WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainable development esd

  1. Education for sustainable development (ESD) : exploring theoretical and practical challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Frans Meijers; Helen Kopnina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to explore the challenges posed by the conceptual framework and diversity of practice of education for sustainable development (ESD). The implications of plurality of ESD perspectives and methodological approaches as well variations in ESD practice will be addressed.

  2. Current State and Future Prospects of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Haruhiko

    2017-01-01

    The UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) ran from 2005 to 2014. This study concerns the concepts of Sustainable Development (SD) and ESD. The term "sustainable development" was coined by the Brundtland Commission in 1987 as the key word in integrating environment and development. SD achieved international consensus at…

  3. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) : The turn away from ‘environment’ in environmental education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopnina, H.N.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the implications of the shift of environmental education (EE) towards education for sustainable development (ESD) in the context of environmental ethics. While plural perspectives on ESD are encouraged both by practitioners and researchers of EE, there is also a danger that

  4. Contributions of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) to Quality Education: A Synthesis of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Robert; Nonoyama-Tarumi, Yuko; Mckeown, Rosalyn; Hopkins, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This research is a synthesis of studies carried out in 18 countries to identify contributions of education for sustainable development (ESD) to quality education. Five common questions were used for the interviews in each country to solicit education leaders and practitioners' views on the outcome and implementation of ESD. The analysis revealed…

  5. Learning for the Future? Effects of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD on Teacher Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Andersson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, politicians, university representatives, scholars and leading NGOs share a strong belief in the ability of educational systems to generate positive attitudes to sustainable development (SD among citizens, with the idea of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD as perhaps the most apparent expression of this conviction. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether ESD might have the intended effects on teacher education students. More specifically, we account for the results from a panel study on the effects of a course on SD held in autumn 2010 at the University of Gothenburg (n = 323 on teacher education students. The surveys consisted of questions about the students’ concerns about various issues, including issues related to SD, and their attitudes towards SD and views of moral obligations to contributing to SD. The study included a control group (n = 97 consisting of students from the teacher-training programme at University West, which had not and did not include ESD. We find positive effects of ESD on almost all attitudes and perceptions, including e.g., personal responsibility in relation to SD and willingness to contribute to SD, while there is no noticeable effect in the control group. We conclude the paper by discussing the implications of our results for the idea of ESD in teacher training programmes at Swedish higher education institutions.

  6. Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development: ESD Research in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    When education for sustainable development (ESD) emerged as part of the educational agenda in the international arena, it was associated with significant shifts in the educational debate about the purpose and nature of education and with the need to respond to crises caused by the modern idea of progress. Scientists from different fields warn…

  7. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Mareike; Rauch, Franz; Eilks, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The years between 2005 and 2014 have been declared as a worldwide Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) by the United Nations. DESD's intended purpose is to promote and more thoroughly focus education as a crucial tool preparing young people to be responsible future citizens, so that our future generations can shape society in a…

  8. EnviWiki – the Czech Multimedia Toolkit for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD (reviewed text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dlouhá

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available EnviWiki, The educational encyclopaedia for ESD literacy has been selected to be part of the EC DG EAC Inventory of innovative good practice on education for sustainable development.The main purpose of the Inventory is to show concrete examples which have been implemented in the Member States under the concept of ESD in formal and non-formal learning contexts and which are at the forefront as regards innovative approaches. Projects/programmes selected as innovative good practice will be used to inform the preparation of the next Progress Report on the EU Sustainable Development Strategy in Education. See European Commission DG Education and Culture Inventory of innovative practices in education for sustainable development, the case study EnviWiki - Environmental Literacy for Teachers (CZECH REPUBLIC, page 51.

  9. The European Virtual Seminar on Sustainable Development as an Opportunity for Staff ESD Competence Development within University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kraker, Joop; Dlouhá, Jana; Machackova Henderson, Laura; Kapitulcinová, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the current and potential value of the European Virtual Seminar on Sustainable Development (EVS) as an opportunity for professional development in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) for teaching staff at university level. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents and reflects on the…

  10. A Critical Review of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Japan: Beyond the Practice of Pouring New Wine into Old Bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Japan stands as a rare country in which ESD has been incorporated as mainstream policy. However, looking back on the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (UNDESD), ESD has not brought about the transformation in Japan that one expects ESD to aim for, despite this support at the policy level. The cause may be that pouring…

  11. Starting the Pluralistic Tradition of Teaching? Effects of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) on Pre-Service Teachers' Views on Teaching about Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Klas

    2017-01-01

    There is currently a well-established belief among politicians, scholars and university representatives that educational systems can produce positive attitudes towards sustainable development (SD) among citizens. This article investigates whether Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in teacher education has effects on pre-service teachers'…

  12. Contesting 'Environment' Through the Lens of Sustainability: Examining Implications for Environmental Education (EE and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kopnina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on implications of presenting nature as a social construction, and of commodification of nature. The social construction of nature tends to limit significance of nature to human perception of it. Commodification presents nature in strict instrumental terms as 'natural resources', 'natural capital' or 'ecosystem services'. Both construction and commodification exhibit anthropocentric bias in denying intrinsic value of non-human species. This article will highlight the im-portance of a deep ecology perspective, by elaborating upon the ethical context in which construction and commodification of nature occur. Finally, this article will discuss the implications of this ethical context in relation to environmental education (EE and education for sustainable development (ESD.

  13. Hard Times in Higher Education: The Closure of Subject Centres and the Implications for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Chalkley

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within many British Universities and, indeed, across higher education internationally, how best to provide education for sustainable development (ESD has become an increasingly important issue. There is now a widespread view that higher education sectors have a key part to play in preparing societies for the transition to a low carbon economy and the shift towards more sustainable ways of living and working. In the UK, a leading role in this field has been played by the Higher Education Academy and especially its network of 24 Subject Centres, each of which promotes curriculum enhancement in a particular discipline area. The mission of the Higher Education Academy has been to help raise the overall quality of the student learning experience across all disciplines and all Higher Education institutions (HEIs. As part of promoting and supporting many kinds of curriculum innovation and staff development, the HE Academy has championed the cause of ESD. Now, however, as a result of government spending cuts, the Academy is facing severe budget reductions and all its Subject Centres are soon to close. At this pivotal moment, the purpose of this paper is, therefore, to review the HE Academy’s past contribution to ESD and to explore the likely future implications of the demise of its Subject Centres. The paper ends by outlining some ideas as to how the ESD agenda might be advanced in the post-Subject Centre era, in the light of the Academy’s intention to support subject communities under its new structure. The paper has been developed through participation in key committees, engagement with Academy and Subject Centre staff, as well as through a literature review.

  14. Building Regional Capacity for Sustainable Development through an ESD Project Inventory in RCE Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peta; Petry, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The Regional Centre of Expertise on Education for Sustainable Development in Saskatchewan (RCE Saskatchewan, Canada) is part of the United Nations University RCE Initiative in support of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-14). With funding from the Government of Saskatchewan's Go Green Fund, RCE Saskatchewan carried out…

  15. Evaluating Sustainable Development Solutions Quantitatively: Competence Modelling for GCE and ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Marko; Eggert, Sabina; Barkmann, Jan; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    To comprehensively address global environmental challenges such as biodiversity loss, citizens need an understanding of the socio-economic fundamentals of human behaviour in relation to natural resources. We argue that Global Citizenship Education and Education for Sustainable Development provide a core set of socio-economic competencies that can…

  16. What Kind of Actions Are Appropriate? Eco-School Teachers' and Instructors' Ranking of Sustainability-Promoting Actions as Content in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagell, Ulrica; Almers, Ellen; Askerlund, Per; Apelqvist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Based on the consideration that learning about different action alternatives and strategies are essential parts of ESD, this quantitative study focuses Eco-School teachers' and instructors' views on including different sustainability-promoting actions in teaching practices. Direct actions, and actions that take place in the private sphere were…

  17. ESD between Systemic Change and Bureaucratic Obfuscation: Some Reflections on Environmental Education and Education for Sustainable Development in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucker, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    As in many other countries, the transformation of the Swiss education system into one that is conducive to a sustainable society is difficult. This article attempts to clarify a framework within which such change could happen. Following an extensive review process, the author has compiled essential learning approaches, knowledge, skills, values…

  18. No-Self, Natural Sustainability and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Ling

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the significance of sustainability and several ways in which education for sustainable development (ESD) can be considered. It presents several issues related to the theories of sustainability and ESD, which are generated based on a firm concept of anthropocentrism. ESD has been used for developing a scientific understanding…

  19. Contents of Education for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D S Ermakov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The essence of education for sustainable development (ESD has been disclosed in this article. The definition of ESD has been formulated. The key approaches to the formation of the ESD curriculum have been designated. The criteria for selecting the content of ESD have been proposed. The feasibility of applying the competency based approach has been shown.

  20. Competences for Education for Sustainable Development in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Franz; Steiner, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Competences are intensively discussed in the context of cross-curricular themes, such as Sustainable Development and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), especially in light of the United Nations Decade for ESD (2004-2015). Recent literature on ESD lists a number of competences for ESD in various fields with the exception of teacher…

  1. Education for sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2009-01-01

     An introduction to the idea of sustainable development (SD) and education for sustainable development (ESD) with reference to the international Decade for Education for Sustainable Development . The chapter includes a focus on conflicting interests between present and future generations related...... to the use of natural resources and other matters, and how that kind of issues can be dealt with in education as ESD....

  2. Tracing Sustainability: An International Comparison of ESD Implementation into Lower Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoly-Simó, Péter

    2013-01-01

    With the progress of the DESD, increasing numbers of researchers have been developing indicators to effectively measure the implementation of ESD in formal, informal and non-formal education. This paper aims to measure the implementation of ESD in secondary school curricula in three countries carrying the fingerprints of a developed (Germany),…

  3. Civic Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmeier, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) often fails to consider the political dimension. To address this gap, this paper focuses on a specific political approach to ESD. The model presented is derived from the four sustainable growth targets of German Development Policy. Instead of relying on a neo-classical or neo-liberal economic paradigm,…

  4. Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Approach to Enterprise Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Division has implemented an innovative approach to Enterprise Risk Management under a unique governance structure and streamlined integration model. ESD's mission is to design and build the capability to extend human existence to deep space. The Enterprise consists of three Programs: Space Launch System (SLS), Orion, and Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO). The SLS is a rocket and launch system that will be capable of powering humans, habitats, and support systems to deep space. Orion will be the first spacecraft in history capable of taking humans to multiple destinations within deep space. GSDO is modernizing Kennedy's spaceport to launch spacecraft built and designed by both NASA and private industry. ESD's approach to Enterprise Risk Management is commensurate with affordability and a streamlined management philosophy. ESD Enterprise Risk Management leverages off of the primary mechanisms for integration within the Enterprise. The Enterprise integration approach emphasizes delegation of authority to manage and execute the majority of cross-program activities and products to the individual Programs, while maintaining the overall responsibility for all cross-program activities at the Division. The intent of the ESD Enterprise Risk Management approach is to improve risk communication, to avoid replication and/or contradictory strategies, and to minimize overhead process burden. This is accomplished by the facilitation and integration of risk information within ESD. The ESD Division risks, Orion risks, SLS risks, and GSDO risks are owned and managed by the applicable Program. When the Programs have shared risks with multiple consequences, they are jointly owned and managed. When a risk is associated with the integrated system that involves more than one Program in condition, consequence, or mitigation plan, it is considered an Exploration Systems Integration

  5. Is ‘Sustainable Development' the core of ‘Education for SustainableDevelopment'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2007-01-01

    What is the core of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and how to avoid that ESD becomes everything good in school and in reality not more than a new terminology without much innovative power for education?......What is the core of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and how to avoid that ESD becomes everything good in school and in reality not more than a new terminology without much innovative power for education?...

  6. Education for Sustainable Development: Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The United Nations' launch of the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development in 2005 has focused international attention on the concept of education for sustainable development (ESD). This paper covers the emergence of ESD in relation to environmental education in South Africa. It critiques the core concept, ...

  7. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental and Sustainability Education: Developing Geography Students' Understandings of Sustainable Development Using Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) persists as an important concept within international policy and yet, despite considerable debate, there remains a lack of consensus as to a pedagogy for ESD in schools. This paper presents findings from a study investigating how an interdisciplinary approach to ESD in England developed one class of 16-…

  8. Education for Sustainable Development: Connecting the Dots for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokool-Ramdoo, Sushita; Rumjaun, Anwar Bhai

    2017-01-01

    Critical pedagogy, practitioner experience and a regulatory perspective are employed to scrutinize the notion of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) as it occurs in the literature. They promote understanding of the challenges impeding the completion of unfinished ESD businesses. In response to practitioner-expressed needs, this paper…

  9. Outlook on Research in Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasel, Cornelia; Bormann, Inka; Schutte, Kerstin; Trempler, Kati; Fischbach, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). It shows a lack of correspondence between ESD research and recent debates in educational research. Research on ESD has established as a field of research with insufficient relations to other fields in educational research. Based on the overview…

  10. Education as a Global "Soft Power" for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayamov, Yury Nikolayevich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse various aspects of education for sustainable development (ESD) drawing attention to the approaching end of the UN Decade on ESD (DESD) in 2014 and to the necessity of the continuation of ESD activities. Defining the internationalisation of education as an ever more significant part of globalisation,…

  11. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Appendices; Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g. missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  12. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Volume 1; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g., missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  13. Consulting the UK ESD Community on an ESD Indicator to Recommend to Government: An Insight into the Micro-Politics of ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, John

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the author was contracted to research possible approaches to a UK indicator of education for sustainable development (ESD). This article describes and seeks to explain the response of government advisers and influential members of the UK ESD community to the approaches he proposed. While the UK strategy for sustainable development called…

  14. Tracing Sustainability: Education for Sustainable Development in the Lower Secondary Geography Curricula of Germany, Romania, and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoly-Simó, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) has received increasing attention. Due to the close affinity that geography as a school subject shares with both theoretical constructs and methodologies of ESD, geography has assumed a key position in the implementation of ESD in formal education. Still, little attention has so…

  15. Public housing and ecologically sustainable development in NSW government policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, M; Proctor, D. [Department of Housing, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    The New South Wales Department of Housing is a public service organisation providing quality rental housing for moderate-to-low income earners with almost 80 percent of the residents relying on government pensions or benefits as their main source of income. Over the years, demographic and social changes have resulted in a need for concentrating on housing for pensioners and smaller households. Increasing concern about the use of resources and the quality of the environment has resulted in a need for adopting sustainable practices in planning for future developments. Responding to the National Strategy of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) and recognizing the benefits of developing ESD and management practices, the Department has developed an ESD policy. This paper explains the policy and the trial by the Department of the Nationwide Housing Energy Rating Tool (NatHERs) on a sample of the Department`s dwellings. The challenges of implementing the ESD policy are education of staff, development of an ESD methodology, the establishment of standards for ESD developments through integration with industry and business, and the integration of ESD issues into planning, design and engineering briefs to facilitate their implementation at the project level. It is concluded that the development of an appropriate ESD methodology will result in a flexible and responsive application of ESD principles which will lead to the development of housing that is appropriate to the needs of the residents, is economically viable to the Department and promotes environmentally sensitive development. (author). 5 figs., refs.

  16. The Marine Education Programme and ESD Schools in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Segreda, Alejandrina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share information about the Costa Rican Marine Education Programme in relation to the quality criteria for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Schools. We found that the application of these criteria is feasible, not only to the organisation and management of schools that are looking to become ESD Schools,…

  17. Earth Charter, ESD and Chinese Philosophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Constable, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the Earth Charter and education for sustainable development (ESD), as part of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. The areas of shared interest between the two are assessed and the invaluable nature of the Earth Charter as a resource outlining global values and principles for a…

  18. Integrating Sustainable Development Concept into Science Education Program Is Not Enough; We Need Competent Science Teachers for Education for Sustainable Development--Turkish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Güliz; Teksöz, Gaye

    2016-01-01

    In order to educate science teachers for a sustainable future, recent discussions are going on related to collaboration between science education and education for sustainable development (ESD). Still, ESD has been in a development stage and needs to be improved in terms of developing teacher competencies. Therefore, in this study we focused on…

  19. From The Human-Environment Theme Towards Sustainability – Danish Geography and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2013-01-01

    Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions. In this ar......Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions...... and climate change and how geographers articulate their role and function as knowledge on human-environment interactions changes. The analysis of the geographical education reveal that geographers’ find their discipline contribute considerably to ESD, and thus the human environment theme seems...

  20. Argentina and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, Marta

    2005-01-01

    In Argentina, few groups recognize the value of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). The Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) carries no significant weight in governmental and nongovernmental circles. It does not appear in any agenda, or in any suggestion or recommendation for policy-making, not even in proposals for…

  1. System level ESD protection

    CERN Document Server

    Vashchenko, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses key aspects of analog integrated circuits and systems design related to system level electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection.  It is an invaluable reference for anyone developing systems-on-chip (SoC) and systems-on-package (SoP), integrated with system-level ESD protection. The book focuses on both the design of semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) components with embedded, on-chip system level protection and IC-system co-design. The readers will be enabled to bring the system level ESD protection solutions to the level of integrated circuits, thereby reducing or completely eliminating the need for additional, discrete components on the printed circuit board (PCB) and meeting system-level ESD requirements. The authors take a systematic approach, based on IC-system ESD protection co-design. A detailed description of the available IC-level ESD testing methods is provided, together with a discussion of the correlation between IC-level and system-level ESD testing methods. The IC-level ESD...

  2. Engaging Mindfully with the Commons: A Case of Caribbean Teachers' Experience with ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    A study of teachers' responses to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in a graduate course in Literature and Education for Sustainable Development, at the School of Education, The University of the West Indies, Mona, revealed that ESD can change indifference to the "commons" to one of mindfulness about local and global…

  3. A Model for Enhancing Education for Sustainable Development with Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Tove; Sammalisto, Kaisu; Vuorisalo, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Enhancing education for sustainable development in higher education is a global challenge. National quality assurance demands for higher education were studied in the context of ESD......Enhancing education for sustainable development in higher education is a global challenge. National quality assurance demands for higher education were studied in the context of ESD...

  4. Model Development on Awareness of Education for Sustainable Schools Development in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifah Mahat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ἀis article aims to develope the Structural Equation Model (SEM on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD student awareness around Sustainable Schools in Malaysia. ἀe cluster sampling technique was used in selecting the school samples and the respondents were then also selected through simple random sampling among upper second-ary pupils. A questionnaire survey was administered for 447 pupils, to evaluate the aḀer eᴀects of the SLAAS. ἀe results showed that the model has been developed to provide an overview of each construct (knowledge on SLAAS Program, ESD content knowledge, ESD practices knowledge, attitudes of ESD and behavioral constructs of ESD formed a ᰀt model. ἀe implication of this article showed that SLAAS Program implemented in Malaysia can be an indicator for the achievement of sustainable school.

  5. Hegemony and the Politics of Policy Making for Education for Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Stefan Lars

    2016-01-01

    Assumptions are readily made about the global nature and discourse of education for sustainable development. This study challenges assumptions made about structural power as expressed through Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) policy and politics of education. Focusing on the concept of sustainable development (SD) and ESD, the research…

  6. Education for Sustainable Development in South Africa: A Model Case Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teise, K.; le Roux, A.

    2016-01-01

    Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is an educational approach that, by being a catalyst of social change, promotes sustainability. Although South African education policy and practice appear to be oriented towards ESD, the concept is contested, and ragged with ambiguity and vagueness. Because the transformation of South African education…

  7. Education for Sustainable Development in Vietnam: Lessons Learned from Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Thi Kinh; Singer, Jane; Gannon, Tracey Jean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges in education for sustainable development (ESD) implementation in teacher education institutions (TEIs) in Vietnam and propose some appropriate solutions to advance ESD in training teachers toward sustainability. Design/methodology/approach The authors interviewed ten lecturers and 75…

  8. Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: State-of-the-Art, Barriers and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Bernaldo, María Olga; Castillejo, Ana; Manzanero, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is a new educational paradigm that allows Universities to lead and respond to social needs towards a more sustainable life. The ESD is a global preparedness and complex phenomena in relation to the effects of human activity on the environment, society and economy in spatial (global, regional and local)…

  9. Unfolding education for sustainable development as didactic thinking and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine Dahl

    2013-01-01

    This article’s primary objective is to unfold how teachers translate education for sustainable development (ESD) in a school context. The article argues that exploring tensions, ruptures and openings apparent in this meeting is crucial for the development of existing teaching practices in relation...... to ESD. The article draws on doctoral research involving interviews with researchers and teachers who have collaborated in ESD research and development projects at primary and secondary schools in two different countries, Denmark and Ireland. It is the teachers’ perspectives on the projects which form...

  10. ESD Implementation at the School Organisation Level, Part 1--Investigating the Quality Criteria Guiding School Leaders' Work at Recognized ESD Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogren, Anna; Gericke, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Research on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) implementation tends to focus primarily on student and teacher outcomes, and there have been few studies on leadership practices at the school organisation level that provide information on how quality in education contributes to ESD implementation. To address this issue, we conducted an…

  11. Branding the Green Education: Challenges Facing Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzy, Omar; Wahieb, Rasha

    2012-01-01

    Due to the scarcity in natural resources and the demand for green labour and economy, education for sustainable development (ESD) gained a great importance in developed countries, let alone developing ones. From this point of view, this paper is studying the possibility of infusing ESD in Egypt after one and a half years since January 2011 youth…

  12. German Chemistry Teachers' Understanding of Sustainability and Education for Sustainable Development--An Interview Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Mareike; Schmidt-Jacob, Sabine; Eilks, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability became a regulatory idea of national and international policies worldwide with the advent of the Agenda 21. One part of these policies includes promoting sustainability through educational reform. With the United Nations World Decade for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), spanning the years 2005 to 2014, all school…

  13. Embedding of ESD in Engineering Education: Experiences from Chalmers University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanstrom, Magdalena; Palme, Ulrika; Wedel, Maria Knutson; Carlson, Ola; Nystrom, Thomas; Eden, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on methods developed, within a three-year Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) project at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, to achieve a higher degree of embedding of ESD in engineering programmes. The major emphasis is on methods used, results achieved and lessons…

  14. Examining the Literature to Reveal the Nature of Community EE/ESD Programs and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Olivia M.

    2018-01-01

    Interest in community environmental education (EE) and community education for sustainable development (ESD) is increasing, as evidenced by the increase in studies examining community EE/ESD approaches and NAAEE's current development of the Community EE Guidelines for Excellence. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to: (1) provide a review of…

  15. Challenges of Implementing ESD in the Education Sector; Experiences in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandås, Astrid; Benedict, Faye

    This article presents and reflects on Norwegian experiences over a period of about 15 years with implementing the Norwegian national strategy for education for sustainable development (ESD) in the education system. We extract lessons about integration of ESD into education systems. After an introduction to central ideas of sustainable development and ESD, the article discusses the need for appropriate strategies and instruments. Key factors are collaboration to allow pupils and schools to actively contribute to a positive development locally and globally, interdisciplinary approaches to complex sustainability issues, and appropriate use of the ICT and other media. ESD programmes and activities should support school development and build the capacity of schools and teachers for integration of ESD.

  16. Problem Based Learning and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2012-01-01

    are problem based learning (PBL), project based learning (PjBL), case study, role play, group discussion, field work, etc. These learning approaches are capable of integrating education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering education at different levels, and do not aim to substitute the core......An engineering education that integrates education for sustainable development (ESD) perspectives claims for a learning approach centred on students, interdisciplinary and problem oriented, and this cannot be achieve through an “add on” strategy. Example of such active learning approaches...... scientific and technological knowledge but instead align it with the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the professional practice. It is agreed among ESD experts that PBL is a suitable learning approach to integrate ESD in the engineering curricula. This paper provides an overview...

  17. Climate Change Education and Education for Sustainable Development in the Republic of Korea: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Junghee

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Korea (ROK) has officially declared its national vision of green growth, and actively develops and implements policies related to education for sustainable development (ESD), green growth education (GGE) and climate change education (CCE). Over the Decade of ESD, the ROK experienced three administrations which have taken different…

  18. An ESD Pathway to Quality Education in the Cyprus Primary Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadji-Beltran, Chrysanthi; Christodoulou, Nicoletta; Zachariou, Aravella; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Barker, Susan; Kadis, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This research is based on the rationale that the well-defined framework of education for sustainable development (ESD), its connection with real life and its specific integration in the educational policies and curricula can help to enhance quality education (QE) in a meaningful and identifiable way. In a first step, the common ground of ESD and…

  19. Education for Sustainable Development: A Movement towards Pedagogies of Civic Compassion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the moral imperative for a renewed vision of schooling in the twenty-first century, from the standpoint of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). ESD advocates for teaching and learning spaces underpinned by civic compassion in the sense of "an active concern for well-being". This paradigm of education seeks…

  20. Exploring the Priorities of Teacher Education Related Policies: An Education for Sustainable Development Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Hayley; Sinnes, Astrid; Gjøtterud, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) for many is considered to be a "quality education" in its own right. There also exist many debates around the semantics and implications of such an education, however this study acknowledges the greater intentions of ESD and thus deems it necessary to analyze to what degree teacher education…

  1. When Businesses Go to School: Neoliberalism and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteaw, Bob Offei

    2008-01-01

    This paper foregrounds education for sustainable development (ESD) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as emergent discourses that need conscious efforts to align their ideals. While it explores the capacity of ESD to make significant contribution towards educational thinking and practice, it does so recognising that current neoliberalists'…

  2. UN Global Action Programme and Education for Sustainable Development: A Critical Appraisal of the Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Daniel; Aubrecht, Elisabeth Lena; Brück, Maria; Ditges, Laura; Gathen, Lea; Jahns, Maximilian; Petersmann, Moritz; Rau, Jörn; Wellmann, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations (UN) proclaimed the years 2005 to 2014 the World Decade on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). As a follow up on the World Decade, the UN launched a Global Action Programme (GAP) that is designed to set the framework for international activities on ESD. The GAP focuses on five priority areas that are of high relevance…

  3. Finding Space for Education for Sustainable Development in the Enterprise Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgitt, David

    2006-01-01

    The promotion of education for sustainable development (ESD) is likely to be constrained by its compatibility with other missions and objectives of higher education institutions (HEIs). Finding space for ESD in the Enterprise Economy invites consideration of opportunities for increasing the visibility and audibility of environmental messages in HE…

  4. Globalisation and Education for Sustainable Development: Emancipation from Context and Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Stefan L.; Östman, Leif O.

    2013-01-01

    This article tries to contribute to the critical debate on the ideological and globalising potential of education for sustainable development (ESD), which exists in the research field of environmental education, by highlighting potential contradictions in the argumentation for ESD's ideological and globalising tendency. Further, the authors…

  5. UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development: Learning Today for a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) will be co-organised in 2014 by UNESCO and the Government of Japan on the occasion of the end of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. It has the following objectives: (1) Celebrating a decade of action; (2) Reorienting education to build a better future…

  6. Unfolding Education for Sustainable Development as Didactic Thinking and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Dahl Madsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article’s primary objective is to unfold how teachers translate education for sustainable development (ESD in a school context. The article argues that exploring tensions, ruptures and openings apparent in this meeting is crucial for the development of existing teaching practices in relation to ESD. The article draws on doctoral research involving interviews with researchers and teachers who have collaborated in ESD research and development projects at primary and secondary schools in two different countries, Denmark and Ireland. It is the teachers’ perspectives on the projects which form the analytical foundation; thus, it is the practices as seen from the ‘inside’. Furthermore, ESD practices are considered in a broader societal perspective, pointing to the critical power of the practice lens.

  7. Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    César Tapia-Fonllem; Blanca Fraijo-Sing; Víctor Corral-Verdugo; Anais Ortiz Valdez

    2017-01-01

    The role that higher education plays in the promotion of sustainable development outstands in the declarations on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), besides being a research priority in higher education. However, few studies exist that evaluate sustainable lifestyles among university students. The aim of this study was to analyze the mission and vision, processes and actions undertaken to promote sustainability in higher education institutions, and to compare the pro-sustainability ...

  8. Understanding Economic and Management Sciences Teachers' Conceptions of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    America, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development has become a key part of the global educational discourse. Education for sustainable development (ESD) specifically is pronounced as an imperative for different curricula and regarded as being critical for teacher education. This article is based on research that was conducted on economic and management sciences (EMS)…

  9. Can We Improve Indicator Design for Complex Sustainable Development Goals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burford, Gemma; Tamas, P.A.; Harder, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    A conceptual framework was constructed for United Nations’ complex Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 4.7 focusing on education for sustainable development (ESD), and used to analyse the usefulness and character of indicators produced from a values-based approach called ESDinds, compared to a

  10. The implementation of education for sustainable development in Sweden: investigating the sustainability consciousness among upper secondary students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Teresa; Gericke, Niklas; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2014-09-01

    Background: Sustainable development (SD) is a complex idea, based on environmental, economic and social dimensions. In line with SD, education for sustainable development (ESD) is an approach to teaching that combines cognitive and affective domains and aims to build empowerment abilities. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to investigate effects of the implementation of ESD in Sweden, in terms of developing students' sustainability consciousness (SC). Two groups of students were included: one was from schools with a profile of ESD and the other one was from comparable schools without explicit ESD-profile. Sample: A total of 638 students from upper secondary schools (grade 12) in science-related or social science-related programs participated in the study. Design and methods: A procedure was created for the selection of schools considered to be the most active in using an ESD approach as well as comparable schools with no explicit ESD approach. During spring 2013, the students responded to a questionnaire based on sustainability knowingness, attitudes and behaviors within the environmental, economic and social dimensions of SD that together constitute the concept of SC. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The results indicate that there are significant differences in SC between students from schools that teach with an ESD approach compared to students from regular schools. Furthermore, a significant difference between the two groups of students was found in the underlying economic dimension of SC. No significant differences were found in the environmental and social dimensions of SC. Conclusions: Although the results show that ESD-profiled schools have effect on students' SC, the effects are relatively small. Therefore, the effects and nature of the implementation of ESD are discussed.

  11. Bridging Geography and Education for Sustainable Development: A Korean Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Douglas R.; Tschapka, Johannes M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an apparent disconnect between geography and education for sustainable development (ESD), with geography underrepresented in publications and curricula related to sustainability though the discipline embraces the need to foment positive change. To bridge this schism, this article introduces advances in education for sustainable…

  12. Sustainable Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsegai Berhane Ghebretekle

    Abstract. This article examines the concept of sustainable development after the Post-. 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement with particular emphasis on Ethiopia. Various African countries are vulnerable to climate change, as is evidenced by recent droughts. Ethiopia is selected as a case study in light of its pace in.

  13. Curriculum Issues: Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries--Zimbabwe Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambudzo, Ignatius Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate curriculum issues, teaching and learning for sustainable development in secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Education for sustainable development (ESD) aims at changing the approach to education by integrating principles, values, practices and needs in all forms of learning. Literature has documented the importance of…

  14. Think Piece: Re-thinking Education for Sustainable Development as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modernist expansion of Education is examined to explore how the concept of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) has emerged, is being worked with, and is being assessed in imperatives intended to foster social-ecological change on a global scale. The opening review sketches how education developed ...

  15. The Kosovo Education for Sustainable Development's Role in Promoting the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beka, Arlinda

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Kosovo declared its independence in 2008 following almost a decade of administration by the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. During the United Nations administration the first initiatives towards Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) were taken, particularly with the Millennium Development Goals agenda. Following the idea of…

  16. Locative Meaning-making: An Arts-based Approach to Learning for Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eernstman, N.; Wals, A.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The term sustainable development is often criticized for having lost credibility due to a lack of clear-cut delineation. The same holds true for education designed to foster sustainable development often referred to as education for sustainable development (ESD). This contribution agrees that the

  17. The Effect of Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Swedish Compulsory Schools--Assessing Pupils' Sustainability Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, D.; Gericke, N.; Chang Rundgren, S.-N.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, numerous schools in Sweden have implemented education for sustainable development (ESD) as an explicit guiding approach in teaching. In this paper, we investigate the effect of this approach in comparison with that of pupils taught in ordinary schools. Accordingly, we introduce the concept of sustainability consciousness to…

  18. Cosmopolitan perspectives on education and sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Sund

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we draw attention to the possibilities of the philosophical perspectives of cosmopolitanism in the development of ESD. We argue that one challenge facing the development and implementation of ESD is the finding of balanced ways to deal with the normativity dilemma that take both the search for consensus and universal claims and particular contexts and dissensionseriously. The paper begins with a brief sketch of environmental andsustainability education in transition and a problematisation of the universal characteristics of ESD. Drawing on the recent works of Martha C. Nussbaum, Peter Kemp, Kwame Anthony Appiah and Sharon Todd, we then explore how scholars with different cosmopolitanism approaches balance between the cultivation of universal values and individuals’ autonomous thinking and relate these approaches to ESD. Our overall claim is that ESD is in need of a critical discussion and exploration of ESD as a political project with dissonant voices that takes the particular human encounter into consideration.

  19. Worry becomes hope in education for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Persson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in environmental education and education for sustainable development (ESD have discussed in what ways young people’s experience in school may contribute to their action competence. This paper illustrates how an action research study centered on students’ reflections can contribute to a change in teaching that supports their action competence in education for sustainable development (ESD. The emphasis is on a pluralistic approach to ESD in which problems concerning sustainable development are considered as open-ended where students’ voices, action competence and decision-makingplay an important role. The researcher together with a teacher and her Year 9 class in a suburb of Stockholm carried out the action research study. The research corpus for the study was the students’ reflections in log books and interviews. Interviews were conducted with a smaller group of five students, and an interview was also made with the teacher at the end of the project to document her experiences. The case illustrates how students’ worries weremade salient through their reflections, which in turn made a change in teaching possible that transformed students’ worries into hope and supported their action competence. This way of working in the school practice may help teachers to think about ESD in new ways as well as in other areas of education.

  20. Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education in China: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingqing

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the significance of education in promoting sustainable development (SD), China has developed a number of policies and initiatives relating to education for sustainable development (ESD) and climate change education (CCE). The article first reviews China's national policies and initiatives with regard to SD, climate change, education,…

  1. Balancing the Tensions and Meeting the Conceptual Challenges of Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Nicole; Nazir, Joanne; Breiting, Soren; Goh, Kim Chuan; Pedretti, Erminia

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses one of the key challenges for work on education, sustainable development and climate change: the overall conceptualisation of central ideas such as Environmental Education (EE), Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and Climate Change Education (CCE). What do these concepts mean in diverse contexts and amongst diverse…

  2. "Our Common World" Belongs to "Us": Constructions of Otherness in Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse how good intentions in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) discursively construct and maintain differences between "Us" and "Them". The empirical material consists of textbooks about sustainable development used in Swedish schools. An analysis of how "Us" and…

  3. Science Education and Education for Sustainable Development--Justifications, Models, Practices and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilks, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The year 2014 marks the end of the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). All educational domains and levels, including primary and secondary science education, have been working to contribute to education enabling younger generations to become responsible citizens and promote sustainable development in our world.…

  4. ESD analog circuits and design

    CERN Document Server

    Voldman, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

  5. Competencies in Education for Sustainable Development: Exploring the Student Teachers’ Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Cebrián

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of higher education, over 100 universities have signed international declarations and have committed to embed sustainability within their operations, outreach, education and research. However, despite the declaration of good intentions and policy developments at the national, regional and international level, little has been achieved in terms of embedding education for sustainable development holistically in the curriculum. To date, a number of research studies have focused on the perceptions and views of university students in relation to sustainable development knowledge, skills and competencies; however, few studies have focused on student teachers’ perceptions of education for sustainable development. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions and views of a group of thirty-two student teachers in relation to education for sustainable development competencies. The research instrument used was a questionnaire. This study provides evidence on the education for sustainable development (ESD competencies that student teachers would prioritize in a school project related to ESD: acquisition of knowledge and practical skills related to nature and natural sciences, to the detriment of other types of learning, such as the promotion of ethical values, positive attitudes towards sustainability and the management of emotions among their future primary school students. Existing ESD theoretical frameworks need to become more alive and integrated within the existing teacher education curriculum to promote the awareness and development of ESD competencies amongst student teachers.

  6. Education for Sustainable Development: Experiences from Action Research with Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deghaidy, Heba

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on Egyptian science teachers' experiences in collective action research projects with a focus on education for sustainable development (ESD). Science teachers were enrolled in a study course "Teaching Strategies" that had been revised with a focus on sustainability. The course was introduced in the spring semester of…

  7. In Transition towards Sustainability: Bridging the Business and Education Sectors of Regional Centre of Expertise Greater Sendai Using Education for Sustainable Development-Based Social Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ofei-Manu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a business-school collaborative learning partnership in the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD in Greater Sendai. This partnership is further linked to a broader context of multi-stakeholder public participation in the RCE that was set up to advance the ESD agenda in the region. The authors propose a conceptual framework for multi-stakeholder, ESD-based social learning within the RCE with the aim of enabling the creation of a sustainability-literate society. This proposal is based on the results of students’ prior experience in ESD activities, optimal age for ESD learning and future job choices presented in this paper, together with a reported article that the levels of sustainability of the two sectoral organizations were mixed and hence need improvement. The paper argues that it will be good to focus on bridging the business and education sectors by building ESD capacity of the children and youth in the formal education sector. It contends this could be done through collaborative learning using the government-mandated “Period of Integrated Studies” (PIS in the Japanese primary and secondary school curriculum. Additionally, it will be appropriate for the RCE Greater Sendai Steering Committee to facilitate and coordinate the learning processes and also promote networking and cooperative interactions among the actors and stakeholders in the region. Recommendations for improvement of the learning partnerships in RCE Greater Sendai are made for consideration at the local and national policy levels.

  8. COOPERATION AND EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN GLOBALIZATION ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEDELCU ELENA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to approach a relatively new topic: international cooperation for sustainable development. The first part of this paper is a theoretical construct which deals with the connection that exists between its main variables: globalization, democratization and development. This part of the paper also brings into evidence the necessity and importance of international cooperation for sustainable development (SD during the globalization era. The second part of the paper aims to briefly analyse the importance and practice of education for sustainable development (ESD in our contemporary society: the case of Romania. Conclusions represent the object of the last part of the paper.

  9. SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the image of the international business environment has changed significantly. Studies conducted by UNCTAD shows that corporate phenomenon developments in the world economy is growing. Without claiming to present an exhaustive topic so vast we tried to capture some "facets" of sustainable development from the perspective of multinational corporations, given the expansion of these economic entities and strengthening their power in the global economy. We present more negative aspects of the actions of multinational corporations in terms of sustainable development, it is very important to know both sides of the coin, which will not only help transnational giants including release. Based on issues such as corporate social responsibility, environmental pollution and workers' rights, we sought to counter official statements. The conclusion is that these economic entities are real forces that can not be ignored in today's world and the obvious problem of sustainable development can not be addressed independently of the phenomenon, context we also identified some possible solutions to conflict of corporations and essence of the concept of sustainable development.

  10. Sustainable Schools in the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Within UNESCO's conception of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), schools should be implementing approaches to teaching and learning that integrate goals for conservation, social justice, appropriate development and democracy into a vision and a mission of personal and social change. ESD also involves ...

  11. Teachers’ Competencies for the Implementation of Educational Offers in the Field of Education for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Bertschy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The term of education is an integral part of any programmatic political document on sustainable development. This fact underlines the significance that is assigned to education in the context of sustainable development. It leads to the question of what competencies teachers need in order to develop and implement educational offers in the field of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD so that they can aspire to and attain specific educational goals with their students. This touches on the question of the building of corresponding competencies in teacher education and further education. So far, few attempts have been made to describe teachers’ competencies regarding ESD and to develop corresponding competence models. The following article presents two models—Curriculum, Sustainable Development, Competences, Teacher Training (CSCT Model and Learning for the future: The Competences in Education for Sustainable Development (ECE Model—and discusses their benefit for teacher education and further education. These models differ in how broadly they define ESD and in what audiences they target at. This comparison shows and explains why competence models should focus on profession-specific core competencies if they are to be used as a basis for the conception of educational offers in the field of ESD in education and further education of teachers. The drawn conclusion consists in initial considerations for the conception of another competence model.

  12. Imaging indicator for ESD safety testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, LeRoy L.,; Nissen, April; Keifer, Patrick N.; Tyson, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new detection method for electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing of explosives, using a single-lens reflex (SLR) digital camera and a 200-mm macro lens. This method has demonstrated several distinct advantages to other current ESD detection methods, including the creation of a permanent record, an enlarged image for real-time viewing as well as extended periods of review, and ability to combine with most other Go/No-Go sensors. This report includes details of the method, including camera settings and position, and results with wellcharacterized explosives PETN and RDX, and two ESD-sensitive aluminum powders.

  13. Educational Systems Design (ESD): An Integrated, Disciplined Inquiry in Schools of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Badrul; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the purpose and function of educational systems design (ESD) programs in schools of education. Highlights include the need for systemic change in educational reform; an interdisciplinary program on ESD that was developed at Indiana University; preparing specialists in ESD; and qualifications of academic advisors in ESD programs. (13…

  14. Institutionalizing ESD Standards in Teacher Education Programs: Case of National Accreditation Council for Teacher Education, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Munawar Sultana

    2015-01-01

    Any reform in education leverages reform in teacher education. The National Accreditation Council for Teacher Education developed Standards for Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs including specific standards relating to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). Data from 103 teacher education programs (TEPs) accredited during the first…

  15. A Collaborative Action Research Project towards Embedding ESD within the Higher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a collaborative action research project conducted at the University of Southampton with the aim to promote curriculum and professional development in education for sustainable development (ESD) and learn from everyday practices of academics. Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach guided by…

  16. Perceptions and Attitudes of Early Childhood Teachers in Korea about Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunhye; Kim, Heejin; Yu, Sunyoung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the perceptions and attitudes of Korean early childhood teachers about education for sustainable development (ESD). A total of 301 Korean early childhood teachers participated in a survey which was purposefully developed for this research. The survey focused on three areas of interest: understanding of concepts about…

  17. Primary Schools Eco-Friendly Education in the Frame of Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabawani, Bulan; Hanika, Ita Musfirowati; Pradhanawati, Ari; Budiatmo, Agung

    2017-01-01

    A research on primary school education in the frame of education for sustainable development, as known as ESD, is important because the awareness of eco-friendly activities and environment empowerment cannot be developed in a short time. Meanwhile, human activities have caused significant environmental degradation. This is an exploratory study…

  18. EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Alilova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim is to consider the relationship of philosophy and education; the article also reviews the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD, a global model for a special educational activity. We also discuss the features of the philosophical approach to the issue of sustainable development. Discussion. In research, we use the method of socio-natural approach, a new educational paradigm that combines the theory and concept of training and education within the anthropocentric approach based on humanistic philosophical ideas which laid the basis for understanding the person as the subject of life, history and culture. We analyzed environmental and educational aspects of sustainable development in the current context. In order to address these challenges, philosophy produces new concepts, theories and paradigms. It is necessary to work on people's motivation and values, develop their cooperation skills, teach civic engagement and democratic by action rather than words. Only a highly educated society can generate environmental paradigm and implement the strategy of sustainable development. Conclusions. We recommend transferring research outcomes into practice in schools starting with elementary school, as well as in vocational schools and universities. Clarifying the essence of the concept of education for sustainable development is possible through philosophical understanding of its genesis and ideas.

  19. Towards Using Transformative Education as a Benchmark for Clarifying Differences and Similarities between Environmental Education and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    The UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) charges educators with a key role in developing and "securing sustainable life chances, aspirations and futures for young people". Environmental Education (EE) and ESD share a vision of quality education and a society that lives in balance with Earth's carrying capacity,…

  20. Civic Education for Sustainable Development and Its Consequences for German Civic Education Didactics and Curricula of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunold, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Since the nineties, the principle of sustainable development has increasingly been adopted by policy makers and civil society in Germany and, of course, in many countries of the world. With the acceptance of this principle, the significance of education for sustainable development (ESD) has also been recognised. Increased awareness of the problems…

  1. The Marine Education Programme and ESD Schools in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Segreda, Alejandrina

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to share information about the Costa Rican Marine Education Programme in relation to the quality criteria for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Schools. We found that the application of these criteria is feasible, not only to the organisation and management of schools that are looking to become ESD Schools, but also for the analysis of different projects seeking to educate students from the perspective of sustainable development. The way in which the criteria were adapted in this case to the area of teaching and learning proved both easy and effective, following the conceptual document produced by Breiting, Mayer and Mogensen in 2005. We therefore recommend that proposals of this kind be disseminated more widely and more attention be paid to their potential to contribute to education systems. As to the Marine Education Programme, the analysis performed highlighted its pertinence and conceptual orientation, and provided an insight into the methodology applied during its constituent workshops; however, in this case, the approach adopted was not tailored in accordance with quality criteria for ESD.

  2. Essential variables help to focus sustainable development goals monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reyers, B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available in the course of implementing the whole process iteratively (Box 1). Some critical research needs for each criterion are:Figure 3 ESo cV ECV EBV EOV ExxV Exx V ESD GV Exx V core ESD GV ESo cVESocV Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability Various areas...

  3. Integrating the Concept of Sustainable Development into English Language Curriculum of Environmental Engineering Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rūta Petkutė

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to present and discuss practical implementation of the objectives of the project Sustainable Living Environment carried out at the Faculty of Environmental Engineering of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU. The project is a response to a commonly articulated and acknowledged need to infuse sustainable development principles into traditional curricula of all levels of education to pursue goals of sustainable development. Thus, the present study aims to take an account of the increasing role of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD in a globalized world and define how the implimentation of the ESD objectives changes teaching/learning patterns at a university of technology. Moreover, it offers an interdisciplinary curriculum scheme for teaching/learning English as a second language for Environmental Engineering as an efficient means to integrate principles of sustainable development into language classroom.

  4. Mapping of Student Sustainable Development Education Knowledge in Malaysia Using Geographical Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Hanifah; Hashim, Mohmadisa; Nayan, Nasir; Saleh, Yazid; Norkhaidi, Saiyidatina Balkhis

    2018-01-01

    This article aims to examine the levels of education for sustainable development (ESD) knowledge among students in secondary schools according to zones in Malaysia by using GIS mapping. The five main zones of the study were the north zone, the south zone, the east coast zone, the central zone, and the East Malaysia zone. This quantitative form of…

  5. Education in Sustainable Development: How Can Science Education Contribute to the Vulnerability Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Education for human development within the constraints of sustainability is problematic for schools. On one hand, it is a political idea that continues to evolve with successive compromises between social groups with differing or even conflicting interests. ESD is therefore inherently "non-disciplinary" and cannot be the basis of a single school…

  6. Education for Sustainable Development in Technology Education in Irish Schools: A Curriculum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in technology education and the extent to which it is currently addressed in curriculum documents and state examinations in technology education at post-primary level in Ireland. This analysis is conducted amidst the backdrop of considerable change in technology…

  7. Embracing the Paradox in Educational Change for Sustainable Development: A Case of Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Higher education institutions have been encouraged to prepare their graduates to be socially and environmentally responsible professionals. However, previous studies have found a slow uptake of education for sustainable development (ESD) in university curricula, particularly in non-environmental disciplines. This paper investigates the process of…

  8. Globalisation and Education for Sustainable Development: Exploring the Global in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Stefan L.; Östman, Leif O.

    2016-01-01

    The article explores education for sustainable development (ESD) as a policy concept in different spaces and how it is re-articulated as part of a process of globalisation. The objective is to explore empirically an alternative set of logics in order to conceive of this process of globalisation. With this objective in mind, the article…

  9. How education for sustainable development is implemented in Germany: Looking through the lens of educational governance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Inka; Nikel, Jutta

    2017-12-01

    The United Nations (UN) Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) aimed to integrate the principles, values and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of education and learning around the world. The authors of this article address the implementation process of ESD in Germany during the UN Decade (2005-2014). By undertaking a meta-analysis of the findings of four related sub-studies they carried out during a three-year project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the authors contribute to the understanding of the process of transferring the concept of ESD within a multi-level education system. They investigated this process at two levels - the federal state (a sub-national entity in Germany) and the communal level. Drawing on educational governance theory, the authors unveil principles, norms, rules and procedures in the coordination of action within constellations of heterogeneous actors contributing to the implementation of ESD in their social entities. The outcome of the meta-analysis describes an emerging governance regime in ESD, taking into consideration the following features impacting the coordination of action being carried out by the actors involved: (1) the understanding of the normative concept of ESD as content of negotiation; (2) the perceived opportunity for actors to gain and increase appreciation within the field of ESD as an incentive for and driver of engagement; and (3) the dynamic quality of the set-up, rules and principles of the coordination of action, which renders these subject to situative changes. In the final part of the paper, the findings are discussed from the perspectives of the theory of transfer and the current empirical basis of ESD policy and governance.

  10. How education for sustainable development is implemented in Germany: Looking through the lens of educational governance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Inka; Nikel, Jutta

    2017-10-01

    The United Nations (UN) Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) aimed to integrate the principles, values and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of education and learning around the world. The authors of this article address the implementation process of ESD in Germany during the UN Decade (2005-2014). By undertaking a meta-analysis of the findings of four related sub-studies they carried out during a three-year project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the authors contribute to the understanding of the process of transferring the concept of ESD within a multi-level education system. They investigated this process at two levels - the federal state (a sub-national entity in Germany) and the communal level. Drawing on educational governance theory, the authors unveil principles, norms, rules and procedures in the coordination of action within constellations of heterogeneous actors contributing to the implementation of ESD in their social entities. The outcome of the meta-analysis describes an emerging governance regime in ESD, taking into consideration the following features impacting the coordination of action being carried out by the actors involved: (1) the understanding of the normative concept of ESD as content of negotiation; (2) the perceived opportunity for actors to gain and increase appreciation within the field of ESD as an incentive for and driver of engagement; and (3) the dynamic quality of the set-up, rules and principles of the coordination of action, which renders these subject to situative changes. In the final part of the paper, the findings are discussed from the perspectives of the theory of transfer and the current empirical basis of ESD policy and governance.

  11. Levels of governance in policy innovation cycles in community education: the cases of Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kolleck, N.; Jörgens, H.; M. Well

    2017-01-01

    While there is little doubt that social networks are essential for processes of implementing social innovations in community education such as Climate Change Education (CCE) or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), scholars have neglected to analyze these processes in the multilevel governance system using Social Network Analysis. In this article, we contribute to closing this research gap by exploring the implementation of CCE and ESD in education at the regional and global levels. We...

  12. Levels of Governance in Policy Innovation Cycles in Community Education: The Cases of Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Kolleck; Helge Jörgens; Mareike Well

    2017-01-01

    While there is little doubt that social networks are essential for processes of implementing social innovations in community education such as Climate Change Education (CCE) or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), scholars have neglected to analyze these processes in the multilevel governance system using Social Network Analysis. In this article, we contribute to closing this research gap by exploring the implementation of CCE and ESD in education at the regional and global levels. We...

  13. ESD practice through global approach -7-year practices of developing science lessen modules and fostering integrated decision making ability-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiyama, Kosei

    2016-04-01

    Hiroshima University High School (HUHS) has devised and carried out overseas exchange programs on ESD issues for 7 years. These programs have been carried out as a part of a government-aided project called SSH (Super Science High School) *1. To start with, we had cooperative study program with a school in Germany in 2009, and next year with a school in Korea, and then gradually have expanded the cooperative schools. Since 2013, we have worked with schools in four countries; Korea, Thailand, Czech and Germany. Science lesson modules here refers to an assembly of a set of lessons, newly developed and improved for the project. These modules characteristically require the students to make decisions by themselves on given problems. In the course of the decision making, students learn what kind of data or facts should be presented as evidence and how they can make their decisions known to others. Among several modules we have designed, the one introduced here deals with the use of solar energy, which we carried out with a school in Korea in 2014-2015. It also includes lessons of the fuel cells using energy from hydrogen gas generated by solar cells. It aims to develop global human resources through carefully planned activities. First, the students of both schools make mixed groups and conduct experiments in physics, chemistry or biology on a given problem related to solar energy. Then they discuss in groups using data obtained from the experiments and through the Internet as evidence. After the thorough discussion, each group gives a presentation on their decision. The analysis of the presentations and the questionnaire to the students revealed the following points: 1) Students have come to have multidimensional perspectives on the utilization of solar energy. 2) Students have come to combine the results of different experiments when making decisions. 3) Students have developed flexible attitudes toward other cultures. 4) Students have developed communication skills in

  14. Special Issue—Pedagogy for Education for Sustainability in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Education for Sustainability (EfS and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD have been under discussion for some two decades. The UN Decade for Education for Sustainable Development 2004–2014 has provided a most important focus for ESD, and for its facilitation. However, while the Decade raised awareness of the need for ESD generally, and particularly in Higher Education, discussion of how this education can be effectively delivered to learners is still gaining momentum. This is especially the situation when considering EfS/ESD in Higher Education Institutions (HEI.

  15. Thermodynamics and sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Rene

    1997-01-01

    It is the objective of this thesis to demonstrate exergy analysis as a powerful instrument to obtain sustainable development. An important aspect of sustainable development is the minimisation of irreversibilities caused by the use of non-renewables. In order to limit the scope of this thesis

  16. Alternative Communications about Sustainability Education

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Sue L. T.

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, UNESCO communicated its conceptualization of education for sustainable development (ESD). This paper does not assume that UNESCO was ineffective in communicating its approach to ESD; rather, the premise is that UNESCO’s actual message was not well received by everyone, with some pushing back with alternative communications of their own. This paper identifies and profiles seven vanguard theoretical and pedagogical appro...

  17. Locative Meaning-making: An Arts-based Approach to Learning for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen E.J. Wals

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The term sustainable development is often criticized for having lost credibility due to a lack of clear-cut delineation. The same holds true for education designed to foster sustainable development often referred to as education for sustainable development (ESD. This contribution agrees that the term suffers from a want of meaning, but argues that the persistent hunt for a definition—i.e., a fixed generic description—produces rather than resolves this deficit. What sustainable development means is context and time dependent and is therefore necessarily ambiguous, open-ended and dynamic. Hence, the success of ESD depends on the paradoxical imperative of reducing vagueness while at the same time maintaining ambiguity. This paper explores how this can be established and proposes a process informed by the arts.  Drawing from dialogic practices, site-specific theatre and a project conducted in a British village, this writing discusses elements that constitute a process of “context-based meaning finding”. It concludes that ESD essentially starts with and revolves around re-embedding SD in life and the act of living, engaging people in place through processes in which communities yield their own, context and time specific interpretations of sustainable development.

  18. Analysis of Pre-School Teachers' Views on the Importance of Education for Sustainable Development by Means of Location and Household Type in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Deniz Kahriman; Olgan, Refika

    2016-01-01

    This article explores views of pre-school teachers in Turkey regarding the importance of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). It also explores how pre-school teachers' views on the importance of Education for Sustainable Development can be explained by their experiences with nature in childhood. The study sample consisted of 838 pre-school…

  19. Turkish Student Science Teachers' Conceptions of Sustainable Development: A phenomenography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Aydin, Abdullah

    2013-03-01

    In creating a society whose citizens have sustainable lifestyles, education for sustainable development (ESD) plays a key role. However, the concept of sustainable development (SD) has developed independently from the input of educators; therefore, ESD presents current teachers with many challenges. At this point, understanding how stakeholders in the education sector (school students, student teachers, and teachers) view SD is of great importance. We selected a sample of 113 Turkish student science teachers from this body of stakeholders and distributed a questionnaire to them that included two separate sections. In the first section, questions regarding personal information such as gender, age, and year group were asked, whereas the meaning of SD was the focus of the second part. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse student teachers' descriptions of SD. The results showed that student teachers had a variety of ideas about SD that could be collected under headings such as environment, technology, society, economy, politics, energy, and education. In addition, we thought that gender, context-based issues, and informal experiences might be responsible for the variety of the responses.

  20. Contemporary Regional Issues in Sustainability : Prospective Application for Activation of Local Community and University Education from an International Seminar

    OpenAIRE

    Pengiran Bagul, Awangku Hassanal Bahar; Ohashi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Employment of the education for sustainable development (ESD) is one of the important issues for the innovation of university education. ESD includes key sustainable development issues such as poverty, social design, commercialization, community participation and livelihood from the global standpoint of view. An international sustainable seminar was held in Malaysia to share the concept for sustainability in 2016. As the result, the concept for sustainability or sustainable society was shown ...

  1. Integration of Sustainability in Engineering Education: Why Is PBL an Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Education for sustainable development (ESD) is one of the challenges engineering education currently faces. Engineering education needs to revise and change its curriculum to integrate ESD principles and knowledge. Problem based learning (PBL) has been one of the main learning pedagogies used to integrate sustainability in engineering…

  2. Social learning–oriented capacity–building for critical transitions towards sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Using two reviews of the United Nations Decade on Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) and a special report on social learning–based ESD prepared for the end of the DESD conference as a backdrop (Wals, Review of contexts and structures for ESD. UNESCO, Paris, 2009a; Wals, J Educ Sustain

  3. Assessing Preschools Using the Eco-Schools Program in Terms of Educating for Sustainable Development in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Aysel; Guler Yildiz, Tulin

    2017-01-01

    This study assesses the practices and environmental properties of preschools implementing the Eco-Schools program, targeting education for sustainable development (ESD) in terms of the program's environmental, sociocultural, and economic pillars. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used. The sample group, determined through criterion…

  4. Education for Sustainable Development in Ethnic Autonomous Areas of China: A Comparison of Two Curriculum Initiatives and Their Educational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Yishin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the educational implications of two curriculum initiatives in China that have produced curricular materials promoting education for sustainable development (ESD) in minority-populated ethnic autonomous areas in China. The two curriculum projects present distinctive discourses, conceptions, models, frameworks and scopes of ESD…

  5. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT VERSUS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Scutaru

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper put in antithesis, theoretically, two models of development and evolution of mankind, namely, economic development based on consumption of the exhaustible resources and pollution and on the other hand the development based on the concepts of sustainable development, involving a new mentality on human life and environment. Economic development includes economic growth, quantified in particular through the GDP, aspect that leads to a reduced analysis taking into account a limited number of variables such as household income, employment labour, consumption of goods and services, etc.. Perpetuation of this model has led, over time, to the company's inability to solve the problems facing mankind today and serious discrepancies regarding current levels of human development. This type of model does not take into account variables such as unemployment, poverty, education, health, environmental pollution, population migration, urban overcrowding, social inclusion etc. At the opposite side of this type of development, which proves to be beyond the crowd problems currently facing humanity, is a new alternative model, that of sustainable development, which provides an integrated view of all these variables and hence the chance of the human society to a new level of evolution. The sustainable development model of mankind put, among others, the zero growth issue or even sustained decrease for some countries. This model requires also reducing resource consumption and increase sustainability of assets created. It also offers practical solutions to many current problems of mankind, among which we can mention providing food for a growing world population and producing clean alternative energy.

  6. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Kenneth F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  7. Saving Resources - Lesson plan of ESD in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Takuya

    2010-05-01

    Geographical education has to perceive the world from diversified viewpoints by involving ESD (Education for Sustainable Development). This can be realized by teaching geography as an integrated science, including ESD that considers ecological, economic and social aspects.. In Japan especially, geographical education tends to emphasize the environmental aspects. The investigation of circumstances from diversified viewpoints helps to analyse the society scientifically and generates? the qualities of a global citizenship toward a sustainable society. And ESD aims at creating the values of sustainability, which is necessary for a global citizenship. In this context, I have developed the lesson plan of ESD in Geography at a secondary level.. Can advanced technologies foster sustainable development? The presentation shows the advanced technology-generated products and analyses the merits and failures with their effects on the global society. The examples of these products are hybrid cars and mobile phones. Cars are necessary for the mobility of our widespread modern society. On the other hand, it is also true that environmental pollution is becoming more serious by the increasing number of cars. We usually assume that economic development and environmental protection are contradictory. But hybrid cars which are coming to world attention now, have good gas mileage compared with normal cars, so they can conserve energy and cut down on the amount of exhaust at the same time. Mobile phones are necessary in business situations, as a tool that helps to communicate while moving. In addition, mobile phones are means that support the life of people living in sparsely populated areas like in Northern Europe. Here, we can curb costs for transmission facilities that were needed otherwise. There is one thing that underlies these advanced technology-generated products such as hybrid cars and mobile phones. The resource that makes the hybrid car technology and the miniaturization of

  8. Management Information System for ESD Program Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    Management Information System (MIS) functional requirements for the ESD Program Office are defined in terms of the Computer-Aided Design and Specification Tool. The development of the computer data base and a description of the MIS structure is included in the report. This report addresses management areas such as cost/budgeting, scheduling, tracking capabilities, and ECP

  9. TOURISM AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ionela Butnaru

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and sustainable development are the subject of many initiatives and public or private debates in Romania. The main problem to which these initiatives try to find an answer is mostly related to the income generation for the local communities by using rationally and efficiently the local potential, in agreement with the economic, social, natural, and cultural factors. Consequently, some measures should be taken, and the tourist sector as a whole needs all the methods of sustainable development: new technologies, change of social behaviour, change of environmental legislation, methods of environmental management, better planning and development of control procedures. In this article, we presented a model of tourism development which should be applied in all the regions of great tourist attraction, and we realised a synthesis of the socio-economic advantages of sustainable tourism.

  10. Multiculturalism, Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and the Shifting Discursive Landscape of Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Bruce; McArdle, Felicity

    2011-01-01

    Australia has a long and sometimes turbulent relationship with the migrant Other. This paper examines a component of this relationship via the window of contemporary multicultural policy. The paper begins with an analysis of the political and social conditions that enabled a national and bipartisan policy of multiculturalism to emerge as…

  11. Integration of Sustainability in Engineering Education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Education for sustainable development (ESD) is one of the challenges engineering education currently faces. Engineering education needs to revise and change its curriculum to integrate ESD principles and knowledge. Problem based learning (PBL) has been one of the main learning pedagogies...... used to integrate sustainability in engineering education. However, there is a lack of understanding of the relation between ESD and PBL principles and the ways in which they can be integrated and practised in the engineering curricula. This paper aims to investigate the relation between PBL and ESD...... and the ways in which they are integrated and practised in the engineering curricula. Design/methodology/approach: The study starts with a review of the literature concerning ESD and PBL theories where relations between both are defined. The literature review is followed by an empirical work in which the PBL...

  12. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PARADIGM - SYNOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinescu Andreea

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Even if sustainable development is a concept that gained quite recently its scientific prestige, through contribution of researchers its content has upgraded to a high degree of conceptual luggage and, through contribution from governance representatives, has gained an impressive good-practice background. Allowing the use of different methodological premises and conceptual tools, sustainable development paradigm is equipped with all the elements that would allow the opening of new horizons of knowledge. Based on the facility which can operate the concept of sustainable development, the European Union aims to develop both a more competitive economy based on environmental protection as well as a new governance of economic policy. This on one hand demonstrates the sustainable development ability to irradiate creativity towards the establishment of interdisciplinary bridges and on the other hand explains the growing interest of researchers interested in the problem of analyzing in detail this fruitful concept. Launched first as a theoretical framework to serve justify actions responsible for weighting economic growth, the concept of Sustainable Development has quickly become a topic of ethical debate circumscribed to the area of perfectibility of human nature to the necessity registry. In this regard, the philosophical content of this paradigm could not remain outside researchers concerns, who want to provide both policy makers and the general public a wide range of evidence to demonstrate the viability of this paradigm. Academia waits until maximization of the contribution of governance to achieve sustainable economic development, which consists in conjunction of this upward path with the momentum given by public policy sync, perfectly adapted for globalization era and all crises to come. However, because this concept based its structure and composition on three pillars, equally important economy, society and environment any attempt to strengthen

  13. Towards sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, R. E.

    Sustainable development is a difficult phrase to define, particularly in the context of human ecosystems. Questions have to be asked, such as "Sustainable for whom?" "Sustainable for what purposes?" "Sustainable at the subsistence or at the luxury level?" and "Sustainable under what conditions?" In this paper, development is taken to mean improving the quality of life. (If development were to mean growth, then it could not be sustained over the long term.) Studies of development must, of course, consider economic factors, particularly in the case of societies who suffer from the pollution of poverty. However, cultural and environmental factors are equally important. In fact, development is not sustainable over the long term if it is not ecologically sustainable. The terms maximum sustainable yield of a renewable resource, carrying capacity of a region and assimilative capacity of a watershed or airshed are discussed. Approaches using these resource management tools are recommended when external conditions are not changing very much. The problem today is that unprecedented rates of change are expected in the next century, not only of environmental conditions such as climate but also of socioeconomic conditions such as renewable resource consumption and populations (of both people and of automobiles)! In rapidly changing situations, policies must be adopted that strengthen resilence and ecosystem integrity; that is, society must increase its ability to adapt. Maintaining the status quo is a long-term prescription for disaster. The problem is of course that little is known about how to design strategies that will increase resilience and ecosystem integrity, and this area of research needs to be strengthened. Some suggestions on appropriate indicators of ecosystem integrity are given in the paper but these need considerable refinement. One of the main problems with long-term environmental policy formulation is the uncertainty to be expected, including the possibility

  14. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF EDUCATION: SWEDISH REALITIES AND RUSSIAN POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss current problems of education for sustainable development, i.e. a global educational innovation that is actively growing in the new century. In Sweden, which has extensive experience in ecological education, education for sustainable development is considered a national model for the creation of the foundation for SD. In Russia, difficulties exist in defining and achieving SD objectives. It has been demonstrated that cooperation between Russia and Sweden in the field of ESD may prove to be very successful. Such cooperation is based on historical, cultural, and geographical factors. Examples of successful cooperation are joint educational projects aimed at improving the ESD framework and its practical implementation. The results of joint projects between the two countries have been analyzed in the context of mutual interests of Russia and Sweden and new goals for cooperation have been outlines.

  15. Catalysis for Sustainable Development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 126, Issue 2. March 2014, pages 309-532. Catalysis for Sustainable Development. pp 309-309. Foreword · M Lakshmi Kantam K S Rama Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 311-317. Concept and progress in coupling of dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions through catalysts.

  16. Ecology and Sustainable Development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 11. Ecology and Sustainable Development. M D Subash Chandran. Book Review Volume 7 Issue 11 November 2002 pp 80-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/11/0080-0081 ...

  17. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  18. Marketing Sustainable Retail Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Ilić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary benefits of sustainable retail over the long run has to be the marketing gain from having something other competitors do not: lower operating costs, a more socially responsible public profile, ease of gaining planning approval for new projects, better access to certain investment pools, higher rents (in the case of developers, ease of recruiting and retaining key people. Each of these benefits needs marketing and public relations support; each benefits from a clear and consistent corporate message that promotes sustainable retail. To date, there are very few retailers or developers who have championed sustainability long enough, consistently enough and with enough actual demonstration of changes in standard operations to gain the benefits of green marketing, but the very paucity of examples serves to underscore the point: the green marketing space is wide open for large retailers and developers. What would be the marketing steps that a company could take to benefit from its “sustainability focus?” The key to any marketing program is to differentiate a company’s actions from those of competitors and to do it along lines that its various stakeholders care about. This practice of differentiation is often expressed as “finding a difference that makes a difference, to someone who makes difference to you.” For retail developers, the first differentiator should be to attract more and better tenants to all of their centers, tenants who value lower operating costs and the developer’s program of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility.

  19. Education for sustainable development in technology education in Irish schools: a curriculum analysis

    OpenAIRE

    McGarr, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper explores the integration of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in technology education and the extent to which it is currently addressed in curriculum documents and state examinations in technology education at post-primary level in Ireland. This analysis is conducted amidst the backdrop of considerable change in technology education at post-primary level. The analysis of the provision of technology education found, that among the range of technology relat...

  20. Financing Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Adam Moe; Funder, Mikkel; Engberg-Pedersen, Lars

    In the fall of 2015, world leaders adopted the most ambitious global development agenda in history. Meeting the aspiring targets of the Sustainable Development Goals will require financing far beyond traditional aid. At the same time, aid itself is under major pressure as European governments cut...... aid budgets or divert them to meet refugee and migration issues. In this context of massive global ambition and concurrent uncertainty on the future of aid, other actors and sources of development financing seem ever more critical, such as the private sector, private foundations and the BRICS....... But what are in fact the interests and modes of operation of such actors in the context of development financing, and to what extent do they align with the aims of the SDGs? And how do national governments of developing countries themselves perceive and approach these new sources of financing?...

  1. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its tradition...... of investigating human environment interactions. In this paper we aim to contribute to this particular field of knowledge by providing an empirical analysis of ESD in Danish University Geography. In this paper it is examined how programs in Geography in higher education have taken different approaches...

  2. Strategies for Sustainable Energy Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses international strategies for establishing a sustainable energy development. Proposals are given for mitigation of global warming.......The paper analyses international strategies for establishing a sustainable energy development. Proposals are given for mitigation of global warming....

  3. SUSTAINABLE TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel-Gabriel, SIMIONESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the different regions of Europe throughout history has known different phases and evolutions according to the conditions which they have gone through. The aim of this article is to present an analysis of European regions depending on three essential elements of a unitary development including: concentration of resources, connecting regions and cooperation, highlighting a number of directions for a sustainable development.From this perspective in the EU financial period 2014-2020, national targets and regional funding should take into account varied issues, focusing on the structure and the concentration of population for the necessary conditions of housing and living (infrastructure, utilities, public services, education, health and social services to be satisfied.

  4. Biogeochemical Cycles for Combining Chemical Knowledge and ESD Issues in Greek Secondary Schools Part II: Assessing the Impact of the Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutalidi, Sophia; Psallidas, Vassilis; Scoullos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In searching for effective ways to combine science/chemical education with EE/ESD, new didactic materials were designed and produced focussing on biogeochemical cycles and their connection to sustainable development. The materials were experimentally applied in 16 Greek schools under the newly introduced compulsory "school project" which…

  5. Introducing Education for Sustainable Development in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Quantitative Analysis of Bioethanol Fuel and Its Blends with Gasoline by Using Solvatochromic Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Paula D.; Loffredo, Carina; Sato, Bruno M.; Reichardt, Christian; El Seoud, Omar A.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "Education for Sustainable Development", ESD, has been introduced in a period where chemistry education is undergoing a major change, both in emphasis and methods of teaching. Studying an everyday problem, with an important socio-economic impact in the laboratory is a part of this approach. Presently, the students in many…

  6. Engineering sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, D.

    1996-05-01

    This article describes how engineers are forming alliances on the job, in communities, and in international organizations to accelerate economic development while they preserve resources and the environment. Despite the end of the Cold War and the rapid economic development in Asia and Latin America, anxiety abounds as the 21st century dawns. The growth rate of the world`s population remains frighteningly high, and the Earth`s atmosphere appears endangered. Even rays of hope, such as the surge in China`s and India`s economies, cast a shadow on the future by threatening to deplete natural resources even further. In the face of such overwhelming conditions, individual effort may seem futile. There are signs, however, that people are joining forces to do what they can within the limits of what is technologically and economically possible. Although many of them are driven by idealism, a good number are participating to make business more efficient and profitable as well as to enhance their nation`s industrial competitiveness. Their model for change and growth is one that doesn`t endanger the environment--a concept that has come to be known as sustainable development. In the process, engineers are leaving the isolation of their laboratories and individual disciplines to educate, invent, inspire, and join forces with other engineers, community groups, environmentalists, business and labor leaders, and government officials. One sign that such collaborative efforts are succeeding--in addition to the tangible results--is the evolution in thinking about sustainable development, as it applies both to today`s world and to future generations.

  7. Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Tapia-Fonllem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role that higher education plays in the promotion of sustainable development outstands in the declarations on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD, besides being a research priority in higher education. However, few studies exist that evaluate sustainable lifestyles among university students. The aim of this study was to analyze the mission and vision, processes and actions undertaken to promote sustainability in higher education institutions, and to compare the pro-sustainability orientation (PSO reported by 360 students coursing first or last semesters at college. The study was intended to evaluate the influence that four higher education institutions in Sonora, Mexico, have on students’ PSO. Results of the study indicate that a coherent PSO factor emerges from the interrelations among pro-environmental dispositional and behavioral variables reported by students. However, university programs and actions do not produce statistically significant differences between freshmen and senior students. Possible reasons explaining the lack of positive influence of those universities on students’ PSO are discussed.

  8. Towards a Theory-based framework for assessing the mainstreaming of education for sustainable development : A case study of teacher education institutions in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Schrage, Jesse; Lenglet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development of a theory-based framework for exploring the ways in which different teacher education institutions in Botswana have worked towards the infusion of education for sustainable development (ESD) in the curriculum and the practice of pre-service teacher education.The framework combines theory of change, a theory of education for sustainable human development and a theory of transformative learning.The objective of this paper is to understand how this theoret...

  9. Ergonomics and education as a strategy for sustainable development in business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Dierci Marcio; Brandão, Erico Lourenço

    2012-01-01

    It is part of the vocabulary of organizations, and the agendas discussed the subject of "Sustainability", but there are few companies that implement practices or even know the means of implementing sustainable practices. The objective of this paper is to discuss an approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) based on the concepts and practice of ergonomics, as a consequence of this approach allows the implementation of integration initiatives focused on sustainability, such as eg. energy efficiency and consumer awareness thus allowing a means of reducing costs and operating expenses, increased competitiveness and significant contributions to corporate sustainability. There is also the inclusion of sustainability in corporate strategic planning, and their implications in the different spheres of the market.

  10. Towards Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor

    2010-01-01

    GHG emissions can be reduced by shifting travel to a more efficient mode, which can be achieved by offering high quality public transport integrated to land use and density policies. However, there is a scarcity of efficient and low-cost alternatives to improve urban transport and tackle GHG emis......). The review highlights empirical evidence of the development and implementation of creative solutions, which integrate transport infrastructure, land use policies and street design strategies for fostering sustainable mobility and GHG emission reduction....... emissions. In this context, the development of a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system integrated with land use policies and street design strategies is gaining attention as a cost-effective alternative, to address poor accessibility and rising GHG emissions. Firstly, this paper presents the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT......) as an effective and low cost alternative to help addressing increasing traffic demands and rising GHG emissions. In the second part, a review presents the experience of three developing-country metropolises that have implemented a BRT system - Curitiba (Brazil), Beijing (China) and Johannesburg (South Africa...

  11. For sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, P

    1994-03-01

    Even though the government of China has made much progress in controlling population growth, demographic momentum is such that the population of China is still increasing at a rate of about 16 million annually. By mid 1994, China had 1.19 billion people, making up more than 21% of the world's population. China adds about 24 million more people each year. This rapidly rising population is placing much pressure on natural resources and the environment. It is also a taxing obstacle for economic development. Huge population size, irregular age and sex structure, uneven geographic distribution, and much lower fertility and mortality rates than other developing countries at a similar level of socioeconomic development characterizes China's current population. The sex ratios are high (e.g., surplus of 16 million males 20 years old), especially for groups under age 10. In 1989, there was a deficit of 879,466 female births. 94% of the population lives in 36% of the territory (the east and southeast regions). The total fertility rate has fallen from 5.8 in 1970 to 2 in 1994. It is lowest in Shanghai and Beijing (about 1.3) and highest in Tibet (4.3). Natural increase has dropped from 26 to 11.9/1000 people. The size and proportion of the population 60 years and older is expected to increase from 98 million (8.6% of the total population) in mid 1990 to 412 million in 2050 (27.4% of the total population). Despite progress in improving the level of education, China still has 180 million illiterate and semiliterate people. Institutions of higher learning are experiencing a brain drain to developed countries and brain transfer to other sectors inside the country. The population policy and program should strive to realize a reasonable population structure and distribution and to develop human resources so China can meet its needs for sustainable development.

  12. Women and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, R

    1992-07-01

    Gender issues in sustainable development focuses on constraints, the policy environment, land rights, the division of labor, reproductive rights, human resource development, productive energy, care of children, education, politics, security, social norms, and women's initiatives. African women's participation in the development process has been limited by the policy environment, sociocultural setting, and women's initiatives. African policy has not recognized the different roles that men and women play. There is unequal division of labor, legal discrimination against women, and abuse of women's basic human rights. Women's subordinate position in society and their concrete needs are ignored. Land tenure and credit systems are based on discriminatory policies. Women share a major portion and in some cases all of the agricultural labor with few tools or equipment. The operating assumption is that women's labor supply is inelastic. In order to fully participate in the development process, women need to be able to determine the number of children needed, the spacing between children, and the timing and the method of contraception. Human resource development in Africa has focused on training men. Women must contribute a major portion of time and labor to processing and cooking food in addition to caring for children. Access to higher education is limited. Political accords have been reached without women when women have contributed significantly to political struggles. Social security is compromised during violence and civil strife. There is sexual harassment in the work place. Culture can subordinate women. Women have been unable to change policy making, planning, and patriarchal ideology. Women are marginal contributors to the labor force. Income-generating projects are primarily confined to the informal sector. The governments impose the women's programs. Political influence is highly desired if change in women's stature is to be accomplished.

  13. Education for Sustainable development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unit-based sustainability assessment tool (USAT) was administered at Masinde Muliro University of. Science and Technology (MMUST), Kenya, between January and March 2012. The assessment focused on establishing to what extent the University integrated sustainability concerns into its core functions of teaching ...

  14. Work activities within sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of a Franco-Brazilian Research project entitled "Work, Innovation and Development". The aim is to conceptually consider work activity within sustainable development, and to contribute methodologically towards developing strategies for designing sustainable work systems. After a brief description of the factors and the dimensions that have contributed to the creation of ideas on sustainable development, we will put forward two main approaches for understanding work activity within the context of sustainability, these being: the durability of work activity and the development of work activities for sustainable development. Both approaches are presented and examples are given. This is followed by a discussion of the design of sustainable work systems that focuses particularly on the political and technical dimensions of project management.

  15. Land Reform and Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Stanton; Peter Rosset; James Boyce

    2005-01-01

    Land reform, equitable distribution, economic development, environmental quality, land reform strategies, Brazil, Landless Workers’ Movement, East Asia, rural poverty, land productivity, sustainable agriculture, comparative advantage, small farms.

  16. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia Ingrid, Keller

    2012-01-01

    .... So for the present study we researched the possible strategies, identifying those options to successfully integrate the dimensions of sustainability into organizational development from a systems...

  17. Divergent Evolution in Education for Sustainable Development Policy in the United Kingdom: Current Status, Best Practice, and Opportunities for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Scott

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the current status of all aspects of education for sustainable development (ESD across the United Kingdom (UK, drawing on evidence from its political jurisdictions (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and setting out some characteristics of best practice. The paper analyzes current barriers to progress, and outlines future opportunities for enhancing the core role of education and learning in the pursuit of a more sustainable future. Although effective ESD exists at all levels, and in most learning contexts across the UK, with good teaching and enhanced learner outcomes, the authors argue that a wider adoption of ESD would result from the development of a strategic framework which puts it at the core of the education policy agenda in every jurisdiction. This would provide much needed coherence, direction and impetus to existing initiatives, scale up and build on existing good practice, and prevent unnecessary duplication of effort and resources. The absence of an overarching UK strategy for sustainable development that sets out a clear vision about the contribution learning can make to its goals is a major barrier to progress. This strategy needs to be coupled with the establishment of a pan-UK forum for overseeing the promotion, implementation and evaluation of ESD.

  18. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, A MULTIDIMENSIONAL CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODORESCU ANA MARIA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development imposed itself as a corollary of economic term "development". Sustainable development is meant to be the summation of economic, environmental and social considerations for the present and especially for the future. The concept of sustainable development plays an important role in european and global meetings since 1972, the year it has been set for the first time. Strategies necessary to achieve the objectives of sustainable development have been developed, indicators meant to indicate the result of the implementation of policies have been created, national plans were oriented towards achieving the proposed targets. I wanted to highlight the multidimensional character of the concept of sustainable development. Thus, using specialized national and international literature, I have revealed different approaches of one pillar to the detriment of another pillar depending on the specific field. In the different concepts of sustainable development, the consensus is undoubtedly agreed on its components: economic, social, environmental. Based on this fact, the concept of sustainability has different connotations depending on the specific content of each discipline: biology, economics, sociology, environmental ethics. The multidimensional valence of sustainable development consists of three pillars ability to act together for the benefit of present and future generations. Being a multidimensional concept, importance attached to a pillar over another is directed according to the particularities of each field: in economy profit prevails, in ecology care of natural resources is the most important, the social aims improving human living conditions. The challenge of sustainable development is to combine all the economic, environmental and social benefits and the present generation to come. Ecological approach is reflected in acceptance of limited natural resources by preserving natural capital. In terms of the importance of

  19. Levels of Governance in Policy Innovation Cycles in Community Education: The Cases of Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kolleck

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While there is little doubt that social networks are essential for processes of implementing social innovations in community education such as Climate Change Education (CCE or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD, scholars have neglected to analyze these processes in the multilevel governance system using Social Network Analysis. In this article, we contribute to closing this research gap by exploring the implementation of CCE and ESD in education at the regional and global levels. We compare the way CCE is negotiated and implemented within and through the global conferences of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC with the way the UN Decade of ESD is put into practice through networks in five different German municipalities. We argue that the role of social networks is particularly strong in policy areas like CCE and ESD, which are best characterized as multi-level and multi-actor governance. Based on data derived from standardized surveys and from Twitter we analyze the complex interactions of public and private actors at different levels of governance in the two selected policy areas. We find, amongst others, that the implementation of CCE and ESD in community education depends in part on actors that had not been assumed to be influential at the outset. Furthermore, our analyses suggest the different levels of governance are not well integrated throughout the phases of the policy innovation cycle.

  20. Sustainable urban development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    Sustainability in urban planning has a long history and it has been a widespread solution to build high and compact in order to minimise the need for transportation, land use and heating. Recent research, however, points towards the need for a supplementary approach which includes the consumer...... behaviour of the household. This approach necessarily has to work from below and include the citizens, as it is their daily practices that have to be challenged. This article reviews the literature of to what extent compact cities are the most sustainable and it use lifestyle interpretations of urbane forms...... to challenge the compact cities approach. As an alternative or supplementary approach the article introduce practice theory as a way to understand consumption and it gives examples on how this approach can be used to inspire local authorities to alternative and supplementary strategies of achieving sustainable...

  1. Developing Ecological Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    IS initiatives become part of a firm’s overall strategy and part of the organizational sustainability process. We find that Green IS initiatives are initiated through a bottom-up process where environmentally concerned individuals identify issues and become Green IS champions. They use their authority...... and edification skills to promote Green IS to the organizational agenda. If the issue is aligned with the organizational agenda, it receives management’s endorsement. The empirical case also shows two types of systemic feedback that can fuel a self-reinforcing sustainability process. The first type of feedback...

  2. Business, government and sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van de B.; Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The range of sustainability objectives has now developed from relatively simple issues of environmental protection to a full array of interwoven social, economic and ecological issues, nationally and internationally. The involved process of sustainable development has now become a permanent and

  3. African Journal of Sustainable Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles should be of sustainable development interest and include full- length reports of original research not previously published elsewhere; research notes which consist of brief reports of new findings, techniques and equipment of importance to sustainable development practice. Reviews or announcement of ...

  4. Education for Sustainable development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that sustainability logically necessitates a deep learning response in educational thinking and practice and anticipative education, recognising the new conditions and discontinuities which face present generations. Faculty of Science and Agriculture. These are in fact two faculties, but they were considered as one for the ...

  5. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  6. Managing Sustainable Information Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautz, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable information systems development (ISD) in the context of this paper is not about products that support sustainability at large with its environmental, economic and social dimensions and little about the development of sustainable products, which are both without doubt important topics....... This paper is about a prerequisite for such products, namely, a sustainable ISD process, a process which exhibits reasonable and responsible stewardship and utilisation of the existing resources for ISD—people and information in the context of scope, time/schedule, budget/cost, quality and risk....

  7. Sustainable development and environmental protection

    OpenAIRE

    Štrbac, Nada; Vuković, Milovan; Voza, Danijela; Sokić, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable development is a recently developed concept that was introduced in order to overcome the shortcomings of previous forms of development; first of all, the neglect of environmental issues. Sustainable development aims to establish an equilibrium among economic, environmental and social dimensions of development. Yet, despite an extensive use of this term, it needs better understanding in order to make easier its implementation. Taking this into account, this paper reviews various in...

  8. SUSTAINABLE NUCLEAR DEVELOPMENT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban Constantin VALECA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of the nuclear power sector in Romania from the perspective of sustainable development. The current state is analysed and the expected future development is investigated. The implementation of ALFRED LFR demonstrator in Romania (reference site: nuclear platform Mioveni is approached from the point of view of the current stage of RDI and implementation and the contribution to sustainable development in Romania and Europe.

  9. Sustainability in coastal tourism development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Marie Visbech; Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling; Liburd, Janne J.

    2018-01-01

    Denmark’s coastlines have been protected from tourism development and construction for more than 80 years. In 2014, the Danish politicians opened up for softer regulation of the coastlines and invited proposals for tourism development projects within the hitherto protected coastal zone. The call ...... benefits are emphasized. Key findings also indicate weak political leadership in the envisaged transfer towards sustainable tourism development.......Denmark’s coastlines have been protected from tourism development and construction for more than 80 years. In 2014, the Danish politicians opened up for softer regulation of the coastlines and invited proposals for tourism development projects within the hitherto protected coastal zone. The call...... explicitly requested nominations for sustainable tourism projects. A comparison between academic sustainability discourse and the approved projects suggests that tourism actors do not address sustainable tourism development as a holistic concept. Long-term perspectives are largely absent, whereas economic...

  10. Environmental law and sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Oliva Sirgo Álvarez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the origin and birth of the human right to a safe and healthy environment in order to allow everyone to live a dignified and quality life. It also analyses the essential content of sustainable development, which must always guide the development of environmental law to ensure a healthy environment for human present and future generations, and a sustainable economic growth that contributes to the development of equal opportunities for all people.

  11. CONCEPTUAL DELIMITATIONS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienciu Ionel-Alin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a model for resource use meant to satisfy human needs, without polluting the environment, so that these needs can be satisfied not only in the present, but in the future as well. It is a concept of nowadays with no generally accepted definition, placing environment first and foremost, aiming at implementing the environmental policies in all structures and at all economic levels. Within the present study we have aimed at creating a conceptual delimitation on sustainable development, sustainability and socialresponsibility, concepts of present interest, that tend to become a mystery for the academic community and practitioners by their variety and complexity of approaches. During our scientific endeavor we believe that social responsibility is the foundation of sustainable development. Sustainable development is a concept used especially at macro-economic level, while social responsibility is used at entity level and incorporates the economic, environmental and social dimension, which has a voluntary character and tries to respond to the information needs of the society and other stakeholders. Sustainability at the entity\\'s level is the goal or final objective of sustainable development – satisfaction of present needs without compromising the possibility for future generations to satisfy their own needs, while social responsibility is an intermediate phase of sustainability wherein entities try to balance the economic, social and environmental dimension. Thus, we can state we include ourselves within social corporatism, slightly close to social institutionalism, which is characteristic to developed countries, giving a particular importance to social contract and relations between entity and society. We believe that in Romania, a POSDRU funded project should be regarded as a legal person with social values, which must be based on sustainable development and to promote, besides legal liability of automatically deriving

  12. Sustainable development: conceptualizations and measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charles C. Mueller

    2008-01-01

    The paper builds up from a review of some expected, but other quite surprising results regarding country estimates for the year 2000 of genuine saving, a sustainability indicator developed by a World Bank research team...

  13. Towards sustainable conversation: Developing environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards sustainable conversation: Developing environmental education processes. ... Southern African Journal of Environmental Education ... paper highlights the importance of seeing environmental education as a process and considers the value of conversation and storytelling in environmental education processes.

  14. Educating Engineers for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrdal, Christina Grann; Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    In this paper, we explore the potentials of designing engineering education activities for sustainability development based on how environmental concerns are integrated into product development processes in a company context. First we draw on a case study from the Danish company Grundfos Management...... A/S and based on their experience with product development practise and competence development of product developers, we propose a set of competences to be addressed in engineering education for sustainable development (EESD). Furthermore, we use the problem based learning philosophy as a base...

  15. Sustainable development goals and inclusive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, J.; Vegelin, C.

    Achieving sustainable development has been hampered by trade-offs in favour of economic growth over social well-being and ecological viability, which may also affect the sustainable development goals (SDGs) adopted by the member states of the United Nations. In contrast, the concept of inclusive

  16. Development of Sustainable Rural Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kantar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sociological view of possibilities for the development of sustainable rural tourism in Koprivnica-Krizevci county, which is located in the north-western part of Croatia. The possibilities for developing rural tourism within the concept of sustainable development have been researched through qualitative empirical research interview method. Research subjects were the owners of tourist farms, decision makers, experts and other stakeholders in the tourism development. Rural tourism represents an alternative to maritime tourism and is relatively undeveloped but important in terms of development of rural areas and family farms. This paper enables an insight into an integrated sustainability of rural tourism which consists of four dimensions: biologicalecological, economic, socio-cultural and political sustainability. In conclusion, integral sustainability in rural tourism is not achieved in all dimensions. Therefore, rural tourism could be a strategy for sustainable development for rural areas and also could be a tool for product differentiation for area that are at stagnation stage.

  17. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  18. What Kind of Critical University Education for Sustainable Development? A Comparative Study of European Students and Social Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Jeziorski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the institutional integration of education for sustainable development (ESD, university courses have been going through rapid changes, but this process can be blocked or aided by each country’s peculiar features, whether institutional, financial, cultural or other. This article proposes an examination of the specific socio-educational characteristics of the implementation of ESD based on a study of the social representations of students in three European countries (Germany, France and Poland, and in two types of Master’s level university education. The paper initially focuses on the differences and similarities in the student research groups. It then analyses the representational components in terms of the possible impacts on the implementation of ESD at the university from a critical, citizenship perspective. Despite the differences in the students’ representational structures in the various countries, we can see that, in the three national groups, the social representations of sustainable development are highly focused and have a highly fragmented character. The lack of systematization of the different elements of the representation poses barriers to critical education, although this takes different forms in the different countries.

  19. Development of Experience-based Learning about Atmospheric Environment with Quantitative Viewpoint aimed at Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Y.; Tago, H.

    2014-12-01

    The word "ESD (Education for Sustainable Development)" has spread over the world in UN decade (2005 - 2014), and the momentum of the educational innovation aimed at ESD also has grown in the world. Especially, environmental educations recognized as one of the most important ESD have developed in many countries including Japan, but most of those are still mainly experiences in nature. Those could develop "Respect for Environment" of the educational targets of ESD, however we would have to take a further step in order to enhance "Ability of analysis and thinking logically about the environment" which are also targets of ESD.Thus, we developed experienced-learning program about atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5), for understanding the state of the environment objectively based on quantitative data. PM2.5 is known for harmful, and various human activities are considered a source of it, therefore environmental standards for PM2.5 have been established in many countries. This program was tested on junior high school students of 13 - 15 years old, and the questionnaire survey also was conducted to them before and after the program for evaluating educational effects. Students experienced to measure the concentration of PM2.5 at 5 places around their school in a practical manner. The measured concentration of PM2.5 ranged from 19 to 41 μg/m3/day, that value at the most crowded roadside exceeded Japan's environmental standard (35 μg/m3/day). Many of them expressed "Value of PM2.5 is high" in their individual discussion notes. As a consistent with that, the answer "Don't know" to the question "What do you think about the state of the air?" markedly decreased after the program, on the other hand the answer "Pollution" to the same question increased instead. From above-mentioned, it was considered that they could judge the state of the air objectively. Consequently, the questionnaire result "Concern about Air Pollution" increased significantly after the program compared

  20. Sustainable development: A HUD perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, E.

    1994-12-31

    Sustainable development is the current term now being used to describe the environmental movement. The term`s popularity can be traced to publication of Our Common Future, the report of the World Commission on Environment and Development (Brundtland Commission). Sustainable development means exactly what is implied; development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (Brundtland Commission). It is another way of conveying the basic premise of {open_quotes}Spaceship Earth{close_quotes}; that our species has been given this planet to live on and we must carefully balance resource utilization if we want to endure more than a few generations, because this is all we`ve got. It is a natural evolution of the conservation and environmental movements into a format that recognizes that environmental issues cannot be viewed in isolation, but must be evaluated in a context of economic development (Powledge). Sustainable development is thus a broad term that encompasses many elements, depending upon the context. Such elements can include: 1 energy, 2 economic development, 3 pollution prevention, 4 biodiversity, 5 historic preservation, 6 social equity, and 7 recycling and solid waste disposal. One of the cornerstones of sustainable development is energy policy, since energy use is perhaps the most defining element of contemporary civilization. In the energy discipline, sustainability can best be paraphrased as living off one`s income as opposed to depleting ones capital. In other words, using solar, wind and other renewables rather than fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are limited and will eventually be depleted, therefore they cannot be considered sustainable. Another element embraced by sustainable development is biodiversity. The biodiversity movement is most sharply distinguished from traditional conservationism for its commitment to the principle of preserving and managing entire ecosystems.

  1. Sustainability Reporting at Schools: Challenges and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbach, Eva; Fischer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances made there is still an implementation gap with regard to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in formal educational systems at the school level. The present paper focuses on sustainability reporting as a recently emerging practice in the school sector. It presents the approach and findings of an exploratory interview study…

  2. INNOVATION CONSTITUENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates an innovation constituent of sustainable development along with environmental, social and economic pillars of the concept. Determining of implementation details of innovation activity by J. Schumpeter is a theoretical prerequisite to understanding of innovation constituent. An innovator-entrepreneur provides a customer with an information image of 'new combinations.' The image is created by identifying customer's future needs, which outline business aims, subject and appropriate means for creating the innovation products. However, consumer choice is largely motivated by values and specific rules of behavior. The rules of consumer society that in the industrial age become the motive, morality and institution, did not consider the reproductive capabilities of the environment. This disagreement was previously presented in The Limits to Growth by the Club of Rome and was reflected in the concept of sustainable development, which gained immense significance after the report of the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 (Our Common Future. The study highlights importance for establishment of new social values that motivate innovators to change their thinking, comprehend their responsibility not only to consumers but also to the environment and future generations. The Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum: Innovation and Collaboration for the Future We want, organized by the UN Global Compact, demonstrates the interest of entrepreneurs in practical implementation of the concept of sustainable development, through an effective innovation activity. The paper summarizes management tools for implementing business commitments to action in priority areas of ensuring sustainable development: Energy & Climate, Water & Ecosystems, Agriculture & Food, Economics & Finance of Sustainable Development, Social Development, and Urbanization & Cities. Main stages of changes in companies are outlined for making responsible

  3. Managing for Sustainable Development Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, C.S.L.; Batjes, Karen; Wigboldus, S.A.; Brouwers, J.H.A.M.; Dickson Baguma, Sylvester

    2017-01-01

    This guide is about managing development initiatives and organizations towardssustainable development impact. It builds on the work of Guijt and Woodhill inthe 2002 IFAD publication Managing for Impact in Rural Development: A Guide for Project M&E. Since then, the managing for sustainable

  4. Energy, sustainability and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llewellyn Smith, Ch

    2006-07-01

    The author discusses in a first part the urgent need to reduce energy use (or at least curb growth) and seek cleaner ways of producing energy on a large scale. He proposes in a second part what must be done: introduce fiscal measures and regulation to change behavior of consumers, provide incentives to encourage the market to expand use of low carbon technologies, stimulate research and development by industry and develop the renewable energies sources. In a last part he looks what part can fusion play. (A.L.B.)

  5. Trade, development and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    1994-01-01

    Mainstream economic theory argues that trade, and especially free trade, is beneficial to everyone involved. This fundamental idea ? which has the character of a dogma ? still plays an important role in international discussions on trade issues, notably in relation to development and environment....

  6. Sustainable Development at Risk

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The book addresses the miseries inflicted by egocentric ideologies that are claimed to be divinely dictated and imposed on others by force. It illustrates the advantages of south-south cooperation between and among nations at different stages of economic and technological development, as opposed to the tied aid policies ...

  7. Sustainable development indicators for cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Nikolayevich Bobylev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of urban population’s life quality implies an investigation of all factors defining it: economic, social and ecological. The development of the corresponding indicators of sustainable urban development is necessary. The majority of the cities in the world and this country show unsustainable development at present time. In the article, the world and Russian experience of development of indicators of sustainable urban development is considered. In the article, opportunities of adaptation of approaches to these indicators’ development on the basis of Human Development Index developed by United Nations Development Program and an index of Adjusted Net Savings of the World Bank for Russia are considered. The authors propose a new integrated index of sustainability for Russian cities. It is based on the concept and methodology of the Adjusted Net Savings index. In order to evaluate the sustainability of urban development taking into account economic, social, and ecological factors, the authors propose applying three corresponding sub-indexes: gross capital, expenses on human capital development, and damage from environmental pollution in the cities. In the article, the authors’ set of indicators for Russian cities is proposed. It reflects the most acute problems of sustainable urban development in Russia and the quality of life in cities; also it corresponds to Russian statistics. 21 key indicators reflecting important economic, social, and ecological urban priorities are proposed. Indicators are divided into nine groups: economic indicators; energy efficiency; transport; social and institutional indicators; air and climate; water resources; waste; especially protected natural territories; noise influence. Proposed indicators for cities allow more adequately assess trends of urbanized space shaping and quality of life

  8. Mainstreaming ESd into Science teacher Education Courses:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-12-11

    Dec 11, 2007 ... Mainstreaming ESd into. Science teacher Education Courses: A Case for ESD Pedagogical Content. Knowledge and Learning as Connection. Overson Shumba and Royda Kampamba, Copperbelt University, Zambia. Abstract. In this case study, researchers evaluated national education policies in Zambia, ...

  9. Realities of sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annan, R.H.

    1997-12-01

    The author gives a brief overview of rural electrification projects which have been developed worldwide based on different forms of renewable energy sources. Rural electrification provides hope to the 1.3 billion people who are still unserved by the power grid, and as a consequence are severely disadvantaged in todays economy in most facits of daily life and health. He recommends a more concerted effort to consolidate the experiences gained from present programs in order to present a more organized program by the time of the 2002 UNCED conference. His recommendation is that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory serve as a secretariat, to gather and formalize the information which has been learned to this point in time.

  10. Energy, Sustainability and Development

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    A huge increase in energy use is expected in the coming decades – see the IEA’s ‘business as usual’/reference scenario below. While developed countries could use less energy, a large increase is needed to lift billions out of poverty, including over 25% of the world’s population who still lack electricity. Meeting demand in an environmentally responsible manner will be a huge challenge. The World Bank estimates that coal pollution leads to 300,000 deaths in China each year, while smoke from cooking and heating with biomass kills 1.3 million world-wide – more than malaria. The IEA’s alternative scenario requires a smaller increase in energy use than the reference scenario and is also less carbon intensive, but it still implies that CO2 emissions will increase 30% by 2030 (compared to 55% in the reference scenario). Frighteningly, implementing the alternative scenario faces “formidable hurdles” according to the IEA, despite the fact that it would yield financial savings for consumers that...

  11. Ruling Relationships in Sustainable Development and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Tom; Sauvé, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    It is from historical perspectives on more than 40 years of environment related education theories, practices, and policies that we revisit what might otherwise become a tired conversation about environmental education and sustainable development. Our contemporary critical analysis of Stefan Bengtsson's research about policy making leads us to…

  12. System level ESD co-design

    CERN Document Server

    Gossner, Harald

    2015-01-01

    An effective and cost efficient protection of electronic system against ESD stress pulses specified by IEC 61000-4-2 is paramount for any system design. This pioneering book presents the collective knowledge of system designers and system testing experts and state-of-the-art techniques for achieving efficient system-level ESD protection, with minimum impact on the system performance. All categories of system failures ranging from ‘hard’ to ‘soft’ types are considered to review simulation and tool applications that can be used. The principal focus of System Level ESD Co-Design is defining and establishing the importance of co-design efforts from both IC supplier and system builder perspectives. ESD designers often face challenges in meeting customers' system-level ESD requirements and, therefore, a clear understanding of the techniques presented here will facilitate effective simulation approaches leading to better solutions without compromising system performance. With contributions from Robert Asht...

  13. Accounting engineering for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidornya A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the sustainable development of industrial enterprises in Russia, accounting for sustainable industrial growth of the national economy, tools of accounting engineering aimed at creating an information basis of transformation the Russian economic model to knowledge based economy. The proposed mechanism of ownership control of industrial enterprises in the context of long-term planning of the national economy. Theoretical bases of accounting engineering, its tools are defined. A brief review of the literature on the problem of accounting engineering is provided. A practical example of the application of the accounting engineering logic for the industrial enterprise is reviewed. It describes the research results obtained during the last 25 years of Russian scientific school of accounting engineering. Conclusions and recommendations on the use of accounting engineering to sustainable development of the Russian economy are formulated.

  14. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ingrid, Keller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of business strategies that build value throughout the supply chain of goods and services and simultaneously contribute to sustainability is one of the most difficult to address in practice. So for the present study we researched the possible strategies, identifying those options to successfully integrate the dimensions of sustainability into organizational development from a systems perspective and its possibilities and limitations. The characteristic activities of the five possible choices - risk management, image building and reputation, productivity and efficiency, innovation and market development - can be implemented in pure form, in combination or sequentially. In this way you can build competitive advantages in the context of sustainability, which allows the company to achieve greater chance of success, not only in the short term but also medium and long term.

  15. Learning Our Way to Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Should environmental education (EE) and education for sustainable development (ESD) try to change students’ behaviours or should it focus on capacity building and critical thinking? The latter is more likely to lead to a citizenry that can examine new challenges and act wisely. New forms of learning

  16. Language Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmunt, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, education for sustainable development starts covering wider and wider spheres of interest and human activity. Out of the three main spheres of interest, such as environmental, economic, and socio-cultural, the first two mentioned here seem to be given more attention than the sphere of socio-cultural activity. In this respect, the aim of…

  17. Cultural Amnesia and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viðar Hreinsson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A few of the main concepts of cultural memory are investigated in this paper, in order to extend the idea of cultural memory to include the diversity of past cultures and cultural products. It is claimed that understanding of diversity, in a dialogue with the past, enhances cultural understanding for the benefit of sustainable development.

  18. The possibility of holistic safety education in Japan: From the perspective of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuto Kitamura

    2014-07-01

    This paper concludes that it is imperative to make continued research efforts to present a new mode of safety education, an initiative that represents one of the important efforts in designing mobility for the future.

  19. Sustainable Development and World Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadii Ursul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article points out that the progressive deterioration of the social and environmental situation on the planet and the emergence of the real threat of anthropo-ecological catastrophe necessitate the abandoning of the current model of civilizational development and the formation (first in theory and then in practice of an ultimately new one. This innovative strategy, which means taking account of the main socio-natural contradiction, is called a sustainable development strategy. This new form of civilizational development must become rationally governed on a planetary scale, thus providing the survival and temporal continuation of the existence of humans and biosphere. The authors regard sustainable development as a vitally important (later on - dominating orientation of international, political and global processes. This vision makes it crucially important to embed this conception into the proper scientific disciplines and research fields. The authors make use of the A.D. Bogaturov's conceptualization approach for the scientific discipline of world politics and consider the latter as an evolutionary form of global political development. The real global integrity of the world political system serves as a global attractor of this evolutionary transformation, and this aspect represents the specific pattern of all global processes. It is supposed that these processes will unfold through transition to sustainable development. The development of the global system of political actorship is considered a fundamental process within the growth of overall complexity of the global political structure. In the evolutionary sustainable development perspective it should result in the formation of an integral subject of global politics and global activity. The article shows that the dominating state-centric approach reproduces the political model of unsustainable development, which is characterized by archaic prerequisites of political realism, spontaneous

  20. Teaching Energy as Part of Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Maarten; McKeon, Frankie; Charnley, Fiona; Fleming, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how energy issues and education for sustainable development (ESD) are part of the agenda for two current European projects, CoDeS and SUSTAIN. The latter is mainly concerned with the development of inquiry-based primary and lower secondary science education while the former is a network that aims to learn more about…

  1. Sustainable Development of the Biosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, W.C.; Munn, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The future management of the world's resources depends upon reconciling the needs of socio-economic development with the conservation of the world's environment. This book provides a strategic framework for understanding and managing the long-term and large-scale interactions between these two requirements, based upon the sustainable development of the natural resources of the biosphere. It represents the first results of an on-going collaborative study organized by the International Institut...

  2. Sustainable development of Russian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Kuz’menkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of administrative-territorial units (ATU refers to the main directions of Russian Federation state policy to ensure the security of the national economy to meet the vital needs of people and the preservation of such a possibility for the future generations. The article describes and analyzes the factors that have the most significant impact on the level of ATE development. The dynamics of the gross output of agriculture in Russia and its critical evaluation are presents. It was revealed that the development of the region is the basis of the national economy security. At present, the concept of “sustainable development” in Russia is relevant and the role of regions in the sustainable development of the Russian Federation is constantly increasing. Stability of self-financing of the regional economy is achieved through conducting effective fiscal, financial, credit, tax and price policy, establishment of equal inter-budgetary relations with the federal center, the development of the securities market, increasing the volume of exports. Conducted research allowed: to identify the main factors influencing the sustainable development of Russia regions. The reasons for the backlog of economy of the Smolensk region of the nationwide growth rate and direction of their elimination are examined. Formation of the forecast of domestic agriculture development in the period up to 2020 should be based on the priority position of the industry in the agricultural sector, which is determined by its decisive role in meeting the population’s needs for basic food products. Prospective volumes of production of major agricultural products are based on the need to meet the challenges provided by the Russian Federation Government Decree.

  3. One Year of Sustainable Development Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This issue of the European Journal of Sustainable Development Research marks its first anniversary, and demonstrates that the journal has already made a notable impact on the field of sustainable development through having published research on many recent advances. The topics likely to be addressed in the future, and thus covered in the European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, are likely to revolve around the 17 Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  4. Effect of a Toolkit and a One-Day Teacher Education Workshop on ESD Teaching Content and Methods—A Study from Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoza Hyseni Spahiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental education in Kosovo is currently under reform. The new strategy for sustainable development demands a strong focus on education for sustainability in schools. However, a lack of teacher education might impede new approaches in the classroom. This study investigated how teachers in Kosovo approach locally-relevant environmental issues in the classroom before and after a one-day in-service workshop on teaching approaches related to education for sustainable development (ESD. Data were gathered in nine classes with a systematic observation scheme and processed using Flanders’ interaction analysis categories system. During the workshop, a specially designed toolkit was introduced to the participants (nine biology teachers from the upper secondary level. The toolkit included teaching approaches suitable for ESD and focused on air and water pollution, waste management, energy saving, and the conservation of biodiversity. Before the workshop, teacher-talk occupied more than 90% of a typical 45-min lesson, and instructions were frontal and directive. After the workshop, pupil-talk strongly increased (up to 88%, and pupils were actively engaged in activities suitable for ESD. Supportive training can thus help teachers to improve their instructional practices. However, only those teachers who had reported support from head teachers and colleagues were still frequently using the toolkit after one year.

  5. Sustainable development in a developing economy: Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable development implies development which ensures maximization of human well being for today's generation which does not lead to declines in future well being. Attaining this path requires eliminating those negative externalities that are responsible for natural resource depletion and environmental degradation.

  6. Branding the Green Education: Challenges Facing Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar Ramzy; Rasha Wahieb

    2012-01-01

    ...) gained a great importance in developed countries, let alone developing ones. From this point of view, this paper is studying the possibility of infusing ESD in Egypt after one and a half years since January 2011 youth revolution...

  7. Language Education for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, education for sustainable development starts covering wider and wider spheres of interest and human activity. Out of the three main spheres of interest, such as environmental, economic, and socio-cultural, the first two mentioned here seem to be given more attention than the sphere of socio-cultural activity. In this respect, the aim of the present paper is to redirect the concern of administrators, researchers and educators preoccupied with sustainability to issues such as equal opportunity, tolerance, respect, and especially foreign language education, being component parts of the socio-cultural sphere. Undoubtedly, competence in the socio-linguistic field becomes the decisive element in negotiations and international contacts which require from the language user to be tactful and tolerant. Since sustainability is not a local issue, all sustainability related problems ought to be discussed on the macro scale, which requires an internationally shared means of communication such as language. Although no name of any language appears in the paper, it becomes evident that the attention is directed towards English as an internationally recognized language or, if necessary, any other language which might serve as a means of communication on the macro scale.

  8. Sustainable Development of Food Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabech, B.; Georgsson, F.; Gry, Jørn

    to food safety - Strengthen efforts against zoonoses and pathogenic microorganisms - Strengthen safe food handling and food production in industry and with consumers - Restrict the occurrence of chemical contaminants and ensure that only well-examined production aids, food additives and flavours are used...... - Strengthen scientific knowledge of food safety - Strengthen consumer knowledge The goals for sustainable development of food safety are listed from farm to fork". All of the steps and areas are important for food safety and consumer protection. Initiatives are needed in all areas. Many of the goals...... in other areas. It should be emphasized that an indicator will be an excellent tool to assess the efficacy of initiatives started to achieve a goal. Conclusions from the project are: - Sustainable development in food safety is important for humanity - Focus on the crucial goals would optimize the efforts...

  9. Green materials for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwasasmita, B. S.

    2017-03-01

    Sustainable development is an integrity of multidiscipline concept combining ecological, social and economic aspects to construct a liveable human living system. The sustainable development can be support through the development of green materials. Green materials offers a unique characteristic and properties including abundant in nature, less toxic, economically affordable and versatility in term of physical and chemical properties. Green materials can be applied for a numerous field in science and technology applications including for energy, building, construction and infrastructures, materials science and engineering applications and pollution management and technology. For instance, green materials can be developed as a source for energy production. Green materials including biomass-based source can be developed as a source for biodiesel and bioethanol production. Biomass-based materials also can be transformed into advanced functionalized materials for advanced bio-applications such as the transformation of chitin into chitosan which further used for biomedicine, biomaterials and tissue engineering applications. Recently, cellulose-based material and lignocellulose-based materials as a source for the developing functional materials attracted the potential prospect for biomaterials, reinforcing materials and nanotechnology. Furthermore, the development of pigment materials has gaining interest by using the green materials as a source due to their unique properties. Eventually, Indonesia as a large country with a large biodiversity can enhance the development of green material to strengthen our nation competitiveness and develop the materials technology for the future.

  10. Kajian Indikator Sustainable Development Goals

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Publikasi Kajian SDGs ini berisi tentang kajian literatur mengenai target dan indikator SDGs yang diusulkan oleh beberapa lembaga dan forum internasional diantaranya High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons (HLPEP), Open Working Group (OWG) dan Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Dari usulan-usulan tersebut dilakukan matching indikator ke target di setiap tujuan-tujuan SDGs yang diusulkan. Selain itu, ditampilkan juga ketersediaan indikator-indikator tersebut di Indonesia.

  11. Open Data for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Oleg; Gurin, Joel; Manley, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The “open data” principle is becoming an increasingly important part of the data revolution, which is recognized worldwide as a key engine for achieving the post-2015 UN Sustainable Development Goals. Open data—publicly available online information that can be used for any purpose at little or no cost—represent one of the most underutilized key assets of modern government. Open data initiatives are often directed at converting open data into formats that can be reus...

  12. [Organic agriculture and sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Gang

    2004-12-01

    Basing on the research and practice of organic agriculture at home and abroad, this paper discussed the objectives of developing green food and the principles that must be persisted in the practice in China. In the light of the arguments concerning with sustainable agriculture, we also discussed the significance of "alternative agriculture" in theory and practice. Compared with conventional high-intensity agriculture, the production approaches of organic alternatives can improve soil fertility and have fewer detrimental effects on the environment. It is unclear whether conventional agriculture can be sustained because of the shortcomings presented in this paper, and it has taken scientists approximately one century to research and practice organic farming as a representative of alternative agriculture. The development of green food in China has only gone through more than ten years, and there would be some practical and theoretical effects on the development of China's green food if we exploit an environment-friendly production pattern of organic agriculture which majors in keeping human health and maintaining sustainable agriculture.

  13. Banking Activity for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Stancu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available he corporations gain a power of influence, unthinkable years ago; they have acquired more and more rights and, in some way, govern the life of billions of peoples and of the earth in general. With every right, comes though the responsibility of the conservation and development of the environment in which the corporations act. The banking system has a major role to play in the evolution of the international framework, given its position on the economic stage. Some important banking groups realized this fact and made important steps in the area. The case study of the Holland banking group ABN AMRO proves the complexity of the introduction of sustainable development in the core of the financial business. The implementation is neither easy nor cheap. It implies essential changes in the bank management, in the way to determine the financial policies, in how to choose the clients, the employees, the suppliers etc. Led in an efficient way, sustainable banking implies innovation, creativity and, implicitly, new gains, through creating new products and opening new markets. The international banking community proved, through leading examples (ABN AMRO Bank, HSBC Group, Rabobank Group, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup etc. that it understands the importance, the necessity and also the viability of the sustainable development.

  14. Sustainable Urban Development and Social Sustainability in the Urban Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruq Ibnul Haqi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Social sustainability and sustainable urban developments are major challenges across the world both developed and developing countries. In general there is a conflict between the approach of sustainable development and social sustainability in the urban context. The concept of sustainability brings a key framework for extensive literature on urban design, architecture and planning. Nevertheless there is a considerable overlap between the social dimensions of sustainability and the theories or notions, for instance the ‘sustainable societies’ that are highlighted in the midst of other aspects: social equity and justice. Such society is widely expected to offer a situation for long-term social relations and activities which are sustainable, inclusive and equitable in a wider perception of the term (environmentally, socially and economically. The method adopted to address this aim involves a content analysis of available academic literature, with focus on the planning sustainable development, built environment, social sustainability, and urban planning fields. The findings demonstrate that in spite of some opposing evidence, many studies have confirmed that there has been displacement of the debate on the term of ‘sustainability’ from ‘ecological and environmental aspects into social and economic aspects’. It is related to how the community feel safe and comfortable living in their own communities, how have they felt of proud of the place where they live. The aim of the paper is to improve our understanding of current theories and practices of planning sustainable development and discuss whether the approach of sustainable development aligns with social sustainability objectives.

  15. Modeling of ESD events from polymeric surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2014-03-01

    Transient electrostatic discharge (ESD) events are studied to assemble a predictive model of discharge from polymer surfaces. An analog circuit simulation is produced and its response is compared to various literature sources to explore its capabilities and limitations. Results suggest that polymer ESD events can be predicted to within an order of magnitude. These results compare well to empirical findings from other sources having similar reproducibility.

  16. Involving citizens in sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    2010-01-01

    Local Environment The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, Volume 15 Issue 6, 541......Local Environment The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, Volume 15 Issue 6, 541...

  17. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND FISCAL POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICU MARCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the future is seen from the perspective of sustainable development. Awareness of the planet's limited resources led to the creation of protective barriers, there’s no more desire for development at any cost. However, establishing these barriers is the most difficult task - how much can we pollute, what is the correct level of taxation for pigouvian taxes? State intervention in coordinating these issues is crucial. Through the power of the "invisible hand", the state is the only one that can keep the pollution problem under control. Integrating the concept of social responsibility in the everyday life of the consumer is the most important step for the future

  18. Sustainable development in a developing economy: Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2013-08-21

    Aug 21, 2013 ... Key words: Environment, degradation, sustainable, development, paradigms, pollution, recycling. ... E-mail: chemstprom@yahoo.com. ..... Waste generators in this category include mechanic workshops, restaurants, small scale manufacturers, filling stations, retail and wholesale shops, government offices, ...

  19. EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 7 (ESD7) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon and is required for flowering repression through a mechanism involving epigenetic gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Olmo, Iván; López-González, Leticia; Martín-Trillo, Maria M; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose A

    2010-02-01

    We have characterized a mutation affecting the Arabidopsis EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 7 (ESD7) gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon (epsilon), AtPOL2a. The esd7-1 mutation causes early flowering independently of photoperiod, shortened inflorescence internodes and altered leaf and root development. esd7-1 is a hypomorphic allele whereas knockout alleles displayed an embryo-lethal phenotype. The esd7 early flowering phenotype requires functional FT and SOC1 proteins and might also be related to the misregulation of AG and AG-like gene expression found in esd7. Genes involved in the modulation of chromatin structural dynamics, such as LHP1/TFL2 and EBS, which negatively regulate FT expression, were found to interact genetically with ESD7. In fact a molecular interaction between the carboxy terminus of ESD7 and TFL2 was demonstrated in vitro. Besides, fas2 mutations suppressed the esd7 early flowering phenotype and ICU2 was found to interact with ESD7. Discrete regions of the chromatin of FT and AG loci were enriched in activating epigenetic marks in the esd7-1 mutant. We concluded that ESD7 might be participating in processes involved in chromatin-mediated cellular memory.

  20. Sustainable development: women as partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dem, M

    1993-02-01

    The economic recession and the structural adjustment programs imposed y the International Monetary Fund have caused sluggish or no economic growth and a decline in living conditions in sub-Saharan Africa. Senegal's New Agricultural Policy has eliminated subsidies for agricultural inputs, worsening the already declining living conditions. Population growth in Senegal exceeds food production; it is very rapid in cities (urban growth rate, 2.7%). Women, especially, suffer from the economic crisis; it increases the burden on women for income generation, but the increased workload does not equate more income. This workload restricts women's opportunities to improve their physical environment and does not improve their status within society. Women still face discrimination daily; power lies with men. Oxfam supports urban women financially and technically as they organize and pursue income generation activities to institute change leading to sustainable development. It has helped a Serere women's group in Dakar to organize and provided credit funds to support their trading activities and family planning sensitization training. Oxfam also finances rural women coming to Dakar during the dry season to pound millet to sell. Problems which have to be overcome to achieve sustainable development acceptable to women are numerous. Women need access to the ways and means of food production. Resources are insufficient and inaccessible to women because women are excluded from the decision-making process. Women generally do not have access to information and training which would help them make their own choices and manage their own lives. Political and sociocultural environments, especially those of the poor, do not easily allow women opportunities for independent reflection and expression. Grassroots women's groups provide the best base to develop female solidarity and women's representation, leading to sustainable development. Development organizations must take up a new dynamic

  1. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH ECO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergina CHIRITESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the relationship between humankind and the environment became scientific and economic concerns of the international community since the first UN Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm, 1972 and resulted in the work of the World Commission on Environment and Development, established in 1985. Report of the Commission presented in 1987 by GH Brundtland, entitled "Our Common Future" provided the first universally accepted definition of sustainable development as "development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the opportunities of future generations to meet their own needs". Brundtland Report, 1987, was reaffirmed by the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development / Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro - Brazil, 1992 which established the principles of Agenda 21, which was intended to be a guide implementation of sustainable development for the 21st century, a development that was required to be applied at national, regional and local level. [1] In the context of developing new eco-economic system adopted a number of international conventions that establish detailed obligations of the States and strict implementation deadlines climate change, biodiversity conservation, protection of forests and wetlands, limiting the use of certain chemicals, access information on the state of the environment and other international legal space outlining the practical application of the principles of sustainable economic development in ecological conditions.

  2. The Deadlock of Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Dutu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The offensive of “total capitalism” and the worsening of global ecological problems sharpen the concern to identify and promote new development directions capable to make compatible its four essential dimensions: economic, social, environmental, and cultural. In front of the announced failure of the “sustainable development” concept due to the conversions of its meanings, a concept stated with great expectations of success more than a quarter of a century ago, new perspectives are sought to overcome the deadlock. The thesis of a society of decrease (which requires exit-ting the capitalism or that of sustainable decrease (made possible by mitigating the over-consumption and over-production trends are among the radical approaches. In order to solve this problem in the context of maintaining the capitalistic project, three other concepts are put forward: the sustainable adaptability, the eco-compatible capitalism, and the society of moderation. Eventually, the most radical option is formulated by E. Morin: to abandon the “development” term and to overcome its imperfections by assuming two fundamental ideas: a policy of humanity combined with another one of planetary civilization. Anyhow, a new paradigm of evolution is absolutely necessary.

  3. The Deadlock of Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Dutu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The offensive of “total capitalism” and the worsening of global ecological problems sharpen the concern to identify and promote new development directions capable to make compatible its four essential dimensions: economic, social, environmental, and cultural. In front of the announced failure of the “sustainable development” concept due to the conversions of its meanings, a concept stated with great expectations of success more than a quarter of a century ago, new perspectives are sought to overcome the deadlock. The thesis of a society of decrease (which requires exit-ting the capitalism or that of sustainable decrease (made possible by mitigating the over-consumption and over-production trends are among the radical approaches. In order to solve this problem in the context of maintaining the capitalistic project, three other concepts are put forward: the sustainable adaptability, the eco-compatible capitalism, and the society of moderation. Eventually, the most radical option is formulated by E. Morin: to abandon the “development” term and to overcome its imperfections by assuming two fundamental ideas: a policy of humanity combined with another one of planetary civilization. Anyhow, a new paradigm of evolution is absolutely necessary.

  4. Measuring Tools for Quantifying Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Annette Evans; Vladimir Strezov; Tim Evans

    2015-01-01

    This work reviews the tools and methods used for quantifying sustainable development. The paper first reviews categorization of the tools based on weak and strong sustainability. It then provides critical review of the UN review of sustainability indicators and the methods for calculating the indicators, which include the environmental footprint, capital approach to measuring sustainable development, green national net product, genuine savings, genuine progress indicator, indicator of sustain...

  5. Making the Sustainable Development Goals Consistent with Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathis Wackernagel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The UN’s Sustainable development Goals (SDGs are the most significant global effort so far to advance global sustainable development. Bertelsmann Stiftung and the sustainable development solutions network released an SDG index to assess countries’ average performance on SDGs. Ranking high on the SDG index strongly correlates with high per person demand on nature (or “Footprints”, and low ranking with low Footprints, making evident that the SDGs as expressed today vastly underperform on sustainability. Such underperformance is anti-poor because lowest-income people exposed to resource insecurity will lack the financial means to shield themselves from the consequences. Given the significance of the SDGs for guiding development, rigorous accounting is essential for making them consistent with the goals of sustainable development: thriving within the means of planet Earth.

  6. Commentary: the judiciary and sustainable development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing from litigation and jurisprudential development from the Brazilian judiciary, this short legal commentary evaluates the role of the judiciary in promoting sustainable development, especially the attainment of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Keywords: Brazil, Sustainable Development, ...

  7. Philosophy of Sustainable Development, Polish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmunt, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to awake awareness of the term "sustainable development" and show that the very term is not understood in a unilateral way. A discrepancy of perception and thus understanding of the notion of sustainability blurs its meaning. Numerous scholars and researchers use the term sustainable or sustainability to…

  8. Sustainable spatial development in higher education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maja TERLEVIĆ; Andreja ISTENIČ STARČIČ; Maruška ŠUBIC KOVAČ

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable development is not only a great challenge for society as a whole, but also for higher education institutions, which have been rapidly including sustainable development in their educational...

  9. The Sustainable Development Goals and REDD+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Lima, Mairon G.; Kissinger, Gabrielle; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid J.; Braña-Varela, Josefina; Gupta, Aarti

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes potential synergies between two recent sustainable development initiatives, namely the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), a climate mitigation mechanism negotiated under the auspices of the United Nations

  10. WATER MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safer Karima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available «Of course I wish I was in school. I want to learn, I want to read and write... But how mom need me to fetch water» - Benny Bazan, Bolivia; «…the factories consume a lot of water, while we can hardly find enough basic our needs, not to mention what we need to irrigate crops» - Gopal Jojor, India. Voices are united by the same thing: the denial of access to water. It’s what began the United Nations report of human development for the year 2006. The observed increase of the population and increasing water pressure to use some form of this article despite the enormous availability and large, underground or surface quantities, but the supply and demand equation is no longer as in the past in spite of the new techniques introduced Kthalih seawater. And has worked to highlight the importance of this element as the most important determinants of sustainable development, which aims to rationality and adulthood and dealing with efforts to achieve growth and meet the needs of the population of housing and economic activities and food and education, without prejudice to the negative form of ecological, and sustainable development is the way only to ensure a good quality of life for residents of the present and the future.

  11. New Humanism and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han d'Orville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The call for a new humanism in the 21st century roots in the conviction that the moral, intellectual and political foundations of globalization and international cooperation have to be rethought. Whilst the historic humanism was set out to resolve tensions between tradition and modernity and to reconcile individual rights with newly emerging duties of citizenship, the new humanism approach goes beyond the level of the nation state in seeking to unite the process of globalization with its complex and sometimes contradictory manifestations. The new humanism therefore advocates the social inclusion of every human being at all levels of society and underlines the transformative power of education, sciences, culture and communications. Therefore, humanism today needs to be perceived as a collective effort that holds governments, civil society, the private sector and human individuals equally responsible to realize its values and to design creatively and implement a humanist approach to a sustainable society, based on economic, social and environmental development. New humanism describes the only way forward for a world that accounts for the diversity of identities and the heterogeneity of interests and which is based on inclusive, democratic, and, indeed, humanist values. Humanism did evolve into the grand movement of human spiritual and creative liberation, which enabled an unparalleled acceleration of prosperity and transformation of civilizations. In line with humanist ethics, the material growth was understood as a collective good, which was to serve all participants of a community and meant to enable the socio-economic progress of society. The exact definition of humanism has historically fluctuated in accordance with successive and diverse strands of intellectual thought. The underlying concept rests on the universal ideas of human emancipation, independence and social justice. Humanism can hence be understood as a moral inspiration for

  12. Phytoextraction to promote sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.W.N. Anderson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mining makes a positive contribution to the economy of Indonesia. Significant earnings accrue through the export of tin, coal, copper, nickel and gold. Of these commodities, gold carries the highest unit value. But not all gold mining is regulated. Indonesia has a significant Artisanal and Small Scale Gold Mining (ASGM industry, defined as any informal and unregulated system of gold mining. These operations are often illegal, unsafe and are environmentally and socially destructive. New technology is needed to support the sustainable exploitation of gold and other precious metal resources in locations where ASGM is currently practised. This technology must be simple, cheap, easy to operate and financially rewarding. A proven option that needs to be promoted is phytoextraction. This is technology where plants are used to extract metals from waste rock, soil or water. These metals can subsequently be recovered from the plant in pure form, and sold or recycled. Gold phytoextraction is a commercially available technology, while international research has shown that phytoextraction will also work for mercury. In the context of ASGM operations, tailings could be contained in specific ‘farming areas’ and cropped using phytoextraction technology. The banning of ASGM operations is not practicable or viable. Poverty would likely become more extreme if a ban were enforced. Instead, new technology options are essential to promote the sustainable development of this industry. Phytoextraction would involve community and worker engagement, education and employment. New skills in agriculture created through application of the technology would be transferrable to the production of food, fibre and timber crops on land adjacent to the mining operations. Phytoextraction could therefore catalyse sustainable development in artisanal gold mining areas throughout Indonesia.

  13. Sustainable spatial development in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Terlević; Andreja Istenič Starčič; Maruška Šubic Kovač

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable development is not only a great challenge for society as a whole, but also for higher education institutions, which have been rapidly including sustainable development in their educational process in the last two decades. Directly or indirectly, education for sustainable spatial development includes all aspects of sustainable development: environmental, economic, social and cultural. Space is a junction of various interests, which requires coordinating the entire process of spatia...

  14. SUSTAINABLE INSURANCE AS A KEY FACTOR OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Volokhova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the insurance sector in the sustainability development support was determined and the possible measures of economic and social loss reduction, based on risk management, risk transfer, and sustainable investment, were proposed. A crucial necessity of the community resilience improvement and cooperation with other stakeholders was indicated. Sustainable insurance sector plays a determinant role in the process of sustainable development as it possess vital leverages to enable and facilitate community resilience, and, therefore, to reduce the possible loss from Economic, Social and Governance issues (ESG issues. First of all, this could be achieved by the means of proper risk management, namely risk assessment and risk reduction. Second, risk transfer will help communities to cope with actual damage made and cover the loss. Finally, sustainable investment activity may be used to make sure that business sector respects the key principles of sustainable development in its day-to-day activity. Cooperation with all the stakeholders of sustainable development, especially governments and communities, will help to develop a better expertize of risk management and create more effective tools for risk reduction. Implementing principles of sustainable investment into the core of their business values, insurance companies are likely to enjoy the improvement of their image and status, higher quality of their investment portfolio, and smaller refund sums payed on claims.

  15. From Attitude Change to Behaviour Change: Institutional Mediators of Education for Sustainable Development Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Velasco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the way in which institutional contexts mediate values-focused behaviour change, with potential design implications. We use concepts taken from training research, where “learning transfer” refers to the translation into practice of the learning acquired during training: it is considered necessary to generalize it for the job context and for it to be maintained over a period of time on the job. In this paper, we analyse the example of one education for sustainable development (ESD intervention that is already established as pedagogically effective when it is deployed in diverse institutional environments worldwide—the Youth as Agents of Behaviour Change program of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC. This allows an opportunity to consider variations in learning transfer due to distinctive moderating institutional features, which can now be understood in terms of varying transfer climates, levels of leadership support and opportunities to practice. Additional barriers of tokenistic consultation, lack of role clarity and perverse effects of increased distance between trainees and their colleagues on return were also seen. ESD programs intending to bridge the values-action gap could benefit from not focusing only on the training content, but pre-planning organisational support for returning trainees and including in the training ways for them to assess and plan to overcome such difficulties.

  16. A Sustainability Education Academic Development Framework (SEAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Academic development is one means of reorientating education within higher education (HE) to include sustainability principles. This paper identifies the requirements of academic development programmes that will provide educators with the skills to engage students in the ideas of sustainability and sustainable development. In order to determine…

  17. The sustainable development; Le developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In the framework of the sustainable development week (june 2003), Actu Environnement published a complete document on the sustainable development to inform the public, recall the main steps of this notion (Rio conference and the following conferences) and the possible employments. It presents also the main organizations acting in the sustainable development domain. (A.L.B.)

  18. Driving change : sustainable development action plans Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2008-01-01

    This guidance builds upon the Sustainable Development Commission’s previous guidance, Getting Started (August 2005), which set out the basic elements that the Sustainable Development Commission would expect to see in a good Sustainable Development Action Plan. Publisher PDF Original published August 2005.

  19. The China Development Bank and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Levanchuk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author presents an empirical study of sustainable banking in China and examines the flagship China DevelopmentBank (CDB. The CDB is directly supervised by the State Council of the People’s Republic of China and is one ofthe largest state-owned financial institutions in the country. Its overseas lending is growing rapidly; it increasingly acts as aglobal player, influenced by a variety of international actors. Using the mercantilist framework, the author investigates how the CDB’s social policies diverge from those set by the Chinese authorities. The analysis discusses CDB’s policy variations that are not in line with government interests or prescribed directly by governmental bodies. It concludes that the bank has been active in developing and establishing its own corporate strategy for implementing the concept of sustainable development to promote a balanced development of the economy, society and the environment. That strategy contains the norms and rules set by Chinese regulatory agencies with regard to social and environmental areas, as well as important elements ofthe international practice of corporate responsibility and sustainable funding. The CDB is most likely driven by its desire tobe considered internationally a good corporate citizen and often acts independently from governmental guidance, which insome sense undermines mercantilist perceptions.

  20. Project-organized learning and the development of competences in Engineering Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Kolmos, Anette

    2013-01-01

    thinking, systems thinking, etc. It is argued that Problem-Based Learning (PBL) provides a suitable framework for developing the competences mentioned, but there is a lack of studies that investigate the room which PBL practice leaves for ESD. In this study, we aim to investigate the staff’s perception...... of what engineering students do; which aspects they touch upon, and which type of knowledge they gain in a PBL environment and how this reflects the ESD principles. The study includes two engineering programs in the PBL environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. The results show distinct strategies...

  1. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONAL AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda GHEORGHIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture today is a strategic point of a country's economy, providing food based on population, development of internal and external trade and manufacturing industries by supplying raw materials. For Romania, this branch is a strong point both in terms climatic (temperate, balanced relief, soil quality and at the same time is also a way of national development and convergence of rural areas to their full potential untapped. With strong reforms, well implemented, a specific legislative framework which aims to protecting private property, Romania could reduce the low efficiency and can have a sustainable agriculture. The paper aimed to present the advantages of consuming organic products, and, on the other hand, the advantages of a country in terms of organic farming. European agriculture is a competitive, market-oriented, but also protecting the environment model.

  2. Developing Sustainable Life Support System Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable spacecraft life support concepts may allow the development of more reliable technologies for long duration space missions. Currently, life support technologies at different levels of development are not well evaluated against each other, and evaluation methods do not account for long term reliability and sustainability of the hardware. This paper presents point-of-departure sustainability evaluation criteria for life support systems, that may allow more robust technology development, testing and comparison. An example sustainable water recovery system concept is presented.

  3. Sustainable development and social learning: Re-contextualising the space of orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Terri

    2016-10-01

    In the lead-up to the 2007 Australian federal election, Labor candidate Kevin Rudd described climate change as the "great moral challenge of our generation". In the years since then, the heat in Australia has been rising - in terms of both temperature and climate politics -, but government action has slowed down. Endorsement of economic growth is prioritised, with only intermittent recognition of environmental costs. At grassroots level, citizens' attitudes are influenced by social norms. This kind of social learning is a major constraint on sustainability. Therefore, it seems useful to consider how educators might help build sustainable futures. To understand how historical context entangles social learning in ways that complicate policies associated with Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and practices of Education for Sustainability (EfS), the author of this paper draws on the concept of "space of orientation". Focusing on adult education, she traces the contradiction between "globalisation" and "sustainability" through policy logics, relational practices in Australian adult education and the "necessary utopia" which provides a point of reference for making futures. She argues that spaces of orientation are a critical resource in this era of intensifying conflicts of interest between economic priorities of globalisation and environmental priorities intended to slow global warming, because they mediate context and orient learning in ways that clear a path towards sustainability through the entangled histories of this present.

  4. Problematising development in sustainability: epistemic justice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problematising development in sustainability: epistemic justice through an African ethic. ... The paper draws on the work of Wolfgang Sachs (1999) who asserts that the notion of sustainability has been consumed by development, presenting a view of sustainability which challenges the current and dominant economically ...

  5. Sustainable spatial development in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Terlević

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is not only a great challenge for society as a whole, but also for higher education institutions, which have been rapidly including sustainable development in their educational process in the last two decades. Directly or indirectly, education for sustainable spatial development includes all aspects of sustainable development: environmental, economic, social and cultural. Space is a junction of various interests, which requires coordinating the entire process of spatial planning, taking into account the goal of sustainable spatial development. The existing values of space are insufficient for the rapid implementation of a sustainable spatial development paradigm. Suitable education is needed by both individuals and spatial planning professionals and at all levels of education. It is therefore necessary to transform some of the academic programs in the higher education curriculum by integrating teaching content and methods that include long-term knowledge and holistic thinking, taking into account the importance of interdisciplinary integration. This article reviews literature in sustainable development in higher education from 2002 to 2013. Topics discussed include students’ and teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development, the presence of sustainable development and sustainable spatial development in higher education and the reasons for the slow introduction of this material into the curriculum. Based on a literature analysis, the last section identifies important drivers that can contribute to a more rapid integration of a sustainable spatial development paradigm into higher education.

  6. Using Participatory Action Research to Develop a Course Module on Education for Sustainable Development in Pre-Service Chemistry Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Burmeister

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a course module on sustainability issues and Education for Sustainable Development in German pre-service chemistry teacher education. The module was inspired by empirical research findings about the knowledge base of student teachers. It was created and cyclically refined using Participatory Action Research. Experience gained during its three-year application will be reflected upon here, including feedback collected from student evaluation sheets. In the end, the participants responded extremely positively to the course. The student teachers stated that the module was interesting, relevant and valuable for their later profession as high school chemistry teachers. They also emphasised that they now felt more competent in the area of sustainability and ESD.

  7. Key events in the history of sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2005-01-01

    This document is a table which summaries the key events in the history of sustainable development, adapted from International Institute for Sustainable Development's sustainable development timeline. Publisher PDF

  8. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman L. Kh. M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A list of recommendation was proposed to drive sustainable construction in this country. In conclusion, the status of sustainable construction in Malaysia is still in its infancy. The lack of awareness, training and education, ineffective procurement systems, existing public policies and regulatory frameworks are among the major barriers for sustainable construction in Malaysia. Besides the needs for capacities, technologies and tools, total and ardent commitment by all players in the construction sectors including the governments and the public atlarge are required in order to achieve sustainable construction in Malaysia.

  9. Role of Flexibility in Sustainable Port Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taneja, P.; Vellinga, T.; Ros, R.

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability has become a high profile objective in all aspects of our lives, including the development of our infrastructures. Flexibility can enhance sustainability endeavors, yet its contribution is not clear to most. In this paper we investigate the role of flexibility in sustainable port

  10. Information technology for sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Guerra, Aida; Knoche, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present different strategies to integrate concerns about sustainability into Information and Communication Technology (ITC) projects by use of problem based learning (PBL) methodology. In alignment with PBL we introduce two different models for problem analysis where students move...... implications of the different approaches to integrate sustainability. We conclude that students indeed chose divers strategies to integrate sustainability into their projects and those diverse strategies are indeed needed to obtain student engagement. Furthermore, the introduction of an open-ended thematic...

  11. Energy access and sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Alstone, Peter; Gershenson, Dimitry

    2015-03-01

    With 1.4 billion people lacking electricity to light their homes and provide other basic services, or to conduct business, and all of humanity (and particularly the poor) are in need of a decarbonized energy system can close the energy access gap and protect the global climate system. With particular focus on addressing the energy needs of the underserved, we present an analytical framework informed by historical trends and contemporary technological, social, and institutional conditions that clarifies the heterogeneous continuum of centralized on-grid electricity, autonomous mini- or community grids, and distributed, individual energy services. We find that the current day is a unique moment of innovation in decentralized energy networks based on super-efficient end-use technology and low-cost photovoltaics, supported by rapidly spreading information technology, particularly mobile phones. Collectively these disruptive technology systems could rapidly increase energy access, contributing to meeting the Millennium Development Goals for quality of life, while simultaneously driving action towards low-carbon, Earth-sustaining, energy systems.

  12. Is the concept of sustainable tourism sustainable? Developing the Sustainable Tourism Benchmarking Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Cernat, Lucian; Gourdon, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Given the complexity of the issues surrounding the concept of sustainable tourism, the current paper tries to provide a unified methodology to assess tourism sustainability, based on a number of quantitative indicators. The proposed methodological framework (Sustainable Tourism Benchmarking Tool – STBT) will provide a number of benchmarks against which the sustainability of tourism activities in various countries can be assessed. A model development procedure is proposed: identification of th...

  13. Impact of Sustainability Pedagogies on Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Neus; Tomas, Louisa; Woods, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) espouses student-centred, transformative pedagogies that promote learning through active, participatory and experiential learning. Yet, traditional lectures provide limited opportunities for engaging students in such pedagogies. This article reports on the inclusion of sustainability pedagogies within…

  14. The Measurement of Sustainable Development in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Fauzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly the end of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs era, bring back ideas for looking international development goals. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs is one of them. In this study, sustainable development has defined as the balance of economic, social and environmental. The achievement of sustainable development is measured by using two different approaches, partial and composite indicator. Partial development indicators showed progress in economic and social dimensions. However, progress in these areas seems to put pressure on the environment. Sustainable Development Index (IPB, which is a composite of GDP, HDI and IKLH (Environmental Quality Index also gives the same message. By using a balance between dimensions of development technique, as chosen scenario, sustainable development in Indonesia reached about two-thirds of the maximum target. Hight progress in economic and social ultimately corrected by environmental degradation.

  15. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  16. Ensuring sustainability in developing world biofuel productoin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Von Maltitz, Graham P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available SUSTAINABILITY IN DEVELOPING WORLDS BIOFUEL PRODUCTION Graham von Maltitz, Lorren Haywood and Benita De Wet Natural Resources and the Environment CSIR, Pretoria South Africa forest bioenergy for sustainable development Sustainability Assessment Framework... in Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar growing for EU markets Type 3 projects E.g. Outgrowers linked to commercial plantations Small scale farmers linked to commercial biofuel fuel processing plants Type 2 projects E.g. Commercial farmers in South...

  17. Sustainable Development and High Seas Fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Spijkers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of the concept of sustainable development in the legal regime governing the exploitation of the natural resources of the oceans, particularly fisheries on the high seas. General documents on sustainable development and legal instruments on high seas fisheries are analyzed in order to see in which way they refer to each other and whether they provide a sufficiently comprehensive framework to ensure the sustainable management of fisheries in the high seas.

  18. Transnational Markets for Sustainable Development Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallemore, Caleb; Jespersen, Kristjan

    2016-01-01

    framework to develop a new approach to addressing an important question in development studies: how do donors (understood as donor agencies, funds and foundations, and firms) choose which projects to support? Beginning with the observation that matching markets in sustainable development governance......Transnational sustainable development—that is, sustainable development policy initiatives involving actors in multiple countries—often involves donor sponsorship of sustainable development projects, similar to matching markets like venture capital, employment searches, or college admissions....... These transaction systems, also known as matching markets, can be seen in a variety of phenomena in transnational development governance, including private aid, public–private sustainable development projects, and transnational polycentric governance initiatives. In this paper, we utilize the matching market...

  19. Responsible and sustainable business in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Săvoiu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Businesses in the contemporary world, detached from the classic entrepreneurial paradigm in keeping with which a business appears, grows and matures, are undergoing a process of adjustment to the new concept of sustainability, focusing on reconciling global, regional, national and local economic development and the quality of the environment. The practical organization of a responsible and sustainable business, the results of which are ever new products and services, which creates new jobs, and contributes, by aggregating systematically, to assessing new macroeconomic results, from GDP or NDP to import and export, and especially to sustainable economic development, requires the presence of both the three classical factors, i.e., capital, labour and location (land, and the other three essential new factors, which are called technology, information and the specific skills of the business owner, or simply of the entrepreneur.

  20. Education for sustainable development. Just do it : guide to designing education for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, S.

    Sustainable development has become a crucial part of our modern society and our education. Sustainability is a complex concept. After all, what is considered sustainable to us now may not necessarily be so in the future. We need to continually review our judgments with regards to sustainability.

  1. System theoretic approach to sustainable development problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batanović Vladan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that the concepts and methodology contained in the system theory and operations research are suitable for application in the planning and control of the sustainable development. The sustainable development problems can be represented using the state space concepts, such as the transition of system, from the given initial state to the final state. It is shown that sustainable development represents a specific control problem. The peculiarity of the sustainable development is that the target is to keep the system in the prescribed feasible region of the state space. The analysis of planning and control problems of sustainable development has also shown that methods developed in the operations research area, such as multicriteria optimization, dynamic processes simulation, non-conventional treatment of uncertainty etc. are adequate, exact base, suitable for resolution of these problems.

  2. Cultural heritage and sustainable development in SUIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Hassler, Uta; Kohler, Niklaus

    2002-01-01

    The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development.......The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development....

  3. Urban Logistics in Sustainable Development Conception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paula Bajdor

    2012-01-01

    .... The urban logistics is addressed to the cities, to prevent negative effects which are occurring in them, in cities, working in the areas of sustainable development (economic, social and environmental). The article presents the impact of logistics activities on the basis of urban logistics in a fully sustainable urban development. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT

  4. Education for Sustainable Development: Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    verbalising problems or organising token environmental actions. As sustainable development is taken up at political levels, the environment ..... consensus around an explicit integrating idea (e.g. sustainable development) and skilled teachers who enjoy ambiguity and can link the integrating idea to the knowledge base ...

  5. Achieving sustainable development through tax harmonization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using Nigeria as a case study, this article examines the efficacy of tax harmonization as an option for the achievement of two objectives: the integration of a developing country with other economies, and its sustainable development. It highlights the nexus between tax harmonization – a tax policy option – and sustainable ...

  6. Indigenous Knowledge And Sustainable Development: Investigating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable development is perceived as a complex concept because of the south–north, north–north and south–south divide. The various perspectives on this subject are embedded in people's own beliefs or interests regarding what sustainable development (SD) means to them. No wonder SD is viewed by politicians as ...

  7. Integrating Sustainable Development Education into Secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The average secondary school leaver in Nigeria is ill-equipped in the basics of sustainable development. ... This paper opines that principles and practice of sustainable development education should be incorporated in key subjects like geography, history, government, introductory technology, home economics, agricultural ...

  8. THE JUDICIARY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Public and private means of transportation use fossil fuels. Wind and solar power plants are still not very significant. There is no planning for the creation of sustainable infrastructure in public and private works. Brazil lacks a consistent programme for energy conservation and efficiency. The government has no system to.

  9. When Sustainable Development is Core Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Galamba, Kirsten Ramskov

    2010-01-01

    of reorganising public building administration into FM for sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach: Understandings of the term Sustainable Facilities Management is identified through reviews of FM literature as well as literature on sustainable buildings and sustainable urban development...... of society. The research is carried out in collaboration with a Danish local authority which is recognised internationally for its frontrunner initiatives as a green local authority. An ongoing Ph.D. study is included in the research. Findings: SFM is argued to be a holistic FM strategy which contributes...

  10. The Two Faces of Sustainability : Fuzzy Evaluation of Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, T.

    2003-01-01

    An evaluative framework of sustainable development operates at both the production system level and the society level: objective information gathered at the production system level is given subjective meaning at the society level. The evaluative framework constitutes a complete cycle

  11. Education for Sustainable Development at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 20-22 June 2012, marking the twentieth anniversary of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and the tenth anniversary of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. With more than…

  12. Networks as Tools for Sustainable Urban Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Tollin, Nicola

    Due to the increasing number of networks related to sustainable development (SUD) the paper focuses on understanding in which way networks can be considered useful tools for sustainable urban development, taking particularly into consideration the networks potential of spreading innovative policies......, strategies and actions. There has been little theoretically development on the subject. In practice networks for sustainable development can be seen as combining different theoretical approaches to networks, including governance, urban competition and innovation. To give a picture of the variety...... of sustainable networks, we present different examples of networks, operating at different geographical scales, from global to local, with different missions (organizational, political, technical), fields (lobbying, learning, branding) and its size. The potentials and challenges related to sustainable networks...

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CRISTU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development requires better quality of life for present and future generations. Additional data is required to measure lasting progress, that tracks economic growth. The objectives that take these aspects into consideration should be accompanied by economic, social, environmental and demographic indicators. Thus, sustainable development indicators satisfy these requirements. The articles makes an analysis of the main indicators of sustainable development. Even though it is important to observe them at a macro, European level, it is necessary to take into consideration the specific situation existing at a local and regional level, as well. Equally important is the integration of objectives aimed at sustainable development into the national policies. Economic improvement can be achieved through jobs and sustainable consumption.

  14. Training of chemistry teachers for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanshina, S. I.; Sagitova, R. N.; Melnikov, G. F.; Fedotova, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    Proposed and piloted teacher training plan containing elements of the concept of sustainable development. teacher training plan includes the development of general and specialized courses in chemical disciplines, organization of activities, taking into account the principles of Green Chemistry.

  15. Sustainable Industrial Development Programmes of International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, more insightful corporate entrepreneurship programmes with improved infrastructural and electric power facilities should be encouraged. Increasing support to firms through diverse channels would boost rapid economic development of the sub region. Key words: Sustainable programmes, economic development, ...

  16. PSSD - Planning System for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PSSD - Planning System for Sustainable Development - is a part of the Baltic Sea Region's INTERREG II C program. The current report describes some theories, methods and tools developed under the PSSD project. First, the theoretical foundation of the project is described. Secondly, the role...... of indicators in sustainable development is discussed and a Web-based indicator generator is described. Thirdly, we describe a number of methods and tools, which support planning for sustainable development. Finally, some technical interface tools - especially a Web-based interface to the methods and tools...

  17. Grounding Headphones for Protection Against ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    A simple alternative technique has been devised protecting delicate equipment against electrostatic discharge (ESD) in settings in which workers wear communication headsets. In the original setting in which the technique was devised, the workers who wear the headsets also wear anti-ESD grounding straps on their wrists. The alternative technique eliminates the need for the wrist grounding straps by providing for grounding through the headsets. In place of the electrically insulating foam pads on the headsets, one installs pads made of electrically conductive foam like that commonly used to protect electronic components. Grounding wires are attached to the conductive foam pads, then possibly to the shielding cable which may be grounded to the backshell on the connector. The efficacy of this technique in protecting against ESD has been verified in experiments. The electrical resistance of the pads is a few megohms - about the same as that of a human body between the fingers of opposite hands and, hence, low enough for grounding. The only drawback of the technique is that care must be taken to place the foam pads in contact with the user s skin: any hair that comes between the foam pads and the skin must be pushed aside because hair is electrically insulating and thus prevents adequate grounding.

  18. Children between Sustainable Development and Commercials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péter, Lilla; Balázs, Szilvia

    2009-01-01

    Our paper deals with the relationship between sustainability, media advertisements and their effect on children. This topic is highly actual today, as the children of today, who grow up in front of the TV will be the consumers of tomorrow. The perpetual growth of consuming and gathering material goods is not serving the sustainable development.…

  19. Sustainable development in Cameroon's forestry sector: Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    This paper examines initiatives formulated by the government of Cameroon to promote sustainable development within its forestry sector, and proffers a series of policy recommendations for advancing sustainable forest management in Cameroon. Since the enactment of Cameroon's comprehensive forestry law (Law N0.

  20. Transforming Our World: Literacy for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemann, Ulrike, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This compilation offers global examples of innovative and promising literacy and numeracy programmes that link the teaching and learning of literacy to sustainable development challenges such as health, social equality, economic empowerment and environmental sustainability. This publication is a timely contribution to the 2030 Agenda for…

  1. Inventions for future sustainable development in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, E.; Beers, P.J.; Fischer, A.R.H.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is directed to the importance of different inventions as driver for sustainable development of agriculture. Inventions are defined as radical new ideas, perspectives and technologies that hold the potential to trigger a change in sustainable agriculture. Innovation is based on one or

  2. Sustainable wastewater management in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Carsten Hollænder; Fryd, Ole; Koottatep, Thammarat

    of treated wastewater, energy conservation, and proper financial and organizational set up.   Sustainable Wastewater Management in Developing Countries will urge practitioners, decision makers, and researchers to approach these systems in new ways that are practical, innovative, and-best of all-sustainable....

  3. Better energy indicators for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter G.; Abdalla, Kathleen; Quadrelli, Roberta; Vera, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    The UN Sustainable Development Goal 7 aims to deliver affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Tracking progress towards the targets under this goal can spur better energy statistics and data gathering capacity, and will require new indicators that also consider the interplay with other goals.

  4. Resource linkages and sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anouti, Yahya

    prices we estimate that the demand for gasoline could be reduced by 7.8 percent and that of diesel by 5.9 percent. This would lead to not only reduction in the associated negative externalities, but also to the generation of more than USD400 billion in revenues for governments. However, the partial equilibrium analysis in essay one ignores the general equilibrium effects that will be mainly driven by how the government spends the subsidy. In essay 2, we build the case for phasing out these subsidies and accompanying that by a welfare compensating cash transfer. In order to evaluate the impact of that on consumer's welfare, we develop a numerical model for Saudi Arabia in a general equilibrium setting to discuss a phase out of transport fuel subsidies that is. Results show that the Saudi government can increase its consumers' welfare up to five percentage points. In case the cash transfer is adjusted to keep consumers' utility at the pre-reform level, the required compensating transfer would leave the government with three percentage points of additional revenues. Finally, we highlight policy implications of phasing out the transport fuel subsidies. Finally, in essay 3 we turn our focus to the application of local content policies in the oil and gas sector. There is limited literature that investigates economic linkages from the extractive industries, assesses intertemporal tradeoffs, and guides the design of efficient and sustainable policies. Our contribution in this essay is three-fold. First, we present the first comprehensive analysis of economic linkages from the oil and gas sector across 48 countries. Then, we analyze the economic distortions from applying local content policies using a Hotelling type optimal control model with an international oil company maximizing its profits subject to a local content requirement. Finally, we investigate the presence of a socially optimal local content level when the social planner maximizing the net benefits from the

  5. CIRP Design 2012 Sustainable Product Development

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    During its life cycle, a product produces waste that is over 20 times its weight. As such it is critical to develop products that are sustainable. Currently product development processes lack high quality methods and tools that are empirically validated to support development of sustainable products. This book is a compilation of over forty cutting edge international research papers from the 22nd CIRP International Design Conference, written by eminent researchers from 15 countries, on engineering design process, methods and tools, broadly for supporting sustainable product development.   A variety of new insights into the product development process, as well as a host of methods and tools that are at the cutting edge of design research are discussed and explained covering a range of diverse topics. The areas covered include: ·Sustainable design and manufacturing, ·Design synthesis and creativity, ·Global product development and product life cycle management, ·Design for X (safety, reliability, manufactu...

  6. The UK Government sustainable development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This Command Paper sets out the Government's strategy for sustainable development, taking into account the national and international developments that have occurred since its previous policy statement ('A better quality of life: a strategy for sustainable development in the United Kingdom', Cm 4345; ISBN 0101434529) published in May 1999, including devolution in Scotland and Wales and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development. The strategy is based on four agreed priorities of sustainable consumption and production, climate change, natural resource protection, and sustainable communities with a focus on tackling environmental inequalities; and uses a new indicator set with commitments to look at new indicators such as on well-being. Proposals include: the establishment of a new Community Action 2020 programme; and strengthening the role of the Sustainable Development Commission to ensure an independent review of government progress, with all central government departments and executive agencies to produce sustainable development actions plans by December 2005. 1 annex.

  7. Space - the essential dimension of sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Mogens

    be accumulated as waste being an obstacle for new development. If this circular process can be repeated indefinitely, the development is truly sustainable. However, sustainability involves many aspects, and most importantly the aims of development. That includes the meaning of value and hereby the moral/ethical...... their needs. The articles tries to illustrate how space, as the combination of natural resources, environments and man-made capital, is the basic and most important dimension of sustainability. The article aims at giving an overview of the basic interdependence of natural resource endowment, technological...

  8. The sustainable development; Le developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robreau, Y.; Porcher, P

    2002-11-01

    This document aims to define the sustainable development concept with a special attention for France and Israel position. The first part recalls the history of the sustainable development from the ''Man and Biosphere'' program of the UNESCO to Rio protocol. Then are described the principles of the sustainable development, the France plans and the France position at Johannesburg conference. The last part is devoted to the Israel position and a short presentation of the consequences of the greenhouse gases on the human health and the environment. (A.L.B.)

  9. The Importance of Women in Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Emel

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable development is defined as the "Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" in Brutland Report(1987). The strategies focusing on women employment and reducing poverty lead to faster and stronger economic growth and sustainable development. Women’s education and their economic and social empowerment have very important effects on the policy of reducing poverty and their respectability in th...

  10. Developing a comprehensive definition of sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Julia E; Mascarenhas, Alekhya; Bain, Julie; Straus, Sharon E

    2017-09-02

    Understanding sustainability is one of the significant implementation science challenges. One of the big challenges in researching sustainability is the lack of consistent definitions in the literature. Most implementation studies do not present a definition of sustainability, even when assessing sustainability. The aim of the current study was to systematically develop a comprehensive definition of sustainability based on definitions already used in the literature. We searched for knowledge syntheses of sustainability and abstracted sustainability definitions from the articles identified through any relevant systematic and scoping reviews. The constructs in the abstracted sustainability definitions were mapped to an existing definition. The comprehensive definition of sustainability was revised to include emerging constructs. We identified four knowledge syntheses of sustainability, which identified 209 original articles. Of the 209 articles, 24 (11.5%) included a definition of sustainability. These definitions were mapped to three constructs from an existing definition, and nine new constructs emerged. We reviewed all constructs and created a revised definition: (1) after a defined period of time, (2) a program, clinical intervention, and/or implementation strategies continue to be delivered and/or (3) individual behavior change (i.e., clinician, patient) is maintained; (4) the program and individual behavior change may evolve or adapt while (5) continuing to produce benefits for individuals/systems. All 24 definitions were remapped to the comprehensive definition (percent agreement among three coders was 94%). Of the 24 definitions, 17 described the continued delivery of a program (70.8%), 17 mentioned continued outcomes (70.8%), 13 mentioned time (54.2%), 8 addressed the individual maintenance of a behavior change (33.3%), and 6 described the evolution or adaptation (25.0%). We drew from over 200 studies to identify 24 existing definitions of sustainability

  11. Teacher Professional Development with an Education for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This national case study reports on the development of a national network, curriculum framework and resources for teacher education, with specific focus on the inclusion of environment and sustainability, also known as education for sustainable development (ESD) in the South African teacher education system. It reviews ...

  12. Framework for measuring sustainable development in NAMAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm; Bizikova, Livia; Harris, Melissa

    The research project ‘Measuring sustainable development (SD) in Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs)’ was initiated by the NAMA Partnership Working Group on Sustainable Development (WG-SD). The aim of the research project is to improve quantitative and qualitative measurement of the SD...... outcomes of NAMAs, thereby enhancing understanding of how NAMAs can contribute to meeting national development goals. The UNEP DTU Partnership (UDP), in collaboration with the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), and supported by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate...... of the SD impacts of NAMAs, based on a review of the literature on sustainability assessment tools and approaches, and a study of the different stakeholder perspectives among developing country governments, support agencies, the private sector and civil-society organisations....

  13. Contradictions Between Risk Management and Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Odd Einar; Langhelle, Oluf; Engen, Ole A. [Univ. of Stavanger (Norway). Dept. of Media, Culture and Social Science

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to discuss how risk management as a methodology and mindset influence on priorities and decisions concerning sustainable development. Management of risks and hazards often rely on partial analysis with a limited time frame. This may lead to a paradoxical situation where risk management and extended use of risk analysis could hamper long term sustainable development. The question is: Does the use of risk and vulnerability analysis (RaV-analysis) hamper or contribute to sustainable development? Because risk management and assessment has a more narrow scope and a limited time perspective based on well established methodologies, the tangible impacts of risk reducing measures in a project is easier to calculate than long-term and intangible impacts on global development. Empirical evidence is still scarce, but our preliminary conclusion is that mainstream risk management and assessments is counterproductive to sustainable development.

  14. Introducing education for sustainable development in the undergraduate laboratory: quantitative analysis of bioethanol fuel and its blends with gasoline by using solvatochromic dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Galgano, Paula Decot; Loffredo,Carina; Sato, Bruno M.; Reichardt, Christian; Seoud, Omar Abdel Moneim Abou El

    2012-01-01

    The concept of Education for Sustainable Development, ESD, has been introduced in a period where chemistry education is undergoing a major change, both in emphasis and methods of teaching. Studying an everyday problem, with an important socio-economic impact in the laboratory is a part of this approach. Presently, the students in many countries go to school in vehicles that run, at least partially, on biofuels; it is high time to let them test these fuels. The use of renewable fuels is not ne...

  15. ESD full chip simulation: HBM and CDM requirements and simulation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Franell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Verification of ESD safety on full chip level is a major challenge for IC design. Especially phenomena with their origin in the overall product setup are posing a hurdle on the way to ESD safe products. For stress according to the Charged Device Model (CDM, a stumbling stone for a simulation based analysis is the complex current distribution among a huge number of internal nodes leading to hardly predictable voltage drops inside the circuits.

    This paper describes an methodology for Human Body Model (HBM simulations with an improved ESD-failure coverage and a novel methodology to replace capacitive nodes within a resistive network by current sources for CDM simulation. This enables a highly efficient DC simulation clearly marking CDM relevant design weaknesses allowing for application of this software both during product development and for product verification.

  16. Seizing Community Participation in Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev Clausen, Helene; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    Despite ten years of strategic focus on growth through sustainable tourism, few research projects generated understanding of how development policy initiatives contributed to community benefits locally. This article addresses this research gap and explores how the aims of local development...... and cultural sustainability defined in the Mexican national tourism program Pueblos Mágicos are put into practice. The analysis is focused on how citizenship, local participation and democracy are operationalized and what are the local consequences of this governmental program in the community of Álamos...... migrant community in shaping sustainable tourism development as cultural brokers, social entrepreneurs and mediators of market knowledge. The paper criticizes the notion of homogenous local communities as an instrumental condition of sustainable and participatory development....

  17. Sprawl and sustainable urban development in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50 years urban development in Europe has been affected by extensive urban sprawl. Environmental, economic and social impacts of long lasting sprawl are threatening urban identity, urban culture and cultural identity of European territory. Last two decades the main concept in European planning and governance system has been the sustainable development, namely sustainable urban development and its implementation. We ought to be realistic about the possibilities to counter sprawl. Realistic seams to steer sprawling tendencies in more suitable and sustainable manner, so called smart urban sprawl. This paper analyses the planning concepts and gives the brief review of current policies for steering the urban sprawl in EU, which are considered to be of importance in achieving more sustainable urban development and efficient urban management in Serbia.

  18. Education for Sustainable Development: Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acknowledges that knowledge is socially created, a process that forms the basis for objectivity ... 'Recycling and environment conservation is the simplest thing someone can do, but people tend to .... sustainable development in Germany.

  19. Lifelong learning networks for sustainable regional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron; Ruelle, Christine; Valkering, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable regional development is a participatory, multi-actor process, involving a diversity of societal stakeholders, administrators, policy makers, practitioners and scientific experts. In this process, mutual and collective learning plays a major role as participants have to exchange and

  20. Managed Sustainable Development Classification Of Resources And Goods amp Services Calculating Sustainable Growth Rate And The Sustainable Development Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Saxena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Macro-level manmade problems can often be best solved by understanding and manipulating the economics behind it. The world today is facing genuine problems of scarcity of resources and environmental amp ecological issues in view of intergenerational equity. The paper proposes a new approach of identification and classification of i Resources and ii Goods and services in the context of sustainable development. Every economy has ambitious economic growth aspirations which are often found conflicting with the commitments on natural resource conservation and climate change obligations. The proposed methodology is a reconciliation of the aspired economic growth of a region and the conservation of the resources and nature. The paper employs contribution of different types of goods and services in the gross domestic product GDP of a region to analyze sustainability of development. The important parameters that the paper establishes are Sustainability Ratio R Sustainable Growth Rate SG and the Sustainable Development Index SI. These parameters can be used to compare the sustainable development level of different regions. Ensuring natural resource and environmental sustainability will eventually ensure economic sustainability. The paper considers resource depletion concerns as well as the environmental pollutants biological risks carbon footprint warhead proliferation et cetera thereby ensuring all round sustainability from survival to economic end. The sustainability analysis is done for long periods such as 50 years 100 years et cetera. The index shows how sustainable the development of an economy is and how sustainability it is growing. The presently much revered GDP growth numbers are directionless it does not tell the type of growth an economy essentially has. The direction should be sustainability which the paper stresses upon. An illustration of sustainability analysis of India is also done. Such indices can help identifying sustainably developing

  1. [Health and environmental governance for sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet; Gallo, Edmundo; Magalhães, Danielly de Paiva; Setti, Andréia Faraoni Freitas; Franco Netto, Francisco de Abreu; Buss, Daniel Forsin

    2012-06-01

    The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, will address the challenges for sustainable development (SD), 'green economy and poverty eradication' and the 'institutional structure of sustainable development'. Therefore it will address the governance needed to achieve such goals. This paper discusses the structure of global, regional and national governance of and for health and environment in the context of SD. Among other global actions, the Millenium Development Goals were a significant recent political effort, but despite its advances, it fails when ignores the structural causes of production and consumption patterns and the unequal distribution of power, which are responsible for inequities and impede true development. To achieve SD, proposals must avoid reductionism, advancing conceptually and methodologically to face the challenges of the socio-environmental determinants of health through intersectoral action, including social participation and all levels of government. It is paramount to continue the implementation of Agenda 21, to meet the MDGs and to create 'Sustainable Development Goals'. Regarding the health field, Rio+20 Summit must reassure the connection between health and sustainability - as a part of the Social pillar of sustainable development - inspiring politics and actions in multiple levels.

  2. Ecotourism and Sustainable Development in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Buchsbaum, Bernardo Duha

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the current issues facing ecotourism in Costa Rica; critically examine the impacts and challenges of ecotourism; analyze the potential of ecotourism as a strategy for sustainable development; look at ways in which ecotourism and sustainable development can be evaluated; and suggest ways to improve current ecotourism practices and policies for Costa Rica. What are the impacts and challenges of ecotourism? What are the possible benefits that...

  3. Stakeholder Participation for Sustainable Property Development

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Carlos; Olander, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Complexity in property development projects involves and affects stakeholders with different attributes, interests, needs and concerns. Thus, each stakeholder may influence a project negatively or positively. The literature suggests that the concepts of stakeholder, participation, social sustainability and sustainable development are intertwined and together can contribute to social change. To enhance transparency and involvement of a wide range of stakeholders, there is a need for a systemat...

  4. Duality of Health Promotion and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kirsten Bransholm; Land, Birgit; Kjærgård, Bente

    2015-01-01

    reduction and how these strategies affect the prospects for promoting health and sustainable food production and consumption. Danish food waste reduction strategies are used as examples with references to selected policy documents on food waste reduction strategies launched by international organisations...... sustainability and, vice versa, sustainability conditions health. Thus, to avoid unintended, negative effects the strategies directed towards sustainable development must be correlated with strategies for health promotion. The conceptual model is used to take a closer look at the complexities of food waste...... such as FAO, WHO, and the UN. We conclude that the strategies directed towards reducing food waste ignore the health and sustainability problems related to the oversupply of food. Neither do the Danish proponents of food waste reduction strategies explicitly articulate the built-in option to reduce the supply...

  5. Science, Open Communication and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Wilbanks

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the prerequisites for sustainable development is knowledge, in order to inform coping with sustainability threats and to support innovative sustainability pathways. Transferring knowledge is therefore a fundamental challenge for sustainability, in a context where external knowledge must be integrated with local knowledge in order to promote user-driven action. But effective local co-production of knowledge requires ongoing local access to existing scientific and technical knowledge so that users start on a level playing field. The information technology revolution can be a powerful enabler of such access if intellectual property obstacles can be overcome, with a potential to transform prospects for sustainability in many parts of the world.

  6. Sustainable Entrepreneurial Orientation: A Business Strategic Approach for Sustainable Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Criado-Gomis; Amparo Cervera-Taulet; Maria-Angeles Iniesta-Bonillo

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes sustainable entrepreneurial orientation (SEO) as a multidimensional construct that offers researchers the possibility of empirically testing their theoretical proposals in the sustainable entrepreneurship field...

  7. Towards Science for Democratic Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jonas Egmose

    through a theoretical conceptualisation of democratic sustainable development. In this framework sustainability is understood as the immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously to renew itself without eroding its own foundation for existence. Consequently societal......This PhD thesis considers how community-based action research can further new research orientations towards sustainable development. The thesis is empirically situated in the area of upstream public engagement where new forms of bottom-up citizen participation are developed to engage local...... sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, thus contrasting scientific progress perceived as intellectual commodity production driving the knowledge economy. In this perspective, social environmental problems represent societal, cultural and democratic challenges, calling...

  8. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSIBILITY OF BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Krykun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Today sustainable development is a widely used term, which has been increasingly influential in recent years. Debates about sustainability no longer consider sustainability solely as an environmental concern, but also incorporate economic and social dimensions. However, while a social and economic dimensions of sustainable development are widely discussed, environmental degradation becomes more and more crucial each year and is likely to reduce human well-being all across the world within the next few decades. The purpose of the paper is to analyse ecological ‘pillar’ of sustainable development, its historical background, main steps towards implementation of ‘new global environmental rules for society. Methodology. The paper is based on statistical information from public sources, reports of different international organizations and institutions, which are used to stress and underline main crucial points of research. Results of the survey show, that environmental quality, economic development and social well-being are interdependent and the main aim of international institutions, independent countries, businesses and society is to achieve environmentally sustainable development. Environmental issues make strong impact on modern economy. Responsible global strategy of development provides the whole society with rules, how ‘wise’ technological changes and economic policy can make industrial production processes less polluting and less resource intensive but yet more productive and profitable. Practical implications. Strategy of sustainable development and it’s three basic dimensions have found practical implication in one complex model, which illustrates the level of development of each country – the Human Development Index, which is focusing on three basic dimensions of human development: life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling and gross national income per capita. Another data, which is

  9. Forests in the Light of Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Gabriela Turtureanu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainable development assigns all the social and economic development methods and forms, whose fundament is firstly represented by the insurance of a balance between these socialeconomic systems and the elements of the natural capital. The most known definition of sustainable development is surely the one of the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED in the “Our common future” report, also known as the Brundtland Report: “sustainable development is the development that aims at satisfying the present need without compromising future generations‟ possibility to satisfy their own needs”. Sustainable development also aims at and tries to establish a theoretical frame in order to make decisions in all situations that include a human/environment report, whether it is about the environment, the economic or the social environment. Though sustainable development has initially been regarded as a solution to the ecological crisis determined by the huge industrial exploitation of resources and the continuous soil degradation of the environment and it has sought to preserve the quality of the environment, nowadays the concept has been extended to the living quality in its intricacy, involving the economic and social issue. Nowadays, the concern of sustainable development also represents a concern for right and country equality, not only for generations. Within the process, several international conventions have been adopted, which establish precise country requirements and strict implementation terms regarding climate changing, biodiversity preservation, protection of the forest fund and of the wet areas, access to environment quality information and others, that outline an international judicial space for the implementation of the sustainable development concepts.

  10. Using Sustainable Development as a Competitive Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Pat

    Sustainable development reduces construction waste by 43%, generating 50% cost savings. Residential construction executives lacking adequate knowledge regarding the benefits of sustainable development practices are at a competitive disadvantage. Drawing from the diffusion of innovation theory, the purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore knowledge acquisition within the bounds of sustainable residential construction. The purposive sample size of 11 executive decision makers fulfilled the sample size requirements and enabled the extraction of meaningful data. Participants were members of the National Home Builders Association and had experience of a minimum of 5 years in residential construction. The research question addressed how to improve knowledge acquisition relating to the cost benefits of building green homes and increase the adoption rate of sustainable development among residential builders. Data were collected via semistructured telephone interviews, field observation, and document analysis. Transcribed data were validated via respondent validation, coded into 5 initial categories aligned to the focus of the research, then reduced to 3 interlocking themes of environment, competitive advantage, and marketing. Recommendations include developing comprehensive public policies, horizontal and vertical communications networks, and green banks to capitalize sustainable development programs to improve the diffusion of green innovation as a competitive advantage strategy. Business leaders could benefit from this data by integrating sustainable development practices into their business processes. Sustainable development reduces operational costs, increases competitive advantage for builders, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Implications for social change increase energy independence through conservation and developing a legislative policy template for comprehensive energy strategies. A comprehensive energy strategy promotes economic development

  11. Community Health Global Network and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the achievements, failures and passing of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG, the world has turned its eyes to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG, designed to foster sustainable social, economic and environmental development over the next 15 years.(1 Community-led initiatives are increasingly being recognised as playing a key role in realising sustainable community development and in the aspirations of universal healthcare.(2 In many parts of the world, faith-based organisations are some of the main players in community-led development and health care.(3 Community Health Global Network (CHGN creates links between organisations, with the purpose being to encourage communities to recognise their assets and abilities, identify shared concerns and discover solutions together, in order to define and lead their futures in sustainable ways.(4 CHGN has facilitated the development of collaborative groups of health and development initiatives called ‘Clusters’ in several countries including India, Bangladesh, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Myanmar. In March 2016 these Clusters met together in an International Forum, to share learnings, experiences, challenges, achievements and to encourage one another. Discussions held throughout the forum suggest that the CHGN model is helping to promote effective, sustainable development and health care provision on both a local and a global scale.

  12. Hydropower and Sustainable Development: A Journey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Kristin; Saili, Lau; Taylor, Richard; Abdel-Malek, Refaat

    2010-09-15

    Hydropower produces 16% of our electricity; it is one of the world's major renewable energy resources. It is playing an important role in enabling communities around the world to meet their power and water needs. The pace of hydropower growth has been rapid but sometimes with little guidance to ensure development is based on sustainability principles. Some of the most promising initiatives to fill the void, such as the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol, have been driven by the hydropower sector itself. Efforts focus on carrying forward this momentum to obtain a tool for hydropower sustainability agreed across sectors and stakeholders.

  13. Zzaap! taming ESD, FRI, and EMI

    CERN Document Server

    Corp, M Bruce

    1990-01-01

    A ""zzap""! is the mortal enemy of today's sophisticated electronics designs. A ""zzaap!"" can cause a circuit to ""lock up"" or ""hang"" -delete bits form a data stream or mysteriously insert bits that aren't supposed to be there or, worst of all, cause the sudden failure of critical integrated circuits. M. Bruce Corp takes you inside the often mysterious world of electrostatic discharge (ESD), radio frequency interference (RFI, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) to show how these can cause a bewildering array of transient problems or catastrophic failures.

  14. Are We Educating Engineers for Sustainability?: Comparison between Obtained Competences and Swedish Industry's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Andreas; Abelsson, Anna Priem; Lundqvist, Ulrika; Svanstrom, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to contribute to the quality improvement and long-term strategic development of education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering education curricula. Design/methodology/approach: The content in 70 courses in environment and SD were characterized and quantified using course document text analysis.…

  15. Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research and development can no longer be the exclusive domain of scientists. To find sustainable solutions to development problems, a wider range of actors must be involved. It is crucial, for example, that local stakeholders provide input to the process. Participatory research and development (PR&D) offers such an ...

  16. Factors of a sustainable development of region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kirillov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In article sights of different authors at a sustainable development of regional ekologo-economic systems are considered, balanced development major factors are allocated, the contribution of mineral and raw sources to development of the Volgograd region is analyzed.

  17. Sustainable development strategy formation for business corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Zaporozhtseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the concept of the company sustainable development strategy based on its economic security level, which includes the economic security concept loss threat control; and the concept of company sustainable development based on the fact, that the company in a developed market should not only "defend", but also ensure its development. After it implementation of decomposition is applied to the system of strategic economic security through a balanced scorecard, which allows translating the mission and vision into a set of operational goals and targets. The main components of strategic economic security provision are: business processes, finance, contractors and staff; based on the state which economic security level is determined as: high, normal, low or critical. After that, the strategic prospects are set, i.e. transition from the lowest to the highest economic security level takes place, passing the economic security fields. In order to do this, certain company development strategy is selected, the mechanism for its implementation is being worked out. At the same time, company sustainable development strategy is identified in the case of a growth strategy use, which implies a transition from endogenous development strategy to introductive or introspective development strategy with further access to multi-integral development strategy. If there is inverse relationship, one can not speak of any sustainable development strategy. Besides, development, implementation and use of monitoring for the design process of the company's development strategy taking into account its economic security level acquires great importance.

  18. Models for Sustainable Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2008-01-01

    The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China.......The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China....

  19. Sustaining the Entrepreneurship in Rural Tourism Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhafiza Md Sharif

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurs play an important role in sustaining rural tourism and formulation of sustainable strategies being the initiators of the tourism business and the engine of the local development. Therefore, it is necessary to stimulate the development of entrepreneurial activities for the recovery of rural tourism potential and regional traditions, maintaining local employment growth and increase living standards in line with identifies needs and priorities of regional human resources development. This article aims to discuss the involvement of local communities in development of rural tourism entrepreneurship as well as addressing the issue of entrepreneurship in rural tourism.

  20. Sustainable rural development and communicative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Langvad, Anne-Mette

    2006-01-01

    Functional differentiation within society at large poses a major challenge to practising sustainable rural development. Multiplication of perspectives on sustainability calls for a theoretical position that is based on the integrity of each of the perspectives in play and for an approach that is ...... that is able to coordinate the various partial perspectives. In this article we present such a theoretical framework for poly-ocular communicative learning....

  1. Ecotourism – model of sustainable tourist development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Stefanica

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the tendency in the tourism industry was that of return towards nature and towards the authentic cultural values. Among all the forms of tourism, ecotourism distinguishes itself through the strongest connection with the natural and cultural environment, representing the most valuable form of manifestation of sustainable tourism, with the fastest growth rhythm worldwide. Integrated in the sustainable development, ecotourism involves activities that directly contribute to the nature protection and to keeping the old human creations unaltered.

  2. BUSINESS ETHICS AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Dan CR?CIUN

    2014-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief analysis of some typical processes which affect in a dramatic way the present and the future resources of world development. Sustainability is one of the key-concepts on which a solution of these negative processes could be based. The abstract idea of sustainability can get a more substantial practical support in connection with the concept of triple bottom line, proposed by J. Elkington. The triple bottom line views the industrial performances of a corporation,...

  3. Advancing sustainable development in Canada : policy issues and research needs[PRI Project, Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliadis, P. [Government of Canada Privy Council Office, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Policy Research Initiative; Creech, H.; Glanville, B.; Barg, S.; Cosbey, A.; Roy, M.; Swanson, D.A.; Venema, H.D.; Von Moltke, K. [International Inst. for Sustainable Development, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Slayen, S. (ed.)

    2003-11-01

    This paper defined 7 policy-relevant issues that advance sustainable development in Canada. These were; (1) urban redesign, (2) freshwater management, (3) eco-region sustainability, (4) impacts of globalization on sustainable development in Canada, (5) designing signals and incentives that promote sustainable behaviour among citizens, (6) reducing the ecological burden of unsustainable lifestyles, and (7) international engagement in sustainable development. The authors questioned why these issues have not made greater progress, given that they have been on national and international agendas since 1972. They also questioned why it is so difficult to integrate environmental and economic signals. Finally, they examined whether enough ecological and political space can be provided to developing countries to achieve sustainable development while enhancing the standard of living in Canada and not threatening critical global systems. 173 refs.

  4. Making technological innovation work for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Harley, Alicia G.; Matus, Kira; Moon, Suerie; Murthy, Sharmila L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents insights and action proposals to better harness technological innovation for sustainable development. We begin with three key insights from scholarship and practice. First, technological innovation processes do not follow a set sequence but rather emerge from complex adaptive systems involving many actors and institutions operating simultaneously from local to global scales. Barriers arise at all stages of innovation, from the invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Second, learning from past efforts to mobilize innovation for sustainable development can be greatly improved through structured cross-sectoral comparisons that recognize the socio-technical nature of innovation systems. Third, current institutions (rules, norms, and incentives) shaping technological innovation are often not aligned toward the goals of sustainable development because impoverished, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic and political power to shape innovation systems to meet their needs. However, these institutions can be reformed, and many actors have the power to do so through research, advocacy, training, convening, policymaking, and financing. We conclude with three practice-oriented recommendations to further realize the potential of innovation for sustainable development: (i) channels for regularized learning across domains of practice should be established; (ii) measures that systematically take into account the interests of underserved populations throughout the innovation process should be developed; and (iii) institutions should be reformed to reorient innovation systems toward sustainable development and ensure that all innovation stages and scales are considered at the outset. PMID:27519800

  5. Making technological innovation work for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Chan, Gabriel; Harley, Alicia G; Matus, Kira; Moon, Suerie; Murthy, Sharmila L; Clark, William C

    2016-08-30

    This paper presents insights and action proposals to better harness technological innovation for sustainable development. We begin with three key insights from scholarship and practice. First, technological innovation processes do not follow a set sequence but rather emerge from complex adaptive systems involving many actors and institutions operating simultaneously from local to global scales. Barriers arise at all stages of innovation, from the invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Second, learning from past efforts to mobilize innovation for sustainable development can be greatly improved through structured cross-sectoral comparisons that recognize the socio-technical nature of innovation systems. Third, current institutions (rules, norms, and incentives) shaping technological innovation are often not aligned toward the goals of sustainable development because impoverished, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic and political power to shape innovation systems to meet their needs. However, these institutions can be reformed, and many actors have the power to do so through research, advocacy, training, convening, policymaking, and financing. We conclude with three practice-oriented recommendations to further realize the potential of innovation for sustainable development: (i) channels for regularized learning across domains of practice should be established; (ii) measures that systematically take into account the interests of underserved populations throughout the innovation process should be developed; and (iii) institutions should be reformed to reorient innovation systems toward sustainable development and ensure that all innovation stages and scales are considered at the outset.

  6. Slumdog sustainability | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-06

    Oct 6, 2010 ... A pilot project underway in Penjaringan shows how a few key investments can leverage the latent creativity and energy that are hallmarks of community life. Working together. Penjaringan is one of eight “living laboratories” on three continents that are part of the International Development Research Centre's ...

  7. Alternative Fuels and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The main report of the project on Transportation Fuels based on Renewable Energy. The report contains a review of potential technologies for electric, hybrid and hydrogen propulsion in the Danish transport sector, including an assessment of their development status. In addition, the energy...

  8. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VĂDUVA MARIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The phrase "human settlements system" is a concern for researchers in various fields as geography, economics, regional planning and for those responsible for formulating and implementing spatial development policies. The research covers various aspects of human settlements and is a meeting place of many disciplines and humanities. It is natural, as human settlements, either as isolated or in territorial systems they belong, are where manifests are transformed and develop human communities and societies as a whole. Problems national system of settlements in Romania are varied and complex. The evolution and consolidation of a stable and balanced is a continuous and dynamic process that goes through a series of steps, some characterized by profound transformations that can be called critical. One such step is the present one, where the influence of the changes in the economy and social and political life, the very development of settlements, be they urban or rural, knows a turning point, a certain vulnerability when the progressive or regressive of evolution is may change at any time. Industry restructuring on the one hand and reîmproprietărirea owners, are factors that can create shock effects unchecked urban and rural areas. On the other hand the development of trade, multiplying special services, urban (banks, insurers, etc. and can foster diversity of choices population compared to a net urban areas where living conditions and financial incentives for farmers are still far to be attractive

  9. New partnerships encourage sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    In two Indian states, life for approx. 100,000 poor people has been made a bit easier. Via the Indian Solar Loan Programme, which is supported by UNEP Risø Centre, they have been given access to loans which can fi nance the purchase of solar cellsystems. This means access to a reliable and renewa...... and renewable form of energy, with a positive impact on social and economic development....

  10. Sustainable urban development of Glasgow

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijević Branka

    2009-01-01

    Similar problems can be identified in the rise, crisis, regeneration and planning of cities regardless of their geographical location. The aim of this paper is to highlight the problems and solutions that have these universal characteristics and are evident in the urban development of Glasgow in the past and today. As Glasgow's name includes the archaic word for 'green', the common interpretation of the city's name is 'dear green place' alluding to the green banks of the river Clyde. It seems...

  11. Sustainable development perspectives of poultry production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Steenfeldt, Sanna; Horsted, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The concept of ‘sustainability’ or ‘sustainable development’ is multi-dimensional, encompassing economic, environmental, social, and institutional governance aspects. The theoretical framework for this article on sustainability in poultry production is built on this multi-dimensional understanding...... of the concept, acknowledging that it is complex and contested. It is challenging to analyse or discuss the sustainability of one single sector within agriculture, because this sector is part of a global food system, and a systems approach is necessary. This article gives examples of elements which link to one...... throughout major parts of the world (economic aspects). There are numerous potential pathways for sustainable development of poultry production. Poultry are living, sentient animals that can be well integrated into many different types of urban and rural farming systems, where they benefit from...

  12. Neighborhood Sustainability Assessment: Evaluating Residential Development Sustainability in a Developing Country Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yigitcanlar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization, improved quality of life, and diversified lifestyle options have collectively led to an escalation in housing demand in our cities, where residential areas, as the largest portion of urban land use type, play a critical role in the formation of sustainable cities. To date there has been limited research to ascertain residential development layouts that provide a more sustainable urban outcome. This paper aims to evaluate and compare sustainability levels of residential types by focusing on their layouts. The paper scrutinizes three different development types in a developing country context—i.e., subdivision, piecemeal, and master-planned developments. This study develops a “Neighborhood Sustainability Assessment” tool and applies it to compare their sustainability levels in Ipoh, Malaysia. The analysis finds that the master-planned development, amongst the investigated case studies, possesses the potential to produce higher levels of sustainability outcomes. The results reveal insights and evidence for policymakers, planners, development agencies and researchers; advocate further studies on neighborhood-level sustainability analysis, and; emphasize the need for collective efforts and an effective process in achieving neighborhood sustainability and sustainable city formation.

  13. A new Era in Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Steve

    2007-03-15

    It is 20 years since the World Commission on Environment and Development — the Brundtland Commission — released its influential report on sustainable development. This is now the declared intention of most governments, many international organisations, and an increasing number of businesses and civil society groups. High profile 'intentions' have given rise to a bewildering array of sustainable development plans, tools and business models. But these have not yet triggered the pace, scale, scope and depth of change that is needed to make development sustainable. They leave the underlying causes of unsustainable development largely undisturbed. They include few means for anticipating non-linear changes – from climate change to economic cycles – and for building resilience to them. Consequently, most environmental and welfare measures continue to decline in almost all countries. Much energy has been spent crafting the sustainable development 'toolkit'. But that energy has been channelled largely through a narrow set of international processes and 'elite' national actors. The results are not yet integral to the machinery of government or business, or people's daily lives. This paper calls for energies to be directed in new ways, constructing a truly global endeavour informed by diverse local actors' evidence of 'what works', and focusing more keenly on long-term futures. The key drivers and challenges of a 'new era in sustainable development' are suggested, to elicit ideas and leadership from a richer vein of experience than has been embraced by the formal international endeavours to date. This paper is the first in a series on the sustainable development futures that face key sectors and stakeholder groups.

  14. Curitiba: Towards sustainable urban development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinovitch, J.

    1995-12-31

    Curitiba is best known for its innovative public transport system based on buses but this is only one among many initiatives which have improved the environment and quality of life in the city, limited pollution and waste and reduced resource use. The public transport system has also been complemented by comprehensive initiatives in planning and land use management. This paper describes not only the development of the public transport system but also the planning and administrative framework that was needed to make it, and other initiatives taken in Curitiba, effective.

  15. Sustainable urban development of Glasgow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Branka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar problems can be identified in the rise, crisis, regeneration and planning of cities regardless of their geographical location. The aim of this paper is to highlight the problems and solutions that have these universal characteristics and are evident in the urban development of Glasgow in the past and today. As Glasgow's name includes the archaic word for 'green', the common interpretation of the city's name is 'dear green place' alluding to the green banks of the river Clyde. It seems that the urban planners of Glasgow in the 19th century were inspired by the city's name when they planned its future development. Around 1810, Glasgow was the second largest city in the United Kingdom, after London. As the city centre was densely built around 1840, planning of the expansion towards the west, and then towards the east and south, began. The expansion included plans for generous public gardens, tree-lined streets, private gardens for residents of multi-storey buildings, house gardens, green spaces for sport and recreation (tennis and bowling, and allotments. Today's generations enjoy these green spaces which were developed in the past. During the 19th century Glasgow became an important industrial centre renowned for shipbuilding and the railway industry. After the First World War these industries declined due to the increase of transport by cars and planes. At the beginning of the 20th century Glasgow had over 1 million inhabitants, but by 1950 the population had almost halved. The building facades were blackened by smoke from burning coal used for heating. As crime was rising, Glasgow's reputation became very poor. During the 1970s the burning of coal was forbidden, the heating switched to gas, and the cleaning of yellow and red stone facades began. During the 1980s and 1990s, regeneration along the Clyde began and is ongoing and expanding beyond the city centre. Several significant cultural manifestation were organized in the 1990s

  16. Nigerian Educational Research For Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education and research controls the development of any nation because no nation can rise above the products of its educational system. However, a number of problems face our educational and national development in general. The solution to such problem lies in research . educational research for sustainable ...

  17. Evolving approaches to sustainable development | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-28

    Jan 28, 2011 ... Profile of IDRC's Environment and Natural Resource Management (ENRM) program area. "Sustainable development" is a widely used term that means different things to different people. Our Common Future, the 1987 report issued by the Brundtland Commission, defined it as “development that meets the ...

  18. Environmental Education for Sustainable Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Education for Sustainable Development in Developing Societies: The Role of School Teachers. ... human values and behaviour, right across the entire social spectrum, from that of over exploitation of nature and ecological apathy, to a new spirit, habits, morals, ethics, ideals, principles, customs and life styles.

  19. Deploying Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development efforts that ignore IK would end up wasting enormous amounts of resources and might not achieve expected results. The need to deploy IK for sustainable development can be conceptualised when one observes the dynamics and total shift of Africans away from their culture towards western knowledge.

  20. Imperatives of Vocational Education and Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education is seen as one of the most powerful instrument man has devised so far to shape his own fortune. Vocational education in particular is the cornerstone for any sustainable technological development. Its relevant practical training components hold the key to Nigeria becoming technologically developed.

  1. Historical Consciousness and Sustainable Development in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development studies have become very strategic in charting the way forward for most Third World countries including Nigeria. A historical approach, which is the main thrust of this paper, intends to provide the building blocks, not only for economic advancement but for sustainable development in Nigeria that is ...

  2. Radio broadcasting for sustainable development in southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick O. Waeber and Yvonne Orengo

    2008-12-01

    Dec 1, 2008 ... to Millennium Development Goals in Southern Madagascar” pour illustrer en ... in Madagascar. Endemic Plants in the Mandena. Mining Area. Radio for Sustain able Development contact@mwc-info.net for general inquiries. Postfach ...... PR model will now occur in other parts of the island even where.

  3. The Globe Sustained: Shakespeare’s allegory for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteren van Cattenburch, Iris

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability theory shows that the sustainability problem is a value orientation problem. In a recent study, Klaas van Egmond identified an underlying pattern of a crossed circle, representing affirmative and adversative value orientations, whose disintegration engenders unsustainable tendencies.

  4. [Environment, health and sustainable development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Environmental problems and their impact on health and welfare of the population, mainly the most deprived and excluded, from access to material and symbolic goods, provided only to a privileged minority, must be analyzed within the context of the global economic and financial crisis which swept the whole world since 2008. The collapse of the capitalist system and its negative impacts on production, income and employment provide evidence to the predatory nature of the underlying social and political relations which lead humanity to a catastrophic abyss whose consequences are felt on local, national and global levels. Appointing to the main aspects of environmental deterioration - greenhouse gases; pollution of rivers, lakes and oceans; the erosion and intoxication of soils; the lack of basic sanitation and fresh water supply in metropolitan areas, this essay refers to official health indicators published recently by the Ministry of Health of Brazil which documents destructive trends. Discussing the dysfunction and the paradoxes of capital accumulation the essay points out to the need for building a new development paradigm based on cooperation and solidarity; an equitable distribution of the social product and the reform of the political system leading from the present authoritarian patterns of social relations to a participative and a true democratic model.

  5. Ladakh, kingdom of sustainable development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goeury

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With some 15,000 km² of protected areas, Ladakh has become synonymous with biodiversity protection in India. Specific regulations have been drawn up for the region to ensure preservation of the natural environment. Local officials who contested the principles of India’s hard law have benefited from the initiatives of numerous NGOs and have developed an alternative model for protecting the environment. Certain large emblematic mammals like the snow leopard have enabled the legitimisation of a policy that is based on the participation of local inhabitants rather than on their eviction to areas outside the sanctuaries. The protected areas have thus become an element of a Ladakhi identity project that distinguishes the region with respect to Kashmiri regional power.Avec 15 000 km² d’aires protégées, le Ladakh est devenu un haut lieu de la protection de la biodiversité en Inde. Localement ont été élaborées des procédures spécifiques de préservation. Les élites locales qui contestaient les principes de la hard law indienne ont bénéficié des initiatives de nombreuses ONG et proposent désormais un modèle de protection alternatif. Certains grands mammifères emblématiques comme le léopard des neiges ont permis de légitimer cette politique qui s’appuie sur la participation des populations locales et non sur leur éviction à la périphérie d’espaces sanctuaires. Les aires protégées intègrent alors un projet identitaire ladakhi de distinction vis-à-vis du pouvoir régional cachemiri.

  6. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  7. Civic Entrepreneurship: In Search of Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuri, Tariq; Najam, Adil; Spanger-Siegfried, Erika [Stockholm Environment Institute - Boston Center (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Around the world, civic entrepreneurs are practising sustainable development through their actions. Representing civil society, business, and government, civic entrepreneurs are championing sustainable development and succeeding – often despite significant odds – in making it happen on the ground. It may often happen at a small scale, but it does so in undeniably real, robust and promising terms. Civic entrepreneurship is driven explicitly by the public interest, and seeks to create new ways of building social capital and of harnessing existing ideas, methods, inventions, technologies, resources or management systems in the service of collective goals.

  8. Integrated transport strategies for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Replogle, M. [Environmental Defense Fund Transportation Project, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Metropolitan transportation and land development patterns in most of the world are growing increasingly unsustainable. Many factors point to the need for adoption of a new paradigm for sustainable transportation and community development in both high and low income countries: overpopulation, growing air pollution, limited physical and economic capacity to expand automobile-based transportation systems without community destruction, growing inequality in the distribution of resources, and the urgent need to limit global CO{sub 2} emissions to slow the place of global warming. This paper discusses the new paradigm for integrated and sustainable transport strategies. (author) 9 refs.

  9. The Seductive Logic of Subtractive Sustainability: Reflections on Sustainable Socio-economic Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To discuss the drivers and impediments sustainability of social systems.
    Design / Research methods: Analysis of and reflections on the discussions on campus antifragility during the 4th international conference on efficiency, sustainable business and sustainable economic development,

  10. Knowledge Governance for Sustainable Development: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorrae van Kerkhoff

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a knowledge intensive process, but plagued by persistent concerns over our apparent inability to connect what we know with more sustainable practices and outcomes. While considerable attention has been given to ways we may better understand and enhance the knowledge-based processes that support the governance of social-­ecological systems, relatively few have examined the governance of knowledge itself. The institutions—rules and norms—that govern knowledge may shed light on the persistence of 'gaps' between knowledge and action. In this review I seek to answer the question: can interdisciplinary knowledge governance literature contribute to understanding and analysing the institutional knowledge-based dimensions of sustainable development? I present and analyse the concept of knowledge governance as it is emerging in a range of disciplines and practice areas, including private sector management literature and public regulation theory and practice. I then integrate the findings from this review into a model of sustainable development proposed by Nilsson et al. [1]. I show that knowledge governance (as a scale above knowledge management can inform Nilsson et al.'s three "nested" dimensions of sustainability: human wellbeing (through access to knowledge and freedom to exercise informed choice; resource-base management (though enhancing regulation and innovation and transitions from exclusive to inclusive knowledge systems; and global public goods (by balancing public and private interests and fostering global innovation systems. This review concludes by presenting a framework that places sustainable development in the context of broader socio-political struggles towards more open, inclusive knowledge systems.

  11. Social Learning as a Key Factor in Sustainability Transitions: The Case of Okayama City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didham, Robert J.; Ofei-Manu, Paul; Nagareo, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The Okayama Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Project is an ongoing initiative in Okayama City, Japan, established in 2005 by the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) Okayama and the Okayama Municipal Government with the aim "to create a community where people learn, think and act together towards realising a sustainable…

  12. Towards Developing Sustainable Agriculture In Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Homaidan Noueddine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rural development is progressively seen as an important for solution for expanding the financial viability of large areas stimulating social recovery and enhancing the life style of rural groups. Many countries try to eliminate rural neediness and to have substantial potential in attracting visitors and social development looking for new progress. This paper argues that the social event of sustainable activities and attractions and the development of rural life empowers co-operation and organizations between groups and government. Meaningful community participation together with public sector support presents opportunities for the development of small-scale original sustainable and community projects in less developed areas. This paper interrogates the development of rural routes in Lebanon and highlights factors critical to its success.

  13. ESD Test Apparatus for Soldering Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jose; Esser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    ESDA (Electrostatic Discharge Association) ESD STM 13.1-2000 requires frequent testing of the voltage leakage from the tip of a soldering iron and the resistance from the tip of the soldering iron to the common point ground. Without this test apparatus, the process is time-consuming and requires several wires, alligator clips, or test probes, as well as additional equipment. Soldering iron tips must be tested for electrostatic discharge risks frequently, and this typically takes a lot of time in setup and testing. This device enables the operator to execute the full test in one minute or less. This innovation is a simple apparatus that plugs into a digital multimeter (DMM) and the Common Point Ground (CPG) reference. It enables the user to perform two of the electrostatic discharge tests required in ESD STM 13.1-2000. The device consists of a small black box with two prongs sticking out of one end, two inputs on the opposite end (one of the inputs is used to connect the reference CPG to the DMM), and a metal tab on one side. Inside the box are wires, several washers of various materials, and assembly hardware (nuts and screws/bolts). The device is a passive electronic component that is plugged into a DMM. The operator sets the DMM to read voltage. The operator places the heated tip of the soldering iron onto the metal tab with a small amount of solder to ensure a complete connection. The voltage is read and recorded. The operator switches the DMM to read resistance. The operator places the heated tip of the soldering iron onto the metal tab with a small amount of solder to ensure a complete connection. The resistance is recorded. If the recorded voltage and resistance are below a number stated in ESDA ESD STM 13.1-2000, the test is considered to pass. The device includes all the necessary wiring internal to its body so the operator does not need to do any independent wiring, except for grounding. It uses a stack of high-thermal-resistance washers to minimize the

  14. Sustainable Development of Mining Mineral Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiński, Józef

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes mineral resources and the demand for them, taking into account the dynamics and global trends in the economy of raw materials. It presents the importance of mineral resources in the development of the world economy, and the importance of mineral resources that are critical for economic development. The main assumptions presented in this paper are the main assumptions that relate to the sustainable development of the mining sector, the ones that will significantly shape th...

  15. Knowledge Management for Sustainable Development: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that knowledge management (KM) is a function of sustainable development (SD). The authors define the two concepts and discuss both the factors that make for successful SD process and the challenges that characterize KM. The conclusion reached is hat KM is emerging as a powerful ...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-12-28

    Dec 28, 2017 ... environment. This article argues that social work needs to incorporate environmental issues so that it nurtures sustainable development in its praxis. Hitherto, social work has been relegated to become a cure for social ills and not an active player in the prevention of social problems in Zimbabwe. These are ...

  17. Internationalising Experiential Learning for Sustainable Development Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young S.; Schottenfeld, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the internationalising of informal experiential learning as a pedagogical intervention for sustainable development education in the curriculum of built environment disciplines in the United States (US). A group of American students in the School of Planning, Design and Construction at Michigan State University participated in…

  18. Sustainable Development of the Algerian Steppe | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sustainable Development of the Algerian Steppe. The Algerian steppe covers more than 30 million ha of land and constitutes a buffer zone between the Sahara Desert and the green belt in the North. The diversity and relative abundance of fodder plants has allowed the steppe to provide livelihoods for 15% of the ...

  19. Examining Success Factors for Sustainable Rural Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This collaborative project will examine the role the Integrated Co-operative Model can play in reducing poverty and promoting development in rural African communities. Specifically, it aims to add to the knowledge of how to improve livelihoods and reduce poverty in a sustainable way in rural communities. It will strive to: ...

  20. sustainable development of national energy resources

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Committee on International Law on Sustainable Development in 2003 and submitted its fifth and final report at .... and gas are shared natural resources, with a recent attempt by the ILC Special Rapporteur on Shared ..... the principles, and widely varying consequences of their application depending on the specific context.

  1. Leadership and Change in Sustainable Regional Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotarauta, M.; Horlings, L.G.; Liddle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This book shows, first of all, that leadership plays a crucial role in reinventing regions and branching out from an old path to something new in order to create more balanced and sustainable regional development. Second, it maintains that leadership is not a solo but a multi-agent and -level

  2. Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The past, The Current Trend, and the futu. ... Antimicrobial chemotherapy is a highly valued medical science which has shaped modern humanity in a phenomenal fashion. Within the past half century, ... Key Words; Antimicrobials, microbial resistance, diseases ...

  3. Professional Development in Environmental and Sustainability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION. 75. Lack of content and pedagogical knowledge. Regardless of their teaching experience, which ranged from one year to 25 years, each participant indicated in their reflective journals that they felt lacking in the pedagogical.

  4. 'SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT' IN A SOUTH AFRICAN CONTEXT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over the last decade 'education for sustainable development' has become a central concept in environmental education. (EE). In 1980 the World Conservation Strategt;. (WCS) was established by the International. Union of Conservation of Nature and. Natural Resources (IUCN), in collaboration with the World Wide Fund for ...

  5. Integrating Sustainable Development into Operations Management Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Peter; Persson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely acknowledged that aspects of sustainable development (SD) should be integrated into higher level operations management (OM) education. The aim of the paper is to outline the experiences gained at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden from integrating aspects of SD into OM courses. Design/methodology/approach: The paper…

  6. Natural Resources, Multinational Enterprises and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Daniel; Hobdari, Bersant; Oh, Chang Hoon

    2018-01-01

    to international business. We identify two broad areas: the theory of FDI and the MNE, and the link between MNEs and sustainable development. We survey the relevant literature, much of it from outside IB, and identify a rich menu of research opportunities for IB scholars, many of which are addressed in the papers...

  7. Editorial Comment | Olawuyi | Journal of Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The). Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial Comment. DS Olawuyi. Abstract.

  8. facilitating sustainable development through market-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    behaviour impacting on the environment, is to prescribe a range of legislative standards, prohibitions and restrictions and ... Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004; and National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act 39 of 2004. ... and development are sustainable and that activities that impose high social and economic costs in ...

  9. South America and Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostuni, Josefina

    2006-01-01

    Three South American countries, Argentina, Chile and Brazil, have been selected in order to study the impact of the document "The United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development". In these countries, whose people react energetically against any attempt to break the environmental balance, the synergic power of education is…

  10. Hospitableness and sustainable development: New responsibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How does the current paradigm of the host-guest relationship cause the hospitality industry to lag behind in sustainable development? Hospitality is often defined as “a feeling of being welcome”. It is about “welcoming the stranger: a person who comes today and stays tomorrow”, or “a stranger who is treated like a god”.

  11. Virtual learning networks for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable development is a participatory, multi-actor process. In this process, learning plays a major role as participants have to exchange and integrate a diversity of perspectives and types of knowledge and expertise in order to arrive at innovative, jointly supported solutions. Virtual

  12. Professional Development in Environmental and Sustainability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on constructs from the Zone of Feasible Innovation (ZFI), which is related to Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), practising Science teachers' engagement in curriculum innovation in environmental and sustainability education is analysed. Data were generated using reflective journals, lesson plans, ...

  13. Imperatives of Vocational Education and Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    looking for employment opportunity increase day by day. Nigeria's educational practices were tailored ... It can be a tool for securing employment and sustainable development in Nigeria. Vocational education .... strengthening the bridge between education and schooling and preparation for the world of work with attention ...

  14. Sustainability Assessment Model in Product Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Faiz Mohd; Johan, Kartina; Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Omar, Badrul

    2017-08-01

    Faster and more efficient development of innovative and sustainable products has become the focus for manufacturing companies in order to remain competitive in today’s technologically driven world. Design concept evaluation which is the end of conceptual design is one of the most critical decision points. It relates to the final success of product development, because poor criteria assessment in design concept evaluation can rarely compensated at the later stages. Furthermore, consumers, investors, shareholders and even competitors are basing their decisions on what to buy or invest in, from whom, and also on what company report, and sustainability is one of a critical component. In this research, a new methodology of sustainability assessment in product development for Malaysian industry has been developed using integration of green project management, new scale of “Weighting criteria” and Rough-Grey Analysis. This method will help design engineers to improve the effectiveness and objectivity of the sustainable design concept evaluation, enable them to make better-informed decisions before finalising their choice and consequently create value to the company or industry. The new framework is expected to provide an alternative to existing methods.

  15. Successful Globalisation, Education and Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Angela W.; Green, Andy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the role of education in "successful globalisation" and how this links with agendas for sustainable development. In the first part "successful globalisation" is defined as economic growth combined with equality and social peace. Japan and the East Asian tiger economies--particularly South Korea and…

  16. Biotechnologizing Jatropha for local sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puente, D.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores whether and how the biotechnologization process that the fuel-plant Jatropha curcas is undergoing might strengthen local sustainable development. It focuses on the ongoing efforts of the multi-stakeholder network Gota Verde to harness Jatropha within local small-scale

  17. Evolutionary economic theories of sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, P.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sustainable development has become the dominant concept in the study of interactions between the economy and the biophysical environment, as well as a generally accepted goal of environmental policy. So far, economists have predominantly applied standard or neo-classical theory to environmental

  18. Novel combustion concepts for sustainable energy development

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Avinash K; Gupta, Ashwani K; Aggarwal, Suresh K; Kushari, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    This book comprises research studies of novel work on combustion for sustainable energy development. It offers an insight into a few viable novel technologies for improved, efficient and sustainable utilization of combustion-based energy production using both fossil and bio fuels. Special emphasis is placed on micro-scale combustion systems that offer new challenges and opportunities. The book is divided into five sections, with chapters from 3-4 leading experts forming the core of each section. The book should prove useful to a variety of readers, including students, researchers, and professionals.

  19. Universities as Potential Actors for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael von Hauff

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Universities can contribute to the solutions of major challenges of the 21st century such as increasing environmental and socio-economic crises, inequalities of income and wealth and political instabilities by integrating the concept of sustainable development (SD in research, organization, and by educating future decision makers. For instance, by integrating sustainability into the organization, universities can lead by example. Furthermore, through the curriculum, future decision makers can learn the competences needed to solve ecological, social, and economic problems in societies. However, despite their possible importance, universities in Germany fall behind internationally in implementing sustainable strategies. Therefore this paper presents/introduces an approach to how universities can implement the holistic concept of SD that considers all three dimensions (economic, ecological, and social relating to their main functions of research and education in addition to their organization. Additionally this paper analyzes the current state of implementing sustainability strategies at universities, and how the success of these implementation efforts can be evaluated and be fostered further. We find that assessment systems enable universities to systematically use their potential for action for SD by initiating, evaluating, and accelerating the sustainability process. This also applies in the case of German universities, where the implementation of SD is still in the early stages.

  20. Sustainability Transitions in the Developing World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mguni, Patience

    With the progression of climate change, urban stormwater management infrastructure will come under pressure. There is doubt about the ability of conventional centralised stormwater management systems to adequately manage projected increases in precipitation and attention in the urban water...... management sector is turning towards decentralised green infrastructure-based approaches such as Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). This PhD thesis explores the potential for sustainability transitions towards more sustainable urban water management (SUWM) through the integration of SUDS mainly from...... and moving towards SUWM differs according to context. For developing cities with infrastructure deficits like Addis Ababa and Dar es Salaam, most opportunities for socio-technical change lie in more bottom-up emergent change as urban water management regimes may not have adequate capacity. For cities like...

  1. Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben

    Abstract This thesis entitled Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions is divided into six chapters involving topics and projects related to green and sustainable chemistry. The chapters can be read independently, however a few concepts and some background information is introduced...... in chapter one and two which can be helpful to know when reading the subsequent chapters. The first chapter is an introduction into the fundamentals of green and sustainable chemistry. The second chapter gives an overview of some of the most promising methods to produce value added chemicals from biomass...... and only leads to small amounts of waste formation due to the all-catalytic nature of the procedure. This chapter involves the use of transition metal catalysis as well as classic organic chemistry. In chapter four, supported gold nanoparticles are used as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of primary...

  2. A QUEST for sustainable continuing professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2017-01-01

    on a large-scale, long-term Danish CPD project for which all the activities were created with these consensus criteria in mind. The overall purpose has been to develop a sustainable model for CPD that acknowledges teachers’ situated learning in professional learning communities (PLCs), supports bottom...... organized by the local PLC, and individual enactments in the teachers’ own classrooms. This “rhythm” has now been institutionalized, and even though the project has come to an end, there is still networking across schools and PLC activities continue in all five municipalities. In order to assess...... experiencing changes in collaboration and classroom practice. Furthermore there seems to be a delayed correlation between schools with the most sustained PLC activities and student outcomes. Factors supporting sustainability are discussed, these include scaffolding the teachers’ collaborative inquiries...

  3. Sustainable transportation initiatives in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, M.J. [ed.

    2000-03-01

    The primary goal of the workshop was to share experiences of sustainable transport practices from invited medium-sized cities in Latin America and Asia. The purpose was to learn how sustainable mechanisms have been incorporated into national planning and implementation systems. Emphasis was given to understand what concrete mechanism work to promote sustainable transport in the selected projects. The workshop included participation of transport economics and engineers, policy makers and policy-advisors, and key representatives from the transportation government and non-governmental sector in El Salvador. Among participants there were also members from academia, private consultants and international NGOs. The workshop provided a basis for outreach in terms of directly informing participants on the specific experiences brought in by the participating countries. The Workshop set out to address the following main objectives: To demonstrate successful examples of transportation initiatives that show positive sustainable economic, environmental and social benefits in selected developing countries; To provide a forum for discussion of sustainable transport paths; To develop a network for information exchange and capacity building; To gather information on concrete mechanisms to promote sustainable transportation; To demonstrate efficient mechanisms and tools for collection and analysis of data in transport; To create an inventory of success stories and alternative visions for the future. Several institutions collaborated in organising the event: the Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG-Sri Lanka), The Peace and Development Research Group from Goeteborg University and institutions within El Salvador: Centro Salvadeoreno de Tecnologia Apropiada (CESTA), and the Climate Change Communication office of the Ministry of Environment in Salvador. This volume contains reports of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop in San Salvador. The agenda

  4. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ; Marilena PAPUC

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy. At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD). In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Mar...

  5. Innovation capabilities for sustainable development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Keun; Juma, Calestous; Mathews, John

    2014-01-01

    A sustainable pathway for Africa in the twenty-first century is laid out in the setting of the development of innovation capabilities and the capture of latecomer advantages. Africa has missed out on these possibilities in the twentieth century while seeing the East Asian countries advance. There are now abundant examples and cases to draw on, in the new setting where industrial development has to have green tinges to be effective.

  6. Assessing the built environment’s contribution to sustainable development: the sustainable building assessment tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses how the built environment can support sustainable development. It identifies the key characteristics of built environment that can be used to support sustainable development and shows how this can be developed into a set...

  7. Sustainable development in a developing economy: Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2013-08-21

    Aug 21, 2013 ... towards environmental management in Nigeria which is a fast developing economy. ... dation, to global concerns such as climate change and .... Business Risk. Green Consumerism. Legislation. Increased Employee. Motivation and Recruitment. International Standards. Increased Access to Finance. C. O.

  8. INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina MOCUTA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development in Romania can be achieved only through consensus orchestrated prioritizing people's attitudes and values. In order to achieve a maximum performance, cultural change must precede structural and functional changes, such an approach leading to a lasting transformation. Cultural change is not about social traditions, history, language, art, etc.., But those on the behavior, mentality, attitude towards work, economy and society. Sustainable development have to mean quality and achieve only limited natural capital, social and anthropogenic own or attracted. A drawing resources must be addressed by cost and their global rarity. Sustainable development for Romania, represents the effective management of resources in the national competitiveness and national foreign goods and services. Human health suppliers, health organizations that offer health services and those who need these services, meet on a market, called health services market, whose mechanism has features different from the other markets, not only from the point of view of the two forces, demand and supply, but also from the third party who pays. In the context of globalization, human development, defined as a process of people’s expanding possibilities to choose, cannot exist without an appropriate health. People often make choices in the economic, social and political fields, situated in the centre of development policies. From the human health perspective, attention is aimed at quality of the economic development, and not quantity, in three critical domains: expectation and quality of life, educational level and access to all the necessary economic resources in order to lead a decent life.

  9. Urban landscape architecture design under the view of sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, WeiLin

    2017-08-01

    The concept of sustainable development in modern city landscape design advocates landscape architecture, which is the main development direction in the field of landscape design. They are also effective measures to promote the sustainable development of city garden. Based on this, combined with the connotation of sustainable development and sustainable design, this paper analyzes and discusses the design of urban landscape under the concept of sustainable development.

  10. Constructive Solutions in Achieving Sustainable Development Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprita Diana Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development adopted by the UN aims to encourage theefficient use of resources, by focusing on the modern technologies for protecting the environmentduring the farming process. World agriculture is under increasing pressure as a result of acomplex of mutually reinforcing factors: the upward trend of world population, the inefficient useof scared resources, the lack of concrete solutions that make agricultural production more efficientwithout affecting the environment. Food security has become a global priority, thereby, achievingthe SDO’s objectives will depend on the ability of nations to meet current challenges: climatechange, biodiversity degradation, desertification or rural abandonment. Among the measuresunanimously accepted as the basis of the global sustainable development strategy, we find:stimulating investments in agriculture in all developing countries, namely creating jobs andproviding decent incomes (especially for young farmers, giving real support to small farmers byfacilitating both partnerships and access to resources.

  11. Wind energy for a sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    of both the wind energy related research activities and the wind energy industry, as installed capacity has been increasing in most of the developed and developing countries. The DTU Wind Energy department carries the heritage of the Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy by leading the research......Wind energy is on the forefront of sustainable technologies related to the production of electricity from green sources that combine the efficiency of meeting the demand for growth and the ethical responsibility for environmental protection. The last decades have seen an unprecedented growth...... developments in all sectors related to planning, installing and operating modern wind farms at land and offshore. With as many as 8 sections the department combines specialists at different thematic categories, ranging from meteorology, aeroelastic design and composite materials to electrical grids and test...

  12. Strategic Networks for Sustainable Tourism Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelyna Krasteva Yoveva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an innovative approach towards introduction of an up-to-date sustainable development philosophy founded on the principles of combination and balance of common and individual interests on multilateral perspective, i.e. individuals vs. organizations, public groups vs. governmental authorities, industry vs. macroeconomic development, nation states vs. international regional development etc. The optimal implementation of such an approach is imminently dependent on an authentic self-awareness of own identity, values, purposes and motivation for positive contribution to the common well-being. The author’s arguments are based on the conviction that when more individuals and organizations harness deeper understanding of the mutual benefits within their operations area and undertake collaborative efforts to solve common problem their steadfast long-term development may be secured even in times of social-economic-political-eco-etc. crises and within a dynamically changing environment.Main purpose of current article is the concentration of the research on looking for and applying the principles of consistency, exchange of good collaborative practices and consequently strategic and operational utilization of the synergy effect, systems thinking and the holistic approach. Collaborative efforts would lead to greater effectiveness and optimization that satisfies individual and common interests in multiple environmental dimensions. The study aims to analyze the potential of a new network paradigm for provision of effectively applied strategies within the contemporary sustainable development context.Some good practices within the area of joint development of sustainable strategic networks in tourism industry in Bulgaria are presented. A case study of a culinary and hospitality cluster recently established in the Dobrudzha region is about to demonstrates the strategic network viability and sustainability in a contemporary agricultural

  13. The sustainability transition. Beyond conventional development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskin, P.; Chadwick, M.; Jackson, T.; Leach, G.

    1996-10-01

    This paper synthesizes findings of the first phase in SEI`s PoleStar Project - a project aimed at developing long-term strategies and policies for sustainable development. Taking a global and long-range perspective, the paper aims to describe a theoretical framework for addressing sustainability, to identify emerging issues and outline directions for future action. The paper begins by setting today`s development and environmental challenges in historical context, and describing the scenario method for envisioning and evaluating alternative futures, and identifying propitious areas for policy and action. It next summarizes a detailed scenario based on conventional development assumptions, and discusses the implications of this scenario for demographic and economic patterns, energy and water resources, land resources and agriculture, and pollution loads and the environment to the year 2050. The conventional scenario relies in part on the sectorally-oriented work discussed in Papers 3 through 6 of the PoleStar Project report series, and makes use of the PoleStar System, software designed for integrated resource, environment and socio-economic accounting and scenario analysis (described in Paper 2). The paper then examines the critical risks to social, resource and environmental systems lying ahead on the conventional development path. Finally, the paper surveys the requirements for sustainability across a number of policy dimensions, and raises key questions for the future. The PoleStar Project is proceeding to examine a range of alternative development scenarios, in the context of the work of the regionally-diverse Global Scenario Group, convened by SEI. The hope remains to offer wise counsel for a transition to an equitable, humane and sustainable future for the global community. 144 refs, 30 figs, 9 tabs

  14. 41 CFR 102-76.50 - What is sustainable development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Construction Sustainable Development § 102-76.50 What is sustainable development? Sustainable... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is sustainable development? 102-76.50 Section 102-76.50 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  15. School development and education for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centrone, Liza [Univ. of Bressanone (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    OECD (2003) has developed a set of six scenarios for schooling in the future up to 2020. They have been clustered into three main categories: Scenarios 1a and 1b ''Attempting to Maintain the Status Quo'', 2a and 2b ''Re-schooling'', and 3a and 3b ''De-schooling''. The scenarios describe in a somewhat ''pure form'' how schooling in general might take place in about fifteen years. In reality, of course, one would expect complex mixes to emerge between these different possible futures, rather than one or the other. By sharpening the alternatives, however, they provide an opportunity to think about what we want and do not want, and how probable the more or less desired choices are in terms of on-going trends and policies. (orig.)

  16. Sustainable Development Action Plans (SDAPs) : support and scrutiny from the Sustainable Development Commission

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2008-01-01

    This paper details the guidance, support and scrutiny that the SDC will provide on Sustainable Development Action Plans (SDAPs), to government departments, executive agencies, and other government bodies. Publisher PDF

  17. Business system: Sustainable development and anticipatory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Potočan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and development of humankind depends mainly upon the co-ordinated operation of all areas and levels of human activity. However, in theory and in practice there is no model of operation, which would provide a harmonized and target oriented development. A partial solution is offered by sustainable development, which tries to define and carry out common goals of mankind with a harmonized implementation of human activities at all levels of its living and behaviour. Companies belong to central institutions of modern society which essentially co–create the sustainability of society. The company’s endeavour by simulation to prepare models of their goals concerning their internal and external environment. On the base of systemic treatment, we can define companies as business system, which can survive in a log-run only on the basis of sustainable development. The business system can also be supported by the application of the anticipatory systems. The anticipatory systems can be, in this sense, understood as an entity of the methodological approach, techniques and modes of work. Their characteristics have, a direct impact on the determination of goals, on the orientation of operation, and hence on the achievement of the business system results.

  18. Implementing sustainable development programs in Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, H.

    1994-12-31

    Achieving sustainable development requires a revision of the present view of the nature of the city as an environment, and its relation to a larger ecosystem of which it is an essential part. The environmental health of a wilderness area is inextricably related to the environmental, and economic, health of the great urban centers. The vitality of dense metropolitan areas, where population and economic activities are concentrated, is key to the preservation of productive farm lands, wildlife habitat, and open spaces. The social and economic crisis which grips many metropolitan centers, with attendant flight of industry and development to the so-called {open_quotes}greenfields,{close_quotes} fundamentally spreads a broader crisis to our common ecosystem. This crisis is marked by the obliteration of habitat necessary for biodiversity, loss of fertile farm land, and the contamination of air, water and land, as an unescapable effect of the sprawl created by flight from the urban centers. The removal of false conceptual distinctions between the city and nature, distinctions that are unfortunately at the heart of so much of American environmental philosophy, is key to the concept of `sustainable development.` This article sets forth how the City of Chicago is implementing this understanding of the nature of the urban environment, in pursuit of sustainable development within the city.

  19. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at...

  20. Bioenergy for sustainable development: An African context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoyana, Robert Blessing

    This paper assesses the sustainability concerns of bioenergy systems against the prevailing and potential long term conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa with a special attention on agricultural and forestry waste, and cultivated bioenergy sources. Existing knowledge and processes about bioenergy systems are brought into a “sustainability framework” to support debate and decisions about the implementation of bioenergy systems in the region. Bioenergy systems have been recommended based on the potential to (i) meet domestic energy demand and reduce fuel importation (ii) diversify rural economies and create employment (iii) reduce poverty, and (iv) provide net energy gains and positive environmental impacts. However, biofuels will compete with food crops for land, labour, capital and entrepreneurial skills. Moreover the environmental benefits of some feedstocks are questionable. These challenges are, however, surmountable. It is concluded that biomass energy production could be an effective way to achieve sustainable development for bioenergy pathways that (i) are less land intensive, (ii) have positive net energy gains and environmental benefits, and (iii) provide local socio-economic benefits. Feasibility evaluations which put these issues into perspective are vital for sustainable application of agricultural and forest based bioenergy systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such evaluations should consider the long run potential of biofuels accounting for demographic, economic and technological changes and the related implications.

  1. The Economic Crisis and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Hvelplund, Frede

    of sustainable energy solutions involves the replacement of imported fossil fuels by substantial investments in energy conservation and renewable energy. In such situation, it becomes increasingly essential to develop economic thinking and economic models that can analyse the concrete institutions in which...... the market is embedded. This paper presents such tools and methodologies and applies them to the case of the Danish heating sector. The case shows how investments in decreasing fossil fuels and CO2 emissions can be made in a way in which they have a positive influence on job creation and economic development......This paper presents Concrete Institutional Economics as an economic paradigm to understand how the wish for sustainable energy in times of economic crisis can be used to generate jobs as well as economic growth. In most countries, including European countries, the USA and China, the implementation...

  2. Government policies on sustainable development in Namibia

    OpenAIRE

    Tarr, P.; Blackie, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution, since 1990, of key government policies on sustainable development in Namibia. Namibia’s approach has been largely homegrown, responding to issues that are of concern to the Namibian public and policy-makers. The most successful policies have been those that have either been based on strong community-level institutions such as conservancies, or on high-quality scientific analysis, such as the management of fisheries and Environmental Assessment...

  3. Keeping the sustainable development flame alive

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Brande, Karoline; Happaerts, Sander; Bouteligier,Sofie

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development has been rearing its head in international, national and local policy debates for almost 25 years. And yet the precise meaning of the concept is still elusive. It is vague and difficult to actually put into practice. That's why policy makers, civil society activists and scholars use it with reserve. But what is the history of the concept, and what does its future look like?

  4. Violates stem wood burning sustainable development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    friendly effects of substituting wood burning for fossil fuels. With reference to Bent Sørensen's classical work on 'Renewable Energy' the assumption of CO2-neutrality regarding incineration is problematised when applied to plants with long rotation periods as trees. Registered CO2-emissions from wood...... burning are characterised together with particle and PAH emissions. The positive treatment of wood stove-technology in the Danish strategy for sustainable development (draft 2007) is critically evaluated and approaches to better regulation are identified....

  5. Making Technological Innovation Work for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Anadon, Laura; Chan, Gabriel; Harley, Alicia Grace; Matus, Kira; Murthy, Sharmila; Clark, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable development requires harnessing technological innovation to improve human well-being in current and future generations. However, poor, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic or political power to shape innovation processes to meet their needs. Issues arise at all stages of innovation, from invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Three insights should inform efforts to intervene in innovation syste...

  6. Sustainable Development - An Oil Industry View

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langcake, Peter [Shell International BV, (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    For Shell companies, according to this presentation, sustainable development is an umbrella concept that they have been dealing with for many years and that has recently been given increased focus. Over the years, concern about the depletion of non-renewable resources has been overshadowed by concern about the depletion of renewable sources such as fisheries, forests etc. and climate changes. The primary contribution that Shell can make to sustainable development now and in the foreseeable future is in the economic sphere. Some examples of the involvement of Shell are given: (1) Shell companies have for many years invested considerably in forestry projects and recently some have developed businesses in biomass to power generation projects. Some have projects in photovoltaics. (2) In the Camisea project in Peru, a Shell company is putting the sustainability principle to work by integrating economic, environmental and social aspects. Two large oil reserves lie on either side of the Camisea River. The area is home to several indigenous peoples; it borders a national park and is rich in biodiversity. (3) In Malaysia, Shell is exploiting rich offshore gas fields. These projects are examples of technology cooperation and capability building that contribute to Malaysia`s plans for becoming fully industrialized by 2020

  7. Crafting usable knowledge for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William C; van Kerkhoff, Lorrae; Lebel, Louis; Gallopin, Gilberto C

    2016-04-26

    This paper distills core lessons about how researchers (scientists, engineers, planners, etc.) interested in promoting sustainable development can increase the likelihood of producing usable knowledge. We draw the lessons from both practical experience in diverse contexts around the world and from scholarly advances in understanding the relationships between science and society. Many of these lessons will be familiar to those with experience in crafting knowledge to support action for sustainable development. However, few are included in the formal training of researchers. As a result, when scientists and engineers first venture out of the laboratory or library with the goal of linking their knowledge with action, the outcome has often been ineffectiveness and disillusionment. We therefore articulate here a core set of lessons that we believe should become part of the basic training for researchers interested in crafting usable knowledge for sustainable development. These lessons entail at least four things researchers should know, and four things they should do. The knowing lessons involve understanding the coproduction relationships through which knowledge making and decision making shape one another in social-environmental systems. We highlight the lessons that emerge from examining those coproduction relationships through the ICAP lens, viewing them from the perspectives of Innovation systems, Complex systems, Adaptive systems, and Political systems. The doing lessons involve improving the capacity of the research community to put its understanding of coproduction into practice. We highlight steps through which researchers can help build capacities for stakeholder collaboration, social learning, knowledge governance, and researcher training.

  8. Electricity reform and sustainable development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James H.; Kahrl, Fredrich

    2008-10-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of supplying electricity is a key to China's sustainable development, and a focus of both domestic and international concerns with greenhouse gas emissions. The environmental performance of the electricity sector is strongly affected by its institutional arrangements: regulatory frameworks, wholesale markets, pricing mechanisms, planning and coordination, and enforcement and incentive mechanisms. These arrangements are set to change as electricity reforms inaugurated in 2002, but sidetracked by several years of supply shortages, are being resumed. In this paper we examine the impact of electricity reform on environmental sustainability by analyzing case studies of four environmental initiatives in the electricity sector: retirement of inefficient generators, installation of pollution control equipment, renewable energy development, and efforts to promote energy efficiency. We find that implementation of these policies falls short of objectives for two main underlying reasons: conflicting priorities between central and provincial governments, and ineffective regulation. Sustainability will be best served not by redoubling short-term supply-oriented, market-based reforms, but by better aligning central and provincial government incentives, and by developing competent, independent regulation at the provincial level. China's central government and sub-national governments in industrialized countries can both contribute to the latter goal.

  9. An integrated framework for sustainable development goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Griggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations (UN Rio+20 summit committed nations to develop a set of universal sustainable development goals (SDGs to build on the millennium development goals (MDGs set to expire in 2015. Research now indicates that humanity's impact on Earth's life support system is so great that further global environmental change risks undermining long-term prosperity and poverty eradication goals. Socioeconomic development and global sustainability are often posed as being in conflict because of trade-offs between a growing world population, as well as higher standards of living, and managing the effects of production and consumption on the global environment. We have established a framework for an evidence-based architecture for new goals and targets. Building on six SDGs, which integrate development and environmental considerations, we developed a comprehensive framework of goals and associated targets, which demonstrate that it is possible, and necessary, to develop integrated targets relating to food, energy, water, and ecosystem services goals; thus providing a neutral evidence-based approach to support SDG target discussions. Global analyses, using an integrated global target equation, are close to providing indicators for these targets. Alongside development-only targets and environment-only targets, these integrated targets would ensure that synergies are maximized and trade-offs are managed in the implementation of SDGs.

  10. Learning with Intangible Heritage for a Sustainable Future: Guidelines for Educators in the Asia-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Janet; Achilles, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The guide provides teacher educators and teachers with an understanding of the concept of intangible cultural heritage (ICH) and explains why ICH should be integrated into the curriculum in tandem with the principles and perspectives of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). This guide explains how the strategic incorporation of ICH elements…

  11. Education in Sustainable Development: How Can Science Education Contribute to the Vulnerability Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Education for human development within the constraints of sustainability is problematic for schools. On one hand, it is a political idea that continues to evolve with successive compromises between social groups with differing or even conflicting interests. ESD is therefore inherently `non-disciplinary' and cannot be the basis of a single school subject if we wish to keep the creativity that results from the dynamics at work. On the other hand, SD leads us to think collectively about solutions that ensure a future of our choosing that preserves the biological capacity of the planet and to reduce our vulnerability. The sciences thus have a key role: their ability to question the world and to model the consequences of collective and individual choices. But there is a risk of technocratic drift and SD leads us to think about society's values and aims. A new link is established between sciences and humanities with a democratic model in sight. This paper presents what is possible out of the prospective scenarios method within general and compulsory education by seeking, through an empirical approach, to determine its feasibility, its contributions, its limits, and to locate the place of science education in the elaboration of the perception of "vulnerability". Both primary and secondary schools are concerned.

  12. The theory of sustainable Tourism Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberta Tahiri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a phenomenon that has seen a rapid multi fold increase and growth since the middle of the twentieth century. For host communities and countries, the development of tourism has offered numerous advantages, as well as some significant challenges and difficulties. In recent decades, the awareness has been strengthened that tourism needs to be developed following the sustainable development concept. This approach eliminates or significantly decreases the negative impacts of tourism growth and sets the basis for long-term enjoyment of benefits. In the field of tourism, sustainable development translates in two important categories of considerations: conserving natural environment and resources and the biodiversity and conserving the living cultural heritage and traditions. Designing sustainable tourism development strategies should be done in cooperative efforts by the state, businesses and local communities. The strategies need to focus on maximizing the potential positive and eliminating or minimizing potential negative impacts. Impact monitoring and evaluation mechanisms need to be set up, including identification of performance indicators. When tourism growth emerges from a carefully designed and implemented strategy, tourism is documented to contribute to generating foreign exchange earnings, creating employment and income, and stimulating domestic consumption. It also brings about social and cultural development of the host communities. Researches have shown that smaller and developing countries specialized in tourism experience higher economic growth compared to countries without significant tourism industry. Contemporary economic and statistical methods ensure that the contribution of tourism in national economies can be precisely and easily measured, which in itself can be used as an indicator in assessing the impact and effects of tourism growth.

  13. Physical limitations of semiconductor devices defects, reliability and esd protection

    CERN Document Server

    Vashchenko, V A

    2008-01-01

    Provides an important link between the theoretical knowledge in the field of non-linier physics and practical application problems in microelectronics. This title focuses on power semiconductor devices and self-triggering pulsed power devices for ESD protection clamps.

  14. Alternative Communications about Sustainability Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue L. T. McGregor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, UNESCO communicated its conceptualization of education for sustainable development (ESD. This paper does not assume that UNESCO was ineffective in communicating its approach to ESD; rather, the premise is that UNESCO’s actual message was not well received by everyone, with some pushing back with alternative communications of their own. This paper identifies and profiles seven vanguard theoretical and pedagogical approaches to the problem of unsustainability, including, but not limited to: sustainable contraction, unlearning unsustainability, a 3D-heuristic, an integrative, place-based approach, and a Gaia-informed, ecological approach. It concludes with a discussion of seven overarching alternative messages for communicating about sustainability including: refocused education; complexity, chaos and living systems; Gaia and ecology; paradigm shifts for uncertainty; knowledge integration; existentialism; and fear and hope. Intellectual and pedagogical discourse can be kindled and stimulated by drawing on alternative communications about the normative concept of sustainability.

  15. Literacy Education and Sustainable Development in Developing Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghenekohwo, Jonathan E.; Frank-Oputu, Ekima A.

    2017-01-01

    The development of a literate society is a pre-requisite for the emergence of a knowledge economy. The thesis advanced in this paper is that, without massive investment and promotion of literacy education, development that is targeted at the 17-point sustainable development goals (SDGs) will be bereft of citizen's empowerment, engagement,…

  16. WP/072 Is the Clean Development Mechanism Promoting Sustainable Development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yongfu; He, Jingjing; Tarp, Finn

    One of the dual objectives of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol is to promote sustainable development in the host countries. With different CDM indicators for 58 CDM host countries over 2005-10, this paper empirically assesses whether CDM project development fulfils...

  17. Sustainable regional development and natural hazard impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena; Svetlosanov, Vladimir; Kudin, Valery

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades, natural hazard impacts on social and economic development in many countries were increasing due to the expansion of human activities into the areas prone to natural risks as well as to increasing in number and severity of natural hazardous events caused by climate changes and other natural phenomena. The escalation of severe disasters (such as Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan 2011) triggered by natural hazards and related natural-technological and environmental events is increasingly threatening sustainable development at different levels from regional to global scale. In our study, we develop a model of ecological, economic and social sustainable development for the European part of Russia and the Republic of Belarus. The model consists of six blocks including 1) population, 2) environment, 3) mineral resources, 4) geographic space, 5) investments, and 6) food production and import. These blocks were created based on the analysis of the main processes at the regional level; all the blocks are closely interrelated between each other. Reaching the limit values of block parameters corresponds to a sharp deterioration of the system; as a result, the system can lose its stability. Aggravation of natural and natural-technological risk impacts on each block and should be taken into account in the model of regional development. Natural hazards can cause both strong influences and small but permanent perturbations. In both cases, a system can become unstable. The criterion for sustainable development is proposed. The Russian Foundation for Humanities and Belorussian Republican Foundation for Fundamental Research supported the study (project 15-22-01008).

  18. The Economic Crisis and Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Hvelplund, Frede

    2012-01-01

    of sustainable energy solutions involves the replacement of imported fossil fuels by substantial investments in energy conservation and renewable energy (RE). In such situation, it becomes increasingly essential to develop economic thinking and economic models that can analyse the concrete institutions in which...... the market is embedded. This paper presents such tools and methodologies and applies them to the case of the Danish heating sector. The case shows how investments in decreasing fossil fuels and CO2 emissions can be made in a way in which they have a positive influence on job creation and economicdevelopment......This paper presents Concrete Institutional Economics as an economic paradigm to understand how the wish for sustainable energy in times of economiccrisis can be used to generate jobs as well as economic growth. In most countries, including European countries, the USA and China, the implementation...

  19. Sustainable Entrepreneurial Orientation: A Business Strategic Approach for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Criado-Gomis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes sustainable entrepreneurial orientation (SEO as a multidimensional construct that offers researchers the possibility of empirically testing their theoretical proposals in the sustainable entrepreneurship field. The authors propose an integration of different theories. In accordance with the dynamic capabilities view, SEO is approached under an organizational paradigm of strategic orientations delimited by competitive culture and multiple orientation perspectives. Furthermore, SEO’s nature is conceived at a firm-based entrepreneurship level and is based on an integrated triple bottom line sustainability. This approach is conceptualized using a categorization scheme and defined in accordance with the organizational predisposition perspective. Several research lines are proposed, all based on relational models with SEO as the key concept.

  20. DIMENSIONS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIUS BULEARCA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainable development, resulted from the reconsideration of the report between development and pollution in the light of the interdependencies among the components of development, defines the profound change in which the exploitation of resources, direction of investments, the development of technologies takes a new path in the sense that, by their judicious harmonization, provides significant increase of the present and future potential to meet the requirements of society. Such a development is based on economic growth, which is, in fact, its spring, but also on new concepts and values that provide a superior framework of transposing the growth coordinates. Such a framework should provide incentives to accelerate economic growth, whose objectives, ways and tools are defined in a long-term perspective, able to provide large openings to the real progress of society at all levels and provide solutions for the effective and continuous support for this progress. Therefore, in this article, we identify and explain the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social and environmental.

  1. Urban forests for sustainable urban development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundara, Denny M.; Hartono, Djoko M.; Suganda, Emirhadi; Haeruman, S. Herman J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper explores the development of the urban forest in East Jakarta. By 2030 Jakarta area has a target of 30% green area covering 19,845 hectares, including urban forest covering an area of 4,631 hectares. In 2015, the city forest is only 646 hectares, while the city requires 3,985 hectares of new land Urban forest growth from year to year showed a marked decrease with increasing land area awoke to commercial functions, environmental conditions encourage the development of the city to become unsustainable. This research aims to support sustainable urban development and ecological balance through the revitalization of green areas and urban development. Analytical methods for urban forest area is calculated based on the amount of CO2 that comes from people, vehicles, and industrial. Urban spatial analysis based on satellite image data, using a GIS program is an analysis tool to determine the distribution and growth patterns of green areas. This paper uses a dynamic system model to simulate the conditions of the region against intervention to be performed on potential areas for development of urban forests. The result is a model urban forest area is integrated with a social and economic function to encourage the development of sustainable cities.

  2. Renewable energy for sustainable development and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omer, Abdeen

    2010-09-15

    The increased availability of reliable and efficient energy services stimulates new development alternatives. This article discusses the potential for such integrated systems in the stationary and portable power market in response to the critical need for a cleaner energy technology. Throughout the theme several issues relating to renewable energies, environment and sustainable development are examined from both current and future perspectives. It is concluded that renewable environmentally friendly energy must be encouraged, promoted, implemented and demonstrated by full-scale plan especially for use in remote rural areas.

  3. Chemistry for sustainable development in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurib-Fakim, Ameenah [Mauritius Univ., Reduit (Mauritius); Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas (eds.) [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Faculty of Veterinary Science

    2013-07-01

    Chemistry for Sustainable Development in Africa' gives an insight into current Chemical research in Africa. It is edited and written by distinguished African scientists and includes contributions from Chemists from Northern, Southern, Western, Eastern, Central and Island state African Countries. The core themes embrace the most pressing issues of our time, including Environmental Chemistry, Renewable Energies, Health and Human Well-Being, Food and Nutrition, and Bioprospecting and Commercial Development. This book is invaluable for teaching and research institutes in Africa and worldwide, private sector entities dealing with natural products from Africa, as well as policy and decision-making bodies and non-governmental organizations.

  4. Special Edition: Environment in Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Morse

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available When we were invited by the editors of Sustainability to put together a special edition on “Environment in Sustainable Development” our first reaction was to question whether this was really needed. After all, the environment has long been regarded as a central plank in sustainability and there are countless articles and books published on an annual basis that explore the impact of our economic and social activities on our environment. Just what is it that a special edition can achieve? What new angles could we hope to provide? Our initial thinking was to link the special edition to a particular, almost unique, location in time rather than space. We are in the process of recovering, albeit stuttering, from the deepest economic crash experienced by the European and North American economies. The crash has brought some national economies to their knees and, if economic commentators are to be believed, almost destroyed the Euro. Recovery from that crash has been slow and it is arguable whether at the time of writing this has developed much momentum. There is still the skewed perception that prosperity equals economic growth and that economic growth can take place without real (sustainable development or by simply implementing austerity measures and surely without people’s participation. An analogy from National Parks worldwide is when conservation agencies try to enforce protection without local people’s support. All such attempts have either failed or resurrected only once people’s involvement was secured and guaranteed. The unidirectional austerity measures imposed mainly in the countries of southern Europe have destroyed social cohesion leaving deeply wounded societies, while at the same time have also put up for grabs important assets (including natural capital in each of these countries and therefore in jeopardy even their long term recovery.

  5. Linkages between climate change and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, Noreen; Morlot, Jan Corfee [OECD, Paris (France); Davidson, Ogunlade [Energy and Development Research Centre (EDRC), Cape Town (ZA)] [and others

    2002-09-01

    Climate change does not yet feature prominently within the environmental or economic policy agendas of developing countries. Yet evidence shows that some of the most adverse effects of climate change will be in developing countries, where populations are most vulnerable and least likely to easily adapt to climate change, and that climate change will affect the potential for development in these countries. Some synergies already exist between climate change policies and the sustainable development agenda in developing countries, such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, transport and sustainable land-use policies. Despite limited attention from policy-makers to date, climate change policies could have significant ancillary benefits for the local environment. The reverse is also true as local and national policies to address congestion, air quality, access to energy services and energy diversity may also limit GHG emissions. Nevertheless there could be significant trade-offs associated with deeper levels of mitigation in some countries, for example where developing countries are dependent on indigenous coal and may be required to switch to cleaner yet more expensive fuels to limit emissions. The distributional impacts of such policies are an important determinant of their feasibility and need to be considered up-front. It follows that future agreements on mitigation and adaptation under the convention will need to recognise the diverse situations of developing countries with respect to their level of economic development, their vulnerability to climate change and their ability to adapt or mitigate. Recognition of how climate change is likely to influence other development priorities may be a first step toward building cost-effective strategies and integrated, institutional capacity in developing countries to respond to climate change. Opportunities may also exist in developing countries to use regional economic organisations to assist in the design of integrated

  6. Criteria Assessment Model for Sustainable Product Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Turan, Faiz; Johan, Kartina; Hisyamudin Muhd Nor, Nik

    2016-11-01

    The instability in today's market and the ever increasing and emerging demands for mass customized and hybrid products by customers, are driving companies and decision makers to seek for cost effective and time efficient improvements in their product development process. Design concept evaluation which is the end of conceptual design is one of the most critical decision points in product development. It relates to the final success of product development, because poor criteria assessment in design concept evaluation can rarely compensated at the later stages. This has led to real pressure for the adaptation of new developmental architecture and operational parameters to remain competitive in the market. In this paper, a new integrated design concept evaluation based on fuzzy-technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (Fuzzy-TOPSIS) is presented, and it also attempts to incorporate sustainability practices in assessing the criteria. Prior to Fuzzy-TOPSIS, a new scale of “Weighting criteria” for survey process is developed to quantify the evaluation criteria. This method will help engineers to improve the effectiveness and objectivity of the sustainable product development. Case example from industry is presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology. The result of the example shows that the new integrated method provides an alternative to existing methods of design concept evaluation.

  7. Collaborative decision making for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsley, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    For many years, economic development has mean industrial recruitment where business-at-any-cost was preached by a small elite, where civic discord replaced civic discussion, where families made more money but had less to spend, where residents learned to lock their doors, where communities changed from the unique to commonplace and a thousand towns looked alike. But now, scores of communities are saying no to old, worn-out approaches to development and embracing a new kind of development that respects the community and the environment. Created collaboratively by people from all walks of community life, this new approach is called sustainable community economic development. Though new, sustainable development is based on traditional values of stewardship and working together. Its principles are powerful in their simplicity. Its lessons enrich community decision making. This paper describes these principles and lessons. It introduces a community decision-making process that applies them and suggests the kinds of results you can expect from such a process in your town.

  8. Developing a holistic framework to understand the contribution of sustainable public procurement to the development of more sustainable business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, S.; Lozano, R.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development has encouraged companies to re-asses the 9 way they do business. The integration of sustainability requirements into the 10 procurement process, leading to sustainable procurement, can motivate companies to 11 develop more sustainable business models. 12

  9. Linkages between climate change and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noreen Beg; Jan Corfee Morlot; Ogunlade Davidson; Yaw Afrane-Okesse; Lwazikazi Tyani; Fatma Denton; Youba Sokona; Jean Philippe Thomas; Emilio Lebre La Rovere; Jyoti K. Parikh; Kirit Parikh; A. Atiq Rahman [OECD, Paris (France)

    2002-09-01

    Climate change does not yet feature prominently within the environmental or economic policy agendas of developing countries. Yet evidence shows that some of the most adverse effects of climate change will be in developing countries. Some synergies already exist between climate change policies and the sustainable development agenda in developing countries, such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, transport and sustainable land-use policies. Climate change policies could have significant ancillary benefits for the local environment. The reverse is also true as local and national policies to address congestion, air quality, access to energy services and energy diversity may also limit GHG emissions. Nevertheless there could be significant trade-offs associated with deeper levels of mitigation in some countries, for example where developing countries are dependent on indigenous coal and may be required to switch to cleaner yet more expensive fuels to limit emissions. The distributional impacts of such policies are an important determinant of their feasibility and need to be considered up-front. It follows that future agreements on mitigation and adaptation under the Climate Convention will need to recognise the diverse situations of developing countries with respect to their level of economic development, their vulnerability to climate change and their ability to adapt or mitigate. Recognition of how climate change is likely to influence other development priorities may be a first step toward building cost-effective strategies and integrated, institutional capacity in developing countries to respond to climate change. Opportunities may also exist in developing countries to use regional economic organisations to assist in the design of integrated responses and to exploit synergies between climate change and other policies such as those designed to combat desertification and preserve biodiversity.

  10. Energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy that is specifically charged with encouraging the more efficient use of energy resources, and the use of renewable energy resources - such as solar power, wind power, biomass energy and geothermal energy. In the past several years, EE has increased its emphasis on technology deployment through partnerships with states, local governments and private companies. Partnerships move new discoveries more quickly into the marketplace, where they can create jobs, prevent pollution, save resources, and produce many other benefits. The author then emphasizes the importance of this effort in a number of different sections of the paper: energy consumption pervades everything we do; U.S. energy imports are rising to record levels; transportation energy demand is increasing; U.S. energy use is increasing; population growth increases world energy demand; total costs of energy consumption aren`t always counted; world energy markets offer incredible potential; cost of renewables is decreasing; clean energy is essential to sustainable development; sustainable energy policy; sustainable energy initiatives: utilities, buildings, and transportation.

  11. Sustainable Development in Indian Automotive Component Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, E.

    2013-01-01

    India is the world's second fastest growing auto market and boasts of the sixth largest automobile industry after China, the US, Germany, Japan and Brazil. The Indian auto component industry recorded its highest year-on-year growth of 34.2 % in 2010-2011, raking in revenue of US 39.9 billion; major contribution coming from exports at US five billion and fresh investment from the US at around US two billion. For inclusive growth and sustainable development most of the auto components manufacturers has adopted the cluster development approach. The objective is to study the technical efficiency (θ), peer weights (λ i ), input slacks (S-) and output slacks (S+) of four Auto Component Clusters (ACC) in India. The methodology adopted is using Data Envelopment Analysis of Input Oriented Banker Charnes Cooper Model by taking number of units and number of employments as inputs and sales and exports in crores as an outputs. The non-zero λ i 's represents the weights for efficient clusters. The S > 0 obtained for one ACC reveals the excess no. of units (S-) and employment (S-) and shortage in sales (S+) and exports (S+). However the variable returns to scale are increasing for three clusters, constant for one more cluster and with nil decrease. To conclude, for inclusive growth and sustainable development, the inefficient ACC should increase their turnover and exports, as decrease in no. of enterprises and employment is practically not possible. Moreover for sustainable development, the ACC should strengthen infrastructure interrelationships, technology interrelationships, procurement interrelationships, production interrelationships and marketing interrelationships to increase productivity and efficiency to compete in the world market.

  12. Environmental ethics and education for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubo Mohorič

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article – sustainable development and limits to growth within the dominant paradigm of constant eco- nomic growth – is an urgent issue today. Mankind is facing a great dilemma regarding the future, as certain effects of the current anthropocentric and non-sustainable development have become apparent in the environment and nature as well as in the human society. The economic development is, despite occasional economic downturns, a serious threat for the future of all life on the planet, not only human beings. The entropy law is universal; it applies to the entire universe, including the people on the Earth. It has been proved by many research studies that the majority of the effects we can observe in the environment are of anthropogenic origin. It is obvious that humans will have to change their practices to a certain extent and, above all, reconsider their attitude to constant economic growth and the effects (good or bad it entails. The author suggests that a solution to this problems could be in the new ecological ethics, which is intrinsic and no longer anthropocentric, the ethics that will see sustainable (balanced and close to nature development not as a goal in itself but as a means to reach the set goals. We could perhaps shorten the path to acceptance of this kind of ethics, which fosters responsibility towards the environment, people and all living creatures, if we knew how to pass on the experience of older generations to today’s youth by using a suitable educational approach. Luckily, the young generations, who are living with us here and now and sharing the fate of our time and space, are extremely perceptive of the »new« environmental/ecological ethics. To embrace it is more than just our individual right and obligation; we are, as the article states, »authorised« and bound to do so by a number of international treaties.

  13. Sustainable development and quality health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    On the occasion of Development Week in Canada, Dr. Remi Sogunro spoke in February, 1994, about the many achievements of quality primary health care and PLAN's strategy to achieve sustainability. In one generation, under-5 mortality has been cut by a third. Deaths from measles has been reduced from 2.5 million to 1 million a year. Skeletal deformities from polio also have been reduced from 1/2 million to less than 140,000. Despite all this, there is much more to be attained. 35,000 children under 5 die from preventable diseases every day in developing countries. The health community is working hard to address these silent emergencies. PLAN International's primary health care program targets the poor and undeserved populations where diseases are prevalent. The main focus of PLAN's programs are mothers and children who are most vulnerable to disease. Key interventions that PLAN gives priority to are childhood and maternal immunization programs, including pre- and post-natal care for mothers. Other interventions under PLAN's comprehensive primary health care program include: control of diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, growth monitoring, nutrition and control of STDs and HIV/AIDS infection, water and sanitation, family planning information and educational services, and rehabilitation of the handicapped. "Go in search of people, begin with what they know, build on what they have," goes a Chinese proverb. This also summarizes PLAN's guiding principle for achieving sustainable development: the importance of investing in people. PLAN's programs in the field build partnerships and empower communities. PLAN's emphasis on institution-building and capacity-building with local institutions is an important part of organizational strategy to ensure sustained development. full text

  14. Mobilizing consumer demand for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijp, van J.C.M.; Fischer, A.R.H.

    2011-01-01

    A lot of innovation effort is aimed at increased sustainable consumption, while at the same time actual sustainable consumption is not meeting the expectations raised by the positive public attitudes towards sustainability. This is indicative of a gap between attitudes and behaviors in sustainable

  15. Swedish environmental and sustainability education research in the era of post-politics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beniamin Knutsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The special issue New Swedish environmental and sustainability education research, published in Education & Democracy 20(1, introduced a novel generation of Swedish ESD research. With the intention to spur academic debate this rejoinder offers alternative interpretations of some of the findings in the special issue. The article contests the special issue’s proclaimed distinction between empirical studies and ideological debate in the field of ESD research, and points to the contradiction between the special issue’s promotion of ‘pluralism’ and the absence of critical interrogations of sustainable development. Theoretically informed by post-Marxist thought the concept post-politics is employed to shed new light on sustainable development and its companion ESD. It is argued that the contributions in the special issue are partly embedded in a post-political logic and that several findings are open for far more radical interpretations. This suggests, ultimately, that there is a need for alternative pathways that can challenge and complement mainstream ESD research.

  16. Journal of Renewable Energy and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Gaber Dessouky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Energy is one of the basic needs of humanity and, for ages, the sun seemed to be the main source ofall energy in the universe and that is why the ancient Egyptians used to venerate it. Many wastes andcorpses – under pressure and heat – have been converted throughout the years inside the earth intothe oil on which recent development is totally based to support humans’ life, particularly intransportation and power generation. As time passes, it has been proven that oil will vanish. For thefirst moment, it seemed like mankind will certainly suffer due to such a hard situation and some peoplethought that we will get back to stone ages when oil no longer exists. Thanks for the Renewable Energy scientist who has looked at the issue from a different prospective,that is, even if oil vanishes, the main reason of its existence is still there, that is the sun . The sun has the capability to still make people enjoy their life not only by enjoying the sunny weatherin many places of the world and having good times on the beach for those who live by the sea but alsothe sun can still provide man with required energy and cause the wind to blow, the waves to raise, theplants to be converted to biomass, and the earth to store its geothermal energy. As long as life goes on, the sun will always rise and will always grant its energy to mankind. It is theclean, renewable and sustainable energy, which guarantees sustainable development. Because of the high correlation between renewable energy and sustainable development, the editorialteam of this journal thought of offering a hub to researchers interested in these two important fields topresent their work and share it with others who have the same interest in such a wide area ofresearch . Thanks to the Academy Publishing Center, ‘APC’ owned by the Arab Academy for Science,Technology and Maritime Transport ‘AASTMT’ for hosting this international journal .

  17. Fuzzy logic marketing models for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Constantin ENACHE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy logic offers a different approach to describe economic and marketing phenomena. By providing a replacement for crisp values the fuzzy sets proved to be efficient alternatives for customer behaviour analysis. These advantages can provide a new way to address sustainable development issues. The present paper aims at presenting the main characteristics of fuzzy models and their main advantages. Evidence on how to implement a fuzzy model and what are its strong points are provided based on previous research and published scientific papers. It is concluded that fuzzy logic gives a different view on a wide range of topics

  18. Nuclear Technology for the Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Science, technology and innovation will play a crucial role in helping countries achieve the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the 1930s, the peaceful applications of nuclear technology have helped many countries improve crops, fight pests, advance health, protect the environment and guarantee a stable supply of energy. Highlighting the goals related to health, hunger, energy and the environment, in this presentation I will discuss how nuclear technology contributes to the SDGs and how nuclear technology can further contribute to the well-being of people, help protect the planet and boost prosperity.

  19. Journal of Science and Sustainable Development: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Science and Sustainable Development: About this journal. Journal Home > Journal of Science and Sustainable Development: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Archives: Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 10 of 10 ... Archives: Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The). Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Attitudes of green organizations' personnel toward genuine sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allevato, Camillo

    2017-01-01

    Layman's summary: This thesis dissertation concerns the identification of the main factors that influence attitudes towards genuine sustainable development, in order to identify strategies that will be more effective in education for quality sustainable development. In the pursuit of genuine

  2. CONCEPT FORMATION OF ENTERPRISE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Barmutsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies a problem of enterprise sustainable development which exists in the context of modern social and economic and dynamic development of the economy in theRepublicofBelarus.The executed analysis of critical situations considers a crisis that makes harmful effects in the whole world and in the economy of theRepublicofBelarusnot only as a negative phenomena but also as a positive element that serves as a stimulator for a new phase of life.The paper examines main stages of transfer to stable sustainable operation of an enterprise that continues its development within the framework of industrial technologies and application of innovation technologies.New information and economic structure is characterized by fast obsolescence of capital and also by certain financial losses for risk, innovations, higher quality of products and execution of service. However even having such economic situation the lost opportunity due to nonuse of the possibility to start change-over to products of new generation covers minimization of expenses achieved at the cost of efficient usage of obsolete technologies and worn-out equipment. 

  3. The Bioeconomy Model in Future Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipate Nicolae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The future of sustainable development is the bioeconomy with the ―global‖ solution; both global and local action for developed the renewable energy generation. When local solutions are implemented is being laid for global solutions are positive affect the national economy. The implementation of the bioeconomy strategy used by society to prevent urgent problems, such as increasing competition for natural resources, climate change, rural sustainable development. The bioeconomy is a new economic and social order and promotes systemic change from using non-renewable resources to renewables. Bioeconomy reveals that production, which involves the transformation of a limited stock of matter and energy, but respecting the same laws that govern entropy closed systems, the entropy or unavailable matter and energy in the forms tend to increase continuously. Economic growth not only increases the apparent output per unit of inputs, which is performed using finite stock of matter and energy in the world. The current economy is based on fossil fuels and other material inputs suffering entropic degradation, both in the raw material extraction and pollution. The production, even if technical progress leads to lower overall yields. The idea of a steady state as the final economic growth that perpetuated indefinitely pendulum model is an impossibility

  4. BUILDING INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosiljka Vuković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many proofs confirming the importance of sustainable development for Montenegro. Shared international challenges, global economic crisis, and, particularly, the country's natural characteristics emphasize that sustainable development is the only way ahead. In 2002 Montenegro formed the National Council for Sustainable Development; in 2005 the Office for Sustainable Development was established, and the National Strategy of Sustainable Development was adopted in 2007. With these developments, Montenegro created the most advanced institutional basis for sustainable development in its region. After carefully observing the functioning of national sustainable development institutions, however, the Office for Sustainable Development embarked upon the process of their reform in 2008. As a result, the Council was fundamentally reformed, having its membership downsized and composition transformed. Two Annual Reports on the Implementation of the Sustainable Development Strategy have been completed and the process of defining sustainable development indicators commenced in co-operation with the United Nations. This paper critically examines the evolution of the set-up of the Montenegrin sustainable development system, presents the advantages and disadvantages of the government-anchored Council. Based on the lessons learnt, it presents recommendations for policy makers on promoting and enforcing sustainable development. The paper argues that only by effectively co-ordinating all segments of society and ensuring genuine participation of outside-government stakeholders, the countries can ensure that sustainable development principles are incorporated in national and local policies. The independence and pro-activeness in approach of sustainable development institutions is essential in ensuring the supremacy of sustainable practices in decision-making. Considering the similarities in historic, economic and social developments of the former socialist

  5. Energy technology progress for sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvizu, D.E.; Drennen, T.E.

    1997-03-01

    Energy security is a fundamental part of a country`s national security. Access to affordable, environmentally sustainable energy is a stabilizing force and is in the world community`s best interest. The current global energy situation however is not sustainable and has many complicating factors. The primary goal for government energy policy should be to provide stability and predictability to the market. This paper differentiates between short-term and long-term issues and argues that although the options for addressing the short-term issues are limited, there is an opportunity to alter the course of long-term energy stability and predictability through research and technology development. While reliance on foreign oil in the short term can be consistent with short-term energy security goals, there are sufficient long-term issues associated with fossil fuel use, in particular, as to require a long-term role for the federal government in funding research. The longer term issues fall into three categories. First, oil resources are finite and there is increasing world dependence on a limited number of suppliers. Second, the world demographics are changing dramatically and the emerging industrialized nations will have greater supply needs. Third, increasing attention to the environmental impacts of energy production and use will limit supply options. In addition to this global view, some of the changes occurring in the US domestic energy picture have implications that will encourage energy efficiency and new technology development. The paper concludes that technological innovation has provided a great benefit in the past and can continue to do so in the future if it is both channels toward a sustainable energy future and if it is committed to, and invested in, as a deliberate long-term policy option.

  6. LINK BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND EFFECTIVENESS IN REGIONAL GOVERNMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAN ZÁVODNÝ POSPÍŠIL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes relationship between sustainable development and regional government efficiency. Author defines first sustainable development, its principles and relationship to the public administration area. With usage of systematic review is later defined efficiency in public administration. Based on this information is analyzed relationship between sustainable development and the effectiveness of the management system of regional government.

  7. LINK BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND EFFECTIVENESS IN REGIONAL GOVERNMENT

    OpenAIRE

    JAN ZÁVODNÝ POSPÍŠIL

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes relationship between sustainable development and regional government efficiency. Author defines first sustainable development, its principles and relationship to the public administration area. With usage of systematic review is later defined efficiency in public administration. Based on this information is analyzed relationship between sustainable development and the effectiveness of the management system of regional government.

  8. Sustainable tourism development: the case study of Antalya, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif Gurkan Kaya; Richard Smardon

    2001-01-01

    This paper discuss ideas about how tourism can be made base for sustainable tourism development in Antalya, Turkey. The introduction is a general overview of sustainable tourism development in coastal areas. The paper also addresses the role of NGOs in the course of development. Information is given about coastal tourism facilities in Turkey. Finally, sustainable...

  9. Legal perspectives on the role of culture in sustainable development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article introduces some legal perspectives on the role of culture in sustainable development. The authors agree that sustainable development has been designed as an environmental concept but that room exists for the more prominent inclusion of some form(s) of the notion "culture" in the sustainable development ...

  10. The Role of Ergonomics in Sustainable Agricultural Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the role of ergonomics on sustainable agricultural development in Nigeria. Agriculture plays a key role in the Nigerian economy and hence the need for sustained development within the sector. Ergonomic intervention in Nigeria was identified as a key driver for sustainable development while fostering ...

  11. Sustainable minerals operations in the developing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Marker; M.G. Petterson; F. McEvoy; M H. Stephenson

    2005-12-15

    The sustainable development of minerals, which are non-renewable resources, is a major challenge in today's world. This Special Publication gives examples from developing countries at all scales of mineral extraction. The volume reviews environmental, economic, health and social problems and highlights the need to solve these before sustainability can be achieved. The better solutions require mutual understanding, through full involvement of all stakeholders, education, training and investment so that small-scale and artisanal mines can grow into well-managed operations. At larger scales, most major international mining companies have now improved their practices and are monitoring their progress, although there is no room for complacency in this rapidly changing area. Chapters of particular interest are: Markets for industrial mineral products from mining waste by P.W. Scott, J.M. Eyre, D.J. Harrison and A.J. Bloodworth and Mining and environmental problems in the Ib valley coalfield of Orissa, India by P.P. Mishra.

  12. Sustainable urban development and industrial pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Julka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of cities is highly connected with the pollution generated from industrial facilities and power plants. Both affect quality of air, weather, health and quality of life. The main goal of this paper is to determine the impact of selected weather parameters on the pollution from mentioned plants. From the research results, it can be concluded that sustainable urban development and welfare of citizens are dependent on causal relationship between pollution and weather. The greatest level of impact was recorded for nitric dioxide. In the case of carbon monoxide, the level of impact is the middle. The lowest level was recorded for particulate matter. The biggest impact on the carbon monoxide emission and particulate matter is that of air pressure, whereas temperature has the biggest impact on nitrogen dioxide emission. The research shows that air humidity and wind speed do not have a significant impact on the emission of pollutants from the plants. Research shows need for further studies in the field of impact of pollution from industry on urban weather and human health.

  13. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORTING IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Braendle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability reports contain important information for the stakeholders. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of recent developments in the area of sustainability reporting in China. The paper presents useful insights into sustainability reporting in China and helps to better navigate the future trends in sustainability reporting practices. The sustainability reporting rules in China should not rely on a basis of broad standards but on legally enforced binding rules.

  14. Challenging the sustainability of micro products development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Grave, Arnaud; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2006-01-01

    regarding the impact of size for recycling or environment. Indeed micro production is often seen as environmental friendly thanks to the small amount of material used. Such a statement can be misleading. In this article EcoDesign or Design for Environment (DFE) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA......Environmental aspects are one of the biggest concerns regarding the future of manufacturing and product development sustainability. Furthermore, micro products and micro technologies are often seen as the next big thing in terms of possible mass market trend and boom. Many questions are raised...... and the intermediate parts which can be in-process created. Possible future trends for micro products development scheme involving environmental concerns are given....

  15. A QUEST for sustainable continuing professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2017-01-01

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) can be crucial in improving teaching, and student learning. Extant research suggests consensus pertaining to the core features of effective CPD including content focus, active learning, coherence, duration and collaborative activities. This chapter reports...... on a large-scale, long-term Danish CPD project for which all the activities were created with these consensus criteria in mind. The overall purpose has been to develop a sustainable model for CPD that acknowledges teachers’ situated learning in professional learning communities (PLCs), supports bottom...... the effectiveness of the intervention, a mixed methods design has been employed. This included a series of questionnaires, observations and interviews that were used to capture teacher reflections and new enactments, teacher collaboration and student learning. Findings reveal a positive correlation between...

  16. ENERGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN CUBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrayan Bravo Hidalgo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Employment and enhancing the use of renewable energy sources could be considered as the beginning of a third ¨Industrial Revolution¨. The transition to a low carbon dioxide emission permits to a momentous turning point in the fight against climate change, improve energy security, and last but not least, significantly reduce the geopolitical intentions of this. The increase in renewable sources constitutes a guideline for energy policy in Cuba. Thus, programs for the construction of small hydropower plants, plant cells and photovoltaic panels, solar thermal energy systems for various services are developed; and the use of other primary sources such as wind and biomass. This work shows the implementation of these practices in the nation, the present results and future aspirations facing the demands of sustainable and steady development of generation and power consumption.

  17. Bioeconomy, Climate Change, and Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, Helena L.

    2016-05-31

    This presentation addresses the recognition that the sustainability of the bioeconomy requires strong interlinkages between existing and developing industries in agriculture (terrestrial and aquatic); forestry; waste and residue management in rural, industrial, and urban environments; the chemicals and biotechnology industry in terms of production of substitutes or better performing materials and chemicals; and in the fuels and power sectors. The transition to a low-carbon intensity economy requires the integration of systems and uses circular economy concepts to increase resource use efficiency and security for all biomass and other resources used as well. It requires innovation along the whole supply chains as well as research, development, and demonstration of the integrated systems with strong partnerships from the landscapes and watersheds where biomass is planted all the way to the many applications.

  18. Renewable energy strategies for sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    production, and replacement of fossil fuels by various sources of renewable energy. Consequently, large-scale renewable energy implementation plans must include strategies of how to integrate the renewable sources in coherent energy systems influenced by energy savings and efficiency measures. Based......This paper discusses the perspective of renewable energy (wind, solar, wave and biomass) in the making of strategies for a sustainable development. Such strategies typically involve three major technological changes: energy savings on the demand side, efficiency improvements in the energy...... on the case of Denmark, this paper discusses the problems and perspectives of converting present energy systems into a 100 percent renewable energy system. The conclusion is that such development will be possible. The necessary renewable energy sources are present, if further technological improvements...

  19. IMPORTANCE OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN TERMS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANKICA TODOROVIC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of tourist resources and tourist products, competitive ability and positioning of the destinations in the tourist market affect the economic development of the national economy. Natural resources are key, but under-utilized resources necessary for the tourism development, whereby reaching the level where the key development resources are on the verge of carrying capacities, thus making the model structure of the future development to be a significant contribution in searching the optimal model of sustainable development. The paper points to the importance of previous positive experience in the development of tourism and related activities especially in terms of development planning in accordance with the available resources, spatial opportunities and sustainable development. The research the possibility of defining an optimal model for sustainable tourism development in the case of mountain destinations in Zlatibor District will indicate the need to precisely define economic-geographical resources which determine the individual role of an each resource in creating the tourist offer, as well as, to show that the inadequate management of tourist resources and marketing activities leads to their degradation.

  20. Sustainable Urban Development: A Literature Review and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews current literature on sustainable development and proposes a framework for applying this concept to city and regional planning. It begins by exploring interpretations of the concept of sustainability itself, next looks at some urban planning traditions toward an urban planning framework that can incorporate this concept. The following definition of sustainable urban development is proposed: Sustainable urban development seeks to create cities and towns that improv...

  1. Sustainable Development: Paradoxes, Misunderstandings and Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is, in itself, the idea of a harmonic answer to the dual nature of the most pressing problem for global society. Most of the problems dealing with sustainability concern its dual and contradictory nature. That paradoxical reality is in no way a unique feature of sustainability; its universal pervasiveness is demonstrated by…

  2. Approaches to Sustainable Development in Contemporary Museology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campolmi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development has become a leading value of the 21st century society. Throsby’s and Hutter’s recent studies on inter and intra-generational equity, diversity maintenance and interdependence have demonstrated that sustainability values promote a different perspective on cultural institutions. Particularly, they incite to reorganize the production and consumption patterns, and rethink about the construction of meanings in permanent displays. The paper wants to explore how sustainability principles are an approach to develop a “sustainable museology”, which cares about making visitors more critic and aware of the political, sociological, epistemological and cultural implications that lay behind the making of exhibitions. Museums undertaking a sustainable development of their narrative making processes overpass the Foucauldian idea of art museums as heterotopy, (space of otherness, and approach that of archétopy. This model offers rooms to rethink about narratives as stakeholders’ collective processes capable to “meet the needs of the present without compromising those of the future generations”, as stated in the “Brundtland Commision” Report of 1987. The last display done by the Berlin Neue Nationalgalerie is analysed as a case-study for archétopy. Il paper analizza il concetto di sostenibilità nelle politiche governative dei musei d’arte. Lo studio osserva tale valore da un punto di vista sia teorico che pratico e cita l’esempio dei grandi musei europei, facendo più volte riferimento al caso della Tate Modern di Londra. Se da un lato l’argomento è esplicitamente collegato ai musei d’arte in quanto essi operano per la sostenibilità del bene comune, dall’altro i musei europei hanno basato le proprie politiche culturali adottando il così detto approccio “three bottom” già intrapreso dalle grandi aziende e dalle business companies. Tale approccio si basa sull’elaborazione di politiche attente alla

  3. Research and development portfolio of the sustainability science team national sustainable operations USDA Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trista Patterson; David Nicholls; Jonathan Long

    2015-01-01

    The Sustainability Science Team (SST) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service Sustainable Operations Initiative is a 18-member virtual research and development team, located across five regions and four research stations of the USDA Forest Service. The team provides research, publication, systems analysis, and decision support to the Sustainable...

  4. Educating the Engineer for Sustainable Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    More than ever before, we are confronting the challenges of limited resources (water, food, energy and mineral), while also facing complex challenges with the environment and related social unrest. Resource access problems are exacerbated by multi-scale geopolitical instability. We seek a balance that will allow profit but also leave a world fit for our children to inherit. Many are working with small groups to make positive change through finding solutions that address these challenges. In fact, some say that in sum, it is the largest human movement that has ever existed. In this talk I will share our experiences to alleviate vulnerabilities for populations of humans in need while working with students, corporate entities and non governmental organizations. Our main focus is to educate a new cadre of engineers that have an enhanced awareness of and better communication skills for a different cultural environment than the one in which they were raised and are hungry to seek new opportunities to serve humanity at a basic level. The results of a few of the more than forty humanitarian engineering projects completed since 2003 will be superimposed on a theoretical framework for sustainable community development. This will be useful information to those seeking a social corporate position of responsibility and a world that more closely approaches a sustainable equilibrium.

  5. Engineering Education for Sustainable Development. The Contribution of University Curricula to Engineering Education for Sustainable Development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastenhofer, Karen; Lansu, Angelique; Van Dam-Mieras, Rietje; Sotoudeh, Mahshid

    2010-01-01

    Global failures to reach a sustainable development within present-day societies as well as recent breakthroughs within technoscience pose new challenges to engineering education. The list of competencies which engineers should have to rise to these challenges is long and diverse, and often

  6. An Integrated Sustainable Business and Development System: Thoughts and Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J. C. Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Companies understand the importance of monitoring and managing their environmental impacts and aim to integrate, with consistent quality control, effective reduce-reuse-recycle programs and risk preventions. By building an integrated sustainable business and development system to meet certain environmental standards, many companies are eligible to be “green” certified. Companies may consider recognizing global visions on sustainability while implementing local best practices. An integrated sustainable business and development system includes talent management, sustainable supply chain, practicing strategies of leveraging resources effectively, implementing social responsibilities, initiating innovative programs of recycling, reducing, and reusing, advancing leaders’ perceptions towards sustainability, reducing innovation barriers, and engaging sustainable practices strategically.

  7. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Sustainable Development Policy ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Sustainable Development Policy Institute. This funding will strengthen the Sustainable Development Policy Institute's (SDPI) role as a credible public policy institution in Pakistan by enhancing its ability to provide high-quality, influential, and policy-relevant research. About the Sustainable ...

  8. Curriculum Analysis and Education for Sustainable Development in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Ingolfur Asgeir; Norodahl, Kristin; Oskarsdottir, Gunnhildur; Palsdottir, Auour; Petursdottir, Bjorg

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how the Icelandic public school curriculum for early childhood, compulsory and upper secondary school deals with education for sustainable development. As the curriculum does not often mention the term sustainability, a key with which to investigate signs of education for sustainable development in the three curricula was…

  9. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy.At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD. In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Markets Back to Work”, aiming to mobilize and re-focuse the global economy towards.This is the twin challenge of moving towards a green economy: radically reducing the footprint of developed countries, while simultaneously raising levels of social and material well being in developing countries.Without public intervention, the related market failures (i.e. market prices that do not fully reflect the environmental degradation generated by economic activity may delay or even prevent the development of environmentally-friendly technologies.Furthermore, in sectors such as electricity, network effects arising from existing infrastructures create additional barriers to the adoption of alternative sources of power, further hampering incentives to invest in new technologies.Given that the transition to a green economy requires increasing of investment in economic sectors that contribute to enhancing of natural capital and reduce environmental risks, we intend to analyze the main measures taken by Romania to ensure transition to green economy.

  10. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at all the different levels going from the worker, to the group, to the organization, and also to inter-organizational processes. The possibilities for further research and interventions are also discussed.

  11. The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for Well-Being in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the contribution of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development to well-being in organizations from a primary prevention perspective. It deals with sustainability not only in terms of the ecological, economic, and social environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life of every human being. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is seen as a primary prevention perspective that can foster well-being in organizations at all the different levels going from the worker, to the group, to the organization, and also to inter-organizational processes. The possibilities for further research and interventions are also discussed. PMID:28974935

  12. Developing a Model for Sustainable Hotels in Northern Cyprus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soad Abokhamis Mousavi; Ercan Hoşkara; Kyle M Woosnam

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a sustainable hotel building model (SHBM) that will allow for the measurement of sustainability in determining what conditions are most ideal for hotels in Northern Cyprus...

  13. Sustainable heritage utilization in rural tourism development in Serbia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maksin Marija

    2012-01-01

    Research on natural and cultural heritage as one of the key levers of sustainable tourism development in Serbia has been conducted 2010, for the elaboration of the Master plan for Sustainable Rural...

  14. Sustainable Development in a local perspective (VB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars; Bergendorff, Mads; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project was to gather knowledge about the environmental awareness of people in Paru Yai tambon, Khorat, Thailand. This is done through qualitative interviews and observations of two selected environmental problems - garbage management and electricity consumption in households...... awareness in sustainable development, and the topic is approached with a local planning perspective thus including elements of participation, both in the case study and the proposed strategy.The case study shows that environmental awareness among people in Paru Yai in general is low but it also indicates...... a potential for improvements. It is concluded that the two environmental problems in this project are fundamentally too different to be able to support each other with mutual benefit regarding environmental awareness. Environmental awareness could be appropriate in solving local garbage problems for people...

  15. Human-environment sustainable development of rural areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Hongbing; Hu, Shanfeng

    2017-05-01

    Human-environment sustainable development has become the important issue of rural transformation development in China. This paper analyses the development status of rural sustainability in China, and also presents the challenges facing the sustainability from the economic, social and environmental levels, including land and energy efficiency, solid waste, water and other types of environmental pollution. At last, the paper proposes the measures to establish the sustainable and liveable rural areas in China, like raising rural community awareness of sustainable development thinking; improving resource efficiency and new energy; and creating rural green industries and green products.

  16. EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 1 (ESD1) encodes ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN 6 (AtARP6), a putative component of chromatin remodelling complexes that positively regulates FLC accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Trillo, Mar; Lázaro, Ana; Poethig, R Scott; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Piñeiro, Manuel A; Martinez-Zapater, Jose M; Jarillo, Jose A

    2006-04-01

    We have characterized Arabidopsis esd1 mutations, which cause early flowering independently of photoperiod, moderate increase of hypocotyl length, shortened inflorescence internodes, and altered leaf and flower development. Phenotypic analyses of double mutants with mutations at different loci of the flowering inductive pathways suggest that esd1 abolishes the FLC-mediated late flowering phenotype of plants carrying active alleles of FRI and of mutants of the autonomous pathway. We found that ESD1 is required for the expression of the FLC repressor to levels that inhibit flowering. However, the effect of esd1 in a flc-3 null genetic background and the downregulation of other members of the FLC-like/MAF gene family in esd1 mutants suggest that flowering inhibition mediated by ESD1 occurs through both FLC-and FLC-like gene-dependent pathways. The ESD1 locus was identified through a map-based cloning approach. ESD1 encodes ARP6, a homolog of the actin-related protein family that shares moderate sequence homology with conventional actins. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, we have determined that ARP6 is required for both histone acetylation and methylation of the FLC chromatin in Arabidopsis.

  17. 28 nm CMOS process ESD protection based on diode-triggered silicon controlled rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Dong, Shurong; Jin, Hao; Miao, Meng; Hu, Tao; Guo, Wei; Wong, Hei

    2017-11-01

    The downsizing of CMOS technology into the decananometer range has called for the redesign of the ESD protection devices because of the constraints of lower operation voltage and smaller breakdown voltage of the ultrathin gate oxide. In this work, we had developed a two-dimensional diode-triggered silicon-controlled rectifier (TD-DTSCR) structure to cope with the narrowed ESD design window in the 28 nm CMOS technology. A sufficient large SCR trigger voltage was obtained by directing the triggering current to both longitude and lateral directions, through two parasitic diodes and the P-Well, so as to save the chip area for realization. Optimization was done by varying several device parameters and the best ESD robustness obtained was 53.7 mA/μm which was about 65% larger than that of a simple SCR with the same width of 30 μm and realized using the same technology. Failure analysis was also conducted to identify the possible weak spots of the proposed structure.

  18. Sustainable Development in the EU: Redefining and Operationalizing the Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander R.W. van Hees

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although sustainable development plays an important role in EU law, neither EU law nor EU policy clearly explains what the concept means and how it must be put into practice. Policy-makers, NGOs, politicians and businesses do, however, need guidance on sustainable development for the purpose of good policy-making, for effectively holding the EU accountable, and for the design of CSR programmes. To that end, this article will first explain the guidance which EU law and policy already offer on sustainable development. Subsequently, this article will propose (I a more workable definition of sustainable development than the one (the Brundtland definition which is currently used, and (II a framework of application for sustainable development. This framework of application (which will have the form of a sustainability impact assessment provides practical guidance for policy-makers, politicians, NGOs and businesses when dealing with sustainable development in their day-to-day work.

  19. Developing countries challenges in applying sustainable urban development: An application on Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine El Sakka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable urban development (SUD is influenced by social, cultural, economic and environmental sustainability (ES of developing and developed countries. Our paper will focus on the challenges confront the developing countries in sustainable urban development an application will be on Egypt, which will clarify current situation and future challenge will assess the impact of sustainable development on developing country to propose some possible directions for the future .A new solution of improving sustainability of developing cities (SDC should be found.

  20. Sustainable sludge management in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, B.; Barrios, J.A.; Mendez, J.M.; Diaz, J.

    2003-07-01

    Worldwide, unsanitary conditions are responsible of more than three million deaths annually. One of the reasons is the low level of sanitation in developing countries. Particularly, sludge from these regions has a high parasite concentration and low heavy metal content even though the available information is limited. Different issues needed to achieve a sustainable sludge management in developing nations are analysed. Based on this analysis some conclusions arise: sludge management plays an important role in sanitation programs by helping reduce health problems and associated risks; investments in sanitation should consider sludge management within the overall projects; the main restriction for reusing sludge is the high microbial concentration, which requires a science-based decision of the treatment process, while heavy metals are generally low; the adequate sludge management needs the commitment of those sectors involved in the development and enforcement of the regulations as well as those that are directly related to its generation, treatment, reuse or disposal; current regulations have followed different approaches, based mainly on local conditions, but they favour sludge reuse to fight problems like soil degradation, reduced crop production, and the increased use of inorganic fertilizers. This paper summarises an overview of theses issues. (author)

  1. Sustainable human development: an educational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar AZNAR MÍNGUET

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable Human Development (hereafter SHD is taking shape as a proposal for progress in the face of a crisis in civilization so complex and far-reaching that it is considered quite difficult to solve. The aim of this article is to offer a reasoned justification of the evolution of the concept of development and of the need for an educational commitment to be able to make progress towards it. Although it is still polemical and the object of criticism, SHD has become consolidated as a strongly ethical proposal to lead the change in the course of development, transversally affecting its multiple dimensions and advocating interdisciplinary and intercultural cooperation and dialogue. The article analyses the challenges posed by SHD to today’s global society, as well as some ways to respond to them from the field of educational action and research. It concludes with a reasoned structuring of the contents of the monograph and an analytical description of the contents of the different contributions.

  2. Multi Sensor Approach to Address Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of Earth Science research are many folds: to understand how does this planet operates, can we model her operation and eventually develop the capability to predict such changes. However, the underlying goals of this work are to eventually serve the humanity in providing societal benefits. This requires continuous, and detailed observations from many sources in situ, airborne and space. By and large, the space observations are the way to comprehend the global phenomena across continental boundaries and provide credible boundary conditions for the mesoscale studies. This requires a multiple sensors, look angles and measurements over the same spot in accurately solving many problems that may be related to air quality, multi hazard disasters, public health, hydrology and more. Therefore, there are many ways to address these issues and develop joint implementation, data sharing and operating strategies for the benefit of the world community. This is because for large geographical areas or regions and a diverse population, some sound observations, scientific facts and analytical models must support the decision making. This is crucial for the sustainability of vital resources of the world and at the same time to protect the inhabitants, endangered species and the ecology. Needless to say, there is no single sensor, which can answer all such questions effectively. Due to multi sensor approach, it puts a tremendous burden on any single implementing entity in terms of information, knowledge, budget, technology readiness and computational power. And, more importantly, the health of planet Earth and its ability to sustain life is not governed by a single country, but in reality, is everyone's business on this planet. Therefore, with this notion, it is becoming an impractical problem by any single organization/country to bear this colossal responsibility. So far, each developed country within their means has proceeded along satisfactorily in implementing

  3. Energy Reforms in The Developing World: Sustainable Development Compromised?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Mbogo Abdallah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy sector reforms with an emphasis on electricity growth have been taking place extensively and rapidly worldwide Particularly, motivated chiefly by classical economics’ standpoint of efficiency and market considerations, reforms have been made in the developed North. Models of reforms in the North have in turn been replicated in developing countries. However, questions arise as to whether the models used are suitable for the mostly rural and socioeconomically disadvantaged economies in the South. It is argued in this paper that a sustainability focused mode of reforms guided by futures studies is needed for such economies. Reforms taking place in Kenya and neighbouring countries are in particular examined from a sustainable future perspective; and appropriate improvements and further research are recommended.

  4. Toward Sustainable Communities: Problems And Prerequisites Of Developing Sustainably

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is intended to explain to the community why the PLACES program was developed and how it can meet local and institutional objectives. Our hope is that this application will help develop the PLACES program and foster learning between Germany and the US. The appl...

  5. Public finance management in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tropina Valentyna Borysivna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews specific features of the financial policy of sustainable development, especially its development and implementation. The priority areas of financial policy of Ukraine in the context of the goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development are identified. The attention on the importance of internal resources in the structure of sources of financial support the goals and objectives of sustainable development is accented. The directions of the mobilization and efficient use of public financial resources as a necessary condition for socio-economic development of Ukraine on the principles of sustainable development are suggested.

  6. Natural Resources Accounting and Sustainable Development: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... far cannot be described as sustainable because the various developmental processes have misused or over ... Accounting for sustainability incorporates the equity aspect of the paradigm of eco-justice. This approach firmly ..... Restaurant at Stockholm University. Environmental Management,. Vol.52.

  7. Hospitableness and sustainable development: New responsibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [CC BY 4.0] (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0). Introduction. Within the hospitality industry, as in other industries, attention is given to environmental sustainability. Unfortunately, however, most hospitality companies are lagging behind in the process of becoming more sustainable (van Rheede & Blomme, 2012a).

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-12-28

    Dec 28, 2017 ... conditions that contribute to its sustainable usage. However .... field of social work was proposed because it promotes human well-being, compassion and an understanding of systematic ... environment sits behind social work's goal to help create sustainable environmental conditions for the flourishing.

  9. Developing a Binational Geography Curriculum in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Alex; Araya, Fabian; Cortés, Ximena; Ullestad, Mollie

    2015-01-01

    In a world with an ever-increasing population, diminishing natural resources, and greater levels of consumption, sustainability has emerged as a critical concept and it encompasses everything from international policy to lifestyle changes to "green" technologies. While various aspects of sustainability have been adopted by schools and…

  10. Adaptive Networks: the Governance for Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Nooteboom (Sibout)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this book, I reconstruct how policy makers, working together in what I term adaptive networks, have enabled a breakthrough in thinking about sustainable mobility in certain policy circles. I define the conduct of leading actors in these adaptive networks as sustainable change

  11. Sustainable agriculture: Developing a common understanding for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of sustainability has become central to all sectors all over the world, from agriculture to environment to business, engineering and industrialization. The principle of sustainability is the same all over these sectors. However, the understanding of the term may vary from sector to sector depending on how it may be ...

  12. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  13. An approach to sustainable development in Ekurhuleni : the role of sustainable management tools / Elsabeth Olivier

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, Elsabeth

    2004-01-01

    South Africa is a signatory to the Rio Earth Summit Agenda 21 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development's, Johannesburg Plan of lmplernentation. These documents are the definitive guidelines towards sustainable development. As a local authority within South Africa, Ekurhuleni is therefore obliged to implement these sustainability principles as highlighted in Chapter 28 of Agenda 21, namely Local Agenda 21. Various tools are available to implement the Local Agenda 21 princ...

  14. A territorial understanding of sustainability in public development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peti, Marton, E-mail: mpeti@vati.hu

    2012-01-15

    Sustainability theories in European Union (EU) development policies are facing significant challenges: it is difficult to transmit context-specific, publicly communicable messages; the recent development policies strengthen the concurrent development paradigm of economic growth and competitiveness; 'climate change' became a more popular environmental integration term than sustainability in the last few years. However, due to the recent crises of the economic growth, there is a great chance to reintroduce a sustainability-based development. A territorial/regional understanding of sustainability can also be an answer for the current challenges, a platform for refreshing the concept with relevant, specific messages that are close to the everyday life. This paper summarises the 'territorial system'-based basic principles of territorial sustainability in a model called AUTHARSIIV (AUTonomy, HARmony, Solidarity, Innovation, Identity and Values). This is a supplementary sustainability content specified for the context of spatial/regional development or planning. The paper also examines the presence of 'general and territorial sustainability' in regional development programmes, and case studies on applying the territorial sustainability principles in planning, assessment, and implementation. According to the results, sustainability is rarely adapted to the conditions of a given sector or a region, and the territorial aspect of sustainability is underrepresented even in territorial programmes. Therefore, the paper proposes a new planning and assessment system that is based on a set of regionally legitimate sustainability values.

  15. Inter-American Development Bank Sustainability Review 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2009-01-01

    The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is committed to integrating sustainability within the full spectrum of its operations and to promoting the value of sustainability among its stakeholders. In 2008, to help prioritize and to report on progress adequately, the Bank has defined a framework called the Sustainability Agenda. The Sustainability Agenda is based on six key objectives for the Bank and includes both established commitments and new specific goals, as reported in this and previou...

  16. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Growth: Conceptual Plane or Points on a Conceptual Plain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    ) becoming an empty catch-phrase of contemporary environmentalism, a thorough analysis and discussion of the concept is therefore required. A distinction is made between sustainable growth and sustainable development. In the general debate sustainable growth is often used by politicians and developers...... as synonym for sustainable development. It is argued, however, that this is either a misunderstanding based on a superficial knowledge about the meaning of the sustainability concept or simply that it is cynically used to make the traditional growth philosophy more 'digestible' in an age of increasing...... environmental concern. Except from the concept of industrial ecology, present environmental responses from industry bear little resemblance with a basic systems approach to the concept of sustainability. A systems approach, as in constrast to a reductionist approach, holds promises for paving the way...

  17. Sustainable Development in Engineering Education: A Pedagogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, A.; Zascerinska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering education is facing a challenge of the development of student engineers' social responsibility in the context of sustainable development. The aim of the research is to analyze efficiency of engineering curriculum in the context of sustainable development underpinning elaboration of pedagogical guidelines on the development of students'…

  18. Human Capital Development as a Strategy for Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    This paper critically examined how human capital development could be a strategy or a catalyst for sustainable development in the Nigerian education system. The presentation by necessary implication involved an examination of the concepts of human capital development, sustainable development, quality education and ...

  19. The paradigm of sustainable development: a critical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Poczta-Wajda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainable development is now being used in many areas of the economy. Its implementation, however, has its supporters and constructive opponents. Because most authors have a positive attitude towards sustainable development, the aim of the study is to present critical views regarding this concept. The article is based on The analysis of Polish and English literature. The most important critical opinions formulated against the idea of sustainable development include: contradictory, too general and vague definition of sustainable development; abuse of the concept of sustainable development, which has led to the devaluation of the term; and the lack of effects of the implementation of sustainable development and the ever deepening of the problems it was supposed to solve. In order to break the United Nations deadlock, it is necessary to formulate measurable guidelines and to take concrete actions, which require significant financial resources.

  20. Sustainability Policy and Sustainability in Higher Education Curricula: The Educational Developer Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have investigated the views of higher education staff and students about sustainability, yet educational developer perspectives are under-represented in the research. This project gathered educational developer perspectives about sustainability in the curriculum. It sought to capture their views about a national sustainability…