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Sample records for sussex brighton bn1

  1. What do clinicians want from us? An evaluation of Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust clinical librarian service and its implications for developing future working patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, Amanda; Lovell, Alan; Henwood, Flis; Lehmann, Judy

    2006-12-01

    The Clinical Librarian (CL) Service at Brighton was established in 2003 with the aim of providing high-quality evidence to designated teams and fostering an evidence-based culture. To evaluate the CL service at Brighton and discuss the implication of the findings. A combination of internally collected data (n = 167), and an external evaluation of the service by questionnaires (n = 86) of users and non-users and interviews (n = 9) of users. Internal data suggest that the service is valued by its users and that patient care and continuing professional development are the most common uses for searches (confirmed by the external study); that searches generally result in some change in knowledge; and that this knowledge is disseminated. The external study found that visibility of the CL was crucial to the effectiveness of the role and that clinicians used the service mostly to get access to a wider range of resources and/or to save time. Users wanted the CL to include evaluative annotation with the results, and for the CL role to become more embedded in the team. Interview results expanded on the issues of integration of the CL and the need for annotation of results. To be most effective, CLs would be dedicated to one team, but financial constraints make this unlikely. Alternative working patterns are suggested as a possible compromise.

  2. International Conference on Energy Storage, Brighton, Sussex, England, April 29-May 1, 1981, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current developmental, experimental, and production prototype energy storage systems are surveyed, with an emphasis on European programs and products. Attention is given to chemical, thermochemical/heat pump combinations, and reversible reaction heat storage methods. Applications of zeolite, hydrogenated cyclohexane, and fluidized media are examined, as are thermal storage options for industry and utilities. Phase change materials in bulk, encapsulated, and sodium acetate forms are reviewed, particularly for solar energy thermal storage. The compatibility of construction materials with latent heat storage is discussed. Battery systems for transport vehicles, load leveling, and storage of solar and wind-derived electricity are described. Aquifer storage is explored, together with underground pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage, a two-basin tidal power scheme, and kinetic energy rings such as flywheels.

  3. The specialty choices of graduates from Brighton and Sussex Medical School: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Katherine; Elton, Caroline; Newport, Melanie

    2015-03-13

    Since 2007 junior doctors in the UK have had to make major career decisions at a point when previously many had not yet chosen a specialty. This study examined when doctors in this new system make specialty choices, which factors influence choices, and whether doctors who choose a specialty they were interested in at medical school are more confident in their choice than those doctors whose interests change post-graduation. Two cohorts of students in their penultimate year at one medical school (n = 227/239) were asked which specialty interested them as a career. Two years later, 210/227 were sent a questionnaire measuring actual specialty chosen, confidence, influence of perceptions of the specialty and experiences on choice, satisfaction with medicine, personality, self-efficacy, and demographics. Medical school and post-graduation choices in the same category were deemed 'stable'. Predictors of stability, and of not having chosen a specialty, were calculated using bootstrapped logistic regression. Differences between specialties on questionnaire factors were analysed. 50% responded (n = 105/277; 44% of the 239 Year 4 students). 65% specialty choices were 'stable'. Factors univariately associated with stability were specialty chosen, having enjoyed the specialty at medical school or since starting work, having first considered the specialty earlier. A regression found doctors who chose psychiatry were more likely to have changed choice than those who chose general practice. Confidence in the choice was not associated with stability. Those who chose general practice valued lifestyle factors. A psychiatry choice was associated with needing a job and using one's intellect to help others. The decision to choose surgical training tended to be made early. Not having applied for specialty training was associated with being lower on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Medical school experiences are important in specialty choice but experiences post-graduation remain significant, particularly in some specialties (psychiatry in our sample). Career guidance is important at medical school and should be continued post-graduation, with senior clinicians supported in advising juniors. Careers advice in the first year post-graduation may be particularly important, especially for specialties which have difficulty recruiting or are poorly represented at medical school.

  4. LGBT Youth from Brighton to Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jess

    2009-01-01

    Allsorts Youth Project works with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) young people in Brighton and Hove. It provides a safe drop-in space and one-to-one support. It also enables LGBT young people to learn new skills and participate in a wide range of volunteering opportunities including delivering homophobia awareness workshops to their peers.

  5. An investigation into the feasibility of designing a framework for the quantitative evaluation of the Clinical Librarian service at an NHS Trust in Brighton, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Archana; Roper, Tom

    2014-12-01

    This feature presents research undertaken by Archana Deshmukh for her MA dissertation at the University of Brighton. She worked closely with Tom Roper, the Clinical Librarian at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, in a project to explore the feasibility of applying quantitative measures to evaluate the Clinical Librarian service. The investigation used an innovative participatory approach and the findings showed that although an exclusively quantitative approach to evaluation is not feasible, using a mixed methods approach is a way forward. Agreed outputs and outcomes could be embedded in a marketing plan, and the resulting framework could provide evidence to demonstrate overall impact. Archana graduated in July 2014, gaining a Distinction in the MA in Information Studies, and she is currently looking for work in the health information sector. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  6. Biological Efficacy of Streptomyces sp. Strain BN1 against the Cereal Head Blight Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boknam Jung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB caused by the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum is one of the most severe diseases threatening the production of small grains. Infected grains are often contaminated with mycotoxins such as zearalenone and trichothecences. During survey of contamination by FHB in rice grains, we found a bacterial isolate, designated as BN1, antagonistic to F. graminearum. The strain BN1 had branching vegetative hyphae and spores, and its aerial hyphae often had long, straight filaments bearing spores. The 16S rRNA gene of BN1 had 100% sequence identity with those found in several Streptomyces species. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS regions showed that BN1 grouped with S. sampsonii with 77% bootstrap value, suggesting that BN1 was not a known Streptomyces species. In addition, the efficacy of the BN1 strain against F. graminearum strains was tested both in vitro and in vivo. Wheat seedling length was significantly decreased by F. graminearum infection. However, this effect was mitigated when wheat seeds were treated with BN1 spore suspension prior to F. graminearum infection. BN1 also significantly decreased FHB severity when it was sprayed onto wheat heads, whereas BN1 was not effective when wheat heads were point inoculated. These results suggest that spraying of BN1 spores onto wheat heads during the wheat flowering season can be efficient for plant protection. Mechanistic studies on the antagonistic effect of BN1 against F. graminearum remain to be analyzed.

  7. Can your public library improve your health and well-being? An investigation of East Sussex Library and Information Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Anneliese

    2014-06-01

    This article is only the second in the Dissertations into Practice series to highlight the role of public libraries in health information. It is the result of an investigation into the provision of health information in East Sussex Library and Information Service, which formed the basis of Anneliese Ingham's dissertation for her MA in Information Studies at the University of Brighton. At the time Anneliese was doing her research, the service was experimenting with different ways of providing healthcare information at one of its main libraries, and they were interested in the impact of this. The provision of health information to the public is one of my own research interests, and I was Anneliese's dissertation supervisor. I thought she produced a very good piece of work, and the results she highlights in this article are applicable to all public library authorities. Anneliese graduated with an MA in 2012 and worked for East Sussex Library and Information Service, which she joined whilst she was still studying. AM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  8. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in a Sussex spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, C J; Platt, S R; Shelton, G D

    2004-03-01

    A two-year-old, intact female Sussex spaniel was presented with signs of exercise intolerance. Pre- and post-exercise serum lactate and pyruvate concentrations and urinary organic acid screening supported a diagnosis of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, as previously reported in this breed. Dietary therapy was initiated for six months, during which time there was no reported clinical deterioration. A full neurological examination and repeat evaluation of lactate and pyruvate concentrations before and after exercise was conducted one year after diagnosis, at which time the patient had been without dietary modification for six months and had developed more severe exercise intolerance along with evidence of central nervous system dysfunction.

  9. Soviet Union goes to Sussex for advice on science policy

    CERN Multimedia

    Brown, P

    1990-01-01

    Two state officials from the Soviet Union came to the SPRU, Sussex University, to learn about methods for forecasting trends in science and technology and ways of establishing priorities for basic scientific research (1/2 page).

  10. The new world of phospha-organometallic chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The new world of phospha-organometallic chemistry. JOHN F NIXON. School of Chemistry, Physics and Environmental Science, University of. Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QJ, England. The past few years have seen the development of a rich new area of organometallic chemistry in which phosphorus atoms have replaced ...

  11. Barriers to Antenatal Care in an Urban Community in the Gambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Barriers to Antenatal Care in an Urban ... Kingdom1; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore2; Department of Medical Education, Brighton and. Sussex Medical School, Falmer, BN1 9PX, .... themes were identified and documented using Word software. Overarching themes were ...

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Strain BN-1 and Vaccine Strain BN-CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is associated with upper respiratory disease in cattle in many countries. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of the BPIV3 BN-1 strain, isolated from cattle in Japan, and the BN-CE vaccine strain, derived from the BN-1 strain by passages in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

  13. Minerals safeguarding areas and mineral consultation areas for West Sussex

    OpenAIRE

    Hannis, S.D.; Steadman, E. J.; Linley, K.A.; Newsham, R.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes work carried out by the British Geological Survey on behalf of West Sussex County Council to delineate its Minerals Safeguarding Areas and Mineral Consultation Areas. This is in accordance with the methodology outlined in “A guide to mineral safeguarding in England” (McEvoy et al., 2007), which is in line with the Communities and Local Government document, Mineral Policy Statement 1: Planning and Minerals. This was released in November 2006 and it introduc...

  14. From a Whisper to a Scream: The Campaign for Education in Brighton & Hove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Nadia; Pettitt, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of the creation and first two years of the Campaign for Education in Brighton and Hove. It makes a case for grass-roots responses to the various neo-liberal policy initiatives undermining all phases of public education. This article was written prior to publication of the White Paper, Educational Excellence…

  15. Diagnosis of Guillain–Barré syndrome in children and validation of the Brighton criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roodbol (J.); M.C.Y. de Wit (Marie Claire); B. van den Berg (Bianca); Kahlmann, V. (Vivienne); J. Drenthen (Judith); C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); B.C. Jacobs (Bart)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTo describe the key diagnostic features of pediatric Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and validate the Brighton criteria. Retrospective cohort study of all children (<18 years) diagnosed with GBS between 1987 and 2013 at Sophia Children’s Hospital, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam. Clinical

  16. Early municipal bacteriology in Brighton, Aberdeen and Bristol: blessing or burden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S P; Watson, F R

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the idea that bacteriology was introduced as a tool for the diagnosis and management of the individual patient, this review highlights the work of the municipal bacteriological laboratory in the United Kingdom to illustrate how bacteriological laboratories were introduced as means to control community epidemic disease. Using the examples of municipal laboratories in Brighton, Bristol and Aberdeen, it shows how public health considerations of community infectious diseases such as diphtheria and typhoid dominated the early development and workload of the municipal laboratory, rather than examination of patients with pathological states of uncertain aetiology. It argues that this public health focus of the Medical Officer of Health limited the range of diagnostic tests carried out in such laboratories for over two decades. The growing number of pathogenic microbes being discovered in the late 19th century appears to have had little impact on the tests being carried out in the municipal laboratory. Municipal bacteriological facilities in three towns, a central municipal laboratory (in Brighton), a central university pathological department (Aberdeen) or a combination of both (Bristol) all provided the same limited set of tests. This restricted set of bacteriological examinations is likely to have diminished the value and status of bacteriology in what should have been a period of increasing scope.

  17. The West Dean Archaeological Project: research and teaching in the Sussex Downs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Sillar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005/2006 West Dean College and the associated West Dean Estate in West Sussex have provided the home for practical training of Institute of Archaeology students, for both the initiation ritual of the Experimental Archaeology Course (“Prim Tech” and for the field training courses undertaken at the end of the first year. It is also the location of a long-term research project, aimed at understanding human occupation and land use in this part of the South Downs from prehistory to the present day. In this article the authors describe the first two years of activity of the West Dean Archaeological Project.

  18. Pseudo-outbreak of tuberculosis in poultry plant workers, Sussex County, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis Y; Ridzon, Renee; Giles, Beverly; Mireles, Teresa

    2002-12-01

    Delaware is a leading US poultry-producing state, and foreign-born workers make up a significant percentage of those employed by Delaware's poultry plants. In Sussex County, Delaware, a high percentage of the poultry workers are from two countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB), Mexico and Guatemala, and thus are at risk for TB infection and disease. Furthermore, their risk of TB may be increased because many of these workers live in crowded conditions and lack access to medical care.

  19. Early Upper Palaeolithic archaeology at Beedings, West Sussex: new contexts for Pleistocene archaeology

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    Matthew Pope

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The site of Beedings in Sussex was first recognized as the source of some exceptional Upper Palaeolithic flintwork in 1900, but subsequently disappeared from the archaeological literature. In the 1980s it was recognized again, but it was not until 2007–8 that in situ Palaeolithic archaeology was found at the site. In this article, the director of the excavations describes the discovery, within a network of geological fissures, of two separate industries, one Middle Palaeolithic and the other Early Upper Palaeolithic. The archaeology at Beedings spans a crucial cultural transition in the European Palaeolithic and therefore provides an important new dataset for the analysis of late Neanderthal groups in northern Europe and their replacement by modern human populations.

  20. "The merits and demirits of Ibsen's great play": the reception of the Novelty Theatre Company matinée performance A doll's house, Theatre Royal, Brighton England, June 20th 1889

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    Jill Farleigh Wolfe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available “Merits and Demerits of Ibsen’s great play”: The Reception of a performance of A Doll’s House by the Novelty Theatre Company at The Theatre Royal Brighton England June 20th 1889.   This article discusses the reception of a matinée performance of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House on June 20th 1889 at The Theatre Royal Brighton England. This would be the only performance mounted outside London of the original Novelty Theatre Company’s three week production in English as translated by William Archer. Resources from the Brighton Archives which have not been examined before are used, including theatre reviews from local newspapers: The Brighton Herald, The Brighton Examine, The Brighton Times, and The Argus. Coverage of the performance in these newspapers illustrates how the battle between supporters and detractors of Ibsen’s drama continued outside London. Their reviews of the matinée offer valuable insights into the reception of A Doll’s House, not only by theatre critics but a specific audience on a particular English provincial, The Theatre Royal Brighton. Such newspaper accounts allow us to get a much more detailed perspective on Ibsen and the intellectual issues that his drama raised for a provincial audience in Brighton England. The article examines in detail positive responses to Ibsen´s play and the social issues that both shocked and fascinated his audience.

  1. Restoration of a wild grey partridge shoot: a major development in the Sussex study, UK

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    Ewald, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific basis of wild grey partridge management has been known for a generation. This includes controlling nest predators, providing nesting cover, having sufficient insect food for chicks and appropriate rates of shooting. More recently, measures such as providing food for adult birds and habitats for protection from birds of prey have also been considered important. Habitat provision can be expensive, but in the UK costs can be partially recovered through governmental agri–environment schemes. The landowner still needs to pay for the essential gamekeeper. Since 2003/04, one part of the Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust’s (GWCT Sussex Study area has put these principles of environmental management into practice with the aim of restoring a wild grey partridge shoot to this part of Southern England. Results have been impressive, with the spring pair density increasing from 0.3 pairs/100 ha in 2003 to nearly 20 pairs/100 ha in 2010 on an area of just over 10 km2. Over the past two years a wild grey partridge shoot has taken place, and the landowner and his team have gained national recognition for their conservation work.

  2. Infection of the upper respiratory tract of hamsters by the bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 BN-1 strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Minakuchi, Moeko; Sagai, Mami; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). We have generated a recombinant BPIV3 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rBPIV3-EGFP) based on the BN-1 strain isolated in Japan. After intranasal infection of hamsters with rBPIV3-EGFP, EGFP fluorescence was detected in the upper respiratory tract including the nasal turbinates, pharynx, larynx, and trachea. In the nasal turbinates, rBPIV3-EGFP attained high titers (>10(6) TCID50/g of tissue) 2-4 days after infection. Ciliated epithelial cells in the nasal turbinates and trachea were infected with rBPIV3-EGFP. Histopathological analysis indicated that mucosal epithelial cells in bronchi were shed by 6 days after infection, leaving non-ciliated cells, which may have increased susceptibility to bacterial infection leading to the development of BRDC. These data indicate that rBPIV3-EGFP infection of hamsters is a useful small animal model for studying the development of BPIV3-associated BRDC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Reed F. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Hammoud, Dima A. [Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Solomon, Jeffrey [Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Blaney, Joseph E. [Office of the Scientific Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jahrling, Peter B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log{sub 10} PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. - Highlights: • Small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus results in a severe respiratory disease. • CT findings correlated with peripheral oxygen saturation and monocyte increases. • Virus dissemination was limited and mainly confined to the respiratory tract. • CT provides insight into pathogenesis to aid development of animal models of disease.

  5. Three-dimensional geological modelling of anthropogenic deposits at small urban sites: a case study from Sheepcote Valley, Brighton, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, C; Cundy, A B; Royse, K R; Smith, M; Moles, N R

    2013-11-15

    Improvements in computing speed and capacity and the increasing collection and digitisation of geological data now allow geoscientists to produce meaningful 3D spatial models of the shallow subsurface in many large urban areas, to predict ground conditions and reduce risk and uncertainty in urban planning. It is not yet clear how useful this 3D modelling approach is at smaller urban scales, where poorly characterised anthropogenic deposits (artificial/made ground and fill) form the dominant subsurface material and where the availability of borehole and other geological data is less comprehensive. This is important as it is these smaller urban sites, with complex site history, which frequently form the focus of urban regeneration and redevelopment schemes. This paper examines the extent to which the 3D modelling approach previously utilised at large urban scales can be extended to smaller less well-characterised urban sites, using a historic landfill site in Sheepcote Valley, Brighton, UK as a case study. Two 3D models were generated and compared using GSI3D™ software, one using borehole data only, one combining borehole data with local geological maps and results from a desk study (involving collation of available site data, including ground contour plans). These models clearly delimit the overall subsurface geology at the site, and allow visualisation and modelling of the anthropogenic deposits present. Shallow geophysical data collected from the site partially validate the 3D modelled data, and can improve GSI3D™ outputs where boundaries of anthropogenic deposits may not be clearly defined by surface, contour or borehole data. Attribution of geotechnical and geochemical properties to the 3D model is problematic without intrusive investigations and sampling. However, combining available borehole data, shallow geophysical methods and site histories may allow attribution of generic fill properties, and consequent reduction of urban development risk and

  6. 'What has been your experience of providing short-term orthodontics?'--A pilot survey of GDPs in East Sussex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqmani, S

    2016-03-11

    Short-term orthodontics (STO) aims to enhance a patient's smile by aligning their anterior teeth. It is considered a quicker alternative to conventional orthodontics and less destructive than veneers. As such, it has recently gained much popularity in cosmetic dentistry worldwide. STO is provided almost exclusively by general dental practitioners (GDPs), however, the current literature on this subject focuses largely on the opinions of orthodontists and cosmetic dentists, respectively. The aim of this paper, on the other hand, is to examine the opinions of GDPs and what experience they have had of providing STO. It concludes that GDPs performing STO in East Sussex have expressed a wish to receive more teaching and support from their local orthodontists. It also suggests a need for orthodontic professional bodies to issue guidelines on case selection for STO in order to assist GDPs in recognising which malocclusions are beyond their scope of practice.

  7. An investigation into the move towards electronic journals: a case study of NHS libraries in Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Rebecca

    2013-09-01

    Electronic journals are so embedded into practice in academic libraries that it is easy to forget that this is not the case everywhere. In NHS libraries, for example, the staff face a particular set of issues. This article is based on Rebecca England's dissertation on this topic, completed as part of the MSc Econ course in Information and Library studies at Aberystwyth University. Rebecca is E-resources Librarian at the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust. She investigated the momentum towards electronic journals in NHS libraries in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex region and the potential for a regional purchasing consortium. © 2013 The author. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  8. Propuesta de clasificación técnica de los sistemas de explotación de las BN1G de producción (núcleos

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    Nuria Castañeda Clemente

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se propone una clasificación de los sistemas de explotación de las BN1G de producción a partir de las relaciones entre los distintos atributos que caracterizan a los núcleos. Esta clasificación se estructura en tres niveles. El primero discrimina los sistemas de explotación según su número de superficies de talla. En el segundo nivel, la característica jerarquizadora es la relación geométrica entre superficie /plataforma o entre superficies de talla. El tercer y último nivel atiende a la dirección en la que se explotan estas superficies. This work consists in a classification of the production BN1G (cores exploitation systems, based on tlie reiatlonsfíip between ttie different cíiaracteristic core forms features. Tfiere are tfiree levéis of classification.The first one discrimínate between exploitation systems by tlieir number of debitage surfaces. On the second level the hierarchical feature is the geomethcai relationship between the debitage surface and striking platform or between debitage surfaces. Third level is the direction on exploitation of surfaces.

  9. Trans-Tethyan correlation of the Lower-Middle Cenomanian boundary interval; southern England (Southerham, near Lewes, Sussex) and Douar el Khiana, northeastern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, William J.; Gale, Andrew S.

    2017-03-01

    A 480 m section of marls with widely separated levels of nodular limestone in the Fahdene Formation north of Bou Khadra in Tebessa Province, northeastern Algeria, spans the Lower/Middle Cenomanian boundary. A total of 30 ammonite species are present, of which two: Forbesiceras reversum and Calycoceras (Newboldiceras) algeriense are new. The fauna allows recognition of the Northwest European upper Lower Cenomanian Mantelliceras dixoni Zone, the succeeding lower Middle Cenomanian Cunningtoniceras inerme Zone, the Acanthoceras rhotomagense Zone and its subzones of Turrilites costatus and Turrilites acutus. The sequence of index species occurs in the same order in both north-eastern Tunisia and the Southerham Grey Pit in Sussex (and indeed elsewhere in Northwest Europe), indicating these to be robust assemblage zones and subzones that can be recognised on both the north and south sides of the Tethys. Other occurrences of taxa that are common in both sections and regions are markedly different, and include the co-occurrence of Cunningtoniceras inerme (Pervinquière, 1907) with Acanthoceras rhotomagense (Brongniart, 1822) in the costatus Subzone in north-eastern Algeria and central Tunisia, the extension of Acompsoceras renevieri (Sharpe, 1857) into the lower Middle Cenomanian in north-eastern Tunisia, whilst the acme of Turrilites scheuchzerianus Bosc, 1801, is in the dixoni Zone in Northwest Europe, and in the inerme Zone in northeasten Algeria and adjacent parts of Central Tunisia. These differences are not a result of collection failure or non-preservation, but must rather reflect environmental controls on occurrence and abundance.

  10. Un estudio de diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (dish o enfermedad hiperostósica en el cementerio del Hospital Medieval de Chichester, West Sussex, Inglaterra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponce, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El estudio bioarqueológico fue realizado en una población medieval de Chichester (West Sussex, Inglaterra con el propósito de analizar la presencia de la enfermedad hiperostósica en 219 esqueletos enterrados en el cementerio del hospital de St. James y St. Mary Magdalene. La prevalencia fue considerada de acuerdo al sexo, edad y distribución de los individuos dentro del cementerio durante el período temprano (cuando el hospital cumplió funciones de leprosario y tardío (cuando funcionó como albergue para destituídos. Un número total de 11 individuos masculinos y 1 femenino presentaron cambios osteológicos compatibles con la enfemedad hiperostósica lo que correspondió al 5.5% de la población. La mayor prevalencia de la enfermedad hiperostósica fue encontrada durante el período más temprano del cementerio con 7.1% en comparación con 4.1% que correspondieron al período tardío. Los resultados obtenidos son comparativamente similares a aquellos obtenidos en estudios clínicos y en otras poblaciones arqueológicas.

  11. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other volatile organic compounds in lakes in Byram Township, Sussex County, New Jersey, summer 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Zapecza, Otto S.

    1998-01-01

     Water samples were collected from four lakes in Byram Township, Sussex County, N.J., in the summer of 1998 as part of an investigation of the occurrence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in domestic wells of lakeside communities. Cranberry Lake and Lake Lackawanna are surrounded by densely populated communities where the use of gasoline-powered watercraft is prevalent, and water is supplied by lakeside wells. Forest Lake is surrounded by a densely populated community where the use of gasoline-powered watercraft is prohibited. Stag Pond is privately owned, is situated in a sparsely populated area, and is not navigated by gasoline-powered watercraft. Samples were collected from Cranberry Lake in early summer and again in late summer 1998. Concentrations of the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) ranged from 1.6 to 15.0 µg/L (micrograms per liter) on June 24 and decreased with depth. The depth-related concentration gradient is attributed to density stratification caused by the temperature gradient that is present in the lake during the early summer. MTBE concentrations ranged from 7.4 to 29.0 µg/L on September 8 and were uniform with depth, as was water temperature, indicating that the lake was vertically mixed. On the basis of these concentration profiles, the mass of MTBE in Cranberry Lake was estimated to be 15 kilograms on June 24 and 27 kilograms on September 8. These mass estimates are equal to the amount of MTBE in 52 and 95 gallons, respectively, of gasoline that contains 10 percent MTBE by volume. Concentrations of another gasoline oxygenate, tert-amyl-methyl ether (TAME), ranged from 0.07 to 0.43 µg/L on June 24 and from 0.2 to 0.69 µg/L on September 8. The highest concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) were 0.18, 1.2, 0.18, and 0.97 µg/L, respectively, on June 24. All BTEX concentrations in Cranberry Lake on September 8 were less than 0.2 µg/L.

  12. Landslides at Beachy Head, Sussex

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Beachy Head (Figures 1 and 2) is a famous natural and historic site and tourist attraction on the south coast. The cliff top area is part of the Downland Country Park managed by Eastbourne District Council. The section of cliff surveyed at Beachy Head is situated to the east of the modern lighthouse. The survey spans a 400 m south-facing stretch of beach with a cliff height of between 120 and 160 m. Cliffs and lighthouse at Beachy Head As part of a programme of work monitoring coast...

  13. Bridging the Digital Divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book has been endorsed by three leading thinkers in the area of national innovation systems: Christopher Freeman, Emeritus Professor and Founding Director of the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU), University of Sussex, Brighton, UK; Richard R. Nelson, George Blumenthal Professor (Emeritus...

  14. Family ambiguity and domestic violence in Asia: Reconceptualising law and process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamad, M.; Wieringa, S.

    2014-01-01

    The book Family Ambiguity and Domestic Violence in Asia (2013; Brighton: Sussex University Press) raises pertinent questions as to why the incidence of domestic violence has remained as a continuing scourge. The Focus section in this issue of The Newsletter provides the abridged version of select

  15. Floodplain, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. The spatial and temporal representation of a tone on the guinea pig basilar membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, K. E.; Russell, I. J.

    2000-10-01

    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer Brighton, BN1 9QG, United Kingdom In the mammalian cochlea, the basilar membrane's (BM) mechanical responses are amplified, and frequency tuning is sharpened through active feedback from the electromotile outer hair cells (OHCs). To be effective, OHC feedback must be delivered to the correct region of the BM and introduced at the appropriate time in each cycle of BM displacement. To investigate when OHCs contribute to cochlear amplification, a laser-diode interferometer was used to measure tone-evoked BM displacements in the basal turn of the guinea pig cochlea. Measurements were made at multiple sites acrossthe width of the BM, which are tuned to the same characteristic frequency (CF). In response to CF tones, the largest displacements occur in the OHC region and phase lead those measured beneath the outer pillar cells and adjacent to the spiral ligament by about 90°. Postmortem, responses beneath the OHCs are reduced by up to 65 dB, and all regions across the width of the BM move in unison. We suggest that OHCs amplify BM responses to CF tones when the BM is moving at maximum velocity. In regions of the BM where OHCs contribute to its motion, the responses are compressive and nonlinear. We measured the distribution of nonlinear compressive vibrations along the length of the BM in response to a single frequency tone and estimated that OHC amplification is restricted to a 1.25- to 1.40-mm length of BM centered on the CF place.

  17. Ion Implantation Technology: Proceedings of the International Conference on Ion Implantation Technology (8th) Held at the University of Surrey, Guildford, UK on 30 July - 3 August 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    chairman) Diet SpeaIal University of Sussex, Brighton, UK \\ M.F. JACKSON (Conference Secretary) University of Surrey Guildford, UK ,_ 91 7 0 ;tO 1991...P cos y cos , - sin P sin 8 1 W, = cos P cos a sin y + cos P sin a cos y sin P - sin P sin a cos fl -cos P sinasiny+cos Pcos acos y sin fl-sin Pcos

  18. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1BN1A-1RJ5B [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7309999465942383 46.16299819946289 > -0.11699999868869781 0.7900000214576721...07500000298023224 0.09600000083446503 > 0.7818689942359924 1.1783250570297241...58100128173828 47.77899932861328 > -0.05700000002980232 0.8180000185966492...15399999916553497 -0.12300000339746475 > 0.9818189740180969 1.652670979499817...298999786376953 61.77799987792969 > 0.03200000151991844 0.8809999823570251

  19. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  20. Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database, Sussex County, Delaware, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. Vivienda Unifamiliar en Sussex - Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancock, Tom

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available This two-storey home is located in a pleasant, thickly-wooded property overlooking the nearby valley and lake. It replaces an old manor house of the Edwardian period and incorporates existing buildings used for the help living quarters. The ground floor was arranged, distributing the kitchen area and three guest rooms, provided with independent bathrooms at either side of the receptional area, consisting of an ample drawing room and a dining room. The upper floor is reached from the ground floor through two stairways and is divided into two master bedrooms and a study room with the regular associated services. The gallery connecting the two bedrooms in the upper floor creates a double height for the drawing room below, considerably enhancing the decorative possibilities and the creation of the right atmosphere. The façades have been treated with a moderately formalistic approach, reminiscent of the English 18th century architectural style with porticos and columnated arcades.

    Esta vivienda de dos plantas se halla enclavada en una agradable finca, muy poblada de árboles, y dotada de unas magníficas vistas sobre el valle y el lago próximos. Reemplaza a una antigua mansión del período eduardino, e incorpora antiguas construcciones existentes que destina al personal de servicio. La planta baja organiza, a ambos lados de los ambientes principales —consistentes en un amplio salón con estar y un comedor—, los servicios de cocina y tres dormitorios para huéspedes dotados de baños independientes. La planta alta comunicada con la anterior mediante dos escaleras, está ocupada por dos dormitorios principales y un estudio con dependencias anexas. Una galería que da acceso a los dormitorios proporciona doble altura al salón de la planta baja, ampliando considerablemente sus posibilidades decorativas y ambientales. Las fachadas se han tratado con un planteamiento formal moderado que remeda, mediante el uso de pórticos y columnatas, el estilo arquitectónico inglés del siglo XVlll.

  2. Finds and access at Black Patch, East Sussex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of divided space dictates to some extent the activities that take place within the smaller spaces created by such division. Access analysis of Hut Platform 4 at the Bronze Age site at Black Patch, combined with study of the artefacts and ecofacts from the site, gives some insight into the relationship between the constructed spaces and the way they were used. The accessibility of places in which activities occur affects and is affected by the perceived status of these activities. The question of whether or not all of the huts and fences on the hut platform were contemporary has been the subject of some debate; this investigation attempts to establish which configurations of huts and fences fit most closely with the distribution of diagnostic artefacts and ecofacts across the spaces in which they were used. This is achieved by generating control and real relative asymmetry values from permeability maps of the spaces in a number of possible configurations, which are converted into visual form for comparison with the distribution of relevant finds. In order to understand the use of space at the site it is important to consider it in an agrarian context; control of movement between spaces is necessary for certain aspects of livestock farming. A degree of flexibility in the permeability of boundaries allows this control to be exerted. Thus, the fences of Hut Platform 4 may have been erected for practical reasons, rather than to create psychological divisions between 'occupants' of the huts. Individual roundhouses were not necessarily thought of by their users in the same way as 'houses' are thought of today the arrangement of structures at the site was perhaps less influenced by ideas about kinship than the excavator supposed. A possible 'fence corridor' could have had a functional use, as similar arrangements of fences are used today for the control of livestock. Access analysis demonstrates the great range of possibilities for control of movement if all fences were contemporary.

  3. Implementing interprofessional bedside rounding at the prequalification stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuite DR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel R Tuite,1 David Healy,1 Thomas S MacKinnon2 1Faculty of Medicine, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, 2School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the paper by Henkin et al,1 demonstrating that the use of interprofessional bedside rounding (IBR significantly improved nurse–physician teamwork, particularly from the nurses’ point of view. This finding is relevant when one takes into account the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; a review conducted by Epstein concluded that effective interprofessional teamwork both maximizes patient safety and increases job satisfaction and efficiency.2 We, as medical students, believe that inadequate emphasis is placed on interprofessional collaboration at the prequalification phase, and therefore, we suggest that implementing IBR at the university level could represent a method to improve teamwork between the nurses and doctors of the future.  View the original paper by Henkin et al.  

  4. Embracing the "and": between queer and bisexual theory at Brighton BiFest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Georgina; Browne, Kath; Gupta, Camel

    2014-01-01

    Questions of bi identities can be invisibilized and overlooked by queer theorizing and LGBT studies. This article explores the ways in which complex performances of bisexuality can simultaneously encompass and deconstructively critique bi identity in a manner that embraces the "and" between bi and queer, offering important insights into how bi is lived, contested, and reaffirmed. Drawing on the BiCon and BiFest events in the UK, we argue that both the materialities (and supposed fixities) of bi erasures and exclusions and the fluidities that trouble the heterosexual/homosexual divides offer key insights into the spatial and temporal fixing and unfixing of identities.

  5. Gender equality in sport leadership : From the Brighton Declaration to the Sydney Scoreboard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, Johanna A.; Claringbould, Inge

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the development of the legacies of the five World Conferences on Women and Sport that have been convened by the International Working Group on Women and Sport from 1994 to 2010. In particular, it examined the ways in which gender is constructed in these legacies in relation

  6. Keratoprostheses for corneal blindness: a review of contemporary devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhanam VS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Venkata S Avadhanam,1,2 Helen E Smith,2 Christopher Liu1–3 1Sussex Eye Hospital, 2Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, 3Tongdean Eye Clinic, Hove, UK Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, globally 4.9 million are blind due to corneal pathology. Corneal transplantation is successful and curative of the blindness for a majority of these cases. However, it is less successful in a number of diseases that produce corneal neovascularization, dry ocular surface and recurrent inflammation, or infections. A keratoprosthesis or KPro is the only alternative to restore vision when corneal graft is a doomed failure. Although a number of KPros have been proposed, only two devices, Boston type-1 KPro and osteo-odonto-KPro, have came to the fore. The former is totally synthetic and the latter is semi-biological in constitution. These two KPros have different surgical techniques and indications. Keratoprosthetic surgery is complex and should only be undertaken in specialized centers, where expertise, multidisciplinary teams, and resources are available. In this article, we briefly discuss some of the prominent historical KPros and contemporary devices. Keywords: keratoprosthesis, OOKP, KPro, Boston KPro, cornea, ocular surface 

  7. Audit of hospital transfers January to March 2006 from Sussex police custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jane; Mayhew, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this audit was to determine a baseline for timing, numbers and case mix of detainees referred to hospital for medical assessment in order to review the effectiveness of existing custody procedures for the management of medical emergencies. Data was examined for the 3-month period January to March 2006. A total of 12015 detainees were processed during this period, 188 patients identified as requiring hospital assessment, a hospital transfer rate of 1.57% for the period, 80 cases (0.65%) were for potentially life threatening conditions. The health care team assessed 37.7% of all detainees and were recorded as involved in 151 of the 188 cases transferred (80%). The categories of patients sent to hospital included head injury (26/188 or 13.8%), overdose and poisoning (20/188 or 10.6%); chest pain (17/188 or 9.0%), collapse (12/188 or 6.4%), unrousable intoxicated (10/188 or 5.3%), possible drug swallowers (7/188 or 3.72%), breathing problems (4 or 2.12%), acute confusional state (3/188 or 1.6%), 2/188 had a query deep vein thrombosis, one diabetic problem and one acute allergic reaction. The largest category of all was for a miscellany of minor injury unit care. 2009 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 77 FR 32131 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... combines the actions we believe would most effectively achieve the refuge's purposes, vision, and goals and..., diversity, and environmental health policy, such as artificial maintenance of extensive freshwater wetlands...

  9. 78 FR 25092 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Record of Decision for Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ...: Climate change, sea level rise, refuge marshes, habitat and wildlife species management, mosquito control... raised significant new issues, resulted in changes to our analysis, or warranted any further changes to..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and...

  10. 77 FR 76510 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... included climate change, sea level rise, refuge marshes, habitat and wildlife species management, mosquito... observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP.... Changes to the Alternative B, the Service's Preferred Alternative After considering the comments we...

  11. 76 FR 26751 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... our policies and procedures for compliance with those laws and regulations. Prime Hook National... additional issues. Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise A growing body of evidence indicates that accelerating climate change, associated with increasing global temperatures, is affecting water, land, and wildlife...

  12. Fullerene discoverers win nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.

    1996-10-16

    Two Rice University (Houston) chemists, Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley, and a scientist at the University of Sussex (Brighton, U.K.), Harold W. Kroto, have won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the joint discovery of buckminsterfullerenes - soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules. The novel form of carbon, which was initially synthesized by the scientists in 1985 as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} has led to the development of {open_quotes}an entirely new branch of chemistry... with consequences in such diverse areas as astrochemistry, superconductivity, and material chemistry/physics,{close_quotes} according to the Swedish Academy of Sciences (Stockholm). For chemists, the structure is {open_quotes}uniquely beautiful and satisfying,{close_quotes} the academy says.

  13. Delivering a MOOC for literature searching in health libraries: evaluation of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gil; McLaren, Lisa; Maden, Michelle

    2017-12-01

    In an era when library budgets are being reduced, Massive Online Open Courses (MOOC's) can offer practical and viable alternatives to the delivery of costly face-to-face training courses. In this study, guest writers Gil Young from Health Care Libraries Unit - North, Lisa McLaren from Brighton and Sussex Medical School and Liverpool University PhD student Michelle Maden describe the outcomes of a funded project they led to develop a MOOC to deliver literature search training for health librarians. Funded by Health Education England, the MOOC was developed by the Library and Information Health Network North West as a pilot project that ran for six weeks. In particular, the MOOC target audience is discussed, how content was developed for the MOOC, promotion and participation, cost-effectiveness, evaluation, the impact of the MOOC and recommendations for future development. H. S. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  14. Neural correlates of fear: insights from neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garfinkel SN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarah N Garfinkel,1,2 Hugo D Critchley1,2 1Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, 2Department of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK Abstract: Fear anticipates a challenge to one's well-being and is a reaction to the risk of harm. The expression of fear in the individual is a constellation of physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and experiential responses. Fear indicates risk and will guide adaptive behavior, yet fear is also fundamental to the symptomatology of most psychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging studies of normal and abnormal fear in humans extend knowledge gained from animal experiments. Neuroimaging permits the empirical evaluation of theory (emotions as response tendencies, mental states, and valence and arousal dimensions, and improves our understanding of the mechanisms of how fear is controlled by both cognitive processes and bodily states. Within the human brain, fear engages a set of regions that include insula and anterior cingulate cortices, the amygdala, and dorsal brain-stem centers, such as periaqueductal gray matter. This same fear matrix is also implicated in attentional orienting, mental planning, interoceptive mapping, bodily feelings, novelty and motivational learning, behavioral prioritization, and the control of autonomic arousal. The stereotyped expression of fear can thus be viewed as a special construction from combinations of these processes. An important motivator for understanding neural fear mechanisms is the debilitating clinical expression of anxiety. Neuroimaging studies of anxiety patients highlight the role of learning and memory in pathological fear. Posttraumatic stress disorder is further distinguished by impairment in cognitive control and contextual memory. These processes ultimately need to be targeted for symptomatic recovery. Neuroscientific knowledge of fear has broader relevance to understanding human and societal behavior. As yet, only some of

  15. Educational challenges faced by international medical graduates in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Hashim Gastroenterology Department, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, UK Introduction: International medical graduates (IMGs in the UK constitute approximately one-quarter of the total number of doctors registered in the General Medical Council (GMC. The transition of IMGs into the health care system in the UK is accompanied by significant sociocultural and educational challenges. This study aims to explore the views of IMGs in medical training on the educational challenges they face.Methods: This study was conducted in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex region in 2015. All IMGs who work in medical (physicianly training programs were included. Data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Thematic approach was used to analyze the qualitative data.Results: Of the total 61 IMGs included, 17 responded to the survey and 3 were interviewed. The common educational barriers faced by IMGs were related to lack of appreciation of the values and structure of the National Health Service (NHS, ethical and medicolegal issues, receiving feedback from colleagues and the different learning strategies in the UK. IMGs suggested introduction of a mandatory dedicated induction program in the form of formal teaching sessions. They also believed that a supervised shadowing period prior in the first job in the UK would be beneficial. Further assessment areas should be incorporated into the prequalifying examinations to address specific educational needs such as NHS structure and hospital policies. Other measures such as buddying schemes with senior IMGs and educating NHS staff on different needs of IMGs should also be considered.Conclusion: This study highlighted important educational challenges faced by IMGs and generated relevant solutions. However, the opinions of the supervisors and other health care professionals need to be explored. Keywords: international medical graduates, IMG, educational barriers

  16. Role of glutathione in immunity and inflammation in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Ghezzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro GhezziBrighton and Sussex Medical School, Trafford Centre, Falmer, Brighton, UKAbstract: Reactive oxygen species and thiol antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, regulate innate immunity at various levels. This review outlines the redox-sensitive steps of the cellular mechanisms implicated in inflammation and host defense against infection, and describes how GSH is not only important as an antioxidant but also as a signaling molecule. There is an extensive literature of the role of GSH in immunity. Most reviews are biased by an oversimplified picture where “bad” free radicals cause all sorts of diseases and “good” antioxidants protect from them and prevent oxidative stress. While this may be the case in certain fields (eg, toxicology, the role of thiols (the topic of this review in immunity certainly requires wearing scientist’s goggles and being prepared to accept a more complex picture. This review aims at describing the role of GSH in the lung in the context of immunity and inflammation. The first part summarizes the history and basic concepts of this picture. The second part focuses on GSH metabolism/levels in pathology, the third on the role of GSH in innate immunity and inflammation, and the fourth gives 4 examples describing the importance of GSH in the response to infections.Keywords: antioxidants, oxidative stress, sepsis, infection, cysteine

  17. Implementing RFID in a hospital library: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Joseph; Skinner, Ben

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses a scoping study on implementing radio frequency identification device (RFID) in a hospital library context, conducted by Joseph Norwood for his MA dissertation at the University of Brighton. The study was carried out during the summer of 2011 to support possible RFID implementation at the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals (BSUH) Trust, and the library staff were able to use the findings to good effect to create a business plan. This article also acts as the template for the new Dissertations into Practice feature, which was introduced in the March issue (Marshall, A. Health Information and Libraries Journal 2012, 29, 72). The dissertation highlighted here is very practical in nature and had immediate and quantifiable benefits for the Trust library. Future feature articles are likely to reflect the range of health-related dissertation topics which students choose and will include studies on user information behaviour, information services related to mental health and well-being, as well as the impact of technology on health-related library or information services.AM. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  18. Educational Television and Radio in Britain, Present Provisions and Future Possibilities. Papers Prepared for a National Conference Organised Jointly by the BBC and the University of Sussex (Chelwood Gate, Sussex, England, May 13-17, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Broadcasting Corp., London (England).

    The potential value of educational mass media must be weighed against their complexity, costs, and organizational demands within the context of society as a whole. Conclusions of a conference with representatives from research, education, and media indicate that the first criterion for evaluating educational media is how they can make a curriculum…

  19. The Comparison of the View of "Communicative Language Teaching" in Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey and Sussex University; UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Tekin, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    For language teachers, the study of education from international and comparative points of view, which is undertaken by comparative education, is essential because of the international nature of language education. For language teachers, working abroad to widen their experience is very common. Therefore, knowing the latest and common approach is…

  20. Performance of the Brighton collaboration case definition for hypotonic-hyporesponsive episode (HHE) on reported collapse reactions following infant vaccinations in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E; Dzaferagić, Aida; David, Silke; Maas, Nicoline A T van der

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed collapse (sudden onset of pallor, limpness and hyporesponsiveness) following the first infant (DPTP+Hib) vaccination reported to the enhanced passive surveillance system of the Netherlands in 1994-2003. All 1303 reports identified by the current RIVM (National Institute for Public Health

  1. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamia Heikal,1 Pietro Ghezzi,1 Manuela Mengozzi,1 Blanka Stelmaszczuk,2 Martin Feelisch,2 Gordon AA Ferns1 1Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital and Institute for Life Sciences, Southampton, UK Abstract: The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP, were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2 and hypoxic (1% O2 conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay, we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS; the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. Keywords

  2. Aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis for scattered sound in auditoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Molly K.; Xiang, Ning; Kleiner, Mendel

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work was to apply an aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis technique to the analysis of sound scattering effects in auditoria. Time-frequency representations were developed as a motivated effort that takes into account binaural hearing, with a specific implementation of interaural cross-correlation process. A model of the human auditory system was implemented in the MATLAB platform based on two previous models [A. Härmä and K. Palomäki, HUTear, Espoo, Finland; and M. A. Akeroyd, A. Binaural Cross-correlogram Toolbox for MATLAB (2001), University of Sussex, Brighton]. These stages include proper frequency selectivity, the conversion of the mechanical motion of the basilar membrane to neural impulses, and binaural hearing effects. The model was then used in the analysis of room impulse responses with varying scattering characteristics. This paper discusses the analysis results using simulated and measured room impulse responses. [Work supported by the Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation.

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low-Dimensional Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, S; Dobson, P; Neave, J; Arrott, A

    1987-01-01

    This work represents the account of a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low Dimensional Structures", held at the University of Sussex, Brighton, England from 15-19 Sept. 1986. The objective of the workshop was to review the problems of the growth and characterisation of thin semiconductor and metal layers. Recent advances in deposition techniques have made it possible to design new material which is based on ultra-thin layers and this is now posing challenges for scientists, technologists and engineers in the assessment and utilisation of such new material. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has become well established as a method for growing thin single crystal layers of semiconductors. Until recently, MBE was confined to the growth of III-V compounds and alloys, but now it is being used for group IV semiconductors and II-VI compounds. Examples of such work are given in this volume. MBE has one major advantage over other crystal growth techniques in that the structure of the growi...

  4. Predicting uptake of MMR vaccination: a prospective questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Mary; Ogden, Jane

    2004-07-01

    Recent years have seen a decline in the uptake of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. To describe parents' beliefs about the MMR vaccination and to explore the best predictors of uptake by the age of 2 years. Prospective questionnaire study. Brighton and Hove area of East Sussex. Five hundred and eleven parents (response rate = 56.9%) completed a baseline questionnaire regarding their profile characteristics, beliefs about MMR and previous vaccination history prior to receiving a letter to attend for their child's vaccination. Attendance data was collected at follow-up by the age of 2 years. The majority of parents believed that measles, mumps and rubella were serious illnesses and stated that they would feel guilty about any adverse consequences of their decision about vaccination. Many responders were ambivalent about the benefit of vaccinations and were unsure whether to trust either the medical profession or the media. Uptake of MMR vaccination at follow-up was related to previous uptake for vaccination, increased faith in the medical profession, increased faith in the media, and a lower belief that vaccination is unhealthy and can harm the immune system. Many parents hold mixed beliefs about the MMR vaccination and the doctors who administer it. Uptake relates to past vaccination and more positive beliefs.

  5. National Dam Safety Program. Johnson Lake Dam (NJ00499), Passaic River Basin, Tributary to Lubbers Run Brook, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase 1 Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    concrete Cutoff - unknown Grout curtain - unknown h. Spillway Type - concrete overflow spillway 3 Length of weir - free overflow spillway: 10 feet...channel. Macadam has been crudely placed on the right bank of the downstream channel close to the stoplog spillway apparently for the purpose of

  6. The Lower and Middle Cambrian Leithsville Formation within the Wallkill River Valley, Sussex County, New Jersey: Its stratigraphy and archaeological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, M.C. (Hunter College, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1993-03-01

    The Leithsville Formation occurs as series of northeast-southwest trending outcrops within the Hamburg and Unionville Quadrangles of northwestern New Jersey. The lower Califon Member, approximately 30 feet thick, is best developed in structural sags and topographic lows on the Precambrian surface and where the Hardyston Formation (Lower Cambrian) is thin or absent. It occurs as dark gray, coarsely crystalline, stylolitic dolomite. Vugs bearing quartz, orange calcite, and clots of sphalerite are common. Archaeocyathus is present near the base of the section, which is greater than 30 feet thick in the Vernon Valley. Approximately 120 feet of the Hamburg Member occurs in the study area. The lower unit is a series of finely laminated, thinly bedded alternating phyllitic shales and dolomites that grade upward to thicker cycles of dense, dark gray dolomite with intermittent olive green sandstone units. At several locales, this unit is followed by a series of greenish-gray to reddish-brown alternating shales and dolomites, which bear mud cracks and ripple marks. A distinct rubble zone and unconformity-bounded chert sequence occurs near the top of this member. Measured sections of the poorly exposed upper Wallkill Member have revealed 70 feet of coarse grained, medium gray, stylolitic dolomite with abundant algal stromatolites. Several chert-bounded unconformities occur midway in the section, which is internally brecciated and sulfide-rich. Chert occurring as pods within this member has been the focus of prehistoric mining activity within the axis of the valley.

  7. National Dam Safety Program. Morris Lake Dam (NJ00306). Hudson River Basin, Tributary of Wallkill River, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Water, operational procedures are the following: Chlorine and fluoride are added at the Gatehouse prior to the water entering the 12 and 16 inch water...operational procedures for the dam include daily recordings of water main flow, fluoridation and chlorination of water and periodic cleaning of the water...INC. 14𔃾J U go IA Ci C _6 0 I a 0 D10 C4- + + ii P bil B A DATE Jo3e NA~7~ M1W (MA o. CKD -T~ DATE 4176IAe~~SLAke IPAir SHEET NO. 3 O.. LANGAN

  8. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergill B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bav Shergill,1 Simon Zokaie,2 Alison J Carr3 1Department of Dermatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Elm Grove, Brighton, UK; 2Leo Pharma, Princes Risborough, 3Hamell, London, UK Background: There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK. Objectives: To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results: This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305 of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01: 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved

  9. Art, anatomy, and medicine: Is there a place for art in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lawrence T O; Evans, Darrell J R

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can be utilized to teach observational skills in medical students, a skill that is integral to patient examination but seldom taught directly within medical curricula. This article is a subjective survey that evaluates a student selected component (SSC) that explored the uses of art in medicine and investigates student perception on the relationship between the two. It also investigates whether these medical students believe that art can play a role in medical education, and more specifically whether analyzing art can play a role in developing observational skills in clinicians. An "Art in Medicine" 8-week course was delivered to first year medical students at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The use of art to improve observational skills was a core theme throughout. Feedback from the students suggests that they believe a strong association between art and medicine exists. It also showed a strong perception that art could play a role in medical education, and more specifically through analyzing art to positively develop clinical observational skills. The results of this subjective study, together with those from research from elsewhere, suggest that an art-based approach to teaching observational skills may be worth serious consideration for inclusion in medical and other healthcare curricula. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Studies on the Chinese in Southeast Asia in the twenty-first century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwee Hui Kian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Michael D. Barr and Zlatko Skrbis, Constructing Singapore; Elitism, ethnicity and the nation-building project. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2008, xiii + 304 pp. ISBN 978877694028, price GBP 50.00 (hardback; 9788776940294, GBP 16.99 (paperback. Marleen Dieleman, The rhythm of strategy; A corporate biography of the Salim Group of Indonesia. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2007, 205 pp. [ICAS Publications Series, Monograph 1.] ISBN 9789053560334. Price: EUR 29.50 (paperback. Kristina Goransson, The binding tie; Chinese intergenerational relations in modern Singapore. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2009, x + 191 pp. ISBN 9780824832599, price USD 57.00 (hardback; 9780824833527, USD 26.00 (paperback. Chang-Yau Hoon, Chinese identity in post-Suharto Indonesia; Culture, politics and media. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2008, xi + 230 pp. ISBN 9781845192686. Price: GBP 49.95 (hardback. Leo Suryadinata, Understanding the ethnic Chinese in Southeast Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2007, x + 310 pp. ISBN 9789812304377. Price: USD 21.90 (paperback. Sikko Visscher, The business of politics and ethnicity; A history of the Singapore Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Singapore: NUS Press, 2007, xviii + 372 pp. ISBN 97899713657. Price: USD 32.00 (paperback. Voon Phin Keong (ed., Malaysian Chinese and nation-building; Before Merdeka and fifty years after. Vol. 2. Kuala Lumpur: Centre for Malaysian Chinese Studies, 2008. ISBN 9789833808066 (hardback; 9789833908059 (paperback.

  11. The Value of Clinical Practice in Cadaveric Dissection: Lessons Learned From a Course in Eye and Orbital Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Christopher

    To test the hypothesis that there is greater benefit in a dissection-based anatomy course among those participants with clinical experience in the relevant field, and those without. A retrospective comparative study. Brighton and Sussex Medical School Anatomy Department: an educational facility that provides undergraduate and postgraduate anatomy teaching using cadaveric specimens. All attendees (n = 40) to a postgraduate course in eye and orbital anatomy completed course evaluation forms. The course has been attended by delegates from around the country, with experience ranging from that of final year medical students to clinical fellows who have completed their specialist training in ophthalmology. Those participants who were practicing ophthalmology tended to be older than those who were not, with a greater amount of time spent on prior learning. Participants scored both the prosection-led and dissection-led sessions highly, with a mean combined evaluation of 8.9 (out of 10) for dissection-led learning and 9.2 for prosection-led learning. Prosection-led learning was regarded equally by those participants currently practicing in ophthalmology, and those who are not. In contrast, dissection-led learning was scored higher by those participants who were practicing ophthalmology (9.4), when compared with those not in ophthalmic practice (8.5; p = 0.018). The present study supports the hypothesis that the benefits of cadaveric dissection could be maximized during postgraduate surgical training. This has important implications given the trend away from cadaveric dissection in the undergraduate curriculum. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Parent-child interaction during adolescence, and the adolescent's sexual experience: control, closeness, and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taris, T W; Semin, G R

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the role of family environment in determining early or later adolescent sexual behavior. Data were obtained from a 2-wave panel survey during 1989-1990, in the Brighton and Hove areas of Sussex, England. Interviews were conducted among 302 mother-adolescent pairs in the first wave and 255 pairs in the second follow-up wave. The study explored the links between intrafamily conflict (IC) and parent characteristics and adolescent sexual behavior to determine how effective selected factors are in preventing early sex. The theoretical model relates variables to sex at 2 time periods with IC as an intervening variable. The model accounted for 44% of the variance in the amount of IC. Key factors were a mother's suspicion that her child has had sex, the effort put into maintaining good relationships, and the importance attached to child discipline. 23% of the variance in permissiveness was related to adolescent age and religiosity and maternal religiosity. 37% of sexual experience at Time 1 was explained by the duration of the sexual experience, adolescent's age, and adolescent's permissiveness. The likelihood of Time 2 sexual experience was explained by older mothers, more permissive mothers, steady relationships at Time 1, and mother-child intrafamily conflict. Findings suggest that a good argument over matters one cares about is effective in bringing about desired results. An increase in better intrafamily relations did not lead to later sexual experience. Parents may sacrifice clarity as to what they expect from their children as a trade-off for good parent-child relationships.

  13. Water Quality and Occurrence of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) and Other Fuel-Related Compounds in Lakes and Ground Water at Lakeside Communities in Sussex and Morris Counties, New Jersey, 1998-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Reilly, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    Densely populated communities surround many of the larger lakes in northwestern New Jersey. These communities derive most of their water supply from wells. The lakes can be navigated by gasoline-powered watercraft, can be in various stages of eutrophication, may contain pathogens associated with bathing and waterfowl, and are periodically subjected to chemical applications to control aquatic plant growth. Another feature that contributes to water-quality concerns in lakeside communities is the widespread use of septic tanks. Concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline oxygenate, in samples from Cranberry Lake and Lake Lackawanna ranged from 20 to 30 ug/L (micrograms per liter) and 5 to 14 ug/L during the summers of 1998 and 1999, respectively. These levels were persistent throughout the depth of the lakes when mixing conditions were present. MTBE concentrations in samples from the top 20 feet of Lake Hopatcong during summer 1999 were about 10 ug/L and about 2 to 3 ug/L in samples below 20 feet. The source of the MTBE in the lakes was determined to be gasoline-powered watercraft. Other constituents of gasoline--tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)--were detected in the lakes but at much lower concentrations than MTBE. Ambient ground-water quality at Cranberry Lake and Lake Lackawanna appears to be affected by the use of gasoline-powered watercraft. MTBE was detected in water samples from 13 of the 14 wells sampled at Cranberry Lake in fall 1998 and summer 1999. The wells were selected to monitor ambient ground-water quality and had no history of contamination. In ground-water samples collected during fall 1998, MTBE concentrations ranged from 0.12 to 19.8 ug/L, and the median concentration was 0.43 ug/L. In samples from summer 1999, MTBE concentrations ranged from 0.14 to 13.2 ug/L, and the median concentration was 0.38 ug/L. MTBE was detected in samples from four of the five wells at Lake Lackawanna in summer 1999;concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 0.19 ug/L. Lake/ground water interaction is a feasible explanation for the nearly ubiquitous presence of MTBE in ground water. The movement of water from lakes to wells is feasible because many static water levels and essentially all pumped water levels in the wells were below lake levels. Furthermore, diatom fragments were present in samples from the wells. Ambient ground water at Cranberry Lake also may be affected by septic-tank effluent, as indicated by the relation among concentrations of nitrate, boron, and chloroform. This result indicates potential vulnerability of the water supply to contamination by other chemicals and pathogens. Radon in ambient ground water is a concern throughout northern New Jersey. In particular, the median radon concentrations in ground-water samples collected from 14 wells at Cranberry Lake in 1998 and 1999 were 1,282 and 1,046 pCi/L, respectively. The median radon concentration in five ground-water samples collected at Lake Lackawanna in 1999 was 340 pCi/L. Although these values exceed regulatory levels, they are not high relative to radon concentrations measured in northwestern New Jersey. Eight wells in a neighborhood of Cranberry Lake with known MTBE contamination were sampled by the U.S. Geological Survey in summer 1998. MTBE was detected at concentrations greater than or equal to 40 ug/L in five of the wells. Concentrations of TAME, another gasoline oxygenate, were highly correlated with concentrations of MTBE; MTBE concentrations were about 10 times the TAME concentrations. In all samples, however, the concentrations of the BTEX compounds were less than 0.05 ug/L, and the sample from the most highly contaminated well, where the MTBE concentration was 900 ug/L, had no detectable BTEX.

  14. Undine - in Music, Words and Illustration [a collaborative concert at Chichester Council Assembly Rooms, staged by the Departments of Music, and English & Creative Writing, under the auspices of the Sussex Centre for Folklore, Fairy Tales and Fantasy

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, Victoria; Little, Jonathan D.

    2017-01-01

    ‘Of all fairy tales I know, I think Undine the most beautiful’ - George MacDonald\\ud \\ud This one-off musical performance of Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué’s Undine follows the story of the romance between a water-sprite Undine and the Knight Huldbrand. The tale had a profound influence on the 19th century, inspiring operas, ballets and adaptations, including Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid and Dvořák’s Rusalka, as well the imagination of Arthur Rackham.\\ud \\ud This performance wil...

  15. Report of volunteer fieldwork conducted in and around Kingley Vale National Nature Reserve, West Sussex, by the ‘Secrets of the High Woods’ project, March 2015 & February 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodd, James Andrew

    As part of the multi-disciplinary project ‘Secrets of the High Woods’ field survey has been conducted to investigate features requiring further on-site investigation through an extensive programme of volunteer based fieldwork, led under the guidance and support of professional archaeologists. Thi...

  16. Seventh survey of staffing in cardiology in the United Kingdom 1991. British Cardiac Society, the Cardiology Committee of the Royal College of Physicians, and the Trafford Centre for Medical Research, University of Sussex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The Seventh Survey of Staffing in Cardiology was conducted with an index date of 31 July 1991. At that time the total number of posts for cardiologists in England and Wales, defined as individuals trained in the specialty and spending at least 40% of their professional time working in it, was 340. Ten individuals worked part time only, making 335 whole time equivalent posts. This number increased from 1990 by 15 (4.7%). There were 67 cardiologists in Scotland and Northern Ireland, making a total for the United Kingdom of 407 posts (402 whole time equivalents). Sixteen Districts in England and Wales had no cardiologist at the time of the survey, and 31 other Districts had less than seven visiting sessions each week. The situation had not improved since the 1990 survey. The population of these 47 Districts is nearly nine million. Scotland had almost 800,000 additional people served by Health Boards without resident cardiologists. The number of senior registrars and lecturers is inadequate to provide a full period of training for most who advance to consultant status, and the situation will worsen from 1995 onwards. A major problem has been a top slice of 10 posts for a research allocation, few of which are occupied by individuals seeking a career in the specialty. These posts should be redesignated to increase training opportunities to counter the present shortfall and facilitate an expansion in consultant posts of at least 5% per annum over the next decade.

  17. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between

  18. Pregnancy physiology pattern prediction study (4P study): protocol of an observational cohort study collecting vital sign information to inform the development of an accurate centile-based obstetric early warning score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Fiona; Kemp, Jude; Edwards, Clare; Pullon, Rebecca M; Loerup, Lise; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Salvi, Dario; Gibson, Oliver; Gerry, Stephen; MacKillop, Lucy H; Tarassenko, Lionel; Watkinson, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Successive confidential enquiries into maternal deaths in the UK have identified an urgent need to develop a national early warning score (EWS) specifically for pregnant or recently pregnant women to aid more timely recognition, referral and treatment of women who are developing life-threatening complications in pregnancy or the puerperium. Although many local EWS are in use in obstetrics, most have been developed heuristically. No current obstetric EWS has defined the thresholds at which an alert should be triggered using evidence-based normal ranges, nor do they reflect the changing physiology that occurs with gestation during pregnancy. An observational cohort study involving 1000 participants across three UK sites in Oxford, London and Newcastle. Pregnant women will be recruited at approximately 14 weeks' gestation and have their vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature) measured at 4 to 6-week intervals during pregnancy. Vital signs recorded during labour and delivery will be extracted from hospital records. After delivery, participants will measure and record their own vital signs daily for 2 weeks. During the antenatal and postnatal periods, vital signs will be recorded on an Android tablet computer through a custom software application and transferred via mobile internet connection to a secure database. The data collected will be used to define reference ranges of vital signs across normal pregnancy, labour and the immediate postnatal period. This will inform the design of an evidence-based obstetric EWS. The study has been approved by the NRES committee South East Coast-Brighton and Sussex (14/LO/1312) and is registered with the ISRCTN (10838017). All participants will provide written informed consent and can withdraw from the study at any point. All data collected will be managed anonymously. The findings will be disseminated in international peer-reviewed journals and through research conferences.

  19. HCV triple therapy in co-infection HIV/HCV is not associated with a different risk of developing major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Fialho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis C (HCV treatment options have changed with the development of direct activity antivirals (DAAs and the availability of triple therapies have improved HCV cure rates. A common neuropsychiatric side effect of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin treatment is major depressive disorder (MDD, however little is known about such adverse events with protease inhibitor-based triple therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of MDD in co-infected HIV HCV patients undergoing different HCV treatments. Methods: All participants were co-infected HIV HCV attending the Royal Sussex County Hospital Brighton hepatology outpatient clinic between 2010 and 2014. Participants were assessed for DSM-IV MDD and depression severity (using the Hamilton depression scale (HAMD at baseline and monthly after treatment initiation. HIV and HCV stages, genotype, reinfection and standard demographic variables were recorded. Influence of HCV stage (acute vs. chronic and type of treatment (classic vs triple, emergence of MDD and clearance outcomes were analyzed using repeated measures and logistic regression models. Results: Fifty participants with a mean age of 42.65 years (SD=10.32 were included; most were male (98%. The majority had contracted HCV genotype 1 (64% or 4 (26%. The HCV stage and treatment groups were matched for age and depression at baseline. No significant differences were found on virological outcomes considering HCV stage and treatment. From baseline to SVR, there was a significant increase in HAMD scores, F(4,36=10.09, p<.001; this was not significantly influenced by HCV stage, F(4,35=0.54, p=.708 or HCV treatment group, F(4,35=0.60, p=.664. Those with chronic HCV were more likely to transition to MDD than acute infection (OR 7.77, 95% CI 2.04–29.54, p=.003. No differences were found for depression emergence by HCV treatment group (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.22–3.13, p=.787. Conclusions: HCV triple therapy was not associated with a

  20. Suturing techniques and postoperative management in penetrating keratoplasty in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee RM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard MH Lee,1 Fook Chang Lam,1 Tassos Georgiou,1 Bobby Paul,1 Kong Yong Then,1 Ioannis Mavrikakis,1 Venkata S Avadhanam,1 Christopher SC Liu1,21Sussex Eye Hospital, Brighton, United Kingdom; 2Tongdean Eye Clinic, Hove, United KingdomAims: To report on the suturing techniques and aspects of postoperative management in penetrating keratoplasty in the United Kingdom.Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to 137 ophthalmic consultants identified from a Royal College of Ophthalmology database as having a special interest in anterior segment surgery. The questionnaire surveyed surgeon preferences for surgical and suturing technique for penetrating keratoplasty surgery, and the postoperative care of corneal grafts.Results: In all, 68% of questionnaires were completed and returned: 73% of respondents used a Flieringa ring or equivalent, 94% routinely used cardinal sutures, with 50.5% removing them at the end of the procedure. The most common suturing technique for routine penetrating keratoplasty was a single continuous suture (35%. In these cases, a 10/0 nylon suture was used by 89%. Sixty-six percent changed their technique in high-risk cases, 52% used a 3-1-1 knot, and 75% made a distinction between a reef and granny knot, with 76% using a reef. Thirty percent buried the knots within the donor material, and 29% within the host tissue. Twenty-five percent had no routine time for graft suture removal, but 41% removed them between 1 and 2 years post-surgery. After suture removal, 98% used steroids and 88% used topical antibiotics. Thirty-four percent stopped topical steroids before suture removal, with 38% stopping topical steroids more than 3 months prior to suture removal.Conclusion: This survey demonstrates that there is considerable variation in suturing techniques and postoperative care for penetrating keratoplasty. These significant variations in practice need to be considered when interpreting outcomes and research.Keywords: corneal graft

  1. Macro-scale complexity of nano-to micro-scale architecture of olivine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Macro-scale complexity of nano- to micro-scale architecture of olivine crystals through an iodine vapour transport mechanism ... Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Group, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton, BN2 4GJ, United Kingdom; Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, ...

  2. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); Shawnee...; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa... consultation with representatives of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta...

  3. Cigarette smoking and habits (1): Some studies on gender and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cigarette smoking is an intense growing habit among today's youth. A survey using a structured questionnaire was carried out among 100 randomly picked second year students of University of Brighton, approved by a University of Brighton Ethical Committee. It was tested for reliability to ensure consistency using the Test ...

  4. 32 CFR 732.11 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities. Navy, Army, Air Force, Coast Guard, Veterans Administration, and USTFs (former U.S. Public Health..., telephone (301) 338-3693. (ii) Alston-Brighton Aid and Health Group, Inc., Brighton Marine Public Health...) Lutheran Medical Center, Downtown Health Care Services, 1313 Superior Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44113...

  5. CIGARETTE SMOKING AND HABITS (2): SOME STUDIES ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A survey using structured questionnaire was carried out among 10!} randomly picked second year classes of business students of University of Brighton approved by a University of Brighton Ethical. Committee. It was testedfin reliability to ensure consistency using the Test Re-test method. Out of. 100 students, 4 ...

  6. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Conference Opening and Plenary. "Library and Information Services in a Changing World." Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The three papers in this collection were presented at the opening of the conference and the plenary session. The first is the "Presidential Address: Brighton, 1987 = Eroffnungsansprache zur IFLA Generalkonferenz Brighton 1987" (Hans-Peter Geh). These remarks by the President of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) address…

  7. The Effect of Eggshell Quality on Hatchability of Pure Chicken Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hrnčár

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hatchability is affected by a variety of factors. Eggshell quality plays very important role among these factors. In thiswork we analysed eggshell quality, hatchability and embryonic mortality of pure chicken breeds New Hampshire,Oravka, Plymouth Rock, Rhode Island Red and Sussex Light. Hatchability was significantly lower (P>0.05 inSussex Light in comparison with New Hampshire. The eggshell quality for Sussex Light was significantly decreased(P>0.05 in eggshell thickness (398.73 vs. 356.07 μm and eggshell percentage compared with New Hampshire(10.36 vs. 8.79 %.

  8. Linking road accident data to other files : an integrated road accident recordkeeping system. Contribution in Proceedings of Seminar P 'Road Safety' held at the 14th PTHC Summer Annual Meeting, University of Sussex, England, from 14-17 July 1986. Volume P 284, p. 55-86.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, S

    1986-01-01

    The road accident data which the police collect is of great value to road safety research and is used extensively. This data increases greatly in value if it can be linked to other files which contain more detailed information on exposure. Linking road accident data to other files results in what we call an Integrated Road Accident Recordkeeping System in -which the combined value of the linked files is greater than that of the sum of their individual values.

  9. Linking road accident data to other files : an integrated road accident recordkeeping system. Contribution in Proceedings of Seminar P 'Road Safety' held at the 14th PTHC Summer Annual Meeting, University of Sussex, England, from 14-17 July 1986. Volume P 284, p. 55-86.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, S.

    1986-01-01

    The road accident data which the police collect is of great value to road safety research and is used extensively. This data increases greatly in value if it can be linked to other files which contain more detailed information on exposure. Linking road accident data to other files results in what we

  10. Cultural Resources Survey for Additional Work at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A cultural resources survey was conducted at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, during the late summer of 1981. This work concentrated on the...

  11. 3. Germain Gros.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daouda.thiam

    2009-12-02

    Qaeda), criminal syndicates (the Russian Mafia in Moscow,. London and Brighton Beach, New York City), etc. In the age of globali- zation, bigger may not always be better (as the experience of Daimler-. Chrysler demonstrates) ...

  12. TUC delegates told that 'scroungers' image fuels crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    Hate crimes against people with disabilities are being fuelled by public perceptions that many are 'benefit scroungers', Trades Union Congress delegates heard at their annual conference in Brighton last week.

  13. Rudolf Bultmann en Karl Barth in herinnering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LouwnaVanHeerden

    Amherst College), JD Kingsbury (Union Theological Seminary,. Richmond), FJ Matera (St John's Seminary, Brighton) DP Senior (Catho lic Theological Union) en RD Witherup (Theological College, Washing ton, DC). Gedurende die seminaar het ...

  14. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas RE

    2016-01-01

    ...: To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search...

  15. Shared-Ride Taxi Service in Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Boston Shared-Ride Taxi Demonstration. The City of Boston's Traffic and Parking Department, the project grantee, designed a shared-ride service for Boston's Allston-Brighton neighborhood; Boston Cab Associati...

  16. Accuracy of a pediatric early warning score in the recognition of clinical deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira Freitas Miranda

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the accuracy of the version of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score translated and adapted for the Brazilian context, in the recognition of clinical deterioration. Method: a diagnostic test study to measure the accuracy of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, in relation to a reference standard. The sample consisted of 271 children, aged 0 to 10 years, blindly evaluated by a nurse and a physician, specialists in pediatrics, with interval of 5 to 10 minutes between the evaluations, for the application of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context and of the reference standard. The data were processed and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and VassarStats.net programs. The performance of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context was evaluated through the indicators of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, area under the ROC curve, likelihood ratios and post-test probability. Results: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context showed sensitivity of 73.9%, specificity of 95.5%, positive predictive value of 73.3%, negative predictive value of 94.7%, area under Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve of 91.9% and the positive post-test probability was 80%. Conclusion: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, presented good performance, considered valid for the recognition of clinical deterioration warning signs of the children studied.

  17. Accuracy of a pediatric early warning score in the recognition of clinical deterioration 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Juliana de Oliveira Freitas; de Camargo, Climene Laura; Nascimento, Carlito Lopes; Portela, Daniel Sales; Monaghan, Alan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the accuracy of the version of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score translated and adapted for the Brazilian context, in the recognition of clinical deterioration. Method: a diagnostic test study to measure the accuracy of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, in relation to a reference standard. The sample consisted of 271 children, aged 0 to 10 years, blindly evaluated by a nurse and a physician, specialists in pediatrics, with interval of 5 to 10 minutes between the evaluations, for the application of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context and of the reference standard. The data were processed and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and VassarStats.net programs. The performance of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context was evaluated through the indicators of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, area under the ROC curve, likelihood ratios and post-test probability. Results: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context showed sensitivity of 73.9%, specificity of 95.5%, positive predictive value of 73.3%, negative predictive value of 94.7%, area under Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve of 91.9% and the positive post-test probability was 80%. Conclusion: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, presented good performance, considered valid for the recognition of clinical deterioration warning signs of the children studied. PMID:28699997

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006513 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bN1] ... Length = 131 ... Query: 16 ... FEDLKVGMSAAIGRTVTEADIAIFAGISGDTNPVHLDAEFAASTMFGERIAHGMLSASFI 75 ... ... ... FEDLKVGMSAAIGRTVTEADIAIFAGISGDTNPVHLDAEFAASTMFGERIAHGMLSASFI Sbjct: 1 ... F...EDLKVGMSAAIGRTVTEADIAIFAGISGDTNPVHLDAEFAASTMFGERIAHGMLSASFI 60 ... Query: 136 VLEGHAEIYLP 146 ... VLEGHAEIYLP Sbjct: 121 VLEGHAEIYLP 131

  19. A single L288I substitution in the fusion protein of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 enhances virus growth in semi-suitable cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Ryosuke; Takada, Marina; Kokuho, Takehiro; Tsuboi, Takamitsu; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2017-08-01

    The bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 BN-CE vaccine strain was obtained by serial passage of the BN-1 strain in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF). We previously identified a substitution (L288I) in the fusion (F) protein between the two strains. To examine the effect of the substitution on CEF adaptation and attenuation, we generated a recombinant BN-1 strain with the L288I substitution in the F protein (F L288I -EGFP). F L288I -EGFP replicated more efficiently than a recombinant BN-1 strain (wt-EGFP) in semi-suitable cell lines, suggesting that the L288I substitution was established in the BN-1 strain during the process of adaptation in CEF.

  20. Accuracy of a pediatric early warning score in the recognition of clinical deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Juliana de Oliveira Freitas; Camargo, Climene Laura de; Nascimento, Carlito Lopes; Portela, Daniel Sales; Monaghan, Alan

    2017-07-10

    to evaluate the accuracy of the version of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score translated and adapted for the Brazilian context, in the recognition of clinical deterioration. a diagnostic test study to measure the accuracy of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, in relation to a reference standard. The sample consisted of 271 children, aged 0 to 10 years, blindly evaluated by a nurse and a physician, specialists in pediatrics, with interval of 5 to 10 minutes between the evaluations, for the application of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context and of the reference standard. The data were processed and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and VassarStats.net programs. The performance of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context was evaluated through the indicators of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, area under the ROC curve, likelihood ratios and post-test probability. the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context showed sensitivity of 73.9%, specificity of 95.5%, positive predictive value of 73.3%, negative predictive value of 94.7%, area under Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve of 91.9% and the positive post-test probability was 80%. the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, presented good performance, considered valid for the recognition of clinical deterioration warning signs of the children studied. avaliar a acurácia da versão traduzida e adaptada do Brighton Paediatric Early Warning Score para o contexto brasileiro, no reconhecimento da deterioração clínica. estudo de teste diagnóstico para medir a acurácia do Brighton Paediatric Early Warning Score, para o contexto brasileiro, em relação a um padrão de referência. A amostra foi composta por 271 crianças de 0 a 10 anos, avaliadas de forma cega por uma enfermeira e um médico, especialistas em pediatria, com

  1. Determining the negative effect on house values of proximity to a landfill site by means of an application of the hedonic pricing method

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Du Preez; T Lottering

    2011-01-01

    This study applied the hedonic pricing method to determine whether a disused, solid waste landfill site has an adverse effect on the prices of low-cost houses in New Brighton, a neighbourhood of the Nelson Mandela Metropole, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The results of the study show that the landfill site has a negative effect on New Brighton house prices. The average increase in house value is R36.00 per one hundred metres from the landfill site. This increase amounts to 0.44 percent of the v...

  2. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  3. 75 FR 24972 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993 ODVA, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission disclosing changes in its membership... Company, Daito City, Osaka, JAPAN; Control Concepts Inc., Chanhassen, MN; Exlar Corporation, Chanhassen... Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM; Yaskawa Eshed Technology Ltd., Rosh Ha'ayin, ISRAEL; Automationdirect.com...

  4. Geological-Seismological Evaluation of Earthquake Hazards at Prompton and Francis E. Walter Damsites, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    containing graphite , chrondodite, pyrozene, and other minerals. Contains zinc ores in Sussex County. Pre-Cambrian Granite Coarse-grained, rudely foliated...thin shales and coals; some coals mineable locally. * Anthracite Region Post-Pottsville Formations ,22 PBrown or gray sandstones and shales with some

  5. The Contingency Theory of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, Wilma Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Develops a conceptual framework for determining the appropriateness of various methodologies. Concludes that educators should stop switching from one to another and recognize that the best methodology is contingent upon the circumstances. (Falmer Press, Falmer House, Barcombe, Nr Lewes, East Sussex, BN8 5DL, UK) (JOW)

  6. Gender | Page 36 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. There has been no book published in the last decade that takes a synoptic look at gender–environment issues while bridging theoretical, policy and practice concerns. This book will both fill that gap and bring the debate up to date. — Melissa Leach, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, ...

  7. Correlation and prediction equations for eight-week bodyweight in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 10 regression models used were: Linear; Logarithmic; Inverse; Quadratic; Cubic; Compound; Power; Sigmoidal; Growth; and Exponential equation. The results showed that Orpington breed had higher body weight than Sussex chicken for most weeks. Male chicks were generally higher in weekly body weight from 4 to 8 ...

  8. THE FINTECH BOOK: THE FINANCIAL TECHNOLOGY HANDBOOK FOR INVESTORS, ENTREPRENEURS AND VISIONARIES

    OpenAIRE

    Amalia, Fitri

    2016-01-01

    This book review deals with the fiancial technology area in emerging markets. The followings are the data about the book:Keyword:Publisher:Length:Price:Reading rating:Overall rating:financial technology, emerging marketsJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd, West Sussex, United Kingdom (2016)291 pages$27.16 (paperback)8 (1 = very difficult; 10 = very easy)3 (1 = average; 4 = outstanding)

  9. Behind the Public Face of Kew: Education and Conservation in the Millennium Seed Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Angela

    2010-01-01

    At its Wakehurst Place garden in West Sussex, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, has established the UK home of one of the world's largest conservation projects, the Millennium Seed Bank (MSB) partnership, a global project to conserve biodiversity by collecting and preserving seeds. This article describes what the MSB partnership does, how seeds are…

  10. Women's Early Labour Market Transitions in Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    -investigate the extent to which working as a child affects the school-to-work transition; -clarify how early labour market and early fertility experiences affect women's employment later in life; and -build a strong relationship with national and international stakeholders to ensure uptake of the results. The University of Sussex ...

  11. Allanach Benjamin, LAPTH, France Altarelli Guido, CERN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allanach Benjamin, LAPTH, France. Altarelli Guido, CERN, Switzerland. Ananthanarayan Balasubramanian,. IISc, Bangalore, India. Antoniadis Ignatios, CERN, Switzer- land. Aziz T, TIFR, Mumbai, India. Babu K S, Oklahoma State Univ., USA. Bailey Stephen, Harvard/BaBar, USA. Bailin David, University of Sussex, UK.

  12. The Death of a Contextual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Wendy

    1981-01-01

    The history and decline of an undergraduate interdisciplinary course on contemporary Britain at the University of Sussex are described. It is suggested that interdisciplinary courses require higher investment of resources and commitment to survive, and structural constraints and features are of continuing concern to their proponents. (MSE)

  13. in_focus - Competition and Development: The Power of Competitive ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2008 ... Before joining IDRC, she was a Fellow and Member of the Globalization Team at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex. ... Cette subvention servira à appuyer l'organisation de deux forums de haut niveau sur la concurrence et le développement juste avant les conférences mondiales du ...

  14. Joan Aiken's Armitage Family Stories: Place and Storytelling as a Way into the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the importance of place and story in the life and work of Joan Aiken (1924-2004), with a focus on the Armitage Family short stories. It explores the fluid relationship between books, storytelling and place in Joan Aiken's childhood and looks at her close relationship with the landscape of the Sussex Downs. Particular…

  15. Reducing uncertainty based on model fitness: Application to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... This general methodology is applied to a reservoir model of the Okavango ... local or global and global methods can be based on regression, ..... fdet) empirically represent rooting depth and simulate a linear .... work, we apply an enhanced version of FAST, the extended ..... John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Sussex,.

  16. Ways into Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrice, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Refugees with higher qualifications often find themselves under-utilised in the only jobs they can get. A project at the University of Sussex explored refugees' own perceptions of the barriers they face and designed a course to address them. This article discusses the research project which was specifically designed to work with refugees who had…

  17. 76 FR 73618 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... of new 30-inch- diameter pipeline loop \\1\\ in five separate segments in Bradford, Wayne, and Pike... in Bradford, Susquehanna, and Pike Counties, Pennsylvania; and Sussex County, New Jersey; Abandonment... on or before December 21, 2011. For your convenience, there are three methods you can use to submit...

  18. 75 FR 10242 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... miles of new 30-inch- diameter pipeline loop \\1\\ in seven separate segments in Potter, Tioga, Bradford... in Potter, Tioga, Bradford, Susquehanna, and Pike Counties, Pennsylvania, and Sussex County, New... Washington, DC on or before March 29, 2010. For your convenience, there are three methods which you can use...

  19. Success without "A" Pass: An Educational Experiment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Mary

    2011-01-01

    In 1963, the University of Sussex inaugurated an innovative Early Leavers Scheme in response to two government reports which confirmed that it was still the norm for talented working-class children to leave school aged 15 or 16 and indicated that the hopes of the 1944 Education Act were as yet unfulfilled. This article explores what the scheme has…

  20. Chemistry, Creativity, Collaboration, and C60: An Interview with Harold W. Kroto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2005-01-01

    Harold Kroto is professor of chemistry at Sussex University and President of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK), offers an insight into the way his discoveries, and his interpretation, were influenced by his other interests in the wider fields of chemistry and by his passionate interest in art. He shares his views on the discovery of…

  1. British scientists are ahead in the race to solve one of the biggest mysteries of the universe - why matter exists.

    CERN Multimedia

    Von Radowitz, J

    2003-01-01

    "Researchers at the University of Sussex have been given a 2.3 million pounds grant to make some of the most sensitive measurements ever undertaken of sub-atomic particles. They hope within six years to have answers which might finally explain the creation of matter at the dawn of time" (1/2 page).

  2. THE USE OF ENERGY PATTERN FACTOR (EPF) IN ESTIMATING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara M. D et. al

    Encyclopædia Britannica.2012. Anemometer. Encyclopædia. Britannica Library Ultimate Reference Suite. Version. 2007. Chicago. Manwell, J.F., McGowan, J.G. and Rogers, A.L. (2002). Wind. Energy Explained. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, West Sussex,. England. Ngala, G.M., Alkali, B., and Aji, M.A., (2007). Viability of wind.

  3. Gender and Natural Resource Management: Livelihoods, Mobility ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... There has been no book published in the last decade that takes a synoptic look at gender–environment issues while bridging theoretical, policy and practice concerns. This book will both fill that gap and bring the debate up to date. — Melissa Leach, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, ...

  4. The Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Morphology Among Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Onome Ogueh*, Mudiaga Zini, Sian Williams and Jacob Ighere ... Hospitals NHS Trust, Princess Royal Hospital, Haywards Health, West Sussex RH16 4EX, UK. ... Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective des résultats des analyse des ultrasons.

  5. Day of Our Lives: Making and sharing multi-media documents of everyday mothering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Thomson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Susi Arnott is a freelance filmmaker based in central London, specialising in documentaries on education, social issues and international development. Collaborations with artists and scientists help keep the mind busy. Rachel Thomson is Professor of Childhood and Youth Studies at the University of Sussex where she directs CIRCY, the Centre for Innovation & Research in Childhood and Youth.

  6. PREFACE: International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gabriel; Carugno, Giovanni; Dodonov, Victor; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-07-01

    consists of work devoted to the current status of the theory and measurements related to Casimir forces. Readers must be warned that some topics in this field of research remain controversial (especially the dependence on temperature): they can and do generate debates that sometimes become quite heated. These controversies are reflected in the papers. We believe that at present it is not the business of conference organisers to adjudicate such issues, and hope that detailed expositions of different approaches and different points of view will help readers to formulate their own, and will eventually lead to a better understanding of the problems and of the solutions proposed. The other three groups contain contributions bearing on (1) topics related to causes and consequences of Casimir effects in quantum field theory and gravitation; (2) the so-called dynamical (or nonstationary) Casimir effect and motion-induced radiation, (3) some new manifestations and applications of the Casimir effect. We are grateful to the authors for making their papers so interesting; to the referees for their careful reading of the initial versions, and for their many helpful comments and suggestions; to the Institute of Physics for its kindness in offering to publish these Proceedings in Journal of Physics: Conference Series; and to the Institute of Physics office at the Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow for essential help in the preparation of this volume. On behalf of the participants of the workshop, we thank the direction and staff of the ICCMP for their splendid organization of the event. Finally we acknowledge the support of the Brazilian scientific funding agencies FAP-DF and CNPQ, which covered the local and travel expenses of many participants. The Editors Gabriel Barton (University of Sussex, Brighton, UK) Giovanni Carugno (INFN - Sezione di Padova, Italy) Victor Dodonov (University of Brasilia, Brazil) Margarita Man'ko (Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia) Workshop

  7. Analysis of Information Flow in the Tactical Operations System (TOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    CONFIGURATION M* ANEUVER BRIGADES * UN IT COMMUNICATIONS PROCESSOR "i BER OF NAE LINK W/ FEP TYPE TEPLATES BDE’I MULTI TCS 10 BDE2 MULTI TCS 10 BDE3 MULTI TCS...0.067 BN1.1 T-R.0 0.0 0.183 BNI.1 SDL.0 0.0 0.0 BN1.1 NAI.0 0.0 0.0 BN1.1 SWF.0 0.0 0.0 BN1.1 PL .0 0.0 0.0 3N1.1 UTO.O 0.0 0.0 BN1.1 TD .0 0.0 0.053...ARTY ?Ti.0 0.0 0.0 DIV ARTY UTO.0 0.0 0.915 DIV ARTY TD .0 0.0 0.614 DIV ARTY BIR.0 0.0 0.0 DIV ARTY ELA.0 0.0 0.0 DIV ARY QERY.0 1.000 0.0 B-20 0 EXHIBIT

  8. 78 FR 22288 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... consultation with representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians and the Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa... represented by two present-day tribes: the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians and the Seminole Tribe of Florida...

  9. 78 FR 25468 - Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Funerary Objects in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... Preserve is responsible for notifying the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians and Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa... six sites and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians. Additional Requestors and Disposition Transfer of...

  10. Monitoring the Effect of Facilitation Physiotherapy in Multiple Sclerosis using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, M.; Řasová, K.; Tintěra, J.; Martinková, Patrícia; Procházka, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 7 (2014), s. 1003-1004 ISSN 1352-4585. [RIMS 2014. Annual Conference on Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis /19./. 06.06.2014-07.06.2014, Brighton] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  11. Popnädal / Aivar Meos

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meos, Aivar

    2002-01-01

    Euroopa elektroonilise muusika konverentsist Dance Event Amsterdamis. Ansamblist REM. Norman "Fatboy Slim" Cooki poolt korraldatavast hiilgavast tantsupeost Brighton Beachil. 19. nov. oksjonile jõudvatest kahest veel avaldamata John Lennoni lindistusest. Ansambli Jamiroquai esimesest kontsert-DVDst "Live In Verona 2002"

  12. Economic Cost of Malaria Treatment under the Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic Cost of Malaria Treatment under the Health Insurance Scheme in the Savelugu-Nanton District of Ghana. Introduction ..... of User Charges for Social Services: A Case Study on Health in Uganda. Brighton, United. Kingdom: Institute of Development Studies. Working Paper No. 86. McIntyre, D.; Muirhead, D.

  13. Elektrooniline laulu- ja tantsupidu / Jamie Lidell ; interv. Tristan Priimägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lidell, Jamie

    2006-01-01

    Tristan Priimägi külastas 25. mail Inglismaal Brighton festivalil üritust "Warp Moves", kus intervjueeris Eesti Kunstimuuseumis 2. juuni öösel üritusel "KUMU Öö" esinevaid artiste Jamie Lidelli ja Plaidi

  14. "I 'See' Trayvon Martin": What Teachers Can Learn from the Tragic Death of a Young Black Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bettina L.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the racially hostile environment of U.S. public schooling towards Black males. Drawing on the work of Foucault ("Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison," Penguin Books, London, 1977; "Michel Foucault: beyond structuralism and hermeneutics," The Harvester Press, Brighton, 1982)…

  15. Urban Teacher Education in Partnership: An Inquiry Stance Sustains Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between Brighton High School (BHS) and Boston College (BC) spans several decades. Professors from multiple departments at the university--not only teacher educators but professors of psychology, measurement, and arts and sciences--have walked, as regular parts of the school community, the halls of the gothic-style high school…

  16. Pop / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Heliplaatidest Dungeon Family "Even In Darkness". Fatboy Slim "Live On Brighton Beach". X-Exutioners "Built From Scratch". Fila Brazillia "Jump Leads". Air "Everybody Herz". Billy Idol "VH1 Storytellers". Neil Halstead "Sleeping on Roads". The Soundtrack Of Our Lives "Behind The Music". si-cut.db "Enthusiast"

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uledi-Kamanga, Brighton. Vol 1, No 1 (1987) - Articles Alienation and affirmation: The humanistic vision of Bessie Head Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1016-0728. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  18. South African Medical Journal - Vol 68, No 9 (1983)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chikungunya virus infection - A retrospective study of 107 cases · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S.W. Brighton, O.W. Prozesky, A.L. de la Harpe, 313-315 ...

  19. Research Leadership for the Community-Engaged University: Key Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Angie; Church, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In Great Britain, attempts to broaden university-community engagement have taken significant steps in recent years. A wide variety of community-engagement structures and activities are now emerging. This paper uses one innovative example--University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Program--to describe the opportunities and probe the…

  20. 76 FR 10328 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... manufacturing and warehousing of wind turbine nacelles, hubs, blades and towers at the Vestas Nacelles America... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Vestas Nacelles America, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles, Hubs, Blades and Towers), Brighton, Denver, Pueblo, and Windsor, CO Pursuant to its...

  1. "Eksterne samarbejdsprojekter - Problemer og fordele/Collaborative Projects - Problems and Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare

    - a Global Survey. In: Anna Clarke, Bill Ion, Chris McMahon and Peter Hogarth (eds.): Creating a Better World. Proceedings for the 11th Engineering and Product Design International Conference: Brighton, 2009. (The Design Society and Institution of Engineering and Designers , 2009), 26-31....

  2. 76 FR 19097 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Type: License Transfer. Green Line Shipping & Logistics Services Inc. (NVO), 16230 Lake View Lane... Tejera, Secretary, Application Type: New NVO. Landstar Global Logistics, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 13410 Sutton..., Partner/CEO, Application Type: New NVO License. MBA Logistics, LLC (OFF), 11455 Narin Drive, Brighton, MI...

  3. Developing the Digital Literacies of Academic Staff: An Institutional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Barbara; Handley, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF) aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work: (1) Learning and teaching; (2) Research; (3)…

  4. Enlisting Excel--Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parramore, Keith

    2009-01-01

    In Volume 26, Number 2, we reported on a group case study run for level 3 mathematics students at the University of Brighton. At the core of the study was a quadratic assignment problem, and we reported on attempts by students to use Excel to solve the problem, and on the attendant difficulties. We provided an elegant solution. In this article, we…

  5. Journal of Humanities - Vol 5, No 1 (1991)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The irony of apartheid: A study in technique and theme in the fiction of Nadine Gordimer · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Brighton J. Uledi-Kamanga, 1-15 ...

  6. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uledi-Kamanga, Brighton J. Vol 5, No 1 (1991) - Articles The irony of apartheid: A study in technique and theme in the fiction of Nadine Gordimer Abstract PDF · Vol 8-9, No 1 (1995) - Articles Literature and life: The decline and fall of apartheid in Nadine Gordimer's fiction. Abstract PDF · Vol 13, No 1 (1999) - Articles

  7. Exploring Engaged Spaces in Community-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ceri; Gant, Nick; Millican, Juliet; Wolff, David; Prosser, Bethan; Laing, Stuart; Hart, Angie

    2016-01-01

    The Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP) has been operating at the University of Brighton for the past 10 years. This article explores the different types of space we think need to exist to support a variety of partnership and engaged work. We therefore explore our understandings of shared or "engaged" spaces as a physical,…

  8. Liberating Virtual Machines from Physical Boundaries through Execution Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    05), Brighton, UK, 2005. ACM. [28] Ricardo A. Baratto, Shaya Potter , Gong Su, and Jason Nieh. MobiDesk: Mobile Virtual Desktop Computing. In...Boris Dragovic, Keir Fraser, Steven Hand, Tim Harris , Alex Ho, Rolf Neugebauer, Ian Pratt, and Andrew Warfield. Xen and the Art of Virtualization

  9. Developing Access between Universities and Local Community Groups: A University Helpdesk in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon; Gerhardt, Chloe; Rodriguez, Polly

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer the University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Programme (CUPP) Helpdesk as a model of an "enabling platform" for university-community engagement. Despite the growth of practical and scholarly activity in this area, there is a relative lack of research focused on the processes by which…

  10. Manifestations of African Islam: A Case Study of African Muslims in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early in 2003, African Muslims in Uitenhage's township Kwa-Nobuhle learnt that Muslim women led by Sheikh Nceba Salamntu, then the Imam of the New Brighton Mosque, in Port Elizabeth, participated in a burial process, entering right into the graveyard itself; a hitherto proscribed exercise. The resultant discomfort felt by ...

  11. Growing through Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Barbara J.

    "Growing through Literature" is a curriculum using Joan M. and Erik H. Erikson's theory of the Life Cycle as a structure for selecting and teaching literature to inner-city high school students at Brighton High School in Massachusetts. The program consists of four component parts: Journals, Selected Stories, Discussion, and…

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1981. 'Psychological Research in Africa: Genesis and Function', Race and Class 23 (1): 25-44. Donzelot, M. 1980. The Policing of Families. London. Hutchinson. Foucault, M. 1980. 'Power and Strategies' in C. Gordon (ed), Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and other Writings by Michel Foucault 1972-1977. Brighton.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  14. A Polymath at Play: An Interview with Margaret Boden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Margaret Boden is Research Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex, where she was the founding dean of the university’s School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences. Trained originally at the University of Cambridge and at Harvard University in medicine and the history of philoso......Margaret Boden is Research Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex, where she was the founding dean of the university’s School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences. Trained originally at the University of Cambridge and at Harvard University in medicine and the history...... of philosophy, she has since pursued and published in related fields such as psychology, social psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, cybernetics, control engineering, computer science, and artificial intelligence. A frequent interviewee on television and radio in the United Kingdom, she lectures widely...

  15. Layer-structured hexagonal boron nitride carbon semiconductor alloys for deep UV photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Rakib; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2015-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride carbon alloys, h - (BN)1-x(C2)x, are layer-structured semiconductor materials with a tunable bandgap energy from 0 eV (graphite) to 6.5 eV (h-BN). We report on synthesizing (BN)-rich h - (BN)1-x(C2)x semiconductor alloys using standard MOCVD growth technique on sapphire substrate. Bandgap energy variation with carbon concentration in the deep UV spectral range has been demonstrated through optical absorption measurements. Experimental results suggest that the critical carbon concentration (xc) to form the homogenous h - (BN)1-x(C2)x alloys is about 3.2% at a growth temperature of 1300 °C. It is expected that homogenous h - (BN)1-x(C2)x alloys with higher x can be achieved by increasing the growth temperature. This is a huge advantage over the InGaN alloy system in which higher growth temperatures cannot be utilized to close the miscibility gap. Together with our ability for producing high quality h-BN epilayers, h-(BN)C alloys and quantum wells open up new possibilities for realizing novel 2D optoelectronic devices with tunable physical properties. National Science Foundation.

  16. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1CL7I-1AIFB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EE EEEEEEEEEE EEEEEEEE EEEE - EEE ---- 0 1AI...F Bn> 1AIFB...1CL7I-1AIFB 1CL7 1AIF I B ---------------------------------------...HR CA 216 LYS CA 271 VAL CA 272 ...n> 1CL7 n>I n>1CL7In> VA

  17. Replacement Value of Feather Meal for Fishmeal on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and fifty (250) Light Sussex cockerels were used in a 56 days feeding trial on a deep litter house to assess the effect of replacement of feather meal (FEM) for fishmeal (FM) on their performance. Five replacement levels 0, 2.5, 5 7.5 and 10% of FEM were used for the treatments, (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively) ...

  18. An Advanced Computational Approach to System of Systems Analysis & Architecting Using Agent-Based Behavioral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    typically cannot sustain large numbers (Miller, 1956) (Pedrycz, Ekel, & Parreiras, 2011). In DoD acquisition management, a program’s (system’s...or uncertainty can be due to  Differing interpretation of components’ status facts by the reviewing subject matter experts (SMEs)  The energy of...Parreiras, R. (2011). Fuzzy Multicriteria Decision Making; Models, Methods and Applications. West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons. Rao, S. S. (2009

  19. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 15, Number 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    with the Relaps/MODI code to celaa- leaethe respo of a PWR pressrizer safety valve duringsa sturated steamcdischarg transient and a water wel discarg...Sons Ltd. LU3 3BL, UK Baff ins Lane Chichester, Sussex P019 IUD, England BROWN BOVERI REVIEW ( Brown Bavel Rev.) ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Brown Boveri and Co...85 Brown , D ............ 288,399 Bhattacharya, S.K ......... 2453 Boresi, A.P ... .......... 590 Brown , D.L.. . . 1315, 1427, 1428, Bhatti, M

  20. Neural Correlates of Cross-Cultural Adaptation: How to Improve the Training and Selection for Military Personnel Involved in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Sussex, UK: Psychology Press. Vaughn, L. M., & Phillips, R. (2009). Intercultural adjustment for cultural competence in shared context: “The company we...pressure. This study was designed to examine both cross-cultural non-verbal communication ability as well as the ability to regulate moral emotions...To examine cross-cultural non-verbal communication ability, the study utilized a custom-designed variation of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RMES

  1. Intégration de la dimension genre à la lutte contre la pauvreté et ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... chercheure à l'Institute of Development Studies, à l'Université du Sussex. Spécialiste en économie sociale, elle a enseigné, fait de la recherche et mené à bien des missions de consultation dans les domaines de l'égalité des sexes, de la pauvreté, de la démographie et de la politique sociale. Edición español: Descargar ...

  2. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-10-09

    Oct 9, 1996 ... Treatments. Sixty mature, dry, pregnant Sussex-type cows (mean initial live mass = 461.5 i 3 kg) grazed the maize residues at one of three stocking rates, namely 1.75 cows/ha (LSR), 3.5 cows/ha (MSR) and. 5.26 cows/ha (HSR). The relevant stocking rates were achieved by dividing the 17 ha comprising.

  3. Mainstreaming Informal and Gender in Poverty Reduction : A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Joann Vanek, sociologue spécialisée dans les statistiques sociales et sexospécifiques, a travaillé pendant de nombreuses années à la Division de statistique de l'ONU, à New York. Marilyn Carr est économiste du développement et attachée de recherche à l'Institute for Development Studies, à l'université du Sussex, ...

  4. Arthur Smith Woodward and his involvement in the study of human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, C.; De Groote, I.; Stringer, C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1884, Arthur Smith Woodward first met Charles Dawson, a solicitor and industrious amateur collector, antiquarian, geologist, archaeologist and palaeontologist. This began a long association and friendship centred on their mutual interest in palaeontology and human evolution. Dawson devised a complicated plot focused around the ancient river gravel deposits at Barkham Manor near the village of Piltdown, Sussex. In these gravels he planted stone tools and fossil mammal remains together with ...

  5. Groundwater flood or groundwater-induced flood?

    OpenAIRE

    Robins, N.S.; Finch, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of ‘groundwater flood’ events have been recorded over the Chalk aquifer in southern England since the 1994 occurrence at Chichester, Sussex. Reporting of this event and subsequent groundwater floods indicates that there are two types of groundwater flood event. Type 1 is the true groundwater flood in which the water table elevation rises above the ground elevation, and Type 2 occurs when intense groundwater discharge via bourne springs and highly permeable shallow horizons discharges...

  6. "The Secret Air War Over France" USAAF Special Operations Units in the French Campaign of 1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    another group of fifty intelligence agents for post D-Day infiltration as the PROUST Project.103 All was now ready for OVERLORD. Intelligence agents...infiltrated sixty SUSSEX intelligence agents for the Secret Intelligence Branch of OSS/London. The "Carpetbaggers" dropped forty-six PROUST Project...Operations. Boulder: Westview Press, 1988. Ruby, Marcel . F Section, SOE. London: Leo Cooper Ltd., 1988. Smith, Bradley F. The Shadow Warriors. New York

  7. Combining Teaching and Library Work: the Hybrid Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Sheridan

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on some of the issues raised when professional library staff combine archive management with an active teaching role, drawing on my own experience as an archivist in the University of Sussex Library. There are of course many archivists who are also teachers on professional training courses for prospective archivists but my concern here is teaching in higher education in subject areas other than library, archive and information sciences while using archival resources.

  8. Energy transfer in multi-collision environments; an experimental test of theory: LiH (10;2) in H2(0;0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuyin; Dai, Kang; Shen, Yifan; McCaffery, Anthony J

    2017-03-21

    We report separate experimental and theoretical studies of the equilibration of highly excited LiH (v = 10; J = 2) in H2 at 680 K. Experiments that follow the time evolution of state-to-state population transfer in multi-collision conditions with μs resolution were carried out by Shen and co-workers at Xinjiang University and East China Institute of Science and Technology. At the same time, theoretical computations on the relaxation of this gas mixture were undertaken by McCaffery and co-workers at Sussex University. Rapid, near-resonant, vibration-vibration energy exchange is a marked feature of the initial relaxation process. However, at later stages of ensemble evolution, slower vibration-rotation transfer forms the dominant relaxation mechanism. The physics of the decay process are complex and, as demonstrated experimentally here, a single exponential expression is unlikely to capture the form of this decay with any accuracy. When these separate studies were complete, the evolution of modal temperatures from the Sussex calculations was compared with experimental measurements of these same quantities from Shanghai and Urumqi. The two sets of data were marked by their near identity, within experimental and computational error, representing an experimental validation of the theoretical/computational model developed by the Sussex group and a significant experimental advancement by the group of Shen et al.

  9. Energy transfer in multi-collision environments; an experimental test of theory: LiH (10;2) in H2(0;0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shuyin; Dai, Kang; Shen, Yifan; McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2017-03-01

    We report separate experimental and theoretical studies of the equilibration of highly excited LiH (v = 10; J = 2) in H2 at 680 K. Experiments that follow the time evolution of state-to-state population transfer in multi-collision conditions with μs resolution were carried out by Shen and co-workers at Xinjiang University and East China Institute of Science and Technology. At the same time, theoretical computations on the relaxation of this gas mixture were undertaken by McCaffery and co-workers at Sussex University. Rapid, near-resonant, vibration-vibration energy exchange is a marked feature of the initial relaxation process. However, at later stages of ensemble evolution, slower vibration-rotation transfer forms the dominant relaxation mechanism. The physics of the decay process are complex and, as demonstrated experimentally here, a single exponential expression is unlikely to capture the form of this decay with any accuracy. When these separate studies were complete, the evolution of modal temperatures from the Sussex calculations was compared with experimental measurements of these same quantities from Shanghai and Urumqi. The two sets of data were marked by their near identity, within experimental and computational error, representing an experimental validation of the theoretical/computational model developed by the Sussex group and a significant experimental advancement by the group of Shen et al.

  10. EDITORIAL: Environmental justice: a critical issue for all environmental scientists everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Carolyn

    2007-10-01

    when an issue of water contamination becomes an issue of environmental injustice? How do we measure the impacts of environmental harm today on future generations? How do we measure the distribution of multiple or cumulative impacts on poorer groups? How do we quantify the responsibility of richer citizens in the world for the environmental harms distributed unequally to the poorer citizens? The papers in this focus issue do not answer all these questions, but we hope that this theme will recur in Environmental Research Letters and that more environmental scientists will begin to frame their analyses around the critical issues of distributions of environmental harms and benefits. References [1] United Nations Environment Programme 2007 Global Environmental Outlook 2007 (Nairobi: United Nations Environment Programme) [2] UNICEF 2005 The State of the World's Children 2005 (Oxford: Oxford University Press) [3] World Resources Institute 2002 Wastes Produced from Industrialised Countries available from www.wri.org [4] Stephens C and Stair P 2007 Charting a new course for urban public health State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future ed L Stark (New York: W W Norton) pp 134 48 [5] Lee K N 2007 An urbanizing world State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future ed L Stark (New York: W W Norton) pp 3 22 [6] United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003 Environmental Justice available from www.epa.gov/compliance/environmentaljustice/ [7] Stephens C, Bullock S and Scott A 2001 Environmental justice: rights and mean to a healthy environment for all Special Briefing Paper Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Global Environmental Change Programme (Brighton: ESRC Global Environmental Change Programme, University of Sussex) p 3 available from www.foe.co.uk/resource/reports/environmental_justice.pdf [8] United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Convention on Access to Information 1999 Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters

  11. Determining the negative effect on house values of proximity to a landfill site by means of an application of the hedonic pricing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Du Preez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study applied the hedonic pricing method to determine whether a disused, solid waste landfill site has an adverse effect on the prices of low-cost houses in New Brighton, a neighbourhood of the Nelson Mandela Metropole, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The results of the study show that the landfill site has a negative effect on New Brighton house prices. The average increase in house value is R36.00 per one hundred metres from the landfill site. This increase amounts to 0.44 percent of the value of a house per 100 metres from the landfill. When the change in value is summed for all the properties in the sample area (allowing for variation in value change due to differing distances from the landfill site the total disamenity effect of the landfill site is approximately R1.4 million.

  12. Digital Archaeological Heritage: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith May

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The 17th EAC Symposium (Europae Archaeologiae Consilium in Brighton was convened under a concept note that recognised that 'Digital technologies are developing at an unprecedented speed. As they do, they are opening up many new possibilities for the conduct and presentation of archaeological research and investigation. The digital realm is one which knows few borders and so the sharing of understanding about these new methods, techniques and possibilities across Europe is extremely valuable'. The Brighton Symposium was held over one-and-a-half days (17-18 March 2016 and consisted of three presentation sessions, followed by discussions that included questions and comments from the floor. The presentations were aimed at one of the three broad themes of the symposium although, in actuality, a number of the presenters raised topics that spanned more than one theme.

  13. Senses of Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Lim; Kath Browne

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the testimony of trans respondents to Count Me In Too (a participatory action research project that examined LGBT lives in Brighton and Hove), and this analysis occasions the development of innovative concepts for thinking about understandings and experiences of trans phenomena and gender. The analysis starts by exploring the diversity of trans identities before considering evidence of how health services pathologise trans experiences. These analyses not only call into que...

  14. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    OpenAIRE

    Newland, Barbara; Handley, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF) aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:Learning and teachingResearchCommunication and collaborationAdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to ...

  15. 30. X tähistab EKA 90. aastapäeva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Näitustest. 29. X audoktorite Udo Kultermanni ja Juhani Pallasmaa loengud ning ümarlaud "Disain, tulevik ja identiteet", kus esitavad ettekande Halldor Gislason (Reykjavik), Francois Penz (Cambridge), Bruce Brown (Brighton), Peter McGrory (Helsingi) ja Michael U. Hensel (London), ümarlauda juhib Jüri Soolep. 30. X vilistlaspäev, audoktoriteks promoveeritakse Juhani Pallasmaa, Udo Kultermann, Lars Olof Larsson ja Yrjö Sotamaa

  16. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: multinational case-control study in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dieleman, Jeanne; Romio, Silvana; Johansen, Kari; Weibel, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Five European countries. Participants: 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one or more controls. Case status was classified according to the Brighton Collaboration definition. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, index date, and country. Main outcome measures: Relative ...

  17. Can paediatric early warning scores (PEWS) be used to guide the need for hospital admission and predict significant illness in children presenting to the emergency department? An assessment of PEWS diagnostic accuracy using sensitivity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillitos, Peter J; Hadley, Graeme; Maconochie, Ian

    2016-05-01

    Designed to detect early deterioration of the hospitalised child, paediatric early warning scores (PEWS) validity in the emergency department (ED) is less validated. We aimed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of two commonly used PEWS (Brighton and COAST) in predicting hospital admission and, for the first time, significant illness. Retrospective analysis of PEWS data for paediatric ED attendances at St Mary's Hospital, London, UK, in November 2012. Patients with missing data were excluded. Diagnoses were grouped: medical and surgical. To classify diagnoses as significant, established guidelines were used and, where not available, common agreement between three acute paediatricians. 1921 patients were analysed. There were 211 admissions (11%). 1630 attendances were medical (86%) and 273 (14%) surgical. Brighton and COAST PEWS performed similarly. hospital admission: PEWS of ≥3 was specific (93%) but poorly sensitive (32%). The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was low at 0.690. Significant illness: for medical illness, PEWS ≥3 was highly specific (96%) but poorly sensitive (44%). The AUC was 0.754 and 0.755 for Brighton and COAST PEWS, respectively. Both scores performed poorly for predicting significant surgical illness (AUC 0.642). PEWS ≥3 performed well in predicting significant respiratory illness: sensitivity 75%, specificity 91%. Both Brighton and COAST PEWS scores performed similarly. A score of ≥3 has good specificity but poor sensitivity for predicting hospital admission and significant illness. Therefore, a high PEWS should be taken seriously but a low score is poor at ruling out the requirement for admission or serious underlying illness. PEWS was better at detecting significant medical illness compared with detecting the need for admission. PEWS performed poorly in detecting significant surgical illness. PEWS may be particularly useful in evaluating respiratory illness in a paediatric ED. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  18. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People's Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity.

  19. Defense Health Care: US Family Health Plan is Duplicative and Should be Eliminated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    1) Johns Hopkins Medical Services Co., (2) Brighton Marine Health Center, (3) Martin’s Point Health Care, (4) CHRISTUS Health, (5) Pacific...over the years, some hospitals that were formerly separate designated providers were consolidated under CHRISTUS Health. 16One former designated...Point Health Care 41% South Humana Military Healthcare Services CHRISTUS Health 57% West UnitedHealth Pacific Medical Centers 88% Source: GAO

  20. Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess those published cases of yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease that meet the Brighton Collaboration criteria and to assess the safety of YF vaccine with respect to viscerotropic disease. Literature search Ten electronic databases were searched with no restriction of date or language and reference lists of retrieved articles. Methods All abstracts and titles were independently read by two reviewers and data independently entered by two reviewers. Results All serious adverse events that met the Brighton Classification criteria were associated with first YF vaccinations. Sixty-two published cases (35 died) met the Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic criteria, with 32 from the US, six from Brazil, five from Peru, three from Spain, two from the People’s Republic of China, one each from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Ecuador, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, and four with no country stated. Two cases met both the viscerotropic and YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease criteria. Seventy cases proposed by authors as viscerotropic disease did not meet any Brighton Collaboration viscerotropic level of diagnostic certainty or any YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease causality criteria (37 died). Conclusion Viscerotropic disease is rare in the published literature and in pharmacovigilance databases. All published cases were from developing countries. Because the symptoms are usually very severe and life threatening, it is unlikely that cases would not come to medical attention (but might not be published). Because viscerotropic disease has a highly predictable pathologic course, it is likely that viscerotropic disease post-YF vaccine occurs in low-income countries with the same incidence as in developing countries. YF vaccine is a very safe vaccine that likely confers lifelong immunity. PMID:27784992

  1. 76 FR 32230 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... (Workers).... Clark, NJ 05/16/11 05/09/11 80182 Palmer Johnson Yachts, LLC Sturgeon Bay, WI 05/16/11 05/04... Bristol, TN 05/20/11 05/20/11 Corporation (Company). 80190 Rankin Manufacturing, Inc. New London, OH 05/20/11 05/20/11 (Company). 80191 Tegrant Corporation New Brighton, PA 05/20/11 05/19/11 (Company...

  2. Modelling Urban diffuse pollution in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jato, Musa; Smith, Martin; Cundy, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse urban pollution of surface and ground waters is a growing concern in many cities and towns. Traffic-derived pollutants such as salts, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may wash off road surfaces in soluble or particulate forms which later drain through soils and drainage systems into surface waters and groundwater. In Brighton, about 90% of drinking water supply comes from groundwater (derived from the Brighton Chalk block). In common with many groundwater sources the Chalk aquifer has been relatively extensively monitored and assessed for diffuse rural contaminants such as nitrate, but knowledge on the extent of contamination from road run-off is currently lacking. This project examines the transfer of traffic-derived contaminants from the road surface to the Chalk aquifer, via urban drainage systems. A transect of five boreholes have been sampled on a monthly basis and groundwater samples analysed to examine the concentrations of key, mainly road run-off derived, hydrocarbon and heavy metal contaminants in groundwater across the Brighton area. Trace concentrations of heavy metals and phenols have been observed in groundwater. Electrical conductivity changes in groundwater have also been used to assess local changes in ionic strength which may be associated with road-derived contaminants. This has been supplemented by systematic water and sediment sampling from urban gully pots, with further sampling planned from drainage and settlement ponds adjacent to major roads, to examine initial road to drainage system transport of major contaminants.

  3. Chart-confirmed guillain-barre syndrome after 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among the Medicare population, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakowski, Laura L; Sandhu, Sukhminder K; Martin, David B; Ball, Robert; Macurdy, Thomas E; Franks, Riley L; Gibbs, Jonathan M; Kropp, Garner F; Avagyan, Armen; Kelman, Jeffrey A; Worrall, Christopher M; Sun, Guoying; Kliman, Rebecca E; Burwen, Dale R

    2013-09-15

    Given the increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) found with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, both active surveillance and end-of-season analyses on chart-confirmed cases were performed across multiple US vaccine safety monitoring systems, including the Medicare system, to evaluate the association of GBS after 2009 monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccination. Medically reviewed cases consisted of H1N1-vaccinated Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for GBS. These cases were then classified by using Brighton Collaboration diagnostic criteria. Thirty-one persons had Brighton level 1, 2, or 3 GBS or Fisher Syndrome, with symptom onset 1-119 days after vaccination. Self-controlled risk interval analyses estimated GBS risk within the 6-week period immediately following H1N1 vaccination compared with a later control period, with additional adjustment for seasonality. Our results showed an elevated risk of GBS with 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccination (incidence rate ratio = 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.14, 5.11; attributable risk = 2.84 per million doses administered, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 5.48). This observed risk was slightly higher than that seen with previous seasonal influenza vaccines; however, additional results that used a stricter case definition (Brighton level 1 or 2) were not statistically significant, and our ability to account for preceding respiratory/gastrointestinal illness was limited. Furthermore, the observed risk was substantially lower than that seen with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine.

  4. Identification of Sources with Unknown Wavefronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-31

    SFRS TRANSFER OF SCALER RELATION DECORRELATED SFRS B, B2 ...BN 1 ilc I~III t ilul w ws f e Vici c vI re p m) wi2Iill- i e H’Ic ei (3.30)541 aI i hi I1...vallent to 2 P’ real scalars. The coiist raiints 1bet weeni these scalaris are: 1Every columin imust, be a normalized vector giving one real scala r 4

  5. Model for the role of auxin polar transport in patterning of the leaf adaxial-abaxial axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianmin; Dong, Jiaqiang; Xue, Jingshi; Wang, Hua; Yang, Zhongnan; Jiao, Yuling; Xu, Lin; Huang, Hai

    2017-11-01

    Leaf adaxial-abaxial polarity refers to the two leaf faces, which have different types of cells performing distinct biological functions. In 1951, Ian Sussex reported that when an incipient leaf primordium was surgically isolated by an incision across the vegetative shoot apical meristem (SAM), a radialized structure without an adaxial domain would form. This led to the proposal that a signal, now called the Sussex signal, is transported from the SAM to emerging primordia to direct leaf adaxial-abaxial patterning. It was recently proposed that instead of the Sussex signal, polar transport of the plant hormone auxin is critical in leaf polarity formation. However, how auxin polar transport functions in the process is unknown. Through live imaging, we established a profile of auxin polar transport in and around young leaf primordia. Here we show that auxin polar transport in lateral regions of an incipient primordium forms auxin convergence points. We demonstrated that blocking auxin polar transport in the lateral regions of the incipient primordium by incisions abolished the auxin convergence points and caused abaxialized leaves to form. The lateral incisions also blocked the formation of leaf middle domain and margins and disrupted expression of the middle domain/margin-associated marker gene WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 1 (SlWOX1). Based on these results we propose that the auxin convergence points are required for the formation of leaf middle domain and margins, and the functional middle domain and margins ensure leaf adaxial-abaxial polarity. How middle domain and margins function in the process is discussed. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Artificial intelligence a beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whitby, Blay

    2012-01-01

    Tomorrow begins right here as we embark on an enthralling and jargon-free journey into the world of computers and the inner recesses of the human mind. Readers encounter everything from the nanotechnology used to make insect-like robots, to computers that perform surgery, in addition to discovering the biggest controversies to dog the field of AI. Blay Whitby is a Lecturer on Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence at the University of Sussex UK. He is the author of two books and numerous papers.

  7. Retro-review of flow injection analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Jaromir; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    It is indeed unusual for authors to review their own monograph – J. Ruzicka, E.H. Hansen, Flow Injection Analysis, 2nd Edition, Wiley, Chichester, West Sussex, UK, 1988. – and even more so if the book was published 20 years ago. Yet such an exercise might yield a perspective on the progress...... of analytical instrumentation in general and on the development of flow-injection analysis (FIA) techniques in particular. By reviewing what was written and proposed 20 years ago, it is interesting to observe what proved to be of lasting value, what became accepted, and, above all, what we missed and failed...

  8. Sorption of VX to Clay Minerals and Soils: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    2007, 458, 47–53. 61. Perry, T.D.; Klepac-Ceraj, V.; Zhang, X.V.; McNamara, C.J.; Polz, M.F.; Martin , S.T.; Berke, N.; Mitchell, R. Binding of...A “Closed Loop” Phase Diagram. J. Phys. Chem. 1986, 90(7), 1417–1423. 95. Martin , M.J.S.; Villa, M.V.; Sanchez-Camazano, M. Glyphosphate...Sussex, U.K., 2004 (ISBN 0-470-09058-8). 106. Haque, R.; Lindstrom , F.T.; Freed, V.H.; Sexton, R. Kinetic Study of the Sorption of 2,4- D on Some

  9. Imaging of Scarce Archaeological Remains Using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Soldovieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Romano-British site of Barcombe in East Sussex, England, has suffered heavy postdepositional attrition through reuse of the building materials for the effects of ploughing. A detailed GPR survey of the site was carried out in 2001, with results, achieved by usual radar data processing, published in 2002. The current paper reexamines the GPR data using microwave tomography approach, based on a linear inverse scattering model, and a 3D visualization that permits to improve the definition of the villa plan and reexamine the possibility of detecting earlier prehistoric remains.

  10. J.M. Gratale on Tore T. Petersen’s Richard Nixon, Great Britain and the Anglo-American Alignment in the Persian Gulf and Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tore T. Petersen. Richard Nixon, Great Britain and the Anglo-American Alignment in the Persian Gulf and Arabian Peninsula: Making Allies out of Clients. Sussex Academic Press, 2009.  172pp.  978-1-84519-277-8.Since the events of 9-11 there has been a sizeable quantity of books published on American foreign policy in broad terms, as well as more focused studies on contemporary developments in southwest Asia, more commonly referred to as the Middle East. Many of these volumes are highly politic...

  11. A cross-disciplinary approach to understanding neural stem cells in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique, Domingos; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2010-06-01

    The Company of Biologists recently launched a new series of workshops aimed at bringing together scientists with different backgrounds to discuss cutting edge research in emerging and cross-disciplinary areas of biology. The first workshop was held at Wilton Park, Sussex, UK, and the chosen theme was 'Neural Stem Cells in Development and Disease', which is indeed a hot topic, not only because of the potential use of neural stem cells in cell replacement therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, but also because alterations in their behaviour can, in certain cases, lie at the origin of brain tumours and other diseases.

  12. From technologists to social enterprise developers: Our journey as ‘ICT for development’ practitioners in Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rensburg, J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available . Tel: +27 82 4476239, Fax: + 27 12 841 3341, E-mail: jvrensbu@csir.co.za. 2CSIR Meraka Institute, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa. Tel: +27 12 8413321, Fax: + 27 12 841 3341, E-mail: aveldsman@csir.co.za 3MetaLAB, Sussex Innovation Centre...-2002 SMME SPs 2001-2003 MPCC Tools 2003-2005 MPCC Ops. Res. 2001-2004 (Kellogg) Deployment & Support Models MPCC Bus. Plan 2000-2001 Kiosk Franshise 1995-1996 Infopreneurs In Living Labs 2006-2009 Our organisational definitions...

  13. Adapting Modeling & SImulation for Network Enabled Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    fatigued from six days with little shelter on the slopes of Sussex moun- tain, and by an 18Km march to the battlefield with little sleep . They were...from the US 5th Army under JTF Katrina assisted FEMA in identifying what DoD assist- ance was needed. It also helped the PFO (Principal Federal...to change the posture, is to decide whether such a change is both feasible and desirable. This is partly the result of command inertia , as once in

  14. Planet earth a beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2012-01-01

    In this incredible expedition into the origins, workings, and evolution of our home planet, John Gribbin, bestselling author of In Search of Schrödinger's Cat, The Scientists, and In Search of the Multiverse, does what he does best: taking four and a half billion years of mind-boggling science and digging out the best bits. From the physics of Newton and the geology of Wegener, to the environmentalism of Lovelock, this is a must read for Earth's scientists and residents alike. Trained as an astrophysicist at Cambridge University, John Gribbin is currently Visiting Fellow in Astronomy at the University of Sussex, England.

  15. J. M. Gratale on N. Coles’ s Interpreting Political Events in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Norman Coles. Interpreting Political Events in the United States:  Critical Debate and Representative Democracy.  Sussex Academic Press, 2009,  79pp.At first glance, two things struck me about Norman Coles’s volume.  The first is its rather long title, whereas the second point concerns the book’s length; including the appendices, bibliography and index, it amounts to only seventy-nine pages.  In the first case, long titles are not necessarily problematic, providing the narrative which follows...

  16. Patterns of spontaneous reports on narcolepsy following administration of pandemic influenza vaccine; a case series of individual case safety reports in Eudravigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadroen, Kartini; Straus, Sabine M J M; Pacurariu, Alexandra; Weibel, Daniel; Kurz, Xavier; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2016-09-22

    This study aims to describe the frequency and quality of spontaneous narcolepsy case reports following administration of pandemic influenza vaccine as captured in the Eudravigilance database. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of spontaneous Individual Case Safety Reports (ICSRs), reporting narcolepsy following administration of pandemic influenza vaccine as received by Eudravigilance until July 2014. De-duplication was carried out by Eudravigilance. Frequency of reporting is described as number of ICSRs received per month over time. The quality of the ICSRs was evaluated by completeness of information and diagnostic certainty using the Automated Brighton Collaboration case definition tool (ABC-tool) for narcolepsy. After de-duplication, a total of 1333 ICSRs of narcolepsy and/or cataplexy following pandemic influenza vaccine were identified, originating from 18 countries worldwide. Most of the ICSRs (61.9%) originated from the signaling countries, Sweden and Finland. Although de-duplication of case reports was carried out, it is suspected that many duplicates exist, in particular from Sweden. The majority of the ICSRs (95.3%), reported exposure to Pandemrix®. Only few reports were received for Arepanrix® (1.6%) or Focetria® (0.5%), and Celvapan® (0.1%). Of those ICSRs reporting age, 73.1% concerned persons below age of 20years. When using the ABC-tool, all ICSRs were classified as having insufficient information to meet the Brighton Collaboration case definition of narcolepsy. An increase in reporting of narcolepsy appeared in Eudravigilance only after awareness was raised by the national authorities. Most narcolepsy reports were received from countries where the signal initially occurred, and were related to Pandemrix® in children/adolescents. Basic information about the patient and the exposure was present in most of the ICSRs. The ICSRs captured by Eudravigilance however, do not collect enough information to assess the diagnostic certainty

  17. Síndrome da hipermobilidade articular em jovem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Neves

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 14 year old male patient, with chronic low back pain and generalized joint hypermobility. He also presented a marfanoid habitus, hand joint alterations and striae in the right dorsal region. He fulfilled the Brighton Criteria therefore, after excluding other connective tissue diseases, the diagnosis of JHS was established. JHS is an underestimated and underdiagnosed disease, and must be contemplated in front of musculoskeletal pain associated with generalized hypermobility. The authors describe this case highlighting the importance of looking for signs and symptoms which allow the earlier diagnosis and management.

  18. I Dream of Doughnuts: One Family’s Sweet Saga of the American Dream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel DeSimone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available At the historic intersection of Cambridge Street and Brighton Avenue in Allston, Mass., you might find yourself wondering if you’ve been blasted back in time, say, to the ’50s. Before you stands a small retro-diner style building with a shiny silver overhang and an enormous sign towering over the roof that reads, “Twin Donuts.” This childhood diner throwback sits directly on the point of the sidewalk where the two streets cross and has maintained that spot for almost 60 years now.

  19. Ghosts of Gone Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Linda

    2011-01-01

    GHOSTS OF GONE BIRDS is an ongoing art project dedicated to breathing life back into the birds we have lost – so we don’t lose anymore.\\ud \\ud After shows in Liverpool, London, Brighton and Swansea we have raised a creative army for conservation of over 200 artists, writers and musicians.\\ud \\ud Donations, plus a percentage of the profits from the sale of the original art and prints and 50% of the royalties from the book will go directly to help frontline conservation projects fighting to sav...

  20. An Analysis of Department of Defense Services Contract Trends, 1990-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Express Scripts $425 Subtotal for Top 5 $1,685 $10,493 6 Christus  Health $135 Johns Hopkins APL $297 7 Martin’s Point Health Care $122 Martin’s Point Health...Care $271 8 Johns Hopkins University $89 LHI $214 9 Pacific Medical Centers $81 Christus  Health $175 10 Electronic Data Systems $28 Brighton Marine

  1. Los Alamos nEDM Experiment and Demonstration of Ramsey's Method on Stored UCNs at the LANL UCN Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Steven; Chupp, Tim; Cude-Woods, Christopher; Currie, Scott; Ito, Takeyasu; Liu, Chen-Yu; Long, Joshua; MacDonald, Stephen; Makela, Mark; O'Shaughnessy, Christopher; Plaster, Brad; Ramsey, John; Saunders, Andy; LANL nEDM Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory ultracold neutron (UCN) source was recently upgraded for a factor of 5 improvement in stored density, providing the statistical precision needed for a room temperature neutron electric dipole moment measurement with sensitivity 3 ×10-27 e . cm, a factor 10 better than the limit set by the Sussex-RAL-ILL experiment. Here, we show results of a demonstration of Ramsey's separated oscillatory fields method on stored UCNs at the LANL UCN source and in a geometry relevant for a nEDM measurement. We argue a world-leading nEDM experiment could be performed at LANL with existing technology and a short lead time, providing a physics result with sensitivity intermediate between the current limit set by Sussex-RAL-ILL, and the anticipated limit from the complex, cryogenic nEDM experiment planned for the next decade at the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS-nEDM). This work was supported by the Los Alamos LDRD Program, Project 20140015DR.

  2. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 6 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (1/3) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) Introduction to Cosmology (1/2) Tuesday 7 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Introduction to Cosmology (2/2) Wednesday 8 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN J. Carr; F. Gianotti J. Carr in main auditorium F. Gianotti in TH auditorium LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Discussion Session Thursday 9 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN G. Veneziano; E. Copeland G. Veneziano in main auditorium E. Copeland in TH auditorium Dreams of a Finite Theory (1/2) Student Session (1/3) Discussion Session Friday 10 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN L. Okun / CERN Student Se...

  3. Palaeolithic research at the Institute of Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Garrard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Since its foundation in 1937, the Institute of Archaeology has been an important centre of research on Pleistocene environments and Palaeolithic archaeology. Frederick Zeuner (loA: 1937-1963 was greatly respected for his teaching and research on the subject, including his 1945 publication The Pleistocene period and John Waechter (loA: 1954-1978 for his Palaeolithic excavations at Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar and Swanscombe in the Thames Valley. Mark Newcomer (loA: 1973-1989 inspired many of the students with his experimental research on prehistoric bone and flint technology and for his innovative work on the microwear analysis of flint tools. In 1982, Mark Roberts began his excavations at the Lower Palaeolithic site of Boxgrove in Sussex and more recently Matthew Pope has been involved in an extensive survey of the Middle Pleistocene raised beaches along the south Sussex coast. Simon Parfitt has been undertaking groundbreaking research into the Lower Palaeolithic of East Anglia. Andrew Garrard and Norah Moloney joined the staff of the Institute of Archaeology in 1990 and 1994 respectively, and Dietrich Stout and Ignacio de la Torre in 2005. Each are involved in research relating to human developments through the Pleistocene and this is outlined in the four sections that follow. Several other staff also undertake research in related fields, including Ole Gron, Simon Hills on, Richard Macphail, Marcello Mannino, Tim Schadla-Hall, James Steele and Ken Thomas. The work of several of these has featured in recent issues of Archaeology International.

  4. Allergen skin prick test should be adjusted by the histamine reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreborg, Sten

    2015-01-01

    Skin prick test results are mostly reported as mean wheal diameter obtained with one concentration of allergen. Differences in technique between personnel causes variation in wheal size. The research question was whether the influence of differences in skin prick test technique among assistants and centers can be reduced by relating the allergen wheal response to that of histamine. Two methods for estimating skin reactivity, the method of Nordic Guidelines using histamine as a reference and the method of Brighton et al. [Clin Allergy 1979;9:591-596] not using histamine as a reference, were applied to data from two biological standardization trials, using the same batch of freeze-dried timothy pollen preparation. The concentration defining the Nordic biological unit, defined as a concentration of allergen eliciting a wheal of the same size as that of histamine dihydrochloride 10 mg/ml, did not differ between the centers. When not using histamine as a reference, applying the method of Brighton et al., there was a 15-fold difference in the estimate of the biological activity between the trials that was eliminated by adjusting the allergen response to that of the histamine reference. To reduce the influence of differences in test technique among assistants and centers responses to allergen-induced skin prick tests should be compared to that of histamine. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Oxidative damage in gill of Mytilus edulis from Merseyside, UK, and reversibility after depuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanouil, Christina [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cxe263@bham.ac.uk; Green, Richard M.; Willey, Frances R.; Chipman, J. Kevin [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Mussels were collected from the urban/industrialized site of New Brighton, Merseyside and the relatively non-industrial site of Llandudno, North Wales. All mussels were identified as Mytilus edulis by PCR amplification of Mefp1. DNA single strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were measured in gill within 24 h of collection, using the COMET assay, both with and without formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. Gill lipid peroxidation was also measured within 24 h. No difference between sites was found for frank SSB and malonaldehyde levels, however 8-oxo-dG and 4-hydroxynonenal were significantly greater in New Brighton mussels compared to Llandudno mussels. After 1-month laboratory maintenance, lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG levels were lower. In contrast, frank SSB were higher. This could reflect enhanced DNA repair excision, though we cannot exclude the possibility of other non-oxidative DNA damage. The results suggest that laboratory maintenance allows recovery from environmentally induced oxidative damage, which was more extensive at Merseyside. - Oxidative damage to DNA and lipids was greater in gill of mussels of a polluted site compared to a cleaner one and it was reduced by subsequent depuration.

  6. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  7. Correlations Between General Joint Hypermobility and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and Injury in Contemporary Dance Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemper, Alia; Watkins, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    The first objective of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of general joint hypermobility (GJH) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in BA Dance Theatre 1st and 3rd year students at a contemporary dance conservatory. The second objective was to determine the statistical correlation between GJH, JHS, and injury in this population. A total of 85 (female, N = 78; male, N = 7) contemporary dance students participated in the study. The Beighton score (with a forward flexion test modification) was used to determine GJH, and the Brighton criteria were used to verify JHS. Participants completed a self-reported injury questionnaire that included type of injury (physical complaint, medical diagnosis, or time-loss) and injury frequency. Statistical analysis (Pearson correlation) was used to correlate GJH, JHS, and frequency-of-injury scores. Overall, 69% of the students were found to have GJH, and 33% had JHS. A statistical correlation of r = + 0.331 (p dance students and suggests that screening programs should include the Brighton criteria to identify JHS in these dancers. Subsequent injury tracking and injury prevention programs would then provide data for further research in this area.

  8. Relationships between Liquid Atomization and Solid Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    fragment size distributions found in the research literature , including specific examples of Weibull, Gamma, and root normal size distributions. This...bn 1               n m b n n m 1 1 1 The research literature usually considers Weibull size distributions to be the same when mn...approximations based on test or computational data, while those given in the grey cells are exact values derived from theory. As seen in Appendix A, the

  9. Orthonormal Polynomials on the Unit Circle and Spatially Discrete Painlevé II Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, C B

    1999-01-01

    We consider the polynomials $\\phi_n(z)= \\kappa_n (z^n+ b_{n-1} z^{n-1}+ >...)$ orthonormal with respect to the weight $\\exp(\\sqrt{\\lambda} (z+ 1/z)) dz/2 \\pi i z$ on the unit circle in the complex plane. The leading coefficient equation which is further proved to approach a third order differential equation by double scaling. The third order differential equation is equivalent to the Painlevé II equation. The leading coefficient and second leading coefficient of $\\phi_n(z)$ can be expressed asymptotically in terms of the Painlevé II function.

  10. What's the use?: analysing student citations to provide new insights into e-book usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Groves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a small-scale user-focused piece of research carried out at the University of Sussex. In an attempt to better understand the impact of e-books on student outputs, citation analysis was performed on coursework to identify the e-books that had been used. Of the students surveyed, 11.6% cited an e-book in their work and, for this particular group, EBL was found to be the most popular collection. However, cross reference with the Library discovery tool and Google revealed that e-books available from the web were cited more than those from library collections. Interviews uncovered a spectrum of usage, leading to the conclusion that a comprehensive e-book strategy is required that makes students aware of their benefits, equips them with the skills needed for effective use and increases the number of e-books available.

  11. Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment

    OpenAIRE

    Monnier, Raymonde

    2008-01-01

    Dans ce livre, Katerina Deligiorgi, qui enseigne la philosophie et la littérature à l’Université de Sussex, ouvre un dialogue historique entre Emmanuel Kant et ses contemporains pour répondre aux principales critiques des Lumières, tant à celles du siècle de la critique en France et en Allemagne, qu’aux interprétations post-modernes du XXe siècle. « Qu’est-ce que les Lumières ? », la question intéresse le passé et le présent. La réponse à la question posée par Kant et ses contemporains est à ...

  12. ATLAS Virtual Visit London-20-08-2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Working at the highest energy particle accelerator in the world, a group of scientists gathers each year to discuss the science and discovery potential of extremely energetic and complex phenomena that might emerge from the proton collisions at the LHC. The BOOST Conference of 2014 is hosted by the UCL HEP Group at the heart of London, and features an evening of particle physics, including an introduction to the Higgs and the Large Hadron Collider, a virtual visit to CERN hosted by David Miller of Chicago University, a talk by TEDx speaker Lily Asquith (Argonne National Lab/Sussex Uni) on sonification of LHC data, and a question and answer session! More information can be found on the conference website at: http://www.hep.ucl.ac.uk/boost2014/.

  13. The Effect of Hen Breeds on the Egg Response to the Non Destructive Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Křivánek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the evaluation of the effect of hen breed on the egg response to the non-destructive impact. The eggs of four hen breeds (Leghorn White, Rhode Island Red, Bar Plymouth Rock and Sussex Light were tested. An experimental system was set up to generate the impact force, measure the response wave signal, and analyse the frequency spectrum in the three direction of loading (sharp end, equator, blunt end. The egg dynamic resonance frequency was obtained through the analysis of the dynamically measured frequency response of an egg excited by light impact of a bar. The results showed that the dominant frequency was significantly affected by the hen bread and not significantly affected by excitation velocity. The dominant frequency enables to estimate the eggshell strength under quasi static compression.

  14. PREDICTS: Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity in Changing Terrestrial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Mace

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The PREDICTS project (www.predicts.org.uk is a three-year NERC-funded project to model and predict at a global scale how local terrestrial diversity responds to human pressures such as land use, land cover, pollution, invasive species and infrastructure. PREDICTS is a collaboration between Imperial College London, the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Microsoft Research Cambridge, UCL and the University of Sussex. In order to meet its aims, the project relies on extensive data describing the diversity and composition of biological communities at a local scale. Such data are collected on a vast scale through the committed efforts of field ecologists. If you have appropriate data that you would be willing to share with us, please get in touch (enquiries@predicts.org.uk. All contributions will be acknowledged appropriately and all data contributors will be included as co-authors on an open-access paper describing the database.

  15. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2017-09-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. While of interest as a fundamental particle property, a precise value for the neutron lifetime is also required for consistency tests of the Standard Model as well as to calculate the primordial 4He abundance in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis models. An effort has begun to develop an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with a projected <= 0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed.

  16. Further investigation of a contactless patient-electrode interface of an Electrical Impedance Mammography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, N.; Béqo, N.; Adams, C.; Sze, G.; Tunstall, B.; Qiao, G.; Wang, W.

    2010-04-01

    The Sussex Mk4 Electrical Impedance Mammography (EIM) system is a novel instrument, designed for the detection of early breast cancer, based upon Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). Many innovations in the field have been incorporated in the design improving both signal distribution and response. This paper investigates the behaviour of the contactless patient-electrode interface. The interface was studied in detail using phantom and healthy volunteer, in-vivo, data. Our findings show the necessity for the careful design of electrode enclosure so that the response of the system is not affected by the unpredictable positioning of the breast; it closely mimics those conditions seen when using the phantom. The paper includes a number of possible designs and their individual characteristics. In addition an explanation on the unanticipated effects and solutions for such are described.

  17. A no-name tuberculosis tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis Y; Ridzon, Renee; Giles, Beverly; Mireles, Teresa; Garrity, Kelli; Hathcock, A Leroy; Crowder, David; Jackson, Robert; Taylor, Zachary

    2003-10-01

    Foreign-born persons from countries where tuberculosis (TB) is endemic make up a significant percentage of poultry industry workers in Delaware, a leading poultry-producing state. Many of these workers enter the United States without documentation and assume multiple identities, making it difficult for public health staff to investigate TB contacts who work in the poultry plants. The Sussex County Health Unit of the Delaware Division of Public Health developed a no-name TB tracking system to facilitate identification and treatment of poultry plant workers with TB infection and disease in a high-risk population whose members assume one or more aliases. Completion rates for treatment of latent TB infection in this group increased from 48% to 64% 2 years after the program's implementation.

  18. SMART - Sediment Mitigation Actions for the River Rother, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennine L.; Foster, Ian; Boardman, John; Holmes, Naomi

    2017-03-01

    The River Rother, West Sussex, is suffering from excess sediment which is smothering the river bed gravels. This is thought to be exacerbating issues of pollution and degradation of ecosystems. This project aims to identify the severity, extent, possible causes and potential mitigation options available to reduce these pressures on the river. Data have been collected from ten sites to investigate the amount of sediment stored in the river bed gravels and cores obtained from four small reservoirs to establish rates of sedimentation and contribute to the construction of a temporal sediment budget over the last 50-100 years. Evidence suggests that tributary streams have more stored sediment per m2 upstream of their confluence with the River Rother compared to the Rother itself. Reservoir core data indicate that sediment has accumulated more rapidly in the small reservoirs surrounded by mixed agricultural land compared to one surrounded by ancient woodland. These are preliminary results and work is continuing.

  19. Imaging of Archaeological Remains at Barcombe Roman Villa using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, F.; Utsi, E.; Alani, A.; Persico, R.

    2012-04-01

    The site of the Barcombe Romano-British villa lies in a field on the perimeter of Barcombe village in East Sussex, England. The site came to the attention of the Mid Sussex Field Archaeological Team (MSFAT) and the University College London Field Archaeological Unit (UCL, subsequently replaced by the Centre for Continuing Education of the University of Sussex, CCE) because it was in danger of disappearing altogether without being adequately recorded [1]. In common with many other UK sites of the period, the villa had been extensively robbed out in the centuries following its demise in order to provide building material for the adjacent village and its associated farms, a common problem with Romano-British sites in the UK [2]. In addition, the site is positioned on the ridge of a field in agricultural use and has therefore been extensively ploughed out. As a result, the archaeological evidence was sparse and the little that remained was being rapidly eroded. In April 2001, a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey was carried out jointly by the Department of Engineering, Portsmouth and Utsi Electronics Ltd on behalf of the archaeological team in order to investigate the possibility of mapping both the villa and earlier prehistoric remains on the same ridge. Using a 40m by 60m grid laid out by the archaeological team, a Groundvue 1, with antennas of central frequency 400MHz, was used to survey along a series of parallel transects at intervals of 50cm. The sampling interval along the line of survey was 5cm and probing was carried out to 40ns. The results of the GPR survey, including a comparison with the evidence from the resistivity work, were published in 2002 [3]. The original GPR data were processed (using the ReflexW package) by applying background removal, adding time based gain, averaging over 2 traces in order to reduce noise resulting from the relative movement of the antennas across the ploughed field and finally applying a Bandpass Butterworth filter of 200

  20. Changes in chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivities following tropicamide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J K; Ong, G; Rajak, S; Casswell, A G

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the effects of tropicamide on chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivities over the physiological range of spatial frequencies. A total of 26 healthy volunteers, with a mean age of 32 years, were examined with and without one drop of 1% tropicamide being administered 30 min previously. On each occasion, acuity and pupil diameter were recorded, and chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivities were examined using the Sussex Grating Machine. Following tropicamide administration mean pupil diameter increased from 4.1 mm to 7.2 mm (Ptropicamide administration at 2.20 cycles per degree (cpd) (P=0.01), 3.40 cpd (P=0.01), 10 cpd (P=0.04), 17 cpd (P=0.04), and 25 cpd (Ptropicamide administration at intermediate and high spatial frequencies. No significant changes were seen at low spatial frequencies and in chromatic contrast sensitivities.

  1. Single Microwave Photon Detection with a Trapped Electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Cridland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the use of an electron in a Penning trap as a detector of single microwave photons. At the University of Sussex we are developing a chip Penning trap technology, designed to be integrated within quantum circuits. Microwave photons are guided into the trap and interact with the electron’s quantum cyclotron motion. This is an electric dipole transition, where the near field of the microwave radiation induces quantum jumps of the cyclotron harmonic oscillator. The quantum jumps can be monitored using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, providing the quantum non demolition signal of the microwave quanta. We calculate the quantum efficiency of photon detection and discuss the main features and technical challenges for the trapped electron as a quantum microwave sensor.

  2. USO DE BLOQUES NUTRICIONALES COMO COMPLEMENTO PARA OVINOS EN EL TROPICO SECO DEL ALTIPLANO CENTRAL DE MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Vazquez-Mendoza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar el comportamiento productivo de ovinos complementados con bloques nutricionales en confinamiento y pastoreo. Se llevaron a cabo dos experimentos, el Experimento 1 se realizó con ovinos en confinamiento, el Experimento 2 se realizó con ovinos en pastoreo continuo en pastizales nativos. Para ambos experimentos 1 y 2 se utilizaron quince ovinos F1 (Dorper x Pelibuey, con un peso inicial de 17±3 y 26 ± 3 kg respectivamente. Los tratamientos en el experimento 1 fueron: T1= dieta basal + BN1 (conteniendo L. Leucocephala T2= dieta basal + BN2 (conteniendo salvado de trigo y T3= Dieta basal (Testigo. Los tratamientos en el Experimento 2 fueron: T1= Pastoreo + BN1, T2= Pastoreo + BN2 y T3= Pastoreo (control. Las variables respuestas en ambos experimentos fueron: ganancia diaria de peso (GDP, consumo de bloque nutricional (CBN, consumo de dieta basal (CDB consumo total (CT, digestibilidad aparente de la materia seca de bloques nutricionales (DAMSBN, digestibilidad aparente de la materia seca de la dieta basal (DAMSDB. En ambos experimentos los datos se analizaron mediante un diseño completamente al azar. En el Experimento 1 se encontraron diferencias en la GDP (P

  3. New models for droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-02-01

    A brief summary of new models for droplet heating and evaporation, developed mainly at the Sir Harry Ricardo Laboratory of the University of Brighton during 2011-2012, is presented. These are hydrodynamic models for mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking into account the effects of the moving boundary due to evaporation, hydrodynamic models of multi-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking and not taking into account the effects of the moving boundary, new kinetic models of mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, and a model for mono-component droplet evaporation, based on molecular dynamics simulation. The results, predicted by the new models are compared with experimental data and the prehctions of the previously developed models where possible. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

  4. The effect of quality of family interaction and intergenerational transmission of values on sexual permissiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taris, T W; Semin, G R; Bok, I A

    1998-06-01

    Quality of family interaction as a moderator of the relation between mothers and their adolescent children's sexual permissiveness was examined. Mothers were expected to be able to influence their children's sexual standards, but this effect was expected to be stronger when the family interaction was characterized by mutual understanding and respect. This hypothesis was tested by means of multiple-group structural equation modeling, with a sample of 323 adolescent-mother pairs that were representative of the Brighton and Hove (UK) area. The adolescents were 14 to 18 years old. The results supported our hypothesis that intergenerational transmission of values benefits from good mother-child relations. In addition, we found that socioeconomic status was less strongly related to adolescent permissiveness and age was more strongly related in high quality of interaction groups than in low quality of family interaction groups. Implications of the study are discussed.

  5. From Scene to Screen: The challenges and opportunities of commercial digital platforms for HIV community outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Mowlabocus

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article draws upon data from Reaching Out Online, a collaborative research project that explored the need for, and development of, a digital health outreach service for gay, bisexual men and men who have sex with men (MSM in London and Brighton, United Kingdom. It identifies the challenges that commercial hook-up apps and other digitally based dating and sex services pose for conventional forms of gay men’s health promotion. It then moves to explore the opportunities that these same services offer for health promotion teams. Chiefly, the discussion highlights the potential that commercial platforms offer to peer educators in terms of reaching local cohorts of men, together with the constraints placed upon this form of outreach as a result of the commercial imperatives that underpin these digital services.

  6. Cause Related Marketing: Consumers Perceptions and Benefits for Profit and Non-Profits Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Farache

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to understand consumers’ perceptions regarding Cause Related Marketing [CRM]. The research findings were based on a survey of 200 consumers in the Brighton area and published data. The research aim was focused on the consumers’ perception of the alliance between corporations and non-profit organisations. The research found that consumers have a better perception of firms that work with charities and good causes than those that do not. They believe that the partnership between corporations and charities has an impact on the good of society. However, they are aware that corporations themselves benefit from this partnership. Concerning good causes, consumers prefer to support those related to Children. The researchers noticed that an individual connection with a cause might have considerable influence on consumer attitudes and behaviour in relation to a specific cause.

  7. "Who wants to eat in a toilet?" A social marketing approach to breast-feeding in public places and at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair-Stevens, Terry; Cork, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    A public health project is described which used social marketing philosophy and techniques to find out how to help facilitate breast-feeding in public places and for mothers returning to work. As part of a strategy to increase local breast-feeding rates, Brighton and Hove Healthy City Partnership, representing the local Primary Care Trust, City Council and the business, academic and voluntary sectors, worked with a social marketing consultancy. The consultancy carried out a literature review and qualitative research that used creative engagement methods to consult with local people. The consultations were with key stakeholders, mothers, and groups traditionally less interested in the subject of breast-feeding, such as employers, elderly people, teenage boys, and fathers. The qualitative research generated in-depth insight and soundly-based, practical recommendations for facilitating breast-feeding. The social marketing approach helped to establish that any ensuing policies and practices would be acceptable to a wide range of the local population.

  8. A database in ACCESS for assessing vaccine serious adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas RE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roger E Thomas,1 Dave Jackson2,3 1Department of Family Medicine, G012 Health Sciences Centre, University of Calgary Medical School, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Independent Research Consultant, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Database Consultant, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: To provide a free flexible database for use by any researcher for assessing reports of adverse events after vaccination. Results: A database was developed in Microsoft ACCESS to assess reports of serious adverse events after yellow fever vaccination using Brighton Collaboration criteria. The database is partly automated (if data panels contain identical data fields the data are automatically also entered into those fields. The purpose is to provide the database free for developers to add additional panels to assess other vaccines. Keywords: serious adverse events after vaccination, database, process to assess vaccine-associated events 

  9. Ontologies to capture adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) from real world health data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Harshana; de Lusignan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Immunisation is an important part of health care and adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) are relatively rare. AEFI can be detected through long term follow up of a cohort or from looking for signals from real world, routine data; from different health systems using a variety of clinical coding systems. Mapping these is a challenging aspect of integrating data across borders. Ontological representations of clinical concepts provide a method to map similar concepts, in this case AEFI across different coding systems. We describe a method using ontologies to be flag definite, probable or possible cases. We use Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) as an AEFI to illustrate this method, and the Brighton collaboration's case definition of GBS as the gold standard. Our method can be used to flag definite, probable or possible cases of GBS. Whilst there has been much research into the use of ontologies in immunisation these have focussed on database interrogation; where ours looks to identify varying signal strength.

  10. UKSG Annual Conference 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Dutta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available UKSG offered four free places for students to attend the 2012 Conference, made possible with generous support from Elsevier, whose contribution is very much appreciated. Those eligible to apply were students enrolled on Library & Information and Publishing degree courses, and the successful applicants were (Ieft to right as photographed against the River Clyde: Stuart Lawson (University of Brighton, Jennifer Lovatt (Oxford Brookes University, Gopal Dutta (University of Sheffield and Lydia Lantzsch (Oxford Brookes University. The four have allowed us to take a peek at the diaries they kept during the conference. The extracts below give us a flavour of the event including the plenary and breakout sessions, the debates and the stamina of those who kept the dancing going!

  11. Epidemiology and public health in 1906 England: Arthur Newsholme's methodological innovation to study breastfeeding and fatal diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, Alfredo; Rubenstein, Beth; Victora, Cesar G

    2013-07-01

    In 1906 Arthur Newsholme linked artificial feeding and fatal diarrhea in infants aged one year and younger on the basis of two independent sources of information: mortality registration and a three-year (1903-1905) census of infants from Brighton, United Kingdom. Artificial feeding was more common in the infants who had died (89.3%) than in those in the survey (22.3%). However, boldly assuming the two data sources were nested, Newsholme computed the risks of fatal diarrhea: these were 48 times greater for infants fed fresh cow's milk and 94 times greater for those fed condensed milk than for infants who were exclusively breastfed. This mode of computing risks and risk ratios before the invention of the cohort study design was more innovative than was the usual investigation techniques of his contemporary epidemiologists. Newsholme's conclusions were consistent with the current knowledge that breastfeeding protects against fatal diarrhea.

  12. MRI findings of optic pathway involvement in Miller Fisher syndrome in 3 pediatric patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Zhang, Mia; Wu, Xiao; Jindal, Shanu; Durand, David; Makhani, Naila

    2017-05-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a rare demyelinating condition which may have involvement of cranial nerves. There are a few case reports of optic pathway involvement in children. We describe 3 patients with optic pathway enhancement in pediatric patients with MFS. We retrospectively reviewed brain imaging findings in 17 pediatric patients with of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) meeting Brighton criteria who had brain MRIs performed during their acute illness. Cranial nerve enhancement was seen in 6/17 patients and optic nerve/chiasm enhancement was seen in 3 patients. Cranial nerve enhancement and optic pathway in particular, can be seen in patients with MFS. Imaging findings do not always correlate with clinical manifestations of cranial nerve involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cost estimates of spinal versus general anaesthesia for fractured neck of femur surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakladar, A; White, S M

    2010-08-01

    It remains uncertain whether spinal anaesthesia is preferable to general anaesthesia for surgical repair of hip fracture, but one determining factor is the comparative cost. A detailed cost analysis relating to 20 consultants' intended anaesthetic practice (which provided information of consumables used) and data from the Brighton Hip Fracture Database was performed to quantify any difference in the costs of administering spinal versus general anaesthesia for patients with hip fracture. Although spinal anaesthesia took significantly longer to administer (mean (SD) time 31 (15) min vs 27 (16) min; p anaesthesia (193.81 pounds (37.49)) was significantly less than the cost of general anaesthesia (270.58 pounds (44.68); p anaesthesia was 3.8% of hospital income per hip fracture, and personnel contributed approximately 46% of this cost. While such considerations indicate that spinal anaesthesia is financially preferable, it is unknown whether differential clinical outcomes between regional and general anaesthesia may offset this apparent monetary advantage.

  14. Faut que ça saigne !

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Renneville

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available « Je crois que c’est à Brighton que fut fondée une Société pour la suppression de la vertu. Cette société a elle-même été supprimée, mais je suis au regret de vous informer qu’il en existe une autre à Londres, d’un caractère encore plus abominable. On peut l’appeler, par ses tendances, société pour l’encouragement du crime mais, par un délicat euphémisme, elle s’intitule Société des connaisseurs en matière de crime. Ils se déclarent friands d’homicides ; amateurs et dilettantes en massacres ;...

  15. Joint hypermobility syndrome in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Satybaldyev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS is a disease characterized by symptoms of locomotor system involvement in the absence of obvious systemic rheumatic diseases (RDs. JHS accompanied by the symptomatology of RDs should be distinguished from isolated joint hypermobility, in which there are no complaints even in cases of its generalized manifestations and the patients feel virtually healthy. The paper provides an overview of the literature on the JHS. It gives diagnostic criteria for JHS (the Brighton criteria encompasses the Beighton score and the clinical manifestation of damages to the locomotor apparatus, visceral organs, and skin in this syndrome. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction as a possible manifestation of JHS and its impact on the daily life of patients are discussed. Attention is paid to the prevention and treatment of JHS. 

  16. Measuring situation awareness in emergency settings: a systematic review of tools and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simon Cooper,1,2 Joanne Porter,3 Linda Peach41School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Berwick, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Brighton, Brighton, UK; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery Monash University, Gippsland, VIC, 4School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaBackground: Nontechnical skills have an impact on health care outcomes and improve patient safety. Situation awareness is core with the view that an understanding of the environment will influence decision-making and performance. This paper reviews and describes indirect and direct measures of situation awareness applicable for emergency settings.Methods: Electronic databases and search engines were searched from 1980 to 2010, including CINAHL, Ovid Medline, Pro-Quest, Cochrane, and the search engine, Google Scholar. Access strategies included keyword, author, and journal searches. Publications identified were assessed for relevance, and analyzed and synthesized using Oxford evidence levels and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme guidelines in order to assess their quality and rigor.Results: One hundred and thirteen papers were initially identified, and reduced to 55 following title and abstract review. The final selection included 14 papers drawn from the fields of emergency medicine, intensive care, anesthetics, and surgery. Ten of these discussed four general nontechnical skill measures (including situation awareness and four incorporated the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique.Conclusion: A range of direct and indirect techniques for measuring situation awareness is available. In the medical literature, indirect approaches are the most common, with situation awareness measured as part of a nontechnical skills assessment. In simulation-based studies, situation awareness in emergencies tends to be suboptimal, indicating the need for improved training techniques to enhance awareness and

  17. Incidence of acute intussusception among infants in eastern France: results of the EPIstudy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso Kamdem, Arnaud; Vidal, Chrystelle; Pazart, Lionel; Leroux, Franck; Pugin, Aurore; Savet, Caroline; Sainte-Claire Deville, Geoffroy; Riou França, Lionel; Guillemot, Didier; Massol, Jacques

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of intussusception in infants varies around the world. The epidemiology of intussusception in France has never been prospectively studied. We performed a prospective observational study with systematic inclusion of all infants aged France (98,000 live births per year), from 4/1/2008 to 3/31/2012. Cases were classified using the Brighton Collaboration classification. In total, 185 infants with suspected intussusception were included of which 169 were idiopathic intussusception. Among these 169 cases, 115 (68%) were classed as Brighton level 1 (confirmed cases). Overall incidence of intussusception over the 4 years of the study was 29.8 (95% CI 24.6-35.7) cases per 100,000 live births for level 1 and 37.5 (95% CI 31.7-44.2) cases per 100,000 live births for all cases (levels 1-4). Annual incidence rates of level 1 intussusception were as follows: 44 (95% CI 31.9-59.3), 30.9 (20.9-44.2), 21.7 (13.4-33.2) and 22.1 (13.7-33.8) per 100,000 live births in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th study years, respectively. The incidence rate of intussusception in the eastern part of France is comparable to that of other European countries. There was a significant trend towards a decrease in the incidence of intussusception. What is known • Intussusception is the most frequent causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and young children. Overall incidence of intussusception in infants aged France on intussusception. What is new: • This prospective and multicenter study provides important information about the epidemiology of intussusception in infants in France over a period of 4 years.

  18. Hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome in Brazilian students and teachers of ballet dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, S B; Oliveira, G M; Osório, F L; Crippa, J A S; Martín-Santos, R

    2015-04-01

    The current literature has been discussing the risks and benefits of joint hypermobility (JHM) for careers in ballet This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of JHM and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in a group of ballet teachers and students, looking both at aspects related to the flexibility required to dance, as at the risk of injuries when hypermobility is associated with other symptoms, in the case of JHS. We evaluated ballet teachers and ballet students, with age ranging from 18 to 40 years. All participants completed identification and sociodemographic questionnaires and underwent a physical examination. JHM was assessed using the Beighton score with goniometry. Symptoms of JHS were evaluated according to the Brighton criteria. Final sample consisted of 77 participants, being 44 ballet students and 33 ballet teachers. The prevalence of JHM in the sample as a whole was 58 %. Teachers and students had no significant differences regarding the prevalence of JHM (p = 0.74) (OR 1.21; 95 % CI 0.48-3.07). However, the prevalence of JHS was significantly different (p = 0.04) between students (16 %) and teachers (36 %). Teachers were three times more likely than student to have JHS (OR 3.02; 95 % CI 1.03-8.85). Teachers and students also presented differences in the frequency of specific items of Beighton score and Brighton criteria. These data provide elements to discuss the relationship between hypermobility, ballet technique and selection for dance, suggesting that dancers with JHS could find in ballet teaching an alternative to maintain professional activity with dance, while remaining protected from the higher risk of injury that professional dancers may be exposed to.

  19. Dynamical R Matrices of Elliptic Quantum Groups and Connection Matrices for the q-KZ Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Konno

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available For any affine Lie algebra ${mathfrak g}$, we show that any finite dimensional representation of the universal dynamical $R$ matrix ${cal R}(lambda$ of the elliptic quantum group ${cal B}_{q,lambda}({mathfrak g}$ coincides with a corresponding connection matrix for the solutions of the $q$-KZ equation associated with $U_q({mathfrak g}$. This provides a general connection between ${cal B}_{q,lambda}({mathfrak g}$ and the elliptic face (IRF or SOS models. In particular, we construct vector representations of ${cal R}(lambda$ for ${mathfrak g}=A_n^{(1}$, $B_n^{(1}$, $C_n^{(1}$, $D_n^{(1}$, and show that they coincide with the face weights derived by Jimbo, Miwa and Okado. We hence confirm the conjecture by Frenkel and Reshetikhin.

  20. Gas-exfoliated porous monolayer boron nitride for enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingcheng; Wu, Peiwen; Chao, Yanhong; He, Jing; Li, Hongping; Lu, Linjie; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Huaming; Zhu, Wenshuai

    2018-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride has been regarded to be an efficient catalyst in aerobic oxidation fields, but limited by the less-exposed active sites. In this contribution, we proposed a simple green liquid nitrogen gas exfoliation strategy for preparation of porous monolayer nanosheets (BN-1). Owing to the reduced layer numbers, decreased lateral sizes and artificially-constructed pores, increased exposure of active sites was expected, further contributed to an enhanced aerobic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) performance up to ∼98% of sulfur removal, achieving ultra-deep desulfurization. This work not only introduced an excellent catalyst for aerobic ODS, but also provided a strategy for construction of some other highly-efficient monolayer two-dimensional materials for enhanced catalytic performance.

  1. GAO report and EDF cost revisions reignite debate on Hinkley Point C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, The Independent Global Nuclear News Agency, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-10-15

    The announcement by French state-controlled utility EDF that it has added pound 1.5 bn (Euro 1.7 bn, $ 1.9 bn) to its estimated costs for two new reactors at Hinkley Point C, has led to questions about whether the government should rethink the project, with some politicians calling for it to be abandoned. EDF's announcement came less than two weeks after a report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said the government's deal for the two EPR units, now estimated to be costing pound 19.6 bn (Euro 22.3 bn, $ 25.5 bn), has locked consumers into a risky and expensive project with uncertain strategic and economic benefits. The UK's Energy Technologies Institute (ETI), in a report prepared before the EDF announcement, had already said the requirement to improve the predictability and affordability of new nuclear power plants has never been stronger.

  2. P[N(i-Bu)CH(2)CH(2)](3)N: nonionic Lewis base for promoting the room-temperature synthesis of α,β-unsaturated esters, fluorides, ketones, and nitriles using Wadsworth-Emmons phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintareddy, Venkat Reddy; Ellern, Arkady; Verkade, John G

    2010-11-05

    The bicyclic triaminophosphine P(RNCH(2)CH(2))(3)N (R = i-Bu, 1c) serves as an effective promoter for the room-temperature stereoselective synthesis of α,β-unsaturated esters, fluorides, and nitriles from a wide array of aromatic, aliphatic, heterocyclic, and cyclic aldehydes and ketones, using a range of Wadsworth-Emmons (WE) phosphonates. Among the analogues of 1c [R = Me (1a), i-Pr (1b), Bn (1d)], 1a and 1b performed well, although longer reaction times were involved, and 1d led to poorer yields than 1c. Functionalities such as cyano, chloro, bromo, methoxy, amino, ester, and nitro were well tolerated. We were able to isolate and characterize (by X-ray means; see above) the reactive WE intermediate species formed from 2b and 1c.

  3. Metal and base free synthesis of primary amines via ipso amination of organoboronic acids mediated by [bis(trifluoroacetoxy)iodo]benzene (PIFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nachiketa; Goswami, Avijit

    2015-08-07

    A metal and base free synthesis of primary amines has been developed at ambient temperature through ipso amination of diversely functionalized organoboronic acids, employing a combination of [bis(trifluoroacetoxy)iodo]benzene (PIFA)-N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and methoxyamine hydrochloride as the aminating reagent. The amines were primarily obtained as their trifluoroacetate salts which on subsequent aqueous alkaline work up provided the corresponding free amines. The combination of PIFA-NBS is found to be the mildest choice compared to the commonly used strong bases (e.g. n-BuLi, Cs2CO3) for activating the aminating agent. The reaction is expected to proceed via activation of the aminating reagent followed by B-N 1,2-aryl migration.

  4. Removing the mustard oil bomb from seeds: transgenic ablation of myrosin cells in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) produces MINELESS seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Birgit Hafeld; Thangstad, Ole Petter; Ahuja, Ishita; Rossiter, John Trevor; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-06-01

    Many plant phytochemicals constitute binary enzyme-glucoside systems and function in plant defence. In brassicas, the enzyme myrosinase is confined to specific myrosin cells that separate the enzyme from its substrate; the glucosinolates. The myrosinase-catalysed release of toxic and bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates, upon activation or tissue damage, has been termed 'the mustard oil bomb' and characterized as a 'toxic mine' in plant defence. The removal of myrosin cells and the enzyme that triggers the release of phytochemicals have been investigated by genetically modifying Brassica napus plants to remove myrosinase-storing idioblasts. A construct with the seed myrosin cell-specific Myr1.Bn1 promoter was used to express a ribonuclease, barnase. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing barnase were embryo lethal. Co-expressing barnase under the control of the Myr1.Bn1 promoter with the barnase inhibitor, barstar, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enabled a selective and controlled death of myrosin cells without affecting plant viability. Ablation of myrosin cells was confirmed with light and electron microscopy, with immunohistological analysis and immunogold-electron microscopy analysis showing empty holes where myrosin cells normally are localized. Further evidence for a successful myrosin cell ablation comes from immunoblots showing absence of myrosinase and negligible myrosinase activity, and autolysis experiments showing negligible production of glucosinolate hydrolysis products. The plants where the myrosin defence cells have been ablated and named 'MINELESS plants'. The epithiospecifier protein profile and glucosinolate levels were changed in MINELESS plants, pointing to localization of myrosinases and a 35 kDa epithiospecifier protein in myrosin cells and a reduced turnover of glucosinolates in MINELESS plants.

  5. Surveying for the rare Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii in northern Iberian peninsula by means of an acoustic lure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urtzi Goiti

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the Araba province (Basque Country, Iberian Peninsula we surveyed for the rare Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii using a recently developed method based on an acoustic lure, the Sussex AutoBat. We surveyed 16 deciduous woodlands, an irrigation pool and a cave, a total of 45 sites. The synthesized calls were played behind mist nets following an established protocol. In total, we captured 32 bats representing 6 genera and 10 species; among these, 6 M. bechsteinii, 3 M. daubentonii, 4 Nyctalus leisleri, 5 Plecotus auritus, 1 P. austriacus, and 1 Barbastella barbastellus were caught using the acoustic lure. Two of the Bechstein’s bats were lactating females. By radiotracking one of them, we found the third known breeding colony for this rare species in the Iberian Peninsula. The acoustic lure proved to be a promising method for improving the trapping success of this species. Riassunto Indagine sul Vespertilio di Bechstein (Myotis bechsteinii in Spagna mediante emissioni sonore. Il monitoraggio del Vespertilio di Bechstein (Myotis bechsteinii, specie rara di chirottero nella provincia di Araba (Paesi Baschi, penisola iberica, è stato effettuato mediante l’utilizzo di emissioni ultrasonore per attrarre gli animali (Sussex AutoBat. Sono stati monitorati 45 siti, distribuiti in 16 differenti boschi a latifoglie, un bacino utilizzato per scopi irrigui e una grotta. In ciascun sito sono state utilizzate reti mist net di varia lunghezza e sono stati emessi richiami ultrasonori in prossimità delle reti stesse, secondo una procedura standardizzata. In totale, grazie all'utilizzo delle emissioni sonore sono stati caturati 32 pipistrelli appartenenti a 10 specie, tra cui 6 M. bechsteinii, 3 M. daubentonii, 4 Nyctalus leisleri, 5 Plecotus auritus, 1 P. austriacus

  6. Before you make the data interoperable you have to make the people interoperable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, I.

    2008-12-01

    In February 2006 a deceptively simple concept was put forward. Could we use the International Year of Planet Earth 2008 as a stimulus to begin the creation of a digital geological map of the planet at a target scale of 1:1 million? Could we design and initiate a project that uniquely mobilises geological surveys around the world to act as the drivers and sustainable data providers of this global dataset? Further, could we synergistically use this geoscientist-friendly vehicle of creating a tangible geological map to accelerate progress of an emerging global geoscience data model and interchange standard? Finally, could we use the project to transfer know-how to developing countries and reduce the length and expense of their learning curve, while at the same time producing geoscience maps and data that could attract interest and investment? These aspirations, plus the chance to generate a global digital geological dataset to assist in the understanding of global environmental problems and the opportunity to raise the profile of geoscience as part of IYPE seemed more than enough reasons to take the proposal to the next stage. In March 2007, in Brighton, UK, 81 delegates from 43 countries gathered together to consider the creation of this global interoperable geological map dataset. The participants unanimously agreed the Brighton "Accord" and kicked off "OneGeology", an initiative that now has the support of more than 85 nations. Brighton was never designed to be a scientific or technical meeting: it was overtly about people and their interaction - would these delegates, with their diverse cultural and technical backgrounds, be prepared to work together to achieve something which, while technically challenging, was not complex in the context of leading edge geoscience informatics. Could we scale up what is a simple informatics model at national level, to deliver global coverage and access? The major challenges for OneGeology (and the deployment of interoperability

  7. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  8. Live virus vaccines based on a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone: Standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David K; Hendry, R Michael; Singh, Vidisha; Rose, John K; Seligman, Stephen J; Klug, Bettina; Kochhar, Sonali; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2016-12-12

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viral and other microbial pathogens in their genome (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many such viral vector vaccines are now at various stages of clinical evaluation. Here, we introduce an attenuated form of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) as a potential chimeric virus vaccine for HIV-1, with implications for use as a vaccine vector for other pathogens. The rVSV/HIV-1 vaccine vector was attenuated by combining two major genome modifications. These modifications acted synergistically to greatly enhance vector attenuation and the resulting rVSV vector demonstrated safety in sensitive mouse and non-human primate neurovirulence models. This vector expressing HIV-1 gag protein has completed evaluation in two Phase I clinical trials. In one trial the rVSV/HIV-1 vector was administered in a homologous two-dose regimen, and in a second trial with pDNA in a heterologous prime boost regimen. No serious adverse events were reported nor was vector detected in blood, urine or saliva post vaccination in either trial. Gag specific immune responses were induced in both trials with highest frequency T cell responses detected in the prime boost regimen. The rVSV/HIV-1 vector also demonstrated safety in an ongoing Phase I trial in HIV-1 positive participants. Additionally, clinical trial material has been produced with the rVSV vector expressing HIV-1 env, and Phase I clinical evaluation will initiate in the beginning of 2016. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing key characteristics of the novel rVSV vaccine vectors, in comparison to wild type VSV. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing transparency and comparability of information. The Brighton Collaboration V3SWG template may also be useful as a guide to the

  9. Live Virus Vaccines Based on a Yellow Fever Vaccine Backbone: Standardized Template with Key Considerations for a Risk/Benefit Assessment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P.; Seligman, Stephen J.; Robertson, James S.; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B.; Condit, Richard C.; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called “chimeric virus vaccines”). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were replaced by the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  10. OneGeology: Making the World’s Geological Map Data Accessible Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, H.; Jackson, I.; Robida, F.; Thorleifson, H.

    2009-12-01

    OneGeology (http://onegeology.org) is a successful international initiative of the geological surveys of the world and the flagship project of the ‘International Year of Planet Earth’. Its aim is to provide dynamic web access to geological map data covering the world, creating a focus for accessing geological information for everyone. Thanks to the enthusiasm and support of participating nations the initiative has progressed rapidly and geological surveys and the many users of their data are excited about this ground-breaking project. Currently 10 international geoscience organizations have endorsed the initiative and more than 109 countries have agreed to participate. OneGeology works with whatever digital format is available in each country. The target scale is 1:1 million, but the project is pragmatic and accepts a range of scales and the best available data. The initiative recognizes that different nations have differing abilities to participate and transfer of know-how to those who need it is a key aspect of the approach. A key contributor to the success of OneGeology has been its utilization of the latest new web technology and an emerging data exchange standard for geological map data called GeoSciML. GeoSciML (GeoScience Markup Language) is a schema written in GML (Geography Markup Language) for geological data. GeoSciML has the ability to represent both the geography (geometries e.g. polygons, lines and points) and geological attribution in a clear and structured format. OneGeology was launched March 2007 at the inaugural workshop in Brighton England. At that workshop the 43 participating nations developed a declaration of a common objective and principles called the “Brighton Accord” (http://onegeology.org/what_is/accord.html) . Work was initiated immediately and the resulting OneGeology Portal was launched at the International Geological Congress in Oslo in August 2008 by Simon Winchester, author of “The Map that Changed the World”. Since the

  11. General practitioners believe that hypnotherapy could be a useful treatment for irritable bowel syndrome in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lusignan Simon

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome is a common condition in general practice. It occurs in 10 to 20% of the population, but less than half seek medical assistance with the complaint. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 406 GPs listed on the West Sussex Health Authority Medical List to investigate their views of this condition and whether they felt hypnotherapy had a place in its management Results 38% of general practitioners responded. The achieved sample shared the characteristics of target sample. Nearly half thought that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS was a "nervous complaint" and used a combination of "the placebo effect of personal care," therapeutic, and dietary advice. There is considerable divergence in the perceived effectiveness of current approaches. Over 70% thought that hypnotherapy may have a role in the management of patients with IBS; though the majority (68% felt that this should not be offered by general practitioners. 84% felt that this should be offered by qualified hypnotherapist, with 40% feeling that this should be offered outside the health service. Conclusions General practitioners vary in their perceptions of what constitutes effective therapy in IBS. They are willing to consider referral to a qualified hypnotherapist.

  12. Effective communication between ENT and primary care - a survey of outpatient correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, A B; Watts, S; Fleming, J

    2015-06-01

    To improve the quality of outpatient clinic communication between Otolaryngology and primary care doctors. Three example outpatient letters with identical content were created using different structure styles - full prose, headline subheadings with full prose and full subheadings throughout. Electronic questionnaires were sent out to 30 randomly selected General Practitioners in the area served by Western Sussex NHS Trust. The electronic mail study invite contained the initial GP referral, the three different letter formats and a link to the Sheffield Assessment for Letters (SAIL) questionnaire, which contained a 18-point checklist, 6 rating subheadings with a 10-point rating scale and a free text comment section. Study participants were asked to read the letters in the time usually afforded to outpatient letters in their routine practice, answer questions and then rate the letters. With a response rate of 66.7%, overall comparison of GP preferences demonstrated a significant variation between the three letter formats (Freidman P value = 0.0001). Post hoc multiple comparisons showed statistically significant preference for the headline subheading and prose letter compared to the full subheaded letter (P effective communication between healthcare professionals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Salt gradient solar pond for solar heat collection and long term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsworth, P.J.; Al-Saleh, N.; Phillips, V.; Butlin, B.

    1985-01-01

    The solar pond project at the University of Sussex aims to study the design, construction, filling, and operation of salt gradient solar ponds, and to develop instrumentation for monitoring behaviour and performance. This paper describes the construction, filling, and operation of an outdoor pilot solar pond, and a simple means of maintaining salt density gradient, as well as work on pond transparency. To obtain high overall operating efficiency we have successfully experimented with extracting heat from both the non-convecting insulation layer and the convecting storage layer of the pond. This permits interception and extraction of heat flow in the non-convecting layer which would otherwise be lost at the surface. We have carried out laboratory and outdoor experiments to test whether this causes unwanted convective mixing in the non-convective zone, and have measured heat transfer coefficients achievable in that layer. Both steady-state and finite difference model calculations are presented to indicate the improvements in operating efficiency and temperature that are achievable with this method of heat extraction. Good applications and limitations are discussed.

  14. A contextual study of police car telematics: the future of in-car information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Paul; Langham, Martin

    2005-02-01

    Telematics systems are increasingly prevalent, but how safe are they to use? Designers have the challenge of designing systems that are suitable for usage within vehicles--systems that do not excessively distract the driver from the primary task of driving. This investigation addressed the requirements of telematics system design by evaluating an existing telematics device in the context of its everyday use. The system evaluated was the Mobile Data Terminal, a device used by the Sussex Police Force to assist officers in their duties whilst out on patrol. The investigation involved interviewing officers, working alongside officers in real-world situations, and assessing the system through implementation of a telematics safety checklist. The findings showed that the Mobile Data Terminal improved the productivity of double-crewed patrol cars, but was less effective, and potentially compromised road safety when patrol cars were single-crewed. The central conclusion was that telematics systems, which are considered to be incompatible with driving, should not be accessible whilst a vehicle is in motion.

  15. Different Dimensions of Cognitive Style in Typical and Atypical Cognition: New Evidence and a New Measurement Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealor, Andy D; Simner, Julia; Rothen, Nicolas; Carmichael, Duncan A; Ward, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    We developed the Sussex Cognitive Styles Questionnaire (SCSQ) to investigate visual and verbal processing preferences and incorporate global/local processing orientations and systemising into a single, comprehensive measure. In Study 1 (N = 1542), factor analysis revealed six reliable subscales to the final 60 item questionnaire: Imagery Ability (relating to the use of visual mental imagery in everyday life); Technical/Spatial (relating to spatial mental imagery, and numerical and technical cognition); Language & Word Forms; Need for Organisation; Global Bias; and Systemising Tendency. Thus, we replicate previous findings that visual and verbal styles are separable, and that types of imagery can be subdivided. We extend previous research by showing that spatial imagery clusters with other abstract cognitive skills, and demonstrate that global/local bias can be separated from systemising. Study 2 validated the Technical/Spatial and Language & Word Forms factors by showing that they affect performance on memory tasks. In Study 3, we validated Imagery Ability, Technical/Spatial, Language & Word Forms, Global Bias, and Systemising Tendency by issuing the SCSQ to a sample of synaesthetes (N = 121) who report atypical cognitive profiles on these subscales. Thus, the SCSQ consolidates research from traditionally disparate areas of cognitive science into a comprehensive cognitive style measure, which can be used in the general population, and special populations.

  16. Different Dimensions of Cognitive Style in Typical and Atypical Cognition: New Evidence and a New Measurement Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy D Mealor

    Full Text Available We developed the Sussex Cognitive Styles Questionnaire (SCSQ to investigate visual and verbal processing preferences and incorporate global/local processing orientations and systemising into a single, comprehensive measure. In Study 1 (N = 1542, factor analysis revealed six reliable subscales to the final 60 item questionnaire: Imagery Ability (relating to the use of visual mental imagery in everyday life; Technical/Spatial (relating to spatial mental imagery, and numerical and technical cognition; Language & Word Forms; Need for Organisation; Global Bias; and Systemising Tendency. Thus, we replicate previous findings that visual and verbal styles are separable, and that types of imagery can be subdivided. We extend previous research by showing that spatial imagery clusters with other abstract cognitive skills, and demonstrate that global/local bias can be separated from systemising. Study 2 validated the Technical/Spatial and Language & Word Forms factors by showing that they affect performance on memory tasks. In Study 3, we validated Imagery Ability, Technical/Spatial, Language & Word Forms, Global Bias, and Systemising Tendency by issuing the SCSQ to a sample of synaesthetes (N = 121 who report atypical cognitive profiles on these subscales. Thus, the SCSQ consolidates research from traditionally disparate areas of cognitive science into a comprehensive cognitive style measure, which can be used in the general population, and special populations.

  17. Search for Supersymmetry in final states with three leptons and missing transverse energy with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has collected an unprecedented amount of data in the 3 years of data taking since its start. In this document I will dis- cuss the results of the analysis I performed during my PhD at the university of Sussex for the search of Supersymmetry in events with three leptons (electron/muon/tau) and missing transverse energy in the final state. The search is performed on the full dataset collected by the experiment in 2012, at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. These results are interpreted in SUSY models with chargino-neutralino pair production via decays involving sleptons, staus, gauge bosons and the newly discovered Higgs boson. These results presen- ted improve on previous searches performed at ATLAS in three lepton final states with only electrons and muons. Special focus will be given to the optimisation process of Su- persymmetry signal with respect to the SM background, and the statistical interpretation of the results obtained with this search.

  18. Factors associated with quality of life in active childhood epilepsy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Atkinson, Patricia; Das, Krishna B; Chin, Richard F M; Aylett, Sarah E; Burch, Victoria; Gillberg, Christopher; Scott, Rod C; Neville, Brian G R

    2015-05-01

    Improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL), rather than just reducing seizures, should be the principal goal in comprehensive management of childhood epilepsy. There is a lack of population-based data on predictors of HRQOL in childhood epilepsy. The Children with Epilepsy in Sussex Schools (CHESS) study is a prospective, population-based study involving school-aged children (5-15 years) with active epilepsy (on one or more AED and/or had a seizure in the last year) in a defined geographical area in the UK. Eighty-five of 115 (74% of eligible population) children underwent comprehensive psychological assessment including measures of cognition, behaviour, and motor functioning. Parents of the children completed the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE).Clinical data on eligible children was extracted using a standardised pro forma. Linear regression analysis was undertaken to identify factors significantly associated with total Quality of Life in this population. Factors independently significantly associated (p QOLCE scores were seizures before 24 months, cognitive impairment (IQ QOLCE when children with IQ < 50 were excluded from analysis. The majority of factors associated with parent reported HRQOL in active childhood epilepsy are related to neurobehavioural and/or psychosocial aspects of the condition. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of cry2-type genes in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates recovered from diverse habitats in India and isolation of a novel cry2Af2 gene toxic to Helicoverpa armigera (cotton boll worm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katara, Jawahar Lal; Kaur, Sarvjeet; Kumari, Gouthami Krishna; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Insecticidal cry and vip genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been used for control of lepidopteran insects in transgenic crops. However, novel genes are required for gene pyramiding to delay evolution of resistance to the currently deployed genes. Two PCR-based techniques were employed for screening of cry2-type genes in 129 Bt isolates from diverse habitats in India and 27 known Bt strains. cry2Ab-type genes were more prevalent than cry2Aa- and cry2Ac-type genes. Correlation between source of isolates and abundance of cry2-type genes was not observed. Full-length cry2A-type genes were amplified by PCR from 9 Bt isolates and 4 Bt strains. The genes from Bt isolates SK-758 from Sorghum grain dust and SK-793 from Chilli seeds warehouse, Andhra Pradesh, were cloned and sequenced. The gene from SK-758 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866915) was novel, while that from SK-793 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866914) was identical to the cry2Ab1 gene. The Bacillus thuringiensis Nomenclature Committee ( http://www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/home/Neil_Crickmore/Bt/toxins2.html ) named these genes cry2Af2 and cry2Ab16, respectively. The cry2Af2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be toxic towards Helicoverpa armigera. The cry2Af2 gene will be useful for pyramiding in transgenic crops.

  20. Whole genome resequencing of a laboratory-adapted Drosophila melanogaster population sample [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Gilks

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of a study into the molecular genetics of sexually dimorphic complex traits, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain data on genomic variation in an outbred laboratory-adapted fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster population. We successfully resequenced the whole genome of 220 hemiclonal females that were heterozygous for the same Berkeley reference line genome (BDGP6/dm6, and a unique haplotype from the outbred base population (LHM. The use of a static and known genetic background enabled us to obtain sequences from whole genome phased haplotypes. We used a BWA-Picard-GATK pipeline for mapping sequence reads to the dm6 reference genome assembly, at a median depth of coverage of 31X, and have made the resulting data publicly-available in the NCBI Short Read Archive (Accession number SRP058502. We used Haplotype Caller to discover and genotype 1,726,931 small genomic variants (SNPs and indels, <200bp. Additionally we detected and genotyped 167 large structural variants (1-100Kb in size using GenomeStrip/2.0. Sequence and genotype data are publicly-available at the corresponding NCBI databases: Short Read Archive, dbSNP and dbVar (BioProject PRJNA282591. We have also released the unfiltered genotype data, and the code and logs for data processing and summary statistics (https://zenodo.org/communities/sussex_drosophila_sequencing/.

  1. Small Engines as Bottoming Cycle Steam Expanders for Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohitha Weerasinghe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery bottoming cycles for internal combustion engines have opened new avenues for research into small steam expanders (Stobart and Weerasinghe, 2006. Dependable data for small steam expanders will allow us to predict their suitability as bottoming cycle engines and the fuel economy achieved by using them as bottoming cycles. Present paper is based on results of experiments carried out on small scale Wankel and two-stroke reciprocating engines as air expanders and as steam expanders. A test facility developed at Sussex used for measurements is comprised of a torque, power and speed measurements, electronic actuation of valves, synchronized data acquisition of pressure, and temperatures of steam and inside of the engines for steam and internal combustion cycles. Results are presented for four engine modes, namely, reciprocating engine in uniflow steam expansion mode and air expansion mode and rotary Wankel engine in steam expansion mode and air expansion mode. The air tests will provide base data for friction and motoring effects whereas steam tests will tell how effective the engines will be in this mode. Results for power, torque, and p-V diagrams are compared to determine the change in performance from air expansion mode to steam expansion mode.

  2. Effects of the origin and caponisation on carcass and meat traits in cockerels and capons aged 18 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Adamski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effect of the origin and caponisation on selected slaughter traits and quality indicators of meat in cockerels and capons of strains N88 (New Hampshire, R55 (Rhode Island Red, S11 (Sussex, and P55 (Plymouth Rock. The slaughter yield, breast muscle weight, percentage share of muscles in total in the carcasses, and fatness in general did not differ between the cockerels and capons within the evaluated strains. The trait that mostly distinguished cockerels from capons of strain N88 was the weight of leg muscles. Similarly, the fat content of carcasses expressed with the weight and percentage share of the skin with subcutaneous fat and abdominal fat did not differ between the evaluated groups of cockerels and capons. However, the weight of the leg muscles varied depending on the origin of cockerels and capons. As for the physiochemical properties of meat as well as its chemical composition, no significant differences were recorded in 18-week-old birds. The only obvious effect of the origin and caponisation was found on varied contents of fat in breast muscles in cockerels of strains N88 and P55, and capons of strain P55.

  3. Antioxidant Potential of the Polyherbal Formulation “ImmuPlus”: A Nutritional Supplement for Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cecchini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to counteract harmful effects of oxidative stress due to pathological conditions or physical exercise, horses are often administered dietary supplements having supposed high antioxidant activities. The aim of the present study was to identify the in vitro antioxidant potential of “ImmuPlus”, a polyherbal formulation (Global Herbs LTD, Chichester, West Sussex, Great Britain, containing three medicinal plants (Withania somnifera, Tinospora cordifolia, and Emblica officinalis, known in Ayurveda for their use in human disease treatment. Extracts obtained by different solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, and hexane were tested for total antioxidant capacity, total reducing power, scavenging activity against DPPH radical, and total polyphenol and flavonoid contents. Our results showed that, except as regards hexane, all the used solvents are able to extract compounds having high antioxidant activity, even when compared to ascorbic acid. Regression analysis showed significant correlations between antioxidant properties and polyphenol/flavonoid contents, indicating the latter, known for their beneficial effects on health of human and animal beings, as major components responsible for the strong antioxidant capacities. Moreover, obtained results suggest the effective role of the polyherbal mixture as good source of antioxidants in horses.

  4. Francisco Miranda, Director de Colciencias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraím Otero Ruiz

    2006-09-01

    De su desempeño en Sussex (universidad distinguida mundialmente por sus estudios sobre desarrollo tecnológico, transferencia de tecnología y administración de proyectos se recibieron siempre los mejores informes, que lo colocaron en el alto nivel de los latinoamericanos ilustres que han pasado larga o brevemente por dicho claustro, como Máximo Halty-Carrere del Uruguay, Francisco Sagasti del Perú o Fernando Chaparro de Colombia. Con ese bagaje regresó al país donde fue designado como Director Administrativo del Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigación Médica (CIDEIM de Cali, cargo que ocupó de 1992 a 2002; y al terminar ese decenio fue nombrado por la Junta Directiva como Director Ejecutivo, cargo que ocupó hasta su designación en COLCIENCIAS. En Cali ha ocupado también distinguidas posiciones, tales como Miembro del Consejo Directivo de la Fundación Planeta Valle y del Consejo de Internacionalización de la Universidad Javeriana en esa ciudad...

  5. Using the simplified case mix tool (sCMT) to identify cost in special care dental services to support commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, B G; Freeman, R; Richards, D; Crosbie, S; Patel, P; White, S; Humphris, G

    2017-03-01

    To commission dental services for vulnerable (special care) patient groups effectively, consistently and fairly an evidence base is needed of the costs involved. The simplified Case Mixed Tool (sCMT) can assess treatment mode complexity for these patient groups. To determine if the sCMT can be used to identify costs of service provision. Patients (n=495) attending the Sussex Community NHS Trust Special Care Dental Service for care were assessed using the sCMT. sCMT score and costs (staffing, laboratory fees, etc.) besides patient age, whether a new patient and use of general anaesthetic/intravenous sedation. Statistical analysis (adjusted linear regression modelling) compared sCMT score and costs then sensitivity analyses of the costings to age, being a new patient and sedation use were undertaken. Regression tables were produced to present estimates of service costs. Costs increased with sCMT total scale and single item values in a predictable manner in all analyses except for 'cooperation'. Costs increased with the use of IV sedation; with each rising level of the sCMT, and with complexity in every sCMT category, except cooperation. Costs increased with increase in complexity of treatment mode as measured by sCMT scores. Measures such as the sCMT can provide predictions of the resource allocations required when commissioning special care dental services. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  6. PiRaNhA: a server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V.; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue accessibility and residue hydrophobicity as features. The server allows the submission of up to 10 protein sequences, and the predictions for each sequence are provided on a web page and via email. The prediction results are provided in sequence format with predicted RBRs highlighted, in text format with the SVM threshold score indicated and as a graph which enables users to quickly identify those residues above any specific SVM threshold. The graph effectively enables the increase or decrease of the false positive rate. When tested on a non-redundant data set of 42 protein sequences not used in training, the PiRaNhA server achieved an accuracy of 85%, specificity of 90% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.41 and outperformed other publicly available servers. The PiRaNhA prediction server is freely available at http://www.bioinformatics.sussex.ac.uk/PIRANHA. PMID:20507911

  7. Implementing a strategy to promote lifelong learning in the primary care workforce: an evaluation of leadership roles, change management approaches, interim challenges and achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Susan; Woods, Leslie; Boudioni, Markella; Lemma, Ferew; Tavabie, Abdol

    2008-01-01

    To identify and explore leadership roles and responsibilities for implementing the workforce development strategy; to identify approaches used to implement and disseminate the strategy; and to identify and explore challenges and achievements in the first 18 months following implementation. A formative evaluation with qualitative methods was used. Documentary analysis, interviews (n = 29) and two focus groups (n = 12) were conducted with a purposive sample of individuals responsible for strategy implementation. Data were transcribed and analysed thematically using framework analysis. Regional health area in Kent, Surrey and Sussex: 24 primary care trusts (PCTs) and 900 general practices. Primary care workforce tutors, lifelong learning advisors, GP tutors, patch associate GP deans and chairs of PCT education committees all had vital leadership roles, some existing and others newly developed. Approaches used to implement the strategy encompassed working within and across organisational boundaries, communication and dissemination of information. Challenges encountered by implementers were resistance to change - evident in some negative attitudes to uptake of training and development opportunities - and role diversity and influence. Achievements included successes in embedding appraisal and protected learning time, and changes in educational practices and services. The use of key leadership roles and change-management approaches had brought about early indications of positive transition in lifelong learning cultures.

  8. Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lusignan Simon

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK the health service is investing more than ever before in information technology (IT and primary care nurses will have to work with computers. Information about patients will be almost exclusively held in electronic patient records; and much of the information about best practice is most readily accessible via computer terminals. Objective To examine the influence of age and nursing profession on the level of computer use. Methods A questionnaire was developed to examine: access, training received, confidence and use of IT. The survey was carried out in a Sussex Primary Care Trust, in the UK. Results The questionnaire was sent to 109 nurses with a 64% response rate. Most primary care nurses (89% use their computer regularly at work: 100% of practice nurses daily, compared with 60% of district nurses and 59% of health visitors (p Conclusions Using computers in the surgery has become the norm for primary care nurses. However, nurses over 50, working out in the community, lack the confidence and skill of their younger and practice based colleagues.

  9. SMART – Sediment Mitigation Actions for the River Rother, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Evans

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The River Rother, West Sussex, is suffering from excess sediment which is smothering the river bed gravels. This is thought to be exacerbating issues of pollution and degradation of ecosystems. This project aims to identify the severity, extent, possible causes and potential mitigation options available to reduce these pressures on the river. Data have been collected from ten sites to investigate the amount of sediment stored in the river bed gravels and cores obtained from four small reservoirs to establish rates of sedimentation and contribute to the construction of a temporal sediment budget over the last 50–100 years. Evidence suggests that tributary streams have more stored sediment per m2 upstream of their confluence with the River Rother compared to the Rother itself. Reservoir core data indicate that sediment has accumulated more rapidly in the small reservoirs surrounded by mixed agricultural land compared to one surrounded by ancient woodland. These are preliminary results and work is continuing.

  10. Investigation of an outbreak of vomiting in nurseries in South East England, May 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, M; Purcell, B; Willis, C; Amar, C F L; Kanagarajah, S; Chamberlain, D; Wooldridge, D; Morgan, J; McLauchlin, J; Grant, K A; Harvey-Vince, L; Padfield, M; Mearkle, R; Chow, J Y

    2016-02-01

    On 30 May 2012, Surrey and Sussex Health Protection Unit was called by five nurseries reporting children and staff with sudden onset vomiting approximately an hour after finishing their lunch that day. Over the following 24 h 50 further nurseries supplied by the same company reported cases of vomiting (182 children, 18 staff affected). Epidemiological investigations were undertaken in order to identify the cause of the outbreak and prevent further cases. Investigations demonstrated a nursery-level attack rate of 55 out of 87 nurseries (63·2%, 95% confidence interval 52·2-73·3). Microbiological tests confirmed the presence of Bacillus cereus in food and environmental samples from the catering company and one nursery. This was considered microbiologically and epidemiologically consistent with toxin from this bacterium causing the outbreak. Laboratory investigations showed that the conditions used by the caterer for soaking of pearl haricot beans (known as navy bean in the USA) used in one of the foods supplied to the nurseries prior to cooking, was likely to have provided sufficient growth and toxin production of B. cereus to cause illness. This large outbreak demonstrates the need for careful temperature control in food preparation.

  11. Are residential and nursing homes adequately screening overseas healthcare workers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loveday Rachel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been significant growth in the number of healthcare workers born outside the UK or recruited to the UK from countries with a high prevalence of TB, Hepatitis and other blood borne infections. Government policy recognises the need for occupational health procedures to facilitate treatment for these individuals and to reduce the risk of transmission of disease to patients. The aim of this study was to undertake a survey of nursing and residential homes in South East England, to assess whether homes had occupational health screening policies for healthcare workers who have originated from overseas, and what level of occupational health screening had been undertaken on these employees. Methods An anonymous survey was sent to all 500 homes in West Sussex assessing occupational health practices for "overseas health care workers", defined as health care workers who had been born outside the UK. Results Only one employer (0.8% reported they had an occupational health screening policy specific for healthcare workers who originate from overseas. Over 80% of homes who had recruited directly had no evidence of screening results for HIV, TB, Hepatitis B and C. The commonest countries of origin for staff were the UK, Philippines, Poland, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and India. Conclusion This study suggests that screening of overseas healthcare workers is not routine practice for residential or nursing care homes and requires further input from Primary Care Trust's, Health Care Commission, Commission for Social Care Inspection, and Professional bodies.

  12. Gordon Fraser (1943-2013)

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    We were deeply saddened to learn that Gordon Fraser had passed away on 3 January. During his 25-year career at CERN, until his retirement in 2002, he made many valuable contributions to the Laboratory, in particular as editor of CERN Courier.   Gordon’s life in science began at Imperial College London, where he obtained a PhD with the theory group of the future Nobel laureate Abdus Salam. He then spent time at Tel Aviv University in Yuval Ne’eman’s group and at Brighton University, before changing career to become a journalist, at first for Computer Weekly in London. He moved into scientific editing at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in 1975 and it was from there that he was hired to join the publications team at CERN in 1977. By 1982 Gordon had become the editor of the CERN Courier. During his time at the helm, both particle physics and the Courier changed considerably. Under his careful stewardship aspects of publishing were outsourced, leading to a...

  13. Action learning: a tool for the development of strategic skills for Nurse Consultants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah; Nixon, Eileen; Hinge, Denise; McFadyen, Jan; Wright, Vanessa; Lambert, Pauline; Pilkington, Carolyn; Newsome, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This paper will discuss the process of action learning and the outcomes of using action learning as a tool to achieve a more strategic function from Nurse Consultant posts. It is documented that one of the most challenging aspect of Nurse Consultant roles, in terms of leadership, is the strategic contribution they make at a senior corporate Trust level, often across organizations and local health economies. A facilitated action learning set was established in Brighton, England, to support the strategic leadership development of eight nurse consultant posts across two NHS Trusts. Benefits to patient care, with regard to patient pathways and cross-organizational working, have been evident outcomes associated with the nurse consultant posts involved in the action learning set. Commitment by organizational nurse leaders is essential to address the challenges facing nurse consultants to implement change at strategic levels. The use of facilitated action learning had been a successful tool in developing the strategic skills of Nurse Consultant posts within this setting. Action learning sets may be successfully applied to a range of senior nursing posts with a strategic remit and may assist post holders in achieving better outcomes pertinent to their roles.

  14. Identifying and interpreting spatiotemporal variation in diagnoses of infectious syphilis among men, England: 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Gibin, Maurizio; Sile, Bersabeh; Simms, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Spatial clusters and variations in the trajectory of local epidemics were explored in relation to sexual orientation, demographic factors, stage of syphilis infection and HIV serostatus. Kulldorff's scan statistics (SaTScan) was used to distinguish endemic and temporary clusters using a two-stage analysis. Endemic areas were found in London, Manchester, Brighton and Blackpool. Up to 40% of diagnoses were found within an 11 km radius of central London. Of men diagnosed with syphilis in London, 80% were men who have sex with men (MSM). Annual incidence in London increased from 24 cases (95% CI 23 to 26) per 100 000 male population in 2009 to 36 cases (95% CI 34 to38) in 2013. In comparison with clusters, endemic areas were characterised by a significantly higher (psource outbreaks were seen at two locations. Control of syphilis in endemic areas has proved elusive and clusters present unique intervention opportunities. Investigating the diversity of local epidemics provides information that can be used to predict outbreak structure, plan and evaluate sexual health services and guide public health investigation, hypothesis generation and research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Brookfield Homes Passive House Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herk, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poerschke, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beach, R. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-02-04

    In 2012-2013, IBACOS worked with a builder, Brookfield Homes in Denver, Colorado, to design and construct a Passive House certified model home. IBACOS used several modeling programs and calculation methods to complete the final design package along with Brookfield's architect KGA Studio. This design package included upgrades to the thermal enclosure, basement insulation, windows, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Short-term performance testing in the Passive House was done during construction and after construction. Testing with a blower door indicated that whole-building air leakage to the outside was 324 CFM and 0.60 ACH50. The other two test homes had little short-term testing done post-construction by the local energy rater. IBACOS then monitored the energy consumption and whole-house comfort conditions of that occupied Passive House after one year of operation and compared the monitoring results to those for two other occupied test houses in the same area with similar square footage but slightly different floor plans. IBACOS also assisted the builder, Brookfield Homes, in researching design scenarios for Zero Energy Ready Home and ENERGY STAR acceptance levels. IBACOS also assisted Brookfield in conceptualizing product for Denver's Brighton Heights area. Brookfield was considering building to Zero Energy Ready Home standards in that location. IBACOS provided strategies that Brookfield may draw from in the event the builder chooses to pursue a Zero Energy Ready Home plan for that market.

  16. Anaphylaxis following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Gold, Mike S; Kemp, Andrew S; McIntyre, Peter B; Burgess, Margaret A; Campbell-Lloyd, Sue

    2008-09-09

    In 2007, Australia implemented the National human papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program, which provides quadrivalent HPV vaccine free to all women aged 12-26 years. Following notification of 7 presumptive cases of anaphylaxis in the state of New South Wales, Australia, we verified cases and compared the incidence of anaphylaxis following HPV vaccination to other vaccines in comparable settings. We contacted all patients with suspected anaphylaxis and obtained detailed histories from telephone interviews and a review of medical records. A multidisciplinary team determined whether each suspected case met the standardized Brighton definition. Some participants also received skin-prick allergy testing for common antigens and components of the HPV vaccine. Of 12 suspected cases, 8 were classified as anaphylaxis. Of these, 4 participants had negative skin-prick test results for intradermal Gardasil. From the 269 680 HPV vaccine doses administered in schools, 7 cases of anaphylaxis were identified, which represents an incidence rate of 2.6 per 100 000 doses (95% CI 1.0-5.3 per 100 000). In comparison, the rate of identified anaphylaxis was 0.1 per 100 000 doses (95% CI 0.003-0.7) for conjugated meningococcal C vaccination in a 2003 school-based program. Based on the number of confirmed cases, the estimated rate of anaphylaxis following quadrivalent HPV vaccine was significantly higher than identified in comparable school-based delivery of other vaccines. However, overall rates were very low and managed appropriately with no serious sequelae.

  17. Incidence and clinical characteristics of Guillain-Barré syndrome before the introduction of Zika virus in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jorge L; Major, Chelsea G; Pastula, Daniel M; Dirlikov, Emilio; Styczynski, Ashley; Luciano, Carlos A; Wojna, Valerie; Sharp, Tyler M; Sejvar, James J; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda

    2017-06-15

    Zika virus has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) incidence. A GBS incidence estimation and clinical description was performed to assess baseline GBS epidemiology before the introduction of Zika virus in Puerto Rico. Hospitalization administrative data from an island-wide insurance claims database and U.S. Census Bureau population estimates provided a crude GBS incidence for 2013. This estimate was adjusted using the proportion of GBS cases meeting Brighton criteria for confirmed GBS from nine reference hospitals. Characteristics of confirmed GBS cases in the same nine hospitals during 2012-2015 are described. A total of 136 GBS hospitalization claims were filed in 2013 (crude GBS incidence was 3.8 per 100,000 population). The adjusted GBS incidence was 1.7 per 100,000 population. Of 67 confirmed GBS cases during 2012-2015, 66% had an antecedent illness. Median time from antecedent illness to GBS onset was 7days. Most cases (67%) occurred during July-September. Puerto Rico's GBS incidence for 2013 was estimated using a combination of administrative data and medical records review; this method could be employed in other regions to monitor GBS incidence before and after the introduction of GBS infectious triggers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Necrotic Ulcerated Lesion in a Young Boy Caused by Cowpox Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Favier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The case presented here points towards the fact that skin lesion observed with a cowpox virus is a rare event but should be considered more as the number of cases has increased in the last years. Cowpox virus (CPXV belongs to the Poxviridae family. The transmission of CPXV to humans is caused by wild rodents or mostly by domestic animals and pet rats. In humans, CPXV is responsible for localized skin lesions regularly accompanied by lymphadenopathy. The lesions remain localized but self-inoculation from the primary lesions could occur. Then physicians have to be vigilant concerning bandages. In this case report, a necrotic and ulcerated lesion of a CPXV infection in a young boy is reported. The CPXV was possibly transmitted by wild rodents. The importance of performing the diagnosis is also pointed out. Virus information was obtained from phylogenetic analyses showing that the CPXV isolate was distinct from outbreaks of human cowpox which occurred in 2009 in France and Germany but was close to the CPXV Brighton Red strain. For several years, cases of viral zoonosis caused by CPXV have increased and physicians should be made aware that people could be infected without history of direct contact with animals.

  19. Prevalence, injury rate and, symptom frequency in generalized joint laxity and joint hypermobility syndrome in a "healthy" college population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russek, Leslie N; Errico, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are gaining increased attention as potential sources of pain and injury. The aims of this study were to evaluate prevalence of GJH and JHS and to determine whether musculoskeletal injuries and symptoms commonly attributed to GJH and JHS were more common within a "healthy" college student population. The study involved a convenience sample of 267 college and graduate students, aged 17-26. GJH was assessed using the Beighton score with a cutoff of 5/9, while JHS was assessed using the Brighton criteria. Injury history and symptoms were assessed by recall. Prevalence of GJH was 26.2 % overall (females 36.7 %, males 13.7 %). Prevalence of JHS was 19.5 % overall (females 24.5 %, males 13.7 %). Injury rates were not significantly different for individuals who had GJH vs. those who did not have GJH. Individuals with JHS were significantly more likely to have had sprains, back pain, and stress fractures. Symptoms were no different between those with GJH and those who did not have GJH. However, individuals with JHS were significantly more likely to report clumsiness, easy bruising, and balance problems than those who did not have JHS. GJH and JHS were relatively common in this healthy college student population; GJH was not associated with increased incidence of injury or symptoms commonly attributed to JHS, but JHS was associated with increased incidence of some injuries and symptoms.

  20. Postmarketing safety surveillance of trivalent recombinant influenza vaccine: Reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Emily Jane; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Jankosky, Christopher

    2017-10-09

    On January 16, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration approved recombinant hemagglutinin influenza vaccine (RIV3) (Spodoptera frugiperda cell line; Flublok), which is the first completely egg-free flu vaccine licensed in the United States. To improve our understanding of the safety profile of this vaccine, we reviewed and summarized reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) following RIV3. Through June 30, 2016, VAERS received 88 reports. Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, were the most common type of adverse event. Based on medical review, 10 cases met the Brighton Collaboration case definition of anaphylaxis, 21 reports described allergic reactions other than anaphylaxis, and 11 reports described signs and symptoms that suggested hypersensitivity. Other adverse events included injection site reactions, fatigue, myalgia, headache, and fever. The occurrence of anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions in some individuals may reflect an underlying predisposition to atopy that may manifest itself after an exposure to any drug or vaccine, and it does not necessarily suggest a causal relationship with the unique constituents that are specific to the vaccine product administered. Further research may elucidate the mechanism of allergic reactions following influenza vaccination: it is possible that egg proteins and influenza hemagglutinin play little or no role. Vaccination remains the single best defense against influenza and its complications. The information summarized here may enable policy makers, health officials, clinicians, and patients to make a more informed decision regarding vaccination strategies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Living Archives – Supporting Creative Practice Students Learning Leaps in Interdisciplinary Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ashmore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding students’ creative process in order to identify meaningful ways to nurture, support and develop creative-practice students and enhance teaching and learning is a major challenge within Higher Education (HE. This paper evaluates a project that studied creative writing and visual-practice students’ experiences of specific creative workshops at the University of Brighton. By providing opportunities for students to identify the things within their experiences, memories and even within themselves that inspire their creativity, the study found that it was possible to effectively support and enhance their creative processes. We suggest that the principles of this project can be applied to interdisciplinary academic work and help us to make links between teaching, learning and research. The paper identifies and explores opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching events and collaborative research and considers the potential impact on the authors own practices. We suggest that opportunities for interdisciplinary work and this process of learning through doing have implications for how we design and implement Creative Writing teaching and also on how we manage and carry out our research.

  2. Anaesthesia for 1131 patients undergoing proximal femoral fracture repair: a retrospective, observational study of effects on blood pressure, fluid administration and perioperative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R J; White, S M

    2011-11-01

    Intra-operative hypotension is a frequent occurrence during anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery in older patients with co-morbidities. We analysed retrospective data from the Brighton Hip Fracture Database to determine the intra-operative fall in systolic blood pressure, and the incidence of absolute (lowest systolic blood pressure 20% fall in systolic blood pressure from baseline) hypotension during general or spinal anaesthesia among 1131 non-consecutive patients with hip fracture. General anaesthesia for 489 patients (43.2%) produced a greater mean (SD) fall in systolic blood pressure than spinal anaesthesia for 578 patients (51.1%): 34.2% (13.0%) vs 29.7% (10.8%), respectively (p 1.5 ml (n = 463), fewer patients receiving ≤ 1.5 ml bupivacaine 0.5% (n = 97) experienced episodes of absolute (31.1% vs 11.3%, p anaesthesia, or reduced volumes of subarachnoid local anaesthetic. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Validation of the Children's Hospital Early Warning System for Critical Deterioration Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Mary C; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Connor, Jean Anne

    Early warning scores, such as the Children's Hospital Early Warning Score (CHEWS), are used by hospitals to identify patients at risk for critical deterioration and trigger clinicians to intervene and prevent further deterioration. This study's objectives were to validate the CHEWS and to compare the CHEWS to the previously validated Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) for early detection of critical deterioration in hospitalized, non-cardiac patients at a pediatric hospital. A retrospective cohort study reviewed medical and surgical patients at a quaternary academic pediatric hospital. CHEWS scores and abstracted PEWS scores were obtained on cases (n=360) and a randomly selected comparison sample (n=776). Specificity, sensitivity, area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) and early warning times were calculated for both scoring tools. The AUROC for CHEWS was 0.902 compared to 0.798 for PEWS (pscores ≥3 was 91.4% for CHEWS and 73.6% for PEWS with specificity of 67.8% for CHEWS and 88.5% for PEWS. Sensitivity for scores ≥5 was 75.6% for CHEWS and 38.9% for PEWS with specificity of 88.5% for CHEWS and 93.9% for PEWS. The early warning time from critical score (≥5) to critical deterioration was 3.8h for CHEWS versus 0.6h for PEWS (pearly warning time than the PEWS for identifying children at risk for critical deterioration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metal concentration in the tourist beaches of South Durban: An industrial hub of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrimurugan, E; Shruti, V C; Jonathan, M P; Roy, Priyadarsi D; Kunene, N W; Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth Campos

    2017-04-15

    South Durban basin of South Africa has witnessed tremendous urban, industrial expansion and mass tourism impacts exerting significant pressure over marine environments. 43 sediment samples from 7 different beaches (Bluff beach; Ansteys beach; Brighton beach; Cutting beach; Isipingo beach; Tiger Rocks beach; Amanzimtoti beach) were analyzed for acid leachable metals (ALMs) Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Co, Pb, Cd, Zn and Hg. The metal concentrations found in all the beaches were higher than the background reference values (avg. in μgg(-1)) for Cr (223-352), Cu (27.67-42.10), Mo (3.11-4.70), Ni (93-118), Co (45.52-52.44), Zn (31.26-57.01) and Hg (1.13-2.36) suggesting the influence of industrial effluents and harbor activities in this region. Calculated geochemical indexes revealed that extreme contamination of Cr and Hg in all the beach sediments and high Cr and Ni levels poses adverse biological effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Childhood intussusception in Uzbekistan: analysis of retrospective surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latipov, Renat; Khudoyorov, Rajabboy; Flem, Elmira

    2011-03-24

    Estimates of baseline incidence of childhood intussusception could help safety monitoring after the introduction of rotavirus vaccines. We studied the incidence of intussusception in Uzbekistan, a GAVI-fund eligible state in Central Asia. We retrospectively reviewed intussusception cases in children Uzbekistan. Demographic and clinical data as well as information on diagnostic and treatment practices were obtained from hospital records. We categorized cases using the Brighton collaboration clinical case definition and calculated the national incidence rate. Over a 5-year study period, 67 confirmed cases were identified, of which 67% were boys. The median age was 12 months, and no seasonal trend in the distribution of cases was observed. The diagnostic methods used included abdominal radiography (87%) and ultrasonography (57%). Intussusception reduction by air enema was successful in 33 (49%) patients and 34 (50%) cases underwent surgery. A total of 4 deaths occurred, including 3 deaths in infants aged 0-6 months. The median length of hospital stay was 7.3 (range 0-37) days. The incidence of intussusception is estimated at 23 (95% CI 13.6-32.4) cases per 100,000 child-years, corresponding to approximately 237 cases annually. This is the first study to estimate the incidence of childhood intussusception prior to the introduction of the rotavirus vaccination in Uzbekistan. A prospective surveillance system using a standardized case definition is needed in order to better examine the occurrence of intussusception in developing countries.

  6. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  7. Síndrome de hiperlaxitud articular benigno en el niño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mariana Haro, Dra.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de hipermovilidad articular se caracteriza por la presencia de articulaciones con rango de movilidad aumentada, asociada a dolor y deterioro funcional del sistema musculoequelético. Su etiología correspondería a una alteración del colágeno tipo I genéticamente determinada con un patrón de herencia autosómico dominante. Su incidencia es mayor en mujeres y en niños. Se ha descrito asociación con algunos síntomas extraarticulares, por lo cual los síntomas podrían no estar solo limitados al sistema musculoesquelético. El sistema de Beighton es una herramienta útil en definir la condición de hiperlaxitud. Su validación para uso en niños fue publicada por Engelsman y cols el año 2011. No obstante para el diagnóstico de Sindrome de Hiperlaxitud articular sería insuficiente, sugiriéndose el uso del sistema de clasificación de Brighton. Su tratamiento se basa en la educación, estabilización articular global, reeducación postural y de la marcha, mejorar capacidad aeróbica, uso de plantillas y órtesis de pie.

  8. Effect of motion control running shoes compared with neutral shoes on tibial rotation during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alice; Birch, Ivan; Kuisma, Raija

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether a motion control running shoe reduces tibial rotation in the transverse plane during treadmill running. An experimental study measuring tibial rotation in volunteer participants using a repeated measures design. Human Movement Laboratory, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton. Twenty-four healthy participants were tested. The group comprised males and females with size 6, 7, 9 and 11 feet. The age range for participants was 19 to 31 years. The total range of proximal tibial rotation was measured using the Codamotion 3-D Movement Analysis System. A one-tailed paired t-test indicated a statistically significant decrease in the total range of proximal tibial rotation when a motion control shoe was worn (mean difference 1.38°, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 2.73, P=0.04). There is a difference in tibial rotation in the transverse plane between a motion control running shoe and a neutral running shoe. The results from this study have implications for the use of supportive running shoes as a form of injury prevention. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease among the elderly: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Ellen; Duclos, Philippe; Yactayo, Sergio; Schuster, Melanie

    2013-12-02

    Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) is a rare and serious adverse event of the yellow fever (YF) vaccine that mimics wild-type YF. Research shows there may be an increased risk of YEL-AVD among the elderly population (≥ 60-65 years old), however this research has yet to be accumulated and reviewed in order to make policy recommendations to countries currently administering the YF vaccine. This paper systematically reviewed all information available on YEL-AVD to determine if there is an increased risk among the elderly, for both travelers and endemic populations. Age-specific reporting rates (RRs) were re-calculated from the literature using the Brighton Collaboration case definition for YEL-AVD and were then analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the RRs of younger and older age groups. Two out of the five studies found a significantly higher rate of YEL-AVD among the elderly population. Our findings suggest unexposed elders may be at an increased risk of developing YEF-AVD, however the evidence remains limited. Therefore, our findings for YF vaccination of elderly populations support the recommendations made by the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) in their April 2013 meeting, mainly vaccination of the elderly should be based on a careful risk-benefit analysis. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization (WHO). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Emigrazione e bilinguismo. Realtà russofone a confronto

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    Monica Perotto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Perotto, Carlo Ambrosi Russian Emigration and Bilingualism The present article compares two different sociolinguistic patterns of Russian emigrants of the last wave in the USA and in Italy. The New York suburb of Brighton Beach presents a typical post-Soviet community confi guration, where Russian language plays an important role of lingua franca, though it is differently realized at the diastratic level. Inside this emigration group it is possible to identify different linguistic attitudes towards Russian language between the elderly immigrants on one hand and the young ones on the other. The former are mostly monolingual and prefer to use Russian in all communication domains, the latter are bilingual with the dominance of English language and a wide use of code switching and code mixing. The Italian context is not so openly polarized, because of the dominance of Italian language, which prevails in almost all social life domains. Despite the fact that Russian speaking people living in Italy do not form a typical community, they show great interest in the mantainance of their mother tongue and of their original identity.

  11. Investigation of a Guillain-Barré syndrome cluster in the Republic of Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastula, Daniel M; Khan, Aalisha Sahu; Sharp, Tyler M; Biaukula, Viema L; Naivalu, Taina K; Rafai, Eric; Ermias Belay; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc; Kosoy, Olga I; Laven, Janeen J; Bennett, Elizabeth J; Jenney, Adam W J; Naidu, Ravi Narayan; Lanciotti, Robert S; Galloway, Renee L; Nilles, Eric J; Sejvar, James J; Kama, Mike

    2017-01-15

    In 2014, we investigated a cluster of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in Fiji that occurred during a dengue epidemic. We designed a case-control study to determine the etiology. Cases were patients meeting Brighton Collaboration criteria for GBS with onset from February 2014 to May 2014. Controls were persons without symptoms of GBS who were matched by age group and location. We collected information on demographics and potential exposures. Serum samples were tested for evidence of recent arboviral or Leptospira spp. infections. Nine cases of GBS were identified for an incidence of five cases per 100,000 population/year. Median age of cases was 27years (range: 0.8-52); five (56%) were male. Six (67%) reported an acute illness prior to GBS onset. Among the 9 cases and 28 controls enrolled, odds ratios for reported exposures or antibodies against various arboviruses or Leptospira spp. were not statistically significant. No clear etiologies were identified for this unusual GBS cluster. There was a temporal association between the GBS cluster and a dengue epidemic, but we were unable to substantiate an epidemiologic or laboratory association. Further study is needed to explore potential associations between arboviral infections and GBS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Serum relaxin levels in benign hypermobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Em, Serda; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Caglayan, Mehmet; Karakoc, Mehmet; Ucar, Demet; Verim, Sabahattin; Yildiz, Ismail; Sariyildiz, Mustafa Akif; Evliyaoglu, Osman; Nas, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the activity of serum relaxin in female patients with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS), locomotor system findings accompanying BJHS, and its relation to relaxin. Into the study, female patients with BJHS and healthy women as the control group were included. The patients were diagnosed by using the Brighton 1998 criteria. Examination of the locomotor system for study groups were performed. Serum relaxin levels of both patient and control group were measured. There were 48 female patients with BJHS and 40 healthy women in the study. With respect to the control group, the level of serum relaxin was higher in the patients (47.1 ± 20.3, 34.4 ± 22.1; p> 0.05). Again compared with the control group, arthralgia (p= 0.00), myalgia (p= 0.01), shoulder impingement syndrome (p= 0.05), pes planus (p= 0.01), and hyperkyphosis (p= 0.000) were higher in the patients. The level of relaxin median was significantly higher in the patients with pesplanus and hyperkyphosis than those who did not have them (p= 0.05, p= 0.01, respectively). Although serum relaxin level is not considered a causative factor for BJHS, the significant increases found in those patients with hyperkyphosis and pes planus suggest the hypothesis that relaxin has a limited and indefinite role in patients with BJHS.

  13. Reform of the European Court of human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojsilović Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Court of Human Rights is the crown in the international system for protecting human rights. In recent years the Court has become a victim of its own success. In response to growing backlog of individual complaints, the Council of Europe has, over the last five years, considered numerous proposals to restructure the European human rights regime and redesign the European Convention on Human Rights. The aim of this article is just to show the most important innovations introduced primarily by Protocol no. 14, and then the Declarations adopted at the Conference in Interlaken, Izmir and at the end in Brighton, this year. Some of the solutions provided will help to reduce the work load of the Court in the future, while others are introduced for practical reasons, or a well-known political. However, adopted proposals should be given time to show some results. But in the other way, the frequent changes in the Court's work system and in the Convention system may prove to be a new problem. An institution such as the Court, the protector of human rights at the European level should not be allowed to suffer frequent 'eartquakes'. It should be let alone to work quietly and without 'turbulence'.

  14. How much will it cost to eradicate lymphatic filariasis? An analysis of the financial and economic costs of intensified efforts against lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Randee J; Sicuri, Elisa; Stone, Christopher M; Matwale, Gabriel; Onapa, Ambrose; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    , which includes countries that previously undertook MDA, is estimated to cost 929 million USD (95% Credible Interval: 884m-972m). Proceeding to eradication is anticipated to require a higher financial investment, estimated at 1.24 billion USD (1.17bn-1.30bn) in the eradication III scenario (immediate scale-up), with eradication II (intensified scale-up) projected at 1.27 billion USD (1.21bn-1.33bn), and eradication I (slow scale-up) estimated at 1.29 billion USD (1.23bn-1.34bn). The economic costs of the eradication III scenario are estimated at approximately 7.57 billion USD (7.12bn-7.94bn), while the elimination scenario is projected to have an economic cost of 5.21 billion USD (4.91bn-5.45bn). Countries in the AFRO region will require the greatest investment to reach elimination or eradication, but also stand to gain the most in cost savings. Across all scenarios, capacity strengthening and advocacy and communication represent the greatest financial costs, whereas mapping, post-MDA surveillance, and administration comprise the least. Though challenging to implement, our results indicate that financial and economic savings are greatest under the eradication III scenario. Thus, if eradication for LF is the objective, accelerated scale-up is projected to be the best investment.

  15. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition for Locally Advanced Periocular Basal Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Omar K; Yin, Vivian; Chou, Eva; Ball, Sharon; Kies, Merrill; William, William N; Migden, Michael; Thuro, Bradley A; Esmaeli, Bita

    2015-08-01

    To review our experience treating patients with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, vismodegib, in patients with orbital or periocular locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or basal cell nevus syndrome. Retrospective interventional case series. We reviewed all patients with locally advanced or metastatic orbital or periocular BCC or basal cell nevus syndrome treated with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, vismodegib, at a comprehensive cancer center from 2009 through 2015. Reviewed data included age; sex; American Joint Commission on Cancer tumor, node, metastasis staging system designation; type and grade of drug-related side effects; response to treatment; duration of follow-up, and status at last follow-up. The study included 10 white men and 2 white women; the median age was 64.5 years. Ten patients had locally advanced BCC; 2 had basal cell nevus syndrome. Among the patients with locally advanced BCC, 5 had T3bN0M0 disease at presentation; 1 each had T3aN0M0, T3bN1M0, T2N1M1, T4N1M1, and T4N2cM1 disease. Overall, 3 patients had a complete response, 6 had a partial response, and 3 had stable disease at last follow-up. Two patients developed progressive disease after a complete response for 38 months and stable disease for 16 months, respectively. All patients developed grade I drug-related adverse effects, most commonly muscle spasms (12 patients), weight loss (10), dysgeusia (9), alopecia (9), decreased appetite (5), and fatigue (4). Five patients developed grade II adverse effects. At last follow-up, none of the 5 patients presenting with T3bN0M0, nor the patient with T3bN1M0 disease, had required orbital exenteration. Hedgehog pathway inhibition produces a significant clinical response in most patients with locally advanced or metastatic orbital or periocular BCC or basal cell nevus syndrome and can obviate orbital exenteration in some patients. Drug-related adverse effects are manageable in most patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-Term Outcomes of Early-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Shengfa [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Oncology, GuiYang Medical College Hospital, Guiyang, Guizhou (China); Han Fei; Zhao Chong; Chen Chunyan; Xiao Weiwei; Li Jiaxin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lu Taixiang, E-mail: ssf2010@sina.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reports of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have been limited. The present study evaluated the long-term survival outcomes and toxicity of early-stage NPC patients treated with IMRT alone. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and January 2008, 198 early-stage (T1-T2bN0-N1M0) NPC patients had undergone IMRT alone. The data from these patients were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were treated to 68 Gy at 2.27 Gy/fraction prescribed to the planning target volume of the primary nasopharygeal gross tumor volume. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system was used to assess the toxicity. Results: At a median follow-up of 50.9 months (range, 12-104), the 5-year estimated disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rate was 97.3%, 97.7%, and 97.8%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was 100% for those with Stage T1 and T2a and 94.2% for those with Stage T2b lesions (p = 0.252). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate for Stage T1N0, T2N0, T1N1, and T2N1 patients was 100%, 98.8%, 100%, and 93.8%, respectively (p = .073). All local recurrence occurred in patients with T2b lesions. Five patients developed distant metastasis. Of these 5 patients, 4 had had Stage T2bN1 disease and 1 had had Stage T2bN0 disease with retropharyngeal lymph node involvement. The most common acute toxicities were mainly Grade 1 or 2. At 24 months after IMRT, no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia had developed, and 62 (96.9%) of 64 evaluated patients were free of trismus; only 2 patients (3.1%) had Grade 1 trismus. Radiation encephalopathy and cranial nerve injury were not observed. Conclusions: IMRT alone for Stage T1N0, T2N0, T1N1, and T2N1 yielded satisfactory survival outcomes with acceptable toxicity, and no differences were found in survival outcomes among these four subgroups. Patients with Stage T2b lesions might have relatively greater risk of local recurrence and those with T2bN1 disease mighth have a greater risk of distant metastasis.

  17. Most ornamental plants on sale in garden centres are unattractive to flower-visiting insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzov, Mihail; Alton, Karin; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2017-01-01

    Gardeners and park managers seeking to support biodiversity in urban areas often plant ornamentals attractive to flower-visiting insects. There is a huge diversity of garden plant varieties, and some recommendations are available as to which are attractive to insects. However, these are largely not based on rigorous empirical data. An important factor in consumer choice is the range of varieties available for purchase. In the UK, garden centres are a key link in the supply chain between growers and private gardens. This study is the first to determine the proportions of flowering ornamentals being sold that are attractive to flower-visiting insects. We surveyed six garden centres in Sussex, UK, each over two days in 2015, by making 12 counts of insects visiting patches of each ornamental plant on display for sale that was in bloom. To provide a consistent baseline among different locations, we brought with us and surveyed marjoram (Origanum vulgare) plants in pots, which are known to be attractive to a wide range of flower-visiting insects. The attractiveness of plant varieties to insects was then expressed in two ways: the absolute number and relative to that on marjoram ('marjoram score'), both per unit area of plant cover. In addition, we noted whether each variety was recommended as pollinator-friendly either via a symbol on the label, or by being included in the Royal Horticultural Society's 'Perfect for Pollinators' list. Furthermore, we compared the attractiveness of plants that are typically grown for more than one year versus only one year. We surveyed 59-74 plant varieties in bloom across the six garden centres. In each garden centre, the distributions of variety attractiveness were highly skewed to the right, with most varieties being relatively unattractive, and few varieties highly attractive to flower-visiting insects. The median attractiveness of varieties with a recommendation was 4.2× higher than that of varieties without. But, due to the large

  18. Most ornamental plants on sale in garden centres are unattractive to flower-visiting insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Karin; Ratnieks, Francis L.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Gardeners and park managers seeking to support biodiversity in urban areas often plant ornamentals attractive to flower-visiting insects. There is a huge diversity of garden plant varieties, and some recommendations are available as to which are attractive to insects. However, these are largely not based on rigorous empirical data. An important factor in consumer choice is the range of varieties available for purchase. In the UK, garden centres are a key link in the supply chain between growers and private gardens. This study is the first to determine the proportions of flowering ornamentals being sold that are attractive to flower-visiting insects. Methods We surveyed six garden centres in Sussex, UK, each over two days in 2015, by making 12 counts of insects visiting patches of each ornamental plant on display for sale that was in bloom. To provide a consistent baseline among different locations, we brought with us and surveyed marjoram (Origanum vulgare) plants in pots, which are known to be attractive to a wide range of flower-visiting insects. The attractiveness of plant varieties to insects was then expressed in two ways: the absolute number and relative to that on marjoram (‘marjoram score’), both per unit area of plant cover. In addition, we noted whether each variety was recommended as pollinator-friendly either via a symbol on the label, or by being included in the Royal Horticultural Society’s ‘Perfect for Pollinators’ list. Furthermore, we compared the attractiveness of plants that are typically grown for more than one year versus only one year. Results We surveyed 59–74 plant varieties in bloom across the six garden centres. In each garden centre, the distributions of variety attractiveness were highly skewed to the right, with most varieties being relatively unattractive, and few varieties highly attractive to flower-visiting insects. The median attractiveness of varieties with a recommendation was 4.2× higher than that of

  19. Il giudice Wyndham e gli spettacoli per l’intrattenimento di Elisabetta I a Norwich

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    F. Minetti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available ENThe fabrication of a popery charge, which in August 1578 Edward Rokewood was subjected to while hosting Queen Elizabeth in the East Anglia, has been dubiously dealt with in the field of gender studies (Dovey, 1996; Brownlow, 2003 or overrated by historians of Puritanism to corroborate how the queen’s Privy Council ruled the kingdom through a manipulation of her weak will and female simple-mindedness (MacCulloch, 1986; Collinson, 2007. My paper proposes to substantiate how the intrigue against Rokewood arose from a wider social group of officers than the Lord Chamberlain Sussex and the royal favourite Leicester’s clique. Some days after the papist had been jailed in the castle of Norwich, mayor and aldermen commissioned public speeches and a composite biblical pageantry which, though allusively, both staged Rokewood’s conspiracy in favour of the Spanish king’s invasion and urged Elizabeth to inflict a death penalty. But the queen did not only turn a deaf ear to these pressures, presiding over the trial proceedings to get a time of forced reform for Rokewood. Some letters from the judge of assizes Francis Wyndham will help me to suggest that she was nor manipulated neither prevented from seeing that the case had been invented by the municipal corporation to advoke their bishop’s means of control and persecution of dissent.ITL’invenzione di un’accusa di papismo, che ad agosto del 1578 Edward Rokewood subisce mentre ospita la regina Elisabetta nella regione orientale dell’Anglia, è discussa con grande scetticismo nel settore dei gender studies (Dovey, 1996, pp. 54-55; Brownlow, 2003, pp. 11-13, oppure sopravvalutata da storici della cultura puritana convinti che il Privy Council tenga le redini del regno manipolando volontà e credulità della regina (MacCulloch, 1986, pp. 218-219; Collinson, 2007, p. 131. Questo paper si propone di documentare come la macchinazione ai danni di Rokewood si estenda ben oltre la cerchia del

  20. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  1. Electrical Transport and Network Percolation in Graphene and Boron Nitride Mixed-Platelet Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbarma, Rousan; Behura, Sanjay; Nguyen, Phong; Sreeprasad, T S; Berry, Vikas

    2016-04-06

    Percolating network of mixed 2D nanomaterials (2DNs) can leverage the unique electronic structures of different 2DNs, their interfacial doping, manipulable conduction pathways, and local traps. Here, we report on the percolation mechanism and electro-capacitive transport pathways of mixed-platelet network of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), two isostructural and isoelectronic 2DNs. The transport mechanism is explained in terms of electron hopping through isolated hBN defect traps between rGO (possibly via electron tunneling/hopping through "funneling" points). With optical bandgaps of 4.57 and 4.08 eV for the hBN-domains and 2.18 eV for the rGO domains, the network of hBN with rGO exhibits Poole-Frenkel emission-based transport with mean hopping gap of 1.12 nm (∼hBN trilayer) and an activation barrier of ∼15 ± 0.7 meV. Further, hBN (1.7 pF) has a 6-fold lower capacitance than 1:1 hBN:rGO, which has a resistance 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of rGO (1.46 MΩ). These carrier transport results can be applied to other multi-2DN networks for development of next-generation functional 2D-devices.

  2. [Case of Colon Metastasis from Early Gastric Cancer 4 Years after Laparoscopic Assisted Distal Gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kosuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Maezawa, Yukio; Kano, Kazuki; Satoyoshi, Tetsuta; Segami, Kenki; Nakajima, Tetsushi; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer(pathological T1bN1M0)in June 2011was admitted to the hospital because of abdominal pain in May 2015.A n abdominal CT scan showed ileus caused by a transverse colon tumor and ascending colon perforation.We performed emergency right hemicolectomy and diverting ileostomy.The postoperative pathological findings revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signetring cell carcinoma similar to the gastric cancer resected 4 years ago.Immunohistochemical findings showed that the colon tumor was positive for CK7, but negative for CK20 and expressed a gastric mucin phenotype.From these findings, the colon tumor was diagnosed as a metastasis from early gastric cancer.Colon metastasis from early gastric cancer is rare and the diagnosis is difficult in some cases.We herein report this case and discuss the clinical and pathologic features of colon metastasis from gastric cancer.

  3. Eating-related concerns, mood, and personality traits in recovered bulimia nervosa subjects: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, D; Kaye, W H; Matsunaga, H; Orbach, I; Har-Even, D; Frank, G; McConaha, C W; Rao, R

    2002-09-01

    Limited data suggest that eating-related concerns and behaviors, disturbances in mood, and altered temperament persist following recovery from bulimia nervosa (BN). In order to replicate and extend such findings, 11 women who were long-term recovered from BN (>1 year with no binging, purging, or restricting behaviors, normal weight, and regular menstrual cycles) were compared with 15 healthy volunteer women on the Eating Disorders Invertory-2 (EDI-2), the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Compared with the control women, the recovered BN women showed elevated levels of the EDI-2 subscales of Drive for Thinness, Body Dissatisfaction, Ineffectiveness, Perfectionism, and Social Insecurity, greater depression and anxiety, elevated levels of the MPQ Stress Reaction dimension and the higher-order factor of Negative Emotionality, and lower levels of the MPQ Well Being and Closeness dimensions. Core eating and weight-related concerns, dysphoric affect, social discomfort, and personality traits indicative of perfectionism persist following long-term recovery from BN. Copyright 2002 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Photo-reduction of CO2 Using a Rhenium Complex Covalently Supported on a Graphene/TiO2 Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shi-Cong; Sun, Xue-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2016-07-07

    One of the promising solutions for decreasing atmospheric CO2 is artificial photosynthesis, in which CO2 can be photoconverted into solar fuels. In this study, a rhenium complex Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl (PyBn=1-(2-picolyl)-4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole) was covalently grafted onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This was further combined with TiO2 to fabricate a novel catalyst composite TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl for CO2 photo-reduction. This hybrid composite demonstrated high selectivity conversion of CO2 into CO under xenon-lamp irradiation. Compared with the unsupported homogeneous catalyst Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl, the covalent immobilized catalyst composite TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl enhanced the turnover number six times and significantly improved catalyst stability. During the process of CO2 photo-reduction, intermediate species with lifetimes longer than hundreds of microseconds were observed and the formation of CO products was revealed using timeresolved infrared spectroscopy. A plausible mechanism for CO2 photo-reduction by the TiO2 -rGO-Re(PyBn)(CO)3 Cl catalyst composite has been suggested. The obtained results have implications for the future design of efficient catalyst composites for CO2 photo-conversion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. [Gastric adenocarcinoma following "silastic vertical ring gastroplasty": case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, A; Memmo, L; Memo, L; Mehdi, A; Mboti, F; Closset, J

    2010-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered as the most effective therapy for morbid obesity. But, each procedure carries both short-and long-term complications. And, it remains unclear if the late occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma could be linked to bariatric surgery. We described a case of a female who developed a gastric adenocarcinoma after a silastic ring vertical gastroplasty (SRVG). A 54-year-old female presented with postprandial vomiting, poor appetite, dysphagia and weight loss 10 year after a SRVG. A gastroscopy with biopsy disclosed a juxta-pyloric adenocarcinoma. No distant metastasis was found. After 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis was performed. After the surgery, a minor anastomotic leak was treated conservatively and a parietal abscess was drained. The pathological studies demonstrated a T2bN1 adenocarcinoma with negative margins. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. At the last work up, the patient is disease-free. The association between a gastric adenocarcinoma and a bariatric procedure such as a SRVG is difficult to assess without a case-control or a cross-sectional study. Nevertheless, when new upper digestive tract complaints occur in any patient with an otherwise unremarkable bariatric surgery follow-up, the diagnosis of gastric cancer should be bear in mind.

  6. Birth outcomes in women with eating disorders in the Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study (MoBa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Cynthia M; Von Holle, Ann; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Torgersen, Leila; Lie, Kari Kveim; Hamer, Robert M; Berg, Cecilie Knoph; Sullivan, Patrick; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2009-01-01

    We explored the impact of eating disorders on birth outcomes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Of 35,929 pregnant women, 35 reported broad anorexia nervosa (AN), 304 bulimia nervosa (BN), 1,812 binge eating disorder (BED), and 36 EDNOS-purging type (EDNOS-P) in the six months before or during pregnancy. The referent comprised 33,742 women with no eating disorder. Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was lower in AN and higher in BED than the referent. AN, BN, and BED mothers reported greater gestational weight gain, and smoking was elevated in all eating disorder groups. BED mothers had higher birth weight babies, lower risk of small for gestational age, and higher risk of large for gestational age and cesarean section than the referent. Pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain attenuated the effects. BED influences birth outcomes either directly or via higher maternal weight and gestational weight gain. The absence of differences in AN and EDNOS-P may reflect small numbers and lesser severity in population samples. Adequate gestational weight gain in AN may mitigate against adverse birth outcomes. Detecting eating disorders in pregnancy could identify modifiable factors (e.g., high gestational weight gain, binge eating, and smoking) that influence birth outcomes. 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spatial response of synthetic microDiamond and diode detectors measured with kilovoltage synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Duncan J; Beveridge, Toby; Lehmann, Joerg; Oliver, Christopher P; Stevenson, Andrew W; Livingstone, Jayde

    2018-02-01

    To map the spatial response of four solid-state radiation detectors of types commonly used for radiotherapy dosimetry. PTW model 60016 Diode P, 60017 Diode E, 60018 Diode SRS, and 60019 microDiamond detectors were radiographed using a high resolution conventional X-ray system. Their spatial response was then investigated using a 0.1 mm diameter beam of 95 keV average energy photons generated by a synchrotron. The detectors were scanned through the beam while their signal was recorded as a function of position, to map the response. These 2D response maps were created in both the end-on and side-on orientations. The results show the location and size of the active region. End-on, the active area was determined to be centrally located and within 0.2 mm of the manufacturer's specified diameter. The active areas of the 60016 Diode P, 60017 Diode E, 60018 Diode SRS detectors are uniform to within approximately 5%. The 60019 microDiamond showed local variations up to 30%. The extra-cameral signal in the microDiamond was calculated from the side-on scan to be approximately 8% of the signal from the active element. The spatial response of four solid-state detectors has been measured. The technique yielded information about the location and uniformity of the active area, and the extra-cameral signal, for the beam quality used. © 2017 Commonwealth of Australia. Medical Physics © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced without prior written permission. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be directed in the first instance to John Wiley & Sons Ltd of The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex P019 8SQ UNITED KINGDOM; alternatively to ARPANSA.

  8. The effect of heart failure nurse consultations on heart failure patients' illness beliefs, mood and quality of life over a six-month period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rebecca; Riley, Jillian P; Mehta, Paresh A; Goodman, Helen; Banya, Winston; Mulligan, Kathleen; Newman, Stanton; Cowie, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effect contact with a heart failure nurse can have on patients' illness beliefs, mood and quality of life. There is growing interest in patients' illness beliefs and the part they play in a patients understanding of chronic disease. Secondary analysis on two independent datasets. Patients were recruited from five UK hospitals, four in London and one in Sussex. Patients were recruited from an inpatient and outpatient setting. The first dataset recruited 174 patients with newly diagnosed heart failure, whilst the second dataset recruited 88 patients with an existing diagnosis of heart failure. Patients completed the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Treatment Representations Inventory at baseline and six months. We used a linear regression model to assess the association that contact with a heart failure nurse had on mood, illness beliefs and quality of life over a six-month period. Patients who had contact with a heart failure nurse were more satisfied with their treatment and more likely to believe that their heart failure was treatable. Contact with a heart failure nurse did not make a statistically significant difference to mood or quality of life. This study has shown that contact with a heart failure nurse can improve patient satisfaction with treatment decisions but has less influence on a patient's beliefs about their personal control, treatment control and treatment concerns. With appropriate support, skills and training, heart failure nurses could play an important role in addressing individual patient's beliefs. There is a need to further investigate this. Exploring patients' illness beliefs and mood could help to enhance person-centred care. Heart failure nurses would need additional training in the techniques used. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Shell model calculation of the nuclear moments of /sup 9/Li in a 2h. omega. space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.; Meder, M.R.

    1984-10-01

    A recent measurement of the magnitude of quadrupole moment of the ground state of /sup 9/Li, Q( /sup 9/Li), finds that Vertical BarQ(/sup 9/Li)/Q(/sup 7/Li)Vertical Bar = 0.88 +- 0.18. A variety of shell-model calculations, using p-shell wave functions, predict Q(/sup 9/Li)approx. =1.3Q( /sup 7/Li) and yield quadrupole moments whose magnitudes are approximately half the experimental values. Agreement between theory and experiment is improved when effective charges are used, although the results are still not completely satisfactory. A calculation of the wave functions of the low-lying states of /sup 7/Li and /sup 9/Li using a modified version of the Sussex matrix elements in a model space, including all 0h..omega.. and 2h..omega.. excitations, has been performed. The resulting value for Q( /sup 9/Li) was -3.46 fm/sup 2/ as ray transitions in /sup 52,53/Cr and /sup 54,55/Mn have been observed using /sup 7/Li(/sup 51/V,xn yp z..cap alpha.. ..gamma..) fusion-evaporation reactions and ..gamma..-particle coincidence techniques. The experiment involved the same reaction at the same center-of-mass energy as the earlier work of Poletti et al., but with target and projectile interchanged. In the present work, eight additional transitions have been identified as occurring in /sup 52/Cr. This provides corroboration of results obtained more recently via /sup 50/Ti(..cap alpha..,2n..gamma..)/sup 52/Cr reaction studies. A simple, efficient approach to the spectroscopy of weakly populated nuclear states which provides for unambiguous isotopic assignments is thus demonstrated.

  10. The stratigraphy of the limeport member of the Allentown Formation: An Upper Cambrian carbonate within the Kittatinny supergroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohl, L.E. (Hunter Coll. of the City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1993-03-01

    The Limeport Member occurs as thin to thickly bedded cycles of peritidal dolomite. A complete cycle includes a shallow subtidal dolarenite overlain by domal algal stromatolites, along with graded sequences of pisoids, oncoids, and oolitic facies. The upper portions of the cycle include fine grained beds of micritic, algal laminated dolomite, whose upper surfaces bear rip up clasts and edgewise conglomerates. The top of a complete sequence is capped by a dark gray, shaly, rubbly dolomite that gives way to a thinly bedded, black calcareous shale. Petrographic thin sections of the shaly units reveal silt-size angular quartz fragments, which may have an aeolian origin. More than 40 unconformity-bounded sequences have been measured along outcrops within the Hamburg Quadrangle in Sussex County, New Jersey. Chert occurs in distinct oolitic facies and also as a selective replacement of algal stromatolites and occasionally along stylolite surfaces associated with sulfides. Three silicification events are illustrated in the chert-rich facies. Thin section analysis of oncoid-rich facies has yielded evidence for silicification early in the diagenesis of the dolomite in the form of preservation of chert-replaced, early diagenetic epitaxial cements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also reveals chert-replaced algal filament within oncolites. The selective replacement of algal stromatolites by chert may represent the second silicification event. Chert occurring along pressure solution surfaces is free of detrital clays and represents a later silicification event associated with the development of stylolites. Geological mapping within the Limeport Member has revealed the presence of several large prehistoric chert quarries, whose prospect pits are developed within the oolitic facies.

  11. Entrevista com o Dr. Alex Shankland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana BENEVIDES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisador do Institute of Development Studies (IDS da Universidade de Sussex, Inglaterra, Alex Shankland é cientista social e já trabalhou como pesquisador, gestor de organizações não governamentais e consultor em desenvolvimento social em diversos países, entre os quais o Brasil, o Peru, o México, a Índia, Angola, Moçambique e o próprio Reino Unido. Suas áreas de pesquisa incluem as práticas de cooperação internacional (com enfoque na relação Brasil-África, a governança democrática, a participação social nos sistemas de saúde e o desenho de políticas públicas para minorias étnicas e outras populações marginalizadas. O tema de seu doutorado foi representação indígena e política de saúde na Amazônia brasileira. Tem mais de 20 anos de experiência como coordenador de programas e projetos, entre os quais a consultoria realizada para o Projeto Vigisus II/Funasa para definição dos modelos de atenção, de organização, de gestão, de financiamento e de monitoramento e de avaliação do Subsistema de Atenção à Saúde Indígena.

  12. Decision analytic model exploring the cost and cost-offset implications of street triage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslin, Margaret; Callaghan, Lynne; Packwood, Martin; Badu, Vincent; Byford, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine if street triage is effective at reducing the total number of people with mental health needs detained under section 136, and is associated with cost savings compared to usual police response. Design Routine data from a 6-month period in the year before and after the implementation of a street triage scheme were used to explore detentions under section 136, and to populate a decision analytic model to explore the impact of street triage on the cost to the NHS and the criminal justice sector of supporting people with a mental health need. Setting A predefined area of Sussex, South East England, UK. Participants All people who were detained under section 136 within the predefined area or had contact with the street triage team. Interventions The street triage model used here was based on a psychiatric nurse attending incidents with a police constable. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was change in the total number of detentions under section 136 between the before and after periods assessed. Secondary analysis focused on whether the additional costs of street triage were offset by cost savings as a result of changes in detentions under section 136. Results Detentions under section 136 in the street triage period were significantly lower than in the usual response period (118 vs 194 incidents, respectively; χ2 (1df) 18.542, ptriage period compared to £1077 in the usual response period. Conclusions Investment in street triage was offset by savings as a result of reduced detentions under section 136, particularly detentions in custody. Data available did not include assessment of patient outcomes, so a full economic evaluation was not possible. PMID:26868943

  13. Reasons for cannabis use in first-episode psychosis: does strength of endorsement change over 12 months?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolliakou, A; Castle, D; Sallis, H; Joseph, C; O'Connor, J; Wiffen, B; Gayer-Anderson, C; McQueen, G; Taylor, H; Bonaccorso, S; Gaughran, F; Smith, S; Greenwood, K; Murray, R M; Di Forti, M; Atakan, Z; Ismail, K

    2015-01-01

    Why patients with psychosis use cannabis remains debated. The self-medication hypothesis has received some support but other evidence points towards an alleviation of dysphoria model. This study investigated the reasons for cannabis use in first-episode psychosis (FEP) and whether strength in their endorsement changed over time. FEP inpatients and outpatients at the South London and Maudsley, Oxleas and Sussex NHS Trusts UK, who used cannabis, rated their motives at baseline (n=69), 3 months (n=29) and 12 months (n=36). A random intercept model was used to test the change in strength of endorsement over the 12 months. Paired-sample t-tests assessed the differences in mean scores between the five subscales on the Reasons for Use Scale (enhancement, social motive, coping with unpleasant affect, conformity and acceptance and relief of positive symptoms and side effects), at each time-point. Time had a significant effect on scores when controlling for reason; average scores on each subscale were higher at baseline than at 3 months and 12 months. At each time-point, patients endorsed 'enhancement' followed by 'coping with unpleasant affect' and 'social motive' more highly for their cannabis use than any other reason. 'Conformity and acceptance' followed closely. 'Relief of positive symptoms and side effects' was the least endorsed motive. Patients endorsed their reasons for use at 3 months and 12 months less strongly than at baseline. Little support for the self-medication or alleviation of dysphoria models was found. Rather, patients rated 'enhancement' most highly for their cannabis use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. What factors are important in smoking cessation and relapse in women from deprived communities? A qualitative study in Southeast England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, A; Barber, J; Rumsby, E; Parker, S; Mohebati, L; de Visser, R O; Venables, S; Fairhurst, A; Lawson, K; Sundin, J

    2016-05-01

    Women are relatively more susceptible to smoking-related diseases and find it more difficult to quit; however, little research exists on factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in women. We examined attitudes towards and perceptions of factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in women from deprived communities. Qualitative interview study. Participants included eleven women, smokers and ex-smokers, from disadvantaged communities in East Sussex, England, who had used the National Health Service (NHS) stop smoking service. Data were collected through a focus group and semi-structured interviews, and subjected to thematic analysis. Participants opined that it is more difficult for women to quit smoking than men. Women felt that postcessation weight gain was inevitable and acted as a barrier to quitting. Hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle and greater levels of stress were perceived as obstacles to quitting and reasons for relapse. Conversely, the women cited effects of smoking on physical appearance, oral hygiene and guilt about exposing children to passive smoke as powerful motivators to quit; and highlighted the impact of public health campaigns that focused on these factors. Views diverged on whether quitting with someone close to you is a help or hindrance. Other themes including alcohol intake, daily routine and being in the presence of smokers emerged as situational triggers of relapse. Interventions that address women's concerns related to postcessation weight gain, hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle and stress may aid with smoking cessation and reduce relapse. Public health campaigns should consider the impact of smoking on physical appearance and the effect of passive smoke on children. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The spectroscopic detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints after development with powders and recovery with adhesive lifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Matthew J; Went, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The application of powders to fingerprints has long been established as an effective and reliable method for developing latent fingerprints. Fingerprints developed in situ at a crime scene routinely undergo lifting with specialist tapes and are then stored in evidence bags to allow secure transit and also to preserve the chain of evidence. In a previous study we have shown that exogenous material within a fingerprint can be detected using Raman spectroscopy following development with powders and lifting with adhesive tapes. Other reports have detailed the use of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints including cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. This study involves the application of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of drugs of abuse in latent fingerprints for fingerprints that had been treated with powders and also subsequently lifted with adhesive tapes. Samples of seized ecstasy, cocaine, ketamine and amphetamine were supplied by East Sussex Police and by the TICTAC unit at St. Georges Hospital Tooting. Contaminated fingerprints were deposited on clean glass slides. The application of aluminium or iron based powders to contaminated fingerprints did not interfere with the Raman spectra obtained for the contaminants. Contaminated fingerprints developed with powders and then lifted with lifting tapes were also examined. The combination of these two techniques did not interfere with the successful analysis. The lifting process was repeated using hinge lifters. As the hinge lifters exhibited strong Raman bands the spectroscopic analysis was more complex and an increase in the number of exposures to the detector allowed for improved clarification. Spectral subtraction was performed to remove peaks due to the hinge lifters using OMNIC software. Raman spectra of developed and lifted fingerprints recorded through evidence bags were obtained and it was found that the detection process was not compromised. Although the application of

  16. Management of heart failure in primary care after implementation of the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, A; Williams, J; de Lusignan, S; Chan, T

    2005-02-01

    To compare the management of heart failure with the standards set out in the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease. A cross-sectional study in 26 general practices, with a combined list size of 256,188, that are members of the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Primary Care Research Network. Information was extracted on the management of 2129 patients with heart failure, of whom 2097 were aged 45 years and over. The prevalence of heart failure was 8.3 per 1000. Prevalence rates increased with age, from 0.2 per 1000 in people aged under 35 years of age to 125 per 1000 in those aged 85 years and over. Coronary heart disease (present in 47%) was the most common comorbid condition in men with heart failure, whereas hypertension (present in 46%) was the most common condition in women. Recording of cardiovascular risk factors was generally higher in younger patients than in older patients, and in men than in women. Blood pressure (92% of men and 90% of women) and smoking status (84% of men and 77% of women) were generally the best-recorded cardiovascular risk factors. Blood electrolytes were recorded in about 83% of men and 75% of women. Only 17% of men and 11% of women with heart failure had a record of undergoing an echocardiogram. Use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or antagonists was 76% in men with heart failure and 68% in women; lowest rates were seen in older patients. Uptake of influenza immunization was generally high, at 85% in men and 84% in women. The use of ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure was higher than in some previous studies. However, many patients have no documentation in their computerized medical records of having undergone key investigations, such as echocardiography.

  17. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, R. B.; Acreman, M. C.

    Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland areas. The manipulation of ditch water levels is a common management technique to maintain important in-stream and in-field habitats in such areas. However, in wet grasslands with low soil conductivities the water table in the centre of each field is not closely coupled to variations in ditch stage. Consequently rainfall and evaporation have a greater influence on the depth to water table and water table fluctuations within each field. In-field micro-topographic variations also lead to subtle variations in the hydrological regime and depth to water table that create a mosaic of different wetness conditions and habitats. The depth, duration, timing and frequency of flooding from accumulated rainfall, surface water and standing groundwater also influence the availability of suitable in-field habitats. Land drainage models are often used for studies of wet grasslands, but tend to be more complex and require more field variables than saturated zone models. This paper applies a 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW, to simulate groundwater levels within a single field in a wet coastal grassland underlain by a low permeability sequence and located in the central part of Pevensey Levels, Sussex, UK. At this scale, the influence of vertical leakage and regional groundwater flow within the deeper, more permeable part of the sequence is likely to be small. Whilst available data were not sufficient to attempt a full calibration, it was found that the sequence could be represented as a single, unconfined sequence having uniform hydraulic properties. The model also confirmed that evaporation and rainfall are the dominant components of the water balance. Provided certain information requirements are met, a distributed groundwater model, such as MODFLOW, can benefit situations where greater hydrological detail in space and time is required to represent complex and

  18. Seasonal variations of soil erosion in UK under climate change: simulations with the use of high-resolution regional climatic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampalini, Rossano; Kendon, Elizabeth; Constantine, José Antonio; Schindewolf, Marcus; Hall, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is expected to have a significant impact on the hydrological cycle, twenty-first century climate change simulations for Great Britain forecast an increase of surface runoff and flooding frequency. Once quality and resolution of the simulated rainfall deeply influence the results, we adopted rainfall simulations issued of a high-resolution climate model recently carried out for extended periods (13 years for present-day and future periods 2100) at 1.5 km grid scale over the south of the United Kingdom (simulations, which for the future period use the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change RCP 8.5 scenario, Kendon et al., 2014). We simulated soil erosion with 3D soil erosion model Schmidt (1990) on two catchments of Great Britain: the Rother catchment (350 km2) in West Sussex, England, because it has reported some of the most erosive events observed during the last 50 years in the UK, and the Conwy catchment (628 Km2) in North Wales, which is extremely resilient to soil erosion because of the abundant natural vegetation. Estimation of changes in soil moisture, saturation deficit as well as vegetation cover at daily time step have been done with the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) (Best et al, 2011). Our results confirm the Rother catchment is the most erosive, while the Conwy catchment is the more resilient to soil erosion. Sediment production is perceived increase in both cases for the end of the century (27% and 50%, respectively). Seasonal disaggregation of the results revels that, while the most part of soil erosion is produced in winter months (DJF), the higher soil erosion variability for future periods is observed in summer (JJA). This behaviour is supported by the rainfall simulation analyse which highlighted this dual behaviour in precipitations.

  19. A Conversation with Martin Stannard and Barbara Cooke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Williams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Martin Stannard is Professor of Modern English Literature at the University of Leicester. He read for his first degree in English at Warwick (1967-70, before taking an MA at Sussex University, and a DPhil at Oxford. Professor Stannard’s two-volume literary biography of Evelyn Waugh (1986, 1992, and his biography of Muriel Spark (2009 are essential reading for Waugh and Spark scholars, and are each studies in the value of historical contextualisation for appreciating the literary oeuvre of a writer. Stannard’s 1995 Norton Critical Edition of Ford Madox Ford’s modernist novel, The Good Soldier, similarly brings context to bear through his rigorous textual editing, annotation and critical apparatus. Stannard is currently the Principal Investigator for the Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh project, which is supported by a grant of  £822,000 from the AHRC, and which will see Oxford University Press publish 43 scholarly edition volumes of Waugh – the first of which appears next year. This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of Waugh’s death. Dr Barbara Cooke also teaches at the School of English at the University of Leicester. She received a BA and MA from Warwick (dates, and a PhD in Creative and Critical writing from the University of East Anglia for her interdisciplinary thesis Oil Men: the Twinned Lives of Arnold Wilson and Morris Young. Dr. Cooke is Research Associate for the Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh, providing a vital link between the project's 23 editors, of which she is one, editing Waugh’s autobiography A Little Learning (1964.

  20. Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lindsay; Black, David; Welch, Jan; Reynolds, Peter; Penlington, Clare

    2015-08-01

    Clinical leadership is considered essential for maintaining and improving patient care and safety in the UK, and is incorporated in the curriculum for all trainee doctors. Despite the growing focus on the importance of leadership, and the introduction of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF) in the UK, leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. Assessment is focused on clinical skills, and trainee doctors receive very little formal feedback on their leadership competencies. In this article we describe the approach taken by Health Education Kent, Sussex and Surrey (HEKSS) to raise the profile of leadership amongst doctors in training in the South Thames Foundation School (STFS). An annual structured formative assessment in leadership for each trainee has been introduced, supported by leadership education for both trainees and their supervisors in HEKSS trusts. We analysed over 500 of these assessments from the academic year 2012/13 for foundation doctors in HEKSS trusts, in order to assess the quality of the feedback. From the analysis, potential indicators of more effective formative assessments were identified. These may be helpful in improving the leadership education programme for future years. There is a wealth of evidence to highlight the importance and value of formative assessments; however, particularly for foundation doctors, these have typically been focused on assessing clinical capabilities. This HEKSS initiative encourages doctors to recognise leadership opportunities at the beginning of their careers, seeks to help them understand the importance of acquiring leadership skills and provides structured feedback to help them improve. Leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Net ecosystem exchange from five land-use transitions to bioenergy crops from four locations across the UK - The Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenakis, Georgios; Perks, Mike; Harris, Zoe M.; McCalmont, Jon; Rylett, Daniel; Brooks, Milo; Evans, Jonathan G.; Finch, Jon; Rowe, Rebecca; Morrison, Ross; Alberti, Giorgio; Donnison, Ian; Siebicke, Lukas; Morison, James; Taylor, Gail; McNamara, Niall P.

    2016-04-01

    A major part of international agreements on combating climate change is the conversion from a fossil fuel economy to a low carbon economy. Bioenergy crops have been proposed as a way to improve energy security while reducing CO2 emissions to help mitigate the effects of climate change. However, the impact of land-use change from a traditional land use (e.g., arable and grassland) to bioenergy cropping systems on greenhouse gas balance (GHG) and carbon stocks are poorly quantified at this time. The Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) to provide scientific evidence within the UK on a range of land-use conversions (LUC) to bioenergy crops. The ELUM network consists of seven partners investigating five LUCs in four locations including Scotland, Wales, North and South England. Transitions included grasslands to short rotation forestry (SRF), to short rotation coppice willow (SRC) and to Miscanthus and arable to SRC and Miscanthus Measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) along with continuous measurements of meteorological conditions were made at seven sub-sites over a two-year period. Results showed that, over two years, two of the land-uses, a grassland in South England and a grassland conversion to Miscanthus in Wales were net sources of carbon. The greatest carbon sink was into the SRF site in Scotland followed by the SRC willow in South England. The annual terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER) for the SRC willow in North and South Sussex sites were similar, but the annual GPP at the South England site was about 27% higher than that the North England site. Establishing a long term network will allow us to continue monitoring the effects of land use change on whole ecosystem carbon balance, providing an insight into which types of LUC are suitable for bioenergy cropping in the UK.

  2. Origin of Stream Bed Sediments in Northwest New Jersey: Factors of Land Use and Source Determined by Trace Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, G. A.; Starks, L. M.; Torres, A. J.; Galster, J. C.; Feng, H.; Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Streams in northern New Jersey span a broad range of environments and land covers, including urban, agriculture, wetlands, and forest. Stream sediments receive input from these environments, and indicate pulses or stages of land use change, or stability. In this project, we use trace elements, including rare earth elements, to fingerprint sediment sources and differentiate between land use as well as immediate sources of sediment, such as stream banks, floodplains, uplands, or urban inputs. Samples of stream bed, stream bank, floodplain sediments, and urban and upland soils were obtained from eight locations in the Flat Brook, Rockaway River, and Wallkill River watersheds in Sussex and Morris counties in New Jersey. Samples were prepared for trace element analysis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Element content was compared to land use, sediment source, and a stream stability index (the Rapid Geomorphic Assessment, RGA). Several elements (V, Cr, Ni, Sr, Pb) were statistically significant at distinguishing between land use. Zr and W were able to distinguish sediment source (i.e. floodplain, bank, upland, etc.) with statistical confidence. Related to stream and bank stability, the RGA showed significant positive correlation with Cr and Co content (increasing Cr and Co with increasing instability), indicating these elements as good proxy indicators for bank erosion. Ongoing studies of element ratios, combined with Cs-136 and Pb-210 activity levels by gamma detector, will further refine the sediment characterization, with an eventual goal of approximating a sediment budget across different land uses and identifying hot spots that deliver disproportionately high amounts of sediment.; Increase in Co content corresponds to an increase in channel and bank instability, indicated by increasing RGA value.

  3. Stochastic stable population growth in integral projection models: theory and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Stephen P; Rees, Mark

    2007-02-01

    Stochastic matrix projection models are widely used to model age- or stage-structured populations with vital rates that fluctuate randomly over time. Practical applications of these models rest on qualitative properties such as the existence of a long term population growth rate, asymptotic log-normality of total population size, and weak ergodicity of population structure. We show here that these properties are shared by a general stochastic integral projection model, by using results in (Eveson in D. Phil. Thesis, University of Sussex, 1991, Eveson in Proc. Lond. Math. Soc. 70, 411-440, 1993) to extend the approach in (Lange and Holmes in J. Appl. Prob. 18, 325-344, 1981). Integral projection models allow individuals to be cross-classified by multiple attributes, either discrete or continuous, and allow the classification to change during the life cycle. These features are present in plant populations with size and age as important predictors of individual fate, populations with a persistent bank of dormant seeds or eggs, and animal species with complex life cycles. We also present a case-study based on a 6-year field study of the Illyrian thistle, Onopordum illyricum, to demonstrate how easily a stochastic integral model can be parameterized from field data and then applied using familiar matrix software and methods. Thistle demography is affected by multiple traits (size, age and a latent "quality" variable), which would be difficult to accommodate in a classical matrix model. We use the model to explore the evolution of size- and age-dependent flowering using an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) approach. We find close agreement between the observed flowering behavior and the predicted ESS from the stochastic model, whereas the ESS predicted from a deterministic version of the model is very different from observed flowering behavior. These results strongly suggest that the flowering strategy in O. illyricum is an adaptation to random between-year variation

  4. Processing of a PVC waste by the metallic recycling process; Kinzoku no risaikuru purosesu ni yoru PVC haikibutsu no shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-05

    Mr. Derek Fray of Cambridge University was PVC '99 conference held in Brighton in the United Kingdom some time ago, and the strip process of tin, zinc, metal of the copper in the iron recycling reported the possibility that the problem of a PVC waste could be solved. Though hydrogen chlorides, carbon dioxide, steam, etc. arise, when PVC burns in the excessive air, they are as the hydrogen chloride with these impurity forms the chlorides with nonferrous metal except for the iron. For example, it becomes possible that it recovers by the condensation by forming the volatile tetrachloride tin, when it deals with the steel plate which coated the tin in 130 degrees C PVC deriving gas. This reaction is the diffusion control in vapor phase, and there is no necessity of putting the object in the shredder. This process can be applied to the case in which there is the polymer coating like the canned food in addition to the tin coating. And, it can be also applied to the removal of zinc from the steel plate that for automobile was galvanized. By the heating of the steel plate, zinc is melted, and it evaporates, and it is recovered as a zinc oxide dust, and dangerous object and problem of the processing occur. In the meantime, in making to be the volatile zinc chloride in about 10 minutes, when it deals with this steel plate with chlorination reagent (chlorine, hydrogen chloride) and excessive air at 750 degrees C, zinc can be removed. It is to electrolyse this zinc chloride in condensation and after the purification, and high-pure zinc oxide and chlorine are got. The person though in Europe, this report has not pulled the interest very much, and it is sure of that this research is realizable in the laboratory level, and it is lamented that the enterprises in which a waste is arising, etc. do not show the interest in present state. (translated by NEDO)

  5. Evaluating the safety and immunogenicity of yellow fever vaccines: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas RE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roger E Thomas Department of Family Medicine, G012 Health Sciences Center, University of Calgary Medical School, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: To review the safety and immunogenicity of yellow fever vaccines. Literature search: The Cochrane Library (including the Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the NHS Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects; MEDLINE; EMBASE; BIOSIS Previews; Global Health; CAB Abstracts; and the Lilacs Database of Latin American and Caribbean literature were searched for individual studies and systematic reviews through January 1, 2015. Results: Six yellow fever vaccines are currently produced, and they are effective against all seven yellow fever virus strains. There is a 99.2% homology of the genome sequences of the six current vaccines. Four systematic reviews identified very small numbers of serious adverse events. A systematic review (updated of all published cases identified 133 serious adverse events that met the Brighton Collaboration criteria: 32 anaphylactic, 42 neurologic (one death, 57 viscerotropic (25 deaths, and two of both neurologic and viscerotropic SAEs. The Sanofi Pasteur Global Pharmacovigilance database reported 276 million doses of Stamaril™ distributed worldwide and identified 12 reports of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD, 24 of yellow fever vaccine-associated neurologic disease (YEL-AND, and 33 reports of anaphylaxis (many already published. The Biomanguinhos manufacturer's database reported 110 million doses distributed worldwide between 1999 and 2009, and the rate of YEL-AND was estimated at 0.084/100,000 doses distributed and YEL-AVD at 0.02/100,000 doses distributed. Conclusion: Reports of serious adverse events are mostly from travelers from developed countries, and there is likely serious underreporting for developing countries. On the basis of the published reports, the yellow fever vaccines are

  6. Networking: a study in planning and developing cross-cultural collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Singh

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a collaboration between the authors at the University of Brighton (UK and the University of Delhi, South Campus. The collaboration came about as a result of the EU-India Cross-Cultural Innovation Network collaboration programme, a project involving several universities and organizations across Europe and India. The authors of this paper both lecture in the area of computer networking. Following meetings in Delhi, they agreed to work together to produce a Web-based networking resource to be generated by the students of both institutions. The first phase of development involved the mounting of Web-based tutorials and documents produced by the students. The second phase will centre on the development of a knowledge base generated by the interaction of the students within an asynchronous forum. Running alongside these phases will be a collaborative bookmarking system, a database in which the students will post URLs of Web-based resources that they find useful in their studies. This system incorporates a form of collaborative filtering, an evolutionary mechanism which seeks to embody the qualities that students value in resources to provide a dynamic set of ratings to assist in the selection of those of most use. The planning of such a system raises some unusual issues, not least in the process of collaboration itself, with concerns as diverse as technical compatibility, institutional and cultural differences, timezones and the reliability of email. Limited bandwidth between our institutions causes special problems with the interactive elements of the resource. We present the methods we are investigating to reduce the impact of this. The fact that the students share an intellectual discipline but are otherwise separated by a cultural and geographical divide is expected to lead to fruitful diversity in thinking and approaches to problem-solving.

  7. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  8. Recent research in DNA repair, mutation and recombination: a report of the DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on 18 December 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N J; Strike, P

    1996-09-02

    The now traditional one day Christmas DNA Repair meeting was held at City University, London for the third year in succession. With over 130 participants and a programme consisting of a total of 24 pre-offered presentations the meeting reached record dimensions. Attendees were from 24 institutions throughout the United Kingdom, and with several distinct research groups contained within the large contingents from the ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories and the MRC Cell Mutation Unit in Brighton, this indicates the increasing interest and depth of UK research in DNA repair. One slight disappointment of the meeting was the fall in the numbers of non-UK participants. Although the meeting in 1994 (Strike, 1995) saw an increase in presentations from Continental Europe (six countries including France, Germany. The Netherlands and Switzerland), the trend did not continue this year, with only Denmark being represented. The 24 contributors consisted of approximately equal numbers of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and more "established' scientists reflecting the continuing policy of encouraging younger members of the repair community to present their work. The mix of presenters was particularly well illustrated by two excellent and consecutive talks by Professor Bryn Bridges (MRC Cell Mutation Unit) and Alison Mitchell, a postgraduate student in Stephen West's laboratory (ICRF, Clare Hall). The organisms under study were as equally disparate and included Archaebacteria, Escherichia coli. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus, mice and men. The range of topics was also varied and included bacterial mutagenesis, NMR studies of Ada protein, preferential DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint genes, reconstitution of nucleotide excision repair and V(D)J recombination in vitro, creation of repair deficient transgenic mice and mismatch defects in human cells. The result was a very successful meeting which was characterized by the consistently high

  9. Illicit drug use among gay and bisexual men in 44 cities: Findings from the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Axel J; Bourne, Adam; Weatherburn, Peter; Reid, David; Marcus, Ulrich; Hickson, Ford

    2016-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) are increasingly combining sex and illicit drugs (an activity referred to as 'chemsex'), in particular GHB/GBL, ketamine, crystal meth, or mephedrone (here called 4-chems). Use of such drugs has been associated with mental health and sexual health harms. We aim to compare patterns of illicit drug use among MSM in 44 European urban centres. In 2010, EMIS recruited 174,209 men from 38 countries to an anonymous online questionnaire in 25 languages. As harm reduction services for drugs and sex are organised at a local level, we chose to compare cities rather than countries. We defined 44 cities based on region/postal code and settlement size. For multivariable regression analyses, three comparison groups of MSM not living in these cities were applied: MSM living in Germany, the UK, and elsewhere in Europe. Data from 55,446 MSM living in 44 urban centres were included. Use of 4-chems (past 4 weeks) was highest in Brighton (16.3%), Manchester (15.5%), London (13.2%), Amsterdam (11.2%), Barcelona (7.9%), Zurich (7.0%) and Berlin (5.3%). It was lowest in Sofia (0.4%). The rank order was largely consistent when controlling for age, HIV diagnosis, and number of sexual partners. City of residence was the strongest demographic predictor of chemsex-drug use. Use of drugs associated with chemsex among MSM varies substantially across European cities. As city is the strongest predictor of chemsex-drug use, effective harm reduction programmes must include structural as well as individual interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Improving global monitoring of vaccine safety: a survey of national centres participating in the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Megan; Wells, George; Walop, Wikke; Duclos, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring (PIDM) was established in 1968 following the thalidomide disaster. The PIDM has had considerable success in analyzing drug-related adverse event reports, but more limited progress has been made in analyzing vaccine-related reports. In June 2005, the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, acknowledging these limitations, called for a global consultation to address the need for improved monitoring and analysis of vaccine-related adverse event reports on an international level. In preparation for this consultation and as part of a larger study designed to evaluate the PIDM, a survey of the National Pharmacovigilance Centres of all 76 countries participating in the PIDM at the time the survey was conducted. Thirty-six countries (47%) responded. Of the 36 responding countries, 16 (44%) reported having a separate surveillance system for adverse events following immunizations (AEFIs) and 30 (83%) reported forwarding AEFI reports to the PIDM. Seven of the 36 countries (19%) indicated that one or more population subgroups are systematically excluded from their country's AEFI surveillance system. Five of the seven countries exclude reports concerning recipients of travellers' vaccines; three exclude recipients of vaccines administered by private physicians outside the national immunization programme and supply scheme; and five exclude reports from the military sector. Only half of the respondents knew of the Brighton Collaboration, a major international initiative aimed at the standardization of AEFI definitions. The survey identified critical elements that should be addressed quickly to improve global vaccine safety monitoring. Communication between national adverse drug reaction and AEFI surveillance authorities, ability to pay for advancing technology in developing countries, and proper use of services and terminologies are issues of concern.

  12. Incidence of narcolepsy before and after MF59-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in South Korean soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jung; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Choe, Kang-Won; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Hye Won; Heo, Jung Yeon

    2015-09-11

    Previous reports mostly from Europe suggested an association between an occurrence of narcolepsy and an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 (Pandemrix(®)). During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign, the Korean military performed a vaccination campaign with one type of influenza vaccine containing MF59-adjuvants. This study was conducted to investigate the background incidence rate of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers and the association of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine with the occurrence of narcolepsy in a young adult group. To assess the incidence of narcolepsy, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of suspicious cases of narcolepsy in 2007-2013 in the whole 20 military hospitals of the Korean military. The screened cases were classified according to the Brighton Collaboration case definition of narcolepsy. After obtaining the number of confirmed cases of narcolepsy per 3 months in 2007-2013, we compared the crude incidence rate of narcolepsy before and after the vaccination campaign. We included 218 narcolepsy suspicious cases in the initial review, which were screened by the diagnostic code on the computerized disease registry in 2007-2013. Forty-one cases were finally diagnosed with narcolepsy in 2007-2013 (male sex, 95%; median age, 21 years). The average background incidence rate of narcolepsy in Korean soldiers was 0.91 cases per 100,000 persons per year. During the 9 months before vaccination implementation (April to December 2009), 6 narcolepsy cases occurred, whereas during the next 9 months (January to September 2010) including the 3-month vaccination campaign, 5 cases occurred. The incidence of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers was not increased after the pandemic vaccination campaign using the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. Our results suggest that the MF59-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine did not contribute to the occurrence of narcolepsy in this young adult group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting Nitrogen Transport From Individual Sewage Disposal Systems for a Proposed Development in Adams County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatwole, K. K.; McCray, J.; Lowe, K.

    2005-12-01

    Individual sewage disposal systems (ISDS) have demonstrated the capability to be an effective method of treatment for domestic wastewater. They also are advantageous from a water resources standpoint because there is little water leaving the local hydrologic system. However, if unfavorable settings exist, ISDS can have a detrimental effect on local water-quality. This presentation will focus on assessing the potential impacts of a large housing development to area water quality. The residential development plans to utilize ISDS to accommodate all domestic wastewater generated within the development. The area of interest is located just west of Brighton, Colorado, on the northwestern margin of the Denver Basin. Efforts of this research will focus on impacts of ISDS to local groundwater and surface water systems. The Arapahoe Aquifer, which exists at relatively shallow depths in the area of proposed development, is suspected to be vulnerable to contamination from ISDS. Additionally, the local water quality of the Arapahoe Aquifer was not well known at the start of the study. As a result, nitrate was selected as a fo-cus water quality parameter because it is easily produced through nitrification of septic tank effluent and because of the previous agricultural practices that could be another potential source of nitrate. Several different predictive tools were used to attempt to predict the potential impacts of ISDS to water quality in the Arapahoe Aquifer. The objectives of these tools were to 1) assess the vulnerability of the Arapahoe Aquifer to ni-trate contamination, 2) predict the nitrate load to the aquifer, and 3) determine the sensitivity of different parameter inputs and the overall prediction uncertainty. These predictive tools began with very simple mass-loading calcula-tions and progressed to more complex, vadose-zone numerical contaminant transport modeling.

  14. Kinship--king's social harmonisation project. Pilot phase of a social network for use in higher education (HE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, B A

    2013-05-08

    Students entering Higher Education are increasingly information and communications technology literate. Many students (graduates and undergraduates) arrive as "digital residents", who are adept with social media and technologically fluent. The informal use of social media for learning is becoming increasingly evident, along with the potentially detrimental effects of a poor digital profile on employment prospects. This paper describes the creation of Kinship (King's Social Harmonisation Project), a university hosted, members only social network, which is currently being piloted in the Medical School at King's College London. Along with a number of other teaching and learning resources, it is intended to use Kinship to establish an informal code of conduct by modelling and moderating appropriate professional online behaviour. Kinship was developed using an open source Elgg platform, thanks to funding of £20,000 from the College Teaching Fund under the mentorship of Brighton University (1). This educational research project, led by Medicine, was proposed to select, customise and evaluate a social networking platform in order to provide functionality that would enhance new and existing e-learning resources, support group interaction, participation and sharing and meet the diverse needs of three academic schools: Medicine, the Dental Institute and two separate Departments, the Modern Languages Centre and the Department of English from Arts & Humanities, as a pilot for wider College deployment. Student involvement is central to the project, from conducting the evaluation to moulding and customising the functionality and look of Kinship, in order to ensure that the site is authentic and evolves in response to their wishes and requirements. Formal evaluation of Kinship commences summer 2012.

  15. The logic of surveillance guidelines: an analysis of vaccine adverse event reports from an ontological perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Courtot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When increased rates of adverse events following immunization are detected, regulatory action can be taken by public health agencies. However to be interpreted reports of adverse events must be encoded in a consistent way. Regulatory agencies rely on guidelines to help determine the diagnosis of the adverse events. Manual application of these guidelines is expensive, time consuming, and open to logical errors. Representing these guidelines in a format amenable to automated processing can make this process more efficient. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using the Brighton anaphylaxis case definition, we show that existing clinical guidelines used as standards in pharmacovigilance can be logically encoded using a formal representation such as the Adverse Event Reporting Ontology we developed. We validated the classification of vaccine adverse event reports using the ontology against existing rule-based systems and a manually curated subset of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. However, we encountered a number of critical issues in the formulation and application of the clinical guidelines. We report these issues and the steps being taken to address them in current surveillance systems, and in the terminological standards in use. CONCLUSIONS: By standardizing and improving the reporting process, we were able to automate diagnosis confirmation. By allowing medical experts to prioritize reports such a system can accelerate the identification of adverse reactions to vaccines and the response of regulatory agencies. This approach of combining ontology and semantic technologies can be used to improve other areas of vaccine adverse event reports analysis and should inform both the design of clinical guidelines and how they are used in the future. AVAILABILITY: Sufficient material to reproduce our results is available, including documentation, ontology, code and datasets, at http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/aero.

  16. Adverse events after Fluzone ® Intradermal vaccine reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Pedro L; Harrington, Theresa; Shimabukuro, Tom; Cano, Maria; Museru, Oidda I; Menschik, David; Broder, Karen

    2013-10-09

    In May 2011, the first trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine exclusively for intradermal administration (TIV-ID) was licensed in the US for adults aged 18-64 years. To characterize adverse events (AEs) after TIV-ID reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous reporting surveillance system. We searched VAERS for US reports after TIV-ID among persons vaccinated from July 1, 2011-February 28, 2013. Medical records were requested for reports coded as serious (death, hospitalization, prolonged hospitalization, disability, life-threatening-illness), and those suggesting anaphylaxis. Clinicians reviewed available information and assigned a primary clinical category to each report. Empirical Bayesian data mining was used to identify disproportional AE reporting following TIV-ID. Causality was not assessed. VAERS received 466 reports after TIV-ID; 9 (1.9%) were serious, including one reported fatality in an 88-year-old vaccinee. Median age was 43 years (range 4-88 years). The most common AE categories were: 218 (46.8%) injection site reactions; 89 (19.1%) other non-infectious (comprised mainly of constitutional signs and symptoms); and 74 (15.9%) allergy. Eight reports (1.7%) of anaphylaxis were verified by the Brighton criteria or a documented physician diagnosis. Disproportional reporting was identified for three AEs: 'injection site nodule', 'injection site pruritus', and 'drug administered to patient of inappropriate age'. The findings for the first two AEs were expected. Twenty-four reports of vaccinees reported, and 14 of 24 were coded with the AE 'drug administered to patient of inappropriate age'. Review of VAERS reports did not identify any new or unexpected safety concerns after TIV-ID. Injection site reactions were the most commonly reported AEs, similar to the pre-licensure clinical trials. Use of TIV-ID in younger and older individuals outside the approved age range highlights the need for education of healthcare providers

  17. Guillain-Barre syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: multinational case-control study in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne; Romio, Silvana; Johansen, Kari; Weibel, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2011-07-12

    To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Case-control study. Five European countries. 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one or more controls. Case status was classified according to the Brighton Collaboration definition. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, index date, and country. Relative risk estimate for Guillain-Barré syndrome after pandemic influenza vaccine. Case recruitment and vaccine coverage varied considerably between countries; the most common vaccines used were adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled risk estimate for all countries was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 6.0). After adjustment for influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection and seasonal influenza vaccination, receipt of pandemic influenza vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (adjusted odds ratio 1.0, 0.3 to 2.7). The 95% confidence interval shows that the absolute effect of vaccination could range from one avoided case of Guillain-Barré syndrome up to three excess cases within six weeks after vaccination in one million people. The risk of occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome is not increased after pandemic influenza vaccine, although the upper limit does not exclude a potential increase in risk up to 2.7-fold or three excess cases per one million vaccinated people. When assessing the association between pandemic influenza vaccines and Guillain-Barré syndrome it is important to account for the effects of influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal influenza vaccination, and calendar time.

  18. The Contribution of the Vaccine Adverse Event Text Mining System to the Classification of Possible Guillain-Barré Syndrome Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsis, T.; Woo, E. J.; Ball, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that a general purpose text mining system, the Vaccine adverse event Text Mining (VaeTM) system, could be used to automatically classify reports of an-aphylaxis for post-marketing safety surveillance of vaccines. Objective To evaluate the ability of VaeTM to classify reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) of possible Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). Methods We used VaeTM to extract the key diagnostic features from the text of reports in VAERS. Then, we applied the Brighton Collaboration (BC) case definition for GBS, and an information retrieval strategy (i.e. the vector space model) to quantify the specific information that is included in the key features extracted by VaeTM and compared it with the encoded information that is already stored in VAERS as Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Preferred Terms (PTs). We also evaluated the contribution of the primary (diagnosis and cause of death) and secondary (second level diagnosis and symptoms) diagnostic VaeTM-based features to the total VaeTM-based information. Results MedDRA captured more information and better supported the classification of reports for GBS than VaeTM (AUC: 0.904 vs. 0.777); the lower performance of VaeTM is likely due to the lack of extraction by VaeTM of specific laboratory results that are included in the BC criteria for GBS. On the other hand, the VaeTM-based classification exhibited greater specificity than the MedDRA-based approach (94.96% vs. 87.65%). Most of the VaeTM-based information was contained in the secondary diagnostic features. Conclusion For GBS, clinical signs and symptoms alone are not sufficient to match MedDRA coding for purposes of case classification, but are preferred if specificity is the priority. PMID:23650490

  19. Integrating palliative care into neurology services: what do the professionals say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepgul, Nilay; Gao, Wei; Evans, Catherine J; Jackson, Diana; van Vliet, Liesbeth M; Byrne, Anthony; Crosby, Vincent; Groves, Karen E; Lindsay, Fiona; Higginson, Irene J

    2017-08-03

    Evaluations of new services for palliative care in non-cancer conditions are few. OPTCARE Neuro is a multicentre trial evaluating the effectiveness of short-term integrated palliative care (SIPC) for progressive long-term neurological conditions. Here, we present survey results describing the current levels of collaboration between neurology and palliative care services and exploring the views of professionals towards the new SIPC service. Neurology and palliative care teams from six UK trial sites (London, Nottingham, Liverpool, Cardiff, Brighton and Chertsey) were approached via email to complete an online survey. The survey was launched in July 2015 and consisted of multiple choice or open comment questions with responses collected using online forms. 33 neurology and 26 palliative care professionals responded. Collaborations between the two specialties were reported as being 'good/excellent' by 36% of neurology and by 58% of palliative care professionals. However, nearly half (45%) of neurology compared with only 12% of palliative care professionals rated current levels as being 'poor/none'. Both professional groups felt that the new SIPC service would influence future collaborations for the better. However, they identified a number of barriers for the new SIPC service such as resources and clinician awareness. Our results demonstrate the opportunity to increase collaboration between neurology and palliative care services for people with progressive neurological conditions, and the acceptability of SIPC as a model to support this. ISRCTN18337380; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. OneGeology - Access to geoscience for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komac, Marko; Lee, Kathryn; Robida, Francois

    2014-05-01

    OneGeology is an initiative of Geological Survey Organisations (GSO) around the globe that dates back to Brighton, UK in 2007. Since then OneGeology has been a leader in developing geological online map data using a new international standard - a geological exchange language known as 'GeoSciML'. Increased use of this new language allows geological data to be shared and integrated across the planet with other organisations. One of very important goals of OneGeology was a transfer of valuable know-how to the developing world, hence shortening the digital learning curve. In autumn 2013 OneGeology was transformed into a Consortium with a clearly defined governance structure, making its structure more official, its operability more flexible and its membership more open where in addition to GSO also to other type of organisations that manage geoscientific data can join and contribute. The next stage of the OneGeology initiative will hence be focused into increasing the openness and richness of that data from individual countries to create a multi-thematic global geological data resource on the rocks beneath our feet. Authoritative information on hazards and minerals will help to prevent natural disasters, explore for resources (water, minerals and energy) and identify risks to human health on a planetary scale. With this new stage also renewed OneGeology objectives were defined and these are 1) to be the provider of geoscience data globally, 2) to ensure exchange of know-how and skills so all can participate, and 3) to use the global profile of 1G to increase awareness of the geosciences and their relevance among professional and general public. We live in a digital world that enables prompt access to vast amounts of open access data. Understanding our world, the geology beneath our feet and environmental challenges related to geology calls for accessibility of geoscientific data and OneGeology Portal (portal.onegeology.org) is the place to find them.

  1. AS03 adjuvanted AH1N1 vaccine associated with an abrupt increase in the incidence of childhood narcolepsy in Finland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Nohynek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with strong genetic predisposition causing excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A sudden increase in childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland soon after pandemic influenza epidemic and vaccination with ASO3-adjuvanted Pandemrix. No increase was observed in other age groups. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study. From January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010 we retrospectively followed the cohort of all children living in Finland and born from January 1991 through December 2005. Vaccination data of the whole population was obtained from primary health care databases. All new cases with assigned ICD-10 code of narcolepsy were identified and the medical records reviewed by two experts to classify the diagnosis of narcolepsy according to the Brighton collaboration criteria. Onset of narcolepsy was defined as the first documented contact to health care because of excessive daytime sleepiness. The primary follow-up period was restricted to August 15, 2010, the day before media attention on post-vaccination narcolepsy started. FINDINGS: Vaccination coverage in the cohort was 75%. Of the 67 confirmed cases of narcolepsy, 46 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated were included in the primary analysis. The incidence of narcolepsy was 9.0 in the vaccinated as compared to 0.7/100,000 person years in the unvaccinated individuals, the rate ratio being 12.7 (95% confidence interval 6.1-30.8. The vaccine-attributable risk of developing narcolepsy was 1:16,000 vaccinated 4 to 19-year-olds (95% confidence interval 1:13,000-1:21,000. CONCLUSIONS: Pandemrix vaccine contributed to the onset of narcolepsy among those 4 to 19 years old during the pandemic influenza in 2009-2010 in Finland. Further studies are needed to determine whether this observation exists in other populations and to elucidate potential underlying immunological mechanism. The role of the adjuvant in particular warrants further research before drawing

  2. Effects of nasal or pulmonary delivered treatments with an adenovirus vectored interferon (mDEF201 on respiratory and systemic infections in mice caused by cowpox and vaccinia viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald F Smee

    Full Text Available An adenovirus 5 vector encoding for mouse interferon alpha, subtype 5 (mDEF201 was evaluated for efficacy against lethal cowpox (Brighton strain and vaccinia (WR strain virus respiratory and systemic infections in mice. Two routes of mDEF201 administration were used, nasal sinus (5-µl and pulmonary (50-µl, to compare differences in efficacy, since the preferred treatment of humans would be in a relatively small volume delivered intranasally. Lower respiratory infections (LRI, upper respiratory infections (URI, and systemic infections were induced by 50-µl intranasal, 10-µl intranasal, and 100-µl intraperitoneal virus challenges, respectively. mDEF201 treatments were given prophylactically either 24 h (short term or 56d (long-term prior to virus challenge. Single nasal sinus treatments of 10(6 and 10(7 PFU/mouse of mDEF201 protected all mice from vaccinia-induced LRI mortality (comparable to published studies with pulmonary delivered mDEF201. Systemic vaccinia infections responded significantly better to nasal sinus delivered mDEF201 than to pulmonary treatments. Cowpox LRI infections responded to 10(7 mDEF201 treatments, but a 10(6 dose was only weakly protective. Cowpox URI infections were equally treatable by nasal sinus and pulmonary delivered mDEF201 at 10(7 PFU/mouse. Dose-responsive prophylaxis with mDEF201, given one time only 56 d prior to initiating a vaccinia virus LRI infection, was 100% protective from 10(5 to 10(7 PFU/mouse. Improvements in lung hemorrhage score and lung weight were evident, as were decreases in liver, lung, and spleen virus titers. Thus, mDEF201 was able to treat different vaccinia and cowpox virus infections using both nasal sinus and pulmonary treatment regimens, supporting its development for humans.

  3. Zika Virus and Guillain–Barre Syndrome: Is There Sufficient Evidence for Causality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, A. Arturo; Stokic, Dobrivoje S.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide concern over Zika virus causing Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) soared after recent reports that Zika-related weakness was due to GBS. A global strategic response plan was initiated with recommendations for at-risk countries to prepare for GBS. This plan has major economic implications, as nations with limited resources struggle to implement costly immunotherapy. Since confirmation of causality is prerequisite to providing specific management recommendations, it is prudent to review data endorsing a GBS diagnosis. We searched PubMed for manuscripts reporting original clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic data on Zika virus and GBS. Five papers met criteria; four case reports and one large case–control study (French Polynesia) that attributed 42 paralysis cases to a motor variant of GBS. Brighton criteria were reportedly used to diagnose GBS, but no differential diagnosis was presented, which violates criteria. GBS was characterized by early onset (median 6 days post-viral syndrome), rapid progression (median 6 days from onset to nadir), and atypical clinical features (52% lacked areflexia, 48% of facial palsies were unilateral). Electrodiagnostic evaluations fell short of guidelines endorsed by American Academy of Neurology. Typical anti-ganglioside antibodies in GBS motor variants were rarely present. We conclude that there is no causal relationship between Zika virus and GBS because data failed to confirm GBS and exclude other causes of paralysis. Focus should be redirected at differential diagnosis, proper use of diagnostic criteria, and electrodiagnosis that follows recommended guidelines. We also call for a moratorium on recommendations for at-risk countries to prepare costly immunotherapies directed at GBS. PMID:27746763

  4. Zika Virus and Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Is There Sufficient Evidence for Causality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Arturo Leis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide concern over Zika virus causing Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS soared after recent reports that Zika-related weakness was due to GBS. A global strategic response plan was initiated with recommendations for at risk countries to prepare for GBS. This plan has major economic implications, as nations with limited resources struggle to implement costly immunotherapy. Since confirmation of causality is prerequisite to providing specific management recommendations, it is prudent to review data endorsing a GBS diagnosis. We searched PubMed for manuscripts reporting original clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic data on Zika virus and GBS. Five papers met criteria; four case reports and one large case-control study (French Polynesia that attributed 42 paralysis cases to a motor variant of GBS. Brighton criteria were reportedly used to diagnose GBS, but no differential diagnosis was presented, which violates criteria. GBS was characterized by early onset (median 6 days post-viral syndrome, rapid progression (median 6 days from onset to nadir, and atypical clinical features (52% lacked areflexia, 48% of facial palsies were unilateral. Electrodiagnostic evaluations fell short of guidelines endorsed by American Academy of Neurology. Typical anti-ganglioside antibodies in GBS motor variants were rarely present. We conclude that there is no causal relationship between Zika virus and GBS because data failed to confirm GBS and exclude other causes of paralysis. Focus should be redirected at differential diagnosis, proper use of diagnostic criteria, and electrodiagnosis that follows recommended guidelines. We also call for a moratorium on recommendations for at risk countries to prepare costly immunotherapies directed at GBS.

  5. Nannofossil and sequence chronostratigraphy of a marine flooding surface in the Turonian of Trinidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, T.C. [Exxon Exploration Company, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A multi-well regional study in the Southern basin, Trinidad, reveals a very pronounced marine flooding surface in Turonian- age sediments. This surface is correlatable with global Turonian marine transgressions and genetically ties with the best hydrocarbon source rocks known in Trinidad. The Turonian marine flooding surface yields abundant nannoplankton. Most notable is Lithastrinus moratus Stover, a short-ranging marker of the Lithastrinus evolutionary series. Two morphotypes of Lithastrinus moratus have been found. The more delicate eight-rayed form evolves from Lithastrinus floralls in early Turonian time. Based on observations in Ste. Croix-1, Rocky Palace-1, Rochard-1, Marac-1, Moniga East-15, Iguana River-1, Lizard Spring-I and Antilles Brighton-102, it occurs more frequently in the lower Turonian, but is rare in Trinidad. It has a more robust seven-rayed descendant that appears to be restricted to a narrow interval associated with peak Turonian marine transgression and usually dominates the nannofossil assemblage in the condensed section. The highest stratigraphic occurrence of this form coincides with the lowest occurrence of Marthastentes furcatus based on core sample studies. The age of the marine flooding surface is therefore well constrained to be in zone CC12 and is considered to be correlative with the 89 million year marine flooding surface. The marine flooding surface appears intercontinentally correlatable as it has also been identified in the Arcadia Shale of the Eagle Ford Group in Texas. Because of its wide areal distribution and ease of paleontological recognition, this surface is ideal for regional hydrocarbon source rock mapping, stratal correlation and structural control.

  6. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  7. Testing of a sodium/nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery for electric propulsion of ships and vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluiters, E.C.; Schmal, D.; Veen, W.R. ter [TNO Inst. of Environmental Sciences, Energy Research and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Posthumus, K.J.C.M. [Royal Netherlands Navy, The Haag (Netherlands). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    1999-07-01

    One of the promising future batteries for electric propulsion of vehicles and ships is the sodium/nickel chloride or ZEBRA (Zero Emission Battery Research Activities) battery. Despite some disadvantages with respect to the high temperature, the advantages with respect to specific energy and energy density are such that, especially in applications where the battery is used on a more or less continuous basis (e.g., in delivery vans and taxies) it is an interesting candidate battery. Another interesting application is on board of ships, like submarines or future electrical surface ships with electric propulsion. In 1995 a 2 year feasibility study, including experimental testing of a 10 kW h battery, was completed. This investigated the naval applicability of the sodium/sulphur battery, which is also a high temperature battery. Here the limited, experimentally proven, life-time of the batteries was of about 1.5 years and this made naval application almost impossible. A paper about this study was presented at the 19th International Power Sources Symposium held at Brighton, England, in April 1995. Because of the more or less comparable specifications on specific energy and the more promising results of the life-time and field tests with sodium/nickel chloride batteries, a ZEBRA battery from AEG Anglo Batteries has been tested for naval applications. This was done by simulating the charge and discharge as it occurs in practice for the applications investigated. With respect to the electrical ship application (investigated for the Royal Netherlands Navy) the power versus time taken from the battery was simulated as well as the charge procedures. The same can be done for the vehicle application: in this case typical drive cycles for a van or taxi are translated to power versus time taken from the battery. The results of the tests for application of the battery in naval ships are very promising. (orig.)

  8. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malard, V.; Berenguer, F.; Prat, O.; Ruat, S.; Steinmetz, G.; Quemeneur, E. [CEA VALRHO, Serv Biochim and Toxicol Nucl, DSV, iBEB, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2007-06-06

    It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to {sup 59}Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxico-genomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and bio-marker research. Results: A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BN1P3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for bio-marker research. Of those, T1MP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion: Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative bio-marker of cobalt toxicity was identified. (authors)

  9. Scaling for turbulent viscosity of buoyant plumes in stratified fluids: PIV measurement with implications for submarine hydrothermal plume turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; He, Zhiguo; Jiang, Houshuo

    2017-11-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to measure instantaneous two-dimensional velocity vector fields of laboratory-generated turbulent buoyant plumes in linearly stratified saltwater over extended periods of time. From PIV-measured time-series flow data, characteristics of plume mean flow and turbulence have been quantified. To be specific, maximum plume penetration scaling and entrainment coefficient determined from the mean flow agree well with the theory based on the entrainment hypothesis for buoyant plumes in stratified fluids. Besides the well-known persistent entrainment along the plume stem (i.e., the 'plume-stem' entrainment), the mean plume velocity field shows persistent entrainment along the outer edge of the plume cap (i.e., the 'plume-cap' entrainment), thereby confirming predictions from previous numerical simulation studies. To our knowledge, the present PIV investigation provides the first measured flow field data in the plume cap region. As to measured plume turbulence, both the turbulent kinetic energy field and the turbulence dissipation rate field attain their maximum close to the source, while the turbulent viscosity field reaches its maximum within the plume cap region; the results also show that maximum turbulent viscosity scales as νt,max = 0.030(B/N)1/2, where B is source buoyancy flux and N is ambient buoyancy frequency. These PIV data combined with previously published numerical simulation results have implications for understanding the roles of hydrothermal plume turbulence, i.e. plume turbulence within the cap region causes the 'plume-cap' entrainment that plays an equally important role as the 'plume-stem' entrainment in supplying the final volume flux at the plume spreading level.

  10. The age of volcanic tuffs from the Upper Freshwater Molasse (North Alpine Foreland Basin) and their possible use for tephrostratigraphic correlations across Europe for the Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocholl, Alexander; Schaltegger, Urs; Gilg, H. Albert; Wijbrans, Jan; Böhme, Madelaine

    2017-07-01

    The Middle Miocene Upper Freshwater Molasse sediments represent the last cycle of clastic sedimentation during the evolution of the North Alpine Foreland Basin. They are characterized by small-scale lateral and temporal facies changes that make intra-basin stratigraphic correlations at regional scale difficult. This study provides new U-Pb zircon ages as well as revised 40Ar/39Ar data of volcanic ash horizons in the Upper Freshwater Molasse sediments from southern Germany and Switzerland. In a first and preliminary attempt, we propose their possible correlation to other European tephra deposits. The U-Pb zircon data of one Swiss (Bischofszell) and seven southern German (Zahling, Hachelstuhl, Laimering, Unterneul, Krumbad, Ponholz) tuff horizons indicate eruption ages between roughly 13.0 and 15.5 Ma. The stratigraphic position of the Unterneul and Laimering tuffs, bracketing the ejecta of the Ries impact (Brockhorizon), suggests that the Ries impact occurred between 14.93 and 15.00 Ma, thus assigning the event to the reversed chron C5Bn1r (15.032-14.870 Ma) which is in accordance with paleomagnetic evidence. We combine our data with published ages of tuff horizons from Italy, Switzerland, Bavaria, Styria, Hungary, and Romania to derive a preliminary tephrochronological scheme for the Middle Miocene in Central Europe in the age window from 13.2 to 15.5 Ma. The scheme is based on the current state of knowledge that the Carpathian-Pannonian volcanic field was the only area in the region producing explosive calc-alkaline felsic volcanism. This preliminary scheme will require verification by more high-quality ages complemented by isotopic, geochemical and paleomagnetic data.

  11. Insertions or Deletions (Indels) in the rrn 16S-23S rRNA Gene Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS) Compromise the Typing and Identification of Strains within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) Complex and Closely Related Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslunka, Christopher; Gifford, Bianca; Tucci, Joseph; Gürtler, Volker; Seviour, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ITS sequences in the rrn operon are suitable for identifying individual Acinetobacter Acb complex members, we analysed length and sequence differences between multiple ITS copies within the genomes of individual strains. Length differences in ITS reported previously between A. nosocomialis BCRC15417T (615 bp) and other strains (607 bp) can be explained by presence of an insertion (indel 13i/1) in the longer ITS variant. The same Indel 13i/1 was also found in ITS sequences of ten strains of A. calcoaceticus, all 639 bp long, and the 628 bp ITS of Acinetobacter strain BENAB127. Four additional indels (13i/2–13i/5) were detected in Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU 10090 ITS length variants (608, 609, 620, 621 and 630 bp). These ITS variants appear to have resulted from horizontal gene transfer involving other Acinetobacter species or in some cases unrelated bacteria. Although some ITS copies in strain c/t13TU 10090 are of the same length (620 bp) as those in Acinetobacter strains b/n1&3, A. pittii (10 strains), A. calcoaceticus and A. oleivorans (not currently acknowledged as an Acb member), their individual ITS sequences differ. Thus ITS length by itself can not by itself be used to identify Acb complex strains. A shared indel in ITS copies in two separate Acinetobacter species compromises the specificity of ITS targeted probes, as shown with the Aun-3 probe designed to target the ITS in A. pitti. The presence of indel 13i/5 in the ITS of Acinetobacter strain c/t13TU means it too responded positively to this probe. Thus, neither ITS sequencing nor the currently available ITS targeted probes can distinguish reliably between Acb member species. PMID:25141005

  12. ADJUVANT TREATMENT WITH BIPHOSPONATES IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER BONE METASTASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant metastasis of thyroid cancer are founded in 10% of all metastases. Bone metastases are founded in 23% of distant metastasis. Complications associated with metastatic skeletal involvement often lead to a deterioration in the overall condition and a decrease in the quality of life of patients. Surgical treatment, chemotherapy are less effective, provide a higher injury rate and toxicity. This is a reason of increasing of cost of treatment. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone mass, which can prolong the time to releasing bone complications: bone fracture, spine column fracture with spinal medulla compression, which decrease the QoL. Surgical treatment and chemotherapy have worse outcomes, higher injury rate, toxicity and increase cost of treatment. Bisphosphonates decrease the level of pain syndrome. Bisphosphonates are used in treatment of oncological patients since 1990. First medication was Fosamax (Aledronat. Later more medications with better efficacy and more useful were synthesised. The last one was Zoledronic acid. Rezorba (zoledronic acid was synthesised in 2006 in Russia. Rezorba has a same efficacy with other bisphosphonates, it was shown in clinical studies with groups of breast cancer and prostatic cancer. Clinical case of 67 y.o. male patient with diagnosis: Thyroid cancer IV c st pT1bN1bM1, right neck, paratraсheal, bone and lung metastasis. Complex treatment (surgery + radioiodine therapy + 5 courses of Rezorba was presented. After 3 courses the level of pain was decreased from 3 to 1,5. After 5 courses the ECOQ score was decreased from 2 to 1 point. Inclusion of Resorba in complex treatment of patients with bone metastasis after thyroid cancer at all stages of treatment decreases the score of pain syndrome and bone tissue reparation.

  13. Changes in eating attitudes, eating disorders and body weight in Chinese medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yanhui; Liu, Tieqiao; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jichuan; Deng, Yunlong; Hao, Wei; Chen, Xiaogang; Xu, Yahui; Wang, Xiuyan; Tang, Jinsong

    2013-09-01

    Eating disorders is a particular problem for university students. However, little is known about this problem among medical students who often have high stress. The aims of this study were to describe the changes in eating attitudes and eating disorders from 2006 to 2008 in a medical student sample, and to compare the gender differences of eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) with this sample. This study was conducted in Changsha city, Mainland China. Self-reported questionnaires, including the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and Eating Disorders Assessment Questionnaire (CETCA), were employed to examine the changes in eating attitudes and eating disorders from 2006 to 2008 in a medical student sample (N = 500). Self-reported findings suggest that tentative eating disorders prevalence was 0.90% (anorexia nervosa (AN): 0; bulimia nervosa (BN): 4 females) in 2006 and 1.44% (AN: 1 male; BN: 1 male and 3 females) in 2008 of the full sample. The present data showed that 2.26% (2 males and 9 females) in 2006 and 2.47% (4 males and 6 females) in 2008 of all students obtained scores greater than 20 on the EAT-26 indicative of distorted eating attitudes and behaviour. Male students kept lower distorted eating attitudes and behaviours than female students, while female students kept a lower BMI than male students in both 2006 and 2008. However, there were no statistically significant changes in eating attitudes, distorted eating attitudes and CETCA in either male or female students from 2006 to 2008. The results of this study suggest that there were no statistically significant changes from 2006 to 2008 in eating attitudes, distorted eating attitudes and CETCA. However, females showed significantly higher eating disorders and distorted eating attitudes compared to males in both 2006 and 2008. This study is furthering our understanding of eating disorders in a Chinese cultural context.

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopy (IR, multinuclear NMR, ESI-MS), diffraction, density functional study and in vitro antiproliferative activity of pyrazole-beta-diketone dihalotin(IV) compounds on 5 melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinari, Claudio; Caruso, Francesco; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Villa, Raffaella; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Phillips, Christine; Tanski, Joseph; Rossi, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Novel 4-acylpyrazolon-5-ato-dihalotin(IV) complexes, [Q2SnX2], (X = F, Cl, Br or I); HQ = HQ(CHPh2) (1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-4-(2,2-diphenylacetyl)pyrazol-5-one), HQ(Bn) (1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-4-(2-phenylacetyl)pyrazol-5-one) or HQ(CF3,py) (4-(2,2,2-trifluoroacetyl)-1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazol-5-one) have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, 1H, 13C, 19F and 119Sn NMR, electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)), analytical and structural methods (X-ray and density functional theory). 119Sn chemical shifts depend on the nature of the halides bonded to tin. Isomer conversion, detected in solution by NMR spectroscopy, is related to the acyl moiety bulkiness while the cis(Cl)-cis(acyl)-trans(pyrazolonato) scheme is found in the solid state. The in vitro antiproliferative tests of three derivatives on three human melanoma cell lines (JR8, SK-MEL-5, MEL501) and two melanoma cell clones (2/21 and 2/60) show dose-dependent decrease of cell proliferation in all cell lines. The activity correlates with the nature of the substituent on position 1 of pyrazole, decreasing in the order pyridyl>Ph>methyl. The activity for (Q(CF3,py))2SnCl2 on the SK-MEL-5 cell line is IC50 = 50 microM.

  15. Altered 5-HT2A Receptor Binding after Recovery from Bulimia-Type Anorexia Nervosa: Relationships to Harm Avoidance and Drive for Thinness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Mathis, Chester A; Frank, Guido K; Weissfeld, Lisa; McConaha, Claire W; Henry, Shannan E; Brooks-Achenbach, Sarah; Barbarich, Nicole C; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a disturbance of serotonin neuronal pathways may contribute to the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). This study applied positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the brain serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor, which could contribute to disturbances of appetite and behavior in AN and BN. To avoid the confounding effects of malnutrition, we studied 10 women recovered from bulimia-type AN (REC AN–BN, >1 year normal weight, regular menstrual cycles, no binging, or purging) compared with 16 healthy control women (CW) using PET imaging and a specific 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, [18F]altanserin. REC AN–BN women had significantly reduced [18F]altanserin binding potential relative to CW in the left subgenual cingulate, the left parietal cortex, and the right occipital cortex. [18F]altanserin binding potential was positively related to harm avoidance and negatively related to novelty seeking in cingulate and temporal regions only in REC AN–BN subjects. In addition, REC AN–BN had negative relationships between [18F]altanserin binding potential and drive for thinness in several cortical regions. In conclusion, this study extends research suggesting that altered 5-HT neuronal system activity persists after recovery from bulimia-type AN, particularly in subgenual cingulate regions. Altered 5-HT neurotransmission after recovery also supports the possibility that this may be a trait-related disturbance that contributes to the pathophysiology of eating disorders. It is possible that subgenual cingulate findings are not specific for AN–BN, but may be related to the high incidence of lifetime major depressive disorder diagnosis in these subjects. PMID:15054474

  16. Using MicroFTIR to Map Mineral Distributions in Serpentinizing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Kubo, M. D.; Cardace, D.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinization, the water-rock reaction forming serpentine mineral assemblages from ultramafic precursors, can co-occur with the production of hydrogen, methane, and diverse organic compounds (McCollom and Seewald, 2013), evolving water appropriate for carbonate precipitation, including in ophiolite groundwater flow systems and travertine-producing seeps/springs. Serpentinization is regarded as a geologic process important to the sustainability of the deep biosphere (Schrenk et al., 2013) and the origin of life (Schulte et al., 2006). In this study, we manually polished wafers of ultramafic rocks/associated minerals (serpentinite, peridotite, pyroxenite, dunite; olivine, diopside, serpentine, magnetite), and travertine/constituent minerals (carbonate crusts; calcite, dolomite), and observed mineral boundaries and interfaces using µFTIR analysis in reflection mode. We used a Thermo Nicolet iS50 FTIR spectrometer coupled with a Continuum IR microscope to map minerals/boundaries. We identify, confirm, and document FTIR wavenumber regions linked to serpentinite- and travertine-associated minerals by referencing IR spectra (RRUFF) and aligning with x-ray diffraction. The ultramafic and carbonate samples are from the following field localities: McLaughlin Natural Reserve - a UC research reserve, Lower Lake, CA; Zambales, PH; Ontario, CA; Yellow Dog, MI; Taskesti, TK; Twin Sisters Range, WA; Sharon, MA; Klamath Mountains, CA; Dun Mountain, NZ; and Sussex County, NJ. Our goals are to provide comprehensive µFTIR characterization of mineral profiles important in serpentinites and related rocks, and evaluate the resolving power of µFTIR for the detection of mineral-encapsulated, residual organic compounds from biological activity. We report on µFTIR data for naturally occurring ultramafics and travertines and also estimate the limit of detection for cell membrane components in mineral matrices, impregnating increasing mass proportions of xanthan gum in a peridotite sand

  17. A multilevel study of the environmental determinants of swine ascariasis in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ângelo Joel; Ribeiro, Ana Isabel; Severo, Milton; Niza-Ribeiro, João

    2017-12-01

    Ascariasis is considered a common parasitosis of swine worldwide. The disease causes significant economic losses due to its effect on feed conversion ratio and liver condemnations at slaughter (liver milk spots). This study aimed to characterise the between-farm and spatial variance in porcine ascariasis in England and to assess the association between the percentage of infected animals and potential environmental risk factors, including production system, socioeconomic deprivation, soil characteristics (pH, topsoil bulk density, topsoil organic matter, topsoil texture class, soil water regime, topsoil available water capacity, and elevation), and climatic conditions (relative humidity, air temperature, and rainfall) before slaughter. Post-mortem inspection results were provided by the Food Standards Agency and comprised information about the number of rejected livers, the number of animals sent to slaughter and the production system. All farms were georeferenced based on the postcode, which allowed the assessment of the area index of socioeconomic deprivation and the extraction of soil and climatic characteristics available in different online databases. Under a multilevel framework with adjustment for spatial autocorrelation, a standard linear mixed model was fitted to estimate the association between these determinants and the percentage of infected animals. From 2,513,973 English farmed pigs included in the study, 4.3% had their livers rejected due to milk spots. The percentage of infected pigs per batch ranged from 0% to 100%. The highest percentages were found in Surrey, East and West Sussex (8.9%) and lowest in Leicestershire, Rutland and Northamptonshire (2.0%). Significant associations were found at multivariable analysis between the proportion of infection and the number of animals sent to slaughter (β=-0.005; 95%CI=-0.005, -0.004), soil texture (peat compared to coarse textured soils; β=-0.516; 95%CI=-1.010, -0.063), relative humidity (β=0.011; 95%CI

  18. Basin fill evolution and paleotectonic patterns along the Samfrau geosyncline: the Sauce Grande basin-Ventana foldbelt (Argentina) and Karoo basin-Cape foldbelt (South Africa) revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gamundí, O. R.; Rossello, E. A.

    As integral parts of du Toit's (1927) ``Samfrau Geosyncline'', the Sauce Grande basin-Ventana foldbelt (Argentina) and Karoo basin-Cape foldbelt (South Africa) share similar paleoclimatic, paleogeographic, and paleotectonic aspects related to the Late Paleozoic tectono-magmatic activity along the Panthalassan continental margin of Gondwanaland. Late Carboniferou-earliest Permian glacial deposits were deposited in the Sauce Grande (Sauce Grande Formation) and Karoo (Dwyka Formation) basins and Falkland-Malvinas Islands (Lafonia Formation) during an initial (sag) phase of extension. The pre-breakup position of the Falkland (Malvinas) Islands on the easternmost part of the Karoo basin (immediately east of the coast of South Africa) is supported by recent paleomagnetic data, lithofacies associations, paleoice flow directions and age similarities between the Dwyka and the Lafonia glacial sequences. The desintegration of the Gondwanan Ice Sheet (GIS) triggered widespread transgressions, reflected in the stratigraphic record by the presence of inter-basinally correlatable, open marine, fine-grained deposits (Piedra Azul Formation in the Sauce Grande basin, Prince Albert Formation in the Karoo basin and Port Sussex Formation in the Falkland Islands) capping glacial marine sediments. These early postglacial transgressive deposits, characterised by fossils of the Eurydesma fauna and Glossopteris flora, represent the maximum flooding of the basins. Cratonward foreland subsidence was triggered by the San Rafael orogeny (ca. 270 Ma) in Argentina and propogated along the Gondwanan margin. This subsidence phase generated sufficient space to accommodate thick synorogenic sequences derived from the orogenic flanks of the Sauce Grande and Karoo basins. Compositionally, the initial extensional phase of these basins was characterized by quartz-rich, craton-derived detritus and was followed by a compressional (foreland) phase characterized by a paleocurrent reversal and dominance of

  19. Nonlinear empirical model of gas humidity-related voltage dynamics of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, M.; Andre, D.; Schmid, O.; Hofer, E. P.

    Intelligent energy management is a cost-effective key path to realize efficient automotive drive trains [R. O'Hayre, S.W. Cha, W. Colella, F.B. Prinz. Fuel Cell Fundamentals, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2006]. To develop operating strategy in fuel cell drive trains, precise and computational efficient models of all system components, especially the fuel cell stack, are needed. Should these models further be used in diagnostic or control applications, then some major requirements must be fulfilled. First, the model must predict the mean fuel cell voltage very precisely in all possible operating conditions, even during transients. The model output should be as smooth as possible to support best efficient optimization strategies of the complete system. At least, the model must be computational efficient. For most applications, a difference between real fuel cell voltage and model output of less than 10 mV and 1000 calculations per second will be sufficient. In general, empirical models based on system identification offer a better accuracy and consume less calculation resources than detailed models derived from theoretical considerations [J. Larminie, A. Dicks. Fuel Cell Systems Explained, John Wiley & Sons, West Sussex, 2003]. In this contribution, the dynamic behaviour of the mean cell voltage of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack due to variations in humidity of cell's reactant gases is investigated. The validity of the overall model structure, a so-called general Hammerstein model (or Uryson model), was introduced recently in [M. Meiler, O. Schmid, M. Schudy, E.P. Hofer. Dynamic fuel cell stack model for real-time simulation based on system identification, J. Power Sources 176 (2007) 523-528]. Fuel cell mean voltage is calculated as the sum of a stationary and a dynamic voltage component. The stationary component of cell voltage is represented by a lookup-table and the dynamic voltage by a parallel placed, nonlinear transfer function. A

  20. Combining antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic agents – optimizing cardiovascular risk factor management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamorano J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available José Zamorano1, Jonathan Edwards21Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain; 2UBC Scientific Solutions, 5 North Street, Horsham, West Sussex, UKAbstract: Clinical guidelines now recognize the importance of a multifactorial approach to managing cardiovascular (CV risk. This idea was taken a step further with the concept of the Polypill™. There are, however, considerable patent, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, registration, and cost implications that will need to be overcome before the Polypill™ or other single-pill combinations of CV medications become widely available. However, a medication targeting blood pressure (BP and lipids provides much of the proposed benefits of the Polypill™. A single-pill combination of the antihypertensive amlodipine besylate and the lipid-lowering medication atorvastatin calcium (SPAA is currently available in many parts of the world. This review describes the rationale for this combination therapy and the clinical trials that have demonstrated that these two agents can be combined without the loss of efficacy for either agent or an increase in the incidence of adverse events. The recently completed Cluster Randomized Usual Care vs Caduet Investigation Assessing Long-term-risk (CRUCIAL trial is discussed in detail. CRUCIAL was a 12-month, international, multicenter, prospective, open-label, parallel design, cluster-randomized trial, which demonstrated that a proactive intervention strategy based on SPAA in addition to usual care (UC had substantial benefits on estimated CV risk, BP, and lipids over continued UC alone. Adherence with antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapies outside of the controlled environment of clinical trials is very low (~30%–40% at 12 months. Observational studies have demonstrated that improving adherence to lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications may reduce CV events. One means of improving adherence is the use of single-pill combinations. Real-world observational

  1. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a casestudy from the Pevensey Levels, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Bradford

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland areas. The manipulation of ditch water levels is a common management technique to maintain important in-stream and in-field habitats in such areas. However, in wet grasslands with low soil conductivities the water table in the centre of each field is not closely coupled to variations in ditch stage. Consequently rainfall and evaporation have a greater influence on the depth to water table and water table fluctuations within each field. In-field micro-topographic variations also lead to subtle variations in the hydrological regime and depth to water table that create a mosaic of different wetness conditions and habitats. The depth, duration, timing and frequency of flooding from accumulated rainfall, surface water and standing groundwater also influence the availability of suitable in-field habitats. Land drainage models are often used for studies of wet grasslands, but tend to be more complex and require more field variables than saturated zone models. This paper applies a 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW, to simulate groundwater levels within a single field in a wet coastal grassland underlain by a low permeability sequence and located in the central part of Pevensey Levels, Sussex, UK. At this scale, the influence of vertical leakage and regional groundwater flow within the deeper, more permeable part of the sequence is likely to be small. Whilst available data were not sufficient to attempt a full calibration, it was found that the sequence could be represented as a single, unconfined sequence having uniform hydraulic properties. The model also confirmed that evaporation and rainfall are the dominant components of the water balance. Provided certain information requirements are met, a distributed groundwater model, such as MODFLOW, can benefit situations where greater hydrological detail in space and time is required to

  2. PREFACE: XI Conference on Beauty, Charm, Hyperons in Hadronic Interactions BEACH

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    Bozzo, Marco

    2014-11-01

    This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 11th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm and Beauty Hadrons, currently known as the BEACH Conferences. The BEACH conferences cover a broad range of physics topics in the field of Hyperon and heavy-flavor physics. This conference continues the BEACH series, which began with a meeting in Strasbourg in 1995 and since then offers a biennial opportunity for both theorists and experimentalists from the high-energy physics community to discuss all aspects of flavour physics. The 11th Conference took place in the Lecture Theatre of the Physics West Building of the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) from July 22nd to July 26th and was attended by 107 participants. All of the sessions were plenary sessions accommodating review talks and shorter contributions discussing both theory and recent experiments. At the end of the conference Valerie Gibson (Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, UK) and Sebastian Jaeger (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, UK) summarized and put in context all the presentations of the conference giving two very interesting Summary talks. These Conference Proceedings are particularly interesting since, due to the long shutdown of the LHC in Geneva (CH), most of the data presented were from the entire data set available. This volume in fact offers an interesting panorama of the present situation and allows a comparison of the experimental data and the theory in a field that is always in continuous evolution. The conference was impeccably organized by the Local Organizing Committee chaired by Cristina Lazzeroni (Birmingham Univeristy, Birmingham, UK) that I want to thank particularly here. Many from the University Staff have contributed to the smooth running of the conference. We would like to thank the Local Scientific Secretariat for their invaluable help in making the conference a truly enjoyable and unforgettable event; a special thanks

  3. 'You can't be a person and a doctor': the work-life balance of doctors in training-a qualitative study.

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    Rich, Antonia; Viney, Rowena; Needleman, Sarah; Griffin, Ann; Woolf, Katherine

    2016-12-02

    Investigate the work-life balance of doctors in training in the UK from the perspectives of trainers and trainees. Qualitative semistructured focus groups and interviews with trainees and trainers. Postgraduate medical training in London, Yorkshire and Humber, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, and Wales during the junior doctor contract dispute at the end of 2015. Part of a larger General Medical Council study about the fairness of postgraduate medical training. 96 trainees and 41 trainers. Trainees comprised UK graduates and International Medical Graduates, across all stages of training in 6 specialties (General Practice, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Surgery) and Foundation. Postgraduate training was characterised by work-life imbalance. Long hours at work were typically supplemented with revision and completion of the e-portfolio. Trainees regularly moved workplaces which could disrupt their personal lives and sometimes led to separation from friends and family. This made it challenging to cope with personal pressures, the stresses of which could then impinge on learning and training, while also leaving trainees with a lack of social support outside work to buffer against the considerable stresses of training. Low morale and harm to well-being resulted in some trainees feeling dehumanised. Work-life imbalance was particularly severe for those with children and especially women who faced a lack of less-than-full-time positions and discriminatory attitudes. Female trainees frequently talked about having to choose a specialty they felt was more conducive to a work-life balance such as General Practice. The proposed junior doctor contract was felt to exacerbate existing problems. A lack of work-life balance in postgraduate medical training negatively impacted on trainees' learning and well-being. Women with children were particularly affected, suggesting this group would benefit the greatest from changes to improve the work-life balance of

  4. Lee Miller à travers la Roumanie, l’appareil photo à la main (1946

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    Adrian-Silvan Ionescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A former model and fashion photographer turned war photographer, Lee Miller visited Romania twice, in 1938 and 1946 respectively. After her second visit she published her impressions and pictures, under the title of Roumania, in Vogue magazine. Besides the published material there are her manuscripts from The Lee Miller Achives at Farley Farm House, East Sussex, England, on which this paper is based. She crossed the border coming from Hungary in early February 1946. Heading for Sibiu her car, a Chevrolet Sedan, slipping on the ice-covered road, stopped on a snowbank far off in the ditch. While looking for help in the nearby village she and her companions left the car unguarded to discover it plundered of everything, wheels included.On a Sunday afternoon she had the privilege of being received by King Mihai I and Queen Mother Elena with whom she talked exstensively. She also took magnificent pictures with the Royal Family in the imposing Peleş Castle. At Sinaia, „the summer capital of Roumania” she had also the opportunity to portray Dinu Brătianu and Iuliu Maniu, the two elderly statesmen. Maniu was surrounded by friends and party members, among whom was young Corneliu Coposu, his private secretary.Moving to Bucharest, she met old friends such as Harri Brauner and his wife, Lena Constante, with whom she wandered through the country eight years ago. Lena and Elena Pătrășcanu, wife of Lucrețiu Pătrășcanu, Minister of Justice, have started a successful marionette theatre where Lee took nice pictures. Other were taken on the streets, with peasants, street vendors and their customers. Harri took her to a bistro where they met Maria Lătărețu, the celebrating folk singer whom Brauner recorded many times. They enjoyed her songs. Suffering from fibrositis, Lee Miller undertook a peculiar treatment in a gypsy village where the inhabitants were dancing bears trainers. She was massaged by a bear weighing about 300 pounds while Brauner took

  5. Social recovery therapy in combination with early intervention services for enhancement of social recovery in patients with first-episode psychosis (SUPEREDEN3): a single-blind, randomised controlled trial.

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    Fowler, David; Hodgekins, Jo; French, Paul; Marshall, Max; Freemantle, Nick; McCrone, Paul; Everard, Linda; Lavis, Anna; Jones, Peter B; Amos, Tim; Singh, Swaran; Sharma, Vimal; Birchwood, Max

    2018-01-01

    Provision of early intervention services has increased the rate of social recovery in patients with first-episode psychosis; however, many individuals have continuing severe and persistent problems with social functioning. We aimed to assess the efficacy of early intervention services augmented with social recovery therapy in patients with first-episode psychosis. The primary hypothesis was that social recovery therapy plus early intervention services would lead to improvements in social recovery. We did this single-blind, phase 2, randomised controlled trial (SUPEREDEN3) at four specialist early intervention services in the UK. We included participants who were aged 16-35 years, had non-affective psychosis, had been clients of early intervention services for 12-30 months, and had persistent and severe social disability, defined as engagement in less than 30 h per week of structured activity. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1), via computer-generated randomisation with permuted blocks (sizes of four to six), to receive social recovery therapy plus early intervention services or early intervention services alone. Randomisation was stratified by sex and recruitment centre (Norfolk, Birmingham, Lancashire, and Sussex). By necessity, participants were not masked to group allocation, but allocation was concealed from outcome assessors. The primary outcome was time spent in structured activity at 9 months, as measured by the Time Use Survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN61621571. Between Oct 1, 2012, and June 20, 2014, we randomly assigned 155 participants to receive social recovery therapy plus early intervention services (n=76) or early intervention services alone (n=79); the intention-to-treat population comprised 154 patients. At 9 months, 143 (93%) participants had data for the primary outcome. Social recovery therapy plus early intervention services was associated with an increase in structured

  6. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2, acid sphingomyelinase, and ceramide levels in COPD patients compared to controls

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    Lea SR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simon R Lea,1,* Hannah J Metcalfe,1,* Jonathan Plumb,1 Christian Beerli,2 Chris Poll,3 Dave Singh,1 Katharine H Abbott-Banner3 1Centre for Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester and University Hospital of South Manchester, NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Postfach, Basel, Switzerland; 3Respiratory Diseases, Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, Horsham, West Sussex, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Increased pulmonary ceramide levels are suggested to play a causative role in lung diseases including COPD. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2 and acid SMase (aSMase, which hydrolyze sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, are activated by a range of cellular stresses, including inflammatory cytokines and pathogens, but notably cigarette smoke appears to only activate nSMase-2. Our primary objective was to investigate nSMase-2 and aSMase protein localization and quantification in lung tissue from nonsmokers (NS, smokers (S, and COPD patients. In addition, various ceramide species (C16, C18, and C20 were measured in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients versus controls. Materials and methods: Patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected or confirmed lung cancer were recruited, and nSMase-2 and aSMase protein was investigated in different areas of lung tissue (small airways, alveolar walls, subepithelium, and alveolar macrophages by immunohistochemistry. Ceramide species were measured in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients and controls by mass spectrometry. Results: nSMase-2 and aSMase were detected in the majority of small airways. There was a significant increase in nSMase-2 immunoreactivity in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients (54% compared with NS (31.7% (P<0.05, and in aSMase immunoreactivity in COPD (68.2% and S (69.5% alveolar macrophages compared with NS (52.4% (P

  7. Delivery characteristics and patients’ handling of two single-dose dry-powder inhalers used in COPD

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    Chapman KR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth R Chapman1, Charles M Fogarty2, Clare Peckitt3, Cheryl Lassen3, Dalal Jadayel3, Juergen Dederichs4, Mukul Dalvi4, Benjamin Kramer5On behalf of the INDEED (indacaterol: handling and preference evaluation of the Breezhaler device in COPD study investigators1University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 2Spartanburg Medical Research, Spartanburg, SC, United States; 3Novartis Horsham Research Centre, Horsham, West Sussex, UK; 4Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 5Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ, USAAbstract: For optimal efficacy, an inhaler should deliver doses consistently and be easy for patients to use with minimal instruction. The delivery characteristics, patients’ correct use, and preference of two single-dose dry powder inhalers (Breezhaler and HandiHaler were evaluated in two complementary studies. The first study examined aerodynamic particle size distribution, using inhalation profiles of seven patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The second was an open-label, two-period, 7-day crossover study, evaluating use of the inhalers with placebo capsules by 82 patients with mild to severe COPD. Patients’ correct use of the inhalers was assessed after reading written instructions on Day 1, and after training and 7 days of daily use. Patients’ preference was assessed after completion of both study periods. Patient inhalation profiles showed average peak inspiratory flows of 72 L/minute through Breezhaler and 36 L/minute through HandiHaler. For Breezhaler and HandiHaler, fine particle fractions were 27% and 10%, respectively. In the second study, correct use of Breezhaler and HandiHaler was achieved by >77% of patients for any step after 7 days; 61% of patients showed an overall preference for Breezhaler and 31% for HandiHaler (P = 0.01. Breezhaler is a low-resistance inhaler suitable for use by patients with a range of disease severities. Most patients used both inhalers correctly

  8. FLEXURAL TESTING OF WOOD-CONCRETE COMPOSITE BEAM MADE FROM KAMPER AND BANGKIRAI WOOD

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    Fengky Satria Yoresta

    2015-07-01

    Safety Initiative. Indonesia. Chauf KA. (2005. Karakteristik Mekanik Kayu Kamper sebagai Bahan Konstruksi. Majalah Ilmiah MEKTEK 7: 41-47. Gangarao HVS, Narendra T & Vijay PV. (2007. Reinforced Concrete Design with FRP Composites. CRC Press, Boca Raton. PKKI (Indonesian Timber Construction Code. (1961. PKKI NI – 5 1961. Direktorat Jenderal Cipta Karya Departemen Pekerjaan Umum, Bandung. Pranata YA, Bambang S & Johannes AT. (2012. Rasio Modulus Penampang Elastik Balok Kayu Laminasi-Baut. Jurnal Teknik Sipil 19: 223-236. Thelandersson S. (2003. Introduction: Wood as a construction material. Pp 15-22 in Sven T & Hans JL (Eds Timber Engineering. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, West Sussex.

  9. Cost of medication adherence and persistence in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a literature review

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    Kennedy-Martin T

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tessa Kennedy-Martin,1 Kristina S Boye,2 Xiaomei Peng2 1Kennedy-Martin Health Outcomes Ltd, Brighton, UK; 2Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: To explore published evidence on health care costs associated with adherence or persistence to antidiabetes medications in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methods: Primary research studies published between January 2006 and December 2015 on compliance, adherence, or persistence and treatment in patients with T2DM that document a link with health care costs were identified through literature searches in bibliographic databases and 2015 abstract books for relevant DM congresses. Results were assessed for relevance by two reviewers. The review was part of a larger overview evaluating the impact of adherence and persistence on a range of clinical and economic outcomes; only findings from the cost element are reported herein.Results: A total of 4,662 de-duplicated abstracts were identified and 110 studies included in the wider review. Of these, 19 reported an association between adherence (n=13, persistence (n=5, or adherence and persistence (n=1, and health care costs. All studies were retrospective, with sample sizes ranging from 301 to 740,195. Medication possession ratio was the most commonly employed adherence measure (n=11. The majority of adherence studies (n=9 reported that medication adherence was associated with lower total health care costs. Pharmacy costs were often increased in adherent patients but this was offset by beneficial effects on other costs. Findings were more variable in persistence studies; three reported that higher pharmacy costs in persistent patients were not sufficiently offset by savings in other areas to result in a reduction in total health care costs.Conclusions: Few studies have evaluated the relationship between adherence, persistence, and health care costs in T2DM. However, it has been consistently shown that medication

  10. Life-cycle impacts of shower water waste heat recovery: case study of an installation at a university sport facility in the UK.

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    Ip, Kenneth; She, Kaiming; Adeyeye, Kemi

    2017-10-18

    Recovering heat from waste water discharged from showers to preheat the incoming cold water has been promoted as a cost-effective, energy-efficient, and low-carbon design option which has been included in the UK's Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) for demonstrating compliance with the Building Regulation for dwellings. Incentivized by its carbon cost-effectiveness, waste water heat exchangers (WWHX) have been selected and incorporated in a newly constructed Sports Pavilion at the University of Brighton in the UK. This £2-m sports development serving several football fields was completed in August 2015 providing eight water- and energy-efficient shower rooms for students, staff, and external organizations. Six of the shower rooms are located on the ground floor and two on the first floor, each fitted with five or six thermostatically controlled shower units. Inline type of WWHX were installed, each consisted of a copper pipe section wound by an external coil of smaller copper pipe through which the cold water would be warmed before entering the shower mixers. Using the installation at Sport Pavilion as the case study, this research aims to evaluate the environmental and financial sustainability of a vertical waste heat recovery device, over a life cycle of 50 years, with comparison to the normal use of a PVC-u pipe. A heat transfer mathematical model representing the system has been developed to inform the development of the methodology for measuring the in-situ thermal performance of individual and multiple use of showers in each changing room. Adopting a system thinking modeling technique, a quasi-dynamic simulation computer model was established enabling the prediction of annual energy consumptions under different shower usage profiles. Data based on the process map and inventory of a functional unit of WWHX were applied to a proprietary assessment software to establish the relevant outputs for the life-cycle environmental impact assessment. Life-cycle cost

  11. AS03 Adjuvanted AH1N1 Vaccine Associated with an Abrupt Increase in the Incidence of Childhood Narcolepsy in Finland

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    Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Partinen, Markku; Vaarala, Outi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Sundman, Jonas; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Hublin, Christer; Julkunen, Ilkka; Olsén, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Kilpi, Terhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with strong genetic predisposition causing excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A sudden increase in childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland soon after pandemic influenza epidemic and vaccination with ASO3-adjuvanted Pandemrix. No increase was observed in other age groups. Methods Retrospective cohort study. From January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010 we retrospectively followed the cohort of all children living in Finland and born from January 1991 through December 2005. Vaccination data of the whole population was obtained from primary health care databases. All new cases with assigned ICD-10 code of narcolepsy were identified and the medical records reviewed by two experts to classify the diagnosis of narcolepsy according to the Brighton collaboration criteria. Onset of narcolepsy was defined as the first documented contact to health care because of excessive daytime sleepiness. The primary follow-up period was restricted to August 15, 2010, the day before media attention on post-vaccination narcolepsy started. Findings Vaccination coverage in the cohort was 75%. Of the 67 confirmed cases of narcolepsy, 46 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated were included in the primary analysis. The incidence of narcolepsy was 9.0 in the vaccinated as compared to 0.7/100,000 person years in the unvaccinated individuals, the rate ratio being 12.7 (95% confidence interval 6.1–30.8). The vaccine-attributable risk of developing narcolepsy was 1∶16,000 vaccinated 4 to 19-year-olds (95% confidence interval 1∶13,000–1∶21,000). Conclusions Pandemrix vaccine contributed to the onset of narcolepsy among those 4 to 19 years old during the pandemic influenza in 2009–2010 in Finland. Further studies are needed to determine whether this observation exists in other populations and to elucidate potential underlying immunological mechanism. The role of the adjuvant in particular warrants further research before drawing

  12. Modelling flow and heat transfer through unsaturated chalk - Validation with experimental data from the ground surface to the aquifer

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    Thiéry, Dominique; Amraoui, Nadia; Noyer, Marie-Luce

    2018-01-01

    During the winter and spring of 2000-2001, large floods occurred in northern France (Somme River Basin) and southern England (Patcham area of Brighton) in valleys that are developed on Chalk outcrops. The floods durations were particularly long (more than 3 months in the Somme Basin) and caused significant damage in both countries. To improve the understanding of groundwater flooding in Chalk catchments, an experimental site was set up in the Hallue basin, which is located in the Somme River Basin (France). Unsaturated fractured chalk formation overlying the Chalk aquifer was monitored to understand its reaction to long and heavy rainfall events when it reaches a near saturation state. The water content and soil temperature were monitored to a depth of 8 m, and the matrix pressure was monitored down to the water table, 26.5 m below ground level. The monitoring extended over a 2.5-year period (2006-2008) under natural conditions and during two periods when heavy, artificial infiltration was induced. The objective of the paper is to describe a vertical numerical flow model based on Richards' equation using these data that was developed to simulate infiltrating rainwater flow from the ground surface to the saturated aquifer. The MARTHE computer code, which models the unsaturated-saturated continuum, was adapted to reproduce the monitored high saturation periods. Composite constitutive functions (hydraulic conductivity-saturation and pressure-saturation) that integrate the increase in hydraulic conductivity near saturation and extra available porosity resulting from fractures were introduced into the code. Using these composite constitutive functions, the model was able to accurately simulate the water contents and pressures at all depths over the entire monitored period, including the infiltration tests. The soil temperature was also accurately simulated at all depths, except during the infiltrations tests, which contributes to the model validation. The model was used

  13. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

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    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  14. Perceptions of HPV and attitudes towards HPV vaccination amongst men who have sex with men: A qualitative analysis.

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    Nadarzynski, Tom; Smith, Helen; Richardson, Daniel; Pollard, Alex; Llewellyn, Carrie

    2017-05-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk of genital warts and anal cancer due to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This study explores MSMs' perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccination prior to the introduction of this programme. Focus groups and one-to-one interviews with self-identified MSM were conducted between November 2014 and March 2015 in Brighton, UK. Participants were recruited from community-based lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender (LGBT) venues and organizations. Discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using framework analysis. Thirty-three men took part (median age 25 years, IQR: 21-27), most of whom (n = 25) did not know about HPV, anal cancer (31), or HPV vaccination (26). While genital warts and anal cancer were perceived as severe, men did not perceive themselves at risk of HPV. All MSM would accept the HPV vaccine if offered by a health care professional. The challenges of accessing sexual health services or openly discussing same-sex experiences with health care professionals were perceived as barriers to accessing HPV vaccination. Two participants were concerned that selective HPV vaccination could increase stigma and prejudice against MSM, comparable to the AIDS epidemic. Ten MSM were unsure about the effectiveness of HPV vaccination for sexually active men and were in favour of vaccinating all adolescent boys at school. Most MSM have poor knowledge about HPV and associated anal cancer. Despite the lack of concern about HPV, most MSM expressed willingness to receive HPV vaccination. There is a need for health education about the risks of HPV and HPV-related diseases so that MSM can appraise the benefits of being vaccinated. Concerns about HPV vaccine effectiveness in sexually active men and possible stigmatization need to be addressed to optimize HPV vaccine acceptability. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Men who have sex with men (MSM) have poor knowledge about HPV and HPV

  15. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccines: A Multinational Self-Controlled Case Series in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Olberg, Henning K.; de Vries, Corinne S.; Sammon, Cormac; Andrews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Par; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; van der Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart C.; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1–4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI). Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. Results Three hundred and three (303) GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99) were exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.2–5.5), based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2–3.1) after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–3.2) when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom) we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month) to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8), which is the main finding. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8). Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule

  16. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccines: a multinational self-controlled case series in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Romio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1pdm09 immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination. METHODS: A self-controlled case series (SCCS analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1-4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI. Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. RESULTS: Three hundred and three (303 GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99 were exposed to A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria. The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 2.2-5.5, based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.1 after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.2 when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8, which is the main finding. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8. Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule out with

  17. OneGeology - The most appropriate model to achieve access to up-to-date geoscience data using a distributed data system

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    Komac, Marko; Duffy, Tim; Robida, Francois; Harrison, Matt; Allison, Lee

    2015-04-01

    OneGeology is an initiative of Geological Survey Organisations (GSO) around the globe that dates back to Brighton, UK in 2007. Since then OneGeology has been a leader in developing geological online map data using a new international standard - a geological exchange language known as the 'GeoSciML' (currently version 3.2 exists, which enables instant interoperability of the data). Increased use of this new language allows geological data to be shared and integrated across the planet with other organisations. One of very important goals of OneGeology was a transfer of valuable know-how to the developing world, hence shortening the digital learning curve. In autumn 2013 OneGeology was transformed into a Consortium with a clearly defined governance structure, making its structure more official, its operability more flexible and its membership more open where in addition to GSO also to other type of organisations that manage geoscience data can join and contribute. The next stage of the OneGeology initiative will hence be focused into increasing the openness and richness of that data from individual countries to create a multi-thematic global geological data resource on the rocks beneath our feet. Authoritative information on hazards and minerals will help to prevent natural disasters, explore for resources (water, minerals and energy) and identify risks to human health on a planetary scale. With this new stage also renewed OneGeology objectives were defined and these are 1) to be the provider of geosciences data globally, 2) to ensure exchange of know-how and skills so all can participate, and 3) to use the global profile of 1G to increase awareness of the geosciences and their relevance among professional and general public. We live in a digital world that enables prompt access to vast amounts of open access data. Understanding our world, the geology beneath our feet and environmental challenges related to geology calls for accessibility of geoscience data and One

  18. Home sampling for sexually transmitted infections and HIV in men who have sex with men: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fisher

    Full Text Available To determine uptake of home sampling kit (HSK for STI/HIV compared to clinic-based testing, whether the availability of HSK would increase STI testing rates amongst HIV infected MSM, and those attending a community-based HIV testing clinic compared to historical control. Prospective observational study in three facilities providing STI/HIV testing services in Brighton, UK was conducted. Adult MSM attending/contacting a GUM clinic requesting an STI screen (group 1, HIV infected MSM attending routine outpatient clinic (group 2, and MSM attending a community-based rapid HIV testing service (group 3 were eligible. Participants were required to have no symptomatology consistent with STI and known to be immune to hepatitis A and B (group 1. Eligible men were offered a HSK to obtain self-collected specimens as an alternative to routine testing. HSK uptake compared to conventional clinic-based STI/HIV testing in group 1, increase in STI testing rates due to availability of HSK compared to historical controls in group 2 and 3, and HSK return rates in all settings were calculated. Among the 128 eligible men in group 1, HSK acceptance was higher (62.5% (95% CI: 53.5-70.9 compared to GUM clinic-based testing (37.5% (95% CI: 29.1-46.5, (p = 0.0004. Two thirds of eligible MSM offered an HSK in all three groups accepted it, but HSK return rates varied (highest in group 1, 77.5%, lowest in group 3, 16%. HSK for HIV testing was acceptable to 81% of men in group 1. Compared to historical controls, availability of HSK increased the proportion of MSM testing for STIs in group 2 but not in group 3. HSK for STI/HIV offers an alternative to conventional clinic-based testing for MSM seeking STI screening. It significantly increases STI testing uptake in HIV infected MSM. HSK could be considered as an adjunct to clinic-based services to further improve STI/HIV testing in MSM.

  19. Maintaining persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth-hormone therapy in children: comparing jet-delivery and needle-based devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spoudeas HA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Spoudeas,1 Priti Bajaj,2 Nathan Sommerford3 1London Centre for Paediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London, 2Ferring Pharmaceuticals, London, 3Health Informatics Research, Sciensus Ltd, Brighton, UK Purpose: Persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth hormone (GH; somatropin therapy in children is widely acknowledged to be suboptimal. This study aimed to investigate how the use of a jet-delivery device, ZomaJet®, impacts on medication-taking behaviors compared to needle-based devices.Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study of children aged ≤18 years was conducted using a UK-based, nationwide database of GH home-delivery schedules. Data were evaluated for the period between January 2010 and December 2012 for 6,061 children receiving either Zomacton® (somatropin via the ZomaJet jet-delivery device or one of six brands of GH all administered via needle-based devices. Persistence was analyzed for patients with appropriate data, measured as the time interval between first and last home deliveries. An analysis of adherence was conducted only for patients using ZomaJet who had appropriate data, measured by proportion of days covered. Brand switches were identified for all patients.Results: Persistence with GH therapy was significantly longer in patients using ZomaJet compared to needle-based devices (599 days versus 535 days, respectively, n=4,093; P<0.001; this association was observed in both sexes and across age subgroups (≤10 and 11–16 years. The majority (58% of patients using ZomaJet were classed as adherent (n=728. Only 297 patients (5% switched GH brand (n=6,061, and patients tended to use ZomaJet for longer than other devices before switching.Conclusion: It appears important that the choice of a jet-delivery device is offered to children prescribed daily GH therapy. These devices may represent a much-needed effective strategy for maintaining persistence with subcutaneous GH administration in

  20. Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Influenza Vaccination, and Antecedent Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Infections: A Case-Centered Analysis in the Vaccine Safety Datalink, 2009-2011.

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    Sharon K Greene

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS can be triggered by gastrointestinal or respiratory infections, including influenza. During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the United States, monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIV availability coincided with high rates of wildtype influenza infections. Several prior studies suggested an elevated GBS risk following MIV, but adjustment for antecedent infection was limited.We identified patients enrolled in health plans participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink and diagnosed with GBS from July 2009 through June 2011. Medical records of GBS cases with 2009-10 MIV, 2010-11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV, and/or a medically-attended respiratory or gastrointestinal infection in the 1 through 141 days prior to GBS diagnosis were reviewed and classified according to Brighton Collaboration criteria for diagnostic certainty. Using a case-centered design, logistic regression models adjusted for patient-level time-varying sources of confounding, including seasonal vaccinations and infections in GBS cases and population-level controls.Eighteen confirmed GBS cases received vaccination in the 6 weeks preceding onset, among 1.27 million 2009-10 MIV recipients and 2.80 million 2010-11 TIV recipients. Forty-four confirmed GBS cases had infection in the 6 weeks preceding onset, among 3.77 million patients diagnosed with medically-attended infection. The observed-versus-expected odds that 2009-10 MIV/2010-11 TIV was received in the 6 weeks preceding GBS onset was odds ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.59-3.99; risk difference = 0.93 per million doses, 95% CI, -0.71-5.16. The association between GBS and medically-attended infection was: odds ratio = 7.73, 95% CI, 3.60-16.61; risk difference = 11.62 per million infected patients, 95% CI, 4.49-26.94. These findings were consistent in sensitivity analyses using alternative infection definitions and risk intervals for prior

  1. Testing of a sodium/nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery for electric propulsion of ships and vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluiters, Edwin C.; Schmal, Dick; ter Veen, Willem R.; Posthumus, Kees J. C. M.

    One of the promising future batteries for electric propulsion of vehicles and ships is the sodium/nickel chloride or ZEBRA (Zero Emission Battery Research Activities) battery. Despite some disadvantages with respect to the high temperature, the advantages with respect to specific energy and energy density are such that, especially in applications where the battery is used on a more or less continuous basis (e.g., in delivery vans and taxies) it is an interesting candidate battery. Another interesting application is on board of ships, like submarines or future electrical surface ships with electric propulsion. In 1995 a 2 year feasibility study, including experimental testing of a 10 kW h battery, was completed. This investigated the naval applicability of the sodium/sulphur battery, which is also a high temperature battery. Here the limited, experimentally proven, life-time of the batteries of about 1.5 years and this made naval application almost impossible. A paper about this study was presented at the 19th International Power Sources Symposium held at Brighton, England, in April 1995 [R.A.A. Schillemans, C.E. Kluiters, Sodium/sulphur batteries for naval applications, in: A. Attewell, T. Keily (Eds.), Power Sources 15, International Power Sources Symposium Committee, Crowborough UK, 1995. p. 421.]. Because of the more or less comparable specifications on specific energy and the more promising results of the life-time and field tests with sodium/nickel chloride batteries, a ZEBRA battery from AEG Anglo Batteries has been tested for naval applications. This was done by simulating the charge and discharge as it occurs in practice for the applications investigated. With respect to the electrical ship application (investigated for the Royal Netherlands Navy) the power versus time taken from the battery was simulated as well as the charge procedures. The same can be done for the vehicle application: in this case typical drive cycles for a van or taxi are translated to

  2. „To nie była Ameryka”. Z Michaelem Charlesem Steinlaufem rozmawia Elżbieta Janicka (Warszawa – Nowy Jork – Warszawa, 2014–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Janicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available “This was not America.” Michael Charles Steinlauf in conversation with Elżbieta Janicka (Warsaw – New York – Warsaw, 2014–2015 Born in Paris in 1947, Michael Charles Steinlauf talks about his childhood in New York City, in the south of Brooklyn (Brighton Beach, in a milieu of Polish Jewish Holocaust survivors. His later experiences were largely associated with American counterculture, the New Left, an anti-war and antiracist student movement of the 1960s (Students for a Democratic Society, SDS as well as the anticapitalist underground of the 1970s (“Sunfighter”, “No Separate Peace”. In the 1980s, having undertaken Judaic Studies at Brandeis University, Steinlauf arrived in Poland, where he became part of the democratic opposition circles centred around the Jewish Flying University (Żydowski Uniwersytet Latający, ŻUL. In the independent Third Republic of Poland, he contributed to the creation of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. Michael C. Steinlauf’s research interests focus on the work of Mark Arnshteyn (Andrzej Marek and of Yitskhok Leybush Peretz, Yiddish theatre as well as Polish narratives of the Holocaust. The latter were the subject of his monograph Bondage to the dead: Poland and the memory of the Holocaust (1997, Polish edition 2001 as Pamięć nieprzyswojona. Polska pamięć Zagłady. An important topic of the conversation is the dispute concerning the categories used to describe the Holocaust, including the conceptualisation of Polish majority experience of the Holocaust as a collective trauma. Controversies also arise in connection with the contemporary phenomena popularly conceptualised as the “revival of Jewish culture in Poland” and “Polish–Jewish dialogue.”  Another subject of the conversation is Michał Sztajnlauf (1940–1942, Michael C. Steinlauf’s stepbrother. The fate of the brothers was introduced into the canon of Polish culture by Hanna Krall’s short story Dybuk

  3. The alpha1-Na/K pump does not mediate the involvement of ouabain in the development of hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergei N; Taurin, Sebastien; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    The Na/K pump of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and renal epithelial cells (REC) is viewed as a target of digitalis and endogenous ouabain (EO), leading to the development of hypertension. In this study, we compared the effect of ouabain on Na/K pump activity and the intracellular content of monovalent cations in VSMC and REC obtained from rats, humans and dogs. In VSMC from the rat aorta, ouabain inhibited maximal Na/K pump activity measured as the rate of 86Rb influx in Na+-loaded cells, with an ID50 of approximately 20-30 microM without any differences between two strains of normotensive rats (WKY and BN.1x) and three substrains of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Half-maximal inhibition of the Na/K pump in REC from the rat inner medullary collecting duct was observed at approximately 20 microM of ouabain. In contrast to rat cells, half-maximal inhibition of 86Rb influx in VSMC from human coronary arteries and in REC from the Madin-Darby canine kidney was seen at approximately 0.03 and 0.1 microM ouabain, respectively. At concentrations lower than 100 microM, ouabain did not affect the intracellular content of exchangeable Na+ and K+ in rat VSMC, measured as the steady-state distribution of 22Na and 86Rb, whereas in human VSMC, it increased the intracellular Na+/K+ ratio with an ID50 of approximately 0.5 microM. Keeping in mind that the circulating level of administered digitalis and EO does not exceed 10(-9) M, our results strongly suggest that the involvement of these compounds in the pathogenesis of hypertension in rats is not mediated by inhibition of the alpha1-isoform of the Na/K pump in VSMC and REC. Alternative mechanisms of the involvement of EO and ouabain-like factors in the development of hypertension are considered.

  4. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  5. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUMOR GROWTH MARKERS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Examinations were made in 121 patients, including 76 patients with urinary bladder cancer (UBC (superficial (T1N0M (n = 16 and invasive (T2N0M0 and T3aN0M0 (n = 39 carcinomas, carcinoma invading into and out of the bladder wall (n = 21, including T3bN0M0 (n = 14, T3bN1M0 (n = 6, and with T4N1M1 (n = 1, 10 patients with cystitis, 10 with urolithiasis, and 25 apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. The patients with UBC were additionally divided into the following groups according to the degree of tumor cell differentiation: 27 with a low-grade tumor (G1, 24 with a moderate-grade tumor (G2, and 25 with a high-grade tumor (G3. The levels of oncomarkers (urinary bladder carcinoma antigen (UBCA, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA, tissue-specific polypeptide antigen (TSPA, cytokines (interleukin (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α, and angiogenetic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-α (TGFα, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I were studied by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. It has been established that measuring the level of cytokeratin oncomarkers (UBC II, TPA, TPS in the serum, urine, and washings can be, along with cystoscopy, used in the early diagnosis of UBC. A combination of UBC II, TPA, and TPS contents allows speci- fication of the stage of UBC and the grade of tumor cells. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-12 in patients with UBC confirm the development of a proinflammatory cytokine shift and activation of angiogenesis. The ratio of proangiogenic TNF-α to anti-angiogenic IL12 rises with UBC progression. This may be considered to cause increased vascular permeability and a proneness to bleedings from tumor tissues in patients with UBC. Tumor growth and UBC progression are accompanied by a pronounced increase in the serum levels of growth and angiogenetic factors (VEGF, TGF-α, b-FGF, and IGF-1 as compared to the normal values and to those seen in noncancer diseases. Angiogenetic and growth factors may be used in the early diagnostics of UBC and in the verification of the stage and malignancy of tumor growth.  

  6. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUMOR GROWTH MARKERS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Examinations were made in 121 patients, including 76 patients with urinary bladder cancer (UBC (superficial (T1N0M (n = 16 and invasive (T2N0M0 and T3aN0M0 (n = 39 carcinomas, carcinoma invading into and out of the bladder wall (n = 21, including T3bN0M0 (n = 14, T3bN1M0 (n = 6, and with T4N1M1 (n = 1, 10 patients with cystitis, 10 with urolithiasis, and 25 apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. The patients with UBC were additionally divided into the following groups according to the degree of tumor cell differentiation: 27 with a low-grade tumor (G1, 24 with a moderate-grade tumor (G2, and 25 with a high-grade tumor (G3. The levels of oncomarkers (urinary bladder carcinoma antigen (UBCA, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA, tissue-specific polypeptide antigen (TSPA, cytokines (interleukin (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α, and angiogenetic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-α (TGFα, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I were studied by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. It has been established that measuring the level of cytokeratin oncomarkers (UBC II, TPA, TPS in the serum, urine, and washings can be, along with cystoscopy, used in the early diagnosis of UBC. A combination of UBC II, TPA, and TPS contents allows speci- fication of the stage of UBC and the grade of tumor cells. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-12 in patients with UBC confirm the development of a proinflammatory cytokine shift and activation of angiogenesis. The ratio of proangiogenic TNF-α to anti-angiogenic IL12 rises with UBC progression. This may be considered to cause increased vascular permeability and a proneness to bleedings from tumor tissues in patients with UBC. Tumor growth and UBC progression are accompanied by a pronounced increase in the serum levels of growth and angiogenetic factors (VEGF, TGF-α, b-FGF, and IGF-1 as compared to the normal values and to those seen in noncancer diseases. Angiogenetic and growth factors may be used in the early diagnostics of UBC and in the verification of the stage and malignancy of tumor growth.  

  7. The use of geoinformatic data and spatial analysis to predict faecal pollution during extreme precipitation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ray; Purnell, Sarah; Ebdon, James; Nnane, Daniel; Taylor, Huw

    2013-04-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) regulates surface water quality standards in the European Union (EU). The Directive call for the identification and management of point and diffuse sources of pollution and requires the establishment of a 'programme of measures' for identified river basin districts, in order to achieve a "good status" by 2015. The hygienic quality of water is normally monitored using faecal indicator organisms (FIO), such as Escherichia coli, which indicate a potential risk to public health from human waterborne pathogens. Environmental factors influence the transmission of these pathogens and indicator organisms, and statistically significant relationships have been found between rainfall and outbreaks of waterborne disease. Climate change has been predicted to lead to an increase in severe weather events in many parts of Europe, including an increase in the frequency of extreme rainfall events. This in turn is likely to lead to an increase in incidents of human waterborne disease in Europe, unless measures are taken to predict and mitigate for such events. This study investigates a variety of environmental factors that influence the concentration of FIO in surface waters receiving faecal contamination from a variety of sources. Levels of FIO, including Escherichia coli, intestinal enterococci, somatic coliphage and GB124 (a human-specific microbial source tracking marker), were monitored in the Sussex Ouse catchment in Southeast England over a period of 26 months. These data were combined with geoinformatic environmental data within a GIS to map faecal contamination within the river. Previously, precipitation and soil erosion have been identified as major factors that can influence the concentration of these faecal markers, and studies have shown that slope, soil type and vegetation influence both the mechanisms and the rate by which erosion occurs in river catchments. Of the environmental variables studied, extreme precipitation was found to

  8. Spatial pattern of hormone and antibiotic concentrations in surface waters in Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaicunas, R.; Inamdar, S. P.; Dutta, S.; Aga, D.; Zimmerman, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    Water quality surveys of the U.S. have confirmed the presence of hormones and antibiotics in some surface waters. Although the reported concentrations of these substances are extremely low, there is substantial concern about their effect on aquatic species. For example, chronic exposure to estradiol (E2β) concentrations as low as 40 ng/L have been shown to cause endocrine disruption in fish. Furthermore, there is potential for contaminants to enter our drinking supply. Significant sources of hormones and antibiotics include discharge from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and wastewater treatment plants as well as runoff from agricultural land receiving application of animal manure. Since Sussex County, Delaware is one of the leading poultry producing counties in the nation, and many farmers in the state use poultry litter as fertilizer for their crops, it is critical to study the concentrations of contaminants in surface waters. Fifty surface water (streams, lakes, and ponds) sampling locations throughout the state of Delaware were chosen based on DNREC (Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control) data. Locations with the highest nitrogen and phosphorus levels were assumed to be associated with agriculture and wastewater sources and therefore were likely to be contaminated with hormones and antibiotics. The first set of sampling occurred in April representing high-flow conditions, and the second set will occur in September representing low-flow conditions. Water samples will be screened through the cost-effective enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method followed by more rigorous analyses of selected samples using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). ELISA screening includes estradiol (E2β), sulfamethazine and triclosan, while LC/MS/MS will quantify both free and conjugated forms of estrone (E1), estradiol (E2β), estriol (E3), as well as selected sulfa and tetracycline antibiotics. Initial ELISA results

  9. Britain Approaches ESO about Installation of Major New Telescope at Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    interesting celestial objects which can then be studied in much more detail with the many specialised instruments at the powerful VLT Unit Telescopes." ESO, the European Southern Observatory, has eight member states, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland. The United Kingdom participated actively in the early discussions in the 1950's about the establishment of ESO, but later elected not to join, mainly because of its access to other southern astronomical facilities in Australia and South Africa. ESO already possesses a smaller survey instrument at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), with the optical Wide-Field Imager at the ESO/MPG 2.2-m telescope. In addition, the 2.6-m VLT Survey Telescope (VST) with the 16kx16k OmegaCam camera will be installed at Paranal in 2002. It will operate in the visual region of the spectrum and, together with VISTA's infrared capability, ensure unequalled sky- and wavelength coverage from one observing site. Notes [1] The announcement was made in a PPARC Press Release, available at http://www.pparc.ac.uk and at the AlphaGalileo site. [2] Universities in the VISTA Consortium are (in alphabetical order) Birmingham, Cambridge, Cardiff, Durham, Edinburgh, Hertfordshire, Keele, Central Lancashire, Leicester, Liverpool John Moores, Nottingham, Oxford, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Queen's University Belfast, St Andrews, Southampton, Sussex, University College London.

  10. Trends in major-ion constituents and properties for selected sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds, Montana and Wyoming, based on data collected during water years 1980-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Sando, Thomas R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Lorenz, David L.

    2014-01-01

    (site 10)], generally small significant or nonsignificant decreases in most constituents are indicated for period 1. For period 2 for these sites, the TSM trend results do not allow confident conclusions concerning detection of effects of CBM-extraction activities on stream water quality. Detection of significant trends in major-ion constituents and properties for period 2 generally was infrequent, and direction, magnitudes, and significance of fitted trends were not strongly consistent with relative differences in water quality between stream water and CBM-produced water. The TSM indicated significant or generally large magnitude increases in median values of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), sodium, and alkalinity for period 2 for sites 5 and 7, which might indicate potential effects of CBM-extraction activities on stream water. However, other factors, including operations of Tongue River Reservoir, irrigation activities, contributions of saline groundwater, and operations of the Decker coal mine, confound confident determination of causes of detected significant trends for sites 5 and 7. For all mainstem Tongue River sites, trends for period 2 generally are within ranges of those for period 1 before substantial CBM-extraction activities. For main-stem Powder River sites analyzed by using the TSM [Powder River at Sussex (site 11), Powder River at Arvada (site 12), Powder River at Moorhead (site 13), and Powder River near Locate (site 16)], significant or generally large magnitude decreases in median values of SAR, sodium, estimated alkalinity, chloride, fluoride, specific conductance, and dissolved solids are indicated for period 1. Patterns in trend results for period 1 for main-stem Powder River sites are consistent with effects of Salt Creek oil-brine reinjection that started in 1990. Trend results for all main-stem Powder River sites downstream from substantial CBM-extraction activities (sites 12, 13, and 16) indicate evidence of potential effects of CBM

  11. Neurologic Complications Associated With the Zika Virus in Brazilian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ivan Rocha Ferreira; Frontera, Jennifer A; Bispo de Filippis, Ana Maria; Nascimento, Osvaldo Jose Moreira do

    2017-10-01

    There are no prospective cohort studies assessing the incidence and spectrum of neurologic manifestations secondary to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in adults. To evaluate the rates of acute ZIKV infection among patients hospitalized with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), meningoencephalitis, or transverse myelitis. A prospective, observational cohort study was conducted at a tertiary referral center for neurological diseases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between December 5, 2015, and May 10, 2016, among consecutive hospitalized adults (>18 years of age) with new-onset acute parainfectious or neuroinflammatory disease. All participants were tested for a series of arbovirosis. Three-month functional outcome was assessed. Samples of serum and cerebrospinal fluid were tested for ZIKV using real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and an IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical, radiographic (magnetic resonance imaging), electrophysiological, and 3-month functional outcome data were collected. The detection of neurologic complications secondary to ZIKV infection. Forty patients (15 women and 25 men; median age, 44 years [range, 22-72 years]) were enrolled, including 29 patients (73%) with GBS (90% Brighton level 1 certainty), 7 (18%) with encephalitis, 3 (8%) with transverse myelitis, and 1 (3%) with newly diagnosed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Of these, 35 patients (88%) had molecular and/or serologic evidence of recent ZIKV infection in the serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid. Of the patients positive for ZIKV infection, 27 had GBS (18 demyelinating, 8 axonal, and 1 Miller Fisher syndrome), 5 had encephalitis (3 with concomitant acute neuromuscular disease), 2 had transverse myelitis, and 1 had chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Admission to the intensive care unit was required for 9 patients positive for ZIKV infection (26%), and 5 (14%) required mechanical ventilation. Compared with admission

  12. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Recognition for teachers The Institute of Physics has continued its programme of recognition for inspiring teachers with nine Teachers Awards in 2000, one at primary level and eight at secondary. The quality and quantity of nominations for secondary awards was very encouraging, especially those nominations made by students, but the number of nominations for teachers in the primary sector was disappointing. The award winners are: Teacher of Primary Science Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Gill Stafford, Greens Norton Church of England Primary School, Towcester, Northants Teachers of Physics (Secondary) John Allen, All Hallows High School, Penwortham, Preston Tim Gamble, Lings Upper School, Northampton Denise Gault, Dalriada School, Ballymoney, Co Antrim Ian Lovat, Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire David Smith, Highgate School, North London Clive Thomas, Newcastle Emlyn Comprehensive School Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Mark Travis, Cape Cornwall School, St Just, Cornwall If you know a teacher in a local primary school who is doing an exceptional job in motivating youngsters and colleagues in the teaching and learning of science, why not consider nominating them for an award? Further details can be obtained from the Institute's Education Department (Steven Chapman) by post or e-mail (schools.education@iop.org .) Annual Congress More details are now available on the various activities at this event taking place on 27 - 30 March 2000 at the Brighton Conference Centre. Among those organized by the Education Department are general science and technology hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 to 12 and more specific physics activities on Static Electricity for older students: * A series of short talks with hands-on demonstrations of music and musical instruments given by musicians, manufacturers and physicists. * A chance for students in years 9 to 13 to experience music making from the professionals' perspective. Mornings, 28 to 30 March

  13. TERMS OF ENSURING QUALITY OF THE RAILWAY WHEELS BUILT UP BY WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Haivoronskyi

    2016-10-01

    the martensite share does not exceed the number of lower bainite (ratio of M/Bn < 1. It is proved that exposure of wheels within 3.5-4.5 hours at 100°C after welding, during their slow cooling improves resistance to brittle fracture of metal heat-affected zone by 1.8-2.3 times. This is due to the removal of diffusion hydrogen from the metal and reduction of the ІІ type stress in the lath volume of bainite and martensite by 1.5. Originality. The author has developed the idea of the structural-phase changes that occur in the metal of railway wheels during arc welding. The relation between the carbon content in steel, cooling rate during welding and resistance to cracking and brittle fracture was found. The authors determined the influence of after-welding wheel cooling conditions on the metal properties. Practical value. Technological recommendations for railway freight wheel building up by welding were developed. Their application will improve quality of the railway wheels built up by welding, reliability and safety of traffic in conditions of growing operating loads.

  14. Directional short wind wave spectra derived from the sea surface photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulov, Vladimir; Yurovskaya, Maria; Chapron, Bertrand; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    New field measurements of 2-D wave number short wind wave spectra in the wavelength range from few millimeters to few decimeters are reported and discussed. The measurement method proposed by [Kosnik and Dulov, 2011] is based on stereophotography and image brightness contrast processing. The method strongly builds on the brightness cross-spectral analysis to reduce the noise within this short wave gravity and capillary range. Field measurements of wind wave spectra are still rare, and the reported data thus provide valuable information to bring new evidences on the 2-D spectral distribution of short wind waves in the wavelength range from decimeters to millimeters. As found, the folded spectra of decimeter waves are very weakly dependent on the wind speed and its direction. Wind speed and direction sensitivity only starts to appear in the short wavelength range, more precisely in the vicinity of the wave number 100 rad/m, where the wind exponent grows from 0.5 to 1.5-2.5 at 800 rad/m, and angular anisotropy parameter introduced by [Elfouhaily et al., 1997] amounts the value of 0.5. These aspects are consistent with other previously reported optical and radar data. For the latter, we solely extracted the polarization sensitivity to best isolate the contribution associated to the wave saturation spectrum around the Bragg resonant wave number. For the former, mean-squared slope statistics were used to assess the integrated shortscale directional spectral properties. As revealed, observed direction spectral distributions are significantly different from those previously suggested [Elfouhaily et al., 1997; Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. On the basis of these new in situ measurements, we then propose to revise the semiempirical analytical model of short wind wave spectra developed by [Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. In this model the key parameter is exponent n governing the nonlinear dissipation rate as D ~ Bn+1, where B is saturation spectrum. Accordingly, new

  15. Comparative study on DOTA-derivatized bombesin analog labeled with {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koumarianou, Eftychia [Institute R-RP, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); IAE, Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland)], E-mail: eytyxiak@yahoo.com; Mikolajczak, Renata; Pawlak, Dariusz [IAE, Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Zikos, Xhristos; Bouziotis, Pinelopi [Institute R-RP, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Garnuszek, Piotr; Karczmarczyk, Urszula; Maurin, Michal [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, National Medicines Institute, Chelmska 30/34, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland); Archimandritis, Spyridon C. [Institute R-RP, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to compare in vitro and in vivo a novel DOTA-chelated bombesin (BN) analog of the amino acid sequence, QRLGNQWAVGHLM-CONH{sub 2} (BN[2-14]NH{sub 2}), labeled with {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, for its potential use in targeted radiotherapy of tumors expressing gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. The same amino acid sequence, but with different chelator, referred as BN1.1 (Gly-Gly-Cys-Aca-QRLGNQWAVGHLM-CONH{sub 2}), has already been studied and reported; however, the DOTA-chelated one, suitable for labeling with M{sup +3} type radiometals, was not yet described. Methods: The conditions for labeling of DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} with noncarrier added {sup 90}Y and with {sup 177}Lu [specific activity (SA), 15 Ci/mg Lu] were investigated and optimized to provide {sup 90}Y-DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} of high SA. The stability of the radiolabeled compounds in human serum was evaluated over a period of 24 h. The human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, known to express GRP receptors, was used for in vitro evaluation of radiolabeled peptide affinity to GRP receptors and for assessment of cytotoxicity of both nonlabeled and radiolabeled peptide. Biodistribution accompanied by receptor blocking was studied in normal Swiss mice. Results: {sup 90}Y-DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} were obtained with radiochemical yield >98% and high SA (67.3 GBq {sup 90}Y/{mu}mol and 33.6 GBq {sup 177}Lu/{mu}mol, respectively). They were stable when incubated in human serum for up to 24 h. The binding affinities of DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} and both {sup nat}Y- and {sup nat}Lu-labeled analogs to GRP receptors were high (IC{sub 50}=1.78, 1.99, and 1.34 nM, respectively), especially for the {sup nat}Lu-DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} complex. The cytotoxicity study of DOTA-BN[2-14]NH{sub 2} to PC-3 cells revealed an IC{sub 50}=6300 nM after 72 h of exposition, while the labeled derivatives showed no

  16. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    How and why we teach An interview with Mick Nott conducted by David Sang Mick Nott teaches at Sheffield Hallam University. He is editor of School Science Review, and over the last three years he has been organizing a website, book and display for the ASE's Science Teacher Festival. Mick Nott You studied Logic with Physics as your undergraduate degree course, at Sussex, at the end of the 1960s. Wasn't this a rather unusual choice? At school, I loved chemistry, particularly physical chemistry. However, physical chemistry didn't love me when I studied it at university. I grew resentful of the demands made on me with the overcrowded morning lecture programme that was mainly a board-copying exercise and the afternoon hours of labs. I felt stifled; there didn't seem to be any space to express oneself. I wanted a course that allowed me some freedom of thought. So in the summer of 1969 I transferred to the Logic with Physics course. Alongside our 'straight' physics we studied the history of topics like atomic and quantum theory, thermodynamics, mechanics from the Greeks to the Newtonian synthesis and we also had a couple of units in the sociology of science. Amongst the set texts of our first class in the summer of 1969 was Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Now well worn with its cover repaired by sticky tape, it still rests on my bookshelves. Reading Kuhn, I understood why I had been dissatisfied with my chemistry course. If I wanted to make it in chemistry I was going to have to conform to thinking exactly like all the other chemists. That wasn't for me. What attracted you into teaching? And where did you teach? I think it was a vocation in that, from the age of 15, I could imagine myself in the role and it was a job I could 'see' myself doing. Now thinking back I suppose it was an obvious way in which a working class child could transcend class barriers. I did my postgraduate teacher training at Sussex because it was assessed by coursework and

  17. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    fellow students to celebrate the end of their exams, Andrew met Finnish summer student, Kaija Kettunen, whom he married in 1975 in her home town of Lieksa, Finland. They had a son, Daniel, now living in South Riding, Virginia, and a daughter, Caroline, living in Oakland, California. In 1973, Andrew obtained his doctorate degree in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, working under the direction of Martin Ryle, winner of the 1974 Nobel Prize in physics. Andrew's PhD was dedicated to a study of the Crab Nebula at the highest radio frequencies at which the Cambridge One-mile Telescope could operate. This work, which included both intensity and polarization data, was a triumph of perseverance and skill in the reduction of an extremely complex data set. This experience stood him in excellent stead for his future career. After his PhD, Andrew went on to be a postdoctoral research fellow at Sterrewacht, Leiden, Netherlands, and then at the Astronomy Centre of the University of Sussex, England. By that time, Andrew wanted to leave England, because he thought that he would be able to secure a permanent position in astronomy faster in another country. He also loved traveling and getting to know other cultures, and he learned foreign languages easily. In 1978, Andrew and his wife had two choices: One was to accept a position at the European Southern Observatory in Garching and the other was to come to the University of Maryland. Together they decided to come to the United States rather than go to Germany because of the language and culture. Andrew remained at the University of Maryland for his entire career. He was a scientist of extraordinary productivity and impact over his lifetime: He wrote more than three-hundred scientific publications and accumulated more than 11,000 citations to this large body of work. In the 1970s and 1980s, he pioneered the use of radio telescopes for the study of active galactic nuclei, writing in collaboration with his students a number of seminal

  18. Comparison of high- versus low-intensity community health worker intervention to promote newborn and child health in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findley SE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sally E Findley,1 Omolara T Uwemedimo,2 Henry V Doctor,1,3 Cathy Green,4 Fatima Adamu,5 Godwin Y Afenyadu61Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; 2Pediatric Global Health Program, Cohen Children’s Medical Centre of New York, Division of General Pediatrics, New Hyde Park, NY, USA; 3Operations Research Unit, Programme for Reviving Routine Immunization in Northern Nigeria-Maternal Newborn and Child Health (PRRINN-MNCH, Abia State House, Abuja, Nigeria; 4Health Partners International, Waterside Centre, Lewes, East Sussex, United Kingdom; 5Social Development and Community Engagement Unit, 6Operations Research Unit, PRRINN-MNCH Programme, Nassarawa GRA, Kano State, NigeriaBackground: In Northern Nigeria, infant mortality rates are two to three times higher than in the southern states, and, in 2008, a partnership program to improve maternal, newborn, and child health was established to reduce infant and child mortality in three Northern Nigeria states. The program intervention zones received government-supported health services plus integrated interventions at primary health care posts and development of community-based service delivery (CBSD with a network of community volunteers and community health workers (CHWs, who focus on educating women about danger signs for themselves and their infants and promoting appropriate responses to the observation of those danger signs, consistent with the approach of the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness strategy. Before going to scale in the rest of the state, it is important to identify the relative effectiveness of the low-intensity volunteer approach versus the more intensive CBSD approach with CHWs.Methods: We conducted stratified cluster sample household surveys at baseline (2009 and follow-up (2011 to assess changes in newborn and sick child care practices among women with births in

  19. Training courses on neutron detection systems on the ISIS research reactor: on-site and through internet training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescop, B.; Badeau, G.; Ivanovic, S.; Foulon, F. [National Institute for Nuclear science and Technology French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA), Saclay Research Center, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-01

    Today, ISIS research reactor is an essential tool for Education and Training programs organized by the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) from CEA. In the field of nuclear instrumentation, the INSTN offers both, theoretical courses and training courses on the use of neutron detection systems taking advantage of the ISIS research reactor for the supply of a wide range of neutron fluxes. This paper describes the content of the training carried out on the use of neutron detectors and detection systems, on-site or remote. The ISIS reactor is a 700 kW open core pool type reactor. The facility is very flexible since neutron detectors can be inserted into the core or its vicinity, and be used at different levels of power according to the needs of the course. Neutron fluxes, typically ranging from 1 to 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}.s, can be obtained for the characterisation of the neutron detectors and detection systems. For the monitoring of the neutron density at low level of power, the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of the reactor is equipped with two detection systems, named BN1 and BN2. Each way contains a fission chamber, type CFUL01, connected to an electronic system type SIREX.The system works in pulse mode and exhibits two outputs: the counting rate and the doubling time. For the high level of power, the I and C is equipped with two detection systems HN1 and HN2.Each way contain a boron ionization chamber (type CC52) connected to an electronics system type SIREX. The system works in current mode and has two outputs: the current and the doubling time. For each mode, the trainees can observe and measure the signal at the different stages of the electronic system, with an oscilloscope. They can understand the role of each component of the detection system: detector, cable and each electronic block. The limitation of the detection modes and their operating range can be established from the measured signal. The trainees can also

  20. ESA joins forces with Japan on new infrared sky surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    launch of ESA’s Herschel infrared mission, in early 2008,” commented Prof. Southwood. With the largest and most powerful space telescope to date (3.5 metres in diameter), Herschel will build on the ASTRO-F census of the infrared universe and on the legacy left by other satellites such as ESA’s ISO and NASA’s Spitzer. It will reveal the deepest secrets of galaxies and of star formation and evolution, while also studying the chemistry of the cold, hidden cosmos. Note for editors ASTRO-F is the result of a truly international effort. It was developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), with the participation of Nagoya University, the University of Tokyo, the National Institute of Information & Communications Technology and other Japanese universities and institutes. Including South Korea, the project also draws on the involvement of ESA and a consortium of UK universities (Imperial College, London, the Open University, the University of Sussex) funded by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), as well as the Netherlands Institute for Space Research and Groningen University (NL). ESA’s ground-station support will be managed by the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC). ESA’s European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) is in charge of pointing reconstruction and user support for European open time observations. ASTRO-F is carrying onboard a cooled telescope with an approx. 70 centimetre aperture. It is also equipped with two instruments: the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) and the Infrared Camera (IRC). Together, they will make possible an all-sky survey in six infrared wavelengths. These instruments will also perform detailed photometric and spectroscopic observation of selected astronomical targets over the 2-180 micrometre wavelength range in 13 bands. During the survey, ASTRO-F will provide a complete infrared map of our galaxy with its stellar nurseries, which are only observable in infrared because their visible light is

  1. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    , giving a really excellent set of presentations. Finally we are also pleased to express our thanks to the Conference Office of the Institute of Physics for their invaluable support in organising this event. We are especially grateful to Dawn Stewart for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, as well as to Claire Garland for her planning and management of this event. This conference is the second in a series of conferences that began with the Rutherford Jubilee Conference held in Manchester in 1961, which is described in one of the contributions to these proceedings. I do hope that at least some of the delegates from the Centennial Conference will be able to attend the next one, fifty years hence in 2061, just as we were honoured to have some of the Jubilee delegates with us for the Centennial. If I am still around, I doubt that I will have the energy then to be conference chair. I would also not like to attempt to predict the plenary programme, but I hope that it will be as vibrant and exciting as the 2011 conference. Professor Sean J Freeman Conference Chair On behalf of the UK Organising Committee Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford (Photograph courtesy of The University of Manchester) Edited by: Sean Freeman (The University of Manchester) Andrei Andreyev (University of the West of Scotland/The University of York) Alison Bruce (University of Brighton) Alick Deacon (The University of Manchester) Dave Jenkins (University of York) Dave Joss (University of Liverpool) Douglas MacGregor (University of Glasgow) Paddy Regan (University of Surrey) John Simpson (University of Daresbury) Garry Tungate (University of Birmingham) Bob Wadsworth (University of York) Dan Watts (University of Edinburgh) International Advisory Panel: A Aprahamian (Notre Dame, USA) J Äystö (Jyväskylä, Finland) F Aziaez (Orsay, France) J-P Blaizot (Saclay, France/ECT, Italy) A Bracco (Milan, Italy) H Caines (Yale, USA) C W de Jaeger (JLAB, USA) J Dilling (TRIUMF, Canada) J

  2. VISTA: Pioneering New Survey Telescope Starts Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    catalogues at data centres in the United Kingdom at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh. All data will become public and be available to astronomers around the globe. Jim Emerson of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium, is looking forward to a rich harvest of science from the new telescope: "History has shown us some of the most exciting results that come out of projects like VISTA are the ones you least expect - and I'm personally very excited to see what these will be!" Notes [1] The VISTA Consortium is led by Queen Mary, University of London and consists of: Queen Mary, University of London; Queen's University of Belfast; University of Birmingham; University of Cambridge; Cardiff University; University of Central Lancashire; University of Durham; The University of Edinburgh; University of Hertfordshire; Keele University; Leicester University; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Nottingham; University of Oxford; University of St Andrews; University of Southampton; University of Sussex and University College London. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the world's largest survey

  3. Impressions From Congressess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tıp Eğitimciliği Sempozyumu (Symposium on Teachers' Training in Medicine, 17-19 Ekim 1996, Istanbul. 17-19 Ekim 1996 günlerinde İstanbul Üniversitesi İstanbul Tıp Fakültesi tarafından düzenlenen sempozyumda; 2000 yılında tıp eğitiminin ilkeleri, Türkiye'nin gelecekteki gereksinimlerinin belirlenmesi, Eğitim programlarının planlanmasının prensipleri, Tıp eğitiminde multimedia uygulamaları, eğitim ve öğretim metodolojilerinin aktarıldığı konferanslar verildi. Bu konferanslarda TTB, TÜBİTAK, Sağlık Bakanlığı ve YÖK temsilcileri ile ülkemizden ve İngiltere, Kanada, İtalya, İsviçre, Hollanda ve ABD 'den Tıp eğitimciliği konusunda yeni metodolojileri ileri süren, uyarlayan hatta yıllardır bu yöntemlerle eğitimin sürdürülmesinde görev alan değerli öğretim üyeleri konuları katılan diğer öğretim üyeleri ile tartıştılar. Katıldığım bu toplantıda yıllar önce (1981 kısa süreli rehber öğretmenlik görevini üstlendiğim interaktif eğitim metodlarının en uzun süredir uygulandığı Kanada'nın McMaster Üniversitesi eğitim yöntemleri ile ilgili sonuçların özellikleri ve semposium sırasında düzenlenen Workshoplarda ( Problem based learning, Competancy based learning, Participatory learning birlikte çalıştığımız öğretim üyelerinin yararlandıklarını belirtmeleri nedeni ile bu notu aktarmak istedim. Çok verimli geçen son gününde ülkemizden çeşitli bildirilerin de tartışıldığı bu semposium ile ilgili yazılı kaynak ya da benzeri bilgilerin Prof.Dr. Talat Cantez, İstanbul Tıp Fakültesi Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalından alınabileceğini sizlerle paylaşmak istedim. Prof.Dr.Seıpil Salaçin, Çukurova Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Adli Tıp Anabilim Dalı, Adana. An International Conference Violence, Abuse & Women's Citizenship, 10-15 Kasım 1996, Brigthon / İngiltere. Bradford Üniversitesi ev sahipliğinde Brighton (

  4. Kongre İzlenimleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tıp Eğitimciliği Sempozyumu (Symposium on Teachers' Training in Medicine, 17-19 Ekim 1996, Istanbul. 17-19 Ekim 1996 günlerinde İstanbul Üniversitesi İstanbul Tıp Fakültesi tarafından düzenlenen sempozyumda; 2000 yılında tıp eğitiminin ilkeleri, Türkiye'nin gelecekteki gereksinimlerinin belirlenmesi, Eğitim programlarının planlanmasının prensipleri, Tıp eğitiminde multimedia uygulamaları, eğitim ve öğretim metodolojilerinin aktarıldığı konferanslar verildi. Bu konferanslarda TTB, TÜBİTAK, Sağlık Bakanlığı ve YÖK temsilcileri ile ülkemizden ve İngiltere, Kanada, İtalya, İsviçre, Hollanda ve ABD 'den Tıp eğitimciliği konusunda yeni metodolojileri ileri süren, uyarlayan hatta yıllardır bu yöntemlerle eğitimin sürdürülmesinde görev alan değerli öğretim üyeleri konuları katılan diğer öğretim üyeleri ile tartıştılar. Katıldığım bu toplantıda yıllar önce (1981 kısa süreli rehber öğretmenlik görevini üstlendiğim interaktif eğitim metodlarının en uzun süredir uygulandığı Kanada'nın McMaster Üniversitesi eğitim yöntemleri ile ilgili sonuçların özellikleri ve semposium sırasında düzenlenen Workshoplarda ( Problem based learning, Competancy based learning, Participatory learning birlikte çalıştığımız öğretim üyelerinin yararlandıklarını belirtmeleri nedeni ile bu notu aktarmak istedim. Çok verimli geçen son gününde ülkemizden çeşitli bildirilerin de tartışıldığı bu semposium ile ilgili yazılı kaynak ya da benzeri bilgilerin Prof.Dr. Talat Cantez, İstanbul Tıp Fakültesi Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Anabilim Dalından alınabileceğini sizlerle paylaşmak istedim. Prof.Dr.Seıpil Salaçin, Çukurova Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Adli Tıp Anabilim Dalı, Adana. An International Conference Violence, Abuse & Women's Citizenship, 10-15 Kasım 1996, Brigthon / İngiltere. Bradford Üniversitesi ev sahipliğinde Brighton (