim majority population communities. Through the approach proposed by Bigg and Satterthwaite (2005 with strengthening local organizations and community development programs, Islamic microfinance should engage a strategic partnership with the Masjid and Islamic charity institutions (zakat and waqf organization. This strategic alliance will result more integrated programs and also capacity building of the institutions involved. This paper aims to contribute a grass root model in the purpose of combating poverty in the framework of Islamic economic system. =========================================== Kemiskinan harus didefinisikan, diukur, dan diteliti akar penyebabnya dari berbagai perspektif. Oleh karena itu, dalam merancang dan mengimplementasikan program pengentasan kemiskinan, faktor-faktor ekonomi, konteks sosial dan politik yang mengelilingi kemiskinan juga harus dipertimbangkan. Sen (1982; 1999 memandang kemiskinan sebagai sebuah dunia yang kompleks, dan dimensi dasar etika harus ditempatkan sebagai sebuah masalah ekonomi yang vital. Peneliti sendiri dalam hal ini berpandangan bahwa orang-orang miskin pada dasarnya punya kapasitas yang memadai untuk keluar dari garis kemiskinan. Salah satunya adalah dengan program

  14. A Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment: Implications in the Field of Microfinance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis, Marloes A.; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Women’s empowerment is an important goal in achieving sustainable development worldwide. Offering access to microfinance services to women is one way to increase women’s empowerment. However, empirical evidence provides mixed results with respect to its effectiveness. We reviewed previous research on the impact of microfinance services on different aspects of women’s empowerment. We propose a Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment to integrate previous findings and to gain a deeper understanding of women’s empowerment in the field of microfinance services. This model proposes that women’s empowerment can take place on three distinct dimensions: (1) the micro-level, referring to an individuals’ personal beliefs as well as actions, where personal empowerment can be observed (2) the meso-level, referring to beliefs as well as actions in relation to relevant others, where relational empowerment can be observed and (3) the macro-level, referring to outcomes in the broader, societal context where societal empowerment can be observed. Importantly, we propose that time and culture are important factors that influence women’s empowerment. We suggest that the time lag between an intervention and its evaluation may influence when empowerment effects on the different dimensions occur and that the type of intervention influences the sequence in which the three dimensions can be observed. We suggest that cultures may differ with respect to which components of empowerment are considered indicators of empowerment and how women’s position in society may influence the development of women’s empowerment. We propose that a Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment should guide future programs in designing, implementing, and evaluating their interventions. As such our analysis offers two main practical implications. First, based on the model we suggest that future research should differentiate between the three dimensions of women’s empowerment to

  15. A Three-Dimensional Model of Women's Empowerment: Implications in the Field of Microfinance and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis, Marloes A; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Women's empowerment is an important goal in achieving sustainable development worldwide. Offering access to microfinance services to women is one way to increase women's empowerment. However, empirical evidence provides mixed results with respect to its effectiveness. We reviewed previous research on the impact of microfinance services on different aspects of women's empowerment. We propose a Three-Dimensional Model of Women's Empowerment to integrate previous findings and to gain a deeper understanding of women's empowerment in the field of microfinance services. This model proposes that women's empowerment can take place on three distinct dimensions: (1) the micro-level, referring to an individuals' personal beliefs as well as actions, where personal empowerment can be observed (2) the meso-level, referring to beliefs as well as actions in relation to relevant others, where relational empowerment can be observed and (3) the macro-level, referring to outcomes in the broader, societal context where societal empowerment can be observed. Importantly, we propose that time and culture are important factors that influence women's empowerment. We suggest that the time lag between an intervention and its evaluation may influence when empowerment effects on the different dimensions occur and that the type of intervention influences the sequence in which the three dimensions can be observed. We suggest that cultures may differ with respect to which components of empowerment are considered indicators of empowerment and how women's position in society may influence the development of women's empowerment. We propose that a Three-Dimensional Model of Women's Empowerment should guide future programs in designing, implementing, and evaluating their interventions. As such our analysis offers two main practical implications. First, based on the model we suggest that future research should differentiate between the three dimensions of women's empowerment to increase our

  16. A Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment: Implications in the Field of Microfinance and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes A. Huis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Women’s empowerment is an important goal in achieving sustainable development worldwide. Offering access to microfinance services to women is one way to increase women’s empowerment. However, empirical evidence provides mixed results with respect to its effectiveness. We reviewed previous research on the impact of microfinance services on different aspects of women’s empowerment. We propose a Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment to integrate previous findings and to gain a deeper understanding of women’s empowerment in the field of microfinance services. This model proposes that women’s empowerment can take place on three distinct dimensions: (1 the micro-level, referring to an individuals’ personal beliefs as well as actions, where personal empowerment can be observed (2 the meso-level, referring to beliefs as well as actions in relation to relevant others, where relational empowerment can be observed and (3 the macro-level, referring to outcomes in the broader, societal context where societal empowerment can be observed. Importantly, we propose that time and culture are important factors that influence women’s empowerment. We suggest that the time lag between an intervention and its evaluation may influence when empowerment effects on the different dimensions occur and that the type of intervention influences the sequence in which the three dimensions can be observed. We suggest that cultures may differ with respect to which components of empowerment are considered indicators of empowerment and how women’s position in society may influence the development of women’s empowerment. We propose that a Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment should guide future programs in designing, implementing, and evaluating their interventions. As such our analysis offers two main practical implications. First, based on the model we suggest that future research should differentiate between the three dimensions of women

  17. Animal Board Invited Review: Comparing conventional and organic livestock production systems on different aspects of sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wagenberg, C P A; de Haas, Y; Hogeveen, H; van Krimpen, M M; Meuwissen, M P M; van Middelaar, C E; Rodenburg, T B

    2017-10-01

    To sustainably contribute to food security of a growing and richer world population, livestock production systems are challenged to increase production levels while reducing environmental impact, being economically viable, and socially responsible. Knowledge about the sustainability performance of current livestock production systems may help to formulate strategies for future systems. Our study provides a systematic overview of differences between conventional and organic livestock production systems on a broad range of sustainability aspects and animal species available in peer-reviewed literature. Systems were compared on economy, productivity, environmental impact, animal welfare and public health. The review was limited to dairy cattle, beef cattle, pigs, broilers and laying hens, and to Europe, North America and New Zealand. Results per indicators are presented as in the articles without performing additional calculations. Out of 4171 initial search hits, 179 articles were analysed. Studies varied widely in indicators, research design, sample size and location and context. Quite some studies used small samples. No study analysed all aspects of sustainability simultaneously. Conventional systems had lower labour requirements per unit product, lower income risk per animal, higher production per animal per time unit, higher reproduction numbers, lower feed conversion ratio, lower land use, generally lower acidification and eutrophication potential per unit product, equal or better udder health for cows and equal or lower microbiological contamination. Organic systems had higher income per animal or full time employee, lower impact on biodiversity, lower eutrophication and acidification potential per unit land, equal or lower likelihood of antibiotic resistance in bacteria and higher beneficial fatty acid levels in cow milk. For most sustainability aspects, sometimes conventional and sometimes organic systems performed better, except for productivity, which was

  18. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees. PMID:27764099

  19. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees.

  20. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Martínez-Alcántara

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots. Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees.

  1. Feasibility and pilot study of the effects of microfinance on mortality and nutrition in children under five amongst the very poor in India: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Shalini; Szatkowski, Lisa; Sinha, Ranjeet; Yaron, Gil; Fogarty, Andrew; Allen, Stephen; Choudhary, Sunil; Smyth, Alan R

    2014-07-23

    The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include targets for the health of children under five years old. Poor health is linked to poverty and microfinance initiatives are economic interventions that may improve health by breaking the cycle of poverty. However, there is a lack of reliable evidence to support this. In addition, microfinance schemes may have adverse effects on health, for example due to increased indebtedness. Rojiroti UK and the Centre for Promoting Sustainable Livelihood run an innovative microfinance scheme that provides microcredit via women's self-help groups (SHGs). This pilot study, conducted in rural Bihar (India), will establish whether it is feasible to collect anthropometric and mortality data on children under five years old and to conduct a limited cluster randomized trial of the Rojiroti intervention. We have designed a cluster randomized trial in which participating tolas (small communities within villages) will be randomized to either receive early (SHGs and microfinance at baseline) or late intervention (SHGs and microfinance after 18 months). Using predesigned questionnaires, demographic, and mortality data for the last year and information about participating mothers and their children will be collected and the weight, height, and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) of children will be measured at baseline and at 18 months. The late intervention group will establish SHGs and microfinance support at this point and data collection will be repeated at 36 months.The primary outcome measure will be the mean weight for height z-score of children under five years old in the early and late intervention tolas at 18 months. Secondary outcome measures will be the mortality rate, mean weight for age, height for age, prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting among children under five years of age. Despite economic progress, marked inequalities in child health persist in India and Bihar is one of the worst affected states. There

  2. Global recession and microfinance risk governance in developing countries

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    Roberto Moro Visconti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Global recession, started in 2008, is still proving an unresolved perfect storm and the financial crisis has affected also the real economy, creating widespread social unrest. Microfinance institutions (MFIs in developing countries seem however less affected by the worldwide turmoil, due to their segmentation and resilience to external shocks. Recession has a big impact on governance mechanisms, altering the equilibriums among different stakeholders and increasing the risk of investment returns; any governance improvement is highly welcome and recommended. No governance, no money for growth or bare survival. In the confused phase we are living in, at the moment there are not evident winners, but the underbanked poorest, unless properly supported, once again risk being the ultimate losers.

  3. Government-sponsored microfinance program: Joint liability vs. individual liability

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    Arghya Kusum Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Swarnajayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY is a government-sponsored microfinance program. The scheme is based on four features: group lending with joint liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. We propose a new model of SGSY having these features: group lending with individual liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. “Joint liability” clause of the existing model is replaced with individual liability in the new model. The paper shows that problem of adverse selection is removed in both models, i.e. in “SGSY with group lending and joint liability” and “SGSY with group lending and individual liability.” The problem of “moral hazard” is more severe in the existing model of SGSY compared with the proposed model of SGSY. Borrowers are also benefitted from participation in the proposed scheme of SGSY than that in the existing model of SGSY.

  4. The determinants of capital structure of microfinance institutions in Ghana

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    Anthony Kyereboah-Coleman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a panel data methodology, this study examines the determinants of capital structure of 52 microfinance institutions (MFIs in Ghana. The empirical results show that the MFIs are highly leveraged and that their capital structure is explained partly by standard finance theory and by other unconventional variables. Specifically, the study confirms that leverage is positively related to asset tangibility, with small MFIs using short-term and large MFIs using long-term debt. Though, the findings confirm that leverage is inversely related to risk, they also suggest that some MFIs enjoy long-term debt in spite of risk, while profitability is irrelevant in explaining the capital structure decisions of MFIs. Finally, the study shows that the reputation and board independence of MFIs significantly and positively affect their capital structure decisions.

  5. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Roxana; Dunn, Kim

    2008-11-06

    While the promise and enthusiasm for regional health information organizations (RHIOs) are immense, a significant issue regarding this type of health information exchange, (HIE) remains unclear: financial sustainability. As of today, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. The purpose of this study is to conduct a literature review of the current state of RHIOs adaptation and implementation of business models for successful financial sustainability, as well as evaluate existing RHIOs financial situation to determine and recommend best models for economic uphold. This literature review will be the starting point for thorough analysis and understanding of the economic factors required for RHIOs to generate a return on investment (ROI) and become self-sustainable.

  6. Funding for self-employment of people with disabilities. Grants, loans, revolving funds or linkage with microfinance programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Ton

    2008-03-01

    In 2005, Handicap International commissioned a study on the practices of funding for self-employment activities of people with disabilities (PWD), with a special focus on access to microfinance. The overall goal of the study was to produce a framework document highlighting good practices, strategies, tools and operational methods that guarantee the efficiency and sustainability of self-employment projects for PWDs. The first phase of the study consisted of a literature review and a worldwide survey. Through this first phase the research team identified the most innovative programmes for further analysis through field visits. In the second phase field visits were conducted in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Nicaragua and Uganda, while regional workshops were organised in Dhaka and Nairobi. Phase three involved consolidation and analysis of the information and finally drafting of the framework document. This paper summarises the findings and good practices as presented in the framework document, based on the results of the literature review, the survey and the field research. It is not a scientific paper, i.e. it doesn't contain a discussion of the literature reviewed or systematic reference to sources, the same as the document on which it is based, as it is primarily meant for 'practitioners'. A main finding of the study was that there is no single 'best solution' to funding of self employment activities. While inclusion of PWDs in existing microfinance institutions (MFIs) is the preferred strategy, guaranteeing efficiency, sustainability and future access to funding for the target group, it was found that in reality many PWDs do not have access to microfinance programmes. This can be explained by stigmatisation of PWDs by staff of MFIs, who do not believe in their income earning and repayment capacity, and self-exclusion by PWDs. To fight against it projects have been set-up linking MFIs with programmes for PWDs, focusing on better information

  7. Biodiversity Indicators for Sustainability Evaluation of Conventional and Organic Agro-ecosystems

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    Concetta Vazzana

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest widespread positive responses of biodiversity to organic farming. However, the effect of organic farming management on biodiversity over time needs to be better understood and this paper aims to compare agricultural biodiversity in a long-term experiment including three different agroecosystem management patterns (old organic, young organic and conventional. The level of agroecosystem sustainability related to plants has been assessed both for the structural and the associated biodiversity, using biodiversity Indicators. The data collected in three years (2003-2005 show that the system under organic agriculture management is better than conventional one for every indicator and it improves each aspect over the time. This trend holds especially for the associated biodiversity while the planned biodiversity can still be improved.

  8. CSR and Sustainability Report for Nonprofit Organizations. An Italian Best Practice

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    Patrizia GAZZOLA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the sustainability report for the communication of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in a nonprofit organization. To this aim, an Italian case study is analyzed: the Fondazione Renato Piatti Onlus, a nonprofit organization of Social Utility. In the first part, we analyze the CSR for nonprofit organizations and the sustainability report (also called ‘social balance’. In the second part, we present evidence from the case study. The research is exploratory in nature when considering the connection of corporate social responsibility efforts to the nonprofit sector, a qualitative methodology was chosen over quantitative methods. Specifically, the case study was used to show what strategy a nonprofit organization can develop. Nowadays CSR strategies received a growing attention from both businesses and nonprofit organizations but also from the EU which forced large public-interest entities to present a social balance. For nonprofit organizations, applying social responsibility is not a voluntary issue. Nonprofit organizations have an ethical obligation to their stakeholder and to the public to conduct their activities with accountability and transparency. Scholars have increasingly been studying the impact of corporate social responsibility as a business strategy in for-profit companies. However, there is still lack of researches on how nonprofit organizations implement CSR into the strategy. As a consequence of the above remarks, a large part of nonprofit organizations fails to correctly implement a successful long term CSR strategy. The Fondazione Renato Piatti Onlus belongs to that group that has been able to incorporate social responsibility within the organization, then expanding its content into a social report drawn up in accordance with the guidelines of the Italian Agency for the Third Sector.

  9. Improving the Sustainability of Office Partition Manufacturing: Balancing Options for Reducing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds

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    Marc A. Rosen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Options are examined to improve the sustainability of office partition manufacturing by reducing volatile organic compounds (VOC emissions. Base VOC emissions for a typical plant are estimated using a mass balance approach. Pollution prevention and sustainability measures are assessed using realistic criteria and weightings. Sustainability has been considered from an industry perspective, considering factors like economics, environmental impact, quality, health and safety. Through a case study, it is demonstrated that several advantageous options are available for reducing VOC emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions, and thereby enhancing the sustainability of that industrial operation. The measures deemed most viable include implementing several best management practices, not painting of non-visible parts, switching gluing processes, recycling solvent and modifying attachments. The results are intended to be balanced so as to improve their acceptability and adoptability by industry. It appears that it would be advantageous for manufacturers of office panels to evaluate the feasibility of these measures and to implement the most appropriate. The results are likely extendable to other operations in the wood furniture industry, and would improve their sustainability.

  10. Gendered Poverty and Education: Moving beyond Access to Expanding Freedoms through Microfinance Policy in India and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voola, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Microfinance has been recognized globally as a poverty alleviating strategy and particularly as a gender equality enhancing approach. There have been immense, intense and nuanced debates in the field of international development, feminist studies and comparative social policy regarding the role of microfinance in addressing gendered poverty. This…

  11. The Impact of Information and Communication Technology on Intermediation, Outreach, and Decision Rights in the Microfinance Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    The microfinance industry provides financial services to the world's poor in hopes of moving individuals and families out of poverty. This dissertation document suggests that information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the microfinance industry, especially given recent advancements in mobile banking, Internet usage and…

  12. Are Physicians Obliged to Lead Environmental Sustainability Efforts in Health Care Organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Cheryl C; Hill, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Climate change threatens health, health care, and the industries and resources upon which these depend. The growing prevalence and severity of its health consequences and economic costs are alarming health professionals and organizations as their professional obligations, grounded in the core value of health, include protecting against these harms. One means of fulfilling these obligations is to lead or support sustainability initiatives that are built upon current, reliable, accurate, and unbiased evidence and collaboratively tailored to meet specific needs and respond to specific contexts. We consider why and how health professionals and organizations should lead or support such initiatives. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  13. A Review of Organic Farming for Sustainable Agriculture in Northern India

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    S. K. Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the post independence period, the most important challenge in India has been to produce enough food for the growing population. Hence, high-yielding varieties are being used with infusion of irrigation water, fertilizers, or pesticides. This combination of high-yielding production technology has helped the country develop a food surplus as well as contributing to concerns of soil health, environmental pollution, pesticide toxicity, and sustainability of agricultural production. Scientists and policy planners are, therefore, reassessing agricultural practices which relied more on biological inputs rather than heavy usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Organic farming can provide quality food without adversely affecting the soil’s health and the environment; however, a concern is whether large-scale organic farming will produce enough food for India’s large population. Certified organic products including all varieties of food products including basmati rice, pulses, honey, tea, spices, coffee, oilseeds, fruits, cereals, herbal medicines, and their value-added products are produced in India. Non edible organic products include cotton, garments, cosmetics, functional food products, body care products, and similar products. The production of these organic crops and products is reviewed with regard to sustainable agriculture in northern India.

  14. Autocatalytic sets and chemical organizations: modeling self-sustaining reaction networks at the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim; Steel, Mike; Dittrich, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Two related but somewhat different approaches have been proposed to formalize the notion of a self-sustaining chemical reaction network. One is the notion of collectively autocatalytic sets, formalized as RAF theory, and the other is chemical organization theory. Both formalisms have been argued to be relevant to the origin of life. RAF sets and chemical organizations are defined differently, but previously some relationships between the two have been shown. Here, we refine and explore these connections in more detail. In particular, we show that so-called closed RAFs are chemical organizations, but that the converse is not necessarily true. We then introduce and apply a procedure to show how chemical organizations can be used to find all closed RAFs within any chemical reaction system. We end with a discussion of why and how closed RAFs could be important in the context of the origin and early evolution of life.

  15. The Social Construction of the Microfinance Industry: a comparison of donor and recipient perspectives

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    Arjun Bisen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance has been one of the fastest growing “industries” of the new millennium, with the sector now containing over 10,000 microfinance institutions (MFIs worth an estimated USD with over $60 billion in assets (Microfinance Information Exchange 2011. This expansion has stimulated interest from both scholars and the mainstream media. There is a growing volume of academic research which broadly centres on two approaches: an “institutionalist perspective” that highlights microfinance as an innovation in applying market solutions to social problems; and the other approach, often described as welfarist, that questions the capacity of an increasingly commericalised sector to realize a mission of poverty reduction. But do these themes and concerns permeate academic boundaries? Specifically, does media coverage in key donor and recipient countries confirm or challenge or even engage with these debates? To date much of this academic literature has overlooked how “microfinance” has been socially constructed in the public sphere through the mass media. Through its interpretation of events, the media can influence the way an issue is discussed and evaluated and in this way influence individual perceptions (Gamson 1988. In this article we present an analysis of recent media coverage of microfinance in one key donor country, the United States and one major recipient country, India. By conducting a media content analysis of 100 newspaper articles (sorted by level of relevance that appeared in the top 10 highest circulating English language newspapers in India and the US over a 12 month period January-December 2008 we discuss how media coverage in these two countries differed in significant ways. The Indian media sample tended to focus on operational issues and report on specific business activity within the microfinance industry, in general treating it as a ‘regular’ part of the financial and banking system. While the US media sample made

  16. Financial resources of the microfinance sector: Securitisation deals – Issues and challenges Interview with the MFIs Grameen Koota and Equitas

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    M. Jayadev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Securitisation has emerged as an innovative and structured product that meets the funding requirements of microfinance institutions (MFIs. This paper provides a contextual note on the microfinance sector and the financial sources of MFIs. The note is followed by interviews with senior executives of two microfinance institutions on the securitisation deals of microfinance institutions. We argue in our note that the microfinance sector needs to be revived to meet the broader goal of financial inclusion. Banks and MFIs have to collaborate with each other to meet this objective. Banks have to encourage MFIs to shift over to low cost finance either by giving direct loans or through innovative deals like securitisation. Commercial banks have to leverage MFIs for their origination and recovery capabilities in small loans.

  17. Determining business models for financial sustainability in regional health information organizations (RHIOs): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Roxana; Burciago, Daniel; Dunn, Kim

    2009-10-01

    Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) have the potential to alleviate today's health care problems by granting providers access to a supported body of clinical information for all patients in a given region. While the promise of and enthusiasm for RHIOs is immense, the issue of their financial sustainability remains unclear. It has been said that the business model supporting a regional or national health information network is as essential, if not more essential, than the technology that makes it feasible. Currently, there is a clear lack of concrete business models implemented in RHIOs' projects. This article reports the results of a literature review of the current status of the adaptation and implementation of business models by RHIOs for successful financial sustainability. Based on the review, this article also attempts to evaluate the existing financial situation of RHIOs to determine and recommend the best models of economic sustainability. Significant findings include RHIOs' present financial environment, planning, and self-sustainability methods. Future studies will be needed as RHIOs continue to grow and move toward the implementation phase of their development.

  18. The Role of Marketing Audit in Evaluation Sustainable Marketing Performance in Romanian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Serbănică

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In today`s society, marked by profound changes in consumer attitudes towards the environment and social issues, organizations are forced to behave responsibly, to be oriented towards a sustainable marketing. However the efforts of the organization should be evaluated periodically to see the extent to which objectives are achieved and the extent to which resource consumption leads to results. From the marketing perspective, this can be achieved through marketing audit, which is a tool for evaluating and controlling a marketing organization’s performance. This paper aims, through a documentary study in the first part and an exploratory quantitative research, in the second, to highlight the role and place of the audit of marketing in companies in Romania, to assess the effectiveness of marketing activity undertaken the principles of sustainability. The last part of the paper includes research findings and a series of theoretical and managerial recommendations on the use of marketing audit as a tool for assessing the sustainability of marketing companies in the target group, with the possibility of generalizing to all companies operating on the market in Romania.

  19. Sustainability of Constructed Wetland under the Impact of Aquatic Organisms Overloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chieh Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impacts, such as earthquakes, chemical pollution and anthropogenic factors can affect the stability and sustainability of an ecosystem. In this study, a long-term (3.7 years investigation experiment was conducted to estimate the sustainability of a constructed wetland (CW under the impact of aquatic organisms overloading. The situation of aquatic organisms overloading in this study meant that around 27,000 kg of fishes had to be moved and accommodated in a 4 ha water area of wetland for six months. Experimental results indicated that the pH value of CW water was slightly acidic and the Dissolved Oxygen (DO level decreased under the impact. On the other hand, the levels of Electrical Conductivity (EC, Suspended Solids (SS, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, and Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN of CW water were increased under the impact. The pathogen analysis revealed that total coliforms, Salmonella spp., Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia coli, in the wetland water increased under the impact. The analyzed factors of water quality and amount of pathogens were all returned to their original statuses soon after the impact ended. Eventually, the results of microbial community structure analysis showed that overloading of aquatic organisms slightly increased the specific richness (R of wetland bacteria, whereas higher structural biodiversity (H of CW could stabilize the whole microbial community and prevent the pathogens or other bacteria from increasing to become the dominant strains. These results were novel and could be possible to conclude that a CW environment could not only stabilize the water quality and amount of pathogens resulting from the impact of aquatic organisms overloading, but also they could stabilize the microbial community structures, allowing the biogeochemical cycles of the CW to function. They could provide the useful information for wetland sustainability.

  20. Sustainability of US Organic Beef and Dairy Production Systems: Soil, Plant and Cattle Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy J. Soder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the National Organic Program implemented a rule for the US stating that pasture must be a significant source of feed in organic ruminant systems. This article will focus on how the pasture rule has impacted the management, economics and nutritional value of products derived from organic ruminant systems and the interactions of grazing cattle with pasture forages and soils. The use of synthetic fertilizers is prohibited in organic systems; therefore, producers must rely on animal manures, compost and cover crops to increase and maintain soil nitrogen content. Rotational and strip grazing are two of the most common grazing management practices utilized in grazing ruminant production systems; however, these practices are not exclusive to organic livestock producers. For dairy cattle, grazing reduces foot and leg problems common in confinement systems, but lowers milk production and exposes cows to parasites that can be difficult to treat without pharmaceuticals. Organic beef cattle may still be finished in feedlots for no more than 120 days in the US, but without growth hormones and antibiotics, gains may be reduced and illnesses increased. Grazing reduces the use of environmentally and economically costly concentrate feeds and recycles nutrients back to the soil efficiently, but lowers the rate of beef liveweight gain. Increased use of pasture can be economically, environmentally and socially sustainable if forage use efficiency is high and US consumers continue to pay a premium for organic beef and dairy products.

  1. I Have a Dream: Organic Movements Include Gene Manipulation to Improve Sustainable Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhart U. Ryffel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several papers in a Special Issue of Sustainability have recently discussed various aspects to evaluate whether organic farming and gene manipulation are compatible. A special emphasis was given to new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs. These new approaches allow the most predictable genetic alterations of crop plants in ways that the genetically modified plant is identical to a plant generated by conventional breeding. The articles of the Special Issue present the arguments pro and contra the inclusion of the plants generated by NPBTs in organic farming. Organic movements have not yet made a final decision whether some of these techniques should be accepted or banned. In my view these novel genetically manipulated (GM crops could be used in such a way as to respect the requirements for genetically manipulated organisms (GMOs formulated by the International Federation of Organic Movements (IFOAM. Reviewing the potential benefits of disease-resistant potatoes and bananas, it seems possible that these crops support organic farming. To this end, I propose specific requirements that the organic movements should proactively formulate as their standards to accept specific GM crops.

  2. Strongly Reducing, Visible-Light Organic Photoredox Catalysts as Sustainable Alternatives to Precious Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya; Pearson, Ryan M; Lim, Chern-Hooi; Sartor, Steven M; Ryan, Matthew D; Yang, Haishen; Damrauer, Niels H; Miyake, Garret M

    2017-08-16

    Photoredox catalysis is a versatile approach for the construction of challenging covalent bonds under mild reaction conditions, commonly using photoredox catalysts (PCs) derived from precious metals. As such, there is need to develop organic analogues as sustainable replacements. Although several organic PCs have been introduced, there remains a lack of strongly reducing, visible-light organic PCs. Herein, we establish the critical photophysical and electrochemical characteristics of both a dihydrophenazine and a phenoxazine system that enables their success as strongly reducing, visible-light PCs for trifluoromethylation reactions and dual photoredox/nickel-catalyzed C-N and C-S cross-coupling reactions, both of which have been historically exclusive to precious metal PCs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Sustainability, natural and organic cosmetics: consumer, products, efficacy, toxicological and regulatory considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Fonseca-Santos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The interest in sustainable products has increased along the years, since the choice of products, packaging and production processes have a great impact on the environment. These products are classified by regulatory agencies in different categories, aggregating advantages to the product and increasing the demand by consumers. However, there is no harmonization in guidelines of these certifying agencies and each cosmetic industry formulates their product and packaging in a more rational way, which causes less damage to the environment. Many cosmetic products have in their formulation natural products that perform a specific biological function, but these products should be evaluated on efficacy and toxicological aspects. The aim of this article is to approach sustainability, natural and organic cosmetics, considering the consumer and the efficacy, toxicological and regulatory aspects.

  4. Energy-microfinance intervention for low income households in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. Sharath Chandra

    In India, limited energy access and energy inequity hamper the lives of low income households. Traditional fuels such as firewood and dung cake account for 84 percent and 32 percent of the rural and urban household cooking energy (NSSO, 2007). With 412 million people without access to electricity in 2005, India hosts the world's largest such population (IEA, 2007). But, low income households still spend 9 - 11.7 percent1 of their incomes on inefficient forms of energy while wealthy households spend less than 5 percent on better energy products (Saghir, 2005). Renewable energy technologies coupled with innovative financial products can address the energy access problem facing the low income households in India (MacLean & Siegel, 2007; REEEP, 2009). Nevertheless, the low income households continue to face low access to mainstream finance for purchasing renewable energy technology at terms that meet their monthly energy related expenditure (ESMAP, 2004a; SEEP, 2008a) and low or no access to energy services (Ailawadi & Bhattacharyya, 2006; Modi et. al., 2006). The lack of energy-finance options has left the marginalized population with little means to break the dependence on traditional fuels. This dissertation proposes an energy microfinance intervention to address the present situation. It designed a loan product dedicated to the purchase of renewable energy technologies while taking into account the low and irregular cash flows of the low income households. The arguments presented in this dissertation are based on a six-month pilot project using this product designed and developed by the author in conjunction with a microfinance institution and its low income clients and Energy Service Companies in the state of Karnataka. Finding the right stakeholders and establishing a joint agreement, obtaining grant money for conducting the technology dissemination workshops and forming a clear procedure for commissioning the project, are the key lessons learnt from this study

  5. Microfinance strategy and its impact on profitability and operating efficiency: evidence from Indonesia Released On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saladin Ghalib

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available After the Asian crisis in 1998, Indonesian banking transformed very quickly into more market-oriented banking. This development increased the competition, on the one hand, and pressure to perform better financially, especially after foreign investor taking over the ownership, on the other hand. Some banks transformed their business strategies into a microfinance bank for profit motives. Such strategy jointly results in significant profitability and efficiency. Using SUR regression, it is found that for the profitability equation, the profitability relates to the size of the bank, the loan loss reserve to gross loan (LLRGL, equity ratio (ETA and fixed asset ratio (FIXASEQ. For operating efficiency (CIR, the result is similar and only the sign is different. Interestingly that for profitability, the microfinance strategy (MFS is significant, but not for operating cost efficiency. It implies the need for more cost efficient commercial banks entering microfinance business as it will benefit small borrowers in terms of lower interest margin.

  6. Alleviating poverty or reinforcing inequality? Interpreting micro-finance in practice, with illustrations from rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Becky Yang

    2014-06-01

    Academic and political discussions about micro-finance have been found lacking in predictive power, because they are based on orthodox economic theory, which does not properly comprehend the social components of credit. I take a better approach, utilizing credit theory--specifically, Ingham's explication of how the nature of money as credit leads to social inequality. I also expound the perspective that morality is not separate from considerations borrowers make in micro-finance programmes on the micro level. I draw upon illustrations from my fieldwork in rural China, where a group-lending micro-finance programme was administered as part of a larger government-initiated effort across the country. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  7. Promoting occupational safety and health for working children through microfinance programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carothers, Richard; Breslin, Curtis; Denomy, Jennifer; Foad, Mamdouh

    2010-01-01

    Microfinance programs are recognized as a way of improving incomes and creating employment for large numbers of low-income families, but there are concerns that working conditions within these informal microenterprises are far from ideal. For example, when families receive loans to expand a microenterprise, children may make up the labor shortfall until the family can afford to hire adult workers. Through the Promoting and Protecting the Interests of Children who Work (PPIC-Work) project being carried out in Egypt, a set of interventions that can not only improve working conditions, but can also be integrated into standard microfinance programs has been developed. By working with and through self-financing microfinance programs, the PPIC-Work approach provides a way of improving occupational safety and health not only for children working in microenterprises but also for large numbers of children and adults working in the informal sector more generally.

  8. An empirical approach to the credit risk assessment of a microfinance institution in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Lara Rubio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth of micro-credit along with the excellent conditions to carry out microfinance activity in the economy and financial system of the Republic of Peru are pushing for Microfinance Institutions (IMF increased competition with banks in this segment business. Like in commercial banks, in microfinance questions such as: is this customer profitable?, What is the credit limit that I must accept to his/her application?, What interest rate should I charge to him/ her?, How I can reduce the risk default?, etc., are matters to be assessed properly. We propose a method that could facilitate improvement in customer qualification between failed and not failed. To this end, we propose a methodology that analyzes credit risk in the provision of microcredit through the design of a credit scoring model that we apply to a Development Agency for Small and Micro Enterprise (EDPYME, which is an IMF under the supervision by the Banking and Insurance Superintendency (SBS.

  9. Determinants of microfinance outreach in Sub-Saharan Africa: A panel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Adams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The study focused on analysing the outreach performance of microfinance institutions (MFIs in providing critical services for the poor using innovative lending techniques within constrained environments. Research purpose: The study examined the trade-off relations between the depth and the breadth of outreach and identified institutional level factors that influence MFIs outreach in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Motivation for the study: MFIs continue to play critical roles in extending financial services to the poor and yet previous studies have not analysed comprehensively the dimensions of outreach necessary for financial inclusion. Research design, approach and methods: The study employed correlation analysis and random effects methodology to panel data regression analysis (619 observations, 71 MFIs across 10 countries to establish the trade-off relations and the determinants of outreach in SSA. Main findings: It was established that a trade-off exists between the depth of outreach (access to credit disbursement by poor clients and breadth of outreach (number of clients served. The results further revealed that gross loan portfolio, portfolio at risk, borrower per staff member, interest rate, and operating expenses to assets ratio are the main institutional determinants of MFIs outreach in SSA. Practical/managerial implications: The policy implication is that MFIs that concentrate efforts in reaching the relatively poor do so at the expense of reaching a large number of poor clients. We suggest that effective monitoring of depth and breadth and the adoption and implementation of cost-saving outreach technologies by MFIs could enable them to operate sustainably and efficiently. Contribution/value added: A major contribution of the study is the trade-off relations revealed between the depth of outreach and the breadth of outreach of MFIs which advances the outreach literature.

  10. Organic vs. organic - soil arthropods as bioindicators of ecological sustainability in greenhouse system experiment under Mediterranean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Ceglie, F G; Depalo, L; Al Bitar, L; Mimiola, G; Tittarelli, F; Burgio, G

    2017-11-23

    Organic greenhouse (OGH) production is characterized by different systems and agricultural practices with diverse environmental impact. Soil arthropods are widely used as bioindicators of ecological sustainability in open field studies, while there is a lack of research on organic production for protected systems. This study assessed the soil arthropod abundance and diversity over a 2-year crop rotation in three systems of OGH production in the Mediterranean. The systems under assessment differed in soil fertility management: SUBST - a simplified system of organic production, based on an input substitution approach (use of guano and organic liquid fertilizers), AGROCOM - soil fertility mainly based on compost application and agroecological services crops (ASC) cultivation (tailored use of cover crops) as part of crop rotation, and AGROMAN - animal manure and ASC cultivation as part of crop rotation. Monitoring of soil fauna was performed by using pitfall traps and seven taxa were considered: Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Araneae, Opiliones, Isopoda, Myriapoda, and Collembola. Results demonstrated high potential of ASC cultivation as a technique for beneficial soil arthropod conservation in OGH conditions. SUBST system was dominated by Collembola in all crops, while AGROMAN and AGROCOM had more balanced relative abundance of Isopoda, Staphylinidae, and Aranea. Opiliones and Myriapoda were more affected by season, while Carabidae were poorly represented in the whole monitoring period. Despite the fact that all three production systems are in accordance with the European Union regulation on organic farming, findings of this study displayed significant differences among them and confirmed the suitability of soil arthropods as bioindicators in protected systems of organic farming.

  11. Assessing sustainability of organic apple orchards. The case of small scale apple production in Ningxia Province, PR China

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    China produces 43% of the world apple supply, but low fruit quality remains a problem for export of table fruit. Ningxia province is also facing challenges such as low soil fertility, poor orchard infrastructure and inadequate institutional support for small-scale apple producers. The study was carried out to assess a. the sustainability of organic apple orchards and b. the potential role of Organic and Fair Trade certification to contribute to farm sustainability and improve socio-economic o...

  12. Transitions towards sustainable agriculture: the organic apiculture niche in an Argentinean cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Vila Seoane

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that it is possible to transform innovation pathways in natural-resource-based industries towards more sustainable ones. In particular, it employs the socio-technical transitions framework to understand the structural barriers that the industrial agricultural system puts to COOPSOL, an Argentinean cooperative project of organic apiculture. The article is based on qualitative data that systematize, on the one hand, the pressures for continuity and change in the agricultural system. On the other hand, the data reveal the main perceptions of COOPSOL´s actors about the existing structural limits.

  13. Microfinance Participation, Control Over Resources, and Justification of IPV: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta

    2016-04-13

    A high percentage of men and women are purported to justify intimate partner violence (IPV) in countries that are steeped in patriarchy even in the presence of programs such as microfinance that aim to address gender equity. This article examines two assertions that emerge from the literature on microfinance and its potential for positive outcomes for women who participate in it: (a) Microfinance participation is associated with reduced justification of IPV, and (b) microfinance participants with control over their own resources are less likely to justify IPV when compared with microfinance participants who do not have control over their resources. Couples data from a nationally representative survey, the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, were used in the present study. Propensity score matching and logistic regression analyses were conducted to reveal that (a) microfinance participation was not associated with justification of IPV and that (b) women who participated in microfinance were less likely to justify IPV when they had no control over their resources. Implications for practitioners and policymakers are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Digestion of sludge and organic waste in the sustainability concept for Malmö, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Cour Jansen, J; Gruvberger, C; Hanner, N; Aspegren, H; Svärd, A

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sludge has been part of the treatment plant in Malmö for many years and several projects on optimisation of the digestion process have been undertaken in full scale as well as in pilot scale. In order to facilitate a more sustainable solution in the future for waste management, solid waste organic waste is sorted out from households for anaerobic treatment in a newly built city district. The system for treatment of the waste is integrated in a centralised solution located at the existing wastewater treatment plant. A new extension of the digester capacity enables separate as well as co-digestion of sludge together with urban organic waste from households, industry, restaurants, big kitchens, food stores, supermarkets, green markets etc. for biogas production and production of fertiliser. Collection and pre-treatment of different types of waste are in progress together with examination of biogas potential for different types of organic waste. Collection of household waste as well as anaerobic digestion in laboratory and pilot scale has been performed during the last year. It is demonstrated that organic household waste can be digested separately or in combination with sludge. In the latter case a higher biogas yield is found than should be expected from digestion of the two materials separately. Household waste from a system based on collection of organic waste from grinders could be digested at mesophilic conditions whereas digestion failed at thermophilic conditions.

  15. Digestion of sludge and organic waste in the sustainability concept for Malmoe, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Jes la Cour; Gruvberger, Christopher; Hanner, Niklas; Aspegren, Henrik; Svaerd, Aasa

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sludge has been part of the treatment plant in Malmoe for many years and several projects on optimisation of the digestion process have been undertaken in full scale as well as in pilot scale. In order to facilitate a more sustainable solution in the future for waste management, solid waste organic waste is sorted out from households for anaerobic treatment in a newly built city district. The system for treatment of the waste is integrated in a centralised solution located at the existing wastewater treatment plant. A new extension of the digester capacity enables separate as well as co-digestion of sludge together with urban organic waste from households, industry, restaurants, big kitchens, food stores, supermarkets, green markets etc. for biogas production and production of fertiliser. Collection and pre-treatment of different types of waste are in progress together with examination of biogas potential for different types of organic waste. Collection of household waste as well as anaerobic digestion in laboratory and pilot scale has been performed during the last year. It is demonstrated that organic household waste can be digested separately or in combination with sludge. In the latter case a higher biogas yield is found than should be expected from digestion of the two materials separately. Household waste from a system based on collection of organic waste from grinders could be digested at mesophilic conditions whereas digestion failed at thermophilic conditions.

  16. Learning from the organic food system as a model for sustainable food systems - the Organic Food System Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahl, Johannes; Strassner, Carola; Hertwig, Jostein

    2016-01-01

    Today’s understanding of food systems includes product-specific values (e.g. palatability, taste, nutritional and safety values, health promotion) and process-oriented values (e.g. environmental impact, animal welfare and social fairness). These values are currently challenged and changing. Food ...... production and consumption within one system, thus creating and distributing value along the chains for sustainable food systems.......Today’s understanding of food systems includes product-specific values (e.g. palatability, taste, nutritional and safety values, health promotion) and process-oriented values (e.g. environmental impact, animal welfare and social fairness). These values are currently challenged and changing. Food...... habits, cultural, social, ethical, economic and political criteria play an increasingly important role as values. An organic values-based supply chain links food production to values such as partnership, cooperation and trust. Within a values-based supply chain, all actors should be connected through...

  17. Sustainable Utility of Magnetically Recyclable Nano-Catalysts in Water: Applications in Organic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj B. Gawande

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically recyclable nano-catalysts and their use in aqueous media is a perfect combination for the development of greener sustainable methodologies in organic synthesis. It is well established that magnetically separable nano-catalysts avoid waste of catalysts or reagents and it is possible to recover >95% of catalysts, which is again recyclable for subsequent use. Water is the ideal medium to perform the chemical reactions with magnetically recyclable nano-catalysts, as this combination adds tremendous value to the overall benign reaction process development. In this review, we highlight recent developments inthe use of water and magnetically recyclable nano-catalysts (W-MRNs for a variety of organic reactions namely hydrogenation, condensation, oxidation, and Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions, among others.

  18. Greening the Processes of Metal-Organic Framework Synthesis and their Use in Sustainable Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junying; Shen, Kui; Li, Yingwei

    2017-08-24

    Given the shortage of sustainable resources and the increasingly serious environmental issues in recent decades, the demand for clean technologies and sustainable feedstocks is of great interest to researchers worldwide. With regard to the fields of energy saving and environmental remediation, the key point is the development of efficient catalysts, not only in terms of facile synthesis methods, but also the benign utilization of such catalysts. This work reviews the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and MOF-based materials in these fields. The definition of MOFs and MOF-based materials will be primarily introduced followed by a brief description of the characterization and stability of MOF-related materials under the applied conditions. The greening of MOF synthesis processes will then be discussed and catalogued by benign solvents and conditions and green precursors of MOFs. Furthermore, their suitable application in sustainable catalysis will be summarized, focusing on several typical atom-economic reactions, such as the direct introduction of H 2 or O 2 and C-C bond formation. Approaches towards reducing CO 2 emission by MOF-based catalysts will be described with special emphasis on CO 2 fixation and CO 2 reduction. In addition, driven by the explosive growth of energy consumption in the last century, much research has gone into biomass, which represents a renewable alternative to fossil fuels and a sustainable carbon feedstock for chemical production. The advanced progress of biomass-related transformations is also illustrated herein. Fundamental insights into the nature of MOF-based materials as constitutionally easily recoverable heterogeneous catalysts and as supports for various active sites is thoroughly discussed. Finally, challenges facing the development of this field and the outlook for future research are presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Gunfight at the NOT OK Corral: Reply to "High Noon for Microfinance" by Duvendack and Palmer-Jones (Uncut version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Mark M

    2012-01-01

    The paper "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations" by Duvendack and Palmer-Jones replicates the papers of Chemin (2008) and Pitt and Khandker (1998) that estimate the impact of microfinance in Bangladesh. My paper replicates the Duvendack and Palmer-Jones replication and finds so many serious errors in their code and misrepresentations of the methods described in their paper that I conclude that their results are spurious and provide no evidence about the validity of either the papers of Chemin or Pitt and Khandker or on the effectiveness of microfinance.

  20. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kolb

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  1. La microfinance et les TIC : systèmes d'information de gestion en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hivos procède actuellement à l'exécution d'un programme (STAR) visant à mettre les technologies de l'information et de la communication (TIC) au service des ONG qui oeuvrent dans les ... Research results : analyzing the impact of introducing an automated management information system within microfinance institutions.

  2. Training for empowerment : The impact of training for women participating in a microfinance intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Marloes; Hansen, Nina; Lensink, Bernardus; Vu, Nhung

    2015-01-01

    Previous economic research on the impact of offering access to microfinance (micro loan and training) to women provided mixed results with respect to female empowerment. Based on social change literature we expected that inviting female borrowers together with their husbands may stimulate female

  3. Do natural catastrophes shake microfinance institutions? Using a new measure of MFI risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Using financial data for more than 1000 microfinance institutions (MFIs) from about 80 developing and emerging market countries, I explore the impact of natural disasters on the financial fragility of these MFIs. For this purpose, I apply a two-stage approach. First, as MFI risk is a multifaceted

  4. The Impact of Micro-Finance on the Performance of Small-Scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-02

    Oct 2, 2014 ... Literature on the impact of micro-finance institutions (MFIs) on small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) is ... 2005), and others becoming banking financial institutions is now serving as an indicator of profitability to .... twentieth century, in Ghana, was to introduce competition on to the financial market and.

  5. Financial constraints, risk taking and firm performance: Recent evidence from microfinance clients in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan Willebrands; Martijn Boermans

    2012-01-01

    Financial constraints and risk taking are two well-established determinants of firm performance, however, no research analyzes how these variables are connected in the context of a high risk environment. Using data from microfinance clients in Tanzania, we derive a novel financial constraints

  6. The impact of gender and business training for female microfinance clients in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, Nhung; van Velzen, Rosine; Lensink, Robert; Bulte, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    This study documents the impact of offering a gender and business training to female microfinance clients in Vietnam on business outcomes and women empowerment using a randomised controlled trial. Many researchers argue that management and business skills are crucial to increase productivity and

  7. Recent Developments in Microfinance and the Impact of the Financial Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The present contribution offers a critical discussion of the current trend of commercialization of microfinance. It draws attention to some of the said commercialization's potentially negative effects, such as increasing indebtedness, rising interest rates, and reduced access to credit for the

  8. Microfinance Institutions' Successful Delivery Of Micronutrient Powders: A Randomized Trial In Rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Aaron; Elize, Wesly; Jean-Louis, Florence

    2017-11-01

    Globally, two-thirds of child deaths could be prevented by increased provision of health interventions such as vaccines, micronutrient supplements, and water purification tablets. We report the results from a randomized controlled trial in Haiti during 2012 that tested whether microfinance institutions-which reach 200 million households worldwide-can effectively deliver health products. These institutions provide loans to underserved entrepreneurs, primarily poor women in rural areas. In the intervention group, micronutrient powders to improve the nutrition of young children were distributed at regularly occurring microfinance meetings by a trained borrower. In both the control and the intervention groups, nurses led seminars on nutrition and extended breastfeeding during microfinance meetings. At three-month follow-up, the mean difference in hemoglobin concentration between children in the intervention group and those in the control group was 0.28 grams per deciliter (g/dL)-with a subsample of younger children (under two years of age) showing greater relative improvement (0.46 g/dL)-and the odds ratio for children in the intervention group meeting the diagnostic criteria for anemia was 0.64. The results are similar to those of previous studies that evaluated micronutrient powder distribution through dedicated health institutions. Our findings suggest that microfinance institutions are a promising platform for the large-scale delivery of health products in low-income countries.

  9. The Impact of Micro-Finance on the Performance of Small-Scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature on the impact of micro-finance institutions (MFIs) on small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) is still fraught with inconsistent results, with some concluding on positive impacts while others reporting negative impacts. This paper therefore sets out to assess the impact that the study-MFIs are making on their ...

  10. The development of women empowerment : How access to microfinance services can impact the position of women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Marloes; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Bernardus

    2016-01-01

    Investing in women’s economic empowerment to increase gender equality and to reduce poverty are relevant goals of the United Nations. Herein offering access to microfinance services (i.e., micro loan, training) to women is considered an important means to strengthen women’s position. However,

  11. Innovative technology and sustainable development of organic dairy farming : the case of automatic milking systems in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.

    2009-01-01

    Development of organic dairy farming in Denmark is characterized by up-scaling, increasing productivity and automation. Increasing discussion on compliance with organic principles and sustainability has been forwarded. Automatic milking systems (AMS) are part of this development and have been

  12. Group-based microfinance for collective empowerment: a systematic review of health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Lois; Pennington, Andy; Nayak, Shilpa; Sowden, Amanda; White, Martin; Whitehead, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    To assess the impact on health-related outcomes, of group microfinance schemes based on collective empowerment. We searched the databases Social Sciences Citation Index, Embase, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO, Social Policy & Practice and Conference Proceedings Citation Index for articles published between 1 January 1980 and 29 February 2016. Articles reporting on health impacts associated with group-based microfinance were included in a narrative synthesis. We identified one cluster-randomized control trial and 22 quasi-experimental studies. All of the included interventions targeted poor women living in low- or middle-income countries. Some included a health-promotion component. The results of the higher quality studies indicated an association between membership of a microfinance scheme and improvements in the health of women and their children. The observed improvements included reduced maternal and infant mortality, better sexual health and, in some cases, lower levels of interpersonal violence. According to the results of the few studies in which changes in empowerment were measured, membership of the relatively large and well-established microfinance schemes generally led to increased empowerment but this did not necessarily translate into improved health outcomes. Qualitative evidence suggested that increased empowerment may have contributed to observed improvements in contraceptive use and mental well-being and reductions in the risk of violence from an intimate partner. Membership of the larger, well-established group-based microfinance schemes is associated with improvements in some health outcomes. Future studies need to be designed to cope better with bias and to assess negative as well as positive social and health impacts.

  13. Economic Sustainability of Organic Aloe Vera Farming in Greece under Risk and Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos Liontakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, an encouraging environment for the restructuring and modernization of the agricultural sector has formed in Greece. The diversification into higher-value crops can be a promising option for small and average-sized farms, particularly during the current economic crisis. One of the most promising alternative crops that have been recently established in Greece is the organic Aloe vera crop. The main advantage of this crop is that it can utilize poor farmlands and, therefore, can facilitate rural development in marginal areas. This study explores the economic sustainability of the Aloe vera crop, considering the embedded risk and uncertainty. The results indicate that organic aloe farming is a promising alternative to “traditional” crops in Greece, particularly for family farms in rural areas. In contrast, this activity is not advisable to the most entrepreneurial type of farmers, unless their crop size allows economies of scales. Finally, the Stochastic Efficiency with Respect to a Function (SERF analysis associates farmers’ risk attitude with their willingness to be involved in organic Aloe vera farming. SERF analysis highlights the crucial role of farmers’ risk aversion and concludes that, above a certain level of risk aversion, farmers have no incentive to adopt this economic activity.

  14. Novel inorganic and organic electrode materials for sustainable and greener Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarascon, J.M. [Univ., de Picardie Jules Verne CNRS, Amiens (France). Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides

    2010-07-01

    Rechargeable batteries are among the major technological developments that will have an impact on the commercialization of electric-powered vehicles. Their development relies on advancements in energy storage as well as on the design of better performing and less expensive materials for electrode assemblies. Issues of sustainability must also be taken into consideration when choosing electrode materials for the next generation of batteries. This presentation reported on a study in which LiFePO{sub 4} electrodes were synthesized via eco-efficient hydrothermal/solvothermal processes using latent bases or other bio-related approaches. The recently developed ionothermal approach was successfully applied to prepare materials derived from the olivine-type structure (LiMPO{sub 4}; M=Mn, Co, and Ni) as well as other electrodes having F- in addition to PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} as part of the anionic lattice. A new family of fluorophosphates compounds AMSO{sub 4}F (A= Li, Na; M= 3d metals) having the tavorite-type structure or other derived structures were also synthesized through this study. The most promising electrode was LiFeSO4F, which is based on several chemical elements, making it a serious contender to LiFePO4 for the next generation of Li-ion batteries for automotive applications. However, this electrode is not a sufficient step forward towards the long-term demand for materials sustainability. In contrast, organic electrodes appear as ideal candidates because they can be synthesized from natural organic sources, are biodegradable and are not resource limited. For that reason, this presentation also examined the feasibility of using conjugated dicarboxylates anodes and oxocarbons positive electrodes, for renewable Li-ion batteries.

  15. Loan Methodology, Gender, Enviroment and the Formation of Capital by Mexican Microfinance Institutions-Edición Única

    OpenAIRE

    Denis John Griffin

    2012-01-01

    Although evidence from literature in social psychology, sociology, the economics of gender, and business administration generally states that men are more successful than women as business owners and employees, the development literature suggests that women may be more successful than men in microfinance programs. This may be due to higher levels of peer-group pressure, community pressure, group participation and solidarity in microfinance groups with a greater proportion of...

  16. The influence of CEO power on agency costs in non-profit organisations: evidence from the global microfinance industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mersland, Roy; Pascal, Daudi; Beisland, Leif Atle

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines agency costs incurred by microfinance organisations. We argue that differences in agency costs not only stem from differences in ownership form but are also influenced by the amount of power wielded by the chief executive officer (CEO). We proxy for agency costs using operating expenses, asset utilisation, liquidity and tangible asset intensity. Using a sample of 374 microfinance organisations located in 76 countries, we find evidence that agency costs are higher in microf...

  17. Backyard Living – Integrative Policies Towards Migrant Workers: Housing Microfinance in Greater Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Noltze

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The urban agglomeration of the Vietnamese southeast industrial driving force Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC has become the most outstanding benefi ciary of the remarkable economic growth and foreign investments in the Vietnamese economy since the start of a comprehensive economic reform process in the mid 1980s. The notable development towards the foremost economic centre led to a high influx of migrant workers. In the course of an ongoing expansion process towards a megacity of tomorrow, the defi cient provision of adequate housing remains one of the most challenging problems of rural migrants in Greater HCMC. However, a future-oriented sustainable megacity concept is strongly dependent on the successful integration of migrants into the urban society. Within this context, the housing market is considered to be a key aspect of comprehensive urban planning. Hereby, housing microfinance (HMF will be presented as an alternative housing finance scheme meeting the demand of a noteworthy number of poor and low-income people. Thereby HMF can do both: focus on specifi c needs of migrants with respect to their current life situation and enhance its outreach to a potential target group.

  18. Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Donnel [BlocPower LLC, New York, NY (United States); Cox, Morris [BlocPower LLC, New York, NY (United States); Harmarneh, Sarey [BlocPower LLC, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Chen [BlocPower LLC, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-21

    BlocPower’s mission is to provide access to energy efficiency financing for underserved communities across the United States. This project, “Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved Communities,” is an extension of that goal and is grounded in the principles of providing engineering and financing services to those in need. The project is based on the creation of a BlocPower Marketplace as a central hub for connecting shovel-ready green buildings to institutional investors. This ‘connection’ entails using online crowdfunding to aggregate debt and equity capital from institutional investors to connect to customers (building owners) across various financial portfolios. BlocPower Marketplace is intended to bring social, environmental, and financial returns to investors while also decreasing investor risk by loaning out funds for energy installations in individual buildings. In detail, the intended benefits of crowdsourcing are two-sided. Firstly, for building owners, clean energy retrofit installations improve building operations, reduce utility costs, and reduce harmful impacts to their surrounding environment. Secondly, for institutional investors, they gain access to a new market of energy efficiency and are able to provide debt or equity capital with high financial returns. This gives investors the opportunity to create social and environmental impact in communities around the country as well. With this in mind, BlocPower designed the marketplace to specifically answer exploratory research questions with respect to the pricing of energy financing. Institutional investors typically charge high rates on project financing solutions in the energy space, particularly in low and middle-income communities, because of fears that required debt service will not be made. This makes access to energy capital exorbitantly difficult for those that need it the most. Through this project, BlocPower tested investor appetite to determine if

  19. Animal Board Invited Review: Comparing conventional and organic livestock production systems on different aspects of sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van C.P.A.; Haas, de Y.; Hogeveen, H.; Krimpen, van M.M.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2017-01-01

    To sustainably contribute to food security of a growing and richer world population, livestock production systems are challenged to increase production levels while reducing environmental impact, being economically viable, and socially responsible. Knowledge about the sustainability performance

  20. Nutritional Cues Tie Living Organisms to Their Environment and Its Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Melanie S.; Adams, Robert B.; Wessman, Carol A.; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We connect modern, intensive agriculture’s role in environmental degradation to its role in producing nutritionally unbalanced foods, and delineate specific approaches to reduce agriculture’s environmental impact, while producing healthful foods. We call attention to recently discovered genetic programs used by all living organisms to respond to their environment, and present a model of how these programs change body composition and function (of humans and their crop plants and livestock alike) in response to environmental cues. We propose that production of nutritionally balanced crops and livestock requires careful consideration of how these plants and animals are grown; the composition of plant food is modulated by growing conditions, body composition of livestock reflects their feed; composition and function of human body and brain are strongly affected by how food plants and animals are produced. We selected four nutritional features not only involved in (i) governing human health by modulating these genetic programs, but (ii) also affected by agricultural practices. These nutritional features are fat composition (especially saturated fat and the ratio of polyunsaturated omega-6 oils to omega-3 oils), carbohydrate composition (especially the proportion of carbohydrates with a high glycemic index, such as sugars and quick-burning starches) and the level of antioxidant micronutrients. We not only outline threats to human health presented by the current environment, but also potential gains in quality-of-life in a future environment designed to optimize human wellness using insights into the gene-programing effect of diet- and other lifestyle-related factors. These gains could extend beyond optimal human physical and mental health to gains in workforce productivity. The same changes in agricultural practices required to achieve these gains in human health are also needed to support environmental health and sustainable food production. The resulting vision of

  1. Nutritional Cues Tie Living Organisms to Their Environment and Its Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Melanie S; Adams, Robert B; Wessman, Carol A; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We connect modern, intensive agriculture's role in environmental degradation to its role in producing nutritionally unbalanced foods, and delineate specific approaches to reduce agriculture's environmental impact, while producing healthful foods. We call attention to recently discovered genetic programs used by all living organisms to respond to their environment, and present a model of how these programs change body composition and function (of humans and their crop plants and livestock alike) in response to environmental cues. We propose that production of nutritionally balanced crops and livestock requires careful consideration of how these plants and animals are grown; the composition of plant food is modulated by growing conditions, body composition of livestock reflects their feed; composition and function of human body and brain are strongly affected by how food plants and animals are produced. We selected four nutritional features not only involved in (i) governing human health by modulating these genetic programs, but (ii) also affected by agricultural practices. These nutritional features are fat composition (especially saturated fat and the ratio of polyunsaturated omega-6 oils to omega-3 oils), carbohydrate composition (especially the proportion of carbohydrates with a high glycemic index, such as sugars and quick-burning starches) and the level of antioxidant micronutrients. We not only outline threats to human health presented by the current environment, but also potential gains in quality-of-life in a future environment designed to optimize human wellness using insights into the gene-programing effect of diet- and other lifestyle-related factors. These gains could extend beyond optimal human physical and mental health to gains in workforce productivity. The same changes in agricultural practices required to achieve these gains in human health are also needed to support environmental health and sustainable food production. The resulting vision of

  2. Nutritional Cues Tie Living Organisms To Their Environment And Its Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Sarah Adams

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We connect modern, intensive agriculture’s role in environmental degradation to its role in producing nutritionally unbalanced foods, and delineate specific approaches to reduce agriculture’s environmental impact, while producing healthful foods. We call attention to recently discovered genetic programs used by all living organisms to respond to their environment, and present a model of how these programs change body composition and function (of humans and their crop plants and livestock alike in response to environmental cues. We propose that production of nutritionally balanced crops and livestock requires careful consideration of how these plants and animals are grown; the composition of plant food is modulated by growing conditions, body composition of livestock reflects their feed; composition and function of human body and brain are strongly affected by how food plants and animals are produced. We selected four nutritional features not only involved in (i governing human health by modulating these genetic programs, but (ii also affected by agricultural practices. These nutritional features are fat composition (especially saturated fat and the ratio of polyunsaturated omega-6 oils to omega-3 oils, carbohydrate composition (especially the proportion of carbohydrates with a high glycemic index, such as sugars and quick-burning starches and the level of antioxidant micronutrients. We not only outline threats to human health presented by the current environment, but also potential gains in quality-of-life in a future environment designed to optimize human wellness using insights into the gene-programming effect of diet- and other lifestyle-related factors. These gains could extend beyond optimal human physical and mental health to gains in workforce productivity. The same changes in agricultural practices required to achieve these gains in human health are also needed to support environmental health and sustainable food production. The

  3. Environmental Impacts of Plant-Based Diets: How Does Organic Food Consumption Contribute to Environmental Sustainability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Lacour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundStudies investigating diet-related environmental impacts have rarely considered the production method of the foods consumed. The objective of the present study, based on the NutriNet-Santé cohort, was to investigate the relationship between a provegetarian score and diet-related environmental impacts. We also evaluated potential effect modifications on the association between a provegetarian score and the environmental impacts of organic food consumption.MethodsFood intake and organic food consumption ratios were obtained from 34,442 French adults using a food frequency questionnaire, which included information on organic food consumption for each group. To characterize the overall structure of the diets, a provegetarian score was used to identify preferences for plant-based products as opposed to animal-based products. Moreover, three environmental indicators were used to assess diet-related environmental impacts: greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, cumulative energy demand (CED, and land occupation. Environmental impacts were assessed using production life cycle assessment (LCA at the farm level. Associations between provegetarian score quintiles, the level of organic food consumption, and environmental indicators were analyzed using ANCOVAs adjusted for energy, sex, and age.ResultsParticipants with diets rich in plant-based foods (fifth quintile were more likely to be older urban dwellers, to hold a higher degree in education, and to be characterized by an overall healthier lifestyle and diet. A higher provegetarian score was associated with lower environmental impacts (GHG emissionsQ5vsQ1 = 838/1,664 kg CO2eq/year, −49.6%, P < 0.0001; CEDQ5vsQ1 = 4,853/6,775 MJ/year, −26.9%, P < 0.0001; land occupationQ5vsQ1 = 2,420/4,138 m2/year, −41.5%, P < 0.0001. Organic food consumption was also an important modulator of the relationship between provegetarian dietary patterns and environmental impacts but only

  4. Efficient nitrogen recycling through sustainable use of organic wastes in agriculture - an Australian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Hannah; Landman, Michael; Collins, David; Walton, Katrina; Penney, Nancy; Pritchard, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    The effective recycling of nutrients in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) domestic (e.g. source separated food waste), agricultural, and commercial and industrial (C&I) biowastes (e.g. food industry wastes, papermill sludge) for use on land, generally following treatment (e.g. composting, anaerobic digestion or thermal conversion technologies) as alternatives to conventional mineral fertilisers in Australia can have economic benefits, ensure food security, and close the nutrient loop. In excess of 75% of Australian agricultural soils have less than 1% organic matter (OM), and, with 40 million tonnes of solid waste per year potentially available as a source of OM, biowastes also build soil carbon (C) stocks that improve soil structure, fertility and productivity, and enhance soil ecosystem services. In recent years, the increasing cost of conventional mineral fertilisers, combined with changing weather patterns have placed additional pressure on regional and rural communities. Nitrogen (N) is generally the most limiting nutrient to crop production, and the high-energy required and GHGs associated with its manufacture mean that, additionally, it is critical to use N efficiently and recycle N resources where possible. Biosolids and biowastes have highly variable organic matter (OM) and nutrient contents, with N often present in a variety of forms only some of which are plant-available. The N value is further influenced by treatment process, storage and fundamental soil processes. The correct management of N in biowastes is essential to reduce environmental losses through leaching or runoff and negative impacts on drinking water sources and aquatic ecosystems. Gaseous N emissions also impact upon atmospheric quality and climate change. Despite the body of work to investigate N supply from biosolids, recent findings indicate that historic and current management of agricultural applications of N from biosolids and biowastes in Australia may still be inefficient leading

  5. Community-Assisted Urban Sustainable Organic and Ecological Agriculture in the Philippines: Experiential Learnings and the Ways Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Catedral, Isagani; Villegas, Pablito

    2014-01-01

    The Kasama Ka Organik Koop is a staunch advocate in the promotion of Sustainable Organic and Ecological Agriculture and farming systems. The establishment of urban techno-demo organic gardens cum livelihood and entrepreneurship development center is one of the hands-on strategies adopted. The farm has been envisaged to serve as an eco-tourism venue to promote environmental awareness and knowledge, and livelihood and employment opportunities to the community.

  6. [25 years of organized ambulatory heart sport in Luxembourg. The development of a sustained rehabilitation model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagardelle, Charles; Feiereisen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    After Second World War cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially coronary artery disease (CAD), turned out to be an epidemic in the western countries including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, and accounted for nearly half of all deaths. A lot of strategies, among them treatment by physical activity, were developed to fight this challenge and, fortunately, a mortality regression of about 50 % could be achieved. Nowadays, eastern European countries and, more recently, China and India face an increasing CVD mortality. During the seventies ambulatory heart sport clubs, then labeled as, "coronary clubs" became very popular in Europe especially in West-Germany. Around 2000 there were more than 6000 heart sports groups in Germany. In 1984 a first group was founded in Luxembourg City (Centre) a, 1991 a second group started in Esch/Alzette (South) and in 2002 a third regional group in Ettelbruck (North) so that, by now, the 3 main public health districts of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg can offer regular ambulatory sports activities to almost all concerned cardiac patients in the country. The ambulatory heart sport groups of Luxembourg cooperate in a federated association allowing an integrated logistic organization. Since the beginning nineties cardiac rehabilitation became a field of interest to the university faculties and later of scientific societies, like the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). New subgroups were founded and guidelines were published and renewed. The movement of ambulatory heart sport groups was more or less neglected in the prevention and rehabilitation activities of the scientific societies. Recently the ESC proposed a new definition of comprehensive CVD prevention and rehabilitation programmes as "coordinated, multifaceted interventions designed to optimize a cardiac patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning, in addition to stabilizing, slowing, or even reversing the progression of the

  7. Performance and productivity changes in microfinance banks in South-West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa A. Olasupo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Nigerian Microfinance sub-sector is yet to attain the desired level of global best practice. This paper thus investigated the performance and productivity changes of MFBs in South-West Nigeria, from 2006 to 2010, having had the Microfinance Policy launched in 200. From the use of relevant accounting ratios, the study revealed that only 16% of the sampled MFBs met the recommended maximum PAR value of 5% in 200. It was also revealed that 31% of the sampled MFBs reported a debt/equity ratio above the recommended value of 2 in 2006, while 32% had gearing of over 2 in 2010. The Malmquist productivity index revealed that the MFBs experienced fluctuating performances in their productivity changes, with pure technical efficiency improvements in 2007 and 2009. Overall, the performance and productivity changes experienced by the MFBs depicted a sub-sector with huge potentials and hence require nurturing to achieve its goals.

  8. Portrayal of sustainability principles in the mission statements and on home pages of the world's largest organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Stephen T; Lawes, Michael J; James, Robyn; Bigland, Kristen; Zander, Kerstin K

    2016-04-01

    Conservation can be achieved only if sustainability is embraced as core to organizational cultures. To test the extent to which the related concepts of sustainability, conservation, response to climate change, poverty alleviation, and gender equity have been incorporated into organizational culture, we compared mission statements published from 1990 to 2000 with those published in 2014 for 150 organizations, including conservation nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), aid NGOs, government development agencies, resource extraction companies, and retailers (30 in each category). We also analyzed the 2014 home web pages of each organization. Relative to the earlier period, the frequency with which mission statements mentioned poverty alleviation, biodiversity conservation, and a range of sustainable practices increased only slightly by 2014, particularly among resource extractors and retail companies. Few organizations in any sector had embedded either climate change or gender equity into their mission statements. In addition, the proportional intensity with which any of the aspirations were expressed did not change between periods. For current home pages, conservation NGOs, resource extractors, and government agencies were significantly more likely to acknowledge the importance of matters that were not part of their core business, but few aid agencies or retail companies promoted goals beyond alleviation of crises and profit maximization, respectively. Overall, there has been some progress in recognizing poverty alleviation, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable practices, but gender equity and a determination to reduce impacts on climate change are still rarely promoted as central institutional concerns. Sustainability in general, and biodiversity conservation in particular, will not be achieved unless their importance is more widely apparent in core communication products of organizations. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. La microfinance en Afrique centrale : Le défi des exclus | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    20 avr. 2015 ... Les pauvres ruraux font face à un défi majeur par rapport à leur accès aux produits financiers qui sont fournis par le système bancaire formel. Ces pauvres sont exclus du système à cause des exigences des institutions bancaires conventionnelles. La promesse de la microfinance est de s'assurer que ces ...

  10. La microfinance en Afrique centrale: Le défi des exclus

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Il y a une base théorique solide expliquant l'existence des institutions de microfinance. A cause de l'asymétrie de l'information et les problèmes d'agence, les banques de détail formelles rencontrent un certain nombre de défis à opérer dans les zones rurales et dans les économies villageoises. Ces facteurs expliquent ...

  11. Factors influencing branchless banking for microfinance in Sudan: Theoretical perspectives and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Khattab, I; Balola, Y; Eldabi, TA

    2012-01-01

    In Sudan more than 40% live below the poverty line and getting basic financial service poses a challenge to financial institutions. Most of these unserved populations live in far-flung areas that make it difficult for microfinance institutions to reach them. But the enormous growth of mobile technology industry has created new opportunity to expand financial services to this unserved population. Branchless banking is one of the latest technologies that have been employed in different developi...

  12. On the estimation stability of efficiency and economies of scale in microfinance institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bolli, Thomas; Anh Vo Thi

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses a panel data set of microfinance institutions (MFI) across the world to compare several identification strategies of cost efficiency and economies of scale. Concretely, we contrast the non-parametric Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) with the Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) and a distribution-free identification based on time-invariant heterogeneity estimates. Furthermore, we analyze differences of production functions across regions and investigate the relevance of accountin...

  13. On the Estimation Stability of Efficiency and Economies of Scale in Microfinance Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bolli Thomas; Vo Thi Anh

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses a panel data set of microfinance institutions (MFI) across the world to compare parametric and non parametric identification strategies of cost efficiency and economies of scale. The results suggest that efficiency rankings of MFIs are robust across methodologies but reveal substantial unobserved heterogeneity across countries. We further find substantial economies of scale for a pure financial production process. However accounting for the multi dimensional production process...

  14. Integrating microfinance and health strategies: examining the evidence to inform policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, Sheila; Metcalfe, Marcia; Geissler, Kimberley; Dunford, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Single solutions continue to be inadequate in confronting the prevalent problems of poverty, ill health and insufficient health system capacity worldwide. The poor need access to an integrated set of financial and health services to have income security and better health. Over 3500 microfinance institutions (MFIs) provide microcredit and financial services to more than 155 million households worldwide. Conservative estimates indicate that at least 34 million of these households are very poor by the definition in the Millennium Development Goals, representing around 170 million people, many in remote areas beyond the reach of health agencies, both private and governmental. A small but increasing number of MFIs offer health-related services, such as education, clinical care, community health workers, health-financing and linkages to public and private health providers. Multiple studies indicate the effectiveness of microfinance and its impact on poverty. A small but growing number of studies also attempt to show that MFIs are capable of contributing to health improvement by increasing knowledge that leads to behavioural changes, and by enhancing access to health services through addressing financial, geographic and other barriers. While these studies are of uneven quality, they indicate positive health benefits in diverse areas such as maternal and child health, malaria and other infectious disease, and domestic violence. While more rigorous research is needed to inform policy and guide programme implementation to integrate microfinance and health interventions that can reliably enhance the well-being of the poor, there is useful evidence to support the design and delivery of integrated programmes now. Worldwide, current public health programmes and health systems are proving to be inadequate to meet population needs. The microfinance sector offers an underutilized opportunity for delivery of health-related services to many hard-to-reach populations.

  15. Public-private Partnerships in Micro-finance: Should NGO Involvement be Restricted?

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Chowdhury, Prabal; Roy, Jaideep

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines public-private partnerships in micro-finance, whereby NGOs can help in channelizing credit to the poor, both in borrower selection, as well as in project implementation. We argue that a distortion may arise out of the fact that the private partner, i.e. the NGO, is a motivated agent. We find that whenever the project is neither too productive, nor too unproductive, reducing such distortion requires unbundling borrower selection and project implementati...

  16. Flow boiling heat transfer of carbon dioxide inside a small-sized microfin tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Chaobin; Haraguchi, Nobori; Hihara, Eiji [Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated the flow boiling heat transfer of carbon dioxide inside a small-sized microfin tube (mean inner diameter: 2.0 mm; helix angle: 6.3 ) at a saturation temperature of 15 C, and heat and mass flux ranges of 4.5-18 kW m{sup -2} and 360-720 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. Although, experimental results indicated that heat flux has a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficient, the coefficient does not always increase with mass flux, as in the case of conventional refrigerants such as HFCs or HCFCs. Under certain conditions, the heat transfer coefficient at a high mass flux was lower than that at a lower mass flux, indicating that convective heat transfer had a suppression effect on nucleate boiling. The heat transfer coefficients in the microfin tubes were 1.9{proportional_to}2.3 times the values in smooth tubes of the same diameter under the same experimental conditions, and the dryout quality was much higher, ranging from 0.9 to 0.95. The experimental results indicated that using microfin tubes may considerably increase the overall heat transfer performance. (author)

  17. Experimental analysis of refrigerants flow boiling inside small sized microfin tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Andrea; Rossetto, Luisa

    2017-07-01

    The refrigerant charge reduction is one of the most challenging issues that the scientific community has to cope to reduce the anthropic global warming. Recently, mini microfin tubes have been matter of research, since they can reach better thermal performance in small domains, leading to a further refrigerant charge reduction. This paper presents experimental results about R134a flow boiling inside a microfin tube having an internal diameter at the fin tip of 2.4 mm. The mass flux was varied between 375 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, heat flux from 10 to 50 kW m-2, vapor quality from 0.10 to 0.99. The saturation temperature at the inlet of the test section was kept constant and equal to 30 °C. R134a thermal and fluid dynamic performances are presented and compared against those obtained with R1234ze(E) and R1234yf and against values obtained during R134a flow boiling inside a 3.4 mm ID microfin tube.

  18. Microfinance Institutions’ Social Intermediation and Micro and Small Enterprises Survival in Thika Town, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZabronChege Wairimu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuous rapid growth of microfinance institutions in Kenya seems not to offer enough solution to the micro and small enterprises survival challenges with more than a one-third of MSEs start-ups collapsing within the first three years. It is the high rate of collapse and low rate of survival of MSEs that motivated this research to fill the existing gap on the missing linkage between MFIs and MSEs survival. This study looked at the role of the social intermediation services offered by MFIs on survival of MSEs in Thika Town which is both an industrial town and a business hub. A descriptive study design was adopted. Stratified and purposive sampling methods were used to select a sample 272 MSEs. Findings indicated that; regular microfinance participation help reduce loan application and payment bureaucracy while keeping entrepreneur updated on available opportunities. Training equips MSEs owners with necessary managerial skills on financial management, book keeping, and business operations. Group liability eliminates the need for collateral security when accessing loan while it increases the amount of loan accessed. Networking increases business link widening goods and services markets and allows for formation of business clubs. Finally, it was found that training was the most sought service followed by group liability, microfinance participation, and networking. From the study findings, the researcher recommends that MSEs continue seeking for social intermediation services and especially networking to improve their competitiveness and create a competitive advantage over their competitors boosting their survival.

  19. Paradigm Shift in the Microfinance Sector and its Implications for Theory Development: Empirical Evidence from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ahmad Khan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial and non-financial subsidized resources at the disposal of international donoragencies available for continued support of the microfinance sector are not unlimited. One ofthe strategies resorted to by the donor community to ensure supply of financial resources tothe sector was to make it lucrative to private-sector investment. Thus, for more than a decadenow, the donor community has been emphasizing profitability on the part of microfinanceinstitutions to enable the sector to attract commercial capital. This move on the part of thedonor community led microfinance institutions to adapt both functionally and structurally tobetter cope with donor’s expectations and show them profits. Many microfinance institutionsset example of successful adaptation and reorientation of their tangible and intangibleorganizational elements to enable them to survive under these new conditions. Laughlin’s(1991 Model of Organizational Change provides a theoretical base for understanding such anorganizational change in the light of changing external circumstances. While the Modelplacated all the relevant research questions, it did not fully explain all the trends observed inthe empirical data collected for the study, which lent a room for development in the Model.

  20. Brazilian Women Entrepreneurs: Exploring Sustainability as a Strategy for Developing Resilient Business Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Anna Church

    2017-01-01

    .... Building upon the conceptual framework of sustainability principles in business, and applying a qualitative phenomenological study, we explored the perceptions of Brazilian women entrepreneurs...

  1. Sustainability Perceptions in Romanian Non-Profit Organizations: An Exploratory Study Using Success Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ion Ceptureanu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses sustainability perceptions in Romanian non-profits by investigating 81 non-profits managers and board members. Using a multidimensional sustainability measurement framework, Success Factor Analysis, as a conceptual model, we measured perceptions on 5 critical sustainability factors: People, Business Model, Operations, Strategy and Culture and concluded that there are significant differences in the perceptions of sustainability depending on respondents’ previous failure experiences. While those which previously experienced failure adopt a long-term approach based on marketization, clear accountability standards and rely on strategy, while the others prefer a short-term approach, focused more on non-profits operations and focus on human resources.

  2. Effects of HIV/AIDS and microfinance of women on income, medical expenditures and schooling in Côte d'Ivoire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fofana, B.; Ophem, van J.A.C.; Niehof, A.; Antonides, G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper examines the issue of HIV and AIDS in relation to women, human capital and microfinance in Côte d’Ivoire. In total, 440 women and two microfinance institutions (MFIs) served as study units. The HIV epidemic negatively affected both the human and financial capital of households.

  3. Examining Structural Relationships between Work Engagement, Organizational Procedural Justice, Knowledge Sharing, and Innovative Work Behavior for Sustainable Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woocheol Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human/social dimension of organizational sustainability, this area of scholastic endeavor has received relatively little attention when compared to the economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. On the basis of social exchange theory, this study posited the important role that employee work engagement is a key component for improving human performance for organizational sustainability. In order to do so, it suggests the important role that employee work engagement has on the relationships among various factors in the organization, including organizational procedural justice, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behaviors. A total of 400 complete responses from full-time employees in Korean organizations were used for the purpose of data analysis with structural equation modeling (SEM. The results demonstrated that organizational procedural justice is positively related with employee work engagement, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behavior. In addition, work engagement enhances employee knowledge sharing and innovative work behavior, and knowledge sharing enhances innovative work behavior. With regard to the mechanisms of these relationships, work engagement and knowledge sharing acted as significant mediators. Based on the findings, we suggested relevant research implications and recommendations for future research on sustainable organizations.

  4. Understanding wicked problems and organized irresponsibility: challenges for governing the sustainable intensification of chicken meat production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueren, E.M.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Framing sustainable intensification as a wicked problem reveals how inherent trade-offs and resulting uncertainty and ambiguity block integrated problem solving as promoted by sustainable chain management approaches to production and consumption. The fragmented institutional set-up of the chains

  5. Tackling the Sustainability Dilemma: A Holistic Approach to Preparing Students for the Professional Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Sibylle

    2011-01-01

    Increased knowledge of business sustainability as the basis of a holistic approach to value creation has inspired many managers to integrate ecological and social stewardship into their strategic business innovation plans. However, the coverage of sustainability issues in business courses remains small at many universities. This article…

  6. Sustainability of livestock production systems : a comparing conventional and organic livestock husbandry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van C.P.A.; Haas, de Y.; Hogeveen, H.; Krimpen, van M.M.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable livestock production systems are needed to feed the larger, more urban, richer and older world population in 2050. Quantitative information about the sustainability performance of existing livestock production systems can aid the debate of which actions could be developed and

  7. Framework for Assessing Environmental, Social, and Economic Sustainability of ICT Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, Khuloud

    2013-01-01

    Key challenges that confront the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industry today in defining and achieving social, environmental, and economic sustainability goals include identifying sustainable operating standards and best practices and measuring and assessing performance against those practices. The industry lacks a framework for…

  8. Self-Organization and the Bypass: Re-Imagining Institutions for More Sustainable Development in Agriculture and Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Sherwood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In exploring the social dynamics of agrofood movements in Ecuador as examples of self-organization (i.e., locally distributed and resolved development, this article departs from a preoccupation with innovation by means of design and the use of scaling as a metaphor for describing research contributions in agriculture and food. The case material highlights that much development is contingent, unpredictable, and unmanageable as well as unbound to fixed spaces or places. In their study of people’s daily practice, the authors do not find clear boundaries between dichotomies of internal–external, lay–expert, traditional–modern, or local–global organization, but heterogeneous blends of each. For the purposes of sustainable development, this highlights the need for attention to be paid to relationships (social, material, and biological, adaptation (the capacity to innovate, and responsibility (adherence to norms of sustainability. Far from romanticizing self-organization, the authors acknowledge that people and their institutions share varying degrees of complicity for the goods as well as the bads of their economic activity, such as mass soil degradation, agrobiodiversity loss, and poisoning by pesticides. Nevertheless, even under highly difficult conditions, certain actors effectively bypass the limitations of formal institutions in forging a socio-technical course of action (i.e., policy for relatively healthy living and being. As such, the authors have come to appreciate self-organization as a neglected, if paradoxical, resource for policy transition towards more sustainable agriculture and food.

  9. Interactions between microfinance programmes and non-economic empowerment of women associated with intimate partner violence in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Koustuv; Dahlström, Orjan; Timpka, Toomas

    2013-12-06

    This study aims to examine the associations between microfinance programme membership and intimate partner violence (IPV) in different socioeconomic strata of a nationally representative sample of women in Bangladesh. The cross-sectional study was based on a nationally representative interview survey of 11 178 ever-married women of reproductive age (15-49 years). A total of 4465 women who answered the IPV-related questions were analysed separately using χ(2) tests and Cramer's V as a measure of effect size to identify the differences in proportions of exposure to IPV with regard to microfinance programme membership, and demographic variables and interactions between microfinance programme membership and factors related to non-economic empowerment were considered. Only 39% of women were members of microfinance programmes. The prevalence of a history of IPV was 48% for moderate physical violence, 16% for severe physical violence and 16% for sexual violence. For women with secondary or higher education, and women at the two wealthiest levels of the wealth index, microfinance programme membership increased the exposure to IPV two and three times, respectively. The least educated and poorest groups showed no change in exposure to IPV associated with microfinance programmes. The educated women who were more equal with their spouses in their family relationships by participating in decision-making increased their exposure to IPV by membership in microfinance programmes. Microfinance plans are associated with an increased exposure to IPV among educated and empowered women in Bangladesh. Microfinance firms should consider providing information about the associations between microfinance and IPV to the women belonging to the risk groups.

  10. Organic food in Denmark – from grass root initiative to market niche: potentials and barriers for further sustainable transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms in the shaping of organic food in Denmark since the 1970’ies are analysed as a contribution to the discussion of strategies for a more sustainable production and consumption of food. The background is the major achievements in Denmark within organic food since the 1970’ies, but also...... production, which more easily can be converted into organic farming. Some considerations for organic food as a future environmental strategy are presented....... the recent years’ reduction in the land converted to organic farming. The analyses are based on experiences from projects, analyses and literature and draw on innovation theory and theory about social construction of technology. The analyses show an ongoing interaction between production, consumption...

  11. Examining Sustainability Factors for Organizations that Adopted Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, funds were received to replicate Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) among eldercare providers in Honolulu. This case study, conducted 1 year after the close of the initial 3-year replication grant, explored factors for sustaining the delivery of CDSMP, with an aim to create guidelines for cultivating sustainability. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with one representative from each of eight eldercare agencies, with the representative specified by the agency. Representatives discussed the presence and strength (low, medium, or high) of sustainability factors, including readiness, champions, technical assistance, perceived fit of CDSMP with their agency, CDSMP modifiability, perceived benefits of CDSMP, and other. Only three of the eight agencies (38%) were still offering CDSMP by the end of 2010. Agencies who sustained CDSMP rated higher on all sustainability factors compared to those that did not sustain the program. Additional factors identified by representatives as important were funding and ongoing access to pools of elders from which to recruit program participants. When replicating evidence-based programs, sustainability factors must be consciously nurtured. For example, readiness must be cultivated, multiple champions must be developed, agencies must be helped to modify the program to best fit their clientele, evaluation findings demonstrating program benefit should be shared, and linkages to funding may be needed. PMID:25964896

  12. Greener Pathways to Organics and Nanomaterials: Sustainable Applications of Nano-Catalysts(South Korea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable chemical synthetic activity involving alternate energy input, and greener reaction medium in aqueous or solvent-free conditions will be summarized for heterocyclic compounds, coupling reactions, and a variety of name reactions; these reactions are catalyzed by basic w...

  13. Managing Operational Risk Related to Microfinance Lending Process using Fuzzy Inference System based on the FMEA Method: Moroccan Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaoui Youssef Lamrani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Managing operational risk efficiently is a critical factor of microfinance institutions (MFIs to get a financial and social return. The purpose of this paper is to identify, assess and prioritize the root causes of failure within the microfinance lending process (MLP especially in Moroccan microfinance institutions. Considering the limitation of traditional failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA method in assessing and classifying risks, the methodology adopted in this study focuses on developing a fuzzy logic inference system (FLIS based on (FMEA. This approach can take into account the subjectivity of risk indicators and the insufficiency of statistical data. The results show that the Moroccan MFIs need to focus more on customer relationship management and give more importance to their staff training, to clients screening as well as to their business analysis.

  14. Organic Coffee for a Sustainable Development in Peru : A qualitative study on how Peruvian coffee farmers’ development is affected by choosing organic cultivation and certification

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, Klas Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Title: Organic Coffee for a sustainable development in Peru -­‐ A qualitative study on how Peruvian coffee farmers’ development is affected by choosing organic cultivation and certification Seminar date: 2013-­‐05-­‐31 University: Mälardalen University Västerås Institution: School of Business, Society and Engineering Level: Bachelor Thesis in Business Administration Course name: Bachelor Thesis in Business Administration, FÖA 300, 15 ECTS Author: Marcus Brink 1987-­‐05-­‐10 Tutor...

  15. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seconda, Louise; Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Hamza, Oualid; Boizot-Szantai, Christine; Soler, Louis-Georges; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-12

    Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv) and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed). Conv-NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv-Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org-NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org-Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org-Med and Conv-Med groups compared to the Conv-NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points): 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.23-9.36) and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24-9.35) versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17-8.22)) respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01-1.74) for the Org-Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28-0.60) for the Conv-NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org-Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34-11.52). This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain.

  16. Organic Aquaculture – the link between sustainable production and superior products

    OpenAIRE

    Jokumsen, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The first Danish organic rainbow trout with the Danish red Ø label was introduced to the market in 2005. The demand for organic trout is increasing and Danish trout farmers are currently con¬verting to organic production. However, the development of organic trout production in Denmark has been challenged by a very strict national legislation for organic aquaculture production. The objectives of the research include the most critical areas in the chain that forms the link between organic fe...

  17. ‘More health for the money’: an analytical framework for access to health care through microfinance and savings groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somen

    2014-01-01

    The main contributors to inequities in health relates to widespread poverty. Health cannot be achieved without addressing the social determinants of health, and the answer does not lie in the health sector alone. One of the potential pathways to address vulnerabilities linked to poverty, social exclusion, and empowerment of women is aligning health programmes with empowerment interventions linked to access to capital through microfinance and self-help groups. This paper presents a framework to analyse combined health and financial interventions through microfinance programmes in reducing barriers to access health care. If properly designed and ethically managed such integrated programmes can provide more health for the money spent on health care. PMID:25364028

  18. 'More health for the money': an analytical framework for access to health care through microfinance and savings groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somen

    2014-10-01

    The main contributors to inequities in health relates to widespread poverty. Health cannot be achieved without addressing the social determinants of health, and the answer does not lie in the health sector alone. One of the potential pathways to address vulnerabilities linked to poverty, social exclusion, and empowerment of women is aligning health programmes with empowerment interventions linked to access to capital through microfinance and self-help groups. This paper presents a framework to analyse combined health and financial interventions through microfinance programmes in reducing barriers to access health care. If properly designed and ethically managed such integrated programmes can provide more health for the money spent on health care.

  19. Efficiency of Microfinance Institutions in Sub – Saharan Africa: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... had difficulty in sustaining their operations in the absence of grants, external funding, and subsidies ... Efficiency is critical for MFIs to remain competitive and responsive to clients' needs. This study ... between financial performance and outreach of MFIs in South Asia for the period 2003-. 2009 using the ...

  20. Standards of socially responsible management – Impact on sustainable development of the organization, the social and natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Peršič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the results of a study on the importance of the introduction/implementation of standards of socially responsible management and their impact on the business performance of organizations as well as to confirm the correlations with the sustainable development of the broader social and natural environment. The research included a population of medium-sized and large organizations (over 50 employees in the fields of marketing services in the Republic of Slovenia. Research results confirmed a direct link of understanding the management standards in organizations with a larger number of employees and the achieved higher income from operations. Research participants are familiar with the requirements of the Quality Management System Standard ISO 9001 and the Environmental Management System Standard ISO 14001, which is particularly significant for older business executives with many years of work experience in the company they run. The hypothesis that the implementation of the principles of social responsibility has a positive impact on sustainable development and the financial indicators of the organization – higher profits, business growth, productivity and cost-effectiveness in operations – has been confirmed.

  1. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  2. The role of social identity and attitudes toward sustainability brands in buying behavior for organic products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, J.; Hoogendam, K.

    2011-01-01

    Green consumerism and the role of eco-marketing have become increasingly important for increasing the market share of sustainable (non-) food products. The current study examines the effect of social identification with certain green consumer groups on brand knowledge, brand attitude and buying

  3. Media and Environmental Non-Governmental Organizations (ENGOs) Roles in Environmental Sustainability Communication in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Saifudin, Mohamad Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Considering the massive environmental problems occurring in Malaysia, the media and the ENGOs are said to play pivotal roles in delivering environmental information to the mass society in order to increase their awareness, knowledge and practices towards the environment and sustainability. This study sought to shed the light on the type of roles…

  4. Microfinance and HIV/AIDS prevention: assessing its promise and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Shari L; Blankenship, Kim

    2009-06-01

    Researchers increasingly argue that poverty and gender inequality exacerbate the spread of HIV/AIDS and that economic empowerment can therefore assist in the prevention and mitigation of the disease, particularly for women. This paper critically evaluates such claims. First, we examine the promises and limits of integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and microfinance programs by examining the available evidence base. We then propose future research agendas and next steps that may help to clear current ambiguities about the potential for economic programs to contribute to HIV/AIDS risk reduction efforts.

  5. La microfinance et les TIC : systèmes d'information de gestion en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La présente phase consistera en une recherche-action qui tentera de répondre à la question suivante : quelles répercussions a la mise en place d'un système automatisé d'information de gestion au sein d'une institution de microfinance ou d'une coopérative d'épargne et de crédit sur les employés, les clients et les ...

  6. Microfinance and HIV/AIDS Prevention: Assessing its Promise and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Shari L.; Blankenship, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Researchers increasingly argue that poverty and gender inequality exacerbate the spread of HIV/AIDS and that economic empowerment can therefore assist in the prevention and mitigation of the disease, particularly for women. This paper critically evaluates such claims. First, we examine the promises and limits of integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and microfinance programs by examining the available evidence base. We then propose future research agendas and next steps that may help to clear current ambiguities about the potential for economic programs to contribute to HIV/AIDS risk reduction efforts. PMID:19294500

  7. Sustainability of US Organic Beef and Dairy Production Systems: Soil, Plant and Cattle Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy J. Soder; Jennifer W. MacAdam; Aimee N. Hafla

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the National Organic Program implemented a rule for the US stating that pasture must be a significant source of feed in organic ruminant systems. This article will focus on how the pasture rule has impacted the management, economics and nutritional value of products derived from organic ruminant systems and the interactions of grazing cattle with pasture forages and soils. The use of synthetic fertilizers is prohibited in organic systems; therefore, producers must rely on animal manu...

  8. Producing a local, organic diet gives a healthy, sustainable and more climate-friendly diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Troels; Hermansen, John Erik

    2011-01-01

    In: Organic is life – Knowledge for tomorrow (Neuhoff, D., Halberg, N., Rasmussen. I., Hermansen, J., Ssekyewa, C., Sohn, S.M. eds.). Proceedings of the Third Scientific Conference of the International Society of Organic Agriculture Research (ISOFAR), held at the 17th IFOAM Organic World Congress...

  9. Mapping of Norwegian civil society organizations working on energy and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This study provides a mapping of Norwegian CSOs working on energy and development issues in developing countries and an overview assessment of how the CSOs fit with the priorities of the Norwegian Governments Clean Energy for Development Initiative. The study has been commissioned by Norad, the Norwegian agency for development aid. The study surveys 10 Norwegian CSOs, five of which are primarily environmentally oriented (Bellona, FIVAS, Naturvernforbundet, WWF-Norway and Zero, with green backgrounds in the tables) and five of which are primarily socially oriented (ARC-Aid, Kirkens Noedhjelp, Misjonsalliansen, Norges Vel and Utviklingsfondet, with reddish background in the tables). The study is based on a desk-top review of available material from the CSOs as well as semi-structured interviews. The goal of the Clean Energy for Development Initiative is to increase access to clean energy at an affordable price based on the long-term management of natural resources and efficient energy use. Activities shall also contribute to sustainable economic and social development in selected partner countries and to international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.The study shows that many Norwegian CSOs have potential to contribute further to effective implementation of Clean Energy for Development Initiative strategies and realization of goals: At least five Cos are already carrying out relevant work in the Initiatives core countries (ref. table A below). In addition, most of the Cos surveyed have a long track-record of relevant activities in non-core countries (ref. table A), something which provides substantial potential for transfer of relevant experience and concepts from non-core countries to work in core countries. Most of the Cos have a relevant and professional competence base, capacity and plans for scaling-up Clean Energy for Development Initiative related work.The CSOs engaged in clean energy for development activities are mainly engaged in developing clean

  10. Sustainability labelling as a challenge to legitimacy: spillover effects of organic Fairtrade coffee on consumer perceptions of mainstream products and retailers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anagnostou, A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to better understand the impact of norm-challenging products on consumers’ perceptions of mainstream products and retailers. By showing that sustainable market offerings are feasible, products with sustainability labels, such as Fairtrade and organic products, implicitly

  11. Lean Transformation Guidance: Why Organizations Fail To Achieve and Sustain Excellence Through Lean Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hamed Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many companies are complaining that lean didn’t achieve their long-term goals, and the improvement impact was very short-lived. 7 out of each 10 lean projects fail as companies try to use lean like a toolkit, copying and pasting the techniques without trying to adapt the employee’s culture, manage the improvement process, sustain the results, and develop their leaders. When the Toyota production system was created, the main goal was to remove wastes from the shop floor using some lean techniques and tools. What was not clear is that this required from Toyota a long process of leadership development, and a high commitment to training and coaching their employee. A Failure to achieve and sustain the improvement is a problem of both management and leadership as well as the improper understanding of the human behavior, and the required culture to success.

  12. The Poor Don’t Need Another Prophet: A People-Centered Approach to Microfinance and Education in Bolivia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: As international aid agencies increasingly embrace microfinance, the darling of international development, questions are beginning to surface. Who benefits from this savings and lending system that claims to target the poor? Does an increase in social capital of the poor

  13. Development Innovations through Entrepreneurial Microfinance and the Attempt to Achieve the United Nations Millennium Development Goals in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As one of the countries in the Global South, Bangladesh has experienced numerous development challenges since its liberation in 1971. Bangladesh has showcased how to fight against poverty and to initiate meaningful change and development in human lives. Nobel Prize (2006 winner Grameen Bank is one of the popular development innovations in the country. Since the beginning of this Bank in the early 1970s, microfinance and entrepreneurship development with small amounts of money have proliferated to nearly every corner of the globe with the paramount goal of alleviating global poverty and ensuring human development. Like all other new social science techniques, the societal revolution brought about by microfinance expansion has left substantial room for refinement and further support by empirical evidence. This article critically evaluates a non-governmental initiative to empower extremely poor women through entrepreneurial microfinance, and examines the socioeconomic impacts in achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (UNMDGs. This article covers both primary and secondary information. The aim is to demonstrate how countries of the Global South can use carefully designed microfinance projects to address major development challenges and meaningfully contribute to creating a more equal, humane society.

  14. From Credit to Collective Action: The Role of Microfinance in Promoting Women's Social Capital and Normative Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Paromita

    2009-01-01

    Can economic ties positively influence social relations and actions? If so, how does this influence operate? Microfinance programs, which provide credit through a group-based lending strategy, provide the ideal setting for exploring these questions. This article examines whether structuring socially isolated women into peer-groups for an…

  15. Performance of smooth and micro-fin tubes in high mass flux region of R-134a during evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsa-ngam, Jittraporn; Nualboonrueng, Thipjak; Wongwises, Somchai

    . The two-phase heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop during evaporation of pure R-134a in smooth and micro-fin tubes are experimentally investigated. Different from most previous studies, the present experiments have been performed at high mass flux conditions. The test section is a 2.5 m long counterflow horizontal double tube heat exchanger with refrigerant flow inside the tube while hot water flows in the annulas. The inner tubes are made from smooth or micro-fin horizontal copper tubing of 9.52 mm outer diameter. The test runs are done at average saturated evaporating temperatures ranging between 10 and 20 °C. The mass fluxes are between 400 and 800 kg/m2s. The experimental results of both smooth and micro-fin tubes show that the average heat transfer coefficient tends to increase with an increase of average quality, mass flux, and evaporating temperature. The pressure drop increases with an increase of average quality and mass flux, but tends to slightly decrease with a rise of evaporating temperature. The average heat transfer coefficient of the 9.52 mm OD micro-fin tube is 50% to 100% higher than that of the 9.52 mm OD smooth tube while the pressure drop is 10% to 60% higher. New correlations for the evaporation heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in high mass flux region of R-134a are proposed for practical use.

  16. A Review of Organic Farming for Sustainable Agriculture in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Yadav; Subhash Babu; M. K. Yadav; Kalyan Singh; G. S. Yadav; Suresh Pal

    2013-01-01

    In the post independence period, the most important challenge in India has been to produce enough food for the growing population. Hence, high-yielding varieties are being used with infusion of irrigation water, fertilizers, or pesticides. This combination of high-yielding production technology has helped the country develop a food surplus as well as contributing to concerns of soil health, environmental pollution, pesticide toxicity, and sustainability of agricultural production. Scientists ...

  17. Sustainability of milk production in the Netherlands - A comparison between raw organic, pasteurised organic and conventional milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Capuano, E.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer preferences are changing, resulting in an increased demand for both organic milk and raw milk due to their perceived higher nutritional value and positive contribution to animal welfare. To compare the advantages and disadvantages of these products with conventional pasteurised milk, a

  18. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Seconda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed. Conv–NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv–Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org–NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org–Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org–Med and Conv–Med groups compared to the Conv–NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points: 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI = 9.23–9.36 and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24–9.35 versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17–8.22 respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01–1.74 for the Org–Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28–0.60 for the Conv–NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org–Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34–11.52. This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain.

  19. Assessment of the Sustainability of the Mediterranean Diet Combined with Organic Food Consumption: An Individual Behaviour Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seconda, Louise; Baudry, Julia; Allès, Benjamin; Hamza, Oualid; Boizot-Szantai, Christine; Soler, Louis-Georges; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Mediterranean diets are promising sustainable food models and the organic food system may provide health and environmental benefits. Combining the two models could therefore be a favourable approach for food sustainability. The aim of this study was to draw up a comparative description of four diets differing in the level of organic foods consumption and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, using multidisciplinary indicators to assess the sustainability of these diets. Four groups of participants were defined and compared, combining the proportion of organic food in their diet (Org versus Conv) and the adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med versus NoMed). Conv–NoMed: Conventional consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Conv–Med: Conventional consumers and Mediterranean diet followers; Org–NoMed: Organic consumers and non-Mediterranean diet followers; Org–Med: Organic consumers and Mediterranean diet followers. The adherence to nutritional recommendations was higher among the Org–Med and Conv–Med groups compared to the Conv–NoMed group (using the mPNNS-GS (modified-Programme National nutrition santé guidelines score/13.5 points): 9.29 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.23–9.36) and 9.30 (95% CI = 9.24–9.35) versus 8.19 (95% CI = 8.17–8.22)) respectively. The mean plant/animal protein intake ratio was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.01–1.74) for the Org–Med group versus 0.44 (95% CI = 0.28–0.60) for the Conv–NoMed group. The average cost of the diet of Org–Med participants was the highest: 11.43 €/day (95% CI = 11.34–11.52). This study highlighted the importance of promoting the Mediterranean diet combined with organic food consumption for individual health and environmental aspects but challenges with regard to the cost remain. PMID:28085096

  20. Individual lending versus group lending: An evaluation with Kenya's microfinance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odongo Kodongo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Group micro-lending has been used successfully in some parts of the world to expand the reach of microcredit programs. However, our study shows that microfinance institutions in Kenya prefer individual lending which is associated with higher default rates compared to group lending. The study also shows that high interest rates increase the odds of client delinquency while loan size is inversely related to delinquency. Given these findings, policymakers need to work for stability in the macro-environment to ensure interest rates charged by microfinance institutions (MFIs remain stable and affordable. Alternatively, MFIs can develop a graduated scale for charging interest rates in which credit is extended to groups at first to hedge the firm against repayment risk; following this, the firm identifies individuals within the groups whose credit risk has improved and issue progressive individual loans to them. Such individual loans would fetch higher returns in form of interest for MFI and boost their outreach, reduce delinquency, and enhance self-sufficiency.

  1. Microfinance: Diagnosis of the micro-business, medium-sized business and its financial technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Toledo Concha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work shows how the financing for micro and small businesses in Peru has increased and has greatlyexpanded in the last few years, not only in institutions specialized in this field, focused their efforts in giving financialservices to businesspeople of micro and medium-sized business, but most of the so-called traditional banks havefocused their attention to this emerging sector using the know-how of microfinance lending technology, banking seekto work with people of low income sectors, that were not subject for credit opportunities to develop their business andas a consequence not able to improve their quality of life .Throughout this investigation, we make a diagnosis of macro and micro environment of the microfinance field, itsdevelopment and expectations for a strong presence in the Peruvian financial market. We consider the development oflending technology, where the analysis of the ability and willingness to pay are the fundamental basis for the evaluationof credits in specialized companies in this sector.

  2. Dynamics of soil dissolved organic carbon pools reveal both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds sustain microbial respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.; Chincarini, R.; Comans, R.N.J.; Hoffland, E.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released from soil organic amendments may influence soil microbial activity and the quality of the soil's DOC pools. Measurements of total DOC are often considered in relation to microbial activity levels but here we propose that quantification of DOC

  3. USE OF ORGANIC RESIDUES FOR THE RECOVERY OF SOIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Galvez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of different organic residues on soil fertility and climate change, through the evaluation of soil organic matter mineralisation, greenhouse gas emission, nutrient availability and soil microbial biomass content and activity. A degraded agricultural soil was amended with three different organic residues (pig slurry digestate, rapeseed meal, and compost at three different doses (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5% w/w and incubated for 30 days at 20 ºC. During incubation, soil CO2 and N2O emissions, K2SO4 extractable organic C, N, NH4+, NO3- and P, soil microbial biomass and some enzymatic activities were determined. Results obtained showed that rapeseed meal and pig slurry are best suited to improve soil chemical and biological fertility, while compost is more appropriate for the enhancement of soil organic matter content and to promote soil C sequestration.

  4. Hydrogenation of organic matter as a terminal electron sink sustains high CO 2 :CH 4 production ratios during anaerobic decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Rachel M.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Rich, Virginia I.; Keller, Jason K.; Bridgham, Scott D.; Zalman, Cassandra Medvedeff; Meredith, Laura; Hanson, Paul J.; Hines, Mark; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Saleska, Scott R.; Crill, Patrick; Cooper, William T.; Chanton, Jeff P.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2017-10-01

    Once inorganic electron acceptors are depleted, organic matter in anoxic environments decomposes by hydrolysis, fermentation, and methanogenesis, requiring syntrophic interactions between microorganisms to achieve energetic favorability. In this classic anaerobic food chain, methanogenesis represents the terminal electron accepting (TEA) process, ultimately producing equimolar CO2 and CH4 for each molecule of organic matter degraded. However, CO2:CH4 production in Sphagnum-derived, mineral-poor, cellulosic peat often substantially exceeds this 1:1 ratio, even in the absence of measureable inorganic TEAs. Since the oxidation state of C in both cellulose-derived organic matter and acetate is 0, and CO2 has an oxidation state of +4, if CH4 (oxidation state -4) is not produced in equal ratio, then some other compound(s) must balance CO2 production by receiving 4 electrons. Here we present evidence for ubiquitous hydrogenation of diverse unsaturated compounds that appear to serve as organic TEAs in peat, thereby providing the necessary electron balance to sustain CO2:CH4 >1. While organic electron acceptors have previously been proposed to drive microbial respiration of organic matter through the reversible reduction of quinone moieties, the hydrogenation mechanism that we propose, by contrast, reduces C-C double bonds in organic matter thereby serving as 1) a terminal electron sink, 2) a mechanism for degrading complex unsaturated organic molecules, 3) a potential mechanism to regenerate electron-accepting quinones, and, in some cases, 4) a means to alleviate the toxicity of unsaturated aromatic acids. This mechanism for CO2 generation without concomitant CH4 production has the potential to regulate the global warming potential of peatlands by elevating CO2:CH4 production ratios.

  5. An Instructor’s Guide for the Building and Sustaining Foreign Counterpart Organizations Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    differs from the BY and WITH approach as, ideally, the stakeholders conceive of, plan, execute, and sustain the work. This has been a barrier in...survey by the deadline. Wright: I didn’t mean to be rude, sir. It’s just that I’m on a very tight calendar and I’ll have hell to pay back at the...I will call you in a few days. Seawright: Ok. Thanks. Asante sana. Oh, I’m going to have hell to pay for this delay back at the office. Thank you

  6. In situ olive mill residual co-composting for soil organic fertility restoration and by-product sustainable reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Casacchia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of organic matter in the form of compost improves overall physical, chemical and biological properties of soils but, to be really sustainable, the composting process should be carried out using the by-products available in situ. Two different soils of a Mediterranean olive orchard, one managed traditionally (NAS and the other amended with compost (AS, were investigated in a two-year experiment. Increases in total organic matter, total nitrogen and pH, were detected in AS if compared to NAS. Significant increases in total and specific microbial counts were observed in AS, with a clear amelioration of microbiological soil quality. The results demonstrated that soil amendment using compost deriving from olive mill by-products can be an important agricultural practice for supporting and stimulating soil microorganisms and, at the same time, for re-using these byproducts, so avoiding their negative environmental impact.

  7. Towards sustainable co-management organization: a case study of the Baikka Beel, Moulvibazar, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidul Islam Bhuiya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in Baikka Beel, Moulvibazar, Bangladesh from July, 2012 to October, 2012. This paper examined the role and performance of the CMOs in the Beel management and the challenges faced by the CMO members. Primary information were collected through focus group discussions using conceptual framework. Organizational development, leadership development, capital formation, women and gender development and conflict resolution were used to examine the performance of the CMOs. The result revealed that the RMO and FRUG were in satisfactory level in sustainability except RMO network. However CMOs were facing some challenges. These included policy level (amendment of Fish Act 1950 regarding permanent sanctuary, lease period extension complexity, no national and social recognition of CMO members, less awareness program to the non-CMO respondents, few scope of media highlight and no fund especially in RMO network operation and operational level (no vehicle to rush to protect the poaching, no provision of honorary for RMO members, less training in capacity building and regional and statewide interactions. At last some recommendations were made for both policy and operational level. Finally new project could be implemented through the implementation of the research findings towards sustainable CMOs.

  8. Comparison of four microfinance markets from the point of view of the effectuation theory, complemented by proposed musketeer principle illustrating forces within village banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance services are essential tools of formalization of shadow economics, leveraging immature entrepreneurship with external capital. Given the importance of shadow economics for the social balance of developing countries, the importance of an answer to a question of how microfinance entities come into existence, is rather essential. While decision-taking process leading to entrepreneurship were explained by the effectuation theory developed in the 90’, these explanations were not concerned with the logics of creation of microenterprises in neither developing countries nor microfinance village banks. While the abovementioned theories explain the nascence of companies in environment of developed markets, importance of a focus on emerging markets related to large share of human society of microfinance clientele is obvious. The study provides a development streak to the effectuation Theory, adding the musketeer principle to the five effectuation principles proposed by Sarasvathy. Furthermore, the hitherto not considered relationship between social capital and effectuation related concepts is another proposal of the paper focusing on description of the nature of microfinance clientele from the point of view of effectuation theory and social capital drawing a comparison of microfinance markets in four countries, Turkey, Sierra Leone, Indonesia and Afghanistan.

  9. A Review of 'Organic Struggle: The Movement for Sustainable Agriculture in the United States'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Francis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic Struggle chronicles the challenges encountered by innovators in a growing segment of the U.S. food pro- duction and marketing system. Practiced for millenia by farmers before the introduction of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and first developed more formally in Europe, organic farming practices began to gain prominence in the U.S. only in the 1950s. Far more than a system for pro- ducing food, this strategy has become a focus for those supporting healthy and pesticide-free products, for some who embrace the organic system as a food movement, and by many who disagree with the current domination of the country’s food industry by large farms and a small num- ber of multinational corporations. Within the organic sector there is debate between those who favor a system primar- ily run by local farmers who sell through small markets and CSAs, and others who insist that the ‘Big-Organic’ seg- ment that now sells more than half of all organic food is doing more to help the environment in the large picture. Author Brian Obach describes this ongoing struggle.

  10. Un caso empírico en la evaluación del riesgo de crédito de una institución de microfinanzas peruana/An empirical approach to the credit risk assessment of a microfinance institution in Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan Lara Rubio; Manuel Pedro Rodríguez Bolívar; Salvador Rayo Cantón

    2011-01-01

      The growth of micro-credit along with the excellent conditions to carry out microfinance activity in the economy and financial system of the Republic of Peru are pushing for Microfinance Institutions (IMF...

  11. Sustainable agriculture - selected papers

    OpenAIRE

    Krasowicz, Stanisław; Wrzaszcz, Wioletta; Zegar, Jozef St.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of research on socially sustainable agriculture. Features of sustainable agriculture. Sustainability of private farms in the light of selected criteria. Subsistence agricultural holdings and the sustainable development of agriculture. Sustainable farms in the light of the FADN data. Description of organic holdings in Poland.

  12. The role of the carbon market in transformation of agriculture towards organic and sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Schwank, Othmar

    2008-01-01

    1. The contribution of organic agriculture to emission reduction in a carbon con-strained world Agriculture is among the five sectors which will have to substantially contribute to the stabiliza-tion of global greenhouse gas emissions in the next 10-15 years. This is one of the messages from the IPCC’s 4th Assessment Report to the Bali Conference and its roadmap adopted in De-cember 2007. Organic farming reduces embedded energy demand on the input side, stores more carbon in soils and cre...

  13. Is This Work Sustainable? Teacher Turnover and Perceptions of Workload in Charter Management Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A. Chris

    2016-01-01

    An unsustainable workload is considered the primary cause of teacher turnover at Charter Management Organizations (CMOs), yet most reports provide anecdotal evidence to support this claim. This study uses 2010-2011 survey data from one large CMO and finds that teachers' perceptions of workload are significantly associated with decisions to leave…

  14. A Model of Sustainability for Professional Organizations: Using a Learning Management System to Offer Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    Professional membership organizations have long maintained their exposure and revenue stream through a variety of traditional avenues, most notably memberships, sponsored conferences, and professional journals. The synergy of this three-tiered model has depended on a certain enhanced status derived from membership benefits and proprietary…

  15. Health Care, Heal Thyself! An Exploration of What Drives (and Sustains) High Performance in Organizations Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    What happens when researching the radical unveils the simplest of solutions? This article tells the story of the 2007 ISPI Annual Conference Encore Presentation, Healthcare, Heal Thyself, sharing the findings of an exploration into high-performance health care facilities and their relevance to all organizations today. It shows how to overcome…

  16. Between activism and science: Grassroots concepts for sustainability coined by Environmental Justice Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Alier, J.; Anguelovski, I.; Bond, P.; DelBene, D.; F. Demaria (Federico); J. Gerber (Julien-François); Greyl, L.; Hass, W.; Healy, H.; Marín-Burgos, V.; Ojo, G.U.; Porto, M.; Rijnhout, L.; Rodríguez-Labajos, B.; Spangenberg, J.; Temper, L.; Warlenius, R.; I. Yánez (Ivonne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract In their own battles and strategy meetings since the early 1980s, EJOs (environmental justice organizations) and their networks have introduced several concepts to political ecology that have also been taken up by academics and policy makers. In this paper, we explain the

  17. Microfinance Impact on Socio-Economic Empowerment: A special Reference to Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Vachya L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study seeks to examine the role of microfinance and its impact on economic and social empowerment of women. There are great debates going on whether forming groups, membership for women, providing credit and imparting some business skills would change the social equations in the society or whether provision of credit may lead to pervasively entrenched political and economic relations among the genders. The proponents argue that providing credit, targeting women can prove to be a suitable mechanism in ameliorating poor women’s socio-economic conditions and thereby can alter the relations between gender and class. Undoubtedly, there have been significant advances in women empowerment in recent years and the concept and practice of SHG-based microfinance has now developed deep roots in many parts of the country. Impact assessment being rather limited so far, it is hard to measure and quantify the effect the Indian microfinance experience so far had on the poverty situation in rural India. The present study seeks to examine the process of women empowerment and changes in the economic status of SHG members in particular and rural women in general. For this study, multi-stage stratified proportionate random sampling technique was adopted for selecting the representative districts, mandals/talukas, villages and households. The primary data was collected from six villages in the three regions (Coastal Andhra, Rayalaseema and Telangana of Andhra Pradesh. Tabular and statistical analyses were applied for examining the data. Empirically acclaimed logistic regression model has been employed for analyzing significant impact of plausible socio-economic factors on women empowerment. The study found that the socio-economic indicators have changed. It also emerged that there has been an increase in women participation in the household decision making process. The study has suggested that the government should prepare suitable plans and programmes

  18. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  19. Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and

  20. MARKETING ACTIVITY IN ROMANIAN MICROCREDIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savescu Roxana Florenta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance is the solution that ensures the provision of loans and other basic financial services to those entrepreneurs who have limited access to the banking sector. These financial services provided by microfinance institutions allow small business owners to take advantage of their entrepreneurship skills by developing small businesses capable of generating additional income. As they mature, Romanian microcredit organizations become gradually aware of the importance of marketing in their current activities. The paper presents the results of a qualitative research on the experience and marketing practices in major microfinance institutions in Romania, highlighting at the same time the factors influencing decisions to invest resources in this area. The conclusions of the research reveal that microcredit organizations have a limited institutional capacity to develop complex marketing programs that drive marketing activities and resources to achieve the objectives of the organization. The approach here is one of a reactive management, the situations that pushes microcredit organizations into engaging in some marketing activities and using various instruments being determined by changes in the structure and level of market development and competition or by the availability of funds for current activity. Although marketing interventions should be considered important on all markets, the truth is that different types of markets (emerging, developing, mature markets require certain marketing activities. The proposed marketing mix contains 8 elements ("8 P" that ought to be optimally combined within the marketing strategy, in order to get the expected response from the target group: product, price, placement, promotion, processes, procedures, personnel, partnership. The topic chosen for this paper answers a need for know-how in the Romanian microcredit organizations, in terms of their marketing activity. From a scientific point of view, the paper

  1. Vijana Vijiweni II: a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of a microfinance and peer health leadership intervention for HIV and intimate partner violence prevention among social networks of young men in Dar es Salaam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajula, Lusajo; Balvanz, Peter; Kilonzo, Mrema Noel; Mwikoko, Gema; Yamanis, Thespina; Mulawa, Marta; Kajuna, Deus; Hill, Lauren; Conserve, Donaldson; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Leatherman, Sheila; Singh, Basant; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-02-03

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, remain important public health problems with devastating health effects for men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. There have been calls to engage men in prevention efforts, however, we lack effective approaches to reach and engage them. Social network approaches have demonstrated effective and sustained outcomes on changing risk behaviors in the U.S. Our team has identified and engaged naturally occurring social networks comprised mostly of young men in Dar es Salaam in an intervention designed to jointly reduce STI incidence and the perpetration of IPV. These stable networks are locally referred to as "camps." In a pilot study we demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of a combined microfinance and peer health leadership intervention within these camp-based peer networks. We are implementing a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of an intervention combining microfinance with health leadership training in 60 camps in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Half of the camps have been randomized to the intervention arm, and half to a control arm. The camps in the intervention arm will receive a combined microfinance and health leadership intervention for a period of two years. The camps in the control arm will receive a delayed intervention. We have enrolled 1,258 men across the 60 study camps. Behavioral surveys will be conducted at baseline, 12-months post intervention launch and 30-month post intervention launch and biological samples will be drawn to test for Neisseria gonorrhea (NG), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) at baseline and 30-months. The primary endpoints for assessing intervention impact are IPV perpetration and STI incidence. This is the first cluster-randomized trial targeting social networks of men in sub-Saharan Africa that jointly addresses HIV and IPV perpetration and has both biological and behavioral endpoints. Effective

  2. Organic textile waste as a resource for sustainable agriculture in arid and semi-arid areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Bo G

    2017-03-01

    New vegetation in barren areas offers possibilities for sequestering carbon in the soil. Arid and semi-arid areas (ASAs) are candidates for new vegetation. The possibility of agriculture in ASAs is reviewed, revealing the potential for cultivation by covering the surface with a layer of organic fibres. This layer collects more water from humidity in the air than does the uncovered mineral surface, and creates a humid environment that promotes microbial life. One possibility is to use large amounts of organic fibres for soil enhancement in ASAs. In the context of the European Commission Waste Framework Directive, the possibility of using textile waste from Sweden is explored. The costs for using Swedish textile waste are high, but possible gains are the sale of agricultural products and increased land prices as well as environmental mitigation. The findings suggest that field research on such agriculture in ASAs should start as soon as possible.

  3. Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) for sustainable energy production and product recovery from organic wastes and industrial wastewaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Deepak; Singh, Anoop; Van Bogaert, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    ) respectively, or other products formed at the cathode by an electrochemical reduction process. As compared to conventional fuel cells, BESs operate under relatively mild conditions, use a wide variety of organic substrates and mostly do not use expensive precious metals as catalysts. The recently discovered......Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are unique systems capable of converting the chemical energy of organic waste including low-strength wastewaters and lignocellulosic biomass into electricity or hydrogen/chemical products in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) or microbial electrolysis cells (MECs...... use of BES for product synthesis via microbial electrosynthesis have greatly expanded the horizon for these systems. Newer concepts in application as well as development of alternative materials for electrodes, separators, and catalysts, along with innovative designs have made BESs very promising...

  4. The fusion of humanistic management and organizational learning vreate sustainable and high quality organizations une

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Largacha Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg Looking for the best results that support company sustainability, diverse methodologies focusing on productivity and efficiency have been developed. Under this perspective, the trends of Human Talent Management look for high productive workers and to have low rates of personnel rotation (Bruce, 2006; Wu y Lee, 2001; Fisher, 2000; Lyons, 2006. However, most of these trends do not surpass the reductionist version of the market which only consider a company as a producer of goods or services (Schumacher, 1975, or the managerial paradigms that create structures opposing human resource management (Maslow, 1968; Berger y Luckmann, 1967; Senge et.al., 1994. The Humanistic Management is an exception as it offers another managerial option based on the existing people in the company, not seen as resources but what they really are: human beings. Its principles focus on alteration, non- ideologies and organizational social obligations (Largacha-Martínez, 2010b. In this paper, the outcomes of a qualitative study in seven companies coordinated by the Humanistic Management Network are presented (Von Kimakowitz, et. al, 2011, analyzing them from the perspective of excellence and organizational learning

  5. Role of Institutions and Organizations for the Sustainable Management of Forest and Pasture as Common Property Resources in Nepal: An Overview of the Indigenous and Traditional Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laya Prasad Uprety

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This is an overview paper based on the contemporary literature available in the regime of forest and pasture as common property resources. The analysis has underscored the role of local institutions and organizations for the sustainable management of forest and pasture as common property resources. The paper concludes that farmers of Nepal have developed and used the organizational and institutional mechanisms for the sustained management of these resources by ensuring social equity. Understanding the ingredients of indigenous resource management systems can have a bearing on developing appropriate national policies aiming at ensuring the sustainability of the future programs of Nepal.Key Words: Institution, organization, indigenous, traditional, common property, sustainable, social equity, participation, etc.DOI = 10.3126/dsaj.v2i0.1357Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.2 pp.31-64

  6. Sustainable organic loading rate and energy recovery potential of mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2014-08-01

    The overall performance of a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for synthetic municipal wastewater treatment was investigated under a range of organic loading rate (OLR). A very steady and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (around 98%) was achieved over a broad range of volumetric OLR of 0.8-10gCOD/L/d. The sustainable volumetric and sludge OLR satisfying a permeate COD below 50mg/L for general reuse was 6gCOD/L/d and 0.63gCOD/gMLVSS (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids)/d, respectively. At a high sludge OLR of over 0.6gCOD/gMLVSS/d, the AnMBR achieved high methane production of over 300ml/gCOD (even approaching the theoretical value of 382ml/gCOD). A low biomass production of 0.015-0.026gMLVSS/gCOD and a sustainable flux of 6L/m2/h were observed. The integration of a heat pump and forward osmosis into the mesophilic AnMBR process would be a promising way for net energy recovery from typical municipal wastewater in a temperate area. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Direct and indirect impacts of crop-livestock organization on mixed crop-livestock systems sustainability: a model-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneessens, I; Veysset, P; Benoit, M; Lamadon, A; Brunschwig, G

    2016-11-01

    Crop-livestock production is claimed more sustainable than specialized production systems. However, the presence of controversial studies suggests that there must be conditions of mixing crop and livestock productions to allow for higher sustainable performances. Whereas previous studies focused on the impact of crop-livestock interactions on performances, we posit here that crop-livestock organization is a key determinant of farming system sustainability. Crop-livestock organization refers to the percentage of the agricultural area that is dedicated to each production. Our objective is to investigate if crop-livestock organization has both a direct and an indirect impact on mixed crop-livestock (MC-L) sustainability. In that objective, we build a whole-farm model parametrized on representative French sheep and crop farming systems in plain areas (Vienne, France). This model permits simulating contrasted MC-L systems and their subsequent sustainability through the following indicators of performance: farm income, production, N balance, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (/kg product) and MJ consumption (/kg product). Two MC-L systems were simulated with contrasted crop-livestock organizations (MC20-L80: 20% of crops; MC80-L20: 80% of crops). A first scenario - constraining no crop-livestock interactions in both MC-L systems - permits highlighting that crop-livestock organization has a significant direct impact on performances that implies trade-offs between objectives of sustainability. Indeed, the MC80-L20 system is showing higher performances for farm income (+44%), livestock production (+18%) and crop GHG emissions (-14%) whereas the MC20-L80 system has a better N balance (-53%) and a lower livestock MJ consumption (-9%). A second scenario - allowing for crop-livestock interactions in both MC20-L80 and MC80-L20 systems - stated that crop-livestock organization has a significant indirect impact on performances. Indeed, even if crop-livestock interactions permit

  8. CONTRIBUTIONS OF MICROFINANCE INSTITUTIONS TO ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF CASSAVA FARMERS IN ABIA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley Chukwuemeka OBIKE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study examined contributions of microfinance institutions to economic efficiency of cassava farmers in Abia state, Nigeria. A multistage random sampling technique was adopted in collecting cross sectional data on a sample size of 240 respondents (120 MFI beneficiaries and 120 non beneficiaries. Primary Data was collected by administering questionnaire on cassava farmers. The result showed that economic efficiency of MFI beneficiaries was influenced by wage rate, price of fertilizer and adjusted Y (output, while wage rate, price of fertilizer and price of cassava cutting s are variables that influenced economic efficiency of non beneficiaries. The t – test analysis confirmed that MFI beneficiaries had higher economic efficiency advantage compared with non beneficiaries. It is recommended that government agricultural policy should take positive steps to reduce interest rate to encourage MFI efforts in providing the necessary platform to encourage higher efficiency in cassava production in Abia state, Nigeria.

  9. Repayment flexibility can reduce financial stress: a randomized control trial with microfinance clients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Erica; Pande, Rohini; Papp, John; Park, Y Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Financial stress is widely believed to cause health problems. However, policies seeking to relieve financial stress by limiting debt levels of poor households may directly worsen their economic well-being. We evaluate an alternative policy - increasing the repayment flexibility of debt contracts. A field experiment randomly assigned microfinance clients to a monthly or a traditional weekly installment schedule (N=200). We used cell phones to gather survey data on income, expenditure, and financial stress every 48 hours over seven weeks. Clients repaying monthly were 51 percent less likely to report feeling "worried, tense, or anxious" about repaying, were 54 percent more likely to report feeling confident about repaying, and reported spending less time thinking about their loan compared to weekly clients. Monthly clients also reported higher business investment and income, suggesting that the flexibility encouraged them to invest their loans more profitably, which ultimately reduced financial stress.

  10. Relationship Between Employee Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention in Microfinance Banks in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghir Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to analyse the factors, which significantly affect employee job satisfaction in Microfinance Banks of Pakistan. Furthermore, the impact of employee job satisfaction is evaluated on employee turnover intentions. Reward system and training opportunities are taken as independent variables. Primary data is used for this research, which was collected through questionnaire and the reliability of instrument is checked using Cronbach’s alpha. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS is used to process the collected data. Descriptive statistics are determined and correlation among variables is also calculated. OLS method is applied to find out the impact of independent variables and the results show that there is a significant positive correlation among training, reward system and employee job satisfaction, while a negative relationship is found between employee job satisfaction and employee turnover intention.

  11. Expanding health coverage in India: role of microfinance-based self-help groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somen

    2017-01-01

    To fulfil its commitment to universal health coverage, it will be necessary for the Indian government to expand access to appropriate and affordable health services. Through the mechanism of microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs), poor women and their families are provided not only with access to finance to improve their livelihoods but also, in many cases, with a range of basic health services. Governments and non-governmental organisations in India have implemented large-scale programmes for the promotion of SHGs. With 93 million people organised nationally, the SHGs provide an established population base that can potentially be used to extend health coverage. However, the potential for working with SHGs to improve people's access to health services has not been an active part of the national policy discourse.​.

  12. New Correlation Methods of Evaporation Heat Transfer in Horizontal Microfine Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishi, Osamu; Honda, Hiroshi

    A stratified flow model and an annular flow model of evaporation heat transfer in horizontal microfin tubes have been proposed. In the stratified flow model, the contributions of thin film evaporation and nucleate boiling in the groove above a stratified liquid were predicted by a previously reported numerical analysis and a newly developed correlation, respectively. The contributions of nucleate boiling and forced convection in the stratified liquid region were predicted by the new correlation and the Carnavos equation, respectively. In the annular flow model, the contributions of nucleate boiling and forced convection were predicted by the new correlation and the Carnavos equation in which the equivalent Reynolds number was introduced, respectively. A flow pattern transition criterion proposed by Kattan et al. was incorporated to predict the circumferential average heat transfer coefficient in the intermediate region by use of the two models. The predictions of the heat transfer coefficient compared well with available experimental data for ten tubes and four refrigerants.

  13. A combined microfinance and training intervention can reduce HIV risk behaviour in young female participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronyk, Paul M; Kim, Julia C; Abramsky, Tanya; Phetla, Godfrey; Hargreaves, James R; Morison, Linda A; Watts, Charlotte; Busza, Joanna; Porter, John Dh

    2008-08-20

    To assess effects of a combined microfinance and training intervention on HIV risk behavior among young female participants in rural South Africa. : Secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from a cluster randomized trial, the Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity study. Eight villages were pair-matched and randomly allocated to receive the intervention. At baseline and after 2 years, HIV risk behavior was assessed among female participants aged 14-35 years. Their responses were compared with women of the same age and poverty group from control villages. Intervention effects were calculated using adjusted risk ratios employing village level summaries. Qualitative data collected during the study explored participants' responses to the intervention including HIV risk behavior. After 2 years of follow-up, when compared with controls, young participants had higher levels of HIV-related communication (adjusted risk ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.12), were more likely to have accessed voluntary counseling and testing (adjusted risk ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.56), and less likely to have had unprotected sex at last intercourse with a nonspousal partner (adjusted risk ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.96). Qualitative data suggest a greater acceptance of intrahousehold communication about HIV and sexuality. Although women noted challenges associated with acceptance of condoms by men, increased confidence and skills associated with participation in the intervention supported their introduction in sexual relationships. In addition to impacts on economic well being, women's empowerment and intimate partner violence, interventions addressing the economic and social vulnerability of women may contribute to reductions in HIV risk behavior.

  14. Community relations and child-led microfinance: a case study of caregiving children in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Rampant levels of AIDS and poverty have made many children in sub-Saharan Africa the primary caregivers of their ageing or ailing guardians. This paper reports on a social action fund initiative that brought caregiving children together to set-up and run income generating activities as a group with the aim of strengthening their coping capabilities. To further our understanding of child-led microfinance activities, this paper explores how intra-community relations can both facilitate and undermine child-led activities, and how these activities in turn can further strengthen some intra-community relations. Twenty-one children (aged 12-17) and six guardians participated in this study. Data included draw-and-write compositions (n=21), essays (n=16), workshop notes and proposals (n=8) and in-depth interviews (n=16). A thematic analysis revealed that the children actively drew on the expertise and involvement of some guardians in the project as well as on each other, developing supportive peer relations that helped strengthen their coping capabilities. However, the children's disenfranchised position in the community meant that some adults took advantage of the child-led activities for their own personal gain. Some children also showed a lack of commitment to collective work, undermining the morale of their more active peers. Nevertheless, both guardians and the children themselves began to look at caregiving children differently as their engagement in the project began to earn them respect from the community - changing guardian/child relations. The paper concludes that microfinance interventions targeting children and young people must consider children's relationships with each other and with adults as key determinants of Project success.

  15. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  16. Assessment of Total Risk on Non-Target Organisms in Fungicide Application for Agricultural Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Musa Bozdogan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, in 2010, the amount of pesticide (active ingredient; a.i. used in agriculture was about 23,000 metric tons, of which approximately 32% was fungicides. In 2012, 14 a.i. were used for fungus control in wheat cultivation areas in Adana province, Turkey. These a.i. were: azoxystrobin, carbendazim, difenoconazole, epoxiconazole, fluquinconazole, prochloraz, propiconazole, prothioconazole, pyraclostrobin, spiroxamine, tebuconazole, thiophanate-methyl, triadimenol, and trifloxystrobin. In this study, the potential risk of a.i. on non-target organisms in fungicide application of wheat cultivation was assessed by The Pesticide Occupational and Environmental Risk (POCER indicators. In this study, the highest human health risk was for fluquinconazole (Exceedence Factor (EF 1.798 for human health, whereas the fungicide with the highest environmental risk was propiconazole (EF 2.000 for the environment. For non-target organisms, the highest potential risk was determined for propiconazole when applied at 0.1250 kg a.i. ha-1 (EF 2.897. The lowest total risk was for azoxystrobin when applied at  0.0650 kg a.i. ha-1 (EF 0.625.

  17. Sustainable processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2004-01-01

    Kristensen_NH and_Beck A: Sustainable processing. In Otto Schmid, Alexander Beck and Ursula Kretzschmar (Editors) (2004): Underlying Principles in Organic and "Low-Input Food" Processing - Literature Survey. Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. ISBN 3-906081-58-3...

  18. Root ABA Accumulation in Long-Term Water-Stressed Plants is Sustained by Hormone Transport from Aerial Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Matías; Lado, Joanna; Rodrigo, María Jesús; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-12-01

    The reduced pool of the ABA precursors, β,β-carotenoids, in roots does not account for the substantial increase in ABA content in response to water stress (WS) conditions, suggesting that ABA could be transported from other organs. Basipetal transport was interrupted by stem-girdling, and ABA levels were determined in roots after two cycles of WS induced by transplanting plants to dry perlite. Leaf applications of isotope-labeled ABA and reciprocal grafting of ABA-deficient tomato mutants were used to confirm the involvement of aerial organs on root ABA accumulation. Disruption of basipetal transport reduced ABA accumulation in roots, and this decrease was more severe after two consecutive WS periods. This effect was linked to a sharp decrease in the β,β-carotenoid pool in roots in response to water deficit. Significant levels of isotope-labeled ABA were transported from leaves to roots, mainly in plants subjected to water dehydration. Furthermore, the use of different ABA-deficient tomato mutants in reciprocal grafting combinations with wild-type genotypes confirmed the involvement of aerial organs in the ABA accumulation in roots. In conclusion, accumulation of ABA in roots after long-term WS periods largely relies on the aerial organs, suggesting a reduced ability of the roots to synthesize ABA from carotenoids. Furthermore, plants are able to transport ABA basipetally to sustain high hormone levels in roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. City leadership for health and sustainable development: the World Health Organization European Healthy Cities Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouros, Agis

    2009-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of European Healthy Cities Network (EHCN) organized by the WHO Regional Office Europe. The focus is on the third of five phases covering the period 1998-2002. Fifty-six cities were members of the WHO-EHCN and over 1000 European cities were members of national networks. Association with WHO has given municipalities legitimacy to move into a domain often associated with health service. Equity and community participation are core values. City mayors provide political leadership. Intersectoral cooperation underpins a Healthy Cities approach. The WHO Regional Office for Europe supports WHO-EHCN, providing guidance and technical leadership. Cities' processes and structures are prerequisits for improvements in health and are central to the evaluation of Phase III of the WHO-EHCN.

  20. Organic Microporous Nanofillers with Unique Alcohol Affinity for Superior Ethanol Recovery toward Sustainable Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi Quan; Konstas, Kristina; Doherty, Cara M; Wood, Colin D; Mulet, Xavier; Xie, Zongli; Ng, Derrick; Hill, Matthew R; Lau, Cher Hon; Shao, Lu

    2017-05-09

    To minimize energy consumption and carbon footprints, pervaporation membranes are fast becoming the preferred technology for alcohol recovery. However, this approach is confined to small-scale operations, as the flux of standard rubbery polymer membranes remain insufficient to process large solvent volumes, whereas membrane separations that use glassy polymer membranes are prone to physical aging. This study concerns how the alcohol affinity and intrinsic porosity of networked, organic, microporous polymers can simultaneously reduce physical aging and drastically enhance both flux and selectivity of a super glassy polymer, poly-[1-(trimethylsilyl)propyne] (PTMSP). Slight loss in alcohol transportation channels in PTMSP is compensated by the alcohol affinity of the microporous polymers. Even after continuous exposure to aqueous solutions of alcohols, PTMSP pervaporation membranes loaded with the microporous polymers outperform the state-of-the-art and commercial pervaporation membranes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Building a Sustainable Global Surgery Nonprofit Organization at an Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisella, Margaret M

    Surgical Outreach for the Americas is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization providing surgical care to those in need in developing countries of the Western Hemisphere. Every year since its inception in 2008, teams of surgeons, nurses, and allied health professionals have traveled to areas of need and performed primarily hernia repair surgeries for those without access to affordable health care. Surgical Outreach for the Americas (SOfA) began as a general concept based on World Health Organization statistics claiming that 11% of the global burden of disease can be resolved via surgery. Armed with this information, a group of compassionate and selfless health care professionals planned the first trip, to the Dominican Republic, in January 2009. Building on what was first just an ambition to help others, we now also train surgeons, surgery residents, and nurses in the countries we serve. To date, SOfA has successfully treated 734 patients, with 899 total surgical procedures performed (693 of these under general anesthesia). These procedures include inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, testicular masses, orchiectomies, and various general surgical procedures. Through the efforts of a great many talented individuals and robust fundraising efforts, the SOfA message continues to gain momentum. SOfA not only considers the health and well-being of the disadvantaged through capacity-building efforts but strives to educate and improve the skills of health care professionals in the countries we visit. Our goal is to increase the number of missions each year and begin a 2-fold educational program that (a) provides surgical resident education through participation in mission work and (b) provides local surgeon education in the areas served. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Acceptability of a microfinance-based empowerment intervention for transgender and cisgender women sex workers in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Priya; Shaw, Stacey A.; Saifi, Rumana; Sherman, Susan G.; Azmi, Nuruljannah Nor; Pillai, Veena; El-Bassel, Nabila; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cisgender and transgender woman sex workers (CWSWs and TWSWs, respectively) are key populations in Malaysia with higher HIV-prevalence than that of the general population. Given the impact economic instability can have on HIV transmission in these populations, novel HIV prevention interventions that reduce poverty may reduce HIV incidence and improve linkage and retention to care for those already living with HIV. We examine the feasibility of a microfinance-based HIV prevention intervention among CWSW and TWSWs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Methods: We conducted 35 in-depth interviews to examine the acceptability of a microfinance-based HIV prevention intervention, focusing on: (1) participants’ readiness to engage in other occupations and the types of jobs in which they were interested in; (2) their level of interest in the components of the potential intervention, including training on financial literacy and vocational education; and (3) possible barriers and facilitators to the successful completion of the intervention. Using grounded theory as a framework of analysis, transcripts were analysed through Nvivo 11. Results: Participants were on average 41 years old, slightly less than half (48%) were married, and more than half (52%) identified as Muslim. Participants express high motivation to seek employment in other professions as they perceived sex work as not a “proper job” with opportunities for career growth but rather as a short-term option offering an unstable form of income. Participants wanted to develop their own small enterprise. Most participants expressed a high level of interest in microfinance intervention and training to enable them to enter a new profession. Possible barriers to intervention participation included time, stigma, and a lack of resources. Conclusion: Findings indicate that a microfinance intervention is acceptable and desirable for CWSWs and TWSWs in urban Malaysian contexts as participants

  3. Effect of combining a health program with a microfinance-based self-help group on health behaviors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Kermode, M; Annear, P L

    2015-11-01

    Women's participation in microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs) and the resultant social capital may provide a basis to address the gap in health attainment for poor women and their children. We investigated the effect of combining a health program designed to improve health behaviours and outcomes with a microfinance-based SHG program. A mixed method study was conducted among 34 villages selected from three blocks or district subdivisions of India; one in Gujarat, two in Karnataka. A set of 17 villages representing new health program areas were pair-matched with 17 comparison villages. Two rounds of surveys were conducted with a total of 472 respondents, followed by 17 key informant interviews and 17 focus group discussions. Compared to a matched comparison group, women in SHGs that received the health program had higher odds of delivering their babies in an institution (OR: 5.08, 95% CI 1.21-21.35), feeding colostrum to their newborn (OR: 2.83, 95% CI 1.02-5.57), and having a toilet at home (OR: 1.53, 95% CI 0.76-3.09). However, while the change was in the expected direction, there was no statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea among children in the intervention community (OR: 0.86, 95% CI 0.42-1.76), and the hypothesis that the health program would result in decreased out-pocket expenditures on treatment was not supported. Our study found evidence that health programs implemented with microfinance-based SHGs is associated with improved health behaviours. With broad population coverage of SHGs and the social capital produced by their activities, microfinance-based SHGs may provide an avenue for addressing the health needs of poor women. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Acceptability of a microfinance-based empowerment intervention for transgender and cisgender women sex workers in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Priya; Shaw, Stacey A; Saifi, Rumana; Sherman, Susan; Azmi, Nuruljannah Nor; Pillai, Veena; El-Bassel, Nabila; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Wickersham, Jeffrey A

    2017-08-02

    Cisgender and transgender woman sex workers (CWSWs and TWSWs, respectively) are key populations in Malaysia with higher HIV-prevalence than that of the general population. Given the impact economic instability can have on HIV transmission in these populations, novel HIV prevention interventions that reduce poverty may reduce HIV incidence and improve linkage and retention to care for those already living with HIV. We examine the feasibility of a microfinance-based HIV prevention intervention among CWSW and TWSWs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. We conducted 35 in-depth interviews to examine the acceptability of a microfinance-based HIV prevention intervention, focusing on: (1) participants' readiness to engage in other occupations and the types of jobs in which they were interested in; (2) their level of interest in the components of the potential intervention, including training on financial literacy and vocational education; and (3) possible barriers and facilitators to the successful completion of the intervention. Using grounded theory as a framework of analysis, transcripts were analysed through Nvivo 11. Participants were on average 41 years old, slightly less than half (48%) were married, and more than half (52%) identified as Muslim. Participants express high motivation to seek employment in other professions as they perceived sex work as not a "proper job" with opportunities for career growth but rather as a short-term option offering an unstable form of income. Participants wanted to develop their own small enterprise. Most participants expressed a high level of interest in microfinance intervention and training to enable them to enter a new profession. Possible barriers to intervention participation included time, stigma, and a lack of resources. Findings indicate that a microfinance intervention is acceptable and desirable for CWSWs and TWSWs in urban Malaysian contexts as participants reported that they were ready to engage in alternative forms of

  5. ISLAMIC WORK ETHIC AS AN ANTECEDENT OF WORK OUTCOMES: A STUDY OF ISLAMIC MICROFINANCE IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahibur Rokhman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Using sample 370 employees from Islamic microfinance institutions in Central Java, Indonesia, this study was conducted to examine the effect of Islamic work ethics on job satisfaction, organizational commitment and turnover intention. The empirical testing indicates that Islamic work ethic has positive effects on both job satisfaction and organizational commitment; whereas there is no significant evidence of the effect of Islamic work ethic on turnover intention. Implication, limitation and suggestion for future research are also discussed.

  6. The Impact of a Comprehensive Microfinance Intervention on Depression Levels of AIDS-Orphaned Children in Uganda. *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewamala, Fred M.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Waldfogel, Jane; Ismayilova, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    Purpose By adversely affecting family functioning and stability, poverty constitutes an important risk factor for children’s poor mental health functioning. This study examines the impact of a comprehensive microfinance intervention, designed to reduce the risk of poverty, on depression among AIDS-orphaned youth. Methods Children from 15 comparable primary schools in Rakai District of Uganda, one of those hardest hit by HIVAIDS in the country, were randomly assigned to control (n=148) or treatment (n=138) conditions. Children in the treatment condition received a comprehensive microfinance intervention comprising of matched savings accounts, financial management workshops, and mentorship. This was in addition to traditional services provided for all school-going orphaned adolescents (counseling and school supplies). Data were collected at wave 1 (baseline), wave 2 (10-months postintervention), and wave 3 (20-months post-intervention). We used multilevel growth models to examine the trajectory of depression in treatment and control conditions, measured using Children’s Depression Inventory (Kovacs). Results Children in the treatment group exhibited a significant decrease in depression whereas their control group counterparts showed no change in depression. Conclusion The findings indicate that over and above traditional psychosocial approaches used to address mental health functioning among orphaned children in sub-Saharan Africa, incorporating poverty alleviation-focused approaches, such as this comprehensive microfinance intervention, has the potential to improve psychosocial functioning of these children. PMID:22443837

  7. The impact of a comprehensive microfinance intervention on depression levels of AIDS-orphaned children in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewamala, Fred M; Neilands, Torsten B; Waldfogel, Jane; Ismayilova, Leyla

    2012-04-01

    By adversely affecting family functioning and stability, poverty constitutes an important risk factor for children's poor mental health functioning. This study examines the impact of a comprehensive microfinance intervention, designed to reduce the risk of poverty, on depression among AIDS-orphaned youth. Children from 15 comparable primary schools in Rakai District of Uganda, one of those hardest hit by HIV/AIDS in the country, were randomly assigned to control (n = 148) or treatment (n = 138) conditions. Children in the treatment condition received a comprehensive microfinance intervention comprising matched savings accounts, financial management workshops, and mentorship. This was in addition to traditional services provided for all school-going orphaned adolescents (counseling and school supplies). Data were collected at wave 1 (baseline), wave 2 (10 months after intervention), and wave 3 (20 months after intervention). We used multilevel growth models to examine the trajectory of depression in treatment and control conditions, measured using Children's Depression Inventory (Kovacs). Children in the treatment group exhibited a significant decrease in depression, whereas their control group counterparts showed no change in depression. The findings indicate that over and above traditional psychosocial approaches used to address mental health functioning among orphaned children in sub-Saharan Africa, incorporating poverty alleviation-focused approaches, such as this comprehensive microfinance intervention, has the potential to improve psychosocial functioning of these children. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Harnessing a community for sustainable disaster response and recovery: an operational model for integrating nongovernmental organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie; Chandra, Anita

    2013-08-01

    Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are important to a community during times of disaster and routine operations. However, their effectiveness is reduced without an operational framework that integrates response and recovery efforts. Without integration, coordination among NGOs is challenging and use of government resources is inefficient. We developed an operational model to specify NGO roles and responsibilities before, during, and after a disaster. We conducted an analysis of peer-reviewed literature, relevant policy, and federal guidance to characterize the capabilities of NGOs, contextual factors that determine their involvement in disaster operations, and key services they provide during disaster response and recovery. We also identified research questions that should be prioritized to improve coordination and communication between NGOs and government. Our review showed that federal policy stresses the importance of partnerships between NGOs and government agencies and among other NGOs. Such partnerships can build deep local networks and broad systems that reach from local communities to the federal government. Understanding what capacities NGOs need and what factors influence their ability to perform during a disaster informs an operational model that could optimize NGO performance. Although the operational model needs to be applied and tested in community planning and disaster response, it holds promise as a unifying framework across new national preparedness and recovery policy, and provides structure to community planning, resource allocation, and metrics on which to evaluate NGO disaster involvement.

  9. Sustainable development as an organizing principle for US foreign policy: Opportunities and enduring constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, J.F.

    1995-07-01

    The disintegration of the Soviet Union has dramatically changed the international topography. Bipolar international relations have given way to a multipolar world wherein the United States is the only true superpower as gauged by both economic and military might. The decline of the Soviet Union has removed an important stabilizing force in international politics and a critical organizing principle for American Foreign Policy -- namely, the containment of international communism. The Soviet Union`s dismantlement has created opportunities for both cooperation and conflict. It means that increasingly cooperative relations between Russia and the United States have reduced the threat of nuclear war while intensifying regional political instability among present and former allies and former client states. Without the Soviet threat more resources are available to restore the nation`s transportation, communications, and industrial infrastructure, clean up the environment, and to develop technologies that promise to increase US economic competitiveness while minimizing environmental impacts. Internationally, there should be additional resources to promote international economic growth, to preserve natural environments, and to build democratic institutions in developing nations.

  10. Credit with Education: A Promising Title II Microfinance Strategy--Supporting Integrated Food Security and Nutrition Programs To Improve Health and Well-Being of Women and Children). Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Christopher; Denman, Vicki

    This paper introduces the reader to microfinance integrated with health and nutrition education as a promising strategy for Title II practitioners. The paper provides an overview of how microfinance, particularly village banking, can contribute to the food-security objectives of Title II. It describes a variant of village banking, called…

  11. Sustainability Organic Agriculture and Livestock Production with Respect to European Union in Eastern Anatolia and East Black Sea Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vecihi Aksakal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The majority of farm households in Turkey and especially the Eastern Anatolia are still based on low-input semi subsistence agriculture and livestock production. Despite a slow decline in recent years, agriculture and livestock production remains a major employer in Turkey and it is a significant contributor to the country’s gross domestic product, GDP. Whist Turkey is one of the EU candidate countries, is self sufficient in food production and Turkish agriculture is poorly structured inefficient, with farming in the Eastern Anatolia being mainly subsistence farming. Yet, these traditional rural structures combined with poor access to low level of education and low level of off-farm unemployment problem makes the situation more complicated and unsustainable. The best way to promote sustainability, better and higher production of Eastern Anatolian and rural Turkey is to invest in the local people, villages through improved, continuing and effective agricultural and livestock programs in particular. Investment in human capital especially in the rural areas leads to more employment opportunities through entrepreneurship and innovation in organic agriculture and livestock production. A holistic approach to developing and improving supply chains could unlock the potential for sophisticated, state-of-the-art organic agriculture and livestock producers and businesses in the region to become EU and global players. Eastern Anatolian livestock producers and the farmers have the ambitions to take part in future progress because the region is naturally organic not by design but default. It is for sure that present potential of the region has not been fully determined and utilized. EU has greatly benefited from previous enlargements economically, politically and socially. When European Union (EU and Turkish Government relations considered and accession of Turkey to EU would be the logical consequence of the previous accessions. The screening on chapter 11

  12. Benzoxazinoids in rye allelopathy - from discovery to application in sustainable weed control and organic farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Margot; Marocco, Adriano; Tabaglio, Vincenzo; Macias, Francisco A; Molinillo, Jose M G

    2013-02-01

    benzoxazinoid contents, as well as a better understanding of the soil persistence of phenoxazinones, of the weed resistance against benzoxazinoids, and of how allelopathic interactions are influenced by cultural practices, would provide the means to include allelopathic rye varieties in organic cropping systems for weed control.

  13. AESIS: a support tool for the evaluation of sustainability of agroecosystems. Example of applications to organic and integrated farming systems in Tuscany, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaio Cesare Pacini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural researchers widely recognise the importance of sustainable agricultural production systems and the need to develop appropriate methods to measure sustainability on the farm level. Policy makers need accounting and evaluation tools to be able to assess the potential of sustainable production practices and to provide appropriate agro-environmental policy measures. Farmers are in search of sustainable management tools to cope with regulations and enhance efficiency. This paper presents the outcomes of applications to organic and integrated farming of an indicator-based framework to evaluate sustainability of farming systems (Agro-Environmental Sustainability Information System, AESIS. The AESIS was described together with a review of applications dating from 1991 in a previous paper. The objective of the present paper is to present the AESIS application to organic and integrated farming systems in Val d’Elsa (Tuscany and discuss how it is adapted for application to ordinary farms. The AESIS is organised into a number of environmental and production systems. For each system, environmental critical points are identified with corresponding agro-environmental indicators and processing methods. Possible solutions to sustainability issues, and critical points of relevance to the agricultural sector of the local economic and agro-ecological zone, are formulated by including an experimental layout, identifying indicator thresholds and by defining management systems with corresponding policy measures. Alternative solutions are evaluated by calculating and measuring the relevant indicators. The outcomes of the AESIS applications are discussed with specific relevance to the operational adoptability of AESIS to ordinary, agri-touristic farms managed with the organic and the integrated production method, respectively. The AESIS framework proved to be sufficiently flexible to meet the requirements for ordinary farm applications while keeping a

  14. Science and norms in policies for sustainable development: assessing and managing risks of chemical substances and genetically modified organisms in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-02-01

    Use of chemical substances and genetically modified organisms cause complex problems characterised by scientific uncertainty and controversies. Aiming at sustainable development, policies for assessment, and management of risks in the two areas are under development in the European Union. The article points out that both science and norms play a central role in risk assessment as well as risk management and suggests that the precautionary principle, the principle of public participation, and the polluter pays principle, all adopted in the European Union, offer a way to operationalise the concept of sustainable development. It is shown, however, that a number of steps ought to be taken to better implement the principles through different policy measures. In doing so, and by recognising the role of both science and norms, the decision-making on risks related to the use of chemicals or genetically modified organisms can be improved to better promote sustainable development.

  15. FA1105 BioGreenhouse (2012-04-19 – 2016-04-18) Towards a sustainable and productive EU organic greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic greenhouse horticulture (OGH)(i.e the production in greenhouses or polytunnels)in the EU should
    improve its sustainability, production and productivity. Emissions of nutrients and its footprint should be
    reduced. Production and productivity are too low to meet the demand of the

  16. A Self-Sustained Wireless Multi-Sensor Platform Integrated with Printable Organic Sensors for Indoor Environmental Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Ching-Da; Su, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Yang; Huang, Yang-Jing; Peng, Sheng-Yu; Yu, Shih-An; Lin, Chih-Ting; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2017-03-29

    A self-sustained multi-sensor platform for indoor environmental monitoring is proposed in this paper. To reduce the cost and power consumption of the sensing platform, in the developed platform, organic materials of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/EB-PANI are used as the sensing films for humidity and CO₂ detection, respectively. Different from traditional gas sensors, these organic sensing films can operate at room temperature without heating processes or infrared transceivers so that the power consumption of the developed humidity and the CO₂ sensors can be as low as 10 μW and 5 μW, respectively. To cooperate with these low-power sensors, a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) system-on-chip (SoC) is designed to amplify and to read out multiple sensor signals with low power consumption. The developed SoC includes an analog-front-end interface circuit (AFE), an analog-to-digital convertor (ADC), a digital controller and a power management unit (PMU). Scheduled by the digital controller, the sensing circuits are power gated with a small duty-cycle to reduce the average power consumption to 3.2 μW. The designed PMU converts the power scavenged from a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) module into required supply voltages for SoC circuits operation under typical indoor illuminance conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first multiple environmental parameters (Temperature/CO₂/Humidity) sensing platform that demonstrates a true self-powering functionality for long-term operations.

  17. A Self-Sustained Wireless Multi-Sensor Platform Integrated with Printable Organic Sensors for Indoor Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chang Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A self-sustained multi-sensor platform for indoor environmental monitoring is proposed in this paper. To reduce the cost and power consumption of the sensing platform, in the developed platform, organic materials of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/EB-PANI are used as the sensing films for humidity and CO2 detection, respectively. Different from traditional gas sensors, these organic sensing films can operate at room temperature without heating processes or infrared transceivers so that the power consumption of the developed humidity and the CO2 sensors can be as low as 10 μW and 5 μW, respectively. To cooperate with these low-power sensors, a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS system-on-chip (SoC is designed to amplify and to read out multiple sensor signals with low power consumption. The developed SoC includes an analog-front-end interface circuit (AFE, an analog-to-digital convertor (ADC, a digital controller and a power management unit (PMU. Scheduled by the digital controller, the sensing circuits are power gated with a small duty-cycle to reduce the average power consumption to 3.2 μW. The designed PMU converts the power scavenged from a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC module into required supply voltages for SoC circuits operation under typical indoor illuminance conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first multiple environmental parameters (Temperature/CO2/Humidity sensing platform that demonstrates a true self-powering functionality for long-term operations.

  18. A Self-Sustained Wireless Multi-Sensor Platform Integrated with Printable Organic Sensors for Indoor Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Ching-Da; Su, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Yang; Huang, Yang-Jing; Peng, Sheng-Yu; Yu, Shih-An; Lin, Chih-Ting; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2017-01-01

    A self-sustained multi-sensor platform for indoor environmental monitoring is proposed in this paper. To reduce the cost and power consumption of the sensing platform, in the developed platform, organic materials of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/EB-PANI are used as the sensing films for humidity and CO2 detection, respectively. Different from traditional gas sensors, these organic sensing films can operate at room temperature without heating processes or infrared transceivers so that the power consumption of the developed humidity and the CO2 sensors can be as low as 10 μW and 5 μW, respectively. To cooperate with these low-power sensors, a Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) system-on-chip (SoC) is designed to amplify and to read out multiple sensor signals with low power consumption. The developed SoC includes an analog-front-end interface circuit (AFE), an analog-to-digital convertor (ADC), a digital controller and a power management unit (PMU). Scheduled by the digital controller, the sensing circuits are power gated with a small duty-cycle to reduce the average power consumption to 3.2 μW. The designed PMU converts the power scavenged from a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) module into required supply voltages for SoC circuits operation under typical indoor illuminance conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first multiple environmental parameters (Temperature/CO2/Humidity) sensing platform that demonstrates a true self-powering functionality for long-term operations. PMID:28353680

  19. Boundary Organizations: Creating a Unique Model for Sustained Dialog Among Scientists and Decison Makers About Long-term Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, B.; Carter, H.; Knight, E.; Meyer, R.

    2015-12-01

    California Ocean Science Trust is a boundary organization formed by the state of California. We work across traditional boundaries between government, science, and communities to build trust and understanding in ocean and coastal science. We work closely with decision makers to understand their priority needs and identify opportunities for science to have a meaningful impact, and we engage scientists and other experts to compile and translate information into innovative products that help to meet those needs. This often sparks new collaborations that live well beyond the products themselves. Through this unique model, we are deepening relationships and facilitating an ongoing dialogue between scientists, decision-makers, and communities. The West Coast of the United States is already experiencing climate-driven changes in marine conditions at both large and small spatial scales. Decision makers are increasingly concerned with the potential threats that these changes pose to coastal communities, industries, ecosystems, and species. Detecting and understanding these multi-stressor changes requires consideration across scientific disciplines and management jurisdictions. Research and monitoring programs must reflect this new reality: they should be designed to connect with the decision makers who may use their results. In this presentation, I will share how we are drawing from the West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Science Panel - an interdisciplinary team of scientists convened by Ocean Science Trust from California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia - to develop actionable guidance for long-term monitoring for long-term change. Building on our experiences working with the Panel, I will discuss the unique model that boundary organizations provide for sustained dialog across traditionally siloed disciplines and management regimes, and share best practices and lessons learned in working across those boundaries.

  20. USING INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION TO CREATE LONGTERM VALUE FOR A SUSTAINABLE ORGANIZATION. CASE STUDY: THE BAKERY INDUSTRY IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANCEA OLIMPIA ELENA MIHAELA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrated marketing communication is considered to be a major development domain during the last decennium of the 20th century. Today, consumers use as many information sources as possible, and the value of integrated marketing communication has grown considerably. Very well targeted, integrated marketing communication campaigns rely on the strengths of the existing communicational tools, to favorably influence the behavior of the target public. The concept of integrated marketing communication was viewed for a long time as being an important management aspect, since by the efficacy of the integrated marketing communication tools, such as advertising, public relations, direct marketing, sales promotion, sales personnel, one can optimize the impact of communication on the target public. Integrated marketing communication has the role of building and consolidating profitable relations with the actual and potential clients and of generating synergy through the coordination of all the communicational mix tools into a coherent programme that can have a maximum effect. Integrated marketing communication can offer a real sustainable competitive advantage to any organization that profitably uses the potential of this communication. For this reason, the aim of the present paper consisted, on the one hand, in the evaluation of the extent to which the baking industry producers in Romania use integrated marketing communication tools, and, on the other hand, in the identification of the ways of measuring the efficacy of each communicational tool used by them.

  1. Positive attitudes toward organic, local, and sustainable foods are associated with higher dietary quality among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E; Laska, Melissa N; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Scant evidence is available on the relationship between preferences for organic, local, sustainable, and nonprocessed foods (ie, alternative food production practices) and dietary quality. This cross-sectional study examined the characteristics and dietary behaviors (eg, consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast food) of young adults who reported placing low, moderate, or high importance on alternative food production practices. A diverse sample of 1,201 students at a 2-year community college and a 4-year public university in the Twin Cities, MN, completed the Student Health and Wellness Study survey in spring 2010. χ(2) tests examined differences in attitudes across demographic characteristics. Linear regression adjusted dietary intake across attitudes. About half (49%) of young adults placed moderate to high importance on alternative production practices, and few demographic differences across attitudes were found. Young adults who placed high importance on alternative production practices consumed 1.3 more servings of fruits and vegetables (Pfood production practices also consumed breakfast approximately 1 more day per week and fast food half as often as those who placed low importance on these practices (Pfood production practices may be well received by this age group. Experimental studies are needed to investigate whether attitudes toward alternative production practices can be manipulated to improve dietary quality. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Economic and environmental sustainability of an AnMBR treating urban wastewater and organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretel, R; Moñino, P; Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the economic and environmental sustainability of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating urban wastewater (UWW) and organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) at ambient temperature in mild/hot climates. To this aim, power requirements, energy recovery from methane (biogas methane and methane dissolved in the effluent), consumption of reagents for membrane cleaning, and sludge handling (polyelectrolyte and energy consumption) and disposal (farmland, landfilling and incineration) were evaluated within different operating scenarios. Results showed that, for the operating conditions considered in this study, AnMBR technology is likely to be a net energy producer, resulting in considerable cost savings (up to €0.023 per m(3) of treated water) when treating low-sulphate influent. Life cycle analysis (LCA) results revealed that operating at high sludge retention times (70 days) and treating UWW jointly with OFMSW enhances the overall environmental performance of AnMBR technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Fonner, Virginia A; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Sweat, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. The authors conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990 to 2012, examining secondary references, and hand-searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care, or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of the 5218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with six conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, three in South or Southeast Asia, and three in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N = 6), female sex workers/bar workers (N = 3), and youth/orphans (N = 3). All studies targeted females except two among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with two group-randomized trials and two individual-randomized trials. All interventions except three included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners, or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these

  4. Examining Structural Relationships between Work Engagement, Organizational Procedural Justice, Knowledge Sharing, and Innovative Work Behavior for Sustainable Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Woocheol Kim; Jiwon Park

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of the human/social dimension of organizational sustainability, this area of scholastic endeavor has received relatively little attention when compared to the economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. On the basis of social exchange theory, this study posited the important role that employee work engagement is a key component for improving human performance for organizational sustainability. In order to do so, it suggests the important role that employee ...

  5. The Revitalization of Women’s Entrepreneurship Spirit In Micro Enterprises With Islamic Microfinance Institution (IMI (Study on The Contribution of BMTs Agam Madani in Agam sub-province, West Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesi Eka Puteri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the contribution of Islamic Microfinance Institutions (IMI in the process of empowerment of women microenterprises, and recommended a related policy.Method – This study is a field research in 2012, which focused in BMTs Agam Madani at Agam district. The data is sourced from the observation, documentation and questionnaires from 60 women micro-entrepreneurs samples who receive working capital financing. This paper uses simple regression model in order to observe relationship between working capital and the increasing of revenue. This model is to measure the amount of the multiplier effect in working capital-to increasing of revenue.Result – This paper found that IMI is a good model to develop society more prosperous by developing BMTs in each district. These BMT has thousands of micro enterprises member and could revitalized the spirit of entrepreneurship of minangkabau’s women. A research to 60 women’s micro entrepreneur samples showed the positive significant influence between lending to revenue. A multiplier effect equal to 0.068.The small number of multiplier effect implied that many factors determining their revenue, not lending only.Conclusion – This finding could explain that IMI could empower micro entrepreneur woman. This finding also recommend few strategies: 1 Revitalization of BMTs as micro catalyst by revitalization of structure of organization, products variation, human resource compentence, sharia monitoring, public cooperation and implementating local cultural value 2 Revitalization of government role as fasilitator, coordinator, initiator and mediator in developing micro sector. Keywords : Women’s Entrepreneurship, Micro Enterprises, Islamic Microfinance Institution, BMTs Agam Madani 

  6. Effect of sustainable land management practices on soil aggregation and stabilization of organic carbon in semiarid mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Franco, Noelia; Albaladejo, Juan; Almagro, María; Wiesmeier, Martin; Martínez-Mena, María

    2016-04-01

    Arid and semiarid regions represent about 47% of the total land area of the world (UNEP, 1992). At present, there is a priority interest for carbon (C) sequestration in drylands. These areas are considered as very fragile ecosystems with low organic carbon (OC) saturation, and potentially, high capacity for soil OC sequestration. In addition, the restoration of these areas is one of the major challenges for scientists, who will be able to identify and recommended the best land uses and sustainable land management (SLM) practices for soil conservation and mitigation of climate change in these environments. In this regard, in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems there is an urgent need for the implementation of SLM practices regardless of land-use type (forest, agricultural and shrubland) to maintain acceptable levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and the physico-chemical protection of the OC. Long- and short-term effects of SLM practices on soil aggregation and SOC stabilization were studied in two land uses. The long-term experiment was conducted in a reforestation area with Pinus halepensis Mill., where two afforestation techniques were implemented 20 years ago: a) mechanical terracing with a single application of organic waste of urban soil refuse, and b) mechanical terracing without organic amendment. An adjacent shrubland was considered as the reference plot. The short-term experiment was conducted in a rain-fed almond (Prunus dulcis Mill., var. Ferragnes) orchard where two SLM practices were introduced 4 years ago: a) reduced tillage plus green manure, and b) no tillage. Reduced tillage was considered as the reference plot given that it is the habitual management practice. Four aggregate size classes were differentiated by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within small macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. In addition, different organic C fractions corresponding with active

  7. Economic and Social Sustainability through Organic Agriculture: Study of the Restructuring of the Citrus Sector in the “Bajo Andarax” District (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Torres

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over 1000 hectares of citrus fruits crops are grown in the Bajo Andarax district in Almeria (Spain. The withdrawal of EU subsidies for conventional production led to a drastic loss of economic profitability of the holdings and, consequently, the abandonment of most of the conventionally managed farms of the district. In this context, a restructuring of the citrus sector from conventional to organic farming was implemented as a strategic measure to achieve the long-term sustainable development of the holdings. This study examines the citrus sector of the district and performs a comprehensive evaluation of the economic sustainability of this shift from conventional to organic production. In addition, the impact of the restructuring of the sector on the social sustainability both at the farm level and at the municipality level is studied. The results of the study are of interest to other agricultural areas of compromised profitability in which a shift towards organic production can represent a viable alternative for the economic and social sustainability of the holdings.

  8. Modelling worker physical health and societal sustainability at farm level: an application to conventional and organic dairy farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calker, van K.J.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Farm-level modelling can be used to determine how farming systems and individual farm-management measures influence different sustainability indicators. Until now however, worker physical health and societal sustainability have been lacking in farm models. For this paper, we first selected

  9. Islam and Economic Development: Exploring the Role of Indonesian Muslim Society in Developing Islamic Microfinance Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayi Yunus Rusyana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a religion is considered as a one of the cultural barriers that can impede an economic development, nevertheless in this paper I prove that Islam as well as Muslim society has a big role to empower economic life in Indonesian Muslim. The growth of Bayt al-Māl wa al-Tamwīl (BMT, Islamic microfinance institution, initiated by Muslim community is a great evidence on how religioun gave a positive impact in economic development in Indonesia. Using the theory of collective action proposed by Alberto Melucci, I explore the main factors that influenced Muslims to establish BMT, and how BMT movement develops in Indonesian Muslim society. Overall, in this paper I argue that the BMT movement can be considered as a social movement where the civil society takes more important role than the state. Interestingly, the lack of regulation is not becoming an obstacle for Muslim society to establish and develop BMT in some regions in Indonesia.

  10. Green microfinance: the case of the Cresol System in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Gonzalez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change which until recently seemed a luxury for the microfinance sector, now appears to be crucial for the future of the sector. Due to their low adaptive capacity, the millions of MF clients worldwide happen to be the most vulnerable to a changing climate. Adapting previous analysis conducted in Nepal and Bangladesh by Agrawala and Maëlis (2010 to the Brazilian context, in this inductive qualitative study we aim to assess potential synergies between MF and CC actions and what strategies can be harnessed to better respond to CC vulnerabilities at client/MF level. To do so, we investigated the case of the second largest rural microcredit programme in Brazil, Sistema Cresol de Cooperativas de Crédito Rural com Interação Solidária. Albeit important overlaps between Cresol's product envelope and CC strategies exist, there is still room to realise synergies to both mitigate a new potential source of risk to Cresol's portfolio and to increase clients' adaptive capacity.

  11. The Effect of Social Capital on Customer’s Repayment Rate at Islamic Microfinance Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaenal Effendi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The potency of Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs in Indonesia which is great, is not directly proportional to the ease of getting capital from formal financial institutions such as banks because it is not bankable. Meanwhile, microfinance institutions (MFIs that provide financing to the MSEs are currently thriving. This condition exposes the existence of factors that cause the MFIs continuesly providing financing to MSEs which are not bankable. This research aims to analyze the effect of social capital toward the repayment rate of Islamic MFIs’ customers. The methods used in this research was the logistic regression. The results showed variable relationship with BMT employees, relations with other customers, and Islamic recitation had positive and significant effect toward the repayment rate of the customer. While recommendations, membership status, and travel time from home to the BMT had negative and significant effect.  Variable outside the social capital indicator which is income rate had no significant effect.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v8i2.2631

  12. Do African microfinance institutions need efficiency for financial stability and social outreach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md A.K. Azad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance institutions (MFIs have the dual objective of providing social welfare and financial stability. We evaluated the financial efficiency of MFIs in sub-Saharan African countries by comparing their regional performances during the period 2004-2013. We addressed prevailing MFI heterogeneity by using the concept of "metafrontier". The results showed that on an average, more than half the MFIs showed a drop in productivity. The measure of how much one country gets closer to or further away from world frontier technology is commonly known as the TGC score. In world frontier technology, East and South Asian countries have taken the lead (TGC score 1.0048 while sub-Saharan African countries lag behind (TGC score 1.0020. Most East and South Asian countries have a TGC score of 1, and most sub-Saharan African countries have a TGC score less than 1. This signifies that Asian countries lead world frontier technology and most African countries do not. The decomposition of efficiency scores showed that with regard to technical changes, African nations had progressed on average only 0.01%, and efficiency change scores had regressed by 0.59% annually.

  13. Financial development and poverty reduction in developing countries: New evidence from banks and microfinance institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ficawoyi Donou-Adonsou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature on financial development and growth has received a lot of attention over the past two decades. Unlike growth, not much of consideration has been given to poverty reduction. Moreover, most of the past studies focus on bank and stock market development. The advent of microfinance institutions (MFIs lets to think about the potential role MFIs can play in a countrywide economy. In this study, we consider to what extent banks and MFIs reduce poverty. We apply the instrumental variables approach, namely the fixed-effects two-stage least squares, to a panel of 71 developing countries over the period 2002–2011. Using credit to GDP as the main financial development indicator, the results indicate that banks reduce poverty when poverty is measured by the headcount ratio and poverty gap. As for the squared poverty gap, there is no significant effect of banks. On the other hand, MFIs do not appear to have any impact on poverty regardless of the measure of poverty employed. These results imply that while banks have some ability to reduce poverty, MFIs do not, at least at the aggregate level. Our results are robust to the use of assets to GDP as an alternative measure of financial development.

  14. Microfinance Institutions and Empowerment of Women in Rural Area: A Case in Tangerang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhaer Pakkana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to discover the performance of the financial independence, the members’ welfare, and accessibility of microfinance institutions to the rural areas in the Tangerang District. To measure the financial dependence is using financial ratios. Measuring levels of performance of the members’ welfare and accessibility using Chi-Square. The results found that, first, the level of welfare of members. The coastal areas have a higher loan value than other regions. Expenditure and income of members, industrial areas have high levels of spending and revenues higher than other regions. The performance of a range to members based on a group basis. Second, the performance of financial independence, categorized as "Healthy". The coastal area is 86.40, the area around the industrial area is 85.71 and agricultural area is 83,73. Third, the level of non-performing loans, the coastal area is 0.03, the industrial area is 0,26, and the agricultural area is 0.19.DOI:  10.15408/sjie.v6i1.4637 

  15. Sustainable agriculture 2030 in three types of organizations. Future images; Duurzame landbouw 2030 in drie organisatievormen. Beelden voor de toekomst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hees, E.M.; Ros, J.; Westhoek, H.; Van der Weijden, W.J.; Hin, C.J.A.

    2003-06-01

    Three scenarios are presented in which a socio-institutional organization is given of the agriculture and horticulture in the Netherlands for the year 2030. For each of the scenarios long-term sustainable targets are realized. The first scenario concerns the autonomous family business. In the second scenario the primary agricultural production is integrated in the food chain and therefore named as chain business. In the third scenario the agricultural production is integrated in the environment, and therefore called the environmental business. [Dutch] Drie beelden van een mogelijke socio-institutionele organisatie van de grondgebonden land- en tuinbouw in 2030 worden geschetst. In elk van de drie beelden worden de lange termijn duurzaamheidsdoelen gerealiseerd. Er is gekozen voor uiteenlopende beelden (in de vorm van ideaaltypen) omdat die meer inzicht bieden in de bandbreedte van mogelijke ontwikkelingen en consequenties. In het eerste beeld bestaat de systeeminnovatie uit het doorontwikkelen van bepaalde kenmerken van de sectorstructuur aan het begin van de 21e eeuw: het zelfstandig (gezins)bedrijf gebaseerd op ondernemersvrijheid en particuliere eigendom van de productie middelen, met name grond. De werknaamluidt: het 'zelfstandig bedrijf. Daarnaast schetsen we beelden, waarin productie en orngeving in een andere verhouding tot eikaar staan. In het tweede beeld is de primaire agrarische productie geintegreerd in de voedselketen, in het derde in de fysieke orngeving. Als werknamen en -omschrijvingen voor deze twee beelden worden respectievelijk het ketenbedrijf en het omgevingsbedrijf gebruikt. De drie beelden worden beschreven als ware het 2030, daarbij 'terugkijkend' op de voorgaande 27 jaar.

  16. Towards an ecologically sustainable energy production based on forest biomass - Forest fertilisation with nutrient rich organic waste matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roegaard, Pia-Maria; Aakerback, Nina; Sahlen, Kenneth; Sundell, Markus [Swedish Polytechnic, Vasa (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    The project is a collaboration between Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Forest Sciences in Umeaa, Swedish Polytechnic, Finland in Vaasa and the Finnish Forest Research Institute in Kannus. Today there are pronounced goals within the EU that lead towards an ecologically sustainable community and there is also a global goal to decrease net carbon dioxide emissions. These goals involve among other things efforts to increase the use of renewable biofuel as energy source. This will result in an enlarged demand for biomass for energy production. Therefore, the forest resources in the Nordic countries will be required for energy production to a far greater extent in the future. One way to meet this increased tree biomass demand is to increase forest tree growth through supply of nutrients, of which nitrogen is the most important. Organic nutrient rich waste matter from the society, such as sewage sludge and mink and fox manure compost from fur farms might be used as forest fertilizer. This would result in increased supply of renewable tree biomass, decreased net carbon dioxide emissions, increased forest ecosystem carbon sequestration, decreased methane emissions from sewage sludge landfill and decreased society costs for sludge landfill or incineration. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to develop methods for forest fertilisation with nutrient rich organic waste matter from municipal wastewater, sludge and manure from mink and fox farms. The project may be divided into three main parts. The first part is the chemical composition of the fertiliser with the objective to increase the nitrogen content in sludge-based fertilisers and in compost of mink and fox manure. The second part involves the technique and logistics for forest fertilisation i.e., to develop application equipment that may be integrated in existing forest technical systems. The third part consists of field fertilisation investigations and an environmental impact assessment

  17. The potential role of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the bioprotection of plants against soil-borne pathogens in organic and/or other sustainable farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrier, Lucy A; Watson, Christine A

    2004-02-01

    Sustainable farming systems strive to minimise the use of synthetic pesticides and to optimise the use of alternative management strategies to control soil-borne pathogens. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous in nature and constitute an integral component of terrestrial ecosystems, forming symbiotic associations with plant root systems of over 80% of all terrestrial plant species, including many agronomically important species. AM fungi are particularly important in organic and/or sustainable farming systems that rely on biological processes rather than agrochemicals to control plant diseases. Of particular importance is the bioprotection conferred to plants against many soil-borne pathogens such as species of Aphanomyces, Cylindrocladium, Fusarium, Macrophomina, Phytophthora, Pythium, Rhizoctonia, Sclerotinium, Verticillium and Thielaviopsis and various nematodes by AM fungal colonisation of the plant root. However, the exact mechanisms by which AM fungal colonisation confers the protective effect are not completely understood, but a greater understanding of these beneficial interactions is necessary for the exploitation of AM fungi within organic and/or sustainable farming systems. In this review, we aim to discuss the potential mechanisms by which AM fungi may contribute to bioprotection against plant soil-borne pathogens. Bioprotection within AM fungal-colonised plants is the outcome of complex interactions between plants, pathogens and AM fungi. The use of molecular tools in the study of these multifaceted interactions may aid the optimisation of the bioprotective responses and their utility within sustainable farming systems.

  18. Exergy sustainability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  19. Why organic resources and current fertilizer formulations in Southern Africa cannot sustain maize productivity: Evidence from a long-term experiment in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Mtangadura, Tongai J.; Mtambanengwe, Florence; Nezomba, Hatirarami; Rurinda, Jairos; Mapfumo, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability of maize-based cropping systems is a major challenge for southern Africa, yet the demand for maize as staple food and animal feed in the region continues to increase. A study was conducted on a sandy clay loam (220 g clay kg-1 soil) at Domboshawa in Zimbabwe to investigate the long-term effects of organic resource quality and application rate, and nitrogen (N) fertilization on soil chemical properties and maize (Zea mays L.) productivity. Crotalaria juncea (high quality), Calli...

  20. Sustainable Management of Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information to organizations to help them implement sustainable food management, including joining the Food Recovery Challenge. To provide education and information to communities and concerned citizens.

  1. Avoiding the Perils and Fulfilling the Promises of Microfinance: A Closer Examination of the Educational Outcomes of Clients' Children in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Tracey; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Many microfinance advocates claim that micro-credit has a positive effect on the educational outcomes of the children of micro-credit borrowers, and that these educational improvements provide us with evidence that micro-credit institutions are serving the social function for which they have been designed. This paper draws attention to this area…

  2. Empowerment as a multifaceted concept: : The impact of offering goal setting training to couples in the context of a microfinance intervention for women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Marloes; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Bernardus

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on the impact of offering access to microfinance (micro loan and training) to women provided mixed results with respect to female empowerment. We propose that empowerment is a three-level concept and should be investigated at the personal, relational, and societal level. In the

  3. Understanding female empowerment : The impact of offering goal setting training to couples in the context of a microfinance intervention for women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Marloes; Hansen, Nina; Otten, Sabine; Lensink, Bernardus

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on the impact of offering access to microfinance (micro loan and training) to women provided mixed results with respect to female empowerment. We propose that empowerment is a three-level concept and should be investigated at the personal, relational, and societal level. In the

  4. Assessment of the Conditions for Linking Microfinance to Household Biodigester Construction in Cambodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandararot, K.; Dannet, L.

    2006-10-15

    This report presents a comprehensive assessment of the conditions for helping households finance the construction of a biodigester. A micro-credit programme for biodigester users was jointly designed by the National Biodigester Programme (NBP), Netherlands Development Finance Company (FMO) and Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). By using in-depth interviews, a household survey and a desk study, it was determined that the demand for biodigester market was significant, with 96.5% of the studied households possessing the capacity to operate a biodigester. The research for demand for micro-credit showed that households were indeed in need of a financial aid (84%) but the majority was unwilling to borrow credit due to fear of inability to repay it. The ones willing to borrow demanded a credit size of 400,000-1,200,000 riels. The MFIs contacted (ACLEDA, Amret, CEB, Prasac, HURREDO) were interested in lending a micro-credit to biodigester users but were also concerned for the credit as it was for consumption and not production. It appeared that credit conditions desired by potential biodigester users were overall in line with MFIs offered conditions, but an interest rate gap was also in place. Some of the extensive suggestions on how to alleviate the problem offered in the report place FMO in the centre of operations as a possible guarantor of default loans, among other duties. The challenges likely to arise because of a roll-out strategy (linking potential biodigester users with micro-credit), as well plausible solutions are presented as well.

  5. Microfine coal firing results from a retrofit gas/oil-designed industrial boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, R.; Borio, R.W.; Liljedahl, G. [Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States). ABB Power Plant Labs.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center; McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The development of a High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) has been in progress since 1987 and the ABB Power Plant Laboratories. The initial work on this concept produced an advanced coal firing system that was capable of firing both water-based and dry pulverized coal in an industrial boiler environment. Economics may one day dictate that it makes sense to replace oil or natural gas with coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn these fuels. The objective of the current program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of this overall objective, the following specific areas were targeted: A coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; Maintaining boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; Maintaining NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb/MBtu; Achieving combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and Calculating economic payback periods as a function of key variables. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components; (2) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC burner; (3) Installation and testing of a HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application; (4) Economic evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications; and (5) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions. This paper will summarize the latest key experimental results (Task 3) and the economic evaluation (Task 4) of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Sustainability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichnothe, Heinz

    2017-03-17

    The long-term substitution of fossil resources can only be achieved through a bio-based economy, with biorefineries and bio-based products playing a major role. However, it is important to assess the implications of the transition to a bio-based economy. Life cycle-based sustainability assessment is probably the most suitable approach to quantify impacts and to identify trade-offs at multiple levels. The extended utilisation of biomass can cause land use change and affect food security of the most vulnerable people throughout the world. Although this is mainly a political issue and governments should be responsible, the responsibility is shifted to companies producing biofuels and other bio-based products. Organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass are considered to be the preferred feedstock for the production of bio-based products. However, it is unlikely that a bio-based economy can rely only on organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass.It is crucial to identify potential problems related to socio-economic and environmental issues. Currently there are many approaches to the sustainability of bio-based products, both quantitative and qualitative. However, results of different calculation methods are not necessarily comparable and can cause confusion among decision-makers, stakeholders and the public.Hence, a harmonised, globally agreed approach would be the best solution to secure sustainable biomass/biofuels/bio-based chemicals production and trade, and to avoid indirect effects (e.g. indirect land use change). However, there is still a long way to go.Generally, the selection of suitable indicators that serve the purpose of sustainability assessment is very context-specific. Therefore, it is recommended to use a flexible and modular approach that can be adapted to various purposes. A conceptual model for the selection of sustainability indicators is provided that facilitates identifying suitable sustainability indicators based on relevance and significance in a

  7. Where do the poorest go to seek outpatient care in Bangladesh: hospitals run by government or microfinance institutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-hwei; Khan, Mujibul Alam

    2015-01-01

    Health programs implemented by microfinance institutions (MFIs) aim to benefit the poor, but whether these services reach the poorest remains uncertain. This study intended to investigate the socioeconomic distribution of patients in hospitals operated by microfinance institutions (i.e. MFI hospitals) in Bangladesh and compare the differences with public hospitals to determine if the programs were consistent with their pro-poor mandate. In this cross-sectional study, we used the convenience sampling method to conduct an interviewer-assisted questionnaire survey among 347 female outpatients, with 170 in public hospitals and 177 in MFI hospitals. Independent variables were patient characteristics categorized into predisposing factors (age, education, marital status, family size), enabling factors (microcredit membership, household income) and need factors (self-rated health, perceived needs for care). We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) to evaluate how these factors contributed to MFI hospital use. Use of MFI hospitals was associated with microcredit membership over 5 years (OR=2.9, pmicrofinance practitioners working at the grassroots level.

  8. Helping Young People Succeed: Strengthening and Sustaining Relationships between Schools and Youth Development Organizations. A National Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    Although schools and youth-development groups are committed to a similar vision of positive physical, intellectual, psychological, and social development of America's children, their isolation from each other can actually hinder growth. The strong bonds among school, community, and family that sustained older generations are frayed and disjointed…

  9. The national sports policies and the sustainable development issue in a globalized world: 2007 – 2013, the experience of an Intergovernmental Organization (IGO-WSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Klein

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, the Intergovernmental Organization, the World Sports Alliance (IGO-WSA, was founded with the support of international civil society (AICESIS, UN-NGO-IRENE and the United Nations. It is entrusted with the mission of educating youth and training the executives of the national sports system to deal with human development issues (education, equity, health, gender, environment while also contributing to the economic development of its Member States (partnerships, poverty reduction.A number of lessons can be drawn from this experience about support to national sports policies in a globalized world, more generally about the contribution to national development by and through sport.  We identify seven engines of an integrated approach to a sustainable development of sport in the developing countries.For the foreseeable future, the WSA-IGO faces six challenges, as tools for a renewed program: sustainability, infrastructures, education, equity, employment and training.Key words:

  10. Angiotensin II type 1a receptors in subfornical organ contribute towards chronic intermittent hypoxia-associated sustained increase in mean arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ashwini; Little, Joel T; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Sleep apnea is associated with hypertension. The mechanisms contributing to a sustained increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) even during normoxic awake-state remain unknown. Rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 7 days, a model of the hypoxemia associated with sleep apnea, exhibit sustained increases in MAP even during the normoxic dark phase. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) hypertension. Since the subfornical organ (SFO) serves as a primary target for the central actions of circulating ANG II, we tested the effects of ANG II type 1a receptor (AT1aR) knockdown in the SFO on the sustained increase in MAP in this CIH model. Adeno-associated virus carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) and small-hairpin RNA against either AT1aR or a scrambled control sequence (SCM) was stereotaxically injected in the SFO of rats. After recovery, MAP, heart rate, respiratory rate, and activity were continuously recorded using radiotelemetry. In the normoxic groups, the recorded variables did not deviate from the baseline values. Both CIH groups exhibited significant increases in MAP during CIH exposures (P dark phase in the CIH groups, only the SCM-injected group exhibited a sustained increase in MAP (P < 0.05). The AT1aR-CIH group showed significant decreases in FosB/ΔFosB staining in the median preoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus compared with the SCM-CIH group. Our data indicate that AT1aRs in the SFO are critical for the sustained elevation in MAP and increased FosB/ΔFosB expression in forebrain autonomic nuclei associated with CIH. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. La comunicación en la gestión de la sostenibilidad en las organizaciones/ The communication in the management of sustainability in the organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida M. Krohling Kunsch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta la síntesis de un estudio empírico realizado en organizaciones brasileñas, cuyos principales objetivos han sido mapear, describir y analizar las políticas y estrategias de comunicación para la gestión de la sostenibilidad. Describe y analiza los principales resultados, destacando los medios de comunicación y las prácticas de comunicación en la promoción de la sostenibilidad utilizado por estas organizaciones en sus relacionamientos con las diversas partes interesadas. Se centra en reflexiones sobre el poder de la comunicación en la sociedad contemporánea y el papel reservado a los tres segmentos: el gobierno, el tercer sector y, en particular, las organizaciones privadas en el desarrollo de la comunicación en los procesos de gestión de la sostenibilidad. Apoya la necesidad de una mayor conciencia y sensibilización de todos los actores sociales en la preservación del planeta Tierra. This article presents the synthesis of an empirical survey into Brazilian organizations, in which the main goal was: to map, describe and analyze the policies and communication strategies for sustainability management. It describes and analyzes the main results highlighting the media and communication practices in promoting sustainability used by these organizations through the relationship with its stakeholders. It brings thoughts and analyzes about the power of the communication on contemporary society and the role reserved for the three segments: government, third sector, and particularly private organizations in the conduction of communication in sustainability management processes. It also supports the need for greater awareness and sensibility of all social actors in preserving the planet.

  12. Where do the poorest go to seek outpatient care in Bangladesh: hospitals run by government or microfinance institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hwei Tseng

    Full Text Available Health programs implemented by microfinance institutions (MFIs aim to benefit the poor, but whether these services reach the poorest remains uncertain. This study intended to investigate the socioeconomic distribution of patients in hospitals operated by microfinance institutions (i.e. MFI hospitals in Bangladesh and compare the differences with public hospitals to determine if the programs were consistent with their pro-poor mandate.In this cross-sectional study, we used the convenience sampling method to conduct an interviewer-assisted questionnaire survey among 347 female outpatients, with 170 in public hospitals and 177 in MFI hospitals. Independent variables were patient characteristics categorized into predisposing factors (age, education, marital status, family size, enabling factors (microcredit membership, household income and need factors (self-rated health, perceived needs for care. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE to evaluate how these factors contributed to MFI hospital use.Use of MFI hospitals was associated with microcredit membership over 5 years (OR=2.9, p<.01, moderately poor household (OR=4.09, p<.001, non-poor household (OR=7.34, p<.01 and need for preventive care (OR=3.4, p<.01, compared with public hospitals. Combining membership and income, we found microcredit members had a higher tendency towards utilization but membership effect pertained to the non- and moderately-poor. Compared with the group who were non-members and the poorest, microcredit members who were non-poor had the highest likelihood (OR=7.46, p<.001 to visit MFI hospitals, followed by members with moderate income (OR=6.91, p<.001 and then non-members in non-poor households (OR=4.48, p<.01. Those who were members but the poorest had a negative association (OR=0.42, though not significant. Despite a higher utilization of preventive services in MFI hospitals, expenditure there was significantly higher.Inequity was more pronounced in MFI

  13. Targeted management of organic resources for sustainably increasing soil organic carbon: Observations and perspectives for resource use and climate adaptations in northern Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heve, William K; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Chirinda, Ngonidzashe

    2016-01-01

    Since soil organic matter (SOM) buffers against impacts of climatic variability, the objective of this study was to assess on-farm distribution of SOM and propose realistic options for increasing SOM and thus the adaptation of smallholder farmers to climate change and variability in the interior...... and residues, traditions for bush-burning and competing use of organic resources for fuels. Our findings suggest a need for effective management practices, training and awareness aimed at improving management of organic resources and, consequently, increasing SOC and resilience to climate-change-induced risks....... northern savannah of Ghana. Data and information on spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC), current practices that could enhance climate adaptation including management of organic resources were collected through biophysical assessments and snap community surveys. Even though homestead fields...

  14. Sustainable Procurement: Integrating Classroom Learning with University Sustainability Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Kyle; Harrison, Terry; Holtry, Matthew; Reeh, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Organizations are facing increased pressure from various stakeholders to address issues of sustainability, resulting in a growing demand for sustainability education and training. Procurement groups remain the key drivers of many sustainability-related strategies, placing pressure on universities to integrate sustainability concepts into the…

  15. 75 FR 56558 - Office of the Secretary: Combating Exploitative Child Labor by Promoting Sustainable Livelihoods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... authority to fund subgrants and microfinance activities. ILAB intends to obligate up to $9.5 million for a... alternatives, microfinance and other income generating activities to improve household income; and 5. Ensuring...

  16. Prediction of friction factor of pure water flowing inside vertical smooth and microfin tubes by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çebi, A.; Akdoğan, E.; Celen, A.; Dalkilic, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model of friction factor in smooth and microfin tubes under heating, cooling and isothermal conditions was developed in this study. Data used in ANN was taken from a vertically positioned heat exchanger experimental setup. Multi-layered feed-forward neural network with backpropagation algorithm, radial basis function networks and hybrid PSO-neural network algorithm were applied to the database. Inputs were the ratio of cross sectional flow area to hydraulic diameter, experimental condition number depending on isothermal, heating, or cooling conditions and mass flow rate while the friction factor was the output of the constructed system. It was observed that such neural network based system could effectively predict the friction factor values of the flows regardless of their tube types. A dependency analysis to determine the strongest parameter that affected the network and database was also performed and tube geometry was found to be the strongest parameter of all as a result of analysis.

  17. Leveraging microfinance to impact HIV and financial behaviors among adolescents and their mothers in West Bengal: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Crookston, Benjamin T; Chanani, Sheila; Kim, Jaewhan; Kline, Sean; Gray, Bobbi L

    2013-01-01

    Microfinance can be used to reach women and adolescent girls with HIV prevention education. We report findings from a cluster-randomized control trial among 55 villages in West Bengal to determine the impact of non-formal education on knowledge, attitudes and behaviors for HIV prevention and savings. Multilevel regression models were used to evaluate differences between groups for key outcomes while adjusting for cluster correlation and differences in baseline characteristics. Women and girls who received HIV education showed significant gains in HIV knowledge, awareness that condoms can prevent HIV, self-efficacy for HIV prevention, and confirmed use of clean needles, as compared to the control group. Condom use was rare and did not improve for women. While HIV testing was uncommon, knowledge of HIV-testing resources significantly increased among girls, and trended in the positive direction among women in intervention groups. Conversely, the savings education showed no impact on financial knowledge or behavior change.

  18. Microfinance against malaria: impact of Freedom from Hunger's malaria education when delivered by rural banks in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Natalie; Crookston, Benjamin; Gray, Bobbi; Alder, Steve; Dearden, Kirk

    2009-12-01

    A community randomized pre-test/post-test design was used to compare the knowledge and behaviors of microfinance clients receiving malaria education (n=213) to those receiving diarrhea education (n=223) and to non-client controls (n=268). Comparisons assessed differences at follow-up as well as within-group changes over time. At follow-up, malaria clients had significantly better malaria knowledge than comparison groups: 48.4% of malaria clients were able to identify groups most vulnerable to malaria compared with 39.2% of diarrhea clients (P=0.044) and 37.7% of non-clients (P=0.024). Malaria clients were more likely than diarrhea clients (P=0.024) (Pmicrofinance institutions can effectively contribute to community and national malaria initiatives.

  19. Rice Cultivation Methods and Their Sustainability Aspects: Organic and Conventional Rice Production in Industrialized Tropical Monsoon Asia with a Dual Cropping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chun Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Options to tackle the sustainability challenges faced in the production of rice, including global and local environmental perspectives, need to be discussed. Here, the global warming potential, water consumption and cumulative energy demand were analyzed using a life-cycle assessment to highlight the sustainability aspects of rice production in Taiwan, where a mixed organic and conventional rice production with a dual cropping system is practiced. The results show that the conventional farming method practiced in Houbi district contributes less to global warming and annual water consumption and consumes less energy than the organic method practiced in Luoshan village on a grain weight basis. It is also more lucrative for farmers because of the higher rice yield. Considering the yield ratio based on the data from two districts, the regional characteristics are more responsible for these differences. Giving up dual cropping to avail water to other sectors by fallowing during the second cropping season is preferable from the GHG emission and productivity perspectives. However, because water shortages usually occur in the first cropping season, it is more realistic to fallow during the first cropping season when domestic and other industrial users have the higher priority. The results presented here can serve as the foundation for exploring the possibilities of options, such as new biorefinery technologies and water allocation policies, in relation to influences on GHG emissions and the national self-sufficiency of rice.

  20. Organic Nanovesicular Cargoes for Sustained Drug Delivery: Synthesis, Vesicle Formation, Controlling “Pearling” States, and Terfenadine Loading/Release Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Botcha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Sustained drug delivery systems” which are designed to accomplish long-lasting therapeutic effect are one of the challenging topics in the area of nanomedicine. We developed an innovative strategy to prepare nontoxic and polymer stabilized organic nanovesicles (diameter: 200 nm from a novel bolaamphiphile, where two hydrogen bonding acetyl cytosine molecules connected to 4,4′′-positions of the 2,6-bispyrazolylpyridine through two flexible octyne chains. The nanovesicles behave like biological membrane by spontaneously self-assembling into “pearl-like” chains and subsequently forming long nanotubes (diameter: 150 nm, which further develop into various types of network-junctions through self-organization. For drug loading and delivery applications, the nanovesicles were externally protected with biocompatible poly(ethyleneglycol-2000 to prevent them from fusion and ensuing tube formation. Nontoxic nature of the nanovesicles was demonstrated by zebrafish teratogenicity assay. Biocompatible nanovesicles were loaded with “terfenadine” drug and successfully utilized to transport and release drug in sustained manner (up to 72 h in zebrafish larvae, which is recognized as an emerging in vivo model system.