WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainability task force

  1. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  2. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 1 in support of the objective to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birol, Fatih [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Brew-Hammond, Abeeku (University of Science and Technology (Ghana

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force One which is dedicated to the objective of achieving universal access to modern energy services by 2030. The report shows that universal energy access can be realized by 2030 with strong, focused actions set within a coordinated framework.

  3. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 2 in support of doubling the global rate of energy efficiency improvement and doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix by 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakicenovic, Nebojsa [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Kammen, Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jewell, Jessica [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (Austria)

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force Two which is dedicated energy efficiency and renewable energy objectives. The report shows that doubling the rate of energy efficiency improvements and doubling the share of energy from renewable sources by 2030 is challenging but feasible if sufficient actions are implemented. Strong and well-informed government policies as well as extensive private investment should focus on the high impact areas identified by the task force.

  4. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  5. 18 CFR 701.58 - Task forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Task forces. 701.58... Headquarters Organization § 701.58 Task forces. The Director with Council concurrence or the Council may establish task forces from time to time to aid in the preparation of issues for presentation to the Council...

  6. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Guideline Development About the USPSTF Our Members Conflict of Interest Disclosures Task Force Resources Our ... Announcements Final Research Plan: Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in ...

  7. 76 FR 22685 - Interagency Management Task Force Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Program Manager chairs the Interagency Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force was created by the Federal... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Interagency Management Task Force Public Meeting AGENCY... Interagency Energy Management Task Force (Task Force) in 2011. FEMP intends to hold recurring public meetings...

  8. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  9. ELP Graduates Named to National Task Force

    OpenAIRE

    CHDS Staff

    2010-01-01

    Five graduates of programs at the Center for Homeland Defense and Security were among 35 members of a new Preparedness Task Force announced April 7 by Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

  10. The Multinational Logistics Joint Task Force (MLJTF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higginbotham, Matthew T

    2007-01-01

    In this monograph, by analyzing the UN, NATO and the US Army's evolving Modular Logistics Doctrine, the author integrates the key areas from each doctrine into a multinational logistics joint task force (MLJTF) organization...

  11. Drug and alcohol task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordey, T. [ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Sunstrum, M. [Enform, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Worker absenteeism due to substance abuse costs the Alberta economy approximately $720 million a year. It is estimated that 20 per cent of all drivers in fatal crashes were using alcohol, and the use of cannabis and cocaine in Alberta has more than doubled over the last 15 years. In addition, 1 in 10 Alberta workers have reported using alcohol while at work and 4 per cent have reported using alcohol 4 hours prior to coming to work during the previous 12 months. In an effort to ensure appropriate health and safety for workers in the Canadian petroleum industry, 6 trade associations in the sector have joined together as the Enform Alcohol and Drug Initiative and are now working to develop a common approach to drug and alcohol guidelines and workplace rules. The task group will determine if existing policies and guidelines are sufficient to ensure a safe workplace and will consider standardizing the testing, application and rehabilitation of workers with respect to the use of drugs and alcohol. In the past, disciplinary actions have often been reversed because employers have not been consistent or did not follow established alcohol and drug policies or test to specific standards. Various work rules for inappropriate alcohol and drug use were reviewed, as well as education and communication strategies regarding policy content. Standards for testing criteria were discussed, as well as issues concerning duty-to-accommodate circumstances. An excerpt of concentration standards was presented. It was concluded that a matrix for companies to assess and determine safety sensitive positions is needed. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. Touchscreen Sustained Attention Task (SAT) for Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangasser, Debra A; Wicks, Brittany; Waxler, David E; Eck, Samantha R

    2017-09-15

    Sustained attention is the ability to monitor intermittent and unpredictable events over a prolonged period of time. This attentional process subserves other aspects of cognition and is disrupted in certain neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it is clinically important to identify mechanisms that impair and improve sustained attention. Such mechanisms are often first discovered using rodent models. Therefore, several behavior procedures for testing aspects of sustained attention have been developed for rodents. One, first described by McGaughy and Sarter (1995), called the sustained attention task (SAT), trains rats to distinguish between signal (i.e., brief light presentation) and non-signal trials. The signals are short and thus require careful attention to be perceived. Attentional demands can be increased further by introducing a distractor (e.g., flashing houselight). We have modified this task for touchscreen operant chambers, which are configured with a touchscreen on one wall that can present stimuli and record responses. Here we detail our protocol for SAT in touchscreen chambers. Additionally, we present standard measures of performance in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparable performance on this task in both sexes highlights its use for attention studies, especially as more researchers are including female rodents in their experimental design. Moreover, the easy implementation of SAT for the increasingly popular touchscreen chambers increases its utility.

  13. Community hoarding task forces: a comparative case study of five task forces in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratiotis, Christiana

    2013-05-01

    During the past decade, many community task forces have formed to address hoarding problems that come to public attention. Such task forces provide a societal-level intervention to assist people with the most severe cases of hoarding, who do not voluntarily seek or want help for their hoarding behaviour. This qualitative study of five U.S. hoarding task forces included sites selected for their diversity of purpose, approaches to hoarding intervention and community geography, composition and resources. Data were collected during the period of September 2007-March 2008. The case study methodology used multiple forms of data, including semi-structured interviews, analysis of documents, small group interviews and investigator observation. This study captured the perspectives of public and private sector service providers such as mental health, housing, social service, public health agencies and community enforcement organisations (fire, police, legal, animal control) to examine how task forces organise and operate and the emerging practice and policy changes. Study findings suggest that structural factors (e.g. leadership, purpose, funding and membership) impact hoarding task force viability, that participation on a task force influences practice and policy decisions about hoarding, and that social work can expand its role in task force leadership. Task forces may be a mechanism for improving community policies about hoarding and mechanisms for addressing other social problems across multiple sectors. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. 77 FR 56845 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ...: Matters to be discussed: Tobacco, oral health and cardiovascular disease. Meeting Accessibility: This... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  15. U.S. Transport Task Force 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H.

    2011-09-21

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) Meeting is a venue for vigorous scientific discourse and discussion on topics in transport and turbulence in fusion plasmas. Its participation is international. The 2010 meeting was highly effective, with 139 registered participants and 131 presentations. This is remarkable for an even year (IAEA year) meeting. The meeting clearly fostered progress in understanding and control of turbulent transport.

  16. Joint Task Force Headquarters Master Training Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    e) JCMT . (f) Corporate Services. 1 IPA/IPL (Imagery Product Archives/Imagery Product Library). 2 COLISEUM. 3 DITDBS. 4 MIDB. 5 FTP. 6 5D...JCMOTF Joint Civil-Military Operations Task Force JCMT Joint Collection Management Tools JCN Joint Communications Network JCSAR Joint Combat Search and

  17. DSB Task Force on Cyber Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    2 Overview of the Cyber Supply Chain Landscape .................................................................................... 4...exploitation via this shortcut to achieve the desired effect. OVERVIEW OF THE CYBER SUPPLY CHAIN LANDSCAPE The supply chain for microelectronics parts...system’s implementation and expected behaviors. Additional research could lead to architectures for achieving greater visibility Task Force on Cyber

  18. A Qualitative Force Structure Analysis of the Global Mobility Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Force GSTF Global Strike Task Force HLSTF Homeland Response Task Force HUMRO Humanitarian Relief Operation ISR Intelligence...Task Force (S&C4ISRTF) 3. Global Strike Task Force ( GSTF ) 4. Global Response Task Force (GRTF) 5. Homeland Security Task Force (HLSTF) 6. Global...enable the “ GSTF and GRTF to deploy and employ rapidly anywhere in the world at any time” (DAF, 2002:16). Therefore, the GMTF has three key

  19. Illinois task force on global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, B.S. [Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in the areas of national policy development, emissions reduction, research and education, and adaptation, and to identify specific actions that will be undertaken to implement the Illinois state action plan. The task force has been tracking national and international climate change policy, and helping shape national policy agenda. Identification and implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures has been performed for emissions reduction. In the area of research and education, the task force is developing the capacity to measure climate change indicators, maintaining and enhancing Illinois relevant research, and strengthening climate change education. Activities relevant to adaptation to new policy include strengthening water laws and planning for adaptation. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. ATR Commissioning Software Task Force Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ottavio, Ted [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kewisch, Jorg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Saltmarsh, Chris [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sathe, Smita [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Satogata, Todd [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shea, Don [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trahern, Garry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-16

    The Beam Injection Tests Software Task Force was charged with studying the software needed for the ATR tests, seen as a stepping stone or template for the larger scope of the full RHIC control system. This report outlines our avenues of exploration so far, presents the current analysis and implementation work in progress, and gives recommendations for the future on the ATR and longer time scales.

  1. A Task Force to Address Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Ronald; Budin, Wendy C; Allie, Tammy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying in the workplace can create a dysfunctional environment that is associated with serious physical and psychological harm to the person being bullied. Nurses' experience with bullying has gained considerable attention in recent years, and warrants further discussion. Nurse leaders need to develop and implement effective bullying prevention initiatives that will foster the functioning of a professional and productive staff in a healthy work environment. The aim of this article is to review workplace bullying as experienced by nurses, and describe how nurses at a Magnet-designated academic medical center developed and implemented a bullying task force to address the problem.

  2. Relationship between force fluctuation in the plantar flexor and sustainable time for single-leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, Kazushige; Yano, Sumio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between force fluctuation during isometric plantar flexion and the sustainable time for single-leg standing. Fourteen healthy males (21+/-1 years) performed unilateral (preferred leg) force matching tasks and single-leg quiet standing. Force matching tasks were performed to maintain isometric plantar flexion for 15 s at levels corresponding to 10% and 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with the visual feedback of force. Force fluctuation during force matching tasks was quantified as the standard deviation of force. Sustainable time for single-leg quiet standing was performed to maintain a single-leg quiet standing barefoot on a platform using the preferred leg with their eyes closed. Force fluctuation was significantly greater in 20% MVC task compared to 10% MVC task. The sustainable time for single-leg quiet standing was strongly correlated with force fluctuation in 20% MVC task (r=-0.56, p=0.04). However, it was not related to force fluctuation in 10% MVC task (r=0.19, p=0.52) or MVC value (r=0.13, p=0.65). These results suggest that a specificity of contraction intensity is observed between force steadiness and the posture stability during single-leg quiet standing; force steadiness during 20% MVC plantar flexion is one of the important components for posture stability during single-leg quiet standing.

  3. 76 FR 5232 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, December 8, 2010... meeting minutes for the third meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force. Chairman...

  4. 75 FR 77934 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, November 10, 2010... meeting minutes for the second meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force. Chairman...

  5. 75 FR 70764 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, October 13, 2010... meeting minutes for the first meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force. Chairman...

  6. 76 FR 11307 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, January 12, 2011... meeting minutes for the third meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force. Chairman, Mr...

  7. 75 FR 32186 - Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Task Force on Community Preventive Services Name: Task Force on Community Preventive Services meeting. Times and Dates: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. EST, June...: The mission of the Task Force is to develop and publish the Guide to Community Preventive Services...

  8. The GAVI Financing Task Force: one model of partner collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstien, Julie B; Kamara, Lidija; Lydon, Patrick; Mitchell, Violaine; Landry, Steve

    2008-12-02

    The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, now called the GAVI Alliance, was launched in 2000 as a coalition of partners, including countries, international organizations, bilateral donors, the vaccine production industry, and nongovernmental organizations; most activities were to be implemented through these partner organizations. Four task forces were established at the outset to define issues relevant to GAVI Alliance goals and to recommend actions. This paper describes the innovations and outputs of the Financing Task Force (FTF), which worked in three areas: country support to sustainably finance vaccines and immunization programs in the context of introducing new vaccines; vaccine supply and demand issues as they impact vaccine choice, production costs and price/dose; innovative financing mechanisms for vaccines and immunization programs through, for example, capital markets. This analysis particularly focuses on the FTF's work on financial sustainability. Through its partnership, the FIF was able to leverage organizational change in its participating organizations, in the countries supported by the GAVI Alliance, and in the policies of GAVI itself. These achievements, along with areas where the desired outcome was not achieved, are summarized with lessons that may be useful to other multi-partner health alliances.

  9. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  10. In vacuum undulator task force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Stefan, P. [and others

    1998-06-01

    Historically the NSLS has been active in R&D for state-of-the-art electron beams, photon beams and x-ray optics. One of the available straight sections has therefore been dedicated to insertion device R&D. Over the past five to seven years a program aimed at exploiting the very small vertical {beta} function in the straight sections has yielded first a prototype small gap undulator (PSGU) and then an in-vacuum undulator (IVUN). The IVUN sources attain a brightness similar to the existing hybrid wigglers in X21 and X25. They radiate significantly lower total power than the wigglers but produce higher power densities. They provide undulator rather than wiggler spectra. Because of the small gaps and small periods there is not much tunability in these devices and they will have to be purpose-built for a specific scientific program. The original IVUN parameters were chosen for in-elastic x-ray scattering, similar to the scientific program on X21. This put the fundamental at 4.6 keV and the third harmonic at 13.8 keV. The question that this new possible insertion device poses is what science programs can best take advantage of this new insertion device source? To answer this, a task force was formed by M. Hart, NSLS Department Chair and charged with identifying viable scientific programs that could seek outside funding to construct IVUN beamlines. The task force concentrated on experimental programs that are presently being pursued on new insertion devices worldwide. For example, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, which takes advantage of the large coherent flux from undulator sources, was considered. However, this program was not considered as the highest priority. The general area of protein crystallography, however, is ideal for the IVUN source. The unique electron beam optics that makes the IVUN possible in the first place also makes the IVUN ideal as a source for microdiffraction.

  11. 'System-Risk' Flood Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Kai; Ridder, Nina; Tavares da Costa, Ricardo; Diederen, Dirk; Viglione, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Current scientific methods and engineering practice in flood risk assessment do not consider the full complexity of flood risk systems. Fundamental spatio-temporal dependencies, interactions and feedbacks need to be addressed to comprehensively quantify the effects of measures at various levels, ranging from local technical to high-level policy options. As each flood is unique, each event offers an unparalleled opportunity to collect data and to gain insights into system's behavior under extreme conditions potentially revealing exceptional circumstances, unexpected failures and cascading effects, and thus a chance to learn and to improve methods and models. To make use of this the Marie-Skłodowska-Curie European Training Network 'System-Risk' (www.system-risk.eu) establishes a Flood Task Force (FTF) that aims to learn about successful practical approaches, but also potential pitfalls and failures in the management of real flood events. The FTF consists of an interdisciplinary group of researchers who will apply in situ their latest methods and knowledge of e.g. how the event developed, how the risk management responded, and what the consequences were. This multi-layered perspective is intended to deepen the understanding of the complexity of flood risk systems as for instance in terms of interactions between hazard, the natural and the built environment, societal institutions and coping capacities. This contribution gives an overview of the conceptual approach to the System-Risk FTF.

  12. Multifunctional Battalion Task Force Training: Slovenian Armed Forces Battalion Training Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL BATTALION TASK FORCE TRAINING: SLOVENIAN ARMED FORCES BATTALION TRAINING CYCLE A thesis presented to...AND SCIENCE General Studies by ALES AVSEC, MAJOR, SLOVENIAN ARMED FORCES Bachelors , University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2002...Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2015 – JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Battalion Task Force Training: Slovenian Armed

  13. Grip force and force sharing in two different manipulation tasks with bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepriá-Bernal, Javier; Pérez-González, Antonio; Mora, Marta C; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L

    2017-07-01

    Grip force and force sharing during two activities of daily living were analysed experimentally in 10 right-handed subjects. Four different bottles, filled to two different levels, were manipulated for two tasks: transporting and pouring. Each test subject's hand was instrumented with eight thin wearable force sensors. The grip force and force sharing were significantly different for each bottle model. Increasing the filling level resulted in an increase in grip force, but the ratio of grip force to load force was higher for lighter loads. The task influenced the force sharing but not the mean grip force. The contributions of the thumb and ring finger were higher in the pouring task, whereas the contributions of the palm and the index finger were higher in the transport task. Mean force sharing among fingers was 30% for index, 29% for middle, 22% for ring and 19% for little finger. Practitioner Summary: We analysed grip force and force sharing in two manipulation tasks with bottles: transporting and pouring. The objective was to understand the effects of the bottle features, filling level and task on the contribution of different areas of the hand to the grip force. Force sharing was different for each task and the bottles features affected to both grip force and force sharing.

  14. Task Force on Aboriginal Peoples in Federal Corrections. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of the Solicitor General, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Canadian Task Force on the Reintegration of Aboriginal Offenders as Law-Abiding Citizens. This task force was established in March 1987 by the Canadian federal government to examine and recommend changes for improving services to help incarcerated Aboriginals achieve successful social…

  15. 75 FR 4402 - Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Task Force on Community Preventive Services Name: Task Force on Community Preventive Services meeting. Times and Dates: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. EST... Preventive Services (Community Guide), which is based on the best available scientific evidence and current...

  16. Task force for integral test of High Energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    According to completion of the JENDL-High Energy file for neutron nuclear cross sections up to 50 MeV, a task force for integral test of high energy nuclear data was organized to discuss a guide line for integral test activities. A status of existing differential and integral experiments and how to perform such a test were discussed in the task force. Here the purpose and outline of the task force is explained with some future problems raised in discussion among the task member. (author)

  17. Urban search and rescue medical teams: FEMA Task Force System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, J A; Lozano, M

    1993-01-01

    Recent national and international disasters involving collapsed structures and trapped casualties (Mexico City; Armenia; Iran; Philippines; Charleston, South Carolina; Loma Prieta, California; and others) have provoked a heightened national concern for the development of an adequate capability to respond quickly and effectively to this type of calamity. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has responded to this need by developing an Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Response System, a national system of multi-disciplinary task forces for rapid deployment to the site of a collapsed structure incident. Each 56-person task force includes a medical team capable of providing advanced emergency medical care both for task force members and for victims located and reached by the sophisticated search, rescue, and technical components of the task force. This paper reviews the background and development of urban search and rescue, and describes the make-up and function of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Task Force medical teams.

  18. Can NATO's new Very High Readiness Joint Task Force deter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rynning, Sten; Ringsmose, Jens

    2017-01-01

    ” a distinct strategic rival – Russia. Chief among the Welsh summit initiatives was the decision to set up a new multinational spearhead force – the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) – as part of an enhanced NATO Response Force (NRF) and within the framework of a so-called Readiness Action Plan (RAP...

  19. Task Force Report 4. Report of the Task Force on Marketing and Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John C.; Evans, Kenneth L.; Carter, Jan; Burke, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND To ensure the success of the proposed New Model of family medicine and to create a better understanding of the nature and role of family medicine, an effective communications plan must be developed and implemented. This Future of Family Medicine task force report proposes strategies for communicating the role of family physicians within medicine, as well as to purchasers, consumers, and other entities. METHODS After reviewing the findings from the research conducted for the Future of Family Medicine project, the task force presents a preliminary brand-positioning strategy for family medicine messages. Based on this strategy, the task force identifies 5 major audiences to which family medicine communications should be directed. A consistent method was used to determine optimum strategies to address each audience: defining the audience, assessing the literature and other pertinent evidence, identifying the communication objectives, determining the key messages, developing brand promises, and proposing strategies and tactics to support the messages and objectives. Preliminary communications plans are then presented for each of the 5 target audiences. MAJOR FINDINGS It is important that the organizations involved in family medicine make a multiyear commitment of resources to implement and support an aggressive communications strategy, which is based on key messages to target audiences. A concerted effort is particularly needed to address the declining interest among medical students in the specialty. Implementing a comprehensive family medicine career development program may be one effective strategy to reverse this trend. To help eliminate the current confusion among the public regarding family medicine and to promote clarity and consistency in terminology, the specialty should replace the name family practice with family medicine and a new graphic symbol for the discipline of family medicine should be developed. CONCLUSION As a discipline, family medicine

  20. Final Report of the Open Source Software Licence Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Fluckiger, François

    2012-01-01

    Following a proposal by the author of this report, the Heads of FP Department and IT Department, recognizing that the situation regarding Open Source Software licensing at CERN needed clarification, created the Open Source Licence Task Force (OSL Task Force) to formulate recommendations on which licence should be used for software developed at CERN. This document is the Main Volume of the final report of the OSL Task Force. It contains eight recommendations with their rationale. It is complemented by a separate Volume of Annexes and two operational notes (Instructions for Specifying the licence terms and Form to document OSL cases).

  1. Force-field compensation in a manual tracking task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Squeri

    Full Text Available This study addresses force/movement control in a dynamic "hybrid" task: the master sub-task is continuous manual tracking of a target moving along an eight-shaped Lissajous figure, with the tracking error as the primary performance index; the slave sub-task is compensation of a disturbing curl viscous field, compatibly with the primary performance index. The two sub-tasks are correlated because the lateral force the subject must exert on the eight-shape must be proportional to the longitudinal movement speed in order to perform a good tracking. The results confirm that visuo-manual tracking is characterized by an intermittent control mechanism, in agreement with previous work; the novel finding is that the overall control patterns are not altered by the presence of a large deviating force field, if compared with the undisturbed condition. It is also found that the control of interaction-forces is achieved by a combination of arm stiffness properties and direct force control, as suggested by the systematic lateral deviation of the trajectories from the nominal path and the comparison between perturbed trials and catch trials. The coordination of the two sub-tasks is quickly learnt after the activation of the deviating force field and is achieved by a combination of force and the stiffness components (about 80% vs. 20%, which is a function of the implicit accuracy of the tracking task.

  2. 77 FR 74341 - Establishing the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... achieving rebuilding success, consistent with the NDRF's commitment to support economic vitality, enhance... by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (Chair). (a) In addition to the Chair, the Task... Department of Housing and Urban Development shall provide the Task Force with such administrative services...

  3. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  4. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  5. Lesion Neuroanatomy of the Sustained Attention to Response Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Gillebert, Celine R.; Schoofs, Hanne; Dupont, Patrick; Peeters, Ronald; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2009-01-01

    The Sustained Attention to Response task is a classical neuropsychological test that has been used by many centres to characterize the attentional deficits in traumatic brain injury, ADHD, autism and other disorders. During the SART a random series of digits 1-9 is presented repeatedly and subjects have to respond to each digit (go trial) except…

  6. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Experimentally muscle pain induces changes in the distribution of muscle activity and affects the muscle coordination. The force steadiness is impaired during muscle pain in the task-related force direction as well as in the tangential directions. In addition, pain lead to a mismatch between the ...

  7. First interim report of the Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force was created by Executive Order 12844, signed by President Clinton on April 21, 1993. In the Order, the President directed that purchases of alternative fueled vehicles by the Federal Government be substantially increased beyond the levels required by current law. The President charged the Task Force with developing recommendations for carrying out the Executive Order, with special emphasis on setting a course that will lead to the widespread use of alternative fueled vehicles by Federal, State, and local government fleets, by private fleets and, ultimately, by individuals. The chief recommendation of the Task Force is the establishment of a Presidential Clean Cities Initiative. To support creation of the Presidential Initiative, the Task Force identified 38 cities and regions, prioritized into three tiers, for concentrating the Initiative`s efforts in Fiscal Years 1994 through 1996. This concentration of effort is key to the effectiveness of the Initiative. The 38 cities and regions would receive priority funding for Federal vehicle purchases and for infrastructure development. In addition, the Task Force has made specific recommendations for overcoming numerous regulatory, economic, and technical barriers that have slowed the introduction of alternative fueled vehicles into general use.

  8. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 4: Matching personnel to activities

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Our series on the work of the Task Forces moves on to Human Ressources at CERN. Staff mobility and topics related to contract policy were the main personnel issues to be considered by Task Force 4, led by John Ferguson, head of AS Division. The aim, as with the other Task Forces, was to find ways to focus resources on the LHC, and once again the recommendations recognise the opportunity to make constructive changes, in this case in Human Resources policy at CERN. Movement of staff between divisions at CERN has generally not been easy, with 'staff complements' (total numbers) set for each sector (research, accelerator, technical and administration). However, the restructuring of the accelerator sector (proposed by Task Force 5 and already agreed in principle) should allow some staff to move to LHC activities. More generally, Task Force 4 recommends that the Laboratory carries out a review of all activities, at a relatively detailed level, so as to identify the resources required to achieve specific goals (t...

  9. Cortical and Spinal Mechanisms of Task Failure of Sustained Submaximal Fatiguing Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Petra S.; Hoffman, Richard L.; Clark, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    In this and the subsequent companion paper, results are presented that collectively seek to delineate the contribution that supraspinal circuits have in determining the time to task failure (TTF) of sustained submaximal contractions. The purpose of this study was to compare adjustments in supraspinal and spinal excitability taken concurrently throughout the performance of two different fatigue tasks with identical mechanical demands but different TTF (i.e., force-matching and position-matching tasks). On separate visits, ten healthy volunteers performed the force-matching or position-matching task at 15% of maximum strength with the elbow flexors to task failure. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), paired-pulse TMS, paired cortico-cervicomedullary stimulation, and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were delivered in a 6-stimuli sequence at baseline and every 2–3 minutes throughout fatigue-task performance. Contrary to expectations, the force-matching task TTF was 42% shorter (17.5±7.9 min) than the position-matching task (26.9±15.11 min; pmuscle fatigue (p = 0.59). There were no task-specific differences for the total amount or rate of change in the neurophysiologic outcome variables over time (p>0.05). Therefore, failure occurred after a similar mean decline in motorneuron excitability developed (p0.10) and an index of upstream excitation of the motor cortex remained constant (p>0.40). Together, these results suggest that as fatigue develops prior to task failure, the increase in corticospinal excitability observed in relationship to the decrease in spinal excitability results from a combination of decreasing intracortical inhibition with constant levels of intracortical facilitation and upstream excitability that together eventually fail to provide the input to the motor cortex necessary for descending drive to overcome the spinal cord resistance, thereby contributing to task failure. PMID:24667484

  10. Cortical and spinal mechanisms of task failure of sustained submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra S Williams

    Full Text Available In this and the subsequent companion paper, results are presented that collectively seek to delineate the contribution that supraspinal circuits have in determining the time to task failure (TTF of sustained submaximal contractions. The purpose of this study was to compare adjustments in supraspinal and spinal excitability taken concurrently throughout the performance of two different fatigue tasks with identical mechanical demands but different TTF (i.e., force-matching and position-matching tasks. On separate visits, ten healthy volunteers performed the force-matching or position-matching task at 15% of maximum strength with the elbow flexors to task failure. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, paired-pulse TMS, paired cortico-cervicomedullary stimulation, and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were delivered in a 6-stimuli sequence at baseline and every 2-3 minutes throughout fatigue-task performance. Contrary to expectations, the force-matching task TTF was 42% shorter (17.5 ± 7.9 min than the position-matching task (26.9 ± 15.11 min; p0.05. Therefore, failure occurred after a similar mean decline in motorneuron excitability developed (p0.10 and an index of upstream excitation of the motor cortex remained constant (p>0.40. Together, these results suggest that as fatigue develops prior to task failure, the increase in corticospinal excitability observed in relationship to the decrease in spinal excitability results from a combination of decreasing intracortical inhibition with constant levels of intracortical facilitation and upstream excitability that together eventually fail to provide the input to the motor cortex necessary for descending drive to overcome the spinal cord resistance, thereby contributing to task failure.

  11. Bilateral movements increase sustained extensor force in the paretic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2018-04-01

    Muscle weakness in the extensors poststroke is a common motor impairment. Unfortunately, research is unclear on whether bilateral movements increase extensor force production in the paretic arm. This study investigated sustained force production while stroke individuals maximally extended their wrist and fingers on their paretic arm. Specifically, we determined isometric force production in three conditions: (a) unilateral paretic arm, (b) unilateral nonparetic arm, and (c) bilateral (both arms executing the same movement simultaneously). Seventeen chronic stroke patients produced isometric sustained force by executing wrist and fingers extension in unilateral and bilateral contraction conditions. Mean force, force variability (coefficient of variation), and signal-to-noise ratio were calculated for each contraction condition. Analysis of two-way (Arm × Type of Condition: 2 × 2; Paretic or Nonparetic Arm × Unilateral or Bilateral Conditions) within-subjects ANOVAs revealed that the bilateral condition increased sustained force in the paretic arm, but reduced sustained force in the nonparetic arm. Further, although the paretic arm exhibited more force variability and less signal-to-noise ratio than the nonparetic arm during a unilateral condition, there were no differences when participants simultaneously executed isometric contractions with both arms. Our unique findings indicate that bilateral contractions transiently increased extensor force in the paretic arm. Implications for Rehabilitation Bilateral movements increased isometric wrsit extensor force in paretic arms and redcued force in nonparetic arms versus unilateral movements. Both paretic and nonparetic arms produced similar force variability and signal-to-noise ratio during bilateral movements. Increased sustained force in the paretic arm during the bilateral condition indicates that rehabilitation protocols based on bilateral movements may be beneficial for functional recovery.

  12. Finanzierung von Medizinbibliotheken: Abschlussbericht der AGMB Task Force / Financing of medical libraries: final report of the AGMB task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein, Diana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available On behalf of the management board of the AGMB in 2003-2005 the AGMB task force on financing of medical libraries dealt with several questions relating to the present legal situation of hospital libraries. The following report summarises the activities of the task force. Furthermore it outlines the legal position of hospital libraries in Germany. Finally it specifies to which extent the new legal requirements concerning continuing education of medical specialists can be used to strengthen the position of hospital libraries.

  13. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard J; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of ultras...

  14. Update on the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials...

  15. Final Report of the ATLAS Reconstruction Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Boisvert, V; George, S; Polesello, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rousseau, D

    2003-01-01

    The reconstruction task force has been charged with performing a top-down design iteration on the ATLAS reconstruction software, considering in particular the granularity of algorithms and event data model, and requirements coming from both offine and high level trigger. One important aim is to find where possible common solutions to common problems across LVL2, EF and offine reconstruction.

  16. The Fernald Citizens Task Force: Shifting the focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegner, G.D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Applegate, J.S. [Cincinnati Univ. (United States); Hoopes, J. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sarno, D. [Phoenix Environmental, Inc. (United States)

    1995-11-30

    In August 1995, the Fernald Citizens Task Force provided the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Ohio EPA (OEPA), and FERMCO with cost-effective, iplementable recommendations for addressing Fernald`s most pressing issues. Fernald is now proceeding with an accelerated cleanup plan to make these recommendations reality. With its initial work plan complete, the Task Force confronted a new challenge: How to shift its focus from developing recommendations designed to influence Fernald`s Records of Decision to advising project managers during remedial design and remedial action. This paper reports on the experiences of the Task Force, the DOE, Fernald regulators, and FERMCO as the Task Force made this shift. In the process, the parties encountered issues involving work plan development, membership, organization, and support resource allocation. Lessons learned as these issues were resolved are summarized. The Fernald experience supports the conclusion that ``hands-on`` citizen involvement in government decision- making at a major environmental remediation site can effectively transition from one area of focus to another.

  17. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  18. Consumer Information. NASFAA Task Force Report. Consumer Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of Student Financial Aid and Administrators (NASFAA) Consumer Information Task Force was convened to conduct a thorough review of the current student consumer information requirements and propose ways to streamline both the content and delivery of those requirements. The proposals in the this report were produced for…

  19. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... addressing 1990-1991 Gulf War Veterans' illnesses. The GWVI-TF published its first annual report in September... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the Gulf War Veterans...

  20. Task force on compliance and enforcement. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Recommendations for measures to strengthen the FEA enforcement program in the area of petroleum price regulation are presented. Results of task force efforts are presented in report and recommendations sections concerned with pending cases, compliance program organization, enforcement powers, compliance strategy, and audit staffing and techniques. (JRD)

  1. Building the Guatemalan Interagency Task Force Tecun Uman: Lessons Identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Support Team MOB main operating base xx Building the Guatemalan Interagency Task Force Tecún Umán MOD Ministry of Defense (Guatemalan) MoDA Ministry...Advisors ( MoDA ) program.1 1 This program partners the U.S. Department of Defense civilian experts with foreign counterparts to build ministerial core

  2. Task Force on Ethics, The University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Univ., Edmonton. The Senate.

    The opinions of students, faculty, and professional associations concerning the role of the University of Alberta in the development of ethical standards were examined by a Senate Task Force on Ethics. One objective was to raise awareness about ethical issues related to teaching, research, community service, and other activities. Reasons for a…

  3. The OMERACT ultrasound task force -- Advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Conaghan, Philip G; Naredo, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the OMERACT Ultrasound Task Force (post OMERACT 8) and highlights of future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 9 meeting, Kananaskis, Canada, May 2008. Results of 3 studies were presented: (1) assessing intermachine reliability; (2) applying ...... standard clinical variables. Future disease areas of importance to develop include a scoring system for enthesitis and osteoarthritis....

  4. Effects of electromagnetic forcing on self-sustained jet oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalter, R.; Tummers, M.J.; Kenjeres, S.; Righolt, B.W.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of electromagnetic forcing on self-sustained oscillations of a jet issuing from a submerged nozzle into a thin vertical cavity (width W much larger than thickness T) has been studied using particle image velocimetry. A permanent Lorentz force is produced by applying an electrical

  5. Space station operations task force. Panel 4 report: Management integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Management Integration Panel of the Space Station Operations Task Force was chartered to provide a structure and ground rules for integrating the efforts of the other three panels and to address a number of cross cutting issues that affect all areas of space station operations. Issues addressed include operations concept implementation, alternatives development and integration process, strategic policy issues and options, and program management emphasis areas.

  6. Finger force sharing during an adapted power grip task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Rossi, Jérémy; Foissac, Matthieu; Grélot, Laurent; Berton, Eric

    2011-10-31

    This study analyses the finger force sharing using power grip task with adapted experimental conditions. This paradigm limits as much as possible the external constraints when the Index (I), Middle (M), Ring (R) and Little (L) fingers act simultaneously: the thumb did not oppose the other fingers and no secondary moments were applied to the wrist. The motor control of these two parameters was limited in contrary to the previous paradigms of the literature. The results showed that the force sharing, the force deficit and the location of the neutral line were different in this condition compared to a classical finger pressing task. We suggest that the observed behaviour was due to the peripheral architecture (muscle bellies, multi-digit motor units) more than the control of the constraints of the tasks. We propose to use this paradigm in further fundamental studies and also during clinical programmes to evaluate the rehabilitation of peripheral architecture characteristics and also finger control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Overview of the NOAA Drought Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S.; Mo, K.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Wood, A.

    2012-01-01

    The charge of the NOAA Drought Task Force is to coordinate and facilitate the various MAPP-funded research efforts with the overall goal of achieving significant advances in understanding and in the ability to monitor and predict drought over North America. In order to achieve this, the task force has developed a Drought Test-bed that individual research groups can use to test/evaluate methods and ideas. Central to this is a focus on three high profile North American droughts (1998-2004 western US drought, 2006-2007 SE US drought, 2011- current Tex-Mex drought) to facilitate collaboration among projects, including the development of metrics to assess the quality of monitoring and prediction products, and the development of an experimental drought monitoring and prediction system that incorporates and assesses recent advances. This talk will review the progress and plans of the task force, including efforts to help advance official national drought products, and the development of early warning systems by the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Coordination with other relevant national and international efforts such as the emerging NMME capabilities and the international effort to develop a Global Drought Information System (GDIS) will be discussed.

  8. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 5 : Restructuring the accelerator sector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The last of our series on the Task Forces. PS accelerator 'We had a clear mandate, which we could approach in a logical way', explains Steve Myers, Head of SL Division and convenor of Task Force 5, 'To avoid duplication of effort in the accelerator sector through a restructuring that would lead to greater efficiency and flexibility and so release resources for the LHC.' The implementation of all their recommendations is already underway, albeit with different time scales. In 2001 the accelerator sector involved more than 900 staff members in three divisions (LHC, PS and SL) and one unit (AC), working in 141 sections within 34 groups. The first step for the Task Force was to identify major activities within the sector and to set up inter-divisional working groups to review these activities (16 in all), identifying the technologies and the numbers of staff associated with each activity. The working groups were also asked to propose ways of grouping the activities into a new more efficient organizational stru...

  9. Modelling vertical human walking forces using self-sustained oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash; Kumar, Anil; Racic, Vitomir; Erlicher, Silvano

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a model of a self-sustained oscillator which can generate reliably the vertical contact force between the feet of a healthy pedestrian and the supporting flat rigid surface. The model is motivated by the self-sustained nature of the walking process, i.e. a pedestrian generates the required inner energy to sustain its repetitive body motion. The derived model is a fusion of the well-known Rayleigh, Van der Pol and Duffing oscillators. Some additional nonlinear terms are added to produce both the odd and even harmonics observed in the experimentally measured force data. The model parameters were derived from force records due to twelve pedestrians walking on an instrumented treadmill at ten speeds using a linear least square technique. The stability analysis was performed using the energy balance method and perturbation method. The results obtained from the model show a good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. AGU's new task force on scientific ethics and integrity begins work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, Peter; Townsend, Randy

    2011-11-01

    In support of the new strategic plan, AGU has established a new task force to review, evaluate, and update the Union's policies on scientific misconduct and the process for investigating and responding to allegations of possible misconduct by AGU members. As noted by AGU president Michael McPhaden, "AGU can only realize its vision of `collaboratively advancing and communicating science and its power to ensure a sustainable future' if we have the trust of the public and policy makers. That trust is earned by maintaining the highest standards of scientific integrity in all that we do. The work of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics is essential for defining norms of professional conduct that all our members can aspire to and that demonstrate AGU's unwavering commitment to excellence in Earth and space science."

  11. Sandia-Power Surety Task Force Hawaii foam analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-11-01

    The Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Power Surety Task Force was officially created in early 2008, after nearly two years of work in demand reduction and renewable energy technologies to support the Warfighter in Theater. The OSD Power Surety Task Force is tasked with identifying efficient energy solutions that support mission requirements. Spray foam insulation demonstrations were recently expanded beyond field structures to include military housing at Ft. Belvoir. Initial results to using the foam in both applications are favorable. This project will address the remaining key questions: (1) Can this technology help to reduce utility costs for the Installation Commander? (2) Is the foam cost effective? (3) What application differences in housing affect those key metrics? The critical need for energy solutions in Hawaii and the existing relationships among Sandia, the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Forest City, make this location a logical choice for a foam demonstration. This project includes application and analysis of foam to a residential duplex at the Waikulu military community on Oahu, Hawaii, as well as reference to spray foam applied to a PACOM facility and additional foamed units on Maui, conducted during this project phase. This report concludes the analysis and describes the utilization of foam insulation at military housing in Hawaii and the subsequent data gathering and analysis.

  12. 77 FR 1548 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSBs). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  13. 76 FR 56863 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and...'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal...

  14. 78 FR 7849 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ...-disabled veterans (SDVOSB's). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and regulatory... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  15. 76 FR 21090 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ...-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and regulatory... applicable to the ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the...

  16. 75 FR 75187 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and...'' of the Task Force and e-mailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record; verbal...

  17. 75 FR 62611 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... to the ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the...

  18. 77 FR 22056 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ...-disabled veterans (SDVOSBs). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and regulatory... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  19. 77 FR 71471 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... veterans (VOB's) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate... ``six focus areas'' of the Task Force and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public...

  20. 76 FR 8393 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... service-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and... areas'' of the Task Force and e-mailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record; verbal...

  1. Defense Science Board Task Force Report: Predicting Violent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Boeing • Coca Cola • Disney • Intel Corporation D E F E N S E S C I E N C E B O A R D | D E P A R T M E N T O F D E F E N S E DSB TASK FORCE...University of North Carolina Corporations:  Microsoft  Coca Cola  Boeing  Disney D E F E N S E S C I E N C E B O A R D | D E P A R T M E

  2. Final Report: ATLAS Phase-2 Tracker Upgrade Layout Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Hessey, N; Mättig, P; Styles, N; Wells, P; Burdin, S; Cornelissen, T; Todorov, T; Vankov, P; Watson, I; Wenig, S

    2012-01-01

    he mandate of the Upgrade Layout Task Force was to develop a benchmark layout proposal for the ATLAS Phase-2 Upgrade Letter of Intent (LOI), due in late 2012. The work described in this note has evolved from simulation and design studies made using an earlier "UTOPIA" upgrade tracker layout, and experience gained from the current ATLAS Inner Detector during the first years of data taking. The layout described in this document, called the LoI-layout, will be used as a benchmark layout for the LoI and will be used for simulation and engineering studies described in the LoI.

  3. Sustained Forced Sale Value Opinion Advice in Nigerian Valuation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    Sustained Forced Sale Value Opinion Advice in Nigerian. Valuation Practice: The Recurring Face of a Bad Coin. Terzungwe Timothy Dugeri. Department of Estate Management, Kaduna State Univeristy. Abstract. This study, the first in a series testing for standardisation of practice among professional Valuers, explores the ...

  4. 76 FR 4115 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Preventive Services AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task Force... Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). DATES: The meeting will be held on Wednesday...

  5. 75 FR 63846 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Preventive Services AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task Force... compiled in the Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). DATES: The meeting will be held...

  6. 76 FR 55394 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Preventive Services AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force--an... Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday...

  7. 78 FR 57161 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services...) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force is... Services (HHS) to identify community preventive programs, services, and policies that increase healthy...

  8. 76 FR 30722 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... Preventive Services AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task Force... Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). DATES: The meeting will be held on Wednesday...

  9. EEI Task Force sights set on building plants better, cheaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Sums budgeted for construction by investor-owned electric utilities nearly quadrupled over the past 10 years, and they are expected to triple again over the next 10 years. The calculations were made by Edison Electric Institute, and they show construction spending going from $4 billion in 1965 to $46 billion in 1985. The industry is faced with an array of uncertainties. Construction planning is faced with rules and regulations and challenges and accusations that delay schedules, and uncertainties of national and international politics. To deal with these and other challenges on an industry-wide basis, a Construction Task Force was established within EEI's Engineering and Operating Division. Its aim: to survey the broad approaches taken by the industry in managing such major components of construction as scheduling, costs, and productivity, in an attempt to come up with suggestions that could reduce the amount of time and money required to bring new plants on-stream. The Task Force is composed of a small number (presently, 9 members) of industry construction executives or managers, representing different geographic regions of the country. (MCW)

  10. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 2: reshaping for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Second in our series reviewing the Task Forces reports. How to lay the foundations for a more efficient organisational structure. Our present organization is based on sixteen Divisions and units under the Directorate. CERN's organization is based on a Directorate and sixteen Divisions and units, while its activities are broadly divided into four Sectors: Research, Accelerators, Technical and Administration. The mandate of Task Force 2, led by Horst Wenninger, was to identify if a structural change and a reduction of duplicated efforts could result in an increased efficiency at CERN, especially as the Laboratory continues to focus its resources on the LHC. 'This is the most difficult project ever undertaken at CERN', acknowledges Wenninger, 'a double accelerator at a temperature of 1.9 K'. For the next five years the success of the LHC must be the main priority, and CERN will have to adapt the procedures of how it works. Wenninger sees the process as an opportunity for the Laboratory to move into the 21st c...

  11. Contribution of the cerebellum to the coupling of grip force and pull force during an isometric precision grip task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Tobias; Schmid, Barbara C; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P; Kutz, Dieter F

    2012-03-01

    This study addresses the influence of the cerebellum on the performance of an isometric precision grip task. For the task, in which the process of "picking a raspberry" is simulated, grip force and pull force had to be increased linearly for a duration of 1-5 s (pull phase) to accomplish the task skillfully. The performance of 11 patients suffering from degenerative cerebellar disease was analyzed and compared with the performance of 11 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Patients with cerebellar disease showed systematic deviations of the pull force slope from a linear trend, dividing the pull phase into two intervals. After an initial sharp and brief increase of pull force (first interval), patients maintained the achieved pull force level almost constant without further increase (second interval). Although controls showed changes in the pull force slope also, they increased pull force during the whole pull phase. Coupling of grip force and pull force was analyzed using stochastic frontier analysis. This technique allows covariation of grip force and the resulting pull force to be analyzed depending on the variation of the grip force. In the patients, grip force and pull force were coupled efficiently only in the first interval. During the second interval, grip force was often exaggerated compared with pull force. In conclusion, patients with cerebellar diseases have difficulties in producing smooth isometric movements and in coupling grip force and pull force efficiently.

  12. The OMERACT ultrasound task force -- Advances and priorities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2009-08-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the OMERACT Ultrasound Task Force (post OMERACT 8) and highlights of future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 9 meeting, Kananaskis, Canada, May 2008. Results of 3 studies were presented: (1) assessing intermachine reliability; (2) applying the scoring system developed in the hand to other joints most commonly affected in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and (3) assessing interobserver reliability on a deep target joint (shoulder). Results demonstrated good intermachine reliability between multiple examiners, and good applicability of the scoring system for the hand on other joints (including shoulder). Study conclusions were discussed and a future research agenda was generated, notably the further development of a Global OMERACT Sonography Scoring (GLOSS) system in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility and added value over standard clinical variables. Future disease areas of importance to develop include a scoring system for enthesitis and osteoarthritis.

  13. IASP task force on euthanasia and assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, M; Clark, D; Goldney, B; Kerkhof, A; Wasserman, J; Wedler, H

    1995-01-01

    The first meeting of the IASP Task Force on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide took place in Venice on June 7, 1995. Several interested observers were present. It was decided that at the public IASP meeting the following day each speaker should address, briefly, the current legal situation and the pressure for change, as well as give a personal statement. David Clark spoke for North America, Bob Goldney for Australia, Michael Kelleher for Britain and Ireland, Jerzy Wasserman for Scandinavia, and Hans Wedler for the German-speaking world. Their views are published in this article. Ad Kerkhof requested that the Dutch television film "Death on Request" be discussed. The committee was of the opinion that clear definitions were essential. In their view, these should take into account the differences between active and passive euthanasia, as well as between professionally assisted and lay-assisted suicide.

  14. Progress Report of the Engineering Data Management System Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, G; CERN. Geneva; Hervé, A; Hauviller, Claude; Klempt, W; Kuipers, J; Loos, R; Nicquevert, B; Onnela, A; Price, M; Rollinger, G; Witzeling, W; Hameri, A P; Mottier, M; Nikkola, J; Pettersson, Thomas Sven; Schinzel, Josi; Tarrant, M; Vuoskoski, J; Farthouat, Philippe; Palazzi, P; Rousseau, B; Ferran, M; Høimyr, Nils-Joar; De Jonghe, J; Strubin, Pierre M; Oliger, S

    1996-01-01

    An Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) is a collection of tools and rules, which enables, as a minimum, a body of vetted information to be built up in a safe place and be easily accessible to the users. The Task Force worked through 1995 - to elucidate CERN's needs for an EDMS in the construction and lifetime of LHC and its experiments - to discover the state of the art of EDMS and find a product on the market which fulfilled CERN's needs. A Call for Tenders was issued in December 1995 and the replies are being evaluated. The name CEDAR has been chosen for the activity of implementing an EDMS at CERN. (CERN EDMS for Detectors and AcceleratoRs). see http://cadd.cern.ch/cedar/.

  15. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naredo, Esperanza

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra- and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility, predictive value, and added value over standard clinical variables. Future research areas will include validating scoring systems for enthesitis and osteoarthritis, and testing the metric qualities of ultrasound for evaluating tenosynovitis and structural damage in RA.

  16. The maze task: measuring forced incremental sentence processing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Kenneth I; Guerrera, Christine; Elliot, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    The maze task is an online measure of sentence processing time that provides an alternative to the standard moving window version of self-paced reading. Rather than each word of the sentence being presented in succession, two words are presented at the same time, and the participant must choose which word is a grammatical continuation of the sentence. This procedure forces the reader into an incremental mode of processing in which each word must be fully integrated with the preceding context before the next word can be considered. Previous research with this technique has not considered whether it is sufficiently sensitive to syntactic complexity effects or to garden path effects. Four experiments are reported demonstrating that reliable differences in processing time for subject relatives and object relatives can be obtained, and that this technique generates garden path effects that correspond closely with the data from eyetracking experiments, but without the spillover effects that are sometimes obtained with eyetracking. It is also shown that the task is sensitive to word frequency effects, producing estimates well in excess of those found with eyetracking.

  17. Family pediatrics: report of the Task Force on the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Edward L

    2003-06-01

    WHY A TASK FORCE ON THE FAMILY? The practice of pediatrics is unique among medical specialties in many ways, among which is the nearly certain presence of a parent when health care services are provided for the patient. Regardless of whether parents or other family members are physically present, their influence is pervasive. Families are the most central and enduring influence in children's lives. Parents are also central in pediatric care. The health and well-being of children are inextricably linked to their parents' physical, emotional and social health, social circumstances, and child-rearing practices. The rising incidence of behavior problems among children attests to some families' inability to cope with the increasing stresses they are experiencing and their need for assistance. When a family's distress finds its voice in a child's symptoms, pediatricians are often parents' first source for help. There is enormous diversity among families-diversity in the composition of families, in their ethnic and racial heritage, in their religious and spiritual orientation, in how they communicate, in the time they spend together, in their commitment to individual family members, in their connections to their community, in their experiences, and in their ability to adapt to stress. Within families, individuals are different from one another as well. Pediatricians are especially sensitive to differences among children-in their temperaments and personalities, in their innate and learned abilities, and in how they view themselves and respond to the world around them. It is remarkable and a testament to the effort of parents and to the resilience of children that most families function well and most children succeed in life. Family life in the United States has been subjected to extensive scrutiny and frequent commentary, yet even when those activities have been informed by research, they tend to be influenced by personal experience within families and by individual and

  18. 75 FR 47624 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task...: [email protected] ); or Liza Johnson, U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Department of the Interior Liaison, U...

  19. 77 FR 6786 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public..., Notice of public comment. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task.... Coral Reef Task Force, provides a forum for coordinated planning and action among federal agencies...

  20. 76 FR 52318 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public..., Notice of public comment. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task... the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, provides a forum for coordinated planning and action among federal...

  1. Use of a sustained visual attention task to determine children at risk for learning problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, J E

    1986-01-01

    Use of a sustained visual attention task to determine children "at risk" for learning problems. The purpose in the study was to compare the sustained visual attention performance of 42 first grade children on a 9.5 minute continuous performance test, as measured by error rate and off-task visual behaviors, e.g., off-task looking time and number of fixations off the task, with a measure of impulsivity and a teacher rating scale of classroom behavior designed to identify children with potential learning disabilities. The present findings suggest that the measurement of "off-task looking time" and "off-task fixations" during a sustained visual attention test are significantly related to the classroom teacher's observation of personal-social behavior and the child's decision making style. This approach for measuring sustained attention has potential use as a clinical tool in identifying and monitoring treatment methodologies for children considered "at risk" for attention and learning problems.

  2. Teaching Sustainable Process Design Using 12 Systematic Computer-Aided Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babi, Deenesh K.

    2015-01-01

    (tasks 4-7) and then sizing, costing and economic analysis of the designed process (tasks 8-9). This produces a base case design. In tasks 10-12, the student explores opportunities for heat and/or mass integration, followed by a sustainability analysis, in order to evaluate the base case design and set...

  3. Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Strategies for Advanced Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    REPORT OF THE DEFENSE SCIENCE BOARD TASK FORCE ON Defense Strategies for Advanced Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threats January 2017 Office of...Science Board Task Force on Defense Strategies for Advanced Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threats completed its information-gathering in February 2016...Defense Strategies fo r Advanced Ballistic and Crui se Missile Threats l am pleased to forward the final report of the DSB Task Force on Defense

  4. Improving child survival: Malnutrition Task Force and the paediatrician's responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A A; Ashworth, A; Khanum, S

    2006-01-01

    Malnutrition (underweight) contributes to approximately 60% of all child deaths, yet health professionals, policy makers, and donor agencies often fail to recognise its relevance to child survival. There is a need for the paediatric community to champion the importance of adequate nutrition for normal growth and development, and of placing sufficient emphasis on the prevention and treatment of malnutrition. Many severely malnourished children die from inappropriate treatment. Case fatality rates of 25–30% are commonly found and in some hospitals as many as 50–70% will die. Many of these deaths are avoidable. Weaknesses in health systems, inappropriate training of doctors and nurses, inadequate supervision, and lack of support for staff all contribute to compromised quality of care. The International Union of Nutritional Sciences, with support from the International Pediatric Association, Launched a global Malnutrition Task Force in 2005. The main objective is to ensure that an integrated system of prevention and treatment of malnutrition is actively supported as a fundamental aspect of care, and becomes an integral part of all training programmes. PMID:16861489

  5. 77 FR 41472 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ...-disabled veterans (SDVOSB'S). Moreover, the Task Force shall coordinate administrative and regulatory... President and emailed prior to the meeting for inclusion in the public record, verbal presentations; however...

  6. Control of force during rapid visuomotor force-matching tasks can be described by discrete time PID control algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob Lund; Feeney, Daniel F; Almuklass, Awad M; Enoka, Roger M

    2017-08-01

    Force trajectories during isometric force-matching tasks involving isometric contractions vary substantially across individuals. In this study, we investigated if this variability can be explained by discrete time proportional, integral, derivative (PID) control algorithms with varying model parameters. To this end, we analyzed the pinch force trajectories of 24 subjects performing two rapid force-matching tasks with visual feedback. Both tasks involved isometric contractions to a target force of 10% maximal voluntary contraction. One task involved a single action (pinch) and the other required a double action (concurrent pinch and wrist extension). 50,000 force trajectories were simulated with a computational neuromuscular model whose input was determined by a PID controller with different PID gains and frequencies at which the controller adjusted muscle commands. The goal was to find the best match between each experimental force trajectory and all simulated trajectories. It was possible to identify one realization of the PID controller that matched the experimental force produced during each task for most subjects (average index of similarity: 0.87 ± 0.12; 1 = perfect similarity). The similarities for both tasks were significantly greater than that would be expected by chance (single action: p = 0.01; double action: p = 0.04). Furthermore, the identified control frequencies in the simulated PID controller with the greatest similarities decreased as task difficulty increased (single action: 4.0 ± 1.8 Hz; double action: 3.1 ± 1.3 Hz). Overall, the results indicate that discrete time PID controllers are realistic models for the neural control of force in rapid force-matching tasks involving isometric contractions.

  7. First annual report of the Divertor Task Force: Progress and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the work of the Divertor Task Force of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, particularly the Task Force`s founding meeting, original research and development needs, organization, and achievements of its first year. The Task Force`s goal is to obtain an increasingly complete physics understanding of existing divertor plasmas, to build analytical and numerical models of the scrape-off-layer divertor plasmas, and to extrapolate them to find design solutions for the high power divertors of ignited tokamak plasmas such as those of ITER and other high performance future tokamaks. 67 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Task dependency of grip stiffness--a study of human grip force and grip stiffness dependency during two different tasks with same grip forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    Full Text Available It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks.

  9. Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-04-25

    Preeclampsia affects approximately 4% of pregnancies in the United States. It is the second leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide and may lead to serious maternal complications, including stroke, eclampsia, and organ failure. Adverse perinatal outcomes for the fetus and newborn include intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight, and stillbirth. Many of the complications associated with preeclampsia lead to early induction of labor or cesarean delivery and subsequent preterm birth. Preeclampsia is more prevalent among African American women than among white women. Differences in prevalence may be, in part, due to African American women being disproportionally affected by risk factors for preeclampsia. African American women also have case fatality rates related to preeclampsia 3 times higher than rates among white women. Inequalities in access to adequate prenatal care may contribute to poor outcomes associated with preeclampsia in African American women. To update the 1996 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for preeclampsia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening and diagnostic tests for preeclampsia, the potential benefits and harms of screening for preeclampsia, the effectiveness of risk prediction tools, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected preeclampsia. Given the evidence that treatment can reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, and the well-established accuracy of blood pressure measurements, the USPSTF found adequate evidence that screening for preeclampsia results in a substantial benefit for the mother and infant. In addition, there is adequate evidence to bound the harms of screening for and treatment of preeclampsia as no greater than small. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that there is a substantial net benefit of screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends screening for preeclampsia in pregnant

  10. Does compliance to patient safety tasks improve and sustain when radiotherapy treatment processes are standardized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Pascale A M; Houben, Ruud; Benders, Jos; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Vandijck, Dominique; Marneffe, Wim; Backes, Huub; Groothuis, Siebren

    2014-10-01

    To realize safe radiotherapy treatment, processes must be stabilized. Standard operating procedures (SOP's) were expected to stabilize the treatment process and perceived task importance would increase sustainability in compliance. This paper presents the effects on compliance to safety related tasks of a process redesign based on lean principles. Compliance to patient safety tasks was measured by video recording of actual radiation treatment, before (T0), directly after (T1) and 1.5 years after (T2) a process redesign. Additionally, technologists were surveyed on perceived task importance and reported incidents were collected for three half-year periods between 2007 and 2009. Compliance to four out of eleven tasks increased at T1, of which improvements on three sustained (T2). Perceived importance of tasks strongly correlated (0.82) to compliance rates at T2. The two tasks, perceived as least important, presented low base-line compliance, improved (T1), but relapsed at T2. The reported near misses (patient-level not reached) on accelerators increased (P patient-level reached) remained constant. Compliance to specific tasks increased after introducing SOP's and improvements sustained after 1.5 years, indicating increased stability. Perceived importance of tasks correlated positively to compliance and sustainability. Raising the perception of task importance is thus crucial to increase compliance. The redesign resulted in increased willingness to report incidents, creating opportunities for patient safety improvement in radiotherapy treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The influences of task repetition, napping, time of day, and instruction on the Sustained Attention to Response Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, M.K.M. van; Alblas, E.E.; Thijs, R.D.; Fronczek, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G. van

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) helps to quantify vigilance impairments. Previous studies, in which five SART sessions on one day were administered, demonstrated worse performance during the first session than during the others. The present study comprises two

  12. Dynamical signatures of isometric force control as a function of age, expertise, and task constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieluf, Solveig; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Jirsa, Viktor; Reuter, Eva-Maria; Godde, Ben; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Huys, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    From the conceptual and methodological framework of the dynamical systems approach, force control results from complex interactions of various subsystems yielding observable behavioral fluctuations, which comprise both deterministic (predictable) and stochastic (noise-like) dynamical components. Here, we investigated these components contributing to the observed variability in force control in groups of participants differing in age and expertise level. To this aim, young (18-25 yr) as well as late middle-aged (55-65 yr) novices and experts (precision mechanics) performed a force maintenance and a force modulation task. Results showed that whereas the amplitude of force variability did not differ across groups in the maintenance tasks, in the modulation task it was higher for late middle-aged novices than for experts and higher for both these groups than for young participants. Within both tasks and for all groups, stochastic fluctuations were lowest where the deterministic influence was smallest. However, although all groups showed similar dynamics underlying force control in the maintenance task, a group effect was found for deterministic and stochastic fluctuations in the modulation task. The latter findings imply that both components were involved in the observed group differences in the variability of force fluctuations in the modulation task. These findings suggest that between groups the general characteristics of the dynamics do not differ in either task and that force control is more affected by age than by expertise. However, expertise seems to counteract some of the age effects. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Stochastic and deterministic dynamical components contribute to force production. Dynamical signatures differ between force maintenance and cyclic force modulation tasks but hardly between age and expertise groups. Differences in both stochastic and deterministic components are associated with group differences in behavioral variability, and observed behavioral

  13. 76 FR 67761 - Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). ACTION: Notice of hearing... Children Exposed to Violence (hereafter refered to as the Task Force). The Task Force is chartered to provide the Attorney General with valuable advice in the areas of children's exposure to ] violence for...

  14. 77 FR 22000 - Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY: This is an... Violence (the ``task force''). The task force is chartered to provide OJP, a component of the Department of Justice, with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of addressing...

  15. 76 FR 67761 - Establishment of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... to Violence AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) ACTION: Notice of... Exposed to Violence (the Task Force) is established in accordance with the provisions of the Federal... exposure to violence. The Task Force will conduct 4 public hearings at various locations around the nation...

  16. Frequency and force effects on psychophysical and myoelectric variables in low- intensity pinching tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; Dieën, J.H. van; Veeger, D.; Looze, M.P. de; Douwes, M.

    2000-01-01

    Force and frequency in manual handling tasks are known risk factors for work related upper arm disorders. Three force levels and three frequencies are used to define the external load in a pinching task. The effects of these external loads on subjective and objective responses are studied.

  17. 76 FR 7579 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public business meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef...-mail: [email protected] ); or Liza Johnson, U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Department of the Interior...

  18. 77 FR 39724 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-123D0102DM-DS61200000] U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife.... Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force... better preserve and protect coral reef ecosystems. The Departments of Commerce and the Interior co-chair...

  19. 77 FR 4561 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services...) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF). The Task Force--an... Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide). DATES: The meeting will be held on Wednesday...

  20. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military... terminating the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services, effective June 1, 2010. FOR...

  1. Screening for Syphilis Infection in Pregnancy : US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Update of the 2004 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force statement about screening for syphilis in pregnancy. Methods: The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force did a targeted literature search for evidence on the benefits of screening, the harms of screening, and the harms of treatment

  2. Report of the MLA Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Language Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 the Executive Council of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA) created a task force to examine current standards and emerging trends in publication requirements for tenure and promotion in English and foreign language departments in the United States. To fulfill its charge, the task force reviewed numerous studies, reports, and…

  3. 75 FR 48929 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY...; (919) 541-5400. The Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to continue discussions on... 6, 2010, in Washington, DC. Teressa Davis, Rulemaking Manager, Natural Resources Conservation...

  4. 75 FR 12493 - Task Force on Childhood Obesity: Request for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Task Force on Childhood Obesity: Request for.... Department of Education. ACTION: Joint request for comments. SUMMARY: Across the country, childhood obesity... establishing a Task Force on Childhood Obesity that directs Federal agencies to create a comprehensive...

  5. Childhood Obesity Task Forces Established by State Legislatures, 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sonia A.; Sherry, Bettylou; Blanck, Heidi M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction States and communities are considering policy and environmental strategies, including enacting legislation, to reduce and prevent childhood obesity. One legislative approach has been to create task forces to understand key issues and develop a course of action. The goal of this study was to describe state-level, childhood obesity task forces in the United States created by legislation from 2001 through 2010. Methods We used the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity database to identify state-level childhood obesity task forces created through legislation from 2001 through 2010. Results We identified 21 states that had enacted legislation creating childhood obesity task forces of which 6 had created more than one task force. Most task forces were charged with both gathering and reviewing information and making recommendations for obesity-prevention actions in the state. Most legislation required that task forces include representation from the state legislature, state agencies, community organizations, and community members. Conclusion Evaluation of the effectiveness of obesity-prevention task forces and the primary components that contribute to their success may help to determine the advantages of the use of such strategies in obesity prevention. PMID:23987250

  6. 75 FR 34439 - Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... of the Secretary Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification... Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification will meet in closed session on July... on August 24-25, 2010. ADDRESSES: Both meetings will be held at Science Applications International...

  7. 75 FR 43943 - Defense Science Board; Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... of the Secretary Defense Science Board; Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification... Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification will meet in closed session... 25-26, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at Science Applications International Corporation...

  8. Effects of Gloves and Pulling Task on Achievable Downward Pull Forces on a Rung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschorner, Kurt E; Slota, Gregory P; Pliner, Erika M; Spaho, Egli; Seo, Na Jin

    2017-11-01

    Objective We examined the impacts of pulling task (breakaway and pull-down tasks at different postures), glove use, and their interaction on achievable downward pull forces from a ladder rung. Background Posture, glove use, and the type of pulling task are known to affect the achievable forces. However, a gap in the literature exists regarding how these factors affect achievable downward pulling forces, which are relevant to recovery from a perturbation during ladder climbing. Methods Forty subjects completed four downward pulling tasks (breakaway force; pull force at maximum height, shoulder height, and a middle height), using three glove conditions with varying coefficient of friction (COF) levels (cotton glove, low COF; bare hand, moderate COF; and latex-coated glove, high COF) with their dominant and nondominant hand. The outcome variable was the maximum force normalized to body weight. Results The highest forces were observed for the highest hand postures (breakaway and maximum height). Increased COF led to higher forces and had a larger effect on breakaway force than the other tasks. The dominant hand was associated with higher forces than the nondominant hand. Male subjects generated greater forces than female subjects, particularly for higher hand positions. Conclusion This study suggests that a higher hand position on the ladder, while avoiding low-friction gloves, may be effective for improving recovery from ladder perturbations. Application This study may guide preferred climbing strategies (particularly those that lead to a higher hand position) for improving recovery from a perturbation during ladder climbing.

  9. A rigorous model of reflex function indicates that position and force feedback are flexibly tuned to position and force tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Abbink, D.A.; Schouten, A.C.; Dewald, J.P.A.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to quantify the separate contributions of muscle force feedback, muscle spindle activity and co-contraction to the performance of voluntary tasks (‘‘reduce the influence of perturbations on maintained force or position’’). Most human motion control studies either isolate only one

  10. Muscle force generation and force control of finger movements in children with spastic hemiplegia during isometric tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Force control ability was investigated in 10 males and 10 females, between 5 and 15 years old with spastic hemiplegia (mild and moderate hand dysfunction), and an aged-matched control group (eight males, 12 females). An isometric force production task at five different levels of maximum voluntary

  11. Muscle force generation and force control of finger movements in children with spastic hemiplegia during isometric tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Force control ability was investigated in 10 males and 10 females, between 5 and 15 years old with spastic hemiplegia (mild and moderate hand dysfunction), and an aged-matched control group (eight males, 12 females). An isometric force production task at five different levels of maximum voluntary

  12. Alternative Aviation Jet Fuel Sustainability Evaluation Report Task 1 : Report Evaluating Existing Sustainability Evaluation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    This report describes how existing biofuel sustainability evaluation programs meet requirements that are under consideration or are in early phases of adoption and implementation in various US and international contexts. Biofuel sustainability evalua...

  13. Evaluation of methods to assess push/pull forces in a construction task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M. J.; van der Beek, A. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.; van der Molen, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the validity of methods to assess push/pull forces exerted in a construction task. Forces assessed using a hand-held digital force gauge were compared to those obtained using a highly accurate measuring frame. No significant differences were found

  14. Response to Vogelstein: How the 2012 AAP Task Force on circumcision went wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Howe, Robert S

    2017-07-09

    Vogelstein cautions medical organizations against jumping into the fray of controversial issues, yet proffers the 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics' Task Force policy position on infant male circumcision as 'an appropriate use of position-statements.' Only a scratch below the surface of this policy statement uncovers the Task Force's failure to consider Vogelstein's many caveats. The Task Force supported the cultural practice by putting undeserved emphasis on questionable scientific data, while ignoring or underplaying the importance of valid contrary scientific data. Without any effort to quantitatively assess the risk/benefit balance, the Task Force concluded the benefits of circumcision outweighed the risks, while acknowledging that the incidence of risks was unknown. This Task Force differed from other Academy policy-forming panels by ignoring the Academy's standard quality measures and by not appointing members with extensive research experience, extensive publications, or recognized expertise directly related to this topic. Despite nearly 100 publications available at the time addressing the substantial ethical issues associated with infant male circumcision, the Task Force chose to ignore the ethical controversy. They merely stated, with minimal justification, the opinion of one of the Task Force members that the practice of infant male circumcision is morally permissible. The release of the report has fostered an explosion of academic discussion on the ethics of infant male circumcision with a number of national medical organizations now decrying the practice as a human rights violation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exploiting impedance shaping approaches to overcome force overshoots in delicate interaction tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loris Roveda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented article is to overcome the force overshoot issue in impedance based force tracking applications. Nowadays, light-weight manipulators are involved in high-accurate force control applications (such as polishing tasks, where the force overshoot issue is critical (i.e. damaging the component causing a production waste, exploiting the impedance control. Two main force tracking impedance control approaches are described in literature: (a set-point deformation and (b variable stiffness approaches. However, no contributions are directly related to the force overshoot issue. The presented article extends both such methodologies to analytically achieve the force overshoots avoidance in interaction tasks based on the on-line estimation of the interacting environment stiffness (available through an EKF. Both the proposed control algorithms allow to achieve a linear closed-loop dynamics for the coupled robot-environment system. Therefore, control gains can be analytically on-line calculated to achieve an over-damped closed-loop dynamics of the controlled coupled system. Control strategies have been validated in experiments, involving a KUKA LWR 4+. A probing task has been performed, representative of many industrial tasks (e.g. assembly tasks, in which a main force task direction is defined.

  16. Operational Command and Control of Joint Task Force Cyberspace Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-27

    is the “coordination and cooperation towar objectives”55 which “can be achieved either through Unity of Command ( UoC ) or through cooperation.”56...According to Dr. Vego, “the highest degree of effectiveness is ensured by having UoE though UoC ” and “failure to establish UoC results in a state of...offers an adversary the ability to do the same to friendly forces. According to Dr. Vego, “without [ UoC ] the [JTF] cannot bring all available forces to

  17. 75 FR 4051 - Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces; Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice of meeting. ] SUMMARY...)(2) of Public Law, the DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces...

  18. 77 FR 42334 - Meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (Correction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Violence (Correction) AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs, Justice. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The... meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (the ``task force...

  19. Composite Warfare Commander Doctrine in the Age of the Joint Task Force: A New Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Richard

    1998-01-01

    .... This doctrine does not, however, transition well into joint or combined operations nor does it adequately address command and control problems associated with a Navy-Marine Task Force, comprised...

  20. Making the first fracture the last fracture: ASBMR task force report on secondary fracture prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eisman, John A; Bogoch, Earl R; Dell, Rick; Harrington, J Timothy; McKinney, Ross E; McLellan, Alastair; Mitchell, Paul J; Silverman, Stuart; Singleton, Rick; Siris, Ethel

    2012-01-01

    ...) to reduce future fracture risk and adverse health outcomes. The Task Force reviewed the current evidence about different systematic interventional approaches, their logical background, as well as the medical and ethical rationale...

  1. Here's a nutshell look at US Preventive Service Task Force recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that clinicians screen all pregnant women for HIV infection, as well as continue to screen all adolescents and adults who are at increased risk for infection.

  2. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Aerial Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delaney, William P; Williams, Michael

    2005-01-01

    .... Ballistic missile threats and targets were not part of the Task Force charter. The aerial targets involve full-scale aircraft, subsonic and supersonic cruise missiles, rotary wing vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs...

  3. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus : US preventive services task force recommendation statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gordis, Leon; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2008-01-01

    Description: Update of 2003 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation about screening for gestational diabetes. Methods: The USPSTF weighed the evidence on maternal and neonatal benefits (reduction in preeclampsia, mortality, brachial plexus injury, clavicular fractures, admission

  4. Selective effects of arm proximal and distal muscles fatigue on force coordination in manipulation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emge, Nicholas; Uygur, Mehmet; Radivoj, Mandic; Kaminski, Thomas W; Royer, Todd; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of muscle fatigue on force coordination and task performance of various manipulation tasks are explored. Grip force (GF; normal force component acting at the digits-object contact area) and load force (LF; tangential component that lifts and holds objects) were recorded prior to and after fatiguing the distal (DAM; i.e., GF producing) and proximal arm muscles (PAM; LF producing). Results reveal a deterioration of GF scaling (i.e., averaged GF-LF ratio), GF-LF coupling (their correlation), and task performance (ability to exert a prescribed LF pattern) associated with DAM, but not PAM fatigue. Deteriorated force coordination clearly increases the likelihood of dropping an object; however, the observed selective effects of DAM and PAM fatigue represent a novel finding deserving of further research.

  5. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 1: finding the least painful cuts

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This week sees the first in our series of reports on the work of the Task Forces By 2004, COMPASS will be the main experiment at the SPS, but the LHC experiments will also be calibrating detectors. 'It was a painful task, with which we had to proceed in the least damaging way', says Dieter Schlatter, Head of the EP Division, when describing his experience as Convenor of Task Force 1. This Task Force was charged with responsibility for advising on how money could be saved within CERN's research programme, in order to help deal with the increased cost to completion of the LHC project. Their role, as with the other Task Forces, was to suggest where savings could be made, and in most cases their suggestions have been incorporated in the Management's draft Long Term Plan. The pain of the task was to some extent alleviated by developments within the LHC project itself. Delays in the delivery of superconducting cable meant that the start up of the LHC would be delayed by a year, to 2007, and this gave Task Force ...

  6. DSB Task Force Report on Air Dominance: Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    supremacy . Of interest , General Dwight Eisenhower brought forward an air campaign plan to General George Marshall in 1942 as part of his duties as the...Executive Summary was cleared for public release on January 3, 2017. The Executive Summary is unclassified and cleared for public release. DEFENSE...A fundamental question is whether air supremacy or air dominance is realistic if U.S. air forces cannot be present in the A2/ AD battle space in

  7. Managing Air Force Joint Expeditionary Taskings in an Uncertain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and Maj Alex Anastasiou (AF/A1PR) helped us understand the impact of joint sourcing assignments on different career fields. Col Robert “Tiny” Lala ...personnel who are undeployable because they have recently returned from a deployment. With the right tool, the Air Force could examine what happens...various nonde- ployable categories from the total in the career field; it does not yet take into account the fact that personnel returning from deployment

  8. The Department of Defense Shale Oil Task Force. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-05

    conclude that historical growth patterns cannot be sustained. 2.2.4 U.S. Domestic Data U.S. domestic production has passed its maximum by most estimates...to retain conventional patterns consumption in the face of declining supplies. The probable effect will be to reduce supplies for national defense in...ifned crud ’ t fit wou I(I be fed to r(’f i ner’ii’s under rules estal)1 i shed by DoE Ihere i ii,, spec i pr us rn i n t lit- -l tite or implement i

  9. Bidirectional transfer between joint and individual actions in a task of discrete force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2017-07-01

    The present study examined bidirectional learning transfer between joint and individual actions involving discrete isometric force production with the right index finger. To examine the effects of practice of joint action on performance of the individual action, participants performed a pre-test (individual condition), practice blocks (joint condition), and a post-test (individual condition) (IJI task). To examine the effects of practice of the individual action on performance during the joint action, the participants performed a pre-test (joint condition), practice blocks (individual condition), and a post-test (joint condition) (JIJ task). Whereas one participant made pressing movements with a target peak force of 10% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in the individual condition, two participants produced the target force of the sum of 10% MVC produced by each of them in the joint condition. In both the IJI and JIJ tasks, absolute errors and standard deviations of peak force were smaller post-test than pre-test, indicating bidirectional transfer between individual and joint conditions for force accuracy and variability. Although the negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary force production) became stronger with practice blocks in the IJI task, there was no difference between the pre- and post-tests for the negative correlation in the JIJ task. In the JIJ task, the decrease in force accuracy and variability during the individual action did not facilitate complementary force production during the joint action. This indicates that practice performed by two people is essential for complementary force production in joint action.

  10. Force levels in uni- and bimanual isometric tasks affect variability measures differently throughout lifespan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Galen, G.P. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-four participants (age 5-93 years) performed isometric force production tasks at five different levels of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with either one or two index fingers. Research questions were whether variability measures in the bimanual task condition were different compared

  11. Force levels in uni- and bimanual isometric tasks affect variability measures differently throughout lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Galen, G.P. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-four participants (age 5-93 years) performed isometric force production tasks at five different levels of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with either one or two index fingers. Research questions were whether variability measures in the bimanual task condition were different compared

  12. Force Management Methods. Task 1 Report. Current Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    OF-THE-ART REVIEW FORCE MANAGEMENT METHODS A/C TYPE: F-ill A/E/D/F FLEET INFORMATION NO. OF AIRCRAFT: 455 : YEAR SERVICE BEGAN: 1970 Warren Toone...DETECT CHANGE IN USAGE? Usage/NZC/loads/damage all used REMARKS: A/24U-6 has some evidence of record dropout during high-g buffett as found during...restricted. 391 Page 4 of 5 A/C TYPE: F-Ill A/E/D/F (Continued) FSM PLAN MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS BASE: Bill Sutherland & Warren Toone MSG- 2 Analysis

  13. Effects of Unilateral Muscle Fatigue on Performance and Force Coordination in Bimanual Manipulation Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Daniel; Jelaska, Igor; Uygur, Mehmet; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of unilateral muscle fatigue on the performance and coordination of grip (GF; normal component acting between the hand and object) and load force (LF; tangential component) in bimanual manipulation tasks, as well as the associated lateral differences. Eleven participants performed various symmetric bimanual tasks either without fatigue, or after fatiguing the GF producing muscles of either the nondominant or dominant hand. The GF/LF ratio of the fatigued and nonfatigued hand decreased and increased, respectively, while the neither the effects of fatigue on the task performance and GF-LF coordination, nor the lateral differences were revealed. The lack of the fatigue associated effects on most of the tested variables typically observed from unimanual tasks could be explained by bimanual assimilation. The findings also suggest that in daily life switching to bimanual tasks when one hand becomes fatigued could be beneficial regarding preserving the high level of both the manipulation performance and force coordination.

  14. Sustained attention in adult ADHD : time-on-task effects of various measures of attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Fuermaier, Anselm B.M.; Koerts, Janneke; Buggenthin, Rieka; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Weisbrod, Matthias; Thome, Johannes; Lange, Klaus W.; Tucha, Oliver

    Neuropsychological research on adults with ADHD showed deficits in various aspects of attention. However, the majority of studies failed to explore the change of performance over time, so-called time-on-task effects. As a consequence, little is known about sustained attention performance of adults

  15. The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eFocke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called internal models. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 Ns/m. Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of forty-six subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA. Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (=-A on day 2 (ABA. The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0% or presence (19% of catch trials, in which the force field was turned off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials. In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research

  16. Report of the Task Force on SSC Magnet System Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-10-01

    The Task Force on SSC Magnet Systems test Site was appointed by Maury Tigner, Director of the SSC, Phase 1 in August 1984. In brief, the charge asked the Task Force to make a critical evaluation of potential test sites for a major SSC magnet System Test Facility (STF) with regard to: (1) availability of the needed space, utilities, staff and other requirements on the desired time scale; and (2) the cost of preparing the sites for the tests and for operating the facilities during the test period. The charge further suggests that, by virtue of existing facilities and availability of experienced staff, BNL and FNAL are the two best candidate sites and that is therefore appears appropriate to restrict the considerations of the Task Force to these sites. During the subsequent deliberations of the Task Force, no new facts were revealed that altered the assumptions of the charge in this regard. The charge does not ask for a specific site recommendation for the STF. Indeed, an agreement on such a recommendation would be difficult to achieve considering the composition of the Task Force, wherein a large fraction of the membership is drawn from the two contending laboratories. Instead, we have attempted to describe the purpose of the facility, outline a productive test program, list the major facilities required, carefully review the laboratories` responses to the facility requirements, and make objective comparisons of the specific features and capabilities offered.

  17. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  18. Text-speak processing and the sustained attention to response task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James; Russell, Paul N; Dorahy, Martin J; Neumann, Ewald; Helton, William S

    2012-01-01

    We examined performance in a sustained attention to response task (SART) (Experiment 1) and a more traditionally formatted vigilance task (Experiment 2) using novel word stimuli (text-speak) and normally spelt words. This enabled us to address whether the SART is a better measure of sustained attention or of response strategy, and to investigate the cognitive demands of text-speak processing. In Experiment 1, 72 participants completed a subset (text-speak) and a word SART, as well as a self-reported text experience questionnaire. Those who reported more proficiency and experience with text-speak made more errors on the subset SART, but this appeared to be due to their increase in response speed. This did not occur in the word SART. In Experiment 2, 14 participants completed high No-Go, low-Go (more traditional response format) versions of these tasks to further investigate the cognitive demands of text-speak processing. Response latency increased over periods of watch only for the text-speak task, not for the word task. The results of Experiment 1 support the perspective that the SART is highly sensitive to response strategy, and the results of both experiments together indicate target detection tasks may be a novel way of investigating the cognitive demands of text-speak processing.

  19. Task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Task 5 Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhen, Ingvar [SWECO VIAK AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-02-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden, some 35 km north of Oskarshamn. Construction of the underground laboratory commenced in 1990 and was completed in 1995, consisting of a 3.6 km. long tunnel excavated in crystalline rock to a depth of approximately 460 m. Prior to, during and subsequent to completion, research concerning the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in fractured crystalline rock has been carried out. Central to this research has been the characterisation of the groundwater flow system and the chemistry of the groundwaters at Aespoe prior to excavation (Pre-investigation Phase) and subsequently to monitor changes in these parameters during the evolution of laboratory construction (Construction Phase). The principle aim of the Aespoe Task 5 modelling exercise has been to compare and ultimately integrate hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology using the input data from the pre-investigation and construction phases. The main objectives were: to assess the consistency of groundwater-flow models and hydrogeochemical mixing-reaction models through integration and comparison of hydraulic and hydrogeochemical data obtained before and during tunnel construction, and to develop a procedure for integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical information which could be used for disposal site assessments. Task 5 commenced in 1998 and was finalised in 2002. Participating modelling teams in the project represented ANDRA (France; three modelling teams - ANTEA, ITASCA, CEA), BMWi/BGR (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), JNC (Japan), CRIEPI (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden; two modelling teams - CFE and Intera (now GeoPoint)). Experience from Task 5 has highlighted several important aspects for site investigations facilitating the possibilities for mathematically integrated modelling and consistency checks that should be taken into account for future repository performance assessments. Equally important is that Task 5 has

  20. Hiking strap force decreases during sustained upwind sailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, R; Bay, Jonathan; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis, that sailing upwind in wind speeds above 12 knots causes fatigue, which manifests as a reduction in exerted hiking strap force and/or maximal isometric voluntary contraction force (MVC) of the knee extensors, was evaluated. Additionally, it was investigated if a relationship exists...... between maximal exerted hiking force (hMVC) and sailing performance. In part 1 of the study, 12 national level athletes sailed upwind for 2 × 10 min while hiking strap forces were continuously acquired. Before, in between and after sailing periods, the MVC of the knee extensors was measured. In part 2...... causes sailing-specific fatigue as evidenced by a marked reduction in exerted hiking strap force. However, MVC of the knee extensors was not compromised ∼45 s after hiking was terminated. Additionally, sailing performance is related to maximal hiking force....

  1. Timing and extent of finger force enslaving during a dynamic force task cannot be explained by EMG activity patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mirakhorlo

    Full Text Available Finger enslaving is defined as the inability of the fingers to move or to produce force independently. Such finger enslaving has predominantly been investigated for isometric force tasks. The aim of this study was to assess whether the extent of force enslaving is dependent on relative finger movements. Ten right-handed subjects (22-30 years flexed the index finger while counteracting constant resistance forces (4, 6 and 8 N orthogonal to the fingertip. The other, non-instructed fingers were held in extension. EMG activities of the mm. flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS and extensor digitorum (ED in the regions corresponding to the index, middle and ring fingers were measured. Forces exerted by the non-instructed fingers increased substantially (by 0.2 to 1.4 N with flexion of the index finger, increasing the enslaving effect with respect to the static, pre-movement phase. Such changes in force were found 260-370 ms after the initiation of index flexion. The estimated MCP joint angle of the index finger at which forces exerted by the non-instructed fingers started to increase varied between 4° and 6°. In contrast to the finger forces, no significant changes in EMG activity of the FDS regions corresponding to the non-instructed fingers upon index finger flexion were found. This mismatch between forces and EMG of the non-instructed fingers, as well as the delay in force development are in agreement with connective tissue linkages being slack when the positions of the fingers are similar, but pulled taut when one finger moves relative to the others. Although neural factors cannot be excluded, our results suggest that mechanical connections between muscle-tendon structures were (at least partly responsible for the observed increase in force enslaving during index finger flexion.

  2. Which Factors Characterize Sustainable Behavior of Defense Forces?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Gerstlberger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Product (GDP) per capita, and medium to high military expenditures per capita seem to favor CSR and sustainability awareness within their militaries. For those countries, military CSR and sustainability strategies can demonstrate win-win situations, mainly due to lower energy and material costs on the one...... hand and reduced environmental impact on the other. However, countries with high military expenditures per capita but low GDP per capita and a loose regulatory environment seem to lack any CSR or sustainability commitment within their militaries....

  3. Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Jan B; Damaraju, Eswar; Padmala, Srikanth; Pessoa, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the brain integrates motivational and attentional signals by using a neuroimaging paradigm that provided separate estimates for transient cue- and target-related signals, in addition to sustained block-related responses. Participants performed a Posner-type task in which an endogenous cue predicted target location on 70% of trials, while motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence of a cash incentive linked to task performance. Our findings revealed increased detection performance (d') as a function of incentive value. In parallel, brain signals revealed that increases in absolute incentive magnitude led to cue- and target-specific response modulations that were independent of sustained state effects across visual cortex, fronto-parietal regions, and subcortical regions. Interestingly, state-like effects of incentive were observed in several of these brain regions, too, suggesting that both transient and sustained fMRI signals may contribute to task performance. For both cue and block periods, the effects of administering incentives were correlated with individual trait measures of reward sensitivity. Taken together, our findings support the notion that motivation improves behavioral performance in a demanding attention task by enhancing evoked responses across a distributed set of anatomical sites, many of which have been previously implicated in attentional processing. However, the effect of motivation was not simply additive as the impact of absolute incentive was greater during invalid than valid trials in several brain regions, possibly because motivation had a larger effect on reorienting than orienting attentional mechanisms at these sites.

  4. Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B Engelmann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the brain integrates motivational and attentional signals by using a neuroimaging paradigm that provided separate estimates for transient cue- and target-related signals, in addition to sustained block-related responses. Participants performed a Posner-type task in which an endogenous cue predicted target location on 70% of trials, while motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence of a cash incentive linked to task performance. Our findings revealed increased detection performance (d’ as a function of incentive value. In parallel, brain signals revealed that increases in absolute incentive magnitude led to cue- and target-specific response modulations that were independent of sustained state effects across visual cortex, fronto-parietal regions, and subcortical regions. Interestingly, state-like effects of incentive were observed in several of these brain regions, too, suggesting that both transient and sustained fMRI signals may contribute to task performance. For both cue and block periods, the effects of administering incentives were correlated with individual trait measures of reward sensitivity. Taken together, our findings support the notion that motivation improves behavioral performance in a demanding attention task by enhancing evoked responses across a distributed set of anatomical sites, many of which have been previously implicated in attentional processing. However, the effect of motivation was not simply additive as the impact of absolute incentive was greater during invalid than valid trials in several brain regions, possibly because motivation had a larger effect on reorienting than orienting attentional mechanisms at these sites.

  5. Oncology Section EDGE Task Force on Urogenital Cancer: A Systematic Review of Clinical Measures for Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Alicia; Harrington, Shana E; Hill, Alexandra; Roscow, Amanda; Alappattu, Meryl

    2017-07-01

    Compared to the general population, women and men with urogenital and colorectal cancer experience higher rates of urinary and fecal incontinence. Although a variety of measures exist to assess these areas, currently, there are no guidelines recommending which outcomes rehabilitation professionals should administer to examine these impairments in those with cancer. To identify outcome measures for assessing urinary and fecal incontinence and evaluate their psychometric data and applicability to the cancer population. Multiple electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo) were reviewed using specific search terms to locate articles that identify outcome measures assessing urinary and fecal incontinence. As part of a larger effort to identify outcome measures for both incontinence and sexual dysfunction, 1118 articles were initially identified, 228 articles were reviewed, and 37 outcome measures were selected for analysis, 13 of which were related to urinary and fecal incontinence. Each incontinence outcome measure was independently reviewed and rated by two reviewers using the Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcome Measure Rating Form. Any discrepancies between reviewers were discussed and an overall recommendation for each outcome measure was made using the 4-point Cancer EDGE Task Force Rating Scale. The Task Force was able to highly recommend 1 measure addressing urinary incontinence (American Urological Association Symptom Index) and 2 measures assessing both urinary and fecal incontinence (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory - Short Form, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire - Short Form). The Task Force also recommended two measures of urinary incontinence that demonstrated strong psychometric properties, but had not yet been evaluated in the cancer population (Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form). The Task Force was unable to recommend any measures that solely addressed fecal incontinence. Five

  6. Working together toward the issue of conjugal violence: the work of an interdisciplinary task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, S; Ratcliffe, M

    1999-01-01

    In 1995 each of the Professional Councils at the Royal Victoria Hospital endorsed the creation of an Interdisciplinary Task Force on Conjugal Violence. Task force members were drawn from Medicine, Nursing and Social Work. The overall goal was to increase the quality of care that the interdisciplinary team could provide to their patients. This mandate encompassed three major tasks. First, to study the extent of awareness about the issue among health care professionals; second, to assess their needs for resources and education; and finally, to recommend and implement means of increasing the level of awareness of this health concern among professionals and patients. The task force members educated themselves about conjugal violence and developed a questionnaire that was distributed to health care professionals within the hospital. The number of individuals from each discipline who received the survey was proportionate to their actual number in the center and selected at random. Results of the survey indicated that all groups desired more information and education about the scope of the problem as well as means for assessing and intervening with patients who are abused. The task force developed a Conjugal Abuse Information Package, an Abuse Assessment Screen, a Public Awareness Program and an Ongoing Teaching Program for Health Care Professionals. This project provides an example of how an interdisciplinary health care team can successfully work together for the benefit of patients.

  7. Guidelines on routine cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Report from an EFNS task force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deisenhammer, F; Bartos, A; Egg, R

    2006-01-01

    total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins, glucose, lactate, cell count, cytological staining, and investigation of infectious CSF. The methods included a Systematic Medline search for the above-mentioned variables and review of appropriate publications by one or more of the task force members. Grading...... of evidence and recommendations was based on consensus by all task force members. It is recommended that CSF should be analysed immediately after collection. If storage is needed 12 ml of CSF should be partitioned into three to four sterile tubes. Albumin CSF/serum ratio (Qalb) should be preferred to total...

  8. 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, J.W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer ......This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape...

  9. Conference-EC-US Task Force Joint US-EU Workshop on Metabolomics and Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: Lily Y. Young

    2009-06-04

    Since 1990, the EC-US Task Force on Biotechnology Research has been coordinating transatlantic efforts to guide and exploit the ongoing revolution in biotechnology and the life sciences. The Task Force was established in June 1990 by the European Commission and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The Task Force has acted as an effective forum for discussion, coordination, and development of new ideas for the last 18 years. Task Force members are European Commission and US Government science and technology administrators who meet annually to enhance communication across the Atlantic, and to encourage collaborative research. Through sponsoring workshops, and other activities, the Task Force also brings together scientific leaders and early career researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to forecast research challenges and opportunities and to promote better links between researchers. Over the years, by keeping a focus on the future of science, the Task Force has played a key role in establishing a diverse range of emerging scientific fields, including biodiversity research, neuroinformatics, genomics, nanobiotechnology, neonatal immunology, transkingdom molecular biology, biologically-based fuels, and environmental biotechnology. The EC-US Task Force has sponsored a number of Working Groups on topics of mutual transatlantic interest. The idea to create a Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology research was discussed in the Task Force meeting of October 1993. The EC-US Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology set as its mission 'To train the next generation of leaders in environmental biotechnology in the United States and the European Union to work collaboratively across the Atlantic.' Since 1995, the Working Group supported three kinds of activities, all of which focus one early career scientists: (1) Workshops on the use of molecular methods and genomics in environmental biotechnology; (2) Short courses with theoretical

  10. 77 FR 23667 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of.... Task Force Recommendation Developments Review of Support to Family Care Givers. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Task..., and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces. All written...

  11. 75 FR 76422 - Meeting of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... five, with one minute of questions available to the Task Force members per presenter. Presenters should... of the Secretary Meeting of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces (Subsequently Referred to as...

  12. Report of the State Geothermal Resources Task Force, State of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburg, Judith; Kirkham, Bill; Hannon, Theodore

    1978-06-01

    The State Geothermal Resources Task Force has investigated the status of geothermal resources and development in California and in this report offers recommendations for overcoming obstacles facing increased utilization of this significant natural resource. For the most part, these recommendations are short-term solutions to immediate problems and would not radically change the roles of governmental agencies currently regulating geothermal development. The Task Force concludes that geothermal operations have been hindered by the lack of a statewide policy on geothermal development. This has resulted in instances where industry has been forced to comply with conflicting governmental policies toward geothermal energy development and environmental protection. The Task Force therefore recommends legislation establishing a statewide policy to encourage geothermal development consistent with environmental quality standards. In addition to geothermal resources suitable for the production of electrical power, California has extensive undeveloped hot water reservoirs suitable for direct thermal applications. The Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission and the US Geological Survey have concluded that these resources, if developed, could make a significant contribution to satisfying California's energy needs. The Task Force therefore recommends establishing a statewide policy to encourage the use of non-electric hot water geothermal resources for commercial and non-commercial uses where the development is consistent with environmental quality concerns.

  13. Can NATO’s new Very High Readiness Joint Task Force deter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsmose, Jens; Rynning, Sten

    2017-01-01

    ” a distinct strategic rival – Russia. Chief among the Welsh summit initiatives was the decision to set up a new multinational spearhead force – the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) – as part of an enhanced NATO Response Force (NRF) and within the framework of a so-called Readiness Action Plan (RAP......). In this article, we examine the dimensions of NATO’s deterrence posture and the VTJF. We argue, that the Alliance has taken important first steps toward establishing credible deterrence, but it needs to do more. Credible deterrence requires not only adequate military capacities, such as the VJTF; it equally...

  14. Handwriting: hand-pen contact force synergies in circle drawing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Kun; Hooke, Alexander W; Kim, You-Sin; Park, Jaebum; Karol, Sohit; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2010-08-26

    This study investigated synergistic actions of hand-pen contact forces during circle drawing tasks in three-dimensional (3D) space. Twenty-four right-handed participants drew thirty concentric circles in the counterclockwise (CCW) and clockwise (CW) directions. Three-dimensional forces acting on an instrumented pen as well as 3D linear and angular positions of the pen were recorded. These contact forces were then transformed into the 3D radial, tangential, and normal force components specific to circle drawing. Uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis was employed to calculate the magnitude of the hand-pen contact force synergy. Three hypotheses were tested. First, hand-pen contact force synergies during circle drawing are dependent on the angular position of the pen tip. Second, hand-pen contact force synergies are dependent on force components in circle drawing. Third, hand-pen contact force synergies are greater in CCW direction than CW direction. The results showed that the strength of the hand-pen contact force synergy increased during the initial phase of circle drawing and decreased during the final phase. The synergy strength was greater for the radial and tangential components as compared to the normal component. Also, the circle drawing in CW direction was associated with greater hand-pen contact force synergy than the CCW direction. The results of this study suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) prioritizes hand-pen contact force synergies for the force components (i.e., radial and tangential) that are critical for circle drawing. The CNS modulates hand-pen contact force synergies for preparation and conclusion of circle drawing, respectively. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. 78 FR 38015 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mail Delivery service through Recovering Warrior Task Force, Hoffman Building...: Thursday, July 25, 2013 8:00 a.m.-8:15 a.m. Administrative 8:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Task Force Consolidated Voting Session 10:45 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Break 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Task Force Consolidated Voting Session...

  16. Force on Force Modeling with Formal Task Structures and Dynamic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    task framework, derived using the MMF methodology to structure a complex mission. It further demonstrated the integration of effects from a range of...restrictions on the title page of this proposal. Scientific Services Program The views, opinions, and/or findings contained in this...application methodology was intended to support a combined developmental testing (DT) and operational testing (OT) strategy for selected systems under test

  17. 77 FR 12881 - Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY: This is an announcement of the third hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence... Justice, with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of addressing...

  18. 77 FR 39264 - Meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (the..., with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of addressing the...

  19. 75 FR 24781 - Task Force on Space Industry Workforce and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Workforce and Economic Development Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense the Secretary of Commerce the... local and Federal economic and workforce-development efforts through a Task Force composed of senior-level Administration officials from relevant agencies that will construct an economic development action...

  20. Folic Acid for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: In 1996, the U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that all women planning or capable of pregnancy take a multivitamin supplement containing folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects. This recommendation is an update of the 1996 USPSTF recommendation.

  1. Summary of the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angioni, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, Volker

    2015-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force workshop, held in Culham, UK, during 8-11 September 2014. The workshop was organized under six topics: momentum transport, energetic particles, challenges in modelling transport i...

  2. First Report to the General Assembly of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Office of the Lieutenant Governor, Providence.

    This document reports on the activities of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention which held its first meeting in September 1985. The function, progress, membership, and meetings of the three committees (public relations, resource, and research) are discussed. A pilot program on suicide prevention is described which provided…

  3. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Persistent Marine Debris, May 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeny, Timothy R. E.; Cottingham, David

    1989-01-01

    Provides a definition of the marine debris problem and a charge to the task force. Presents five general recommendations concerning: federal leadership, public awareness and education program, implementation of laws, research and monitoring, and beach clean-up and monitoring. (RT)

  4. How effective are task forces in tackling illegal logging? Empirical evidence from Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Marte; Hansen, Christian Pilegaard

    2014-01-01

    not proven effective in Ghana. The task forces are influenced by corruption; interference by powerful actors; fear of violence; and logistical and resource-related challenges. The paper suggests that effectively addressing illegal logging in Ghana will require a more normative approach that involves policy...

  5. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnancy : US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Reaffirmation of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for hepatitis B virus hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy. Methods: The USPSTF performed a brief literature update, including a search for new and substantial evidence on the benefits

  6. Update on the NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking Recommendations. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2002 the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) issued a groundbreaking report, "A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges." This report was developed by the NIAAA-supported Task Force on College Drinking after three years of intensive discussions. It described new understanding of dangerous…

  7. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... . Submit written comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration... Open Government Directive, issued by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget on December 8... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task Force...

  8. Effects of age and content of augmented feedback on learning an isometric force-production task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Henk; Mulder, Theo; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2007-01-01

    This study addressed the interaction between age and the informational content of feedback on learning an isometric force-production task. Healthy men and women (30 young adults: 20 to 35 years; 30 older adults: 55 to 70 years) were randomly assigned to a certain type of feedback: knowledge of

  9. Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychological Association (APA), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls was formed in response to expressions of public concern regarding the sexualization of girls and girlhood in U.S. culture. This report examines and summarizes psychological theory, research, and clinical experience addressing the sexualization of girls. The…

  10. Screening for Impaired Visual Acuity in Older Adults : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Update of the 1996 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for visual impairment. Methods: The USPSTF reviewed evidence published since its last review on screening adults 65 years or older in the primary care setting for visual acuity

  11. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal : diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient

  12. Applying the Quebec Task Force criteria as a frame of reference for studies of whiplash injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegen, GJ; van Es, FD; Kingma, J; Meijler, WJ; ten Duis, HJ

    Research prior to 1995 showed a diversity of either inclusion or exclusion criteria (or both) for diagnosing whiplash injury. As a consequence, the Quebec Task Force (QTF) developed expert-based criteria, which may be considered as a the 'new' gold standard. Here, we examined the inclusion criteria

  13. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 3: adjusting services to future needs

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We continue our articles on the Task Force reports The number of craftsmen and technicians could be increased with a change in the staff composition. The mandate for Task Force 3 was to make proposals for savings and new cost control procedures in the area of Industrial Support and Contracts for the period until 2009. The aim, explains the convenor, Karl-Heinz Kissler, was to keep spending under control under difficult conditions when staff numbers are decreasing and the work for the LHC becomes more demanding. The measures proposed, if implemented, could lead to savings of around 170 MCHF. The proposals involve both Industrial Services contracts, which were discussed in the Bulletin of the 22nd of April (n°17/2002) and readjustments for staff at CERN, on which we concentrate here. As with other Task Forces the principle aim was to be able to refocus resources onto the LHC project. In this respect, Task Force 3 could work within the framework of the revised programme for the LHC and the reduced non-LHC pro...

  14. Task force report: Scales for screening and evaluating tremor: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elble, R.; Bain, P.; Forjaz, M. Joao; Haubenberger, D.; Testa, C.; Goetz, C.G.; Leentjens, A.F.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le; Post, B.; Sampaio, C.; Stebbins, G.T.; Weintraub, D.; Schrag, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life

  15. Proceedings of the 12th Task Force Meeting in Silkeborg, Denmark, October 23-25, 1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S. E.; Friberg, Nikolai

    Preface: At the twelfth meeting of the Programme Task Force held on 23-25 October 1996, in Silkeborg, Denmark, several national experts presented information on relevant ongoing national research and monitoring activities and recent results. In the proceedings of the meeting we have compiled five...

  16. Herself: Elle-Meme. Report of the Nova Scotia Task Force on the Status of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova Scotia Task Force on the Status of Women, Halifax.

    This report to the Canadian Government from the Nova Scotia Women's Task Force examines the social issues and problems pertaining to the women's movement in that province. Discussions are provided on the situations and attitudes toward homemakers, working women, marriage, divorce, child care, education, health, and political participation.…

  17. EFNS Guidelines on cognitive rehabilitation: report of an EFNS Task Force.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappa, S.F.; Benke, T; Clarke, S.; Rossi, B.; Stemmer, B.; Heugten, C.M. van

    2003-01-01

    In 1999, a Task Force was set up under the auspices of the European Federation of Neurological Societies with the aim to evaluate the existing evidence for the clinical effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation. This review led to the development of a set of guidelines to be used in the management

  18. The Status of Hunger in Cities, April 1985. Task Force on Joblessness and Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Conference of Mayors, Washington, DC.

    A survey by the U.S. Conference of Mayors of its 22 member Task Force on Joblessness on Hunger to determine the current status of hunger in cities revealed the following facts among others: (1) Despite 15 months of economic recovery, the problem of hunger has grown and is expected to increase over the next year; (2) Two-thirds of the cities…

  19. Effects of age and content of augmented feedback on learning an isometric force-production task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H; Mulder, T.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    This study addressed the interaction between age and the informational content of feedback on learning an isometric force-production task. Healthy men and women (30 young adults: 20 to 35 years; 30 older adults: 55 to 70 years) were randomly assigned to a certain type of feedback: knowledge of

  20. Increasing physical activity. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-26

    The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of community interventions to increase physical activity. The Task Force either strongly recommends or recommends six interventions: two informational approaches (i.e., communitywide campaigns and point-of-decision prompts to encourage use of stairs); three behavioral and social approaches (i.e., school-based physical education, social support interventions in community settings [e.g., setting up a buddy system or contracting with another person to complete specified levels of physical activity], and individually adapted health behavior change programs); and one intervention to increase physical activity by using environmental and policy approaches (i.e., creation of or enhanced access to places for physical activity, combined with informational outreach activities). The Task Force found insufficient evidence on which to base recommendations for classroom-based health education focused on information provision, behavioral skills, and social support interventions in family settings because of inconsistent findings; mass media campaigns, college-age physical education, and health education because of an insufficient number of studies; and classroom-based health education focusing on reducing television viewing and video game playing because of the lack of a demonstrated link between reduced time spent watching television or playing video games and increased physical activity. This report provides additional information regarding the recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information that can help in applying the interventions locally.

  1. Fulfillment of Urgent Operational Needs. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Detect, Identify, Neutralize (TF ODIN ) While not intended, the multiple organizations and processes available may allow simultaneous pursuit of...Science Board Innovation Task Force Study Mr. Roberto Rodriguez , OUSD(C) (Investment) CAPT Douglas Borrebach, Comptroller, JIEDDO CDR Phil Walker...Office of the Chief Army Reserve ODIN observe, detect, identify, neutralize ONS operational need statement ORSA operations research and systems

  2. Report of the Task Force on the Incident of 19th September 2008 at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Claudet, S; Cruikshank, P; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Fessia, P; Garion, C; Jimenez, JM; Kirby, G; Lebrun, Ph; Le Naour, S; Mess, K-H; Modena, M; Montabonnet, V; Nunes, R; Parma, V; Perin, A; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Strubin, P; Tavian, L; Thiesen, H; Tock, J; Todesco, E; Veness, R; Verweij, A; Walckiers, L; Van Weelderen, R; Wolf, R; Fehér, S; Flora, R; Koratzinos, M; Limon, P; Strait, J

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the AT department Task Force established to investigate the 19th September 2008 incident which occurred in sector 3-4 of the LHC. It includes a number of annexes where specific analyses are detailed.

  3. Scope of Practice Barriers for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: A State Task Force to Minimize Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, Maria A; Berends, Susan K; Reyes, Jimmy; Wycoff, Carmen; Kinnetz, Meghan; Frohling, Ami; Baker, Laura; Whitty, Sue; Dirks, Mary; OʼBrien, Mary

    2017-09-01

    Collegial relationships, administrative champions, and persistence are key components to breaking down barriers to advanced practice RN (APRN) practice. This article addresses how Iowa APRNs in a state-sanctioned task force identified barriers for practicing at the top of their licensure in a full practice authority state including defending the right to control the scope of nursing practice in court.

  4. Comparison of impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in surfing-related landing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Nimphius, Sophia; Raymond, Ellen; Secomb, Josh L; Farley, Oliver R L; Newton, Robert U; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in five different landing tasks that are used in training and testing for competitive surfing athletes, to assist coaches in the prescription of landing task progression and monitoring training load. Eleven competitive surfing athletes aged 24 ± 7 years participated, and inertial motion sensors were fixed to the anterior aspect of the feet, mid-tibial shafts, sacrum and eighth thoracic vertebrae on these athletes. Three tasks were performed landing on force plates and two tasks in a modified gymnastics set-up used for land-based aerial training. Peak landing force, resultant peak acceleration and front and rear side ankle dorsiflexion ranges of motion during landing were determined. The peak acceleration was approximately 50% higher when performing aerial training using a mini-trampoline and landing on a soft-density foam board, compared to a similar landing off a 50 cm box. Furthermore, the ankle ranges of motion during the gymnastic type landings were significantly lower than the other landing types (P ≤ 0.05 and P ≤ 0.001), for front and rear sides, respectively. Conclusively, increased task complexity and specificity of the sport increased the tibial peak acceleration, indicating greater training load.

  5. Handle Shape Affects the Grip Force Distribution and the Muscle Loadings During Power Grip Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Jérémy; Goislard De Monsabert, Benjamin; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of handle shape on the grip force distribution in the hand and on the muscle forces during maximal power grip tasks. Eleven subjects maximally grasped 3 handles with different external shapes (circular, elliptic, and double-frustum). A handle dynamometer, equipped with both a force sensor and a pressure map, was used to record the forces exerted at the hand/handle interface. The finger and wrist joint postures were also computed from synchronized kinematic measurement. These processed data were then used as input of a biomechanical hand model to estimate muscle forces. The results showed that handle shape influences the maximal grip force, the grip force distribution, and the finger joint postures. Particularly, we observed that the elliptical shape resulted in a 6.6% lower maximal grip force compared with the circular and double-frustum handle. Concomitantly, the estimated muscle forces also varied significantly according to the handle shape, with up to 48% differences for the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle for example. Interestingly, different muscle coordination strategies were observed depending on the handle shape, therefore suggesting a potential influence of these geometrical characteristics on pathological risks such as tendonitis.

  6. Effects of muscle fatigue on grip and load force coordination and performance of manipulation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emge, Nicholas; Prebeg, Goran; Uygur, Mehmet; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-08-29

    Muscle fatigue is known to be associated with a deteriorated muscle coordination and impaired movement performance in variety of voluntary movements. The aim of this study was to investigate the generally underexplored effect of muscle fatigue on both the coordination between grip force (GF; the force component perpendicular to the hand-object contact area that provides friction) and load force (LF; the parallel force component that can move the object or support the body) as well as movement performance in manipulation tasks. Fifteen participants performed a variety of static and dynamic manipulations both with and without a preceding procedure designed to fatigue the arm and hand muscles. The tasks involved exertion of ramp-and-hold and oscillation patterns of LF against an externally fixed instrumented device, and a simple lift of a freely moving device. The results revealed a fatigue-associated decrease in GF scaling (i.e., the magnitude of GF relative to LF) and GF-LF coupling (correlation between GF and LF), while the task performance regarding the accuracy of exertion of the prescribed LF profiles remained unaffected. We conclude that muscle fatigue both partly decouples GF from LF and reduces the overall GF magnitude, which could potentially explain why hand-held objects are more likely to drop when manipulated with fatigued muscles. However, the unaffected task performance could be explained either by the relatively low level of muscle forces required by the tested tasks, the moderate level of the fatigue imposed, or both. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  8. Theater Sustainment Reserve for the Rwanda Defence Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    laboratory with blood transfusion possibility and surgical facility that can be leveraged by the RDF. In addition, the health-care facility had the...laboratory with blood transfusion possibility and surgical facility. This can be leveraged by the RDF. In addition, the health-care facility had the...required to build this robust sustainment structure are beyond the topic of this study. The lack of time and resources did not allow interviews of

  9. Sustaining Air Force Aging Aircraft into the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Development Center) to receive information. Locations included Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB), Ohio ; Hill AFB, Utah; Robins AFB, Georgia; Scott AFB...Northrop Grumman (Palmdale. California). Lockheed-Martin ( Marietta , Georgia), and General Atomics (San Diego, California). The Panel also was...meeting at Lockheed Martin facility in Marietta , GA. (Note: Briefing contains Lockheed Martin proprietary information). Babish, C. (2009, September

  10. Sustainable animal welfare: does forcing farmers into transition help?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, S.A.; Kramer, M.R.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Dutch society is changing, and so is its attitude towards animal welfare. Meat retailers respond by laying down minimum-quality criteria for farmers who wish to supply to supermarkets—forcing them to either aim for higher quality or lose their market. Policy-wise this is a top-down measure that

  11. United States Plan for Sustaining the Afghan National Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    approximately 900 soldiers, the CNIK had the specified mission to provide security for the MoI’s Poppy Eradication Forces ( PEF ). The CNIK and PEF ...conducted poppy eradication operations in RC South from January to April 2009. The security provided by the CNIK enabled the PEF to eradicate 2,644...hectares of poppy during the 2009 season, compared to 1,174 hectares during 2008. CNIK and PEF operations encountered resistance from insurgents and

  12. The ISPOR Good Practices for Quality Improvement of Cost-Effectiveness Research Task Force Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhan, William F; Al, Maiwenn; Doshi, Jalpa A; Kamae, Isao; Marx, Steven E; Rindress, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Health Science Policy Council recommended and the ISPOR Board of Directors approved the formation of a Task Force to critically examine the major issues related to Quality Improvement in Cost-effectiveness Research (QICER). The Council's primary recommendation for this Task Force was that it should report on the quality of cost-effectiveness research and make recommendations to facilitate the improvement of pharmacoeconomics and health outcomes research and its use in stimulating better health care and policy. Task force members were knowledgeable and experienced in medicine, pharmacy, biostatistics, health policy and health-care decision-making, biomedical knowledge transfer, health economics, and pharmacoeconomics. They were drawn from industry, academia, consulting organizations, and advisors to governments and came from Japan, the Netherlands, Canada and the United States. Face-to-face meetings of the Task Force were held at ISPOR North American and European meetings and teleconferences occurred every few months. Literature reviews and surveys were conducted and the first preliminary findings presented at an open forum at the May 2008 ISPOR meeting in Toronto. The final draft report was circulated to the expert reviewer group and then to the entire membership for comment. The draft report was posted on the ISPOR Web site in April 2009. All formal comments received were posted to the association Web site and presented for discussion at the Task Force forum during the ISPOR 14th Annual International Meeting in May 2009. Comments and feedback from the forums, reviewers and membership were considered in the final report. Once Task Force consensus was reached, the article was submitted to Value in Health. The QICER Task Force recommends that ISPOR implement the following: * With respect to CER guidelines, that ISPOR promote harmonization of guidelines, allowing for differences in

  13. Force control tasks with pure haptic feedback promote short-term focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Gaofeng; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Focused attention has great impact on our quality of life. Our learning, social skills and even happiness are closely intertwined with our capacity for focused attention. Attention promotion is replete with examples of training-induced increases in attention capability, most of which rely on visual and auditory stimulation. Pure haptic stimulation to increase attention capability is rarely found. We show that accurate force control tasks with pure haptic feedback enhance short-term focused attention. Participants were trained by a force control task in which information from visual and auditory channels was blocked, and only haptic feedback was provided. The trainees were asked to exert a target force within a pre-defined force tolerance for a specific duration. The tolerance was adaptively modified to different levels of difficulty to elicit full participant engagement. Three attention tests showed significant changes in different aspects of focused attention in participants who had been trained as compared with those who had not, thereby illustrating the role of haptic-based sensory-motor tasks in the promotion of short-term focused attention. The findings highlight the potential value of haptic stimuli in brain plasticity and serve as a new tool to extend existing computer games for cognitive enhancement.

  14. Contribution of the Cerebellum in Cue-Dependent Force Changes During an Isometric Precision Grip Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Dieter F; Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P

    2016-08-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip forces and pull forces. During this task, subjects use a specialised grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The positions of the fingers are unrestrained and freely selectable. From the finger positions and the geometry of the grip rod, a physical lever was derived which is a comprehensive measurement of the subject's grip behaviour. In this study, the involvement of the cerebellum in establishing cued force changes (CFC) was examined. The auditory stimulus was associated with a motor behaviour that has to be readjusted during an ongoing movement that already started. Moreover, cerebellar involvement on grip behaviour was examined. The results show that patients presenting with degenerating cerebellar disease (CBL) were able to elicit CFC and were additionally able to optimise grip behaviour by minimising the lever. Comparison of the results of CBL with a control group of healthy subjects showed, however, that the CFC incidence was significantly lower and the reduction of the lever was less in CBL. Hence, the cerebellum is involved not only in the classical conditioning of reflexes but also in the association of sensory stimuli with complex changes in motor behaviour. Furthermore, the cerebellum is involved in the optimisation of grip behaviour during ongoing movements. Recent studies lead to the assumption that the cerebello-reticulo-spinal pathway might be important for the reduced optimisation of grip behaviour in CBL.

  15. Defense Science Board Task Force Report: The Role of Autonomy in DoD Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    sufficient for the demands of the task. Apple’s SIRI system for requesting information on the iPhone (based partly on results from DARPA’s Cognitive...TASK FORCE REPORT: The Role of Autonomy in DoD Systems July 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Role of Autonomy in DoD Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  16. 77 FR 6822 - Second Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... to Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY... Exposed to Violence (the ``Task Force''). The Task Force is chartered to provide OJP, a component of the Department of Justice, with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of...

  17. Teachers' Pensions: A Model Retirement Plan for the Future. Report of the Minister's Informal Task Force on Teachers' Pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The Minister of Education of Alberta, Canada established a task force in 1983 to analyze the characteristics of teachers' pension plans and to develop a model retirement plan for teachers in Alberta. The task force reviewed the legislative, structural, administrative, and financial characteristics of Alberta's existing Teachers' Retirement Fund as…

  18. 75 FR 34438 - Defense Science Board Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change for National and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... of the Secretary Defense Science Board Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change for... committee meetings. SUMMARY: The Defense Science Board Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change for National and International Security will meet in closed session on July 14-15 and on July 29...

  19. Unintentional force changes in cyclical tasks performed by an abundant system: Empirical observations and a dynamical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Hasanbarani, Fariba; Akulin, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2017-05-14

    The study explored unintentional force changes elicited by removing visual feedback during cyclical, two-finger isometric force production tasks. Subjects performed two types of tasks at 1Hz, paced by an auditory metronome. One - Force task - required cyclical changes in total force while maintaining the sharing, defined as relative contribution of a finger to total force. The other task - Share task - required cyclical changes in sharing while keeping total force unchanged. Each trial started under full visual feedback on both force and sharing; subsequently, feedback on the variable that was instructed to stay constant was frozen, and finally feedback on the other variable was also removed. In both tasks, turning off visual feedback on total force elicited a drop in the mid-point of the force cycle and an increase in the peak-to-peak force amplitude. Turning off visual feedback on sharing led to a drift of mean share toward 50:50 across both tasks. Without visual feedback there was consistent deviation of the two force time series from the in-phase pattern (typical of the Force task) and from the out-of-phase pattern (typical of the Share task). This finding is in contrast to most earlier studies that demonstrated only two stable patterns, in-phase and out-of-phase. We interpret the results as consequences of drifts of parameters in a dynamical system leading in particular to drifts in the referent finger coordinates toward their actual coordinates. The relative phase desynchronization is caused by the right-left differences in the hypothesized drift processes, consistent with the dynamic dominance hypothesis. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is the emotional Stroop task a special case of mood induction? Evidence from sustained effects of attention under emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Mama, Yaniv; Icht, Michal; Algom, Daniel

    Sustained effects of emotion are well known in everyday experience. Surprisingly, such effects are seldom recorded in laboratory studies of the emotional Stroop task, in which participants name the color of emotion and neutral words...

  1. Sustained attention is associated with error processing impairment: evidence from mental fatigue study in four-choice reaction time task

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Yi; Ma, Feng; Lv, Yixuan; Cai, Gui; Teng, Peng; Xu, FengGang; Chen, Shanguang

    2015-01-01

    .... In this study, we examined how error-related negativity (ERN) of a four-choice reaction time task was reduced in the mental fatigue condition and investigated the role of sustained attention in error processing...

  2. Effect of Body Structure on Skill Formation in a Force Precision Task Mimicking Cello Bowing Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi

    To elucidate the skill formation mechanism in a complex force precision task mimicking cello bowing movements, three-dimensional joint orientations and changes in bowing force are measured for 2 novice and 2 expert subjects. A rigid link model of the human upper limb is constructed in order to calculate changes in joint moment, potential energy and structural inductivity of motion during bowing, and the motions are compared kinetically. Results show that the novices generate low-in-potential energy bowing motion, but not suitable for skillful control of the bow. In contrast, the experts can fulfill a task requirement by skillfully coordinating the musculo-skeletal system, but the motion is not easy as that of the novices. It is suggested that the transition from a novice to an expert may be difficult due to the ease in the initially generated motion, which obstructs the search for the optimal skillful motion.

  3. The Force of Habit: Creating and Sustaining a Wellness Lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Patricia B; Swarbrick, Margaret A; Merlo, David M

    2015-09-01

    Regardless of an individual's mental health status, habits are difficult to establish and/or eliminate. Given the importance of good habits to overall health and wellness, nurses and other mental health service providers need to understand the force of habits (positive and negative), factors that make habit change difficult, and approaches that are likely to facilitate building and maintaining good habits. The current article provides a cursory overview of several factors (i.e., motivation, will-power, and rewards) that impact habit formation. Relevant theories and research are presented. Habit formation can be fostered through a careful analysis of current behaviors, specific and measurable short-term goals or objectives, and a detailed action plan. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Sustaining the Drone Enterprise: How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-17

    Sustaining the Drone Enterprise How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force Major Kiel M. Martin, Ph.D...CT 06510 Abstract The Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), colloquially labeled the “ drone ,” has become iconic of American military campaigns this...Sustaining the Drone Enterprise: How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force’ informed policy decisions by the Office of

  5. Defense Science Board Task Force on Military Satellite Communication and Tactical Networking. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    product of the Defense Science Board (DSB). The DSB is a Federal Advisory Committee established to provide independent advice to the Secretary of Defense...December 2014, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (USD(AT&L)) signed the “Terms of Reference – Defense Science ...Board Task Force on Military Satellite Communication and Tactical Networking.” As a result, the Chairman of the Defense Science Board established a

  6. New task force aims to revamp revenue cycle with a 'patient-centric' focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Revenue Cycle Management Task Force of the Heathcare Information and Management Systems Society is addressing the next generation of revenue cycle management processes and tools. Payers, providers, vendors, and consultants are involved. Front-end processes such as patient access, business analytics, and point-of-service collections are a key focus. Patient access will need new technology or updated legacy systems. Patients will be able to manage their care with a single portal.

  7. Modeling the Creation of Actionable Knowledge within a Joint Task Force Command System (Project GNOSIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    SYSTEM SJ SYSTEM INTERACTIONS AND INFLUENCES SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM SYSTEM I Multiple actors egaglng In comunities of Commrunitles of Interest...STINFO COPY AFRL-HE-WP-TR-2006-0156 Modeling the Creation of Actionable Knowledge within a Joint Task Force Command System (Project GNOSIS) Dennis K...Cognitive Systems Branch WPAFB OH 45433-7604 Best Available Copy 20070129146 NOTICE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in

  8. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Approach to Child Cognitive and Behavioral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Alex R; Mabry-Hernandez, Iris R; Grossman, David C

    2016-10-01

    An important component of routine preventive care for children is the monitoring of growth and development. Although cognitive, affective, and behavioral health problems are commonly encountered in pediatric primary care, there is debate around issues related to early detection of significant problems of this type, including the accuracy of screening and the benefits and harms of early diagnosis and treatment. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force makes recommendations regarding clinical preventive services for primary care clinicians based on the best available scientific evidence. The Task Force has found important gaps related to the validity of commonly used screening tools and significant gaps related to the evidence regarding early treatment. This review describes the meaning of the grades used by the Task Force, how these grades are determined, and the grades assigned to childhood cognitive, affective, and behavioral health recommendations. The review summarizes common themes in the evidence gaps and the future research necessary to advance the field and improve child health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: summary of the ERS Task Force report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jane S.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease characterised by abnormal motile ciliary function. There is no “gold standard” diagnostic test for PCD. The European Respiratory Society (ERS) Task Force Guidelines for diagnosing PCD recommend that patients should be referred for diagnostic testing if they have several of the following features: persistent wet cough; situs anomalies; congenital cardiac defects; persistent rhinitis; chronic middle ear disease with or without hearing loss; or a history, in term infants, of neonatal upper and lower respiratory symptoms or neonatal intensive care admission. The ERS Task Force recommends that patients should be investigated in a specialist PCD centre with access to a range of complementary tests: nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Additional tests including immunofluorescence labelling of ciliary proteins and genetic testing may also help determine the diagnosis. Educational aims This article is intended for primary and secondary care physicians interested in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), i.e. those who identify patients for testing, and those involved in diagnosing and managing PCD patients. It aims: to inform readers about the new European Respiratory Society Task Force Guidelines for diagnosing patients with PCDto enable primary and secondary care physicians to: identify patients who need diagnostic testing; understand the diagnostic tests that their patients will undergo, the results of the tests and their limitations; and ensure that appropriate care is subsequently delivered. PMID:28894478

  10. Is the thumb a fifth finger? A study of digit interaction during force production tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Halla; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied indices of digit interaction in single- and multi-digit maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) tests when the thumb acted either in parallel or in opposition to the fingers. The peak force produced by the thumb was much higher when the thumb acted in opposition to the fingers and its share of the total force in the five-digit MVC test increased dramatically. The fingers showed relatively similar peak forces and unchanged sharing patterns in the four-finger MVC task when the thumb acted in parallel and in opposition to the fingers. Enslaving during one-digit tasks showed relatively mild differences between the two conditions, while the differences became large when enslaving was quantified for multi-digit tasks. Force deficit was pronounced when the thumb acted in parallel to the fingers; it showed a monotonic increase with the number of explicitly involved digits up to four digits and then a drop when all five digits were involved. Force deficit all but disappeared when the thumb acted in opposition to the fingers. However, for both thumb positions, indices of digit interaction were similar for groups of digits that did or did not include the thumb. These results suggest that, given a certain hand configuration, the central nervous system treats the thumb as a fifth finger. They provide strong support for the hypothesis that indices of digit interaction reflect neural factors, not the peripheral design of the hand. An earlier formal model was able to account for the data when the thumb acted in parallel to the fingers. However, it failed for the data with the thumb acting in opposition to the fingers. PMID:15322785

  11. 76 FR 56743 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces; Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense.... Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. 2 p.m. Break. 2:15 p.m. Quality of Life Foundation. 3:15 p.m. National Military Family Association. 4:15 p.m. Task Force Installation Visit Review. 5 p.m. Closing...

  12. 78 FR 28580 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary of... Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces (subsequently referred to as.... Task Force Recommendation Developments Review of Support to Family Care Givers 9:45 a.m.-10:00 a.m...

  13. BILATERAL GROUND REACTION FORCES AND JOINT MOMENTS FOR LATERAL SIDESTEPPING AND CROSSOVER STEPPING TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Sellers

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Racquet sports have high levels of joint injuries suggesting the joint loads during play may be excessive. Sports such as badminton employ lateral sidestepping (SS and crossover stepping (XS movements which so far have not been described in terms of biomechanics. This study examined bilateral ground reaction forces and three dimensional joint kinetics for both these gaits in order to determine the demands of the movements on the leading and trailing limb and predict the contribution of these movements to the occurrence of overuse injury of the lower limbs. A force platform and motion-analysis system were used to record ground reaction forces and track marker trajectories of 9 experienced male badminton players performing lateral SS, XS and forward running tasks at a controlled speed of 3 m·s-1 using their normal technique. Ground reaction force and kinetic data for the hip, knee and ankle were analyzed, averaged across the group and the biomechanical variables compared. In all cases the ground reaction forces and joint moments were less than those experienced during moderate running suggesting that in normal play SS and XS gaits do not lead to high forces that could contribute to increased injury risk. Ground reaction forces during SS and XS do not appear to contribute to the development of overuse injury. The distinct roles of the leading and trailing limb, acting as a generator of vertical force and shock absorber respectively, during the SS and XS may however contribute to the development of muscular imbalances which may ultimately contribute to the development of overuse injury. However it is still possible that faulty use of these gaits might lead to high loads and this should be the subject of future work

  14. Effects of Visual Force Feedback on Robot-Assisted Surgical Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiley, Carol E.; Akinbiyi, Takintope; Burschka, Darius; Chang, David C.; Okamura, Allison M.; Yuh, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Direct haptic (force or tactile) feedback is negligible in current surgical robotic systems. The relevance of haptic feedback in robot-assisted performances of surgical tasks is controversial. We studied the effects of visual force feedback (VFF), a haptic feedback surrogate, on tying surgical knots with fine sutures similar to those used in cardiovascular surgery. Methods Using a modified da Vinci robotic system (Intuitive Surgical, Inc.) equipped with force-sensing instrument tips and real-time VFF overlays in the console image, ten surgeons each tied 10 knots with and 10 knots without VFF. Four surgeons had significant prior da Vinci experience while the remaining six surgeons did not. Performance parameters, including suture breakage and secure knots, peak and standard deviation of applied forces, and completion times using 5-0 silk sutures were recorded. Chi-square and Student’s t-test analyses determined differences between groups. Results Among surgeon subjects with robotic experience, no differences in measured performance parameters were found between robot-assisted knot ties executed with and without VFF. Among surgeons without robotic experience, however, VFF was associated with lower suture breakage rates, peak applied forces, and standard deviations of applied forces. VFF did not impart differences in knot completion times or loose knots for either surgeon group. Conclusions VFF resulted in reduced suture breakage, lower forces, and decreased force inconsistencies among novice robotic surgeons, although elapsed time and knot quality were unaffected. In contrast, VFF did not affect these metrics among experienced da Vinci surgeons. These results suggest that VFF primarily benefits novice robot-assisted surgeons, with diminishing benefits among experienced surgeons. PMID:18179942

  15. The influences of task repetition, napping, time of day, and instruction on the Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Mojca K M; Alblas, Eva E; Thijs, Roland D; Fronczek, Rolf; Lammers, Gert Jan; van Dijk, J Gert

    2014-01-01

    The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) helps to quantify vigilance impairments.Previous studies, in which five SART sessions on one day were administered, demonstrated worse performance during the first session than during the others. The present study comprises two experiments to identify a cause of this phenomenon. Experiment 1, counting eighty healthy participants, assessed effects of repetition,napping, and time of day on SART performance through a between-groups design. The SART was performed twice in the morning or twice in the afternoon; half of the participants took a 20-minute nap before the second SART. A strong correlation between error count and reaction time (RT) suggested effects of test instruction. Participants gave equal weight to speed and accuracy in Experiment 1; therefore, results of 20 participants were compared to those of 20 additional participants who were told to prefer accuracy (Experiment 2). The average SART error count in Experiment 1 was 10.1; the median RT was 280 ms. Neither repetition nor napping influenced error count or RT. Time of day did not influence error count, but RT was significantly longer for morning than for afternoon SARTs. The additional participants in Experiment 2 had a 49% lower error count and a 14% higher RT than the participants in Experiment 1. Error counts reduced by 50% from the first to the second session of Experiment 2, irrespective of napping or time of day. Preferring accuracy over speed was associated with a significantly lower error count. The data suggest that a worse performance in the first SART session only occurs when instructing participants to prefer accuracy, which is caused by repetition, not by napping or time of day. We advise that participants are instructed to prefer accuracy over speed when performing the SART and that a full practice session is included.

  16. Creating a New Model for Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation for Critical Infrastructure: The New York City Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and the NYC Panel on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Solecki, W. D.; Freed, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    The New York City Climate Change Adaptation Task Force, launched in August 2008, aims to secure the city's critical infrastructure against rising seas, higher temperatures and fluctuating water supplies projected to result from climate change. The Climate Change Adaptation Task Force is part of PlaNYC, the city's long- term sustainability plan, and is composed of over 30 city and state agencies, public authorities and companies that operate the region's roads, bridges, tunnels, mass transit, and water, sewer, energy and telecommunications systems - all with critical infrastructure identified as vulnerable. It is one of the most comprehensive adaptation efforts yet launched by an urban region. To guide the effort, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has formed the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), modeled on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Experts on the panel include climatologists, sea-level rise specialists, adaptation experts, and engineers, as well as representatives from the insurance and legal sectors. The NPCC is developing planning tools for use by the Task Force members that provide information about climate risks, adaptation and risk assessment, prioritization frameworks, and climate protection levels. The advisory panel is supplying climate change projections, helping to identify at- risk infrastructure, and assisting the Task Force in developing adaptation strategies and guidelines for design of new structures. The NPCC will also publish an assessment report in 2009 that will serve as the foundation for climate change adaptation in the New York City region, similar to the IPCC reports. Issues that the Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and the NPCC are addressing include decision- making under climate change uncertainty, effective ways for expert knowledge to be incorporated into public actions, and strategies for maintaining consistent and effective attention to long-term climate change even as municipal governments cycle

  17. Multi-muscle synergies in an unusual postural task: quick shear force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Thomas; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2008-05-01

    We considered a hypothetical two-level hierarchy participating in the control of vertical posture. The framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to explore the muscle groupings (M-modes) and multi-M-mode synergies involved in the stabilization of a time profile of the shear force in the anterior-posterior direction. Standing subjects were asked to produce pulses of shear force into a target using visual feedback while trying to minimize the shift of the center of pressure (COP). Principal component analysis applied to integrated muscle activation indices identified three M-modes. The composition of the M-modes was similar across subjects and the two directions of the shear force pulse. It differed from the composition of M-modes described in earlier studies of more natural actions associated with large COP shifts. Further, the trial-to-trial M-mode variance was partitioned into two components: one component that does not affect a particular performance variable (V(UCM)), and its orthogonal component (V(ORT)). We argued that there is a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing this particular performance variable if V(UCM) is higher than V(ORT). Overall, we found a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing both shear force and COP coordinate. For the shear force, this synergy was strong for the backward force pulses and nonsignificant for the forward pulses. An opposite result was found for the COP coordinate: the synergy was stronger for the forward force pulses. The study shows that M-mode composition can change in a task-specific way and that two different performance variables can be stabilized using the same set of elemental variables (M-modes). The different dependences of the ΔV indices for the shear force and COP coordinate on the force pulse direction supports applicability of the principle of superposition (separate controllers for different performance variables) to the control of different mechanical variables in postural tasks. The M

  18. Task-space separation principle: a force-field approach to motion planning for redundant manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Paolo; Campolo, Domenico

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we address human-like motor planning in redundant manipulators. Specifically, we want to capture postural synergies such as Donders' law, experimentally observed in humans during kinematically redundant tasks, and infer a minimal set of parameters to implement similar postural synergies in a kinematic model. For the model itself, although the focus of this paper is to solve redundancy by implementing postural strategies derived from experimental data, we also want to ensure that such postural control strategies do not interfere with other possible forms of motion control (in the task-space), i.e. solving the posture/movement problem. The redundancy problem is framed as a constrained optimization problem, traditionally solved via the method of Lagrange multipliers. The posture/movement problem can be tackled via the separation principle which, derived from experimental evidence, posits that the brain processes static torques (i.e. posture-dependent, such as gravitational torques) separately from dynamic torques (i.e. velocity-dependent). The separation principle has traditionally been applied at a joint torque level. Our main contribution is to apply the separation principle to Lagrange multipliers, which act as task-space force fields, leading to a task-space separation principle. In this way, we can separate postural control (implementing Donders' law) from various types of tasks-space movement planners. As an example, the proposed framework is applied to the (redundant) task of pointing with the human wrist. Nonlinear inverse optimization (NIO) is used to fit the model parameters and to capture motor strategies displayed by six human subjects during pointing tasks. The novelty of our NIO approach is that (i) the fitted motor strategy, rather than raw data, is used to filter and down-sample human behaviours; (ii) our framework is used to efficiently simulate model behaviour iteratively, until it converges towards the experimental human strategies.

  19. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Liu

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response (sNBR using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal."

  20. Bilateral ground reaction forces and joint moments for lateral sidestepping and crossover stepping tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntze, Gregor; Sellers, William I.; Mansfield, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Racquet sports have high levels of joint injuries suggesting the joint loads during play may be excessive. Sports such as badminton employ lateral sidestepping (SS) and crossover stepping (XS) movements which so far have not been described in terms of biomechanics. This study examined bilateral ground reaction forces and three dimensional joint kinetics for both these gaits in order to determine the demands of the movements on the leading and trailing limb and predict the contribution of these movements to the occurrence of overuse injury of the lower limbs. A force platform and motion-analysis system were used to record ground reaction forces and track marker trajectories of 9 experienced male badminton players performing lateral SS, XS and forward running tasks at a controlled speed of 3 m·s-1 using their normal technique. Ground reaction force and kinetic data for the hip, knee and ankle were analyzed, averaged across the group and the biomechanical variables compared. In all cases the ground reaction forces and joint moments were less than those experienced during moderate running suggesting that in normal play SS and XS gaits do not lead to high forces that could contribute to increased injury risk. Ground reaction forces during SS and XS do not appear to contribute to the development of overuse injury. The distinct roles of the leading and trailing limb, acting as a generator of vertical force and shock absorber respectively, during the SS and XS may however contribute to the development of muscular imbalances which may ultimately contribute to the development of overuse injury. However it is still possible that faulty use of these gaits might lead to high loads and this should be the subject of future work. Key pointsGround reaction forces and joint moments during lateral stepping are smaller in magnitude than those experienced during moderate running.Force exposure in SS and XS gaits in normal play does not appear to contribute to the development of

  1. The German Task Force for Earthquakes - A temporary network aftershock monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Eggert, S.; Grosser, H.; Hainzl, S.; Günther, E.

    2009-04-01

    The German Task Force for Earthquakes (GTF) is an interdisciplinary group for immediate response on disastrous earthquakes with the aim to monitor the post-seismic processes and assess the impact of the seismic event on the disaster stricken area. For accomplishing this task, 20 short-period seismic stations for aftershock monitoring; and 10 strong motion instruments for purposes in engineering seismology are available exclusively for the use of the GTF. Furthermore, the GTF is equipped with tools for hydro-geological investigations and has 6 GPS instruments at hand for studying post-seismic deformation. Geological, sociological and remote sensing expertise is provided by a number of scientists at the GFZ or other national and international universities and organisations. We would like to present a variety of results achieved in 20 missions we were able to conduct up to date. This will give an overview on the scientific opportunities which lie in collecting and investigating high resolution local earthquake data. In future, online data transmission is envisaged to allow for aftershock hazard assessment to benefit the work of rescue teams and local authorities in the area concerned. In general, decision making in the beginning of a Task Force activity requires a system of fast dissemination of earthquake information which in our case, is provided by GEOFON.

  2. Asymmetry of lower extremity force and muscle activation during knee extension and functional tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Colin W; Cook, Summer B; Swartz, Erik E; Laroche, Dain P

    2017-09-01

    Strength and power asymmetries of >10% may negatively impact physical function. Twenty-four healthy participants, 30-60 years of age, were assessed for muscle power asymmetry during isokinetic knee extension and ground reaction force asymmetry during chair-rise and vertical jump tasks. Neuromuscular activation asymmetry and coactivation of vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) were assessed in each condition. Symmetric (SG) and asymmetric (AG) groups were identified using a 10% knee extension power asymmetry criterion. The AG had greater chair-rise rate of force development asymmetry (P = 0.003, d = 1.29), but a similar chair-rise and vertical jump peak force asymmetry as the SG. Large group effects were found for VL activation asymmetry during knee extension (P = 0.047, d = 0.87), BF activation asymmetry during vertical jump (P = 0.015, d = 1.12), and strong leg coactivation during vertical jump (P = 0.028, d = 0.96). Compensation for muscle power asymmetry may occur during functional tasks, potentially through differential activation of strong and weak leg muscles. Muscle Nerve 56: 495-504, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhausen, Axel; Bomfim, Joao

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements) and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps) on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF) conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring), SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003). In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR) during ankle jumps (p = 0.006) and multi-jumps (pjumps only (pjumps in minimalist shoes (p = 0.037). Cushioned shoes induced lower VILR (pjumps and multi-jumps compared to minimalist shoes. During ankle jumps, cushioned shoes induced greater Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force (PVGRF, p = 0.002), greater Vertical Average Loading Rate (pjumps, PVGRF was lower (pjump height was higher (pjump tasks, whether it was provided by the shoes or the sports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected. PMID:29020108

  4. Status Report of the Inter-Laboratory Task Force on Remote Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, Nan

    2001-12-13

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be major projects which may require a new mode of international and inter-laboratory collaboration. They are likely to be too costly to be funded by a single nation and too large to be built by a single laboratory. The tremendous technical challenge of a new facility requires a critical mass of highly qualified and experienced physicists and engineers. These experts are presently distributed among the major accelerator centers around the world and it is believed important to maintain and develop this broad base of expertise. The successful accelerator technology development of recent decades depended on extensive exchange of people with complementary technical skills. Therefore, it is desirable and probably necessary that several accelerator laboratories will participate in any future project. A consequence of a multi-laboratory project is that the accelerator will be located a considerable distance from most of the contributing institutions which design, build and operate it. These considerations led the International Committee for Future Accelerators to initiate a study on the general and technical implications of such a collaboration. Two task forces were formed in February 2000 to conduct this study and they were asked to prepare a report on a time scale of one year. The task force on Remote Operation included members from most of the major accelerator laboratories around the world with expertise on accelerator operation, controls software, communication technologies, hardware design and maintenance. The task force members gathered information from the experts at their own institutions and from available experience in other fields, particularly astronomy.

  5. ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law 21: genetic screening of gamete donors: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondorp, W; De Wert, G; Pennings, G; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U; Tüttelmann, F; Provoost, V

    2014-07-01

    This Task Force document explores the ethical issues involved in the debate about the scope of genetic screening of gamete donors. Calls for expanded donor screening arise against the background of both occasional findings of serious but rare genetic conditions in donors or donor offspring that were not detected through present screening procedures and the advent of new genomic technologies promising affordable testing of donors for a wide range of conditions. Ethical principles require that all stakeholders' interests are taken into account, including those of candidate donors. The message of the profession should be that avoiding all risks is impossible and that testing should remain proportional.

  6. International PV QA Task Force's Proposed Comparative Rating System for PV Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force is developing a rating system that provides comparative information about the relative durability of PV modules. Development of accelerated stress tests that can provide such comparative information is seen as a major step toward being able to predict PV module service life. This paper will provide details of the ongoing effort to determine the format of such an overall module rating system. The latest proposal is based on using three distinct climate zones as defined in IEC 60721-2-1 for two different mounting systems. Specific stresses beyond those used in the qualification tests are being developed for each of the selected climate zones.

  7. Overview and history of the Beach Vitex Task Force: an interagency partnership in action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Brabson, Elizabeth N.

    2011-01-01

    Beach vitex (Vitex rotundifolia L. f.), a woody vine from Korea, was introduced into the United States as a dune stabilization plant in the mid-1980s. By the mid- to late-1990s, Beach vitex was observed spreading from landscape plantings along the South Carolina coast, crowding out native dune species. In 2003, in response to concerns about possible impacts of the plant on native dune species, as well as loggerhead sea turtle nesting habitat, the South Carolina Beach Vitex Task Force was organized to address the problem. Since that time, the effort to control Beach vitex has expanded to include North Carolina, and more recently, Virginia.

  8. 'Nothing less than its eradication'? Ireland's hunger task force and the production of hunger

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of actors have intervened in the debate about the causes of hunger and what can be done to eradicate it. One example is a 2008 report by the Hunger Task Force, a group of development experts mandated by the Irish government to explain the root causes of hunger and identify ways for Ireland to play a leading role in eradicating it. In this paper, I present a critical review of what the HTF report says about the causes of hunger. I argue the report fails to live up to its aim of co...

  9. Low-frequency fluctuation in continuous real-time feedback of finger force: a new paradigm for sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhang-Ye; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Wang, Jue; Qing, Zhao; Zang, Zhen-Xiang; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2012-08-01

    Behavioral studies have suggested a low-frequency (0.05 Hz) fluctuation of sustained attention on the basis of the intra-individual variability of reaction-time. Conventional task designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies are not appropriate for frequency analysis. The present study aimed to propose a new paradigm, real-time finger force feedback (RT-FFF), to study the brain mechanisms of sustained attention and neurofeedback. We compared the low-frequency fluctuations in both behavioral and fMRI data from 38 healthy adults (19 males; mean age, 22.3 years). Two fMRI sessions, in RT-FFF and sham finger force feedback (S-FFF) states, were acquired (TR 2 s, Siemens Trio 3-Tesla scanner, 8 min each, counter-balanced). Behavioral data of finger force were obtained simultaneously at a sampling rate of 250 Hz. Frequency analysis of the behavioral data showed lower amplitude in the low-frequency band (0.004-0.104 Hz) but higher amplitude in the high-frequency band (27.02-125 Hz) in the RT-FFF than the S-FFF states. The mean finger force was not significantly different between the two states. fMRI data analysis showed higher fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) in the S-FFF than in the RT-FFF state in the visual cortex, but higher fALFF in RT-FFF than S-FFF in the middle frontal gyrus, the superior frontal gyrus, and the default mode network. The behavioral results suggest that the proposed paradigm may provide a new approach to studies of sustained attention. The fMRI results suggest that a distributed network including visual, motor, attentional, and default mode networks may be involved in sustained attention and/or real-time feedback. This paradigm may be helpful for future studies on deficits of attention, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and mild traumatic brain injury.

  10. 77 FR 4787 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... the Task Force's topics of inquiry. Agenda: (Please refer to http://dtf.defense.gov/rwtf/meetings.html.... Marine Corps WWR Staff Training 5:15-5:30 p.m. Wrap Up Dated: January 26, 2012. Aaron Siegel, Alternate...

  11. Network Centric Operations (NCO) Case Study: U.S. Navy's Fifth Fleet Task Force 50 in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garstka, John; Holloman, Kimberly; Balisle, Christine W; Adkins, Mark; Kruse, Jon

    2006-01-01

    .... The focus is on the background and creation of Task Force 50 (TF-50), and primarily on the evolution of the transformational capabilities that permitted TF-50 to succeed in the manner that it did...

  12. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Mission Impact of Foreign Influence on DoD Software

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    The Defense Science Board (DSB) Task Force on Mission Impact of Foreign Influence on DoD Software examined areas in software security, security architecture, and risk mitigation and received briefings from industry, academia...

  13. QSEN Institute RN-BSN Task Force: White Paper on Recommendation for Systems-Based Practice Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Ann M; Phillips, Janet M; Dolansky, Mary A

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Institute RN-BSN Task Force presents a white paper on Recommendation for a Systems-based Practice Competency. The task force proposes a seventh QSEN competency, systems-based practice, to improve patient quality and safety. Recommendations to integrate systems-based practice into both education and practice settings, consistent with job descriptions and promotion criteria, involve a comprehensive continuing education program for nurses upon interview, orientation, residency programming, performance evaluation, and license renewal.

  14. Modeling of predictive muscular strength for sustained one-handed carrying task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Way; Wang, Chien Wen; Yu, Ruifeng

    2015-01-01

    Manual materials handling (MMH) tasks are common. They are considered major contributors of musculoskeletal injuries and are the sources of financial burden for industries in terms of lost work days and worker compensation costs. One-handed carrying is common and could result in arm fatigue. The purpose of this study was to establish predictive models for one-handed carrying strength considering weight handed and handedness conditions. Twenty male subjects were recruited for the study. The subject carried a weight of 6 or 12 kg using either dominant or non-dominant hand lasting a time period of 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, or 4 minutes. The results showed that handedness (p carrying strength. Predictive models of single arm carrying strength were established under handedness and weight conditions. The MADs of these models ranged from 0.39 to 2.19 kgf. The exponential function based predictive models may be adopted to describe the single arm carrying strength with reasonable predictive errors. The trend of the carrying strength after carrying a load for a certain period may be employed to describe muscular fatigue for sustained carrying tasks.

  15. The health sciences librarian in medical education: a vital pathways project task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Diane G.; Blobaum, Paul M.; Shipman, Jean P.; Markwell, Linda Garr; Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The Medical Education Task Force of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians reviewed current and future roles of health sciences librarians in medical education at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worked with national organizations to integrate library services, education, and staff into the requirements for training medical students and residents. Methods: Standards for medical education accreditation programs were studied, and a literature search was conducted on the topic of the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education. Results: Expectations for library and information services in current standards were documented, and a draft standard prepared. A comprehensive bibliography on the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education was completed, and an analysis of the services provided by health sciences librarians was created. Conclusion: An essential role and responsibility of the health sciences librarian will be to provide the health care professional with the skills needed to access, manage, and use library and information resources effectively. Validation and recognition of the health sciences librarian's contributions to medical education by accrediting agencies will be critical. The opportunity lies in health sciences librarians embracing the diverse roles that can be served in this vital activity, regardless of accrediting agency mandates. PMID:19851492

  16. The health sciences librarian in medical education: a vital pathways project task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Diane G; Blobaum, Paul M; Shipman, Jean P; Markwell, Linda Garr; Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2009-10-01

    The Medical Education Task Force of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians reviewed current and future roles of health sciences librarians in medical education at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worked with national organizations to integrate library services, education, and staff into the requirements for training medical students and residents. Standards for medical education accreditation programs were studied, and a literature search was conducted on the topic of the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education. Expectations for library and information services in current standards were documented, and a draft standard prepared. A comprehensive bibliography on the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education was completed, and an analysis of the services provided by health sciences librarians was created. An essential role and responsibility of the health sciences librarian will be to provide the health care professional with the skills needed to access, manage, and use library and information resources effectively. Validation and recognition of the health sciences librarian's contributions to medical education by accrediting agencies will be critical. The opportunity lies in health sciences librarians embracing the diverse roles that can be served in this vital activity, regardless of accrediting agency mandates.

  17. A comparative evaluation of sonomyography, electromyography, force, and wrist angle in a discrete tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P J; Bowen, Audrey; Howard, David; Canderle, Jiri J

    2011-06-01

    We have previously used the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for prosthesis motor control purposes. In the present study, we further compared subjects' performance using SMG and surface electromyography (EMG) in a series of discrete tracking tasks, both with and without a concurrent auditory attention task. Sixteen healthy subjects used different signals in a random order to control the cursor on a personal computer screen to cancel the letter "E" in a sequence of vertically arranged letters. Subjects' performance was evaluated under isometric contraction and wrist extension using the extensor carpi radiali muscle. The percentage of successfully cancelled Es using SMG decreased by 21 ± 16% and 17 ± 11% in isometric contraction and wrist extension tests, respectively, compared with the corresponding performances using force and angle signals. The corresponding reduction recorded by using EMG was 40 ± 29% and 41 ± 25%. In addition, there was a significant decrease by using EMG compared with that by SMG (p 0.99). Furthermore, the SMG control provided more consistent performances under the single and dual tasks compared with EMG control. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Classification images reveal decision variables and strategies in forced choice tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Lisa M; Murray, Richard F

    2015-06-09

    Despite decades of research, there is still uncertainty about how people make simple decisions about perceptual stimuli. Most theories assume that perceptual decisions are based on decision variables, which are internal variables that encode task-relevant information. However, decision variables are usually considered to be theoretical constructs that cannot be measured directly, and this often makes it difficult to test theories of perceptual decision making. Here we show how to measure decision variables on individual trials, and we use these measurements to test theories of perceptual decision making more directly than has previously been possible. We measure classification images, which are estimates of templates that observers use to extract information from stimuli. We then calculate the dot product of these classification images with the stimuli to estimate observers' decision variables. Finally, we reconstruct each observer's "decision space," a map that shows the probability of the observer's responses for all values of the decision variables. We use this method to examine decision strategies in two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) tasks, for which there are several competing models. In one experiment, the resulting decision spaces support the difference model, a classic theory of 2AFC decisions. In a second experiment, we find unexpected decision spaces that are not predicted by standard models of 2AFC decisions, and that suggest intrinsic uncertainty or soft thresholding. These experiments give new evidence regarding observers' strategies in 2AFC tasks, and they show how measuring decision variables can answer long-standing questions about perceptual decision making.

  19. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkinson, David [Quintessa, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom); Black, John [In Situ Solutions, East Bridgford (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to solute transport in fractured rock. The present report is concerned solely with Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b which relate to the transport of tracers on a 5-metre scale in Feature A at the TRUE-1 site. The task objectives, specifications and individual modelling team results are summarised and reviewed, and an evaluation of the overall exercise is presented. The report concludes with assessments of what has been learnt, the implications for the Task 6 objectives, and some possible future directions.

  20. Altered visual strategies and attention are related to increased force fluctuations during a pinch grip task in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kevin G; Huddleston, Wendy E; Ernest, Bradley E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the visual strategies used by older adults during a pinch grip task and to assess the relations between visual strategy, deficits in attention, and increased force fluctuations in older adults. Eye movements of 23 older adults (>65 yr) were monitored during a low-force pinch grip task while subjects viewed three common visual feedback displays. Performance on the Grooved Pegboard test and an attention task (which required no concurrent hand movements) was also measured. Visual strategies varied across subjects and depended on the type of visual feedback provided to the subjects. First, while viewing a high-gain compensatory feedback display (horizontal bar moving up and down with force), 9 of 23 older subjects adopted a strategy of performing saccades during the task, which resulted in 2.5 times greater force fluctuations in those that exhibited saccades compared with those who maintained fixation near the target line. Second, during pursuit feedback displays (force trace moving left to right across screen and up and down with force), all subjects exhibited multiple saccades, and increased force fluctuations were associated (rs = 0.6; P = 0.002) with fewer saccades during the pursuit task. Also, decreased low-frequency (attention z scores. Comparison of these results with our previously published results in young subjects indicates that saccadic eye movements and attention are related to force control in older adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The significant contributions of the study are the addition of eye movement data and an attention task to explain differences in hand motor control across different visual displays in older adults. Older participants used different visual strategies across varying feedback displays, and saccadic eye movements were related with motor performance. In addition, those older individuals with deficits in attention had impaired motor performance on two different hand motor control tasks, including the

  1. Age-Related Impairment on a Forced-Choice Version of the Mnemonic Similarity Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek J.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies from our lab have indicated that healthy older adults are impaired in their ability to mnemonically discriminate between previously viewed objects and similar lure objects in the Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST). These studies have used either old/similar/new or old/new test formats. The forced-choice test format (e.g., “Did you see object A or object A’ during the encoding phase?”) relies on different assumptions than the old/new test format (e.g., “Did you see this object during the encoding phase?”); hence, converging evidence from these approaches would bolster the conclusion that healthy aging is accompanied by impaired performance on the MST. Consistent with our hypothesis, healthy older adults exhibited impaired performance on a forced-choice test format that required discriminating between a target and a similar lure. We also tested the hypothesis that age-related impairments on the MST could be modeled within a global matching computational framework. We found that decreasing the probability of successful feature encoding in the models caused changes that were similar to the empirical data in healthy older adults. Collectively, our behavioral results extend to the forced-choice test format the finding that healthy aging is accompanied by an impaired ability to discriminate between targets and similar lures, and our modeling results suggest that a diminished probability of encoding stimulus features is a candidate mechanism for memory changes in healthy aging. We also discuss the ability of global matching models to account for findings in other studies that have used variants on mnemonic similarity tasks. PMID:28004951

  2. Age-related impairment on a forced-choice version of the Mnemonic Similarity Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek J; Stark, Craig E L

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies from our lab have indicated that healthy older adults are impaired in their ability to mnemonically discriminate between previously viewed objects and similar lure objects in the Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST). These studies have used either old/similar/new or old/new test formats. The forced-choice test format (e.g., "Did you see object A or object A' during the encoding phase?") relies on different assumptions than the old/new test format (e.g., "Did you see this object during the encoding phase?"); hence, converging evidence from these approaches would bolster the conclusion that healthy aging is accompanied by impaired performance on the MST. Consistent with our hypothesis, healthy older adults exhibited impaired performance on a forced-choice test format that required discriminating between a target and a similar lure. We also tested the hypothesis that age-related impairments on the MST could be modeled within a global matching computational framework. We found that decreasing the probability of successful feature encoding in the models caused changes that were similar to the empirical data in healthy older adults. Collectively, our behavioral results using the forced-choice format extend the finding that healthy aging is accompanied by an impaired ability to discriminate between targets and similar lures, and our modeling results suggest that a diminished probability of encoding stimulus features is a candidate mechanism for memory changes in healthy aging. We also discuss the ability of global matching models to account for findings in other studies that have used variants on mnemonic similarity tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Flattening of Sustainment: The Interaction of Technology, Information, Force Structure, and the Emergence of Operational Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    respective theaters. The ballet between the combatant commands, the generating force, and the requirement of operations to maximize the greatest amount...Year 2007, http://origin.www.gpoaccess.gov/ USbudget/fy07/ pdf /budget/defense.pdf (12 April 2009). 2 logistics capability and sustainment continues...origin.www.gpoaccess.gov/USbudget/fy07/ pdf /budget/defense.pdf (accessed 13 April 2009) Beougher, Guy C. “Improving Division and Brigade Logistics

  4. The Role of the Armys Sustainment Think Tank in Force Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    to set the conditions for meeting future requirements across the doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel...reduces the number of doctrinal publications and completely converts the CASCOM doctrine library to a new hierarchy of sustainment manuals (Army...Armed Forces. He is a graduate of the Defense Leadership and Man- agement Program, the Defense Sys- tems Management College Program Manager’s Course

  5. Sustainability of Long-term Care: Puzzling Tasks Ahead for Policy-Makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Ilaria; van der Wees, Philip J; Mot, Esther S; Wammes, Joost J G; Jeurissen, Patrick P T

    2016-08-17

    The sustainability of long-term care (LTC) is a prominent policy priority in many Western countries. LTC is one of the most pressing fiscal issues for the growing population of elderly people in the European Union (EU) Member States. Country recommendations regarding LTC are prominent under the EU's European Semester. This paper examines challenges related to the financial- and organizational sustainability of LTC systems in the EU. We combined a targeted literature review and a descriptive selected country analysis of: (1) public- and private funding; (2) informal care and externalities; and (3) the possible role of technology in increasing productivity. Countries were selected via purposive sampling to establish a cohort of country cases covering the spectrum of differences in LTC systems: public spending, private funding, informal care use, informal care support, and cash benefits. The aging of the population, the increasing gap between availability of informal care and demand for LTC, substantial market failures of private funding for LTC, and fiscal imbalances in some countries, have led to structural reforms and enduring pressures for LTC policy-makers across the EU. Our exploration of national policies illustrates different solutions that attempt to promote fairness while stimulating efficient delivery of services. Important steps must be taken to address the sustainability of LTC. First, countries should look deeper into the possibilities of complementing public- and private funding, as well as at addressing market failures of private funding. Second, informal care externalities with spill-over into neighboring policy areas, the labor force, and formal LTC workers, should be properly addressed. Thirdly, innovations in LTC services should be stimulated to increase productivity through technology and process innovations, and to reduce costs. The analysis shows why it is difficult for EU Member State governments to meet all their goals for sustainable LTC

  6. Sustainability of Long-term Care: Puzzling Tasks Ahead for Policy-Makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Mosca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The sustainability of long-term care (LTC is a prominent policy priority in many Western countries. LTC is one of the most pressing fiscal issues for the growing population of elderly people in the European Union (EU Member States. Country recommendations regarding LTC are prominent under the EU’s European Semester. Methods This paper examines challenges related to the financial- and organizational sustainability of LTC systems in the EU. We combined a targeted literature review and a descriptive selected country analysis of: (1 public- and private funding; (2 informal care and externalities; and (3 the possible role of technology in increasing productivity. Countries were selected via purposive sampling to establish a cohort of country cases covering the spectrum of differences in LTC systems: public spending, private funding, informal care use, informal care support, and cash benefits. Results The aging of the population, the increasing gap between availability of informal care and demand for LTC, substantial market failures of private funding for LTC, and fiscal imbalances in some countries, have led to structural reforms and enduring pressures for LTC policy-makers across the EU. Our exploration of national policies illustrates different solutions that attempt to promote fairness while stimulating efficient delivery of services. Important steps must be taken to address the sustainability of LTC. First, countries should look deeper into the possibilities of complementing public- and private funding, as well as at addressing market failures of private funding. Second, informal care externalities with spill-over into neighboring policy areas, the labor force, and formal LTC workers, should be properly addressed. Thirdly, innovations in LTC services should be stimulated to increase productivity through technology and process innovations, and to reduce costs. Conclusion The analysis shows why it is difficult for EU Member State

  7. [Sexual behavior characteristics of clients attending the Israel AIDS Task Force anonymous clinic in Tel Aviv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Yaeli; Perry, Zvi H; Nof, Einav; Shiber, Asher; Risenberg, Klaris; Ben Zion, Itzhak

    2014-09-01

    Until now, research on sexual behavior and HIV in Israel has been carried out mainly on the general population, and focused primarily on defining populations at risk, without adequate consideration given to the reasons bringing these populations to be tested, and their specific sexual behaviors. In Israel, one can choose whether to take an HIV test in confidential centers (giving one's name under medical confidentiality) or in anonymous centers (Israel AIDS Task Force in Tel Aviv and Beer Sheva, Levinsky Clinic in Tel Aviv and Haparsim Clinic in Haifa]. At least 21% of the clients of the anonymous testing centers in Israel belong to a high risk population in contrast to 2.6% in confidential clinics, and so, in this study, we hypothesize that characterization of sexual behavior patterns in anonymous testing centers might enable us to better characterize sexual behavior patterns in high risk populations. In this cross-sectional study, we used questionnaires distributed in the clinics by the Israel AIDS Task Force in order to characterize their clinic's clients. The questionnaires were completed by the Israel AIDS Task Force consultants during the consultation period at which the anonymous test was performed. Data collected included: gender, age, testing history, specific sexual behaviors and reasons for applying for the current test. A total of 926 questionnaires were collected; 29.9% of them were of female patients. The average age was 29.47 years (1±8.66]; 21.3% of the clients were men who have sex with men [MSM]; only 2.3% of the clients belonged to other high risk populations. In all groups, the majority of the patients reported high risk sexual behavior (any sexual contact without a condom) and the average age for the first test was much higher than the average age of first sexual intercourse common in Israel. Women reported more participation in unprotected vaginal intercourse than heterosexual men, and a substantial part of MSM reported performing unprotected

  8. Report of the NIH Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; Delitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Note from PTJ's Editor in Chief: Both investigators and readers get frustrated reading research on low back pain because of different definitions of “chronic” and different outcome measures. Lack of consensus on study methods makes it difficult to determine if contradictory findings are based on different methods or different interventions; lack of consensus also prevents synthesis across studies. Dr. Partap Khalsa, Deputy Director, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, announced the release of Research Standards for Chronic Low Pain, and the hope is that future investigations will adopt them and reduce variability in research reporting. The task force on research standards was an international, multidisciplinary team including Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA. Its findings have been published in leading pain journals. PTJ is among the first professional journals to share the report with its readers. Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients' lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. Therefore, NIH Pain Consortium charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimum dataset to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which

  9. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Malisoux

    Full Text Available We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring, SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003. In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR during ankle jumps (p = 0.006 and multi-jumps (p<0.001, in accordance with shock absorption properties. However, in cushioned shoes, SF influenced VILR during ankle jumps only (p<0.001. Contact Time was the only additional variable affected by SF, but only during multi-jumps in minimalist shoes (p = 0.037. Cushioned shoes induced lower VILR (p<0.001 and lower Contact Time (p≤0.002 during ankle jumps and multi-jumps compared to minimalist shoes. During ankle jumps, cushioned shoes induced greater Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force (PVGRF, p = 0.002, greater Vertical Average Loading Rate (p<0.001, and lower eccentric (p = 0.008 and concentric (p = 0.004 work. During multi-jumps, PVGRF was lower (p<0.001 and jump height was higher (p<0.001 in cushioned compared to minimalist shoes. In conclusion, cushioning influenced impact forces during standardised jump tasks, whether it was provided by the shoes or the sports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  10. Wrist splint effects on muscle activity and force during a handgrip task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domizio, Jennifer Di; Mogk, Jeremy P M; Keir, Peter J

    2008-08-01

    Wrist splints are commonly prescribed to limit wrist motion and provide support at night and during inactive periods but are often used in the workplace. In theory, splinting the wrist should reduce wrist extensor muscle activity by stabilizing the joint and reducing the need for co-contraction to maintain posture. Ten healthy volunteers underwent a series of 24 10-s gripping trials with surface electromyography on 6 forearm muscles. Trials were randomized between splinted and nonsplinted conditions with three wrist postures (30 degrees flexion, neutral, and 30 degrees extension) and four grip efforts. Custom-made Plexiglas splints were taped to the dorsum of the hand and wrist. It was found that when simply holding the dynamometer, use of a splint led to a small (wrist against external loading, but appears counterproductive when exerting maximal forces. Wrist bracing should be limited to periods of no to light activity and avoided during tasks that require heavy efforts.

  11. Consensus statement of the ESICM task force on colloid volume therapy in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhart, Konrad; Perner, Anders; Sprung, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Colloids are administered to more patients than crystalloids, although recent evidence suggests that colloids may possibly be harmful in some patients. The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine therefore assembled a task force to compile consensus recommendations based on the current...... best evidence for the safety and efficacy of the currently most frequently used colloids--hydroxyethyl starches (HES), gelatins and human albumin. METHODS: Meta-analyses, systematic reviews and clinical studies of colloid use were evaluated for the treatment of volume depletion in mixed intensive care...... kidney injury and suggest not to use 6% HES 130/0.4 or gelatin in these populations. We recommend not to use colloids in patients with head injury and not to administer gelatins and HES in organ donors. We suggest not to use hyperoncotic solutions for fluid resuscitation. We conclude and recommend...

  12. Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis L. Mcling

    2010-10-01

    The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idaho’s interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

  13. Congressional liaison task force - a briefing of the October 1994 meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    As the US Senate overturned roadblocks attempting-unsuccessfully-to halt passage of the elementary and secondary education reauthorization legislation representatives from several federal agencies and laboratories addressed Congressional Liaison Task Force (CLTF) participants October 12th. They spoke about their commitment, programs, and accomplishments toward the nation`s science knowledge, particularly at the precollege level. Marjorie S. Steinberg legislative assistant to bill cosponsor Sen. Jeff Bingaman (DNM), and Gary Allen, Triangle Coalition director of Governmental affairs, spoke about education legislation and specifically about the Technology for Education Act that was on the Senate floor for a vote in October and now is law. Bruce A. Fuchs talked about the National Institute of Health`s (NIH) work in science literacy and education. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s (NASA) Frank C. Owens and Eddie Anderson contributed to this report.

  14. Progress report of the Engineering Data Management System Task Force CERN-CN-96-002

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalley, J L; Faber, G; Farthouat, Philippe; Ferran, M; Flegel, Wilfried; Hameri, A P; Hauviller, Claude; Hervé, A; Høimyr, Nils-Joar; Klempt, W; Kuipers, J P M; Loos, R; Mottier, M; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nikkola, J; Oliger, S; Onnela, A; Palazzi, P; Pettersson, Thomas Sven; Price, M; Rollinger, G; Rousseau, B; Schinzel, Josi; Strubin, Pierre M; Tarrant, M; Vuoskoski, J; Witzeling, W

    1996-01-01

    An Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) is a collection of tools and rules, which enables, as a minimum, a body of vetted information to be built up in a safe pla and be easily accessible to the users. The Task Force worked through 1995 to elucidate CERN's needs for an EDMS in the construction and lifetime of LHC and its experiments, to discover the state of the art of EDMS and find a product on the market which fulfilled CERN's needs. A Call for Tenders was issued in December 1995 and the replies are being evaluated. The name DAR has been chosen for the activity of implenting an EDMS at CERN (CERN EDMS for Detectors and Accelerators) see http://cadd.cern.ch/cedar

  15. Medical guidelines for space passengers. Aerospace Medical Association Task Force on Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    In the foreseeable future, private companies will manufacture space vehicles with a capacity of transporting tourists into low Earth orbit. Because of the stresses of spaceflight, the effects of microgravity, and limited medical care capability, a system of medical clearance is highly recommended for these space tourists. It is our purpose to establish guidelines for use by private businesses, medical providers, and those planning on being a space tourist. Consequently, a Task Force was organized by the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) for the purpose of facilitating safety of passengers, fellow passengers, crew, and flight operations. The guidelines are meant to serve only as a template with the full expectation that exceptions might be made with appropriate rationale.

  16. Workshop on establishing institutional credibility for SEAB Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    At the request of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board`s Task Force on Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, the National Research Council sponsored a workshop on Establishing Institutional Credibility. The purpose of the workshop was to (1) identify the range of available knowledge regarding the theoretical and conceptual issues of how institutions establish their credibility and legitimacy with key constituents, and (2) to help explore and clarify fundamental concepts in management theory related to these issues. The examination was to include what is known about how organizations establish, maintain, lose, and regain public trust and confidence. There was to be no attempt to develop consensus on these issues or to suggest particular courses of action. The workshop was held on October 24-25, 1991, in Denver, Colorado.

  17. Movement Disorder Society Task Force report on the Hoehn and Yahr staging scale: status and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T; Counsell, Carl; Giladi, Nir; Holloway, Robert G; Moore, Charity G; Wenning, Gregor K; Yahr, Melvin D; Seidl, Lisa

    2004-09-01

    The Movement Disorder Society Task Force for Rating Scales for Parkinson's disease (PD) prepared a critique of the Hoehn and Yahr scale (HY). Strengths of the HY scale include its wide utilization and acceptance. Progressively higher stages correlate with neuroimaging studies of dopaminergic loss, and high correlations exist between the HY scale and some standardized scales of motor impairment, disability, and quality of life. Weaknesses include the scale's mixing of impairment and disability and its non-linearity. Because the HY scale is weighted heavily toward postural instability as the primary index of disease severity, it does not capture completely impairments or disability from other motor features of PD and gives no information on nonmotor problems. Direct clinimetric testing of the HY scale has been very limited, but the scale fulfills at least some criteria for reliability and validity, especially for the midranges of the scale (Stages 2-4). Although a "modified HY scale" that includes 0.5 increments has been adopted widely, no clinimetric data are available on this adaptation. The Task Force recommends that: (1) the HY scale be used in its original form for demographic presentation of patient groups; (2) when the HY scale is used for group description, medians and ranges should be reported and analysis of changes should use nonparametric methods; (3) in research settings, the HY scale is useful primarily for defining inclusion/exclusion criteria; (4) to retain simplicity, clinicians should "rate what you see" and therefore incorporate comorbidities when assigning a HY stage; and (5) because of the wide usage of the modified HY scale with 0.5 increments, this adaptation warrants clinimetric testing. Without such testing, however, the original five-point scales should be maintained.

  18. Trace Contraband Detection Field-Test by the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection Dept.; Shannon, Gary W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection Dept.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNL’s Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories’ (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  19. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power

  20. Direct space-charge effects on the ILC damping rings: Task ForceReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu

    2006-02-28

    In 2005 a global effort was initiated to conduct studies for a baseline recommendation for the various components of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Work for the damping rings was subdivided in a number of tasks. This Report contains the contribution to this effort by the Authors as Coordinators of the Task Force on space charge. (A slightly reduced version of this document can also be found as part of the ''Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC Damping Rings'', Edts. A. Wolski, et al., LBNL-59449.) The studies documented in this Report were carried out for several of the reference lattices considered for the baseline recommendation. Space charge effects were found to be quite noticeable in the lattices with the longest circumference. Although it does not appear that they could prevent operation of any machine having such lattices they do favor a choice of a ring design with shorter ({approx}6km) circumference at 5 GeV.

  1. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisoux, Laurent; Gette, Paul; Urhausen, Axel; Bomfim, Joao; Theisen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements) and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps) on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF) conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring), SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003). In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR) during ankle jumps (p = 0.006) and multi-jumps (pheight was higher (psports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  2. Die zukünftige Ausrichtung der AGMB: ein Bericht aus der Task-Force / The future strategic concept of the AGMB: a preliminary report given by the task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kintzel, Melanie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2008 the managing-committee of the Medical Library Association (AGMB invited the members to form a task force in order to concentrate on a new strategic concept for the association and develop corresponding recommendations and visions. Stagnating attendance at the association’s annual conferences in recent years as well as difficulties in finding future venues and new candidates for the elections to the board gave reason to this scheme. This article introduces the members of the task force and their work hitherto with a special focus on the member survey conducted in the summer of 2008 and its first results.

  3. A future task for Health Promotion research: Integration of Health Promotion and sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Thualagant, Nicole; Holm, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    . Despite obvious interfaces and interactions between the two, our contention is that strategies for health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development and that policies aimed at solving health or sustainability problems may therefore cause new, undesired...

  4. D1 and D2 Inhibitions of the Soleus H-Reflex Are Differentially Modulated during Plantarflexion Force and Position Tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henrique Magalhães

    Full Text Available Presynaptic inhibition (PSI has been shown to modulate several neuronal pathways of functional relevance by selectively gating the connections between sensory inputs and spinal motoneurons, thereby regulating the contribution of the stretch reflex circuitry to the ongoing motor activity. In this study, we investigated whether a differential regulation of Ia afferent inflow by PSI may be associated with the performance of two types of plantarflexion sensoriomotor tasks. The subjects (in a seated position controlled either: 1 the force level exerted by the foot against a rigid restraint (force task, FT; or 2 the angular position of the ankle when sustaining inertial loads (position task, PT that required the same level of muscle activation observed in FT. Subjects were instructed to maintain their force/position at target levels set at ~10% of maximum isometric voluntary contraction for FT and 90° for PT, while visual feedback of the corresponding force/position signals were provided. Unconditioned H-reflexes (i.e. control reflexes and H-reflexes conditioned by electrical pulses applied to the common peroneal nerve with conditioning-to-test intervals of 21 ms and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively were evoked in a random fashion. A significant main effect for the type of the motor task (FT vs PT (p = 0.005, η2p = 0.603 indicated that PTs were undertaken with lower levels of Ia PSI converging onto the soleus motoneuron pool. Additionally, a significant interaction between the type of inhibition (D1 vs D2 and the type of motor task (FT vs PT (p = 0.038, η2p = 0.395 indicated that D1 inhibition was associated with a significant reduction in PSI levels from TF to TP (p = 0.001, η2p = 0.731, whereas no significant difference between the tasks was observed for D2 inhibition (p = 0.078, η2p = 0.305. These results suggest that D1 and D2 inhibitions of the soleus H-reflex are differentially modulated during the performance of

  5. Estimation of low back loading on nurses during patient handling tasks: the importance of bedside reaction force measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, J H

    2001-02-01

    By means of video recording, measurement of ground reaction forces, and biomechanical modeling of the lower part of the body, the low back loading of nurses during patient handling can be estimated. In this study the force exerted on the bedside by a nurse during different patient handling tasks was measured, and the contribution to the moment at the L4/L5 joint was investigated. It is shown that the bedside reaction moment contributes significantly to the total moment, and could lead to substantial over-estimation if not appropriately included in the calculations, when using an upward biomechanical model for estimating the spinal load of nurses during patient handling tasks.

  6. Control of forced self-sustained oscillations via a backward time controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyragas, K. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)]. E-mail: pyragas@pfi.lt; Pyragiene, T. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Tamasevicius, A. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Mykolaitis, G. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2006-02-13

    A weakly non-linear self-sustained oscillator can be synchronized by an external force only in a certain domain of parameters. We exploit unstable periodic orbits and extend this domain via a small control perturbation. The controller is constructed as a backward time replica of the original oscillator that has the same periodic orbits but with the opposite stability properties. The control is achieved by synchronizing the original oscillator with its backward time replica. We demonstrate these ideas both theoretically and experimentally.

  7. Formulation and in vivo evaluation of diclofenac sodium sustained release matrix tablet: effect of compression force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ehab Ibrahim; Shazly, Gamal Abdel-Ghany; Harisa, Gamaleldin Ibrahim; Barakat, Nahla Sedik; Al-Enazi, Fouza Kayem; Elbagory, Ibrahim Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, Diclofenac Sodium (DS) matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression method under different compression forces (5, 10, 15 and 20 KN), using ethylcellulose as matrix forming material. The produced tablets were characterized on the foundation of satisfactory tablet properties such as hardness, friability, drug content, weight variations and in vitro drug release rate. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate any incompatibilities of the tablet's ingredients. Additionally, in vivo bioavailability has been investigated on beagle dogs. Data obtained revealed that, upon increasing compression force the in vitro drug release was sustained and the T(max) value was four hours (for formulations compressed at 15 and 20 kN) compared to the conventional voltarine(®) 50 tablets (T(max) value of 2 hours).

  8. Optimization of muscle activity for task-level goals predicts complex changes in limb forces across biomechanical contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Lucas McKay

    Full Text Available Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3 across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2× compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task

  9. Prospective observational studies to assess comparative effectiveness: the ISPOR good research practices task force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Marc L; Dreyer, Nancy; Anderson, Fred; Towse, Adrian; Sedrakyan, Art; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2012-01-01

    In both the United States and Europe there has been an increased interest in using comparative effectiveness research of interventions to inform health policy decisions. Prospective observational studies will undoubtedly be conducted with increased frequency to assess the comparative effectiveness of different treatments, including as a tool for "coverage with evidence development," "risk-sharing contracting," or key element in a "learning health-care system." The principle alternatives for comparative effectiveness research include retrospective observational studies, prospective observational studies, randomized clinical trials, and naturalistic ("pragmatic") randomized clinical trials. This report details the recommendations of a Good Research Practice Task Force on Prospective Observational Studies for comparative effectiveness research. Key issues discussed include how to decide when to do a prospective observational study in light of its advantages and disadvantages with respect to alternatives, and the report summarizes the challenges and approaches to the appropriate design, analysis, and execution of prospective observational studies to make them most valuable and relevant to health-care decision makers. The task force emphasizes the need for precision and clarity in specifying the key policy questions to be addressed and that studies should be designed with a goal of drawing causal inferences whenever possible. If a study is being performed to support a policy decision, then it should be designed as hypothesis testing-this requires drafting a protocol as if subjects were to be randomized and that investigators clearly state the purpose or main hypotheses, define the treatment groups and outcomes, identify all measured and unmeasured confounders, and specify the primary analyses and required sample size. Separate from analytic and statistical approaches, study design choices may strengthen the ability to address potential biases and confounding in

  10. Report of the ASHP Task Force on Caring for Patients Served by Specialty Suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselnova, Dominick; Donley, Kathy; Ehlers, Diane; Hyduk, Amy E; Koontz, Susannah E; Nowobilski-Vasilios, Anna; Pawlicki, Kathleen S; Poikonen, John C; Poremba, Art C; Sasser, Cathy L; Schell, Kenneth H; Schwab, Jay L; Swinarski, Dave; Chen, David; Kirschenbaum, Bonnie; Armitstead, John

    2010-10-01

    Task Force recommendations are discussed in more detail in eAppendix A (available at www.ajhp.org). What follows is a brief summary of those recommendations. In very abbreviated terms, the Task Force suggested that ASHP: 1. Consider creating and maintaining a Web resource center on ASHP's website to provide information about restricted drug distributions systems (RDDSs), risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMSs), risk assessment and minimization plans (RiskMAPs), and specialty suppliers and products. 2. Provide comprehensive education to members, other health professionals, regulators, third-party payers, patients, and other stakeholders about RDDSs, REMSs, RiskMAPs, and specialty suppliers and products. 3. Develop policies to advocate that a. Pharmacists serve as the institutional leaders in compliance and utilization challenges of safely managing externally supplied medications and related drug administration devices, b. Agencies, organizations, and associations that influence the distribution, sale, and dispensing of medications under these alternative distribution models address issues these models create in continuity of care, reimbursement, and patient safety, c. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Joint Commission develop standards and interpretations that accommodate hospital use of these products and devices when currently available technology (e.g., cold-chain storage, e-pedigree) is used to ensure patient safety, d. Group purchasing organizations negotiate contractual arrangements for specialty pharmaceuticals for both acquisition costs and distribution arrangements, and e. Information technology (IT) be used to resolve issues created by alternative distribution models and that ASHP work with IT vendors to ensure that programs are designed to meet the needs of these evolving models. 4. Quantify through research, perhaps in cooperation with entities such as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Institute of

  11. Expanding a professional dental care system: experiences of Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Frank L; Smith, Gregory M; Cobb, James W; Patterson, Craig G; Smith, Mark A; Pollard, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09, Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion managed an extensive dental care system stretching throughout the Iraq theater of operations. We illustrate several of the unique challenges faced by Task Force 261's headquarters and its dental and area support companies, and describe the remedies emplaced by the Task Force. Personnel structure, the evacuation chain, supply and facility management, dental civil-military operations, detainee care, information technology applications, and public health initiatives are discussed in detail.

  12. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: highlights of the 1996 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, P S; Berg, A O; Woolf, S

    1997-02-01

    The recent report of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is a compendium of the scientific evidence supporting clinical preventive services that might be offered by primary care physicians. Pediatric recommendations include height, weight and blood pressure measurements, neonatal screening for hemoglobinopathies and counseling about injury prevention, diet and exercise, sexual behavior, substance abuse and dental health. Lead screening is recommended in communities with a high prevalence of elevated lead levels. Adult recommendations include measurement of blood pressure and weight, selective screening for elevated total cholesterol level, screening persons over age 50 for colorectal cancer, screening women for cervical cancer at least every three years, and screening women 50 to 69 years of age for breast cancer with mammography every one to two years. Counseling patients about substance abuse, diet and exercise, injury prevention, sexual behavior and dental health is recommended. Women of childbearing age should receive folic acid supplementation to prevent neural tube defects if they should become pregnant. Multiple marker testing is recommended for women over age 35 to screen for Down syndrome. Immunization recommendations are similar to those of other national groups.

  13. Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Ebell, Mark; Epling, John W; Herzstein, Jessica; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-03-28

    Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).

  14. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: recommendations of an international task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Boumpas, Dimitrios; Burmester, Gerd; Combe, Bernard; Cutolo, Maurizio; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan Jesus; Haraoui, Boulos; Kalden, Joachim; Keystone, Edward C; Kvien, Tore K; McInnes, Iain; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Schoels, Monika; van der Heijde, Desirée

    2010-01-01

    Background Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. Methods A task force of rheumatologists and a patient developed a set of recommendations on the basis of evidence derived from a systematic literature review and expert opinion; these were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >60 experts from various regions of the world in a Delphi-like procedure. Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The treat-to-target activity resulted in 10 recommendations. The treatment aim was defined as remission with low disease activity being an alternative goal in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with appropriate therapeutic adaptation to reach the desired state within 3 to a maximum of 6 months was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity which include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the disease. Levels of agreement were very high for many of these recommendations (≥9/10). Conclusion The 10 recommendations are supposed to inform patients, rheumatologists and other stakeholders about strategies to reach optimal outcomes of RA based on evidence and expert opinion. PMID:20215140

  15. Report of the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on Treatment of Gender Identity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byne, William; Bradley, Susan J; Coleman, Eli; Eyler, A Evan; Green, Richard; Menvielle, Edgardo J; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L; Pleak, Richard R; Tompkins, D Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Both the diagnosis and treatment of Gender Identity Disorder (GID) are controversial. Although linked, they are separate issues and the DSM does not evaluate treatments. The Board of Trustees (BOT) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), therefore, formed a Task Force charged to perform a critical review of the literature on the treatment of GID at different ages, to assess the quality of evidence pertaining to treatment, and to prepare a report that included an opinion as to whether or not sufficient credible literature exists for development of treatment recommendations by the APA. The literature on treatment of gender dysphoria in individuals with disorders of sex development was also assessed. The completed report was accepted by the BOT on September 11, 2011. The quality of evidence pertaining to most aspects of treatment in all subgroups was determined to be low; however, areas of broad clinical consensus were identified and were deemed sufficient to support recommendations for treatment in all subgroups. With subjective improvement as the primary outcome measure, current evidence was judged sufficient to support recommendations for adults in the form of an evidence-based APA Practice Guideline with gaps in the empirical data supplemented by clinical consensus. The report recommends that the APA take steps beyond drafting treatment recommendations. These include issuing position statements to clarify the APA's position regarding the medical necessity of treatments for GID, the ethical bounds of treatments of gender variant minors, and the rights of persons of any age who are gender variant, transgender or transsexual.

  16. Screening for Gynecologic Conditions With Pelvic Examination: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa; Siu, Albert L; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-03-07

    Many conditions that can affect women's health are often evaluated through pelvic examination. Although the pelvic examination is a common part of the physical examination, it is unclear whether performing screening pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women has a significant effect on disease morbidity and mortality. To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for gynecologic conditions with pelvic examination for conditions other than cervical cancer, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, for which the USPSTF has already made specific recommendations. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy, benefits, and potential harms of performing screening pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant adult women 18 years and older who are not at increased risk for any specific gynecologic condition. Overall, the USPSTF found inadequate evidence on screening pelvic examinations for the early detection and treatment of a range of gynecologic conditions in asymptomatic, nonpregnant adult women. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of performing screening pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant adult women. (I statement) This statement does not apply to specific disorders for which the USPSTF already recommends screening (ie, screening for cervical cancer with a Papanicolaou smear, screening for gonorrhea and chlamydia).

  17. Report of the International Society of Nephrology: North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter G; Parker, Thomas F

    2003-04-01

    This article comprises a report from the North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force (RDRTF) set up in 2001 by the International Society of Nephrology Acute Renal Failure Commission. The conclusions of the report are (1) given the rarity of renal disasters in the Americas the North American and Latin American RDRTF's should be merged; (2) for the same reason, a single RDRFT Coordination Center for the whole world should be established and it is suggested that this be in Ghent, Belgium; (3) the collaborative group set up in Europe and involving the European RDRTF and Medecins Sans Frontiers be asked to extend their rapid response service to cover acute renal disasters in the Americas south of the United States-Mexico border; (4) the combined RDRTF for the Americas should establish a list of nephrologists, nurses, and technicians who are available to assist in the acute response to renal disasters; (5) the combined RDRTF of the Americas establish an inventory of equipment, machines, and methods for their transport that would be available in the event of a disaster; and (6) the RDRTF of the Americas should undertake a large-scale educational initiative on management of renal disasters. Copyright 2003 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  18. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Mandigers, Paul J J; Pakozdy, Akos; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Pumarola, Martí Batlle; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Dogs with epilepsy are among the commonest neurological patients in veterinary practice and therefore have historically attracted much attention with regard to definitions, clinical approach and management. A number of classification proposals for canine epilepsy have been published during the years reflecting always in parts the current proposals coming from the human epilepsy organisation the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). It has however not been possible to gain agreed consensus, "a common language", for the classification and terminology used between veterinary and human neurologists and neuroscientists, practitioners, neuropharmacologists and neuropathologists. This has led to an unfortunate situation where different veterinary publications and textbook chapters on epilepsy merely reflect individual author preferences with respect to terminology, which can be confusing to the readers and influence the definition and diagnosis of epilepsy in first line practice and research studies.In this document the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) discusses current understanding of canine epilepsy and presents our 2015 proposal for terminology and classification of epilepsy and epileptic seizures. We propose a classification system which reflects new thoughts from the human ILAE but also roots in former well accepted terminology. We think that this classification system can be used by all stakeholders.

  19. IRI Task Force Activity at ICTP: Proposed improvements for the IRI region below the F peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicella, S. M.; Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B. W.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Gonzalez, M. E. Mosert; Zolesi, B.; Zhang, M. L.; Zhang, S. R.

    The Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy has hosted special IRI Task Force Activities (TFAs) annually since 1994. This article reviews the format and results of the 1994, 1995, and 1996 TFAs. The prime focus of these TFAs has been the F1 region and the bottomside F2 region. Each meeting has tackled a specific subset of modeling problems using morning round-table discussions and afternoon computer sessions to solve the `problem of the day'. Data, models and related software were provided by the participants on electronic media or were retrieved over the internet. As a result of this effort several improvements have been proposed for the IRI description of the region below the F2 peak: (1) A more accurate description of the probability of the existence of the F1 layer, (2) A more realistic description of the bottomside thickness parameters, (3) A set of new anchor points to define the intermediate region between the E valley top and the bottomside F2 region.

  20. Organ donation education initiatives: A report of the Donor Management Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Christopher P; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Malinoski, Darren; Wright, Charles; Swanson, LeAnn

    2016-10-01

    It is essential that hospitals and health professionals establish systems to facilitate patients' organ donation wishes. Donation education has been neither standardized nor systematic, and resources related to donation processes have not been widely accessible. This report describes 2 free, publicly available educational resources about the organ donation process created to advance the mission of basic education and improve donation processes within hospitals and health care systems. Members of the Donor Management Task Force of the Organ Donation and Transplantation Alliance (the Alliance) and the Health Resources and Services Administration of the US Department of Health and Human Services convened annually in person and by teleconferencing during the year to develop 2 educational vehicles on organ donation. Two educational products were developed: the Organ Donation Toolbox, an online repository of documents and resources covering all aspects of the donation process, and the Educational Training Video that reviews the basic foundations of a successful hospital donation system. There is a need for more research and education about the process of organ donation as it relates to the medical and psychosocial care of patients and families before the end of life. The educational products described can help fill this critical need. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. The Design of the Internet's Architecture by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cath, Corinne; Floridi, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The debate on whether and how the Internet can protect and foster human rights has become a defining issue of our time. This debate often focuses on Internet governance from a regulatory perspective, underestimating the influence and power of the governance of the Internet's architecture. The technical decisions made by Internet Standard Developing Organisations (SDOs) that build and maintain the technical infrastructure of the Internet influences how information flows. They rearrange the shape of the technically mediated public sphere, including which rights it protects and which practices it enables. In this article, we contribute to the debate on SDOs' ethical responsibility to bring their work in line with human rights. We defend three theses. First, SDOs' work is inherently political. Second, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), one of the most influential SDOs, has a moral obligation to ensure its work is coherent with, and fosters, human rights. Third, the IETF should enable the actualisation of human rights through the protocols and standards it designs by implementing a responsibility-by-design approach to engineering. We conclude by presenting some initial recommendations on how to ensure that work carried out by the IETF may enable human rights.

  3. [Global and historical development of the IMETAF (International Molecular Epidemiology Task Force) in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodezky, C

    1997-01-01

    IMETAF or International Molecular Epidemiology Task Force was created upon the enthusiasm of Janice Dorman, molecular epidemiologist at Pittsburgh University. Also, she was in charge of the WHO type I Diabetes world project called DIAMOND. As a result of this project done with Mexican scientists. The Scientific Committee of IMETAF was formed on July 28, 1993. The activities began. A national infrastructure survey was done to analyze the epidemiology and molecular biology capabilities; a directory of scientist in epidemiology and molecular biology was elaborated; a theoric and practical course on molecular epidemiology was organized during 1996 and a second one will be held in 1997; and a series of Workshops were done: cancer and leukemias; bacterial diseases; trypanosomiosis and leishmaniosis and viral diseases. The results of these academic activities were brought to the National Academy of Medicine to a 2 days workshop and to an International Symposium called Projection of molecular epidemiology in medicine, held on April 17, 1996. The papers are published in this number. The goal of IMETAF will continue promoting transfer of technology, stimulating formal training in molecular epidemiology and helping getting funds for collaborative projects.

  4. Ethical issues in Alzheimer disease: the experience of a national Alzheimer society task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C A; Whitehouse, P J; Post, S G; Gauthier, S; Eberhart, A; LeDuc, L

    1999-01-01

    There has been increasing recognition of the ethical dilemmas that arise in the delivery of health care services and in planning and executing scientific research. Alzheimer disease (AD) and related dementias pose a particular challenge for families, care providers, and researchers because of the nature of the illness. Naturally, those at potential risk of developing the disease are eager for scientists to develop valid predictive tests for the disease. Alzheimer organizations have developed worldwide in response to the growing awareness and knowledge of the effects of dementia on individuals and their families. These organizations have played a role in advocating for research, increasing general awareness of the nature of the disease, and lobbying for more services for persons with dementia and their families. These organizations have also realized the increasing concern about the many ethical issues that arise in caring for those with AD and researching causes and cures. This paper describes a unique process one national Alzheimer society used to develop an Ethics Task Force to provide guidelines on ethical issues.

  5. Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Davidson, Karina W; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P; Silverstein, Michael; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2016-12-20

    Genital herpes is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States, occurring in almost 1 in 6 persons aged 14 to 49 years. Infection is caused by 2 subtypes of the herpes simplex virus (HSV), HSV-1 and HSV-2. Antiviral medications may provide symptomatic relief from outbreaks but do not cure HSV infection. Neonatal herpes infection, while uncommon, can result in substantial morbidity and mortality. To update the 2005 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for genital herpes. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy, benefits, and harms of serologic screening for HSV-2 infection in asymptomatic persons, including those who are pregnant, as well as the effectiveness and harms of preventive medications and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce future symptomatic episodes and transmission to others. Based on the natural history of HSV infection, its epidemiology, and the available evidence on the accuracy of serologic screening tests, the USPSTF concluded that the harms outweigh the benefits of serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. The USPSTF recommends against routine serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. (D recommendation).

  6. Screening for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Owens, Douglas K; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2018-01-09

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, a lateral curvature of the spine of unknown cause with a Cobb angle of at least 10°, occurs in children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form and usually worsens during adolescence before skeletal maturity. Severe spinal curvature may be associated with adverse long-term health outcomes (eg, pulmonary disorders, disability, back pain, psychological effects, cosmetic issues, and reduced quality of life). Early identification and effective treatment of mild scoliosis could slow or stop curvature progression before skeletal maturity, thereby improving long-term outcomes in adulthood. To update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for idiopathic scoliosis in asymptomatic adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The USPSTF found no direct evidence on screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and health outcomes and no evidence on the harms of screening. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on treatment with exercise and surgery. It found adequate evidence that treatment with bracing may slow curvature progression in adolescents with mild or moderate curvature severity (Cobb angle scoliosis cannot be determined. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. (I statement).

  7. International confederation for cleft lip and palate and related craniofacial anomalies task force report: beyond eurocleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semb, Gunvor

    2014-11-01

    The assigned objective for the Task Force Beyond Eurocleft was "to make recommendations for initiations of local and/or participation in multi-national cleft outcome studies and consist of individuals from the European experience with cleft outcome studies (Scandcleft, Eurocleft) and those who have initiated, or intend to initiate, similar studies in other geographical areas." By May 2013 the Task Force (TF) consisted of 183 members from 59 countries. It was agreed that this initiative should be truly global and include all cleft specialties as well as representatives from cleft support groups in recognition of the huge commitment for improving cleft care worldwide. The vision for this group is to build a dynamic, well-functioning TF that will work globally and be multidisciplinary with inclusive and respectful behavior to improve care for all individuals born with cleft lip and/or palate. As there is a large diversity in needs and interest in the group a range of parallel approaches would be required depending on the experience, resources, and challenges of regions, teams, and individuals. Important ideas for future work were: (1) Work on a global survey of access, existing outcome studies, current collaborations, and lessons learned. (2) Work towards the creation of a lasting, living resource for newcomers to intercenter collaboration that is kept fresh with new reports, copies of relevant publications, model grant applications, and a list of volunteers with the right experience to provide support and guidance for new initiatives. (3) Develop simple online training modules to provide information about the benefits and principles of multidisciplinary care, collaborative data collection and auditing short and longer-term outcomes. (4) Establish subgroups that will work within all regions of the world with regional and national leaders identified. An evaluation of current standards of care should be undertaken and country/region specific remedies to optimize

  8. Our Families, Our Children: The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force Report on Quality Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispenza, Mary

    The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force documented anecdotal evidence of homophobia in child care and school age communities, including: (1) refusal to accept children from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families into child care; (2) biased attitudes expressed to children when they speak about their families; and (3) demonstrated…

  9. 78 FR 13100 - Models for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force Traveler TSTF-535...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ..., Revision 0, ``Revise Shutdown Margin Definition To Address Advanced Fuel Designs,'' Using the Consolidated... Specifications (TSs) Task Force (TSTF) Traveler TSTF-535, Revision 0, ``Revise Shutdown Margin Definition to....gov/reading-rm/adams.html . To begin the search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select...

  10. 77 FR 3454 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... gather data from panels and briefers on the Task Force's topics of inquiry. Agenda: (Please refer to http...-4:15 p.m. Break 4:15-5:15 p.m. Marine Corps WWR Staff Training 5:15-5:30 p.m. Wrap Up Public's...

  11. 78 FR 9928 - Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Drug Shortages Task Force and Strategic Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for... on drug shortages as required by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, the...

  12. Magistrates' Survey. 1988 Follow-Up: Analysis of Results. Report to the Governor's Task Force on Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sylvester; Relos, Ruth

    In 1988, over one-third of all North Carolina magistrates, from 87 of 100 counties, responded to a survey from the Governor's Task Force on Domestic Violence. Ninety-nine percent of respondents indicated that they had handled at least one case in which a woman had complained about physical violence or threats from her husband or boyfriend. The…

  13. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). METHODS...

  14. Mountains of Work: NACUBO TRA97 Task Force Takes Proactive Stance in Developing Processes, Recommending Changes, and Offering Advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anne C.; Bachinger, Mary M.; Whalen, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    A National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) task force has developed a process guide, list of policy issues and unsolved questions, and recommendations for colleges and universities to use in complying with the reporting requirements of the Tax Relief Act of 1997, which provides parents of college students with tax…

  15. 77 FR 22324 - Correction-Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Correction--Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) The original date of publication for this...

  16. Research on Youth in an Age of Complexity: The Rockefeller Youth Task Force and Daniel Yankelovich, 1965-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Theresa M.

    2008-01-01

    The period between 1965 and 1975 encompasses important events associated with the peak of the youth movement in the 1960s and its demise in the 1970s. The period was an "age of complexity" according to Daniel Yankelovich, a social scientist hired by John D. Rockefeller 3rd's Youth Task Force to study the wave of protests that Rockefeller felt…

  17. The American Psychological Association Task Force assessment of violent video games: Science in the service of public interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra L; Appelbaum, Mark; Dodge, Kenneth A; Graham, Sandra; Nagayama Hall, Gordon C; Hamby, Sherry; Fasig-Caldwell, Lauren G; Citkowicz, Martyna; Galloway, Daniel P; Hedges, Larry V

    2017-01-01

    A task force of experts was convened by the American Psychological Association (APA) to update the knowledge and policy about the impact of violent video game use on potential adverse outcomes. This APA Task Force on Media Violence examined the existing literature, including the meta-analyses in the field, since the last APA report on media violence in 2005. Because the most recent meta-analyses were published in 2010 and reflected work through 2009, the task force conducted a search of the published studies from 2009-2013. These recently published articles were scored and assessed by a systematic evidentiary review, followed by a meta-analysis of the high utility studies, as documented in the evidentiary review. Consistent with the literature that we reviewed, we found that violent video game exposure was associated with: an increased composite aggression score; increased aggressive behavior; increased aggressive cognitions; increased aggressive affect, increased desensitization, and decreased empathy; and increased physiological arousal. The size of the effects was similar to that in prior meta-analyses, suggesting a stable result. Our task force concluded that violent video game use is a risk factor for adverse outcomes, but found insufficient studies to examine any potential link between violent video game use and delinquency or criminal behavior. Our technical report is the basis of this article. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. 78 FR 46931 - Intent To Hold North Dakota Task Force Meeting as Established by the Missouri River Protection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... improve conservation, protect recreation from sedimentation, improve water quality, improve erosion..., and to identify and develop new projects. DATES: North Dakota Missouri River Task Force established by... implement critical restoration projects meeting the goals of the plan, and determine if these projects...

  19. Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2009-01-01

    Description: New recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on the use of nontraditional, or novel, risk factors in assessing the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of asymptomatic persons. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted of literature since 1996 on 9 proposed

  20. 75 FR 43944 - Defense Science Board; Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change for National and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Science Board; Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change... Climate Change for National and International Security will meet in closed session August 18-19, and...

  1. Compilation of reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report contains reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management, from experts in the United States. The contents of the report focus mainly on public opinion, and government policies as perceived by the public.

  2. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. METHODS: Th...

  3. 77 FR 3373 - Establishing Visa and Foreign Visitor Processing Goals and the Task Force On Travel and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Task Force On Travel and Competitiveness By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution... travel promotion in order to create jobs and spur economic growth in the United States, while continuing to protect our national security, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. The travel and...

  4. 75 FR 55577 - Office of the Secretary: Defense Science Board (DSB) Task Force on the Survivability of DoD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Assets to Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and Other Nuclear Weapons Effects AGENCY: Defense Threat Reduction... Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and other Nuclear Weapons Effects (hereafter referred to as the Task Force) will meet... focus to assess implementation of the DoD Instruction covering nuclear survivability including EMP and...

  5. Multi-morbidities of allergic rhinitis in adults: European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cingi, C.; Gevaert, P.; Mösges, R.; Rondon, C.; Hox, V.; Rudenko, M.; Muluk, N. B.; Scadding, G.; Manole, F.; Hupin, C.; Fokkens, W. J.; Akdis, C.; Bachert, C.; Demoly, P.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Pawankar, R.; Rombaux, P.; Toskala, E.; Kalogjera, L.; Prokopakis, E.; Hellings, P. W.; Bousquet, J.

    2017-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force on Allergic Rhinitis (AR) comorbidities. The aim of this multidisciplinary European consensus document is to highlight the role of multimorbidities in the definition, classification, mechanisms,

  6. Report of the Secretary of Defense Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management. Phase II: Review of the DoD Nuclear Mission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlesinger, James R; Carns, Michael P; Crouch, II, J. D; Gansler, Jacques S; Giambastiani, Jr., Edmund P; Hamre, John J; Miller, Franklin C; Williams, Christopher A; Blackwell, Jr, James A

    2008-01-01

    Incidents related to the Air Force's mishandling of nuclear weapons and components led to the creation of the Task Force in June 2008 to provide advice on nuclear matters for the Secretary of Defense...

  7. Is the emotional Stroop task a special case of mood induction? Evidence from sustained effects of attention under emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Mama, Yaniv; Icht, Michal; Algom, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Sustained effects of emotion are well known in everyday experience. Surprisingly, such effects are seldom recorded in laboratory studies of the emotional Stroop task, in which participants name the color of emotion and neutral words. Color performance is more sluggish with emotion words than with neutral words, the emotional Stroop effect (ESE). The ESE is not sensitive to the order in which the two groups of words are presented, so the effect of exposure to emotion words does not extend to disrupting performance in a subsequent block with neutral words. We attribute this absence of a sustained effect to habituation engendered by excessive repetition of the experimental stimuli. In a series of four experiments, we showed that sustained effects do occur when habituation is removed, and we also showed that the massive exposure to negative stimuli within the ESE paradigm induces a commensurately negative mood. A novel perspective is offered, in which the ESE is considered a special case of mood induction.

  8. One digit interruption: the altered force patterns during functionally cylindrical grasping tasks in patients with trigger digits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Tsun Chen

    Full Text Available Most trigger digit (TD patients complain that they have problems using their hand in daily or occupational tasks due to single or multiple digits being affected. Unfortunately, clinicians do not know much about how this disease affects the subtle force coordination among digits during manipulation. Thus, this study examined the differences in force patterns during cylindrical grasp between TD and healthy subjects. Forty-two TD patients with single digit involvement were included and sorted into four groups based on the involved digits, including thumb, index, middle and ring fingers. Twelve healthy subjects volunteered as healthy controls. Two testing tasks, holding and drinking, were performed by natural grasping with minimal forces. The relations between the force of the thumb and each finger were examined by Pearson correlation coefficients. The force amount and contribution of each digit were compared between healthy controls and each TD group by the independent t test. The results showed all TD groups demonstrated altered correlation patterns of the thumb relative to each finger. Larger forces and higher contributions of the index finger were found during holding by patients with index finger involved, and also during drinking by patients with affected thumb and with affected middle finger. Although no triggering symptom occurred during grasping, the patients showed altered force patterns which may be related to the role of the affected digit in natural grasping function. In conclusion, even if only one digit was affected, the subtle force coordination of all the digits was altered during simple tasks among the TD patients. This study provides the information for the future studies to further comprehend the possible injuries secondary to the altered finger coordination and also to adopt suitable treatment strategies.

  9. Anxiety and cognitive efficiency: differential modulation of transient and sustained neural activity during a working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fales, C L; Barch, D M; Burgess, G C; Schaefer, A; Mennin, D S; Gray, J R; Braver, T S

    2008-09-01

    According to the processing-efficiency hypothesis (Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), anxious individuals are thought to require greater activation of brain systems supporting cognitive control (e.g.,dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; DLPFC) in order to maintain equivalent performance to nonanxious subjects. A recent theory of cognitive control (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007) has proposed that reduced cognitive efficiency might occur as a result of changes in the temporal dynamics of DLPFC recruitment. In this study, we used a mixed blocked/ event-related fMRI design to track transient and sustained activity in DLPFC while high- and low-anxious participants performed a working memory task. The task was performed after the participants viewed videos designed to induce neutral or anxiety-related moods. After the neutral video, the high-anxious participants had reduced sustained but increased transient activation in working memory areas, in comparison with low-anxious participants. The high-anxious group also showed extensive reductions in sustained activation of "default-network" areas (possible deactivation). After the negative video,the low-anxiety group shifted their activation dynamics in cognitive control regions to resemble those of the high-anxious group. These results suggest that reduced cognitive control in anxiety might be due to a transient, rather than sustained, pattern of working memory recruitment. Supplementary information for this study may be found at www.psychonomic.org/archive.

  10. Evaluation of the controlled grip force exertion tasks associated with age, gender, handedness and target force level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyeong-Hee; Kim, Dae-Min; Lee, Sung-Yong; Lee, Jun-Hyub; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2017-05-23

    Force control of the hand is an essential factor for operating tools and moving objects. Therefore, a method for quantifying hand functionality more accurately and objectively is very important. The present study included 60 healthy participants (30 elderly and 30 young adults) to evaluate the effects of age, gender and target force levels on tracking performance. Tracking performance was quantified by measuring the difference between target force levels and exerted force. Females exerted 59.6% of the maximum grip strength of males and the elderly group exerted 70.5% of maximum grip strength compared with the young group. The elderly group showed 3.1 times larger tracking error than the young group. There was a significant difference in females between the young and elderly groups, indicating age-related decline in hand function is more pronounced in females. The difference in grip force control ability between the elderly and young groups was significant at the low target force level (5% maximum voluntary contraction). The results of this study could be used for hand function evaluation guidelines. In addition, this study could be used as a tool for physiotherapy to improve hand function and prevent its decline in elderly people.

  11. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  12. Assessment of occlusion curriculum in predoctoral dental education: report from ACP Task Force on Occlusion Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Damian J; Wiens, Jonathan P; Ference, John; Donatelli, David; Smith, Rick M; Dye, Bryan D; Obrez, Ales; Lang, Lisa A

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this report were to (1) assess the current occlusion curriculum in the predoctoral prosthodontic education of US dental institutions and (2) to examine the opinions of faculty, course directors, and program directors on the contents of occlusion curriculum. The Task Force on Occlusion Education from the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) conducted two surveys using a web-based survey engine: one to assess the current status of occlusion education in predoctoral dental education and another to examine the opinions of faculty and course directors on the content of occlusion curriculum. The sections in the surveys included demographic information, general curriculum information, occlusion curriculum for dentate patients, occlusion curriculum for removable prosthodontics, occlusion curriculum for implant prosthodontics, temporomandibular disorder (TMD) curriculum, teaching philosophy, concepts taught, and methods of assessment. The results from the surveys were compiled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results from the two surveys on general concepts taught in occlusion curriculum were sorted and compared for discrepancies. According to the predoctoral occlusion curriculum surveys, canine guidance was preferred for dentate patients, fixed prosthodontics, and fixed implant prosthodontics. Bilateral balanced occlusion was preferred for removable prosthodontics and removable implant prosthodontics. There were minor differences between the two surveys regarding the occlusion concepts being taught and the opinions of faculty members teaching occlusion. Two surveys were conducted regarding the current concepts being taught in occlusion curriculum and the opinions of educators on what should be taught in occlusion curriculum. An updated and clearly defined curriculum guideline addressing occlusion in fixed prosthodontics, removable prosthodontics, implant prosthodontics, and TMD is needed. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Developing Bayesian adaptive methods for estimating sensitivity thresholds (d’ in Yes-No and Forced-Choice tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Andres Lesmes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by Signal Detection Theory (SDT, we developed a family of novel adaptive methods that estimate the sensitivity threshold – the signal intensity corresponding to a pre-defined sensitivity level ( d' = 1-- in Yes-No (YN and Forced-Choice (FC detection tasks. Rather than focus stimulus sampling to estimate a single level of %Yes or %Correct, the current methods sample psychometric functions more broadly, to concurrently estimate sensitivity and decision factors, and thereby estimate thresholds that are independent of decision confounds. Developed for four tasks --(1 simple YN detection, (2 cued YN detection, which cues the observer’s response state before each trial, (3 rated YN detection, which incorporates a Not Sure response, and (4 forced-choice detection -- the quick YN and quick FC methods yield sensitivity thresholds that are independent of the task’s decision structure (YN or FC and/or the observer’s subjective response state. Results from simulation and psychophysics suggest that 25 trials (and sometimes less are sufficient to estimate YN thresholds with reasonable precision (s.d.=.10-.15 decimal log units, but more trials are needed for forced-choice thresholds. When the same subjects were tested across tasks of simple, cued, rated, and forced-choice detection, adaptive threshold estimates exhibited excellent agreement with the method of constant stimuli, and with each other. These YN adaptive methods deliver criterion-free thresholds that have previously been exclusive to FC methods.

  14. Computerized assessment of sustained attention: interactive effects of task demand, noise, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, J C

    1996-12-01

    In a sample of 163 college undergraduates, the effects of task demand, noise, and anxiety on Continuous Performance Test (CPT) errors were evaluated with multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance. Results indicated significantly more omission errors on the difficult task. Complex interaction effects of noise and self-reported anxiety yielded more omissions in quiet intermittent white noise, particularly for high-anxious subjects performing the difficult task. Anxiety levels tended to increase from pretest to posttest, particularly for low-anxious subjects in the quiet, difficult-task condition, while a decrease was seen for high-anxious subjects in the loud, easy-task condition. Commission errors were unrelated to any predictor variables, suggesting that "attention" cannot be considered a unitary phenomenon. The variety of direct and interactive effects on vigilance performance underscore the need for clinicians to use a variety of measures to assess attentional skills, to avoid diagnosis of attention deficits on the basis of a single computerized task performance, and to rule out anxiety and other contributors to poor vigilance task performance.

  15. 75 FR 59698 - Federal Advisory Committee; Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... family member of a wounded, ill, or injured member of the Armed Forces or veteran who has experience working with wounded, ill, and injured members of the Armed Forces or their families; and e. A number of..., and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Member of the Armed Forces AGENCY: Department...

  16. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, Arjan P; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A C; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J W

    2014-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at U opt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. U opt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s(-1) or 4.83 BL s(-1), (2) 0.82 m s(-1) or 3.25 BL s(-1), and (3) 0.85 m s(-1) or 2.73 BL s(-1). Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of U opt (BL s(-1)) = 234.07(BL)(-0.779) (R (2) = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s(-1) ("swimmers") or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow ("resters") in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min(-1), respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  17. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Janet M. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-03-01

    developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

  18. Teachers' Pensions: A Model Retirement Plan for the Future. Report of the Minister's Informal Task Force on Teachers' Pensions. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The Minister of Education of Alberta, Canada established a task force in 1983 to analyze the characteristics of teachers' pension plans and to develop a model retirement plan for teachers in Alberta. The task force reviewed the legislative, structural, administrative, and financial characteristics of Alberta's existing Teachers' Retirement Fund as…

  19. Guidelines for Cognitive Behavioral Training within Doctoral Psychology Programs in the United States: Report of the Inter-Organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K.; Ronan, George F.; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D.; Belar, Cynthia D.; Berry, Sharon L.; Christofff, Karen A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Dougher, Michael J.; Dowd, E. Thomas; Herbert, James D.; McFarr, Lynn M.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Sauer, Eric M.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a yearlong series of…

  20. Research in the Service of Mental Health. Summary Report of the Research Task Force of the National Institute of Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahraes, Herbert; And Others

    This document is a condensation of the report of the Research Task Force of the National Institute of Mental Health. (The comprehensive and detailed report, totaling over 400 pages, is for sale by the Superintendent of Documents.) The purpose of the Task Force was to conduct a comprehensive review and analysis of the institute's scientific…

  1. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent...... published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete....... Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of exposure, and there is concern that lack of awareness and underreporting may mask the true incidence of the problem. Given...

  2. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete......Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent...... with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs...

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  4. Screening for Celiac Disease: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Bougatsos, Christina; Blazina, Ian; Mackey, Katherine; Grusing, Sara; Selph, Shelley

    2017-03-28

    Silent or subclinical celiac disease may result in potentially avoidable adverse health consequences. To review the evidence on benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children 3 years and older for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, searched to June 14, 2016. Randomized clinical trials and cohort or case-control studies on clinical benefits and harms of screening vs no screening for celiac disease or treatment vs no treatment for screen-detected celiac disease; studies on diagnostic accuracy of serologic tests for celiac disease. One investigator abstracted data, a second checked data for accuracy, and 2 investigators independently assessed study quality using predefined criteria. Cancer incidence, gastrointestinal outcomes, psychological outcomes, child growth outcomes, health outcomes resulting from nutritional deficiencies, quality of life, mortality, and harms of screening. No meta-analytic pooling was done. One systematic review and 3 primary studies met inclusion criteria. No trials of screening for celiac disease were identified. One recent, good-quality systematic review of 56 original studies and 12 previous systematic reviews (sample sizes of primary studies ranging from 62 to more than 12 000 participants) found IgA tissue transglutaminase was associated with high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity both >90%) for diagnosing celiac disease. IgA endomysial antibodies tests were associated with high specificity. Only 2 studies of serologic tests for celiac disease involving 62 and 158 patients were conducted in asymptomatic populations and reported lower sensitivity (57% and 71%). One fair-quality, small (n = 40) Finnish treatment trial of asymptomatic adults with screen-detected celiac disease based on positive serologic findings found initiation of a gluten-free diet associated with

  5. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: 2014 update of the recommendations of an international task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Kvien, Tore K; Navarro-Compán, M Victoria; Oliver, Susan; Schoels, Monika; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Aletaha, Daniel; Andreu, Jose Louis; Aringer, Martin; Bergman, Martin; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Hans; Burkhardt, Harald; Combe, Bernard; Durez, Patrick; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Graninger, Winfried; Hannonen, Pekka; Haraoui, Boulos; Kouloumas, Marios; Landewe, Robert; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Nash, Peter; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Östör, Andrew; Richards, Pam; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Thorne, Carter; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; de Wit, Martinus

    2016-01-01

    Background Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. Objective To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. Methods A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the

  6. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset 6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset, or a previous

  7. U.S. Transport Task Force Meeting - April 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George R. [UC San Diego

    2014-09-19

    The ultimate goal of the U.S. Transport Task Force is to develop a physics-based understanding of confinement and particle, momentum and heat transport in magnetic fusion devices. This understanding should be of sufficient depth that it allows the development of predictive models of plasma transport that can be validated against experiment, and then used to anticipate the future performance of burning plasmas in ITER, as well as to provide guidance to the design of next-step fusion nuclear science facilities. To achieve success in transport science, it is essential to characterize local fluctuations and transport in toroidal plasmas, to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for transport, and ultimately to control these transport processes. These goals must be pursued in multiple areas, including ion and electron thermal transport, particle and momentum transport, the physics of H-modes and the edge pedestal, Internal Transport Barriers, energetic particle transport and 3D effects on all the underlying transport processes. Demonstrating our understanding requires multiple, successful, quantitative tests of theory, simulation and modeling using experimental results in fusion-relevant and basic plasmas (i.e., verification and validation). The 2014 U.S. TTF meeting was held in April 2014 in San Antonio TX to provide a forum for leading scientists focused on the study of transport of particles, momentum and heat in fusion plasmas. Approximately 110 scientists from the US and several from the EU and from China attended and heard oral talks on recent transport results. Several poster sessions were also held. One day of plenary talks were followed by Breakout sessions and poster sessions that were held on focused topics, including L-H transition physics, energetic particles, transport in high performance plasmas, divertor particle and heat flux management and innovative divertor designs, fundamental turbulence studies, end edge transport shortfall. Most of the

  8. Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, David C; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-06-20

    Based on year 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts, approximately 17% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years in the United States have obesity, and almost 32% of children and adolescents are overweight or have obesity. Obesity in children and adolescents is associated with morbidity such as mental health and psychological issues, asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, orthopedic problems, and adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes (eg, high blood pressure, abnormal lipid levels, and insulin resistance). Children and adolescents may also experience teasing and bullying behaviors based on their weight. Obesity in childhood and adolescence may continue into adulthood and lead to adverse cardiovascular outcomes or other obesity-related morbidity, such as type 2 diabetes. Although the overall rate of child and adolescent obesity has stabilized over the last decade after increasing steadily for 3 decades, obesity rates continue to increase in certain populations, such as African American girls and Hispanic boys. These racial/ethnic differences in obesity prevalence are likely a result of both genetic and nongenetic factors (eg, socioeconomic status, intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and fast food, and having a television in the bedroom). To update the 2010 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for obesity in children 6 years and older. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening for obesity in children and adolescents and the benefits and harms of weight management interventions. Comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions (≥26 contact hours) in children and adolescents 6 years and older who have obesity can result in improvements in weight status for up to 12 months; there is inadequate evidence regarding the effectiveness of less intensive interventions. The harms of behavioral interventions can be bounded as small to none, and the harms of screening are minimal. Therefore, the USPSTF

  9. Preeclampsia Screening: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jillian T; Thompson, Jamie H; Burda, Brittany U; Cantor, Amy

    2017-04-25

    Preeclampsia is a complex disease of pregnancy with sometimes serious effects on maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. It is defined by hypertension after 20 weeks' gestation and proteinuria or other evidence of multisystem involvement. To systematically review the benefits and harms of preeclampsia screening and risk assessment for the US Preventive Services Task Force. MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from 1990 through September 1, 2015. Surveillance for new evidence in targeted publications was conducted through October 5, 2016. English-language trials and observational studies, including externally validated prediction models, of screening effectiveness, benefits, and harms from routine preeclampsia screening during pregnancy. Independent dual review of article abstracts and full texts against a priori inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was not performed because of clinical and statistical heterogeneity of included studies. Maternal and infant health outcomes, including eclampsia, stroke, stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight; screening and risk prediction test performance; harms of screening and risk assessment. Twenty-one studies (13 982 participants) were included. No studies directly compared the effectiveness of preeclampsia screening in a screened population vs an unscreened population; 1 US trial (n = 2764) found no difference in benefits or harms with fewer prenatal visits but was underpowered for rare, serious outcomes. For harms, a before-after comparison cohort noninferiority study of urine protein screening for specific indications compared with routine screening (n = 1952) did not identify harms with fewer urine screening tests. Four studies (n = 7123) reported external validation performance of 16 risk prediction models, 5 of which had good or better discrimination (c statistic >0.80) for prediction of preeclampsia, and positive predictive values of 4% in the largest, most

  10. Performance of repetitive tasks induces decreased grip strength and increased fibrogenic proteins in skeletal muscle: role of force and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available This study elucidates exposure-response relationships between performance of repetitive tasks, grip strength declines, and fibrogenic-related protein changes in muscles, and their link to inflammation. Specifically, we examined forearm flexor digitorum muscles for changes in connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; a matrix protein associated with fibrosis, collagen type I (Col1; a matrix component, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1; an upstream modulator of CTGF and collagen, in rats performing one of two repetitive tasks, with or without anti-inflammatory drugs.To examine the roles of force versus repetition, rats performed either a high repetition negligible force food retrieval task (HRNF, or a high repetition high force handle-pulling task (HRHF, for up to 9 weeks, with results compared to trained only (TR-NF or TR-HF and normal control rats. Grip strength declined with both tasks, with the greatest declines in 9-week HRHF rats. Quantitative PCR (qPCR analyses of HRNF muscles showed increased expression of Col1 in weeks 3-9, and CTGF in weeks 6 and 9. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PCR results, and also showed greater increases of CTGF and collagen matrix in 9-week HRHF rats than 9-week HRNF rats. ELISA, and immunohistochemistry revealed greater increases of TGFB1 in TR-HF and 6-week HRHF, compared to 6-week HRNF rats. To examine the role of inflammation, results from 6-week HRHF rats were compared to rats receiving ibuprofen or anti-TNF-α treatment in HRHF weeks 4-6. Both treatments attenuated HRHF-induced increases in CTGF and fibrosis by 6 weeks of task performance. Ibuprofen attenuated TGFB1 increases and grip strength declines, matching our prior results with anti-TNFα.Performance of highly repetitive tasks was associated with force-dependent declines in grip strength and increased fibrogenic-related proteins in flexor digitorum muscles. These changes were attenuated, at least short-term, by anti-inflammatory treatments.

  11. The use of a single inertial sensor to estimate 3-dimensional ground reaction force during accelerative running tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurchiek, Reed D; McGinnis, Ryan S; Needle, Alan R; McBride, Jeffrey M; van Werkhoven, Herman

    2017-08-16

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the sacrum to estimate 3-dimensional ground reaction force (F) during linear acceleration and change of direction tasks. Force plate measurements of F and estimates from the proposed IMU method were collected while subjects (n=15) performed a standing sprint start (SS) and a 45° change of direction task (COD). Error in the IMU estimate of step-averaged component and resultant F was quantified by comparison to estimates from the force plate using Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement (LOA), root mean square error (RMSE), Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient (r), and the effect size (ES) of the differences between the two systems. RMSE of the IMU estimate of step-average F ranged from 37.70 N to 77.05 N with ES between 0.04 and 0.47 for SS while for COD, RMSE was between 54.19 N to 182.92 N with ES between 0.08 and 1.69. Correlation coefficients between the IMU and force plate measurements were significant (p≤0.05) for all values (r=0.53 to 0.95) except the medio-lateral component of step-average F. The average angular error in the IMU estimate of the orientation of step-average F was ≤10° for all tasks. The results of this study suggest the proposed IMU method may be used to estimate sagittal plane components and magnitude of step-average F during a linear standing sprint start as well as the vertical component and magnitude of step-average F during a 45° change of direction task. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodic health examination, 1994 update: 1. Obesity in childhood. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the 1979 Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination recommendation on screening for childhood obesity by reviewing any new evidence concerning health risks in childhood and adulthood, and effective preventive or therapeutic interventions. OPTIONS: Detection: routine measurement of height and weight, use of skinfold thickness measurements, calculation of body mass index (BMI). Intervention: diet, exercise, behaviour modification and comprehensive family-based w...

  13. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A; Bonnin, C M; Bowie, C R; Carvalho, A F; Gallagher, P; Lafer, B; López-Jaramillo, C; Sumiyoshi, T; McIntyre, R S; Schaffer, A; Porter, R J; Torres, I J; Yatham, L N; Young, A H; Kessing, L V; Vieta, E

    2017-09-12

    To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. The task force was launched in September 2016, consisting of 18 international experts from nine countries. A series of methodological issues were identified based on literature review and expert opinion. The issues were discussed and expanded upon in an initial face-to-face meeting, telephone conference call and email exchanges. Based upon these exchanges, recommendations were achieved. Key methodological challenges are: lack of consensus on how to screen for entry into cognitive treatment trials, define cognitive impairment, track efficacy, assess functional implications, and manage mood symptoms and concomitant medication. Task force recommendations are to: (i) enrich trials with objectively measured cognitively impaired patients; (ii) generally select a broad cognitive composite score as the primary outcome and a functional measure as a key secondary outcome; and (iii) include remitted or partly remitted patients. It is strongly encouraged that trials exclude patients with current substance or alcohol use disorders, neurological disease or unstable medical illness, and keep non-study medications stable. Additional methodological considerations include neuroimaging assessments, targeting of treatments to illness stage and using a multimodal approach. This ISBD task force guidance paper provides the first consensus-based recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder. Adherence to these recommendations will likely improve the sensitivity in detecting treatment efficacy in future trials and increase comparability between studies. © 2017 The Authors Bipolar Disorders Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    edu, Janet. twomey@wichita. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-04-30

    This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

  15. Analysis of applied forces and electromyography of back and shoulders muscles when performing a simulated hand scaling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William; Gallagher, Sean; Torma-Krajewski, Janet

    2010-05-01

    Hand scaling is a physically demanding task responsible for numerous overexertion injuries in underground mining. Scaling requires the miner to use a long pry bar to remove loose rock, reducing the likelihood of rock fall injuries. The experiments described in this article simulated "rib" scaling (scaling a mine wall) from an elevated bucket to examine force generation and electromyographic responses using two types of scaling bars (steel and fiberglass-reinforced aluminum) at five target heights ranging from floor level to 176 cm. Ten male and six female subjects were tested in separate experiments. Peak and average force applied at the scaling bar tip and normalized electromyography (EMG) of the left and right pairs of the deltoid and erectores spinae muscles were obtained. Work height significantly affected peak prying force during scaling activities with highest force capacity at the lower levels. Bar type did not affect force generation. However, use of the lighter fiberglass bar required significantly more muscle activity to achieve the same force. Results of these studies suggest that miners scale points on the rock face that are below their knees, and reposition the bucket as often as necessary to do so. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Real-time changes in corticospinal excitability related to motor imagery of a force control task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatemoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Junko; Numata, Atsuki

    2017-01-01

    in order to track an on-screen sine wave form. Participants performed the trained task 40 times with actual muscle contraction in order to construct the motor image. They were then instructed to execute the task without actual muscle contraction, but by imagining contraction of the right wrist...... (Increasing phase), the peak value of the sine wave, during the gradual reduction (Decreasing phase), and after completion of the task. The MEP ratio, as the ratio of imaged MEPs to resting-state, was compared between pre- and post-training at each time point. Results In the ECR muscle, the MEP ratio...

  17. Effects of Caffeine on Classroom Behavior, Sustained Attention, and a Memory Task in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Ruth A.

    1987-01-01

    The investigation of the effect of normative amounts of caffeine on the behavior of six normal kindergarten children found that caffeine exerted only small and inconsistent effects on such classroom behaviors as time off-task and gross motor activity. (Author/DB)

  18. An Achievable Vision: Report of the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Some services, however, always require preauthorization, including psychoanalysis , psychological and neuropsychological testing, electroconvulsive...psychological disorders, including PTSD, depression, substance abuse and psychosis . These guidelines are not consistently implemented across the DOD and the Task

  19. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P. Palstra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s-1 or body lengths s-1, BL s-1 were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145 mm, 206 mm and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: 1 0.70 m s-1 or 4.83 BL s-1, 2 0.82 m s-1 or 3.25 BL s-1 and 3 0.85 m s-1 or 2.73 BL s-1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s-1 = 234.07(BL-0.779 (R2= 0.9909 was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s-1 (‘swimmers’ or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (‘resters’ in a newly designed 3,600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor, were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n= 23 showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n= 23. As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31% in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 mL min-1 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min-1, respectively, under anesthesia. Thus growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  20. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J Gert

    2015-07-01

    To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. CHEMO-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atis, S.; Saha, S.; Auradou, H.; Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Talon, L.; Salin, D.

    2012-09-01

    Autocatalytic reaction fronts between two reacting species in the absence of fluid flow, propagate as solitary waves. The coupling between autocatalytic reaction front and forced simple hydrodynamic flows leads to stationary fronts whose velocity and shape depend on the underlying flow field. We address the issue of the chemico-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves. Towards that purpose, we perform experiments over a wide range of flow velocities with the well characterized iodate arsenious acid and chlorite-tetrathionate autocatalytic reactions in transparent packed beads porous media. The characteristics of these porous media such as their porosity, tortuosity, and hydrodynamics dispersion are determined. In a pack of beads, the characteristic pore size and the velocity field correlation length are of the order of the bead size. In order to address these two length scales separately, we perform lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations in a stochastic porous medium, which takes into account the log-normal permeability distribution and the spatial correlation of the permeability field. In both experiments and numerical simulations, we observe stationary fronts propagating at a constant velocity with an almost constant front width. Experiments without flow in packed bead porous media with different bead sizes show that the front propagation depends on the tortuous nature of diffusion in the pore space. We observe microscopic effects when the pores are of the size of the chemical front width. We address both supportive co-current and adverse flows with respect to the direction of propagation of the chemical reaction. For supportive flows, experiments and simulations allow observation of two flow regimes. For adverse flow, we observe upstream and downstream front motion as well as static front behaviors over a wide range of flow rates. In order to understand better these observed static state fronts, flow

  2. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Weapon Effects Test, Evaluation, and Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    .... These assessments have considered the emergence of terrorism as a major threat to the U.S. homeland and deployed forces abroad, the asymmetric attractiveness of the use of nuclear weapons to offset U.S...

  3. Evaluation of Combat Service Support Logistics Concepts for Supplying a USMC Regimental Task Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenhardt, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    .... This thesis evaluates existing and proposed concepts on how to best use the CSSE resources of a Force Service Support Group to transport supplies to Regimental Combat Teams over constrained networks...

  4. Beyond time and space: The effect of a lateralized sustained attention task and brain stimulation on spatial and selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Nir; De Wandel, Linde; Dockree, Paul; Demeyere, Nele; Chechlacz, Magdalena

    2017-10-03

    The Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) provides a mathematical formalisation of the "biased competition" account of visual attention. Applying this model to individual performance in a free recall task allows the estimation of 5 independent attentional parameters: visual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity, speed of information processing, perceptual threshold of visual detection; attentional weights representing spatial distribution of attention (spatial bias), and the top-down selectivity index. While the TVA focuses on selection in space, complementary accounts of attention describe how attention is maintained over time, and how temporal processes interact with selection. A growing body of evidence indicates that different facets of attention interact and share common neural substrates. The aim of the current study was to modulate a spatial attentional bias via transfer effects, based on a mechanistic understanding of the interplay between spatial, selective and temporal aspects of attention. Specifically, we examined here: (i) whether a single administration of a lateralized sustained attention task could prime spatial orienting and lead to transferable changes in attentional weights (assigned to the left vs right hemi-field) and/or other attentional parameters assessed within the framework of TVA (Experiment 1); (ii) whether the effects of such spatial-priming on TVA parameters could be further enhanced by bi-parietal high frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) (Experiment 2). Our results demonstrate that spatial attentional bias, as assessed within the TVA framework, was primed by sustaining attention towards the right hemi-field, but this spatial-priming effect did not occur when sustaining attention towards the left. Furthermore, we show that bi-parietal high-frequency tRNS combined with the rightward spatial-priming resulted in an increased attentional selectivity. To conclude, we present a novel, theory-driven method for attentional modulation

  5. Effects of Grip-Force, Contact, and Acceleration Feedback on a Teleoperated Pick-and-Place Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Rebecca P; Fitter, Naomi T; Fedalei, Elizabeth A; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2017-01-01

    The multifaceted human sense of touch is fundamental to direct manipulation, but technical challenges prevent most teleoperation systems from providing even a single modality of haptic feedback, such as force feedback. This paper postulates that ungrounded grip-force, fingertip-contact-and-pressure, and high-frequency acceleration haptic feedback will improve human performance of a teleoperated pick-and-place task. Thirty subjects used a teleoperation system consisting of a haptic device worn on the subject's right hand, a remote PR2 humanoid robot, and a Vicon motion capture system to move an object to a target location. Each subject completed the pick-and-place task 10 times under each of the eight haptic conditions obtained by turning on and off grip-force feedback, contact feedback, and acceleration feedback. To understand how object stiffness affects the utility of the feedback, half of the subjects completed the task with a flexible plastic cup, and the others used a rigid plastic block. The results indicate that the addition of grip-force feedback with gain switching enables subjects to hold both the flexible and rigid objects more stably, and it also allowed subjects who manipulated the rigid block to hold the object more delicately and to better control the motion of the remote robot's hand. Contact feedback improved the ability of subjects who manipulated the flexible cup to move the robot's arm in space, but it deteriorated this ability for subjects who manipulated the rigid block. Contact feedback also caused subjects to hold the flexible cup less stably, but the rigid block more securely. Finally, adding acceleration feedback slightly improved the subject's performance when setting the object down, as originally hypothesized; interestingly, it also allowed subjects to feel vibrations produced by the robot's motion, causing them to be more careful when completing the task. This study supports the utility of grip-force and high-frequency acceleration

  6. "FACILS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology" (hereafter "FACILS") presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Methe, Barbara

    2016-02-03

    As we enter the 21st century, the sustainability of the biosphere is a global challenge that can best be met with a global response. This includes how we train and promote our next generation of research scientists in the emerging arenas of genome-enabled biology and a bio-based economy. It is this fundamental issue that formed the motivation for designing and conducting a shortcourse entitled “FACILIS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology” (hereafter “FACILIS”) presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research. This WG was established in 1994 under the umbrella of the US-EC Task Force on Biotechnology Research, a transatlantic collaborative group overseen by the US Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the EC. The Environmental Biotechnology Working Group maintains several goals, including establishing research links between scientists in EU countries and the US and fostering the careers of junior scientists from both sides of the Atlantic to the global nature of scientific cooperation. To that end, a shortcourse was held at the University of Milan in Italy on July 12-25 2014 organized around cross-cutting themes of genomic science and designed to attract a stellar group of interdisciplinary early carrier researchers. A total of 22 students, 10 from the US and 12 from the EU participated. The course provided them with hands-on experience with the latest scientific methods in genomics and bioinformatics; using a format that combines lectures, laboratory research and field work with the final goal to enable researchers to finally turn data into knowledge.

  7. Learning to Control Orientation and Force in a Hammering Task The Initial Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, Carlijn A.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to create stone tools is considered an important step in the emergence of human cognition. To further our understanding of these evolutionary processes we focused on the initial learning processes with which this percussive skill may be acquired. We studied a hammering task in which

  8. Assessing the effects of caffeine and theanine on the maintenance of vigilance during a sustained attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxe, John J; Morie, Kristen P; Laud, Peter J; Rowson, Matthew J; de Bruin, Eveline A; Kelly, Simon P

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine and L-theanine, both naturally occurring in tea, affect the ability to make rapid phasic deployments of attention to locations in space as reflected in behavioural performance and alpha-band oscillatory brain activity (8-14 Hz). However, surprisingly little is known about how these compounds affect an aspect of attention that has been more popularly associated with tea, namely vigilant attention: the ability to maintain focus on monotonous tasks over protracted time-periods. Twenty-seven participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) over a two-hour session on each of four days, on which they were administered caffeine (50 mg), theanine (100 mg), the combination, or placebo in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over fashion. Concurrently, we recorded oscillatory brain activity through high-density electroencephalography (EEG). We asked whether either compound alone, or both in combination, would affect performance of the task in terms of reduced error rates over time, and whether changes in alpha-band activity would show a relationship to such changes in performance. When treated with placebo, participants showed a rise in error rates, a pattern that is commonly observed with increasing time-on-task, whereas after caffeine and theanine ingestion, error rates were significantly reduced. The combined treatment did not confer any additional benefits over either compound alone, suggesting that the individual compounds may confer maximal benefits at the dosages employed. Alpha-band oscillatory activity was significantly reduced on ingestion of caffeine, particularly in the first hour. This effect was not changed by addition of theanine in the combined treatment. Theanine alone did not affect alpha-band activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO): AMIA Task Force Report on CCIO Knowledge, Education, and Skillset Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannry, Joseph; Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    The emerging operational role of the "Chief Clinical Informatics Officer" (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science.

  10. Responses to comments received on the draft final report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Task Force solicited comments on its Draft Final Report from a variety of sources. Letters were sent to over 400 individuals who had expressed interest in the interest in the Department`s radioactive waste, management programs, a notice was placed in the Federal Register, the morning session of the January 1993 meeting of the full Secretary of Energy Advisory Board was given over to discussion of the draft, and Task Force members and staff presented the effort at several professional meetings. Altogether 32 written comments were received. They are reproduced here, followed in each case by the Task Force`s response to specific suggestions made to improve the draft. (The panel did not respond to comments that simply reflected policy preferences or that praised the group`s effort.) With one exception, those specific suggestions are highlighted and given a letter designation from {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} to {open_quotes}Z{close_quotes}. The Task Force`s responses, written in the Fall 1993, are labeled in a like manner. For the one exception, a comments submitted by Judy Treichel, the Task Force`s response is printed on copies of her annotated pages.

  11. Subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition in Hill-type model predicts higher muscle forces in dynamic tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Gerus

    Full Text Available Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subject-specific estimates of the tendon-aponeurosis complex's mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of subject-specific mechanical properties of the tendon-aponeurosis complex on a neuromusculoskeletal model of the ankle joint. Seven subjects performed isometric contractions from which the tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was estimated. Hopping and running tasks were performed and muscle forces were estimated using subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis and generic tendon properties. Two ultrasound probes positioned over the muscle-tendon junction and the mid-belly were combined with motion capture to estimate the in vivo tendon and aponeurosis strain of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. The tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was scaled for the other ankle muscles based on tendon and aponeurosis length of each muscle measured by ultrasonography. The EMG-driven model was calibrated twice - using the generic tendon definition and a subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis force-strain definition. The use of subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a higher muscle force estimate for the soleus muscle and the plantar-flexor group, and to a better model prediction of the ankle joint moment compared to the model estimate which used a generic definition. Furthermore, the subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a decoupling behaviour between the muscle fibre and muscle-tendon unit

  12. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Strategic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for ,Acquisition, Technology and Logistics,Defense Scince Board,Washington,DC,20301... direction that adapts quickly, transforms stovepipes, integrates knowledge and functions, and builds next generation skills and technologies...sustained senior leadership at the White House level that focuses exclusively on global communication and directs all relevant aspects of national capacity

  13. Joint Interagency Task Force-South: The Best Known, Least Understood Interagency Success (INSS Strategic Perspectives, Number 5, June 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    COAST TO GO BE NI N N I G E R I A N I G E R C H A D EGYPT S U D A N ERITREA E T H I O P I A CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLICCAMEROON EQUATORIAL GUINEA GABON...organizations: agents and informants in South America, tactical analysis teams in Europe , law enforcement task forc- es in the United States, ships from the...gradual but apparently permanent migration in smuggling routes inwards toward Central America and out to the Atlantic. Drugs destined for the United

  14. Japanese Society of Allergology task force report on standardization of house dust mite allergen vaccines – Secondary publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Takai

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The task force determined the in vivo allergenic potency (100,000 JAU/ml and Der 1 content (38.5 μg/ml of the JSA reference HDM extract, selected the measurement of Der 1 content as the surrogate in vitro assay, and decided that manufacturers can label a HDM allergen extract as having a titer of 100,000 JAU/ml if it contains 22.2–66.7 μg/ml of Der 1.

  15. The Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa: The Other Front on the Global War on Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-26

    promoting regional stability via civic action programs (CAP). The various CAP’s include providing medical care, dental care, veterinary care, school and...programs, dental civil affairs programs, and show the face of America, that we are the good guys, and that we embrace the rules of law, ethical government...Combating Terrorism Center, 2007. 19 Thomas P.M. Barnett , “The Americans have Landed,” Esquire, 27 June 2007. 2. 23 20 The Combined Joint Task Force-Horn

  16. Force and complexity of tongue task training influences behavioral measures of motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Huo, Xueliang

    2012-01-01

    Relearning of motor skills is important in neurorehabilitation. We investigated the improvement of training success during simple tongue protrusion (two force levels) and a more complex tongue-training paradigm using the Tongue Drive System (TDS). We also compared subject-based reports of fun, pa...... training influences behavioral aspects of tongue motor learning....

  17. Report of Lethbridge Native Education Task Force to Boards of Lethbridge School District #51 and Lethbridge Catholic Separate School District #9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnica, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Reports Task Force recommendations for a sound education program providing opportunities for success for Indian, Metis, and Inuit students and information for Native and non-Native students about Native people, history, culture, and contributions to community and nation. (LFL)

  18. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force (TF1) includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, and identification of fuel performance and system codes applicable to ATF evaluation. The Cladding and Core Materials (TF2) and Fuel Concepts (TF3) task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment task force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (Idaho National Laboratory [INL], U.S.), the Cladding Task Force is chaired by Marie Moatti (Electricite de France [EdF], France), and the Fuels Task Force is chaired by a Masaki Kurata (Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA], Japan). The original Expert Group mandate was established for June 2014 to June 2016. In April 2016 the Expert Group voted to extend the mandate one additional year to June 2017 in order to complete the task force deliverables; this request was subsequently approved by the Nuclear Science Committee. This

  19. Task force report to the Steering Committee of the FAO/ECE/ILO Joint Committee on Forest Technology, Management and Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The first part of this document sets out the Task Force`s composition, terms of reference and methodology. The document looks briefly at the establishment of the Joint Committee, its mandate, structure and methods of work, how it has evolved over the past 30-odd years, and the changes that must be taken into account in the 1990s; describes the Joint Committee`s organization and work methods; identifies and describes other bodies and committees that deal with forestry and the forest industry and cites any coordination or duplication they may have with the Joint Committee; reports on and analyzes responses to the Task Force questionnaire; deals with communications and information exchanges among the Joint Committee and member countries, as well as among the member countries themselves; contains the Task Force`s recommendations to the Steering Committee; and, draws conclusions, based for the most part on the responses to the questionnaire.

  20. Gain Scheduling for Hybrid Force/Velocity Control in Contour Tracking Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Ziliani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a gain scheduling approach is proposed for the hybrid force/velocity control of an industrial manipulator employed for the contour tracking of objects of unknown shape. The methodology allows to cope with the configuration dependent dynamics of the manipulator during a constrained motion and therefore a significant improvement of the performance results. Experimental results obtained with an industrial SCARA manipulator demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique.

  1. Effects of bupropion sustained release on task-related EEG alpha activity in smokers: Individual differences in drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Coppens, Ryan P; Rabinovich, Norka E; Gilbert, David G

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying bupropion's efficacy as an antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid are far from being fully characterized. The present study is the first to examine the effects of bupropion on visuospatial task-related parietal EEG alpha power asymmetry-an asymmetry that has previously been found to be associated with severity of depressive symptoms (i.e., the more depressive symptoms, the greater alpha power in the right vs. left parietal area [Henriques & Davidson, 1997; Rabe, Debener, Brocke, & Beauducel, 2005]). Participants, all of whom were smokers and none of whom were clinically depressed, were randomly assigned to the Placebo group (n = 79) or Bupropion group (n = 31) in a double-blind study. EEG during the performance of the visuospatial task was collected before and after 14 days on placebo or bupropion sustained-release capsules. Relative to the Placebo group, the Bupropion group (especially, the Bupropion subgroup who had a positive right versus left parietal alpha power asymmetry at pretreatment) had a reduction in the parietal alpha asymmetry (driven largely by a decrease in right parietal alpha power). These findings support the hypothesis that bupropion can induce changes in parietal EEG asymmetry that have been shown in previous literature to be associated with a reduction in depressive states and traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried NTM; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). Methods This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. Results The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data has brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. PMID:26384588

  3. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried Ntm; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-11-01

    In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data have brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Epilepsy, seizures, physical exercise, and sports: A report from the ILAE Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, Giuseppe; Kaufman, Kenneth R; Perucca, Emilio; Moshé, Solomon L; Arida, Ricardo M

    2016-01-01

    People with epilepsy (PWEs) are often advised against participating in sports and exercise, mostly because of fear, overprotection, and ignorance about the specific benefits and risks associated with such activities. Available evidence suggests that physical exercise and active participation in sports may favorably affect seizure control, in addition to producing broader health and psychosocial benefits. This consensus paper prepared by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy offers general guidance concerning participation of PWEs in sport activities, and provides suggestions on the issuance of medical fitness certificates related to involvement in different sports. Sports are divided into three categories based on potential risk of injury or death should a seizure occur: group 1, sports with no significant additional risk; group 2, sports with moderate risk to PWEs, but no risk to bystanders; and group 3, sports with major risk. Factors to be considered when advising whether a PWE can participate in specific activities include the type of sport, the probability of a seizure occurring, the type and severity of the seizures, seizure precipitating factors, the usual timing of seizure occurrence, and the person's attitude in accepting some level of risk. The Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy considers this document as a work in progress to be updated as additional data become available. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Experience of using an interdisciplinary task force to develop a culturally sensitive multipronged tool to improve stroke outcomes in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedunni S. Arulogun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The burden of stroke is on the rise in Nigeria. A multi-faceted strategy is essential for reducing this growing burden and includes promoting medication adherence, optimizing traditional biomarker risk targets (blood pressure, cholesterol and encouraging beneficial lifestyle practices. Successful implementation of this strategy is challenged by inadequate patient health literacy, limited patient/medical system resources, and lack of a coordinated interdisciplinary treatment approach. Moreover, the few interventions developed to improve medical care in Nigeria have generally been aimed at physicians (primarily and nurses (secondarily with minimal input from other key health care providers, and limited contributions from patients, caregivers, and the community itself. The Tailored Hospital-based Risk Reduction to Impede Vascular Events after Stroke (THRIVES study is assessing the efficacy of a culturally sensitive multidimensional intervention for controlling blood pressure in recent stroke survivors. A key component of the intervention development process was the constitution of a project task force comprising various healthcare providers and administrators. This paper describes the unique experience in Sub-Saharan Africa of utilizing of an interdisciplinary Task force to facilitate the development of the multipronged behavioral intervention aimed at enhancing stroke outcomes in a low-middle income country.

  6. Consensus on circulatory shock and hemodynamic monitoring. Task force of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Maurizio; De Backer, Daniel; Antonelli, Massimo; Beale, Richard; Bakker, Jan; Hofer, Christoph; Jaeschke, Roman; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Pinsky, Michael R; Teboul, Jean Louis; Vincent, Jean Louis; Rhodes, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Circulatory shock is a life-threatening syndrome resulting in multiorgan failure and a high mortality rate. The aim of this consensus is to provide support to the bedside clinician regarding the diagnosis, management and monitoring of shock. The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine invited 12 experts to form a Task Force to update a previous consensus (Antonelli et al.: Intensive Care Med 33:575-590, 2007). The same five questions addressed in the earlier consensus were used as the outline for the literature search and review, with the aim of the Task Force to produce statements based on the available literature and evidence. These questions were: (1) What are the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic features of shock in the intensive care unit? (2) Should we monitor preload and fluid responsiveness in shock? (3) How and when should we monitor stroke volume or cardiac output in shock? (4) What markers of the regional and microcirculation can be monitored, and how can cellular function be assessed in shock? (5) What is the evidence for using hemodynamic monitoring to direct therapy in shock? Four types of statements were used: definition, recommendation, best practice and statement of fact. Forty-four statements were made. The main new statements include: (1) statements on individualizing blood pressure targets; (2) statements on the assessment and prediction of fluid responsiveness; (3) statements on the use of echocardiography and hemodynamic monitoring. This consensus provides 44 statements that can be used at the bedside to diagnose, treat and monitor patients with shock.

  7. World Psychiatry and the WPA task force to promote dissemination of psychiatric research conducted in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Mario

    2010-01-01

    World Psychiatry, the official journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), is now published in five languages (English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian and French) and reaches more than 33,000 psychiatrists in 121 countries. It received recently its first impact factor, 3.896. The publication of the journal has two objectives. The first is to reach as many psychiatrists of the various countries of the world as possible, disseminating information on recent significant clinical, service and research developments in a language that can be assimilated by the vast majority of them. The second is to give voice to psychiatrists of all regions of the world, encouraging submission of research papers, commentaries and reports on innovative service modalities. Related to this second objective has been the establishment by the WPA of a task force aiming to promote dissemination of psychiatric research conducted in low and middle income countries. Among the objectives of this task force is to advise and support the editors of high quality journals produced in those countries in their efforts to achieve indexation.

  8. Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) June 2014 – December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and...Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...in support of these campaigns have had to maintain a high degree of clinical skill to effectively render care to wounded combatants, a necessity

  9. New path for health-care leadership: clinical systems management. CLMA Clinical Systems Management Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, L; Lien, J; Snyder, J R; Teixeira, R; Vernon, M; Pomerantz, P

    1998-01-01

    This article sets forth a concept and an action plan to support the educational needs for the clinical systems manager. This article describes the roles, competencies, and tasks of the clinical systems manager and defines specific intermediate and long-term steps. Clinical systems management is umbrella terminology used to describe an array of related jobs including, but not necessarily limited to, multidepartmental or interdisciplinary management, regional or health system-wide laboratory management, and traditional laboratory management. In general, clinical systems management recognizes the emergence of new jobs, with the primary responsibility of leading the integration of clinical services within health-care systems.

  10. Sustaining Nurse-Led Task-Shifting Strategies for Hypertension Control: A Concept Mapping Study to Inform Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Sarah; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Gyamfi, Joyce; Quakyi, Nana Kofi; Ntim, Micheal; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2017-10-01

    The use of task-shifting is an increasingly widespread delivery approach for health interventions targeting prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension in adults living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Addressing a gap in the literature, this research examined the sustainability of an ongoing task-shifting strategy for hypertension (TASSH) from the perspectives of community health nurses (CHNs) implementing the program. We used concept-mapping, a mixed-methods participatory approach to understand CHNs' perceptions of barriers and enablers to sustaining a task-shifting program. Participants responded to focal prompts, eliciting statements regarding perceived barriers and enablers to sustaining TASSH, and then rated these ideas based on importance to the research questions and feasibility to address. Twenty-eight community health nurses (21 women, 7 men) from the Ashanti region of Ghana completed the concept-mapping process. Factors influencing sustainability were grouped into five categories: Limited Drug Supply, Financial Support, Provision of Primary Health Care, Personnel Training, and Patient-Provider Communication. The limited supply of antihypertensive medication was considered by CHNs as the most important item to address, while providing training for intervention personnel was considered most feasible to address. This study's findings highlight the importance of examining nurses' perceptions of factors likely to influence the sustainability of evidence-based, task-shifting interventions. Nurses' perceptions can guide the widespread uptake and dissemination of these interventions in resource-limited settings. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  12. Functional difference between sustained and transient modulations of cognitive control in the simon task: evidence from false alarm responses on no-go trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Shin'ya

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control in response compatibility tasks is modulated by the task context. Two types of contextual modulations have been demonstrated; sustained (block-wise) and transient (trial-by-trial). Recent research suggests that these modulations have different underlying mechanisms. This study presents new evidence supporting this claim by comparing false alarm (FA) responses on no-go trials of the Simon task between the sustained and transient contexts. In Experiment 1, the sustained context was manipulated so that a block included a larger number of incongruent trials. Results showed that participants made more FA responses by the hand opposite to the stimulus location. This suggests a generation of response bias in which the task-irrelevant location information is utilized in a reversed manner (i.e., to respond with the right hand to a stimulus presented on the left side and vice versa). Next, Experiment 2 examined the effect of the transient context and found that overall FA rate was lower when a no-go trial was preceded by an incongruent trial than by a congruent trial, whereas such response bias as that shown in Experiment 1 was not demonstrated. This suggests that the transient conflict context enhances inhibition of the task-irrelevant process but does not make the task-irrelevant information actively usable. Based on these results, we propound two types of cognitive control modulations as adaptive behaviors: response biasing based on utilization of the task-irrelevant information under the sustained conflict context and transient enhancement of inhibition of the task-irrelevant process based on the online conflict monitoring.

  13. Common data elements for preclinical epilepsy research: Standards for data collection and reporting. A TASK3 report of the AES/ILAE Translational Task Force of the ILAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C; French, Jacqueline A; Pitkänen, Asla; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Whittemore, Vicky; Scharfman, Helen E

    2017-11-01

    The major objective of preclinical translational epilepsy research is to advance laboratory findings toward clinical application by testing potential treatments in animal models of seizures and epilepsy. Recently there has been a focus on the failure of preclinical discoveries to translate reliably, or even to be reproduced in different laboratories. One potential cause is a lack of standardization in preclinical data collection. The resulting difficulties in comparing data across studies have led to high cost and missed opportunity, which in turn impede clinical trials and advances in medical care. Preclinical epilepsy research has successfully brought numerous antiseizure treatments into the clinical practice, yet the unmet clinical needs have prompted the reconsideration of research strategies to optimize epilepsy therapy development. In the field of clinical epilepsy there have been successful steps to improve such problems, such as generation of common data elements (CDEs) and case report forms (CRFs and standards of data collection and reporting) by a team of leaders in the field. Therefore, the Translational Task Force was appointed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the American Epilepsy Society (AES), in partnership with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to define CDEs for animal epilepsy research studies and prepare guidelines for data collection and experimental procedures. If adopted, the preclinical CDEs could facilitate collaborative epilepsy research, comparisons of data across different laboratories, and promote rigor, transparency, and impact, particularly in therapy development. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Spatial distribution of HD-EMG improves identification of task and force in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanic, Mislav; Rojas-Martínez, Mónica; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Alonso, Joan Francesc

    2016-04-29

    Recent studies show that spatial distribution of High Density surface EMG maps (HD-EMG) improves the identification of tasks and their corresponding contraction levels. However, in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI), some nerves that control muscles are damaged, leaving some muscle parts without an innervation. Therefore, HD-EMG maps in patients with iSCI are affected by the injury and they can be different for every patient. The objective of this study is to investigate the spatial distribution of intensity in HD-EMG recordings to distinguish co-activation patterns for different tasks and effort levels in patients with iSCI. These patterns are evaluated to be used for extraction of motion intention. HD-EMG was recorded in patients during four isometric tasks of the forearm at three different effort levels. A linear discriminant classifier based on intensity and spatial features of HD-EMG maps of five upper-limb muscles was used to identify the attempted tasks. Task and force identification were evaluated for each patient individually, and the reliability of the identification was tested with respect to muscle fatigue and time interval between training and identification. Three feature sets were analyzed in the identification: 1) intensity of the HD-EMG map, 2) intensity and center of gravity of HD-EMG maps and 3) intensity of a single differential EMG channel (gold standard). Results show that the combination of intensity and spatial features in classification identifies tasks and effort levels properly (Acc = 98.8 %; S = 92.5 %; P = 93.2 %; SP = 99.4 %) and outperforms significantly the other two feature sets (p < 0.05). In spite of the limited motor functionality, a specific co-activation pattern for each patient exists for both intensity, and spatial distribution of myoelectric activity. The spatial distribution is less sensitive than intensity to myoelectric changes that occur due to fatigue, and other time

  15. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, parametric studies, and selection of system codes. The Cladding and Core Materials and Fuel Concepts task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment Task Force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (INL), while the Cladding Task Force will be chaired by a representative from France (Marie Moatti, Electricite de France [EdF]) and the Fuels Task Force will be chaired by a representative from Japan (Masaki Kurata, Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA]). This report provides an overview of the Systems Assessment Task Force charter and status of work accomplishment.

  16. Guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism: prepared by the american thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Bianco, Antonio C; Bauer, Andrew J; Burman, Kenneth D; Cappola, Anne R; Celi, Francesco S; Cooper, David S; Kim, Brian W; Peeters, Robin P; Rosenthal, M Sara; Sawka, Anna M

    2014-12-01

    A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. We reviewed the following therapeutic

  17. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R; Abrahamsen, Bo; Adler, Robert A; Brown, Thomas D; Cheung, Angela M; Cosman, Felicia; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Dell, Richard; Dempster, David; Einhorn, Thomas A; Genant, Harry K; Geusens, Piet; Klaushofer, Klaus; Koval, Kenneth; Lane, Joseph M; McKiernan, Fergus; McKinney, Ross; Ng, Alvin; Nieves, Jeri; O'Keefe, Regis; Papapoulos, Socrates; Sen, Howe Tet; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Weinstein, Robert S; Whyte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fractures and recommends that all major features, including their location in the subtrochanteric region and femoral shaft, transverse or short oblique orientation, minimal or no associated trauma, a medial spike when the fracture is complete, and absence of comminution, be present to designate a femoral fracture as atypical. Minor features include their association with cortical thickening, a periosteal reaction of the lateral cortex, prodromal pain, bilaterality, delayed healing, comorbid conditions, and concomitant drug exposures, including BPs, other antiresorptive agents, glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors. Preclinical data evaluating the effects of BPs on collagen cross-linking and maturation, accumulation of microdamage and advanced glycation end products, mineralization, remodeling, vascularity, and angiogenesis lend biologic plausibility to a potential association with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of

  18. Guidelines for the Treatment of Hypothyroidism: Prepared by the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Thyroid Hormone Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Antonio C.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Burman, Kenneth D.; Cappola, Anne R.; Celi, Francesco S.; Cooper, David S.; Kim, Brian W.; Peeters, Robin P.; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sawka, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Methods: Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. Results: We reviewed the

  19. Alternative aviation jet fuel sustainability evaluation report - task 3 : sustainability criteria and rating systems for the use in aircraft alternative fuel supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-31

    This report identifies criteria that can be used to evaluate the sustainability of biofuels introduced into the aviation fuel supply chain. It describes the inputs, criteria and outputs that can be used in a sustainability rating system. It identifie...

  20. Impact of the Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Douglas

    The Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs has worked diligently to develop recommendations for what physics programs could and should be doing to prepare graduates for 21st century careers. While the `traditional' physics curriculum has served for many years, the demands of the new workforce, and the recognition that only a few percent of physics students actually become faculty - the vast majority entering the workforce and applying their skills to a very diverse range of problems, projects, and products - implies that a review of the education undergraduates receives is in order. The outcomes of this study point to the need to provide greater connection between the education process and the actual skills, knowledge, and abilities that the workplace demands. This presentation will summarize these considerations, and show how entrepreneurship and innovation programs and curricula are a particularly effective means of bringing these elements to physics students.

  1. Multi-morbidities of allergic rhinitis in adults: European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, C; Gevaert, P; Mösges, R; Rondon, C; Hox, V; Rudenko, M; Muluk, N B; Scadding, G; Manole, F; Hupin, C; Fokkens, W J; Akdis, C; Bachert, C; Demoly, P; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N; Pawankar, R; Rombaux, P; Toskala, E; Kalogjera, L; Prokopakis, E; Hellings, P W; Bousquet, J

    2017-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force on Allergic Rhinitis (AR) comorbidities. The aim of this multidisciplinary European consensus document is to highlight the role of multimorbidities in the definition, classification, mechanisms, recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of AR, and to define the needs in this neglected area by a literature review. AR is a systemic allergic disease and is generally associated with numerous multi-morbid disorders, including asthma, eczema, food allergies, eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), conjunctivitis, chronic middle ear effusions, rhinosinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy, olfaction disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, disordered sleep and consequent behavioural and educational effects. This report provides up-to-date usable information to: (1) improve the knowledge and skills of allergists, so as to ultimately improve the overall quality of patient care; (2) to increase interest in this area; and (3) to present a unique contribution to the field of upper inflammatory disease.

  2. Report for the CCME Task Force on cleaner vehicles and fuels - Cost of upgrading Canadian transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Findings of a study by Kilborn Engineering Inc for a Task Force of the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) were reviewed. The study concerned estimates of the costs of reducing emissions through fuel reformulation. A total of nine scenarios were examined with information from three of 17 Canadian refineries. Scenarios considered removal of methylcyclopentadienyl-manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) (an octane additive), vapour pressure reduction, benzene/aromatic reduction, toxics and sulphur reduction, and sulphur reduction in diesel fuels. Costs and methods for achieving certain standards varied among the participating refineries. Accuracy of the predictions was estimated to be within 35%. Fuel reformulation costs were determined on a capital recovery cost basis for Atlantic/Quebec region, for Ontario, for the prairie provinces and British Columbia and for Canada as a whole. 31 tabs., 6 refs. for the

  3. Norwegian 1990 sediment data for the North Sea Task Force (NSTF) and the Joint Monitoring Group (JMG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, N.W.; Klungsoeyr, J.

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the 1990 sediment data compiled as part of the Norwegian contribution to the North Sea Task Force Monitoring Master Plan and the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP). The JMP is ordered under the Oslo and Paris Commissions, which were established to protect the marine environment against anthropogenic contamination. The stations monitored by Norway are spread over the Kattegat, Skagerrak, North Sea south to the Dogger Bank and the Faeroe Islands. The contaminants investigated are mainly selected metals, organochlorines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and the samples were collected by gravity cores and grab/box samplers. The raw data and the mean and standard deviations of parallel samples (if relevant) are presented. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Summary of 21st joint EU-US transport task force workshop (Leysin, September 5-8, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Camenen, Y.; Dejarnac, R.; Evans, T.; Görler, T.; Hillesheim, J.; Idomura, Y.; Jakubowski, M.; Ricci, P.; White, A.; 21st Joint EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop, The Participants to the

    2017-08-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 21st Joint EU-US Transport Task Force workshop, held in Leysin, Switzerland, during 5-8 September 2016. The workshop was organized under 8 topics: progress towards full-F kinetic turbulence simulation; high and low Z impurity transport, control and effects on plasma confinement; 3D effects on core and edge transport (including MHD, external fields and stellarators); predictive experimental design; electron heat transport and multi-scale integration; understanding power decay length in the SOL; role of the SOL in the L-H transition; validation of fundamental turbulence properties against turbulence measurements. This report follows the same structure.

  5. Secondary traumatic stress among Internet Crimes Against Children task force personnel: impact, risk factors, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Michael L; Craun, Sarah W

    2014-12-01

    Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force personnel face various forms of child exploitation on a daily basis; their jobs require them to view child pornography, participate in undercover chats, interact with offenders in person, and interview abuse survivors. Although exposure to child exploitation and sexual violence has been shown to cause secondary traumatic stress (STS) in certain professions, this is the first large-scale study to investigate risk for STS among ICAC personnel. We circulated an Internet-based survey to ICAC personnel throughout the country and more than 600 individuals responded. Results provide insight into how STS impacts personal and professional well-being. In addition, they highlight which coping mechanisms were inversely related to STS scores. Implications and limitations of the results are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Safe school task force: University-community partnership to promote student development and a safer school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Corey; Chung-Do, Jane; Ongalibang, Ophelia

    2008-01-01

    The Asian/Pacific Islander Youth Violence Prevention Center (APIYVPC) focuses its youth violence prevention efforts on community mobilization by partnering with Kailua High School and other local community groups. This paper describes the development and activities of the Safe School Task Force (SSTF) and the lessons learned. In response to concerns of school, community members, and students, the SSTF was organized to promote student leadership in raising awareness about problems related to violence. Collaboration among the school, community, and the university places students in leadership roles to reduce school violence and enhances their self-efficacy to improve their school environment. To increase SSTF effectiveness, more attention must be paid to student recruitment, consistent community partnerships, and gaining teacher buy-in. This partnership may be useful in multicultural communities to provide students the opportunities to learn about violence prevention strategies, community mobilization, and leadership skills.

  7. Mind-wandering in younger and older adults: converging evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and reading for comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Balota, David A

    2012-03-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults' changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults' relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering.

  8. Objectives, Budgets, Thresholds, and Opportunity Costs-A Health Economics Approach: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzon, Patricia M; Drummond, Michael F; Towse, Adrian; Pauly, Mark V

    2018-02-01

    The fourth section of our Special Task Force report focuses on a health plan or payer's technology adoption or reimbursement decision, given the array of technologies, on the basis of their different values and costs. We discuss the role of budgets, thresholds, opportunity costs, and affordability in making decisions. First, we discuss the use of budgets and thresholds in private and public health plans, their interdependence, and connection to opportunity cost. Essentially, each payer should adopt a decision rule about what is good value for money given their budget; consistent use of a cost-per-quality-adjusted life-year threshold will ensure the maximum health gain for the budget. In the United States, different public and private insurance programs could use different thresholds, reflecting the differing generosity of their budgets and implying different levels of access to technologies. In addition, different insurance plans could consider different additional elements to the quality-adjusted life-year metric discussed elsewhere in our Special Task Force report. We then define affordability and discuss approaches to deal with it, including consideration of disinvestment and related adjustment costs, the impact of delaying new technologies, and comparative cost effectiveness of technologies. Over time, the availability of new technologies may increase the amount that populations want to spend on health care. We then discuss potential modifiers to thresholds, including uncertainty about the evidence used in the decision-making process. This article concludes by discussing the application of these concepts in the context of the pluralistic US health care system, as well as the "excess burden" of tax-financed public programs versus private programs. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Health Economics Approach to US Value Assessment Frameworks-Introduction: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter J; Willke, Richard J; Garrison, Louis P

    2018-02-01

    Concerns about rising spending on prescription drugs and other areas of health care have led to multiple initiatives in the United States designed to measure and communicate the value of pharmaceuticals and other technologies for decision making. In this section we introduce the work of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Special Task Force on US Value Assessment Frameworks formed to review relevant perspectives and appropriate approaches and methods to support the definition and use of high-quality value frameworks. The Special Task Force was part of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Initiative on US Value Assessment Frameworks, which enlisted the expertise of leading health economists, concentrating on what the field of health economics can provide to help inform the development and use of value assessment frameworks. We focus on five value framework initiatives: the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. These entities differ in their missions, scope of activities, and methodological approaches. Because they are gaining visibility and some traction in the United States, it is essential to scrutinize whether the frameworks use approaches that are transparent as well as conceptually and methodologically sound. Our objectives were to describe the conceptual bases for value and its use in decision making, critically examine existing value frameworks, discuss the importance of sound conceptual underpinning, identify key elements of value relevant to specific decision contexts, and recommend good practice in value definition and implementation as well as areas for further research. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside clinical trials II-An ISPOR Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Willke, Richard J; Glick, Henry; Reed, Shelby D; Augustovski, Federico; Jonsson, Bengt; Briggs, Andrew; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-03-01

    Clinical trials evaluating medicines, medical devices, and procedures now commonly assess the economic value of these interventions. The growing number of prospective clinical/economic trials reflects both widespread interest in economic information for new technologies and the regulatory and reimbursement requirements of many countries that now consider evidence of economic value along with clinical efficacy. As decision makers increasingly demand evidence of economic value for health care interventions, conducting high-quality economic analyses alongside clinical studies is desirable because they broaden the scope of information available on a particular intervention, and can efficiently provide timely information with high internal and, when designed and analyzed properly, reasonable external validity. In 2005, ISPOR published the Good Research Practices for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials: The ISPOR RCT-CEA Task Force report. ISPOR initiated an update of the report in 2014 to include the methodological developments over the last 9 years. This report provides updated recommendations reflecting advances in several areas related to trial design, selecting data elements, database design and management, analysis, and reporting of results. Task force members note that trials should be designed to evaluate effectiveness (rather than efficacy) when possible, should include clinical outcome measures, and should obtain health resource use and health state utilities directly from study subjects. Collection of economic data should be fully integrated into the study. An incremental analysis should be conducted with an intention-to-treat approach, complemented by relevant subgroup analyses. Uncertainty should be characterized. Articles should adhere to established standards for reporting results of cost-effectiveness analyses. Economic studies alongside trials are complementary to other evaluations (e.g., modeling studies) as information for decision

  11. Differences in Visuo-Motor Control in Skilled vs. Novice Martial Arts Athletes during Sustained and Transient Attention Tasks: A Motor-Related Cortical Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier; Fernandez, Thalia; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Martinez Mesa, Juan A.; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and motor processes are essential for optimal athletic performance. Individuals trained in different skills and sports may have specialized cognitive abilities and motor strategies related to the characteristics of the activity and the effects of training and expertise. Most studies have investigated differences in motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) during self-paced tasks in athletes but not in stimulus-related tasks. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences in performance and MRCP between skilled and novice martial arts athletes during two different types of tasks: a sustained attention task and a transient attention task. Behavioral and electrophysiological data from twenty-two martial arts athletes were obtained while they performed a continuous performance task (CPT) to measure sustained attention and a cued continuous performance task (c-CPT) to measure transient attention. MRCP components were analyzed and compared between groups. Electrophysiological data in the CPT task indicated larger prefrontal positive activity and greater posterior negativity distribution prior to a motor response in the skilled athletes, while novices showed a significantly larger response-related P3 after a motor response in centro-parietal areas. A different effect occurred in the c-CPT task in which the novice athletes showed strong prefrontal positive activity before a motor response and a large response-related P3, while in skilled athletes, the prefrontal activity was absent. We propose that during the CPT, skilled athletes were able to allocate two different but related processes simultaneously according to CPT demand, which requires controlled attention and controlled motor responses. On the other hand, in the c-CPT, skilled athletes showed better cue facilitation, which permitted a major economy of resources and “automatic” or less controlled responses to relevant stimuli. In conclusion, the present data suggest that motor expertise

  12. Differences in visuo-motor control in skilled vs. novice martial arts athletes during sustained and transient attention tasks: a motor-related cortical potential study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sanchez-Lopez

    Full Text Available Cognitive and motor processes are essential for optimal athletic performance. Individuals trained in different skills and sports may have specialized cognitive abilities and motor strategies related to the characteristics of the activity and the effects of training and expertise. Most studies have investigated differences in motor-related cortical potential (MRCP during self-paced tasks in athletes but not in stimulus-related tasks. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences in performance and MRCP between skilled and novice martial arts athletes during two different types of tasks: a sustained attention task and a transient attention task. Behavioral and electrophysiological data from twenty-two martial arts athletes were obtained while they performed a continuous performance task (CPT to measure sustained attention and a cued continuous performance task (c-CPT to measure transient attention. MRCP components were analyzed and compared between groups. Electrophysiological data in the CPT task indicated larger prefrontal positive activity and greater posterior negativity distribution prior to a motor response in the skilled athletes, while novices showed a significantly larger response-related P3 after a motor response in centro-parietal areas. A different effect occurred in the c-CPT task in which the novice athletes showed strong prefrontal positive activity before a motor response and a large response-related P3, while in skilled athletes, the prefrontal activity was absent. We propose that during the CPT, skilled athletes were able to allocate two different but related processes simultaneously according to CPT demand, which requires controlled attention and controlled motor responses. On the other hand, in the c-CPT, skilled athletes showed better cue facilitation, which permitted a major economy of resources and "automatic" or less controlled responses to relevant stimuli. In conclusion, the present data suggest that motor

  13. Differences in visuo-motor control in skilled vs. novice martial arts athletes during sustained and transient attention tasks: a motor-related cortical potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier; Fernandez, Thalia; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Martinez Mesa, Juan A; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and motor processes are essential for optimal athletic performance. Individuals trained in different skills and sports may have specialized cognitive abilities and motor strategies related to the characteristics of the activity and the effects of training and expertise. Most studies have investigated differences in motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) during self-paced tasks in athletes but not in stimulus-related tasks. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences in performance and MRCP between skilled and novice martial arts athletes during two different types of tasks: a sustained attention task and a transient attention task. Behavioral and electrophysiological data from twenty-two martial arts athletes were obtained while they performed a continuous performance task (CPT) to measure sustained attention and a cued continuous performance task (c-CPT) to measure transient attention. MRCP components were analyzed and compared between groups. Electrophysiological data in the CPT task indicated larger prefrontal positive activity and greater posterior negativity distribution prior to a motor response in the skilled athletes, while novices showed a significantly larger response-related P3 after a motor response in centro-parietal areas. A different effect occurred in the c-CPT task in which the novice athletes showed strong prefrontal positive activity before a motor response and a large response-related P3, while in skilled athletes, the prefrontal activity was absent. We propose that during the CPT, skilled athletes were able to allocate two different but related processes simultaneously according to CPT demand, which requires controlled attention and controlled motor responses. On the other hand, in the c-CPT, skilled athletes showed better cue facilitation, which permitted a major economy of resources and "automatic" or less controlled responses to relevant stimuli. In conclusion, the present data suggest that motor expertise

  14. The southern Hessen waste management task force - initial situation, objectives, state of development; Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft - Ausgangssituation, Zielsetzung und Entwicklungsstand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.J. [Stadt Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In 1994, the rural districts of Darmstadt-Dieburg, Bergstrasse, Odenwald and Gross-Gerau in southern Hessen and the town of Darmstadt concluded a cooperation agreement permitting them to meet the future demands of the technical code on municipal waste and the `Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetz` (act concerning waste recycling and waste management). In order to formally prepare different forms of cooperation and to accompany corresponding preliminary investigations, the Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft (SAGA) was founded as a municipal task force. SAGA`s task is to debate common affairs in the waste management sector with a view to joint planning and joint facilities. In particular, the requirements of the technical code on municipal waste must be met. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Jahre 1994 haben die suedhessischen Landkreise Darmstadt-Dieburg, Bergstrasse, Odenwald, Gross-Gerau sowie die Stadt Darmstadt beschlossen, bezueglich der kuenftigen Anforderung der TA Siedlungsabfall und des Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetzes zu kooperieren. Zur formellen Vorbereitung von verschiedenen dann auszufuehrenden Kooperationsformen und zur Begleitung entsprechender Voruntersuchungen wurde die Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft (SAGA) als Kommunale Arbeitsgemeinschaft gegruendet. Aufgabe der Kommunalen Arbeitsgemeinschaft ist es, gemeinsam beruehrende Angelegenheiten im Abfallbereich unter dem Gesichtspunkt gemeinsamer Planung und gemeinsamer Einrichtungen zu beraten. Hierbei sollen insbesondere die Vorgaben der TA Siedlungsabfall beruecksichtigt werden. (orig.)

  15. Endpoints for Pre-Dementia AD Trials: A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B.; Bateman, R.; Blennow, K.; Frisoni, G.; Johnson, K.; Katz, R.; Langbaum, J.; Marson, D.; Sperling, R.; Wessels, A.; Salloway, S.; Doody, R.; Aisen, P.

    2015-01-01

    For Alzheimer’s disease treatment trials that focus on the pre-dementia stage of disease, outcome measures are needed that will enable assessment of disease progression in patients who are clinically normal. The EU/US CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from industry, academia, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, on November 19, 2014 to discuss existing and novel outcome assessments that may be useful in pre-dementia trials. Composite measures that assess changes in episodic memory, executive function, global cognition, and global function have recently been developed by a number of groups and appear to be sensitive at this stage. Functional measures that involve real-life complex tasks also appear to capture early subtle changes in pre-dementia subjects and have the advantage of representing clinically meaningful change. Patient reported outcomes and novel CSF and imaging biomarkers have also shown promise. More studies are needed to validate all of these tests in the pre-dementia population. Many of them have been incorporated as exploratory measures in ongoing or planned trials. PMID:26247004

  16. Economic Incentives for Antibacterial Drug Development: Literature Review and Considerations From the Transatlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarretta, Kimberly; Røttingen, John-Arne; Opalska, Aleksandra; Van Hengel, Arjon J; Larsen, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR) in 2015 was tasked with exploring economic incentives for antibacterial drug development and providing recommendations for potential global implementation. Due to the continual decline of pharmaceutical companies investing in new antibiotic development and the rise in antimicrobial resistance, there is an urgent need to examine market mechanisms that are appropriate to encourage small, medium, and large companies to reinvest in this space. This review provides a summary of the various models that have been proposed and highlights positions posed by several policy documents, peer-reviewed publications, organization proposals, and government-sponsored reviews. The findings support a form of a de-linkage model and a combination of push and pull incentive mechanisms. This level of consensus could culminate in global coordination of incentives that strike a balance of rewarding innovation and ensuring appropriate antibiotic use. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. What is an intensive care unit? A report of the task force of the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John C; Bosco, Laura; Adhikari, Neill K; Connolly, Bronwen; Diaz, Janet V; Dorman, Todd; Fowler, Robert A; Meyfroidt, Geert; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Pelosi, Paolo; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Vollman, Kathleen; Zimmerman, Janice

    2017-02-01

    Since their widespread introduction more than half a century ago, intensive care units (ICUs) have become an integral part of the health care system. Although most ICUs are found in high-income countries, they are increasingly a feature of health care systems in low- and middle-income countries. The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine convened a task force whose objective was to answer the question "What is an ICU?" in an internationally meaningful manner and to develop a system for stratifying ICUs on the basis of the intensity of the care they provide. We undertook a scoping review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to assemble existing models for ICU stratification. Based on these and on discussions among task force members by teleconference and 2 face-to-face meetings, we present a proposed definition and classification of ICUs. An ICU is an organized system for the provision of care to critically ill patients that provides intensive and specialized medical and nursing care, an enhanced capacity for monitoring, and multiple modalities of physiologic organ support to sustain life during a period of life-threatening organ system insufficiency. Although an ICU is based in a defined geographic area of a hospital, its activities often extend beyond the walls of the physical space to include the emergency department, hospital ward, and follow-up clinic. A level 1 ICU is capable of providing oxygen, noninvasive monitoring, and more intensive nursing care than on a ward, whereas a level 2 ICU can provide invasive monitoring and basic life support for a short period. A level 3 ICU provides a full spectrum of monitoring and life support technologies, serves as a regional resource for the care of critically ill patients, and may play an active role in developing the specialty of intensive care through research and education. A formal definition and descriptive framework for ICUs can inform health care decision-makers in planning and

  18. Analyzing Forces to the Financial Contribution of Local Governments to Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Pedro Rodríguez Bolívar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, the economic crisis brought high volumes of deficit and debt in public entities, which jeopardized the ability of governments to continue providing public services and caused considerable imbalances of economic growth in different regions. In this context, from the recognition of the linkage between economic development and efficiency in public management, previous research indicates that local governments are called to play a key role in promoting sustainable development through environment, economic and social policies based on financial sustainability of the public services. This paper aims to identify influencing factors on the financial sustainability of local governments, as an indicator of their capacity to maintain the delivery of public services over time. Based on a sample of 139 Spanish municipalities with large population for the period 2006–2014, our findings reveal the influence of variables such as the unemployment rate by sector, the dependent population, the immigrant population and the level of education of the population, on the financial sustainability in local governments, providing new useful knowledge to managers, policymakers, researchers and others stakeholders interested in the sustainability of public services.

  19. The impact of 10-minute activity breaks outside the classroom on male students' on-task behaviour and sustained attention: a randomised crossover design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew N; Olds, Timothy; Lushington, Kurt; Petkov, John; Dollman, James

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of a brief activity bout outside the classroom on boys' attention and on-task behaviour in the classroom setting. Fifty-eight boys (mean age 11.2 ± 0.6 years) were recruited from a boys' elementary school in Adelaide, South Australia. Two year 5 and, similarly, two year 6 classes were assigned using a crossover design to either four weeks of a 10 minute Active Lesson Break followed by four weeks of a 10 minute Passive Lesson Break (reading) or visa versa. Attention was quantified using a computerised psychomotor vigilance task, and on-task behaviour by direct observation. Neither the Active Lesson nor the Passive Lesson condition significantly affected sustained attention or on-task behaviour, and there were no significant differences between conditions. There was no impact on participants' sustained attention or on-task behaviour after a short activity break between lessons. Brief activity breaks outside the classroom do not compromise participants' on-task behaviour or attention levels upon returning to the classroom, although improvement in these variables is not seen either. However, the results suggest that active breaks are effective for accruing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity without compromising classroom behaviours. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. To Enable and Sustain: Pacific Air Forces’ Theater Security Cooperation as a Line of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    and plans guide PACAF in areas of emphasis on regional security coopera- tion, joint teamwork , and the joint needs of its Air Force forces for...inter- agency effort, teamwork with the diplomatic community is essential- to assure that goals and objectives are complementary. This calls for time...Asia-Pacific is a team sport . The security cooperation activities that promote it flow from national- level strategy guided by the combatant commander

  1. Combining Forces: Fostering Sustainability Collaboration between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Alison; Marcus, Jean; Dolling, Katie; Robinson, John; Wahl, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes the sustainability partnership between the City of Vancouver and the University of British Columbia (UBC) and, in particular, the co-curricular Greenest City Scholars graduate student internship program, which has been developed by the two organizations. Through the program, UBC graduate students work on projects at…

  2. Leadership and Context Connectivity: Merging Two Forces for Sustainable School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marishane, Nylon Ramodikoe

    2016-01-01

    School improvement is admittedly the main business of school leadership. However, while there is agreement on the importance of school improvement, sustaining this improvement remains a challenge. The challenge seems to lie in the disconnection between the leader and the context in which the school operates. This chapter presents contextual…

  3. Human behavior and environmental sustainability : Problems, driving forces, and research topics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, Charles; Steg, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Social and behavioral research is crucial for securing environmental sustainability and improving human living environments. To put the following articles into broader perspective, we first give an overview of worldwide developments in environmental quality and trends in resource use. Second, five

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament tear induces a sustained loss of muscle fiber force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth R; Konja, Alexis C; Eckhardt, Logan R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2018-01-18

    Patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears have persistent quadriceps strength deficits that are thought to be due to altered neurophysiological function. Our goal was to determine the changes in muscle fiber contractility independent of the ability of motor neurons to activate fibers. We obtained quadriceps biopsies of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction, and additional biopsies one, two, and six months after surgery. Muscles fiber contractility was assessed in vitro, along with whole muscle strength testing. Compared to controls, patients had a 30% reduction in normalized muscle fiber force at the time of surgery. One month later the force deficit was 41%, and at 6 months the deficit was 23%. Whole muscle strength testing demonstrated similar trends. While neurophysiological dysfunction contributes to whole muscle weakness, there is also a reduction in the force generating capacity of individual muscle cells independent of alpha motor neuron activation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Research, Education and Innovation Bundling Forces towards a Sustainable European Energy Future

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    New technologies and applied innovation in the field of sustainable energy are needed in order to achieve a competitive and climate neutral Europe. As one of the first three Knowledge and Innovation Communities (KIC) of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), KIC InnoEnergy invests in innovation projects and new educational programmes and provides business creation service with the purpose of delivering the disruptive technologies and innovations that Europe requires to meet this ambitious goal. Its stakeholders are top European players in the industry, research institutes, universities and business schools. Six regionally bundled European hubs – Barcelona/Lisbon, Grenoble, Eindhoven, Karlsruhe, Stockholm and Krakow - lead one thematic field each in sustainable energy. The thematic fields addressed range from Intelligent “Energy-efficient Residential Buildings and Cities” over “Energy from Chemical Fuels”, “Renewable Energies”, “Clean Coal Technologies” to “European Smar...

  6. Swing-Leg Trajectory of Running Guinea Fowl Suggests Task-Level Priority of Force Regulation Rather than Disturbance Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Yvonne; Vejdani, Hamid R.; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Hubicki, Christian M.; Hurst, Jonathan W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve robust and stable legged locomotion in uneven terrain, animals must effectively coordinate limb swing and stance phases, which involve distinct yet coupled dynamics. Recent theoretical studies have highlighted the critical influence of swing-leg trajectory on stability, disturbance rejection, leg loading and economy of walking and running. Yet, simulations suggest that not all these factors can be simultaneously optimized. A potential trade-off arises between the optimal swing-leg trajectory for disturbance rejection (to maintain steady gait) versus regulation of leg loading (for injury avoidance and economy). Here we investigate how running guinea fowl manage this potential trade-off by comparing experimental data to predictions of hypothesis-based simulations of running over a terrain drop perturbation. We use a simple model to predict swing-leg trajectory and running dynamics. In simulations, we generate optimized swing-leg trajectories based upon specific hypotheses for task-level control priorities. We optimized swing trajectories to achieve i) constant peak force, ii) constant axial impulse, or iii) perfect disturbance rejection (steady gait) in the stance following a terrain drop. We compare simulation predictions to experimental data on guinea fowl running over a visible step down. Swing and stance dynamics of running guinea fowl closely match simulations optimized to regulate leg loading (priorities i and ii), and do not match the simulations optimized for disturbance rejection (priority iii). The simulations reinforce previous findings that swing-leg trajectory targeting disturbance rejection demands large increases in stance leg force following a terrain drop. Guinea fowl negotiate a downward step using unsteady dynamics with forward acceleration, and recover to steady gait in subsequent steps. Our results suggest that guinea fowl use swing-leg trajectory consistent with priority for load regulation, and not for steadiness of gait. Swing

  7. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Mes, D.; Kusters, K.; Roques, J.A.C.; Flik, G.; Kloet, K.; Blonk, R.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U-opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and

  8. Property Accountability Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-30

    ADDRESSEES )00 O D LO A 000)6 TOTAL NUMkt1 UF CwPIES REQUIRED **~*****~t***~*s*** PAGE 02 * UNCLASSIFIED 262215Z APA 73 S 3 U i 1 " P WJdRA /r (2 , - w4...ZNR UUUUU iw -. R 240E0’Z APA 7oFM CDR U ,AEIGHT _,EOUL Kurr-A //OJ-I,S-SM/! T/ ., TO AW6SH DC /1)ALU-SMS/JALO-ZXT// F SAFMCRUEIH EiU u’ /0-SM I ° PL...the norma .. time for instructional develop- ment. Therefore the changes that are effected must be developed in an atypical manner in the time frame

  9. EFNS task force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippi, M; Agosta, F; Barkhof, F

    2012-01-01

    The European Federation of the Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on the use of neuroimaging in the diagnosis and management of dementia are designed to revise and expand previous EFNS recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to provide ...

  10. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  11. Pain Management Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    increased infection, tumor spread or recurrence. Muscular Muscle weakness, limitation of movement, muscle atrophy, fatigue . Psychological Anxiety, fear...in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial. JAMA . 2009;301(12):1242-1252. Dowden S, McCarthy M, and Chalkiadis G. (2008). Achieving organizational...in Primary Care Patients With Depression and Musculoskeletal Pain JAMA . 2009;301(20):2099-2110. Lew HL, Otis JD, Tun C, Kerns RD, Clark ME, Cif DX

  12. The M 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake and its aftershock sequence: deployment of a Task Force local network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Eggert, S.; Woith, H.; Grosser, H.; Peyrat, S.; Vilotte, J.; Medina, E.; Ruch, J.; Walter, T.; Victor, P.; Barrientos, S.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-05-01

    After the November 14, 2007 Tocopilla earthquake in northern Chile, a local network of 20 short period seismic stations, 5 strong motion instruments, 6 GPS stations and 3 extensometers has been installed in the fault plane area between Tocopilla and Antofagasta by the German Task Force for earthquakes (GFZ Potsdam). The hydrogeology group of the TF sampled 20 thermal water sources in the area of the El Tatio geyser field, located about 170 km E of the epicentre. In collaboration with the IPG Paris, 4 broad band stations were deployed at the northern end of the fault plane between Tocopilla and Maria Elena. Major targets of the investigations of the aftershock sequence are the segment boundary between the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the recent Tocopilla event, stress transfer between both successively ruptured subduction zone segments, structural properties of the fault plane, possible consequences for the northern adjacent Iquique segment, and the influence of earthquake seismic waves on the El Tatio hydrothermal field. In our presentation we would like to show first results on the spatial distribution of the aftershocks and discuss these in relation to studies we have made on the Antofagasta aftershock sequence.

  13. ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law 23: medically assisted reproduction in singles, lesbian and gay couples, and transsexual people†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Shenfield, F; Barri, P; Devroey, P; Diedrich, K; Tarlatzis, B; Provoost, V; Pennings, G

    2014-09-01

    This Task Force document discusses ethical issues arising with requests for medically assisted reproduction from people in what may be called 'non-standard' situations and relationships. The document stresses that categorically denying access to any of these groups cannot be reconciled with a human rights perspective. If there are concerns about the implications of assisted reproduction on the wellbeing of any of the persons involved, including the future child, a surrogate mother or the applicants themselves, these concerns have to be considered in the light of the available scientific evidence. When doing so it is important to avoid the use of double standards. More research is needed into the psychosocial implications of raising children in non-standard situations, especially with regard to single women, male homosexual couples and transsexual people. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Organization of the clinical activity of geriatric oncology: report of a SIOG (International Society of Geriatric Oncology) task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Silvio; Aapro, M S; Bennett, J M; Mori, M; Regenstreif, D; Rodin, M; Stein, B; Zulian, G B; Droz, J P

    2007-04-01

    Management for elderly cancer patients world wide is far from being optimal and few older patients are entering clinical trials. A SIOG Task Force was therefore activated to analyze how the clinical activity of Geriatric Oncology is organized. A structured questionnaire was circulated among the SIOG Members. Fifty eight answers were received. All respondents identified Geriatric Oncology, as an area of specialization, however the organization of the clinical activity was variable. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was performed in 60% of cases. A Geriatric Oncology Program (GOP) was identified in 21 centers, 85% located in Oncology and 15% in Geriatric Departments. In the majority of GOP scheduled case discussion conferences dedicated to elderly cancer patients took regular place, the composition of the multidisciplinary team involved in the GOP activity included Medical Oncologists, Geriatricians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Social Workers. Fellowships in Geriatric Oncology were present in almost half of GOPs. Over 60% of respondents were willing to recruit patients over 70 years in clinical trials, while the proportion of cases included was only 20%. Enrolment in clinical trials was perceived as more difficult by 52% and much more difficult in 12% of the respondents. In conclusion, a better organization of the clinical activity in Geriatric Oncology allows a better clinical practice and an optimal clinical research. The GOP which can be set up in the oncological as well as in the geriatric environment thought a multidisciplinary coordinator effort. Future plans should also concentrate on divisions, units or departments of Geriatric Oncology.

  15. Standards for the Reporting of Genetic Counseling Interventions in Research and Other Studies (GCIRS): an NSGC Task Force Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Gillian W; Babu, D; Myers, M F; Zierhut, H; McAllister, M

    2017-06-01

    As the demand for evidence to support the value of genetic counseling increases, it is critical that reporting of genetic counseling interventions in research and other types of studies (e.g. process improvement or service evaluation studies) adopt greater rigor. As in other areas of healthcare, the appraisal, synthesis, and translation of research findings into genetic counseling practice are likely to be improved if clear specifications of genetic counseling interventions are reported when studies involving genetic counseling are published. To help improve reporting practices, the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) convened a task force in 2015 to develop consensus standards for the reporting of genetic counseling interventions. Following review by the NSGC Board of Directors, the NSGC Practice Guidelines Committee and the editorial board of the Journal of Genetic Counseling, 23 items across 8 domains were proposed as standards for the reporting of genetic counseling interventions in the published literature (GCIRS: Genetic Counseling Intervention Reporting Standards). The authors recommend adoption of these standards by authors and journals when reporting studies involving genetic counseling interventions.

  16. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among school children in suburb Thailand defined by the International Obesity Task Force Standard. [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak; Rerksuppaphol, Lakkana

    2010-02-01

    Overweight and obesity is an emerging problem among children worldwide. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used to define overweight and obesity as it correlates well with high accuracy to measure body fatness. Aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of obesity in Thai school children by using the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) standard. The school based cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,140 children aged 6-15 years in Ongkharak, Thailand. Anthropometric measurements including weight and height were obtained to determine BMI. The results were analyzed statistically by applying student t-test, and Chi-square test. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among school children in suburb Thailand was 12.8% and 9.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in prevalence of overweight and obesity between gender splits and between age specific groups. The prevalence of overweight and obesity has been dramatically increasing among Thai children. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the growth pattern of children with higher BMI for age and to survey for obesity-related co-morbid condition in Thai children.

  17. Dosimetry-based treatment planning for molecular radiotherapy: a summary of the 2017 report from the Internal Dosimetry Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Stokke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European directive on basic safety standards (Council directive 2013/59 Euratom mandates dosimetry-based treatment planning for radiopharmaceutical therapies. The directive comes into operation February 2018, and the aim of a report produced by the Internal Dosimetry Task Force of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine is to address this aspect of the directive. A summary of the report is presented. Results A brief review of five of the most common therapy procedures is included in the current text, focused on the potential to perform patient-specific dosimetry. In the full report, 11 different therapeutic procedures are included, allowing additional considerations of effectiveness, references to specific literature on quantitative imaging and dosimetry, and existing evidence for absorbed dose-effect correlations for each treatment. Individualized treatment planning with tracer diagnostics and verification of the absorbed doses delivered following therapy is found to be scientifically feasible for almost all procedures investigated, using quantitative imaging and/or external monitoring. Translation of this directive into clinical practice will have significant implications for resource requirements. Conclusions Molecular radiotherapy is undergoing a significant expansion, and the groundwork for dosimetry-based treatment planning is already in place. The mandated individualization is likely to improve the effectiveness of the treatments, although must be adequately resourced.

  18. Cirurgia de varizes em regime de mutirão A task force for varicose vein surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Virgini-Magalhães

    2007-09-01

    estágios moderados da doença, especialmente nas classes C2 e C3 da CEAP, e que requerem cirurgias de médio e grande porte para o tratamento de suas patologias.BACKGROUND: Varicose vein surgery of the lower limbs is one of the most frequent procedures carried out in the Brazilian public health system (Sistema Único de Saúde, especially during task forces focused on elective surgeries. However, detailed information on the results of such initiatives are absent in the literature, particularly with regard to the population that benefits from the task forces. OBJECTIVES: To present and discuss the profile of patients operated on during a task force for varicose vein surgery carried out in a public health institution. METHODS: The patients were selected from a database organized by the Brazilian Health Ministry for the program of elective surgeries, and they had no previous link with the hospital institution. A protocol for objective evaluation with the clinical data and demographic profile of the patients was applied. The patients were staged according to CEAP classification. RESULTS: From September 2005 to January 2006, 100 patients (106 procedures underwent surgery, females being predominant (85% of the cases. Mean age was 35±9.8 years. Predominant schooling level among patients was primary school (53%. C2 (49.5% and C3 (39% were the most frequent CEAP classes in the clinical evaluation of lower limbs. A total of 106 surgeries was performed (100 patients. The preferred anesthetic technique was block anesthesia (93% of the procedures. Six patients were submitted to two different procedures due to great volume of lower limb varicose veins; 33 patients were submitted to internal saphenous vein stripping (four cases of segmental saphenous vein stripping; and eight patients were submitted to bilateral total saphenous vein stripping. CONCLUSION: Profile of the population that benefited from the task force for varicose vein surgeries was: young symptomatic female patients

  19. Prevention of dental caries in children from birth through age 5 years: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-06-01

    Update of the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on prevention of dental caries in preschool-aged children. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on prevention of dental caries by primary care clinicians in children 5 years and younger, focusing on screening for caries, assessment of risk for future caries, and the effectiveness of various interventions that have possible benefits in preventing caries. This recommendation applies to children age 5 years and younger. The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians prescribe oral fluoride supplementation starting at age 6 months for children whose water supply is deficient in fluoride. (B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians apply fluoride varnish to the primary teeth of all infants and children starting at the age of primary tooth eruption. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine screening examinations for dental caries performed by primary care clinicians in children from birth to age 5 years. (I Statement). Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Ayal; McIntosh, Diane; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Rector, Neil A; McIntyre, Roger S; Beaulieu, Serge; Swinson, Richard; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2012-02-01

    Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors. Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.

  1. Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

  2. Nursing Education in High Blood Pressure Control. Report of the Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    This curriculum guide on high blood pressure (hypertension) for nursing educators has five sections: (1) Introduction and Objectives provides information regarding the establishment and objectives of the National Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control and briefly discusses nursing's role in hypertension control; (2) Goals…

  3. The Use and Management of the Electromagnetic Spectrum, Part I. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Seven, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    A staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy analyses the use of the electromagnetic spectrum for communications and suggests improvements. The evolution of spectrum use and its present federal management are described together with the problem of achieving efficient use in the areas of electromagnetic congestion. Criticism…

  4. EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus. Report of a task force of the EULAR standing committee for international clinical studies including therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsias, G.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Boletis, J.; Bombardieri, S.; Cervera, R.; Dostal, C.; Font, J.; Gilboe, I. M.; Houssiau, F.; Huizinga, T.; Isenberg, D.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Khamashta, M.; Piette, J. C.; Schneider, M.; Smolen, J.; Sturfelt, G.; Tincani, A.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Gordon, C.; Boumpas, D. T.

    Objective: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with variable presentations, course and prognosis. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations addressing the major issues in the management of SLE. Methods: The EULAR Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists and a clinical

  5. REPORT ON ACTIVITY OF TASK FORCE 1 IN THE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY PROGRAMME: DATA REGISTRY - GLOBAL LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATA RESOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a summary of the findings of a report prepared by Task Force 1 of the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative on the available Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) databases around the world. An update of a previous summary prepared in May 2002 by Norris and Notten, the repor...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart B of... - Fact Sheet-The Federal Interagency Task Force on Food and Shelter for the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Fact Sheet-The Federal Interagency Task Force on Food and Shelter for the Homeless D Exhibit D to Subpart B of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY,...

  7. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling

  8. An Examination of the Roles of Medical Units in Support of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, or Nuclear Event (CBRN) under Joint Task Force Civil Support (JF-CS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    Today, Task Force Medical has evolved since 2006 as represented in figure 3 during a combined exercise conducted by NORTHCOM called Ardent Sentry to...Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)--have jurisdiction over or can coordinate resources within the homeland and, therefore, may be involved in the

  9. Indoor Air Quality In Maine Schools: Report of the Task Force To Examine the Establishment and Implementation of State Standards for Indoor Air Quality in Maine Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Judith

    Asserting that in Maine and across the nation, school buildings are becoming increasingly plagued with indoor air quality (IAQ) problems which contribute to a variety of illnesses in children and adults, this report from a Maine state legislative task force identifies appropriate policies and identifies actions necessary for the prevention and…

  10. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  11. Manitoba Task Force on Francophone Schools Governance. Report = Groupe de travail manitobain sur la gestion des ecoles franco-manitobaines. Le rapport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    Findings of a task force on introduction of a school governance system for Manitoba's (Canada) francophone minority population are reported. The document outlines the background--i.e., the Canadian context--of this report, principles and procedures, the resulting recommended structure for governance, and suggestions for addressing such issues as…

  12. Basic Education in Developing Countries. Hearing before the International Task Force of the Select Committee on Hunger. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    The responsibility of the U.S. House of Representatives Task Force on Hunger is to investigate the causes and dimensions of world hunger and to develop legislative recommendations addressing the issues raised. At this hearing, the issue discussed was of basic education as a crucial link in expanding opportunities for poor and hungry people to…

  13. Continuing Education for Teacher Educators; Advanced-Level Workshops. Report of a Task Force Meeting (Tokyo, March 13-25, 1976).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    The Task Force Meeting on Advanced-Level Workshops for Teacher-Educators, held in Tokyo, examined the preparation of teachers for innovative education in the developing Asian region. Asian educators reported innovative practices and experiences in their own countries. Some major concerns: democratization of education; providing access to…

  14. Sustaining the Knowledge Base of the United States Air Force for Future Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    resulted in the introduction of Air Force Knowledge Now, Web 2.0, Microsoft SharePoint , All Partners Access Network, and Microsoft Office 365. Each...Department of Defense (DOD) organizations such as Microsoft SharePoint , All Partners Access Network, and Microsoft Office 365. The USAF exploration of...Microsoft SharePoint represents a variation from AFKN and Web 2.0. In DOD, the use of Microsoft SharePoint provides unlimited capabilities for

  15. Immediate effects of a knee brace with a constraint to knee extension on knee kinematics and ground reaction forces in a stop-jump task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Herman, Daniel; Preston, Jennifer; Lu, William; Kirkendall, Donald T; Garrett, William E

    2004-01-01

    A small knee flexion angle in landing tasks was identified as a possible risk factor for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries that are common in sports. A specially designed knee brace with a constraint to knee extension would significantly increase the knee flexion angle at the landing of athletic tasks preceded with horizontal movement components, such as stop-jump tasks. Repeated measure design for brace effects. Three-dimensional videographic and force plate data were collected for 10 male and 10 female recreational athletes performing a stop-jump task with and without the specially designed brace. Knee flexion angle at landing, maximum knee flexion angle, and peak ground reaction forces during the stance phase of the stop-jump task were determined for each subject with and without the knee brace. The knee brace decreased the knee flexion angle at the landing by 5 degrees for both genders but did not significantly affect the peak ground reaction forces during the landing. The specially designed knee brace may be a useful device in the prevention and rehabilitation of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sports. Copyright 2004 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

  16. Shared and disorder-specific task-positive and default mode network dysfunctions during sustained attention in paediatric Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and obsessive/compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J. Norman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and obsessive/compulsive disorder (OCD share problems with sustained attention, and are proposed to share deficits in switching between default mode and task positive networks. The aim of this study was to investigate shared and disorder-specific brain activation abnormalities during sustained attention in the two disorders. Twenty boys with ADHD, 20 boys with OCD and 20 age-matched healthy controls aged between 12 and 18 years completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI version of a parametrically modulated sustained attention task with a progressively increasing sustained attention load. Performance and brain activation were compared between groups. Only ADHD patients were impaired in performance. Group by sustained attention load interaction effects showed that OCD patients had disorder-specific middle anterior cingulate underactivation relative to controls and ADHD patients, while ADHD patients showed disorder-specific underactivation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex/dorsal inferior frontal gyrus (IFG. ADHD and OCD patients shared left insula/ventral IFG underactivation and increased activation in posterior default mode network relative to controls, but had disorder-specific overactivation in anterior default mode regions, in dorsal anterior cingulate for ADHD and in anterior ventromedial prefrontal cortex for OCD. In sum, ADHD and OCD patients showed mostly disorder-specific patterns of brain abnormalities in both task positive salience/ventral attention networks with lateral frontal deficits in ADHD and middle ACC deficits in OCD, as well as in their deactivation patterns in medial frontal DMN regions. The findings suggest that attention performance in the two disorders is underpinned by disorder-specific activation patterns.

  17. Analysis of the situation of the vacuum in FTU; Analisi della situazione del vuoto di FTU (Resoconto del lavoro svolto dalla task force)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandrini, C.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M.L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pirani, S.; Zanza, V. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the situation of the vacuum in the FTU tokamak, on 22/5/96 was set up a task force to identify the problem(s) and to settle the operative and cleaning procedures. The main actions of the task force were: leak tests, automatic procedure to monitor on line the state of the machine vacuum and an exhaustive analysis of the work done before. The task force reviewed the outgassing measurements of the plastic materials inserted into the machine and was decided to repeat the test on the thermocouples. The results pointed out that the thermocouples are a practically infinite reservoir of water. The outcome of the task force was a set of new procedures and recommendations during both the operation of FTU and the shutdown periods. FTU is now operating at more acceptable plasma purity. [Italiano] Il 22/5/96 fu costituita una Task Force (TF) per analizzare le cause della `non pulizia` di FTU e per identificare le nuove procedure da seguire per la pulizia della camera da vuoto. Le azioni che la TF intraprese furono: leak tests, monitoraggio continuo dello stato del vuoto e revisione critica del lavoro fatto precedentemente. Vennero poi analizzate delle misure fatte a suo tempo sui materiali presenti nella camera da vuoto di FTU e, nel caso delle termocoppie, si decise di ripetere il test. Da questa seconda prova emerse che i cilindretti di queste termocoppie sono delle riserve inesauribili di acqua che vengono alimentate da ogni riapertura della macchina. Il lavoro della TF si concluse con una serie di procedure e raccomandazioni, da seguire prima di ogni riapertura della macchina e durante le campagne sperimentali a macchina fredda; tali procedure tengono conto del fatto che negli anni e` aumentata la quantita` di materiali plastici presenti nella camera da vuoto, soprattutto nei ports. FTU sta attualmente operando in condizioni piu` accettabili di pulizia della camera.

  18. Definition and significance of polycystic ovarian morphology: a task force report from the Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewailly, Didier; Lujan, Marla E; Carmina, Enrico; Cedars, Marcelle I; Laven, Joop; Norman, Robert J; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2014-01-01

    PCOM. PCOM does not associate with significant consequences for health in the absence of other symptoms of PCOS but, because of the use of inconsistent definitions of PCOM among studies, this question cannot be answered with absolute certainty. CONCLUSIONS The Task Force recommends using FNPO for the definition of PCOM setting the threshold at ≥25, but only when using newer technology that affords maximal resolution of ovarian follicles (i.e. transducer frequency ≥8 MHz). If such technology is not available, we recommend using OV rather than FNPO for the diagnosis of PCOM for routine daily practice but not for research studies that require the precise full characterization of patients. The Task Force recognizes the still unmet need for standardization of the follicle counting technique and the need for regularly updating the thresholds used to define follicle excess, particularly in diverse populations. Serum AMH concentration generated great expectations as a surrogate marker for the follicle excess of PCOM, but full standardization of AMH assays is needed before they can be routinely used for clinical practice and research. Finally, the finding of PCOM in ovulatory women not showing clinical or biochemical androgen excess may be inconsequential, even though some studies suggest that isolated PCOM may represent the milder end of the PCOS spectrum.

  19. Defining Elements of Value in Health Care-A Health Economics Approach: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawalla, Darius N; Doshi, Jalpa A; Garrison, Louis P; Phelps, Charles E; Basu, Anirban; Danzon, Patricia M

    2018-02-01

    The third section of our Special Task Force report identifies and defines a series of elements that warrant consideration in value assessments of medical technologies. We aim to broaden the view of what constitutes value in health care and to spur new research on incorporating additional elements of value into cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). Twelve potential elements of value are considered. Four of them-quality-adjusted life-years, net costs, productivity, and adherence-improving factors-are conventionally included or considered in value assessments. Eight others, which would be more novel in economic assessments, are defined and discussed: reduction in uncertainty, fear of contagion, insurance value, severity of disease, value of hope, real option value, equity, and scientific spillovers. Most of these are theoretically well understood and available for inclusion in value assessments. The two exceptions are equity and scientific spillover effects, which require more theoretical development and consensus. A number of regulatory authorities around the globe have shown interest in some of these novel elements. Augmenting CEA to consider these additional elements would result in a more comprehensive CEA in line with the "impact inventory" of the Second Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. Possible approaches for valuation and inclusion of these elements include integrating them as part of a net monetary benefit calculation, including elements as attributes in health state descriptions, or using them as criteria in a multicriteria decision analysis. Further research is needed on how best to measure and include them in decision making. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Approaches to Aggregation and Decision Making-A Health Economics Approach: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Charles E; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Basu, Anirban; Drummond, Michael F; Towse, Adrian; Danzon, Patricia M

    2018-02-01

    The fifth section of our Special Task Force report identifies and discusses two aggregation issues: 1) aggregation of cost and benefit information across individuals to a population level for benefit plan decision making and 2) combining multiple elements of value into a single value metric for individuals. First, we argue that additional elements could be included in measures of value, but such elements have not generally been included in measures of quality-adjusted life-years. For example, we describe a recently developed extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) that provides a good example of how to use a broader concept of utility. ECEA adds two features-measures of financial risk protection and income distributional consequences. We then discuss a further option for expanding this approach-augmented CEA, which can introduce many value measures. Neither of these approaches, however, provide a comprehensive measure of value. To resolve this issue, we review a technique called multicriteria decision analysis that can provide a comprehensive measure of value. We then discuss budget-setting and prioritization using multicriteria decision analysis, issues not yet fully resolved. Next, we discuss deliberative processes, which represent another important approach for population- or plan-level decisions used by many health technology assessment bodies. These use quantitative information on CEA and other elements, but the group decisions are reached by a deliberative voting process. Finally, we briefly discuss the use of stated preference methods for developing "hedonic" value frameworks, and conclude with some recommendations in this area. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Review of Recent US Value Frameworks-A Health Economics Approach: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Richard J; Neumann, Peter J; Garrison, Louis P; Ramsey, Scott D

    2018-02-01

    The sixth section of our Special Task Force (STF) report reviews and comments on recent US-oriented value assessment frameworks, specifically those published by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We review published commentaries that address the validity, reliability, and conceptual underpinnings of these frameworks. We find common themes of critique regarding the strengths and limitations across frameworks. Particular shortcomings of some frameworks pose greater threats to their face validity and utility compared with others. The most significant limitations include lack of clear perspective (e.g., patient vs. health plan) and poor transparency in accounting for costs and benefits. We then review how each framework adheres to core STF recommendations, with particular emphasis on whether the framework can be used to support coverage decisions by health insurers, and whether it adheres to core principles of cost-effectiveness analysis. The Institute for Clinical and Economic Research framework most closely adheres to core STF recommendations. Others have significant limitations that vary widely from framework to framework. We also review how the frameworks follow STF recommendations for addressing potentially relevant issues beyond cost-effectiveness analysis - for example, equity in resource allocation and patient heterogeneity. Finally, we review whether and how each framework uses value thresholds and addresses affordability concerns. We conclude with suggestions for further research, particularly in the areas of testing the measurement and use of novel elements of value and deliberative processes. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An Overview of Value, Perspective, and Decision Context-A Health Economics Approach: An ISPOR Special Task Force Report [2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Louis P; Pauly, Mark V; Willke, Richard J; Neumann, Peter J

    2018-02-01

    The second section of our Special Task Force builds on the discussion of value and perspective in the previous article of the report by 1) defining a health economics approach to the concept of value in health care systems; 2) discussing the relationship of value to perspective and decision context, that is, how recently proposed value frameworks vary by the types of decisions being made and by the stakeholders involved; 3) describing the patient perspective on value because the patient is a key stakeholder, but one also wearing the hat of a health insurance purchaser; and 4) discussing how value is relevant in the market-based US system of mixed private and public insurance, and differs from its use in single-payer systems. The five recent value frameworks that motivated this report vary in the types of decisions they intend to inform, ranging from coverage, access, and pricing decisions to those defining appropriate clinical pathways and to supporting provider-clinician shared decision making. Each of these value frameworks must be evaluated in its own decision context for its own objectives. Existing guidelines for cost-effectiveness analysis emphasize the importance of clearly specifying the perspective from which the analysis is undertaken. Relevant perspectives may include, among others, 1) the health plan enrollee, 2) the patient, 3) the health plan manager, 4) the provider, 5) the technology manufacturer, 6) the specialty society, 7) government regulators, or 8) society as a whole. A valid and informative cost-effectiveness analysis could be conducted from the perspective of any of these stakeholders, depending on the decision context. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of the STROBE statement to the hypospadias literature: Report of the international pediatric urology task force on hypospadias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Luis H; Lorenzo, Armando J; Bagli, Darius J; Pippi Salle, Joao L; Caldamone, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Observational studies, particularly case series, represent the majority of the current hypospadias research. As a result, this literature lacks standardization of surgical techniques, uniform definitions of hypospadias complications, and consistency of outcome reporting, which may make it difficult to compare results across studies. A modified version of the STROBE statement, containing 20 items, was presented at the International Pediatric Urology Task Force on Hypospadias meeting to assist with clear and transparent reporting of hypospadias studies. The adoption and implementation of this modified tool will allow investigators and health care providers to critically evaluate quality and identify bias within the literature. In addition this instrument will ensure consistency of reporting, improving objective comparisons between studies, unification of results, and development of evidence-based clinical guidelines. In this article, we have applied the modified STROBE statement to the hypospadias literature, aiming to create a guide on study reporting for pediatric urologists, and ultimately improve the quality of research in our field. We present itemized recommendations for adequate reporting of hypospadias studies and case series, ranging from drafting the abstract to addressing biases and potential sources of confounding. Included with each item is a brief explanation of its importance and potential effect on the study, as well as pertinent examples of hypospadias articles. A modified STROBE summary table containing 20 items is presented in (Supplementary Table 1). If properly conducted and reported, hypospadias studies have the potential to provide useful information to clinicians and surgeons. However, authors should recognize the inherent limitations of these observational studies, especially in the form of bias, which may introduce invalid data or limit generalizability. Thus, we expect that the use of this guiding tool will not only improve transparency of

  4. Health plan implementation of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force A and B recommendations--Colorado, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is aimed at expanding access to health care and lowering cost barriers to seeking and receiving care, particularly high-value preventive care. The legislation requires Medicare and all qualified commercial health plans (except grandfathered individual and employer-sponsored plans) to cover routine preventive services graded A and B by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) at no cost to the consumer, along with recommended immunizations and additional preventive care and screenings for women. In 2009, Colorado passed a law with similar USPTF A and B service coverage requirements. To determine how Colorado health plans had interpreted the state and federal law, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) interviewed representatives of commercial health plans serving Colorado residents. The results of those interviews indicated that different health plans interpreted certain USPSTF recommendations differently, including tobacco screening and pharmacotherapy, colorectal cancer screening, and obesity screening and counseling. One health plan communicated the scope, eligibility criteria, and content of the new preventive services coverage to its members or providers. The differences in interpretation of the USPSTF recommendations and limited communication to consumers or health-care providers in Colorado might be repeated in other states. To ensure optimal consumer and health-care provider utilization of preventive service benefits, the preventive services supported by USPSTF A and B recommendations should be clearly defined in health plan benefit language, with processes put in place for consistent implementation and eligibility criteria communicated to both consumers and providers. The experience in Colorado shows that public health organizations can play a key role in successfully implementing PPACA prevention services provisions.

  5. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures: multidisciplinary task force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Lorena P; Khan, Aliya; Sultan, Muhammad; McAssey, Karen; Fouda, Mona A; Armstrong, David

    2013-10-01

    To provide clinicians with an update on the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and to make recommendations on the indications to screen for CD in patients presenting with low bone mineral density (BMD) or fragility fractures. A multidisciplinary task force developed clinically relevant questions related to the diagnosis of CD as the basis for a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (January 2000 to January 2009) using the key words celiac disease, osteoporosis, osteopenia, low bone mass, and fracture. The existing literature consists of level I and II studies. The estimated prevalence of asymptomatic CD is 2% to 3% in individuals with low BMD. Routine screening for CD is not justified in patients with low BMD. However, targeted screening for CD is recommended for patients who have T-scores of -1.0 or less at the spine or hip, or a history of fragility fractures in association with any CD-related symptoms or conditions; family history of CD; or low urinary calcium levels, vitamin D insufficiency, and raised parathyroid hormone levels despite adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Celiac disease testing should be performed while the subject is consuming a gluten-containing diet; initial screening should be performed with human recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase or other IgA tissue transglutaminase assays, in association with IgA endomysial antibody immunofluorescence. Duodenal biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of CD. Human leukocyte antigen typing might assist in confirming or ruling out the diagnosis of CD in cases where serology and histology are discordant. Definitive diagnosis is based on clinical, serologic, and histologic features, combined with a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Current evidence does not support routine screening for CD in all patients with low BMD. A targeted case-finding approach is appropriate for patients who are at higher risk of CD.

  6. Investigating biological traces of traumatic stress in changing societies: challenges and directions from the ESTSS Task Force on Neurobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Thomaes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic stress can have severe consequences for both mental and physical health. Furthermore, both psychological and biological traces of trauma increase as a function of accumulating traumatic experiences. Neurobiological research may aid in limiting the impact of traumatic stress, by leading to advances in preventive and treatment interventions. To promote the possibility for clinical implementation of novel research findings, this brief review describes timely conceptual and methodological challenges and directions in neurobiological trauma research on behalf of the Task Force “Neurobiology of Traumatic Stress” of the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS. The most important conceptual challenges are the heterogeneity of disorders and existence of subtypes across diagnostic categories: differential latent profiles and trajectories regarding symptom expression and neural correlates are being unraveled; however, similar latent classes’ approaches for treatment response and neurobiological data remain scarce thus far. The key to improving the efficacy of currently available preventive interventions and treatments for trauma-related disorders lies in a better understanding and characterization of individual differences in response to trauma and interventions. This could lead to personalized treatment strategies for trauma-related disorders, based on objective information indicating whether individuals are expected to benefit from them. The most important methodological challenge identified here is the need for large consortia and meta-analyses or, rather, mega-analyses on existent data as a first step. In addition, large multicenter studies, combining novel methods for repeated sampling with more advanced statistical modeling techniques, such as machine learning, should aim to translate identified disease mechanisms into molecular blood-based biomarker combinations to predict disorder vulnerability and treatment responses.

  7. Investigating biological traces of traumatic stress in changing societies: challenges and directions from the ESTSS Task Force on Neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaes, Kathleen; de Kloet, Carien; Wilker, Sarah; El-Hage, Wissam; Schäfer, Ingo; Kleim, Birgit; Schmahl, Christian; van Zuiden, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic stress can have severe consequences for both mental and physical health. Furthermore, both psychological and biological traces of trauma increase as a function of accumulating traumatic experiences. Neurobiological research may aid in limiting the impact of traumatic stress, by leading to advances in preventive and treatment interventions. To promote the possibility for clinical implementation of novel research findings, this brief review describes timely conceptual and methodological challenges and directions in neurobiological trauma research on behalf of the Task Force "Neurobiology of Traumatic Stress" of the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS). The most important conceptual challenges are the heterogeneity of disorders and existence of subtypes across diagnostic categories: differential latent profiles and trajectories regarding symptom expression and neural correlates are being unraveled; however, similar latent classes' approaches for treatment response and neurobiological data remain scarce thus far. The key to improving the efficacy of currently available preventive interventions and treatments for trauma-related disorders lies in a better understanding and characterization of individual differences in response to trauma and interventions. This could lead to personalized treatment strategies for trauma-related disorders, based on objective information indicating whether individuals are expected to benefit from them. The most important methodological challenge identified here is the need for large consortia and meta-analyses or, rather, mega-analyses on existent data as a first step. In addition, large multicenter studies, combining novel methods for repeated sampling with more advanced statistical modeling techniques, such as machine learning, should aim to translate identified disease mechanisms into molecular blood-based biomarker combinations to predict disorder vulnerability and treatment responses.

  8. Screening for HIV in pregnant women: systematic review to update the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Cantor, Amy G; Zakher, Bernadette; Bougatsos, Christina

    2012-11-20

    A 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) review found good evidence that prenatal HIV screening is accurate and can lead to interventions that reduce the risk for mother-to-child transmission. To update the 2005 USPSTF review, focusing on previously identified research gaps and new evidence on treatments. MEDLINE (2004 to June 2012) and the Cochrane Library (2005 to the second quarter of 2012). Randomized trials and cohort studies of pregnant women on risk for mother-to-child transmission or harms associated with prenatal HIV screening or antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy. 2 reviewers abstracted and confirmed study details and quality by using predefined criteria. No studies directly evaluated effects of prenatal HIV screening on risk for mother-to-child transmission or maternal or infant clinical outcomes. One fair-quality, large cohort study (HIV prevalence, 0.7%) found that rapid testing during labor was associated with a positive predictive value of 90%. New cohort studies of nonbreastfeeding women in the United States and Europe confirm that full-course combination antiretroviral therapy reduces rates of mother-to-child transmission (<1% to 2.4% vs. 9% to 22% with no antiretroviral therapy). New cohort studies found antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy to be associated with increased risk for preterm delivery (<37 weeks' gestation); there were no clear associations with low birthweight, congenital abnormalities, or infant neurodevelopment. Evidence on long-term maternal harms after short-term antiretroviral therapy exposure during pregnancy remains sparse. Only English-language articles were included. Studies conducted in resource-poor settings may be of limited applicability to screening in the United States. Antiretroviral therapy in combination with avoidance of breastfeeding and elective cesarean section in women with viremia reduces risk for mother-to-child transmission. Use of certain antiretroviral therapy regimens during pregnancy

  9. A comparison of the progression on sustainable procurement between England and Scotland following the United Kingdom’s third sustainable development strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the United Kingdom published its third sustainable development strategy and simultaneously announced its goal to become a leader in the European Union on sustainable procurement by 2009. Four sustainable development priorities and six key recommendations for sustainable procurement authored by the UK Government and the Sustainable Procurement Task Force were set forth to be utilised by local administrations in an effort to reach their ambitious goal for 2009. However, due to changes ...

  10. Battlefield Realism: The Impact of Opposing Force (OPFOR) on Friendly Force Task Performance with Implications for the National Training Center. Volume 2. OPFOR Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    different attack axes. They then formed Into a line formation moving at 20-ZS kilometr per hour. Signal flags had been planted in the ground, at different...attacking force and suppressive force was good, the attack was succesfuL Coordination is the main factor in succeeding. US tactics seemed to be

  11. Mind-wandering in Younger and Older Adults: Converging Evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and Reading for Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D.; Balota, David A.

    2011-01-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults’ changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults’ relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering. PMID:21707183

  12. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  13. Performance of repetitive tasks induces decreased grip strength and increased fibrogenic proteins in skeletal muscle: role of force and inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdelmagid, Samir M; Barr, Ann E; Rico, Mario; Amin, Mamta; Litvin, Judith; Popoff, Steven N; Safadi, Fayez F; Barbe, Mary F

    2012-01-01

    This study elucidates exposure-response relationships between performance of repetitive tasks, grip strength declines, and fibrogenic-related protein changes in muscles, and their link to inflammation...

  14. Towards Sustaining Levels of Reflective Learning: How Do Transformational Leadership, Task Interdependence, and Self-Efficacy Shape Teacher Learning in Schools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoud Oude Groote Beverborg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas cross-sectional research has shown that transformational leadership, task interdependence, and self-efficacy are positively related to teachers’ engagement in reflective learning activities, the causal direction of these relations needs further inquiry. At the same time, individual teacher learning might play a mutual role in strengthening school-level capacity for sustained improvement. Building on previous research, this longitudinal study therefore examines how transformational leadership, task interdependence, self-efficacy, and teachers’ engagement in self-reflection mutually affect each other over time. Questionnaire data gathered on three measurement occasions from 655 Dutch Vocational Education and Training teachers was analyzed using a multivariate Latent Difference Score model. Results indicate that self-reflection and task interdependence reciprocally influence each other’s change. A considerate and stimulating transformational leader was found to contribute to this process. Change in self-efficacy was influenced by self-reflection, indicating that learning leads to competency beliefs. Together, the findings point to the important role transformational leadership practices play in facilitating teamwork, and sustaining teachers’ levels of learning in schools.

  15. In a secondary care setting, differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec task force classification system were typically small

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne; Kent, Peter; Kjaer, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The component of the Quebec Task Force Classification System that subgroups patients based on the extent of their radiating pain and neurological signs has been demonstrated to have prognostic implications for patients with low back pain but has not been tested on patients with neck...... collected, routine clinical data. Patients were classified into Local NP only, NP + arm pain above the elbow, NP + arm pain below the elbow, and NP with signs of nerve root involvement (NP + NRI). Outcome was pain intensity and activity limitation. Associations were tested in longitudinal linear mixed...... and patients with NP + NRI had experienced the largest improvements in pain intensity. Similar results were obtained for activity limitation. CONCLUSIONS: This study found baseline and outcome differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec Task Force Classification System. However...

  16. Skin cancer screening: recommendations for data-driven screening guidelines and a review of the US Preventive Services Task Force controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mariah M; Leachman, Sancy A; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Cranmer, Lee D; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Sondak, Vernon K; Stemwedel, Clara E; Swetter, Susan M; Vetto, John; Bowles, Tawnya; Dellavalle, Robert P; Geskin, Larisa J; Grossman, Douglas; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Hawkes, Jason E; Jeter, Joanne M; Kim, Caroline C; Kirkwood, John M; Mangold, Aaron R; Meyskens, Frank; Ming, Michael E; Nelson, Kelly C; Piepkorn, Michael; Pollack, Brian P; Robinson, June K; Sober, Arthur J; Trotter, Shannon; Venna, Suraj S; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Alani, Rhoda; Averbook, Bruce; Bar, Anna; Becevic, Mirna; Box, Neil; E Carson, William; Cassidy, Pamela B; Chen, Suephy C; Chu, Emily Y; Ellis, Darrel L; Ferris, Laura K; Fisher, David E; Kendra, Kari; Lawson, David H; Leming, Philip D; Margolin, Kim A; Markovic, Svetomir; Martini, Mary C; Miller, Debbie; Sahni, Debjani; Sharfman, William H; Stein, Jennifer; Stratigos, Alexander J; Tarhini, Ahmad; Taylor, Matthew H; Wisco, Oliver J; Wong, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is usually apparent on the skin and readily detected by trained medical providers using a routine total body skin examination, yet this malignancy is responsible for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Currently, there is no national consensus on skin cancer screening in the USA, but dermatologists and primary care providers are routinely confronted with making the decision about when to recommend total body skin examinations and at what interval. The objectives of this paper are: to propose rational, risk-based, data-driven guidelines commensurate with the US Preventive Services Task Force screening guidelines for other disorders; to compare our proposed guidelines to recommendations made by other national and international organizations; and to review the US Preventive Services Task Force's 2016 Draft Recommendation Statement on skin cancer screening. PMID:28758010

  17. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations. Savannah River Site 200-S Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. [ed.; Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; ``Just-in-Time`` precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  19. Implications of ICD-10 for Sarcopenia Clinical Practice and Clinical Trials: Report by the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B; Fielding, R A; Bens, C; Bernabei, R; Cawthon, P M; Cederholm, T; Cruz-Jentoft, A J; Del Signore, S; Donahue, S; Morley, J; Pahor, M; Reginster, J-Y; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, Y; Roubenoff, R; Sinclair, A; Cesari, M

    2018-01-01

    Establishment of an ICD-10-CM code for sarcopenia in 2016 was an important step towards reaching international consensus on the need for a nosological framework of age-related skeletal muscle decline. The International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force met in April 2017 to discuss the meaning, significance, and barriers to the implementation of the new code as well as strategies to accelerate development of new therapies. Analyses by the Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium are underway to develop quantitative definitions of sarcopenia. A consensus conference is planned to evaluate this analysis. The Task Force also discussed lessons learned from sarcopenia trials that could be applied to future trials, as well as lessons from the osteoporosis field, a clinical condition with many constructs similar to sarcopenia and for which ad hoc treatments have been developed and approved by regulatory agencies.

  20. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John H; Patrick, Donald L; Walton, Marc K; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients' health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient's health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment-Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation of

  1. Screening for HIV: systematic review to update the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Selph, Shelley; Dana, Tracy; Bougatsos, Christina; Zakher, Bernadette; Blazina, Ian; Korthuis, P Todd

    2012-11-20

    A 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) review found good evidence that HIV screening is accurate and that antiretroviral therapy (ART) for immunologically advanced disease is associated with substantial clinical benefits, but insufficient evidence to determine the effects on transmission or in less immunologically advanced disease. To update the 2005 USPSTF review on benefits and harms of HIV screening in adolescents and adults, focusing on research gaps identified in the prior review. MEDLINE (2004 to June 2012) and the Cochrane Library (through the second quarter of 2012). Randomized trials and observational studies that compared HIV screening strategies and reported clinical outcomes, evaluated the effects of starting ART at different CD4 cell count thresholds and long-term harms, or reported the effects of interventions on transmission risk. 2 authors abstracted and checked study details and quality using predefined criteria. No study directly evaluated the effects on clinical outcomes of screening versus no screening for HIV infection. A randomized trial and a subgroup analysis from a randomized trial found that ART initiation at CD4 counts less than 0.250 × 109 cells/L was associated with a higher risk for death or AIDS-defining events than initiation at CD4 counts greater than 0.350 × 109 cells/L (hazard ratios, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5] and 5.3 [CI, 1.3 to 9.6]). Large, fair-quality cohort studies also consistently found that ART initiation at CD4 counts of 0.350 to 0.500 × 109 cells/L was associated with lower risk for death or AIDS-defining events than delayed initiation. New evidence from good-quality cohorts with longer-term follow-up confirms a previously observed small increased risk for cardiovascular events associated with certain antiretrovirals. Strong evidence from 1 good-quality randomized trial and 7 observational studies found that ART was associated with a 10- to 20-fold reduction in risk for sexual transmission of HIV. Only

  2. Management of Prostate Cancer in Elderly Patients: Recommendations of a Task Force of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Albrand, Gilles; Gillessen, Silke; Hughes, Simon; Mottet, Nicolas; Oudard, Stéphane; Payne, Heather; Puts, Martine; Zulian, Gilbert; Balducci, Lodovico; Aapro, Matti

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent male cancer. Since the median age of diagnosis is 66 yr, many patients require both geriatric and urologic evaluation if treatment is to be tailored to individual circumstances including comorbidities and frailty. To update the 2014 International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) guidelines on prostate cancer in men aged >70 yr. The update includes new material on health status evaluation and the treatment of localised, advanced, and castrate-resistant disease. A multidisciplinary SIOG task force reviewed pertinent articles published during 2013-2016 using search terms relevant to prostate cancer, the elderly, geriatric evaluation, local treatments, and castration-refractory/resistant disease. Each member of the group proposed modifications to the previous guidelines. These were collated and circulated. The final manuscript reflects the expert consensus. Elderly patients should be managed according to their individual health status and not according to age. Fit elderly patients should receive the same treatment as younger patients on the basis of international recommendations. At the initial evaluation, screening for cognitive impairment is mandatory to establish patient competence in making decisions. Initial evaluation of health status should use the validated G8 screening tool. Abnormal scores on the G8 should lead to a simplified geriatric assessment that evaluates comorbid conditions (using the Cumulative Illness Score Rating-Geriatrics scale), dependence (Activities of Daily Living) and nutritional status (via estimation of weight loss). When patients are frail or disabled or have severe comorbidities, a comprehensive geriatric assessment is needed. This may suggest additional geriatric interventions. Advances in geriatric evaluation and treatments for localised and advanced disease are contributing to more appropriate management of elderly patients with prostate cancer. A better understanding of the role of active

  3. Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes: An Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, Cynthia; Grodensky, Catherine; Ebel, Charles; Middleton, Jennifer C; Harris, Russell P; Ashok, Mahima; Jonas, Daniel E

    2016-12-20

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection. Vertical transmission of HSV can lead to fetal morbidity and mortality. To assess the evidence on serologic screening and preventive interventions for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adults and adolescents to support the US Preventive Services Task Force for an updated recommendation statement. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and trial registries through March 31, 2016. Surveillance for new evidence in targeted publications was conducted through October 31, 2016. English-language randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing screening with no screening in persons without past or current symptoms of genital herpes; studies evaluating accuracy and harms of serologic screening tests for HSV-2; RCTs assessing preventive interventions in asymptomatic persons seropositive for HSV-2. Dual review of abstracts, full-text articles, and study quality; pooled sensitivities and specificities of screening tests using a hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curve analysis when at least 3 similar studies were available. Accuracy of screening tests, benefits of screening, harms of screening, reduction in genital herpes outbreaks. A total of 17 studies (n = 9736 participants; range, 24-3290) in 19 publications were included. No RCTs compared screening with no screening. Most studies of the accuracy of screening tests were from populations with high HSV-2 prevalence (greater than 40% based on Western blot). Pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity of the most commonly used test at the manufacturer's cutpoint were 99% (95% CI, 97%-100%) and 81% (95% CI, 68%-90%), respectively (10 studies; n = 6537). At higher cutpoints, pooled estimates were 95% (95% CI, 91%-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 82%-93%), respectively (7 studies; n = 5516). Use of this test at the manufacturer's cutpoint in a population of 100 000 with a prevalence of HSV-2 of 16% (the

  4. A definition and classification of status epilepticus--Report of the ILAE Task Force on Classification of Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Cock, Hannah; Hesdorffer, Dale; Rossetti, Andrea O; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shinnar, Shlomo; Shorvon, Simon; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-10-01

    The Commission on Classification and Terminology and the Commission on Epidemiology of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) have charged a Task Force to revise concepts, definition, and classification of status epilepticus (SE). The proposed new definition of SE is as follows: Status epilepticus is a condition resulting either from the failure of the mechanisms responsible for seizure termination or from the initiation of mechanisms, which lead to abnormally, prolonged seizures (after time point t1 ). It is a condition, which can have long-term consequences (after time point t2 ), including neuronal death, neuronal injury, and alteration of neuronal networks, depending on the type and duration of seizures. This definition is conceptual, with two operational dimensions: the first is the length of the seizure and the time point (t1 ) beyond which the seizure should be regarded as "continuous seizure activity." The second time point (t2 ) is the time of ongoing seizure activity after which there is a risk of long-term consequences. In the case of convulsive (tonic-clonic) SE, both time points (t1 at 5 min and t2 at 30 min) are based on animal experiments and clinical research. This evidence is incomplete, and there is furthermore considerable variation, so these time points should be considered as the best estimates currently available. Data are not yet available for other forms of SE, but as knowledge and understanding increase, time points can be defined for specific forms of SE based on scientific evidence and incorporated into the definition, without changing the underlying concepts. A new diagnostic classification system of SE is proposed, which will provide a framework for clinical diagnosis, investigation, and therapeutic approaches for each patient. There are four axes: (1) semiology; (2) etiology; (3) electroencephalography (EEG) correlates; and (4) age. Axis 1 (semiology) lists different forms of SE divided into those with prominent motor

  5. Shared decision making about screening and chemoprevention. a suggested approach from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Stacey L; Harris, Russell P; Woolf, Steven H

    2004-01-01

    Shared decision making is a process in which patients are involved as active partners with the clinician in clarifying acceptable medical options and in choosing a preferred course of clinical care. Shared decision making offers a way of individualizing recommendations, according to patients' special needs and preferences, when some patients may benefit from an intervention but others may not. This paper clarifies how the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) envisions the application of shared decision making in the execution of screening and chemoprevention. Unlike conventional USPSTF reports, this paper is neither a systematic review nor a formal recommendation. Instead, it is a concept paper that includes a commentary on the current thinking and evidence regarding shared decision making. Although the USPSTF does not endorse a specific style of decision making, it does encourage informed and joint decisions. This means that patients should be informed about preventive services before they are performed, and that the patient-clinician partnership is central to decision making. The USPSTF suggests that clinicians inform patients about preventive services for which there is clear evidence of net benefit, and, if time permits, about other services with high visibility or special individual importance. Clinicians should make sure that balanced, evidence-based information about the service (including the potential benefits and harms, alternatives, and uncertainties) is available to the patient if needed. For preventive services for which the balance of potential benefits and harms is a close call, or for which the evidence is insufficient to guide a decision for or against screening, clinicians should additionally assist patients in determining whether individual characteristics and personal preferences favor performing or not performing the preventive service. The USPSTF believes that clinicians generally have no obligation to initiate discussion about

  6. Multi-state Beef Reproduction Task Force provides science-based recommendations for the application of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S K; Funston, R N; Hall, J B; Kesler, D J; Lamb, G C; Lauderdale, J W; Patterson, D J; Perry, G A; Strohbehn, D R

    2011-09-01

    Since its formation, the Beef Reproduction Task Force (BRTF) has worked to enhance productivity and profitability of US beef herds by integrating research and extension efforts with the intent of more effectively transferring the use of reproductive technologies to the field. A key early step was to coordinate efforts in identifying effective breeding management protocols for beef cattle and to clarify their associated acronyms. A short list of recommended protocols and their acronyms for synchronization of estrus and ovulation in beef cattle was developed based on results from peer-reviewed, published research and a comprehensive review of data collected from the field. The list of recommended protocols was developed by the BRTF in cooperation with veterinarians and cattle AI industries. These protocols and their acronyms are presented uniformly in all of the major AI sire directories and are available online at http://www.beefrepro.info. Protocol updates are made annually to incorporate the most recent research findings related to estrous cycle control in beef cattle. The Estrus Synchronization Planner, a software program developed in cooperation with the Iowa Beef Center, now reflects these same recommendations. Beginning in 2002, the BRTF hosted and presented 11 educational workshops to more than 1,900 attendees in key cow-calf states. These Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle workshops targeted beef producers, AI industry personnel, veterinarians, allied industry representatives, and academicians. A national media sponsor provided online coverage of the last 3 workshops at http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com. A postmeeting evaluation, developed to assess application of information from 2 recent workshops, was returned by 55% of those contacted (n = 150). Attendees averaged 16 (± 13.4 SD) yr of AI experience, and 80% of respondents represented more than 100 cows. Respondents were asked to estimate the value of AI-sired calves compared with natural

  7. A framework for remission in SLE: consensus findings from a large international task force on definitions of remission in SLE (DORIS)

    OpenAIRE

    van Vollenhoven, R.; Voskuyl, A.; Bertsias, G.; Aranow, C.; Aringer, M.; Arnaud, L.; Askanase, A.; Balážová, P.; Bonfa, E.; Bootsma, H.; Boumpas, D.; Bruce, I.; Cervera, R.; Clarke, A.; Coney, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treat-to-target recommendations have identified 'remission' as a target in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but recognise that there is no universally accepted definition for this. Therefore, we initiated a process to achieve consensus on potential definitions for remission in SLE. METHODS: An international task force of 60 specialists and patient representatives participated in preparatory exercises, a face-to-face meeting and follow-up electronic voting. The level for agreeme...

  8. Interim report of the interagency coal export task force: draft for public comment. [Trade by country 1960-1979; general forecasting to 1985, 1990 and 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The Interagency Coal Export Task Force was formed in the Spring of 1980 at the direction of the President, in support of the international efforts of the United States, encouraging the use of coal. Its purpose was to report on possible courses of action to increase United States steam coal exports in a manner consistent with other national policies, including our commitment to environmental protection. The Task Force assembled existing data, developed significant new information regarding the international coal market and undertook analyses of apparent problems underlying coal exports. The Task Force contributed to a public awareness of the fact that increased coal exports will serve both the domestic and international interests of the United States. Based upon extensive, independent field studies in Europe and the Far East, the Task Force concludes that there will be significant growth in world demand for steam coal. Such growth has already begun, has contributed to the almost seven-fold increase in United States overseas steam coal exports for 1990 over 1979, and is expected to continue beyond the end of this century. The growth in world steam coal trade projected in the report does not guarantee United States coal exporters a large or expanding share of the market. The United States' role depends on the buying strategies of the consuming countries, the policies and prices of competing exporters, and the actions taken by the United States to maintain reasonable prices, prompt delivery and dependable quality. Projections of United States steam coal exports, therefore, rest upon a number of highly uncertain factors which are discussed in some detail.

  9. Retrospective epidemiological study of canine epilepsy in Japan using the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force classification 2015 (2003?2013): etiological distribution, risk factors, survival time, and lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamoto, Yuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Yu, Yoshihiko; WADA, Masae; Kuwabara, Takayuki; FUJIWARA-IGARASHI, Aki; Fujita, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease in veterinary practice. However, contrary to human medicine, epilepsy classification in veterinary medicine had not been clearly defined until recently. A number of reports on canine epilepsy have been published, reflecting in part updated proposals from the human epilepsy organization, the International League Against Epilepsy. In 2015, the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) published a consensus report on the clas...

  10. Astronomy for a Better World: IAU OAD Task Force-1 Programs for Advancing Astronomy Education and Research in Universities in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the IAU Commission 46 and Office for Astronomy Development (OAD) programs that support advancing Astronomy education and research primarily in universities in developing countries. The bulk of these operational activities will be coordinated through the OAD's newly installed Task Force 1. We outline current (and future) IAU/OAD Task Force-1 programs that promote the development of University-level Astronomy at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Among current programs discussed are the past and future expanded activities of the International School for Young Astronomers (ISYA) and the Teaching Astronomy for Development (TAD) programs. The primary role of the ISYA program is the organization of a three week School for students for typically M.Sc. and Ph.D students. The ISYA is a very successful program that will now be offered more frequently through the generous support of the Kavli Foundation. The IAU/TAD program provides aid and resources for the development of teaching, education and research in Astronomy. The TAD program is dedicated to assist countries that have little or no astronomical activity, but that wish to develop or enhance Astronomy education. Over the last ten years, the ISYA and TAD programs have supported programs in Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, South East and West Asia, and South America. Several examples are given. Several new programs being considered by OAD Task Force-1 are also discussed. Other possible programs being considered are the introduction of modular Astronomy courses into the university curricula (or improve present courses) as well as providing access to ``remote learning`` courses and Virtual Astronomy labs in developing countries. Another possible new program would support visits of astronomers from technically advanced countries to spend their sabbatical leaves teaching and advising University Astronomy programs in developing countries. Suggestions for new Task Force -1

  11. Management of opioid use disorders among veterans in subacute rehab: Use of an interdisciplinary task force to address an emerging concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Kate L M; Sharma, Samata; Thurston, Joe; Sivashanker, Karthik; Chang, Grace H

    2016-01-01

    There is both rapidly growing need, and limited evidence-based guidelines, for the management of opioid use disorders in subacute rehab and other nonaddiction medical settings. Following 2 unintentional opioid overdoses within the Community Living Center (CLC), a VA (Veterans Administration) subacute rehab setting, an interdisciplinary CLC Addictions Task Force was created to address a critical issue: how to best meet the combined neuropsychiatric and medical needs of the opiate use disorder patient through a multifaceted treatment approach. The goals of the task force were to develop and institute educational initiatives for providers; create patient care guidelines; increase safety on the unit; improve provider confidence when caring for this high-risk population; and mitigate the risk of unintentional overdose. The task force divided into 4 working groups to meet these aims. Process and outcomes are discussed. We found that in-services by addiction specialists improved clinician comfort in caring for this high-risk patient group. Specific areas that yielded the greatest clinician satisfaction ratings included didactics on how to identify at-risk patients and techniques on how to manage the patient in a general rehab setting. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, and an iterative process, at all stages was critical to the success of the CLC Addictions Task Force, as it improved buy-in and motivation from all disciplines. Improvements have been made to enhance patient safety, improve communication amongst providers, and provide a foundation to improve patient outcomes. Our preliminary work to enhance the identification and management of opioid use disorders at our CLC is an important first step towards a standardized curriculum that could be applied to other VA and non-VA subacute rehab settings.

  12. Oak Ridge Reservation volume I. Y-12 mercury task force files: A guide to record series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-17

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each of the series of records identified in the documents of the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files that pertain to the use of mercury in the separation and enrichment of lithium isotopes at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, which seeks to verify and conduct inventories of epidemiologic and health-related records at various DOE and DOE contractor sites. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project. Specific attention will be given to the history of the DOE-Oak Ridge Reservation, the development of the Y-12 Plant, and the use of mercury in the production of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s. This introduction provides background information on the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files, an assembly of documents resulting from the 1983 investigation of the Mercury Task Force into the effects of mercury toxicity upon workplace hygiene and worker health, the unaccountable loss of mercury, and the impact of those losses upon the environment. This introduction also explains the methodology used in the selection and inventory of these record series. Other topics include the methodology used to produce this guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to the collection.

  13. Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for Health Care Decision Making--Emerging Good Practices: Report 2 of the ISPOR MCDA Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; IJzerman, Maarten; Thokala, Praveen; Baltussen, Rob; Boysen, Meindert; Kaló, Zoltán; Lönngren, Thomas; Mussen, Filip; Peacock, Stuart; Watkins, John; Devlin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Health care decisions are complex and involve confronting trade-offs between multiple, often conflicting objectives. Using structured, explicit approaches to decisions involving multiple criteria can improve the quality of decision making. A set of techniques, known under the collective heading, multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA), are useful for this purpose. In 2014, ISPOR established an Emerging Good Practices Task Force. The task force's first report defined MCDA, provided examples of its use in health care, described the key steps, and provided an overview of the principal methods of MCDA. This second task force report provides emerging good-practice guidance on the implementation of MCDA to support health care decisions. The report includes: a checklist to support the design, implementation and review of an MCDA; guidance to support the implementation of the checklist; the order in which the steps should be implemented; illustrates how to incorporate budget constraints into an MCDA; provides an overview of the skills and resources, including available software, required to implement MCDA; and future research directions. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Groundwater Quality Changes in a Karst Aquifer of Northeastern Wisconsin, USA: Reduction of Brown Water Incidence and Bacterial Contamination Resulting from Implementation of Regional Task Force Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Erb

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Silurian Dolostone region of eastern Wisconsin, the combination of thin soils and waste application (animal manure, organic waste has led to significant groundwater contamination, including Brown Water Incidents (BWIs—contamination resulting in a color or odor change in well water and detections of pathogen indicator bacteria such as E. coli and others. In response, a Karst Task Force (KTF was convened to identify risks and recommend solutions. This article looks at the impact eight years after the 2007 Karst Task Force report—both the actions taken by local resource managers and the changes to water quality. We present the first regional analysis of the 2007 Karst Task Force report and subsequent regulatory changes to determine if these regulations impacted the prevalence of wells contaminated with animal waste and the frequency of BWIs. While all of the counties in the KTF area promoted increased awareness, landowner/manager and waste applicator education alone did not result in a drop in BWIs or other water quality improvements. The two counties in the study that adopted winter manure spreading restrictions on frozen or snow-covered ground showed statistically significant reductions in the instances of BWIs and other well water quality problems.

  15. Comparisons of an open-ended vs. forced-choice 'mind reading' task: implications for measuring perspective-taking and emotion recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy G Cassels

    Full Text Available Perspective-taking and emotion recognition are essential for successful social development and have been the focus of developmental research for many years. Although the two abilities often overlap, they are distinct and our understanding of these abilities critically rests upon the efficacy of existing measures. Lessons from the literature differentiating recall versus recognition memory tasks led us to hypothesize that an open-ended emotion recognition measure would be less reliant on compensatory strategies and hence a more specific measure of emotion recognition abilities than a forced-choice task. To this end, we compared an open-ended version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with the original forced-choice version in two studies: 118 typically-developing 4- to 8-year-olds (Study 1 and 139 5- to 12-year-olds; 85 typically-developing and 54 with learning disorders (Study 2. We found that the open-ended version of the task was a better predictor of empathy and more reliably discriminated typically-developing children from those with learning disorders. As a whole, the results suggest that the open-ended version is a more sensitive measure of emotion recognition specifically.

  16. IEA Bioenergy Tasks 30/31 : country report for the Netherlands : Biomass production for energy from sustainable forestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de J.J.; Spijker, J.H.; Elbersen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    This country report provides information on the biomass production from sustainable forestry in the Netherlands. In chapter 2, Policy on bioenergy in the Netherlands, some information is summarized on bioenergy production in the Netherlands, developments in the policy of the Dutch government on

  17. An Updated Version of the U.S. Air Force Multi-Attribute Task Battery (AF-MATB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    assessing human performance in a controlled multitask environment. The most recent release of AF-MATB contains numerous improvements and additions...Strategic Behavior, MATB, Multitasking , Task Battery, Simulator, Multi-Attribute Task Battery, Automation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...in the previous version of AF-MATB has been preserved, we’ve implemented a second mode with a different set of governing behaviors designed to focus

  18. Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS)--explanation and elaboration: a report of the ISPOR Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Good Reporting Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husereau, Don; Drummond, Michael; Petrou, Stavros; Carswell, Chris; Moher, David; Greenberg, Dan; Augustovski, Federico; Briggs, Andrew H; Mauskopf, Josephine; Loder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Economic evaluations of health interventions pose a particular challenge for reporting because substantial information must be conveyed to allow scrutiny of study findings. Despite a growth in published reports, existing reporting guidelines are not widely adopted. There is also a need to consolidate and update existing guidelines and promote their use in a user-friendly manner. A checklist is one way to help authors, editors, and peer reviewers use guidelines to improve reporting. The task force's overall goal was to provide recommendations to optimize the reporting of health economic evaluations. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement is an attempt to consolidate and update previous health economic evaluation guidelines into one current, useful reporting guidance. The CHEERS Elaboration and Explanation Report of the ISPOR Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Good Reporting Practices Task Force facilitates the use of the CHEERS statement by providing examples and explanations for each recommendation. The primary audiences for the CHEERS statement are researchers reporting economic evaluations and the editors and peer reviewers assessing them for publication. The need for new reporting guidance was identified by a survey of medical editors. Previously published checklists or guidance documents related to reporting economic evaluations were identified from a systematic review and subsequent survey of task force members. A list of possible items from these efforts was created. A two-round, modified Delphi Panel with representatives from academia, clinical practice, industry, and government, as well as the editorial community, was used to identify a minimum set of items important for reporting from the larger list. Out of 44 candidate items, 24 items and accompanying recommendations were developed, with some specific recommendations for single study-based and model-based economic evaluations. The final

  19. The Role of Formal and Informal Forces in Shaping Consumption and Implications for a Sustainable Society. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Mont

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Addressing climate change and the collapse of ecosystems without threatening the economy, while simultaneously improving the well-being of all people and ensuring social justice and equality, seems to be the largest challenge in the history of mankind. So far, all the efforts to address growing environmental and human problems through technological solutions and policy measures have been largely outpaced by growing population and increasing consumption levels. Therefore, an understanding of the essential driving forces and complexities of consumption, and of how environmental impacts from rising consumption can be reduced, is becoming increasingly important. This understanding can be achieved by analyzing not only economic frameworks, political settings, business models, and technological innovations, but also social norms, psychological factors, and collective and individual decision-making processes. This article, Part I, provides a meta-analysis of the main political, economic, technological, and business drivers of contemporary consumption and offers a systematic discussion of the relevance of these factors for the instigation of change towards sustainable patterns and levels of consumption. The main conclusion from Part I and II is that a systems-thinking approach is required in order to understand how various political, technical, social, economic, and psychological drivers overlap and influence each other in creating our consumer society.

  20. Spatiotemporal Pattern and Driving Forces of Arable Land-Use Intensity in China: Toward Sustainable Land Management Using Emergy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualin Xie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The level of arable land-use intensity has important impacts on food security and rural sustainable development. Using the emergy method, we investigate the spatial disparities and driving forces of arable land-use intensity in China from 1999 to 2008 at the national, regional and provincial levels. The empirical results show that chemical fertilizer was the largest component of agricultural inputs and that agricultural diesel oil recorded the highest growth rate. The degree of heterogeneities in arable land-use intensity in China showed a decreasing trend, which resulted mainly from the differences among the eastern, northeastern, central and western regions. The regional disparities in labor, pesticides and plastic sheeting decreased from 1999 to 2008. The per capita annual net incomes of household operations and the agricultural policies had a significant positive correlation with total inputs, fertilizer inputs, pesticide inputs and agricultural plastic sheeting. In addition, the nonagricultural population had a greater impact on agricultural plastic sheeting. Finally, we suggest that there is an urgent need to focus on the effects of chemical fertilizer and pesticide inputs on the ecological environment. Agricultural support policies should be introduced for the poor agricultural production provinces.