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Sample records for suspensory ligament desmitis

  1. Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis – A New Reality

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    Jaroslava Halper*, Ahrar Khan1 and P. O. Eric Mueller2

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD is a chronic, debilitating disease occurring primarily in Peruvian Pasos and Peruvian Paso crosses. However, many other breeds are afflicted as well. DSLD is characterized by a slowly progressing bilateral or quadrilateral lameness. Typically, the owner does not recall any trauma or performance related injury. Fetlock effusion, static and dynamic hyperextension and degenerative joint disease are hallmarks on physical examination. Ultrasonography of affected ligaments reveals diffuse loss of echogenicity, and an irregular fiber pattern. Though until recently DSLD was considered a collagen disorder strictly limited to suspensory ligaments (SLs, our data show that it is a systemic disease involving tissues with high content of collagen. We have identified abnormal accumulations of proteoglycans not only in the SLs, but also in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, patellar and nuchal ligaments, aorta, coronary arteries and sclerae of DSLD-affected horses. Our most recent data point to the presence of an abnormal form of decorin in these proteoglycan deposits. This decorin also exhibited altered biological activity. Treatment for DSLD-affected horses is empirical and directed at minimizing musculoskeletal pain and providing support for the suspensory apparatus. Restricted exercise, supportive bandages and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide some, but usually only temporary relief. Unfortunately, unrelenting pain, severe lameness and suffering require all too often humane euthanasia.

  2. Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis as a systemic disorder characterized by proteoglycan accumulation

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    Yoon Jung

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD is a debilitating disorder thought to be limited to suspensory ligaments of Peruvian Pasos, Peruvian Paso crosses, Arabians, American Saddlebreds, American Quarter Horses, Thoroughbreds, and some European breeds. It frequently leads to persistent, incurable lameness and need to euthanize affected horses. The pathogenesis remains unclear, though the disease appears to run in families. Treatment and prevention are empirical and supportive, and not effective in halting the progression of the disease. Presently, the presumptive diagnosis of DSLD is obtained from patient signalment and history, clinical examination, and ultrasonographic examination of clinically affected horses, and is confirmed at post mortem examination. Presently, there are no reliable methods of diagnosing DSLD in asymptomatic horses. The goal of this study was to characterize and define the disorder in terms of tissue involvement at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results We examined tissues and organs from 28 affected horses (22 Peruvian Pasos, 6 horses of other breeds and from 8 control horses. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of excessive amounts of proteoglycans in the following tissues removed from DSLD-affected horses: suspensory ligaments, superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, patellar and nuchal ligaments, cardiovascular system, and sclerae. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in diameters of collagen fibrils in the tendon, and in smooth muscle cells of the media of the aorta compatible with increased cell permeability in DSLD-affected cells. Separation of tendon extracts by gel chromatography revealed the presence of additional proteoglycan(s in extracts from affected, but not control extracts. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time that DSLD, a disease process previously thought to be limited to the suspensory ligaments of the distal limbs of

  3. Tenogenically induced allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of proximal suspensory ligament desmitis in a horse

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    Aurelie eVandenberghe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Suspensory ligament injuries are a common injury in sport horses, especially in competing dressage horses. Because of the poor healing of chronic recalcitrant tendon injuries, this represents a major problem in the rehabilitation of sport horses and often compromises the return to the initial performance level. Stem cells are considered as a novel treatment for different pathologies in horses and humans. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are well known for their use in the treatment of tendinopathies, however, recent studies report a safe use of allogeneic MSCs for different orthopaedic applications in horses. Moreover, it has been reported that predifferentiation of MSCs prior to injection might result in improved clinical outcomes. For all these reasons, the present case report describes the use of allogeneic tenogenically induced peripheral blood-derived MSCs for the treatment of a proximal suspensory ligament injury. During conservative management for 4 months, the horse demonstrated no improvement of a right front lameness with a Grade 2/5 on the AAEP scale and a clear hypo-echoic area detectable in 30% of the cross sectional area. From 4 weeks after treatment, the lameness reduced to an AAEP Grade 1/5 and a clear filling of the lesion could be noticed on ultrasound. At 12 weeks (T4 after the first injection, a second intralesional injection with allogeneic tenogenically induced MSCs and PRP was given and at 4 weeks after the second injection (T5, the horse trotted sound under all circumstances with a close to total fiber alignment. The horse went back to previous performance level at 32 weeks after the first regenerative therapy and is currently still doing so (i.e. 20 weeks later or 1 year after the first stem cell treatment.In conclusion, the present case report demonstrated a positive evolution of proximal suspensory ligament desmitis after treatment with allogeneic tenogenically induced MSCs.

  4. Septic flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis in an alpaca.

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    Hunter, Barbara G; Semevolos, Stacy A

    2013-07-01

    A 2-year-old male Suri alpaca was referred for evaluation of severe right forelimb lameness of 2 weeks' duration following a traumatic episode. Examination of the distal aspect of the metacarpus revealed 4 wounds exuding purulent material. On weight bearing, the metacarpophalangeal joint was severely hyperextended with the palmar surface touching the ground. Ultrasonography of the palmar surface of the metacarpus revealed desmitis of the proximal suspensory ligament, a large core lesion of the deep digital flexor tendon at mid-metacarpus, and complete loss of fiber pattern within the deep digital flexor tendon and lateral aspect of the superficial digital flexor tendon distally. The alpaca was treated systemically with antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory drugs and underwent repeated antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion. A bandage and splint were applied to stabilize the affected forelimb in an anatomically correct position, and the alpaca underwent prolonged stall confinement. At the time of hospital discharge 5 days after initial evaluation, clinical evidence of infection at the wound sites was absent. Three months following treatment, the alpaca was moving freely in a small paddock and had moderate hyperextension of the metacarpophalangeal joint. Treatment of septic flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis with antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion in combination with systemic treatment with antimicrobials and orthopedic support resulted in an excellent outcome in this alpaca. Antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion is simple to perform and has the potential to be beneficial in the treatment of infections in the distal portion of a limb in camelids.

  5. Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis (DSLD in Peruvian Paso Horses Is Characterized by Altered Expression of TGFβ Signaling Components in Adipose-Derived Stromal Fibroblasts.

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    Wei Luo

    Full Text Available Equine degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD in Peruvian Paso horses typically presents at 7-15 years and is characterized by lameness, focal disorganization of collagen fibrils, and chondroid deposition in the body of the ligament. With the aim of developing a test for disease risk (that can be used to screen horses before breeding we have quantified the expression of 76 TGFβ-signaling target genes in adipose-derived stromal fibroblasts (ADSCs from six DSLD-affected and five unaffected Paso horses. Remarkably, 35 of the genes showed lower expression (p<0.05 in cells from DSLD-affected animals and this differential was largely eliminated by addition of exogenous TGFβ1. Moreover, TGFβ1-mediated effects on expression were prevented by the TGFβR1/2 inhibitor LY2109761, showing that the signaling was via a TGFβR1/2 complex. The genes affected by the pathology indicate that it is associated with a generalized metabolic disturbance, since some of those most markedly altered in DSLD cells (ATF3, MAPK14, ACVRL1 (ALK1, SMAD6, FOS, CREBBP, NFKBIA, and TGFBR2 represent master-regulators in a wide range of cellular metabolic responses.

  6. Desmitis of the fetlock annular ligament in the horse.

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    Verschooten, F; Picavet, T M

    1986-03-01

    Desmitis of the fetlock annular ligament was diagnosed in 30 horses during a period of eight years. Most of the horses had been lame for a prolonged period and had chronically distended digital flexor tendon sheaths. Air tendograms demonstrated thickened palmar or plantar annular ligaments. In 25 horses the ligament was cut longitudinally; of these, 16 horses returned to full work without any difficulty and one became sound after a second operation. Follow up time varied from three months to seven-and-a-half years. None of the five untreated horses returned to work.

  7. Microvasculature of the suspensory ligament of the forelimb of horses.

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    Williams, Megan R; Arnoczky, Steven P; Pease, Anthony P; Stick, John A

    2013-12-01

    To determine the microvascular anatomy of the suspensory ligament of the forelimb of horses. 17 cadaveric forelimbs from 9 adult horses with no known history of forelimb lameness. The median artery of the forelimb was cannulated proximal to the antebrachiocarpal joint and injected with contrast medium for CT evaluation of the gross vasculature (n = 2) or India ink to evaluate the microvasculature (12). Routine histologic evaluation was performed on an additional 3 forelimbs to confirm the microvascular anatomy. The vascular supply of the suspensory ligament of the forelimb originated from branches of the medial and lateral palmar and palmar metacarpal vessels as well as the proximal and distal deep palmar arches. An abundant, longitudinally oriented microvascular supply was evident throughout the length of the suspensory ligament without distinct variation among the proximal, midbody, and distal regions. The intraligamentous blood supply originated from a periligamentous vascular plexus that surrounded the suspensory ligament throughout its length. Histologic findings indicated the presence of a periligamentous connective tissue plexus, which contained vessels that penetrated and anastomosed with an extensive network of intraligamentous vessels throughout the length of the suspensory ligament. The suspensory ligament of the equine forelimb had an abundant intraligamentous microvascular supply throughout its entire length. The absence of an obvious hypovascular area suggested that regional variations in healing rates of the suspensory ligament are not associated with the microvascular anatomy.

  8. The name cranial ovarian suspensory ligaments in mammalian anatomy should be used only to indicate the structures derived from the foetal cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van der Schoot (P.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe term ovarian suspensory ligament appears ambiguous when human adult anatomy textbooks are compared with human embryology or with general mammalian anatomy textbooks. The term ovarian suspensory ligament in laboratory rodents and domestic animals indicates homologous structures during

  9. Andreas Vesalius' 500th Anniversary: First Description of the Mammary Suspensory Ligaments.

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    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2016-09-01

    Sir Astley Paston Cooper has, to date, been acknowledged to be the first to describe the suspensory ligaments of the breast, or Cooper's ligaments, in 1840. We found these ligaments to be recorded in the first edition of 'De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem' by Andreas Vesalius, published in 1543. To commemorate Vesalius' 500th birthday, we quote and discuss this earlier record. Vesalius' record of the nature and function of the fleshy membrane between mammary gland and pectoral muscle, the hard fat intervening the mammary glands, and the fibers running from the fleshy membrane to the skin are a clear representation of posterior layer of the superficial fascial system, the fibro-adipose stroma surrounding and linking the mammary glandular elements, and the suspensory ligaments as we know them. Vesalius recorded the anatomy and function of the latter structures nearly 300 years before Sir Astley Paston Cooper did.

  10. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

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    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  11. In Vivo Measurements of Flexor Tendon and Suspensory Ligament Forces During Trotting Using the Thoroughbred Forelimb Model

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    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; MUKAI, Kazutaka; Ohmura, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko; HIRAGA, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints ...

  12. In Vivo Measurements of Flexor Tendon and Suspensory Ligament Forces During Trotting Using the Thoroughbred Forelimb Model

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    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; MUKAI, Kazutaka; OHMURA, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko; HIRAGA, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints were measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The relationship between the fetlock joint angle and the force in the SL was assessed in 3 limbs of 2 Thoroughbred horses. The forces in the SDFT, DDFT, and SL during a trot were also measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The mass of the 3 segments, and the moment arms of the SDFT and DDFT in the fetlock joint of the Thoroughbred horses were smaller than those of the Warmblood horses, whereas the other values were almost the same in the 2 types. The calculated force in the SDFT with this Thoroughbred model reached a peak (4,615 N) at 39.3% of the stance phase, whereas that in the DDFT reached a peak (5,076 N) at 51.2% of the stance phase. The force in the SL reached a peak (11,957 N) at 49.4% of the stance phase. This lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred can be applied to studying the effects of different shoe types and change of hoof angle for the flexor tendon and SL forces. PMID:24834009

  13. In vivo measurements of flexor tendon and suspensory ligament forces during trotting using the thoroughbred forelimb model.

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    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Mukai, Kazutaka; Ohmura, Hajime; Aida, Hiroko; Hiraga, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints were measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The relationship between the fetlock joint angle and the force in the SL was assessed in 3 limbs of 2 Thoroughbred horses. The forces in the SDFT, DDFT, and SL during a trot were also measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The mass of the 3 segments, and the moment arms of the SDFT and DDFT in the fetlock joint of the Thoroughbred horses were smaller than those of the Warmblood horses, whereas the other values were almost the same in the 2 types. The calculated force in the SDFT with this Thoroughbred model reached a peak (4,615 N) at 39.3% of the stance phase, whereas that in the DDFT reached a peak (5,076 N) at 51.2% of the stance phase. The force in the SL reached a peak (11,957 N) at 49.4% of the stance phase. This lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred can be applied to studying the effects of different shoe types and change of hoof angle for the flexor tendon and SL forces.

  14. New surgical approach to the plantar fetlock joint through the digital flexor tendon sheath wall and suspensory ligament apparatus in cases of concurrent septic synovitis in two cattle.

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    Kofler, J; Martinek, B

    2005-05-01

    A new surgical approach to the infected fetlock joint is described in two cattle suffering from septic tenosynovitis of the lateral digital flexor tendon sheaths of the right lateral hind-digits with concurrent septic serofibrinous arthritis of the adjoining fetlock joints, caused by penetrating wounds. In both patients, the infected sheaths were opened and the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons were removed. Intraoperatively, a small entry through the fetlock joint capsule was detected, directly distal to the lateral proximal sesamoid bone. The tract was surgically enlarged and a second approach into the plantar fetlock joint pouch was created proximally by making a 3 cm long and 0.5 cm wide incision between the two lateral suspensory ligament branches. This allowed easy access to the plantar joint pouch, removal of fibrin clots and an effective joint lavage using 5L of sterile saline solution. The incisions of the fetlock joint capsules remained unsutured and were drained using soft polyurethane foam to preclude premature closure. The tendon sheath wounds remained unsutured. In both patients, the digital flexor tendon sheath and the fetlock joint were lavaged daily for the following three days. The infection was eliminated in both cattle and both fully recovered without residual lameness.

  15. Clinical follow-up of horses treated with allogeneic equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood for different tendon and ligament disorders.

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    Van Loon, Vic J F; Scheffer, Carmen J W; Genn, Herman J; Hoogendoorn, Arie C; Greve, Jan W

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer promise as therapeutic aids in the repair of tendon and ligament disorders in sport horses. Equine allogeneic MSCs derived from umbilical cord blood (eUCB-MSCs) can be obtained in a minimally invasive fashion with successful propagation of MSCs. The objective of this study was to determine the applicability and therapeutic effect of eUCB-MSCs on tendinitis of the superficial digital flexor tendon, desmitis of the suspensory ligament, tendinitis of the deep digital flexor tendon, and desmitis of the inferior check ligament in clinical cases. A retrospective clinical study was performed. At two equine clinics, 52 warmblood horses were treated with cultured eUCB-MSCs between 2009 and 2012. About 2-10 × 10(6) cells per lesion were administered. When a lesion was treated twice, the total amount could run up to 20 × 10(6) cells. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to compare the effect of the injured structure on the success rate, as well as the effect of the age of the horse. Based on repeated examinations, 40 horses (77%) returned to work on the same or a higher level based on information provided by the owner. Neither the injured structure nor the age of the horse had a statistically significant influence on the result. Overall, the results of treatment of some tendon and ligament injuries with eUCB-MSCs in clinical cases are promising.

  16. Biomechanical Comparison of Fixed-Loop and Adjustable-Loop Cortical Suspensory Devices for Metaphyseal Femoral-Sided Soft Tissue Graft Fixation in Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Porcine Model.

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    Nye, Darin D; Mitchell, W Ryan; Liu, Wei; Ostrander, Roger V

    2017-06-01

    To compare the displacement, stiffness, and ultimate failure load of a fixed-loop cortical suspensory device with 2 adjustable-loop devices when positioned on metaphyseal bone. Thirty devices (10 of each device) were positioned on the metaphyseal cortex of 30 porcine femora simulating anatomic anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel placement. Bovine tendons were used for soft tissue grafts, and the constructs were then cycled 1,000 times and pulled to failure, measuring displacement, stiffness, and failure load. Initial displacement, cyclic displacement, and total displacement were 2.98 mm, 2.09 mm, and 5.08 mm for the Endobutton CL (ECL), 2.82 mm, 2.27 mm, and 5.09 mm for the Tightrope (TRT), and 4.25 mm, 3.19 mm, and 7.44 mm for the adjustable-loop ToggleLoc Inline with Ziploop (TLZ), respectively. There was no difference between the ECL and the TRT on any measured outcome. Differences between the TLZ and ECL were statistically significant (initial displacement P = .024, cyclic displacement P < .001, and total displacement P < .001), as were those between the TLZ and TRT (initial displacement P = .010, cyclic displacement P = .001, and total displacement P < .001). Failure loads were 804 N, 801 N, and 682 N for the TRT, ECL, and TLZ, respectively, with no statistically significant difference. When positioned on the metaphyseal cortex, there was no difference in the biomechanical performance of the fixed-loop ECL and adjustable-loop TRT, and no lengthening of the TRTs was observed during cycling. However, the TLZ showed statistically significantly lower stiffness and more displacement during cycling with lengthening of the adjustable loop, the clinical significance of which is unknown. When used for femoral-sided soft tissue graft fixation in an anatomically placed femoral tunnel, the adjustable-loop TRT was biomechanically equivalent to the fixed-loop ECL. However, the adjustable-loop TLZ showed displacement during biomechanical testing that

  17. Aseptic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath, fetlock and pastern annular ligament constriction.

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    Dik, K J; Dyson, S J; Vail, T B

    1995-08-01

    The anatomy of the digital flexor tendon sheath and related tendons and ligaments is described. Diagnosis and management of acute tenosynovitis and long-term tenosynovitis and associated tendon injuries are discussed, as well as the syndrome of stenosis of the fetlock canal (or fetlock annular ligament constriction) and palmar annular ligament constriction. Desmitis of the palmar annular ligament is also described.

  18. Gene Therapy Using Plasmid DNA Encoding Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 164 and Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Genes for the Treatment of Horse Tendinitis and Desmitis: Case Reports

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    Milomir Kovac

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical study, for the first time we used the direct gene therapy to restore severe injuries of the suspensory ligament branch and superficial digital flexor tendon in horses (Equus caballus. We injected the plasmid DNA encoding two therapeutic species-specific growth factors: vascular endothelial growth factor 164 and fibroblast growth factor 2 at the site of injury in the suspensory ligament branch and tendon. Treatment effects were evaluated with the use of clinical observation and ultrasound imaging during a period of a few months. We showed that gene therapy used within a period of 2–3 months after the injury resulted in the complete recovery of functions and full restoration of the severely damaged suspensory ligament and superficial digital flexor tendon.

  19. Temporal growth factor release from platelet-rich plasma, trehalose lyophilized platelets, and bone marrow aspirate and their effect on tendon and ligament gene expression.

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    McCarrel, Taralyn; Fortier, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has generated substantial interest for tendon and ligament regeneration because of the high concentrations of growth factors in platelet alpha-granules. This study compared the temporal release of growth factors from bone marrow aspirate (BMA), PRP, and lyophilized platelet product (PP), and measured their effects on tendon and ligament gene expression. Blood and BMA were collected and processed to yield PRP and plasma. Flexor digitorum superficialis tendon (FDS) and suspensory ligament (SL) explants were cultured in 10% plasma in DMEM (control), BMA, PRP, or PP. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were determined at 0, 24, and 96 h of culture using ELISA. Quantitative RT-PCR for collagen types I and III (COL1A1, COL3A1), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), decorin, and matrix metalloproteinases-3 and 13 (MMP-3, MMP-13) was performed. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were highest in PRP and PP. Growth factor quantity was unchanged in BMA, increased in PRP, and decreased in PP over 4 days. TGF-beta1 and platelet concentrations were positively correlated. Lyophilized PP and PRP resulted in increased COL1A1:COL3A1 ratio, increased COMP, and decreased MMP-13 expression. BMA resulted in decreased COMP and increased MMP-3 and MMP-13 gene expression. Platelet concentration was positively correlated with COL1A1, ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, and COMP, and negatively correlated with COL3A1, MMP-13, and MMP-3. White blood cell concentration was positively correlated with COL3A1, MMP3, and MMP13, and negatively correlated with a ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, COMP, and decorin. These findings support further in vivo investigation of PRP and PP for treatment of tendonitis and desmitis. Copyright 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Modelo de indução de lesão no ligamento suspensório equino com utilização de punch para biópsia cutânea Suspensory ligament lesion model in horses using a skin biopsy punch

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    Anamaria Santos Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar um novo modelo de lesão no ligamento suspensório (LS. Sob anestesia geral, um punch para biópsia cutânea de 0,6cm de diâmetro foi utilizado para criar uma lesão no centro do LS de ambos os membros torácicos e pélvicos, em seis equinos. Todos os animais se recuperam da cirurgia sem nenhuma complicação importante. Realizaram-se avaliações clínicas e ultrassonográficas no período pós-operatório. Durante as primeiras duas semanas, no local da lesão, houve redução no edema de leve para discreto e da dor de discreta para ausente. As lesões foram facilmente observadas ao exame ultrassonográfico 72 horas após a cirurgia como áreas anecoicas homogêneas, representando uma média (± erro padrão de 33,5±5% da área do LS. Não houve alteração significativa na área de lesão durante as primeiras duas semanas (P=0,77. Concluiu-se que o modelo proposto foi eficiente para promover lesões controladas e homogêneas simultaneamente nos quatro LS, sem causar desconforto importante aos equinos. Esses achados, associados à possibilidade de se avaliar previamente o LS por meio de biópsia, demonstram que esse modelo de indução de lesões ligamentosas se apresenta com um método útil, principalmente se aplicado ao estudo de terapias destinadas a melhorar o processo de reparo do LS.The aim was to study a novel model of suspensory ligament (SL lesion. Under general anesthesia, a punch for skin biopsy (0.6cm of diameter was used to create a circular lesion in the middle of SL simultaneously in the four members of six horses. All horses recovered without any important complication. Clinical and ultrasonographic evaluations were made during the post operative period. During the first two weeks, edema changed from mild to discreet, and pain changed from discreet to none around the surgical site. The lesions were easily observed by ultrasonography 48h after surgery as a homogenous anechoic area

  1. [Triple fracture of the shoulder suspensory complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi Mariño, I; Martin Rodríguez, I; Mora Villadeamigo, J

    2013-01-01

    The superior suspensory complex of the shoulder (SSCS) is a ring shaped structure composed of bones and soft tissues that play a fundamental role in the stability of the shoulder joint. Isolated injuries of the SSCS are relatively common, but injuries that affect 3 components are extremely unusual. We present a triple injury of the SSCS in a 26 year old patient with a Neer type ii clavicular fracture, a Kuhn type iii acromion fracture and an Ogawa type i coracoid fracture. An open reduction and stabilization of the clavicle was performed with 2 Kirschner nails. The acromial fracture was synthesized with 2 cannulated screws, and the coracoid fracture was treated conservatively. After 24 months of follow up the patient had an excellent functional outcome according to the Constat-Murley shoulder score and QuickDASH scoring system, and all the fractures healed correctly. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the supraspinous ligament in a series of ridden and unridden horses and horses with unrelated back pathology

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    Knezevic Sabina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the supraspinous ligament (SSL is reported to cause back pain in the horse. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed by ultrasonographic examination. The ultrasonographic appearance of the supraspinous ligament has been well described, but there are few studies that correlate ultrasonographic findings with clinical pain and/or pathology. This preliminary study aims to test the hypothesis that unridden horses (n = 13 have a significantly reduced frequency of occurrence of ultrasonographic changes of the SSL consistent with a diagnosis of desmitis when compared to ridden horses (n = 13 and those with clinical signs of back pain (n = 13. Results The supraspinous ligament of all horses was imaged between T(thoracic6-T18 and ultrasonographic appearance. There was an average of 2.08 abnormal images per horse from the whole group. The average number of abnormalities in unridden horses was 4.92, in ridden horses 2.92 and in horses with clinical back pain 4.69. No lesions were found between T6 and T10 and 68% of lesions were found between T14 and T17. No significant difference (p Conclusion The main conclusion was that every horse in this study (n = 39 had at least one site of SSL desmitis (range 2 to 11. It was clear that ultrasonographically diagnosed SSL desmitis cannot be considered as prima facie evidence of clinically significant disease and further evidence is required for a definitive diagnosis.

  3. The suspensory ligament of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. An ultrastructural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    Following optimized fixation and specimen handling, the endolymphatic duct was investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Tubular microfibrils, 10-12 nm thick and of indefinite length, occupied the subepithelial compartment abundantly and seemed to insert into the basal lamina...

  4. Anatomical transverse magnetic resonance imaging study of ligaments in palmar surface of metacarpus in Miniature donkey: identification of a new ligament.

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    Nazem, M N; Sajjadian, S M

    2017-01-01

    Palmar region of metacarpus in the horses and donkeys is an important region because of its tendons and ligaments which contribute to stay apparatus. This study was done on forelimbs of 6 healthy Miniature donkeys to detect the tendons, ligaments and their accessories on the palmar surface of metacarpus in this animal. Based on that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a good technique to evaluate the soft tissues such as tendons and ligaments, palmar aspects of metacarpus in 6 euthanatised Miniature donkeys were prepared for anatomical and trans-sectional MRI studies to determine the tendons and ligaments in this region. Suspensory ligament, deep digital flexor tendon and its inferior check ligament were similar to them in the horse. Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in this animal had superior check ligament that was present before the carpal joint. On the other hand in the Miniature donkey there was a second accessory ligament for the SDFT that originated from the proximal of palmar surface of the large metacarpal bone which we named it second accessory ligament of SDFT. This ligament was determined in the MRI images too. It seems that this ligament helps the Miniature donkey to stay apparatus, supporting more weight and load for a longer period of time and distance which is a specific morphological feature in this animal.

  5. Management of hindlimb proximal suspensory desmopathy by neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy: 155 horses (2003-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S; Murray, R

    2012-05-01

    Neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy have become accepted as methods of treatment of proximal suspensory desmopathy (PSD), but there are limited long-term studies documenting the outcome. To describe long-term follow-up in horses with PSD alone or with other injuries contributing to lameness and poor performance, including complications, following neurectomy and fasciotomy. Follow-up information was acquired for 155 horses that had undergone neurectomy and fasciotomy for treatment of PSD between 2003 and 2008. Success was classified as a horse having been in full work for >1 year post operatively. Horses were divided into 3 groups on the basis of the results of clinical assessment and diagnostic analgesia. Horses in Group 1 had primary PSD and no other musculoskeletal problem. Horses in Group 2 had primary PSD in association with straight hock conformation and/or hyperextension of the metatarsophalangeal joint. Horses in Group 3 had PSD and other problems contributing to lameness or poor performance. In Group 1, 70 of 90 horses (77.8%) had a successful outcome, whereas in Group 3, 23 of 52 horses (44.2%) returned to full function for >1 year. Complications included iatrogenic damage to the plantar aspect of the suspensory ligament, seroma formation, residual curb-like swellings and the development of white hairs. All horses in Group 2 remained lame. There is a role for neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy for long-term management of hindlimb PSD, but a prerequisite for successful management requires recognition of risk factors for poor outcome including conformation features of straight hock or fetlock hyperextension. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Neck function in early hominins and suspensory primates: Insights from the uncinate process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Woodward, Charles; Tims, Amy; Bastir, Markus

    2018-02-28

    Uncinate processes are protuberances on the cranial surface of subaxial cervical vertebrae that assist in stabilizing and guiding spinal motion. Shallow uncinate processes reduce cervical stability but confer an increased range of motion in clinical studies. Here we assess uncinate processes among extant primates and model cervical kinematics in early fossil hominins. We compare six fossil hominin vertebrae with 48 Homo sapiens and 99 nonhuman primates across 20 genera. We quantify uncinate morphology via geometric morphometric methods to understand how uncinate process shape relates to allometry, taxonomy, and mode of locomotion. Across primates, allometry explains roughly 50% of shape variation, as small, narrow vertebrae feature the relatively tallest, most pronounced uncinate processes, whereas larger, wider vertebrae typically feature reduced uncinates. Taxonomy only weakly explains the residual variation, however, the association between Uncinate Shape and mode of locomotion is robust, as bipeds and suspensory primates occupy opposite extremes of the morphological continuum and are distinguished from arboreal generalists. Like humans, Australopithecus afarensis and Homo erectus exhibit shallow uncinate processes, whereas A. sediba resembles more arboreal taxa, but not fully suspensory primates. Suspensory primates exhibit the most pronounced uncinates, likely to maintain visual field stabilization. East African hominins exhibit reduced uncinate processes compared with African apes and A. sediba, likely signaling different degrees of neck motility and modes of locomotion. Although soft tissues constrain neck flexibility beyond limits suggested by osteology alone, this study may assist in modeling cervical kinematics and positional behaviors in extinct taxa. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation and comparison of clinical results of femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Deniz; Ozcan, Mert

    2016-03-01

    Several femoral fixation devices are available for hamstring tendon autograft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, but the best technique is debatable. We hypothesised that different suspensory femoral fixation techniques have no superiority over each other. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This was a Level III, retrospective, comparative study. A total of 100 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in a single institution with a mean follow-up time of 40 months (12-67 months) were divided into three groups according to femoral fixation devices as 'Endobutton' (n=34), 'Transfix' (n=35) and 'Aperfix' (n=31). The length of painful period after surgery, time to return to work and sporting activities, final range of motion, anterior drawer and Lachman tests, knee instability symptoms, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation score, Short Form 36 (SF-36) score, Lysholm knee score and Tegner point of the patients were evaluated and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between the groups. All techniques led to significant recovery in knee instability tests and symptoms. In this study, the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation techniques were found to be similar. We believe that different femoral fixation techniques have no effect on clinical results provided that the technique is correctly applied. The surgeon must choose a technique appropriate to his or her experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posterior cruciate ligament injury Overview Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury happens far less often than does injury to the knee's more vulnerable counterpart, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The posterior cruciate ...

  9. Complications after arthroscopic coracoclavicular reconstruction using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device in acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after arthroscopically assisted coracoclavicular (CC) fixation using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to report intraoperative and postoperative complications. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation underwent arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Using the Rockwood classification, 3 patients had grade III dislocations, one patient had a grade IV dislocation, and 14 patients had grade V dislocations. The preoperative CC distance of the injured shoulder was 16.1 ± 2.7 mm (range, 11.2 to 21.0 mm), and it increased by 99% ± 36% (range, 17% to 153%) on average compared with the contralateral shoulder. The average CC distance was 10.5 ± 2.5 mm (range, 7.7 to 15.5 mm), and it increased by 30% ± 30% (range, -9.4% to 90%) at the final follow-up. Compared with immediate postoperative radiographs, the CC distance was maintained in 12 patients, increased between 50% and 100% in 4 patients, and increased more than 100% in 2 patients at final follow-up. However, there was no statistical difference in Constant scores between 6 patients with reduction loss (95.6 ± 4.5) and 12 patients with reduction maintenance (98.4 ± 2.5; P = .17). Perioperative complications occurred in 8 patients, including one case of acromioclavicular arthritis, one case of delayed distal clavicular fracture at the clavicular hole of the device, 3 cases of clavicular or coracoid button failures, and 3 cases of clavicular bony erosion. Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained after CC fixation using the single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, CC fixation failure of greater than 50% of the unaffected side in radiological examinations occurred in 33% of the patients within 3 months after the operation

  10. The anococcygeal ligaments: Cadaveric study with application to our understanding of incontinence in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhe Wu; Hata, Fumitake; Jin, Yu; Murakami, Gen; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2015-11-01

    The term "anococcygeal ligament (ACL)" has been used to refer to two distinct structures: a superficial fibrous band originating from the myosepta of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and running upwards to the coccyx (the superficial ACL); and a deep fibrous band originating from the periosteum of the coccyx, merging with the thick presacral fascia and attaching to the superior end of the EAS (the deep ACL). In the present work, elastic fiber histology and muscle immunohistochemistry of sagittal sections obtained from 15 donated elderly male cadavers showed that superficial ACL, corresponding to a superficial fascia or skin ligament, was composed of very tortuous elastic fibers, with a fine elastic fiber mesh at their coccygeal attachment; whereas the deep ACL was composed of almost straight collagen and elastic fibers, intermingled with the coccygeal periosteum. Due to the weak insertion into the coccyx and the wavy course, the superficial ACL is unlikely to provide, even in association with contraction of the longitudinal anal muscle, a stable mechanical support to maintain the configuration of the EAS. Being similar to the suspensory ligament of breast, tissue repair of the skin ligament would not have a mechanical role. In contrast, the deep ACL, in association with the thick presacral fascia, likely plays a role in maintaining a suitable positioning of the anorectum to the coccyx. However, their relative lack of smooth muscles compared with rich elastic fibers indicates that both ACLs may become permanently overextended under conditions of long-term mechanical stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lateral collateral ligament connects the end of the femur (thigh) to the top of the fibula (the thin bone that runs next to the shin bone). The lateral collateral ligament provides stability against varus stress. Varus stress is ...

  12. Relationship between humeral geometry and shoulder muscle power among suspensory, knuckle-walking, and digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Takemoto, Hironori; Kuraoka, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder morphology is functionally related to different patterns of locomotion in primates. To investigate this we performed a quantitative analysis of the relationship between cortical bone thickness (Cbt) of the muscle/tendon attachment site on the humerus and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of the shoulder muscle in primates with different locomotory habits. The deltoid, subscapularis, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus were investigated. A chimpanzee, a gibbon, a baboon, two species of macaque, a lutong, a capuchin, and a squirrel monkey were included in the study. The total length of the humerus was measured and the values were converted into three-dimensional reconstructed data on a computer by computed tomography. The Cbt values were obtained from the volumes divided by the areas of the muscle/tendon attachment sites of the humerus by computer analysis. Muscle mass, muscle fascicle length, and muscle pennation angle were measured and PCSA was calculated using these parameters. A relatively high Cbt and small PCSA were characteristic of the gibbon. The gibbon's high Cbt suggests that passive tension in the muscle/tendon attachment site of suspensory primates (brachiators) may be greater than that of quadrupedal primates, whereas the relatively small PCSA indicates an association with a large amount of internal muscle fascia to endure the passive stress of brachiation. Although chimpanzees undertake some suspensory locomotion, the results for this species resemble those of the digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates rather than those of the suspensory primate. However, the deltoid and subscapularis in chimpanzee differ from those of the other primates and appear to be affected by the peculiar locomotion of knuckle-walking, i.e. the moment arm of forelimb in chimpanzees is relatively longer than that of digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates. Hence, a large PCSA in the deltoid and subscapularis may contribute to sustaining the body weight

  13. Ultrasonography of ankle ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peetrons, P.A. [C.H. Moliere-Longchamp, Dept. of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Silvestre, A. [Hopital Militaire Laveran, Dept. of Radiology, Marseilles (France); Cohen, M. [Hoptial Saint-Joseph, Dept. of Radiology, Marseilles (France); Creteur, V. [C.H. Moliere-Longchamp, Dept. of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-02-01

    The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle is a complex of 3 ligaments: The anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments and the calcaneofibular ligament; these ligaments work together to support the lateral aspect of the ankle. The anterior talofibular (ATF) ligament (Fig. 1) runs from the anterior of the talus. The probe is placed in a slightly oblique position from the malleolus toward the forefoot. The ligament is hyperechoic when its fibres are perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (anisotropy artifact is present in ligaments as well as in tendons). It is approximately 2 mm thick and, during examination, must be straight and tight from one insertion point to the other, as seen in Fig. 2. The posterior talofibular (PTF) ligament, which runs from the posterior part of the malleolus to the posterior part of the talus, is difficult to see on US, being partially or sometimes completely hidden by the malleolus. The calcaneofibular ligament forms the middle portion of the lateral collateral ligament. It is tight between the inferior part of the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus, and runs in a slightly posterior oblique direction toward the heel (Fig. 3). The ligament lies on the deep surface of the fibular tendons, forming a hammock to fall deep on the calcaneus surface (Fig. 4). The calcaneofibular ligament is approximately 2-3 nun thick and is hyperechoic in the distal two-thirds only because of the obliquity of the proximal part. When examining this ligament, it is mandatory that the ankle be flexed dorsally; this stretches the ligament so that it can be seen clearly. (author)

  14. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament graft link: graft preparation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H

    2012-12-01

    The anatomic single-bundle, all-inside anterior cruciate ligament graft-link technique requires meticulous graft preparation. The graft choice is no-incision allograft or gracilis-sparing, posterior semitendinosus autograft. The graft is linked, like a chain, to femoral and tibial TightRope cortical suspensory fixation devices with adjustable-length graft loops (Arthrex, Naples, FL) in the following manner: the graft is quadrupled, and the free ends are first whip-stitched and then sutured with a buried-knot technique, 4 times through each strand in a loop. The graft is placed on a tensioning station under approximately 20 lb of tension during arthroscopic preparation of the knee and then removed from the tensioner and inserted into all-inside femoral and tibial sockets through the anteromedial arthroscopic portal.

  15. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  16. Anatomy of the Lateral Ankle Ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    SİNDEL, Muzaffer

    1998-01-01

    The lateral ligaments of talocrural articulation, namely anterior talofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament and cal-caneofibular ligament, are important in an-atomic reconstruction. If reconstructed improperly, they are known to limit the movements of talocrural articulation and subtalar articulation (talocalcaneal articulation) Studies on anatomy of anterior talofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament and calcaneofibular ligament known as the lateral ligaments ...

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... knee. It prevents the knee from bending out. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. ...

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100230.htm Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament in the center of ...

  19. Torn lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LCL), is an injury to the lateral collateral ligament, a ligament extending from the top-outside surface of the ... the bottom-outside surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from side-to-side ( ...

  20. Torn medial collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MCL), is an injury to the medial collateral ligament. This ligament extends from the upper-inside surface of the ... the bottom-inside surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from medial instability, that ...

  1. [Posterior cruciate ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, K F; Ziring, E; Ruchholtz, S; Efe, T

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are still often overlooked and treatment of a ruptured PCL is inherently different in comparison to anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Conservative treatment is the first-line therapy for acute isolated PCL injuries leading to good clinical and biomechanical results. Injuries to the PCL combined with rupture of other stabilizing ligaments, such as the collateral ligaments or the posterolateral corner of the knee joint are treated surgically. The same is true for high grade chronic PCL insufficiency. Meticulous classification of PCL injuries taking all stabilizing factors of the knee joint as well as the time from injury into account are essential for successful treatment of PCL injuries.

  2. Tendon and ligament imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  3. Broad ligament ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rama C; Lepakshi G; Raju SN

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in the broad ligament is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with a high risk of maternal mortality. Ultrasonography may help in the early diagnosis but mostly the diagnosis is established during surgery. We report the case of a patient with broad ligament ectopic pregnancy diagnosed intraoperatively. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  4. Biomechanical and Computed Tomography Analysis of Adjustable Femoral Cortical Fixation Devices for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Cadaveric Human Knee Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Trevor R; Biercevicz, Alison M; Koruprolu, Sarath C; Paller, David; Spenciner, Dave; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate and compare two adjustable femoral cortical suspensory fixation devices used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction through a novel, direct computed tomography (CT) analysis metric and biomechanical laxity testing in a matched cadaveric human knee study. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions with bovine tendon grafts were performed using two adjustable femoral cortical suspensory fixation devices (RigidLoop Adjustable [DePuy Synthes Mitek, Raynham, MA] and TightRope [Arthrex, Naples, FL]) in 12 knees (6 matched pairs). A mechanical testing series was used to determine each knee's laxity in the intact condition. After reconstruction, each specimen was again tested for laxity and also imaged with CT. The laxity testing and CT imaging were then repeated after 1,000 cycles of anteroposterior loading on each knee to compare changes in laxity for the two fixation devices and to visualize changes in button-to-graft distance migration through a three-dimensional CT imaging method. No significant differences were found between the two fixation groups' laxity measures after reconstruction (all P values ≥ .620) or after cycling (all P values ≥ .211) at any flexion angle. In addition, no significant differences were found between the two groups regarding button-to-graft distance migration (P = .773; mean, 0.61 ± 0.6 mm [95% confidence interval, -0.1 to 1.3 mm] in RigidLoop Adjustable group and 0.53 ± 0.6 mm [95% confidence interval, -0.1 to 1.2 mm] in TightRope group). There were no significant differences between the two femoral cortical suspensory adjustable-loop devices regarding laxity outcomes or loop displacement as measured by button-to-graft distance migration. Use of either of the adjustable-loop cortical suspensory devices in our analysis would appear to produce similar, acceptable laxity outcomes and minimal effects in terms of device-related loop displacement. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  5. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was pulled, and tension in the ligament caused activity of the gamma motor neurones of the muscles around the knee. Impulses from the sensory nerves in ACL were activated during motion of the knee, in particular overstretching and combined extension and rotation. In humans......The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when...... in humans makes it unlikely that it is a directly protective reflex. Instead it may be involved in the updating of motor programs. Further research may characterize the reflex in details and map its pathways. The existence of this reflex indicate that the cruciate ligaments have an afferent function, which...

  6. Avulsion Fracture of the Coracoid Process at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Insertion: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Morioka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion fracture at the site of attachment of the coracoid process of the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL is extremely rare. We presented three adult cases of this unusual avulsion fracture associated with other injuries. Case  1 was a 25-year-old right-handed male with a left distal clavicular fracture with an avulsion fracture of the coracoid attachment of the CCL; this case was treated surgically and achieved an excellent outcome. Case  2 was a 39-year-old right-handed male with dislocation of the left acromioclavicular joint with two avulsion fractures: one at the posteromedial surface of the coracoid process at the attachment of the conoid ligament and one at the inferior surface of the clavicle at the attachment site of the trapezoid ligament; this case was treated conservatively, and unfavorable symptoms such as dull pain at rest and sharp pain during some daily activities remained. Case  3 was a 41-year-old right-handed female with a right distal clavicular fracture with an avulsion fracture of the coracoid attachment of the conoid ligament; this case was treated conservatively, and the distal clavicular fracture became typical nonunion. These three cases corresponded to type I fractures according to Ogawa’s classification as the firm scapuloclavicular connection was destroyed and also to double disruption of the superior shoulder suspensory complex. We recommend surgical intervention when treating patients with this type of acute or subacute injury, especially in those engaging in heavy lifting or overhead work.

  7. The effect of collection and extension on tarsal flexion and fetlock extension at trot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, V A; Walters, J M; Griffith, L; Murray, R C

    2013-03-01

    A recent epidemiological study indicated that various factors may be related to injury in dressage horses, but the mechanism by which these injuries occur has yet to be determined. The suspensory ligament (SL) is a frequent site of injury, and it is assumed that greatest strain is placed on this structure in collected trot; this has yet to be proved conclusively. The study aimed to investigate the effect of collected and extended trot on the hindlimb movement pattern. Four dressage horses were fitted with markers and inertial motion sensors (IMS). High-speed video was obtained for 2 strides on each rein in collected and extended trot on 3 different surfaces: waxed outdoor; sand/plastic granules; and waxed indoor. Maximal tarsal flexion during stance and distal metatarsal coronary band ratio (MTCR), representing fetlock extension, were determined. Inertial motion sensor data determined stride duration, speed and stride length. Data were compared between collection and extension within horses on each surface, and compared between surfaces. Collected trot had significantly lower speed and stride length but longer stride duration than extended trot on all surfaces. All horses had less tarsal flexion and fetlock extension in collected compared with extended trot (P<0.05), which is likely to increase SL loading. The study findings indicate that extended trot may increase SL strain, providing a possible explanation for the high incidence of SL injury in horses trained for extravagant movement. It is possible that substantial use of extended trot could be a risk factor for development of suspensory desmitis, which might be one contributory factor in the prevalence of suspensory desmitis in young horses repeatedly undertaking extravagant movement. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries What's in this article? What Are ...

  9. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  10. MR Imaging of Wrist Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Michael D; Murthy, Naveen S

    2015-08-01

    This article discusses the normal anatomy and pathologic appearances of the intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments using MR Imaging. Technological advances in surface coil design and higher magnetic field strengths have improved radiologists' ability to consistently visualize these small ligaments in their entirety. Wrist ligament anatomy, in the context of proper physiologic function, is emphasized, including common normal variants, and their appearances on MR imaging. The spectrum of disorders, incorporating overlapping appearances of senescent degenerative changes, and destabilizing ligament tears, is outlined. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging to date for various ligament abnormalities is discussed, along with significant limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinico-radiographic Studies on The Prevalent Distal Limb Affections in Working Equine at Luxor City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A.A. Abdel-Hady

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To illustrate the clinical and radiographic findings of some distal limbs affections in Ninety two animals (24 horses and 68 donkeys which were admitted to Animal Care Hospital in Luxor. Each animal was subjected to thorough clinical and radiographic examination; the grade of lameness was recorded and the best radiographic views were taken.  Fifteen types of distal limb affections were evident. The most prevalent affections in donkeys were high and low ring bone (29.35% and hoof abscess ( 9.78% followed by traumatic arthritis of the fetlock (6.52%, suspensory ligament desmitis (5.43%, fracture of first phalanx (5.43%, fracture of PII (4.35%, side bone (3.26%  whereas, fracture of metacarpal bone (1.09%, sesamoditis (1.09% and flexural deformities (1.09%  represented the lowest prevalent affections.On the other hand, side bone (4.35%, fracture of the metacarpal bone (4.35% represented the most prevalent affections in horses followed by high and low ring bone (3.26%, fractures of PI (2.17%, PII (2.17%, subluxation of coronopedal joint (2.17% and punctured wounds in of the hoof (2.17%, traumatic arthritis of the fetlock joint (2.17%. Whereas, navicular disease (1.09%, suspensory ligament desmitis (1.09% and hoof abscess (1.09% were the lowest prevalent affections in horses. Treatment was not recommended in certain cases. In conclusion, although the wide stride progress have made in diagnostic imaging in recent decades, the x ray still offers a satisfactory tool for diagnostic imaging in equine limb practice that is useful for equine practitioners.

  12. Thoracic and lumbar intraforaminal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Gökhan

    2010-09-01

    The author conducted a study to investigate the anatomy of the intraforaminal ligaments of the thoracic and lumbar nerve roots and describe their anatomical relationships and functional properties. This anatomical study performed on the intervertebral foramina, intraforaminal ligaments, transforaminal ligaments, and nerve roots of the thoracic and lumbar spine was performed in human cadavers. The foraminal anatomy was studied in 11 whole cadavers (5 females, 6 males) previously prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 16 to 71 years. The thoracic and lumbar spinal columns were separated from the cervical and sacral segments en bloc using an electric band saw. The paraspinal muscles and their attachments were removed by sharp and meticulous dissection, and the thoracic and lumbar intervertebral foramina were examined under a surgical microscope. The intervertebral foraminal ligaments and nerve roots were exposed. The foraminal contents were identified and studied in detail. The intraforaminal ligaments were stained using H & E to determine ligamentous fiber. Intraforaminal ligaments connect the periosteum and transforaminal ligaments to the nerve root sleeves and vessels within the fatty areolar tissue. Histologically, the ligamentous attachment of the nerve roots within the foramina consists of adipose and connective tissue. The nerve roots are surrounded by intraforaminal ligaments, which may act in conjunction with the dura and periosteum to protect the nerve roots mechanically.

  13. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  14. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and anteroposterior displacements with a failure load that approximates the intact ligament. PMID:25526435

  15. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  16. Fragmentation of stretched liquid ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmottant, P.G.M.; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics and fragmentation of stretched liquid ligaments is investigated. The ligaments are produced by the withdrawal of a tube initially dipping at a free surface. Time resolved high speed motion experiments reveal two different elongation behaviors, depending on the nondimensional number t,

  17. Recruitment of knee joint ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, R.; de Lange, A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of earlier reported data on the in vitro kinematics of passive knee-joint motions of four knee specimens, the length changes of ligament fiber bundles were determined by using the points of insertion on the tibia and femur. The kinematic data and the insertions of the ligaments were

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Malheiros Luzo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  19. MRI of knee ligament injury and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Potter, Hollis G

    2013-10-01

    Knee ligament instability may lead to meniscal and chondral damage, resulting in early osteoarthritis. Due to its superior soft tissue contrast and avoidance of harmful ionizing radiation, MRI has become the most important imaging modality for early recognition of structural defects of the knee joint. This review aims to the understanding of MRI appearances of knee ligament structures associated with knee instability, and to review the common patterns of altered knee mechanics that lead to ligament failure. Normal anatomy of the knee ligaments, pathologic conditions, and postsurgical appearances of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, and posterolateral corner are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structural properties of 6 forearm ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Frederick W; Taormina, Jennifer L; Sutton, Levi G; Harley, Brian J

    2011-12-01

    To first determine the structural properties of 6 forearm ligaments and then to create linear and nonlinear analytical models of each ligament from these properties. We nondestructively tested the annular ligament, dorsal and palmar radioulnar ligaments, and the distal, central, and proximal bands of the interosseous ligament from 7 fresh cadaver forearms in a servohydraulic testing apparatus. We performed testing with the bone-ligament-bone constructs positioned corresponding to neutral forearm rotation as well as in 45° of supination and 45° of pronation. Based on a mechanical creep test of each ligament, we computed a linear and nonlinear ligament stiffness value for each ligament. We then compared these computed analytical responses to loading with loading data when each ligament was tested at 1.0 and 0.05 mm/s. We analyzed differences among ligaments and forearm positions using 1-way and 2-way analyses of variance. The stiffnesses for the distal band and the dorsal radioulnar ligament were statistically less when the constructs were positioned in supination compared with neutral forearm rotation. At all forearm positions, the linear stiffness of the central band was greater than that for the distal band of the interosseous ligament, the proximal band of the interosseous ligament, and the dorsal radioulnar and palmar radioulnar ligaments. In neutral forearm rotation, the linear stiffness of the central band was statistically greater than the annular ligament. The experimental loading behavior of each ligament was better modeled by a nonlinear stiffness than a linear one. The central band of the interosseous membrane is the stiffest stabilizing structure of the forearm. Any structure used to replace the central band or other forearm ligaments should demonstrate a nonlinear response to loading. In considering a reconstruction for the forearm, the graft used should have a nonlinear response to loading and be one that is similar to the normal, original ligament

  1. Demonstrating the fibular collateral ligament.

    OpenAIRE

    Pridmore, S A

    1980-01-01

    A posture is described which allows palpation of the fibular collateral ligament of the knee as an isolated structure. Visual identification is also possible. This is of interest to the clinician and student of surface anatomy.

  2. Collateral ligament (CL) injury - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... twisting injury. Skiers and people who play basketball, football, or soccer are more likely to have this ... PT will teach you exercises to strengthen the muscles, ligaments, and tendons around your knee. As your ...

  3. Cleland's ligaments and Dupuytren's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewring, D J; Rethnam, U

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Cleland's ligaments are affected by Dupuytren's disease and assess their contribution to the flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. Twenty patients with Dupuytren's disease undergoing fasciectomy for a PIP joint contracture > 40° (mean 61°, range 45°-100°) were included. After excision of all other identifiable digital disease, Cleland's ligaments were assessed. If they appeared to be macroscopically affected by Dupuytren's disease they were excised, sent for histological analysis, and any further improvement of PIP joint contracture was recorded. There were 14 males and six females with a mean age of 62 (range 40-79) years. Excision of Cleland's ligaments resulted in a mean further correction of 7° (range 0°-15°). Histological analysis indicated that Cleland's ligament was clearly involved with Dupuytren's disease in 12 patients, indicating that Cleland's ligaments can be affected by Dupuytren's disease. In the remaining specimens the histological findings were equivocal. As these structures are situated dorsal to the neurovascular bundles, a specific dissection has to be undertaken to identify them. Excision of Cleland's ligaments at digital fasciectomy further avoids leaving residual disease and may yield a worthwhile further correction of PIP joint flexion contracture. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  5. [Anterior cruciate ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Amir; Pritsch, Tamir; Yosepov, Lior; Arbel, Ron

    2006-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common, especially in young individuals who participate in sports activities associated with pivoting, decelerating and jumping. About 70% of ACL injuries do not result from direct contact. Establishing risk factors is important for prevention strategies. Risk factors for ACL injuries include environmental factors (e.g. high level of friction between shoes and the playing surface) and anatomical factors (e.g. narrow femoral intercondylar notch and increased joint laxity). History taking and physical examination provide the basis for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive and specific and provides information about associated injuries such as meniscal tears. ACL-injury leads to knee instability which is associated with both acute dysfunction and long-term degenerative changes, such as osteoarthritis and meniscal damage. Surgical treatment of ACL-tears is effective in regard to short term rehabilitation but does not necessarily alter the natural course of this injury and its long-term complications. Therefore, surgical treatment should be reserved primarily for young individuals and for those who are high risk for ACL injury. ACL reconstruction is the standard surgery; however, a wide variety of reconstruction procedures is available and a gold standard procedure has not been defined. Nevertheless, arthroscopic reconstruction with either bone-patellar tendon-bone or a hamstring tendon graft is the most widely used method. Surgical timing is important. Early surgical intervention (i.e. within 4 weeks of injury) might increase complications.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000681.htm Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare To use the sharing features ... that connects a bone to another bone. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside your knee joint and ...

  7. A study of pelvic ligament strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Michel; Boukerrou, Malik; Lacaze, Sophie; Lambaudie, Eric; Fasel, Jean; Mesdagh, Henri; Lobry, Pierre; Ego, Anne

    2003-07-01

    To measure the strength at tearing of pelvic ligaments used in the cure of prolapse and urinary incontinence. We performed our measurements on pelvis ligaments from cadaveric specimens. We dissected 29 human female pelvis cadavers of which storage conditions differed. Ten were frozen, 10 fresh and 9 were stored in formalin. In each cadaver we dissected pre-vertebral ligaments at promontory and right and left symmetrical ligaments. These were the iliopectineal, sacrospinous and arcus tendineus of pelvic fascia. A subjective clinical evaluation of the ligament properties was performed by visual observation as well as finger palpation. Ligaments were classified into three groups. Group A contained high quality ligaments, in terms of thickness and apparent strength following finger palpation. Ligaments of doubtful quality were classified in group B and low apparent quality ligaments in group C. Then the ligaments were stitched by a suture taking the entire ligament and a force was applied on the vagina axis until tearing. The device used for strength measurement during traction was a SAMSON type force gauge, model EASY, serial number SMS-R-ES 300N manufactured by Andilog that was developed for the purpose of our study. Measurements were given in Newton (N). There was a great variability in the values obtained at tearing with minimal values at around 20N and maximal values at 200N. Individually measured, ligament strength varied between individuals, and for the same patient between the type of ligaments and the side. The pre-vertebral ligament was on average the strongest. There was no significant difference according to the storage condition except for the pre-vertebral ligament in formalin cadavers. For bilateral ligaments, there was no difference between the left and right side. The iliopectineal ligament was statistically significantly stronger than the sacrospinous and arcus tendineus of pelvic fascia. There was a correlation between subjective evaluation and

  8. Lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Vaesel, M T; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1996-01-01

    The structure and kinematics of the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint were investigated in 10 cadaveric specimens. The lateral collateral ligament was observed to be a distinct part of the lateral collateral ligament complex. It contains posterior fibers that pass through the annular...

  9. Sacroiliac part of the iliolumbar ligament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Kleinrensink, G.J.; Snijders, C.; Stoeckart, R.

    1999-01-01

    The iliolumbar ligament has been described as the most important ligament for restraining movement at the lumbosacral junction. In addition, it may play an important role in restraining movement in the sacroiliac joints. To help understand its presumed restraining effect, the anatomy of the ligament

  10. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of human lumbar nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, G A; Delwel, E J; Hoogland, P V J M; van der Veen, M R; Wuisman, P I J M; Stoeckart, R; Kleinrensink, G J; Snijders, C J

    2005-03-15

    An anatomic study of the extraforaminal attachments of the lumbar spinal nerves was performed using human lumbar spinal columns. To identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each lumbar level that attach lumbar spinal nerves to structures at the level of the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms to protect the spinal nerve against traction have been described. All these structures involved are located in the spinal canal, proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Five embalmed human lumbar spines (T12-S1) were used. Bilaterally, the extraforaminal region was dissected to describe and measure anatomic structures and their relationships. Histology was performed with staining on the sites of attachment and along the ligament. The levels T12-L2 show bilaterally 2 ligaments, a superior extraforaminal ligament and an inferior extraforaminal ligament. The superior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the joint capsule of the facet joints and inserts in both, the intervertebral disc and the ventral crista of the intervertebral foramen, passing the spinal nerve laterally. In one specimen on level L2-L3, the superior extraforaminal ligament is not attached to the spinal nerve. The inferior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the intervertebral disc, passing the nerve medially and attaching the spinal nerve. At the levels L2-L5, the inferior extraforaminal ligaments are only attached to the intervertebral disc, not to the joint capsule. Histologically, the ligaments consisted of mainly collagenous structures. Ligamentous connections exist between lumbar extraforaminal spinal nerves and nearby structures.

  11. Multiple Ligament Knee Injury: Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Manske, Robert C.; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Non-operative and operative complications are common following multiple ligament knee injuries. This article will describe common complications seen by the surgeon and physical therapist following this complex injury. Complications include fractures, infections, vascular and neurologic complications following injury and surgery, compartment syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, deep venous thrombosis, loss of motion and persistent laxity issues. A brief description of these complications ...

  12. LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle are presented. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water and hydroc...

  13. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  14. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), being the first to get injured ... Treatment protocols range from cast immobilisation to functional rehabilitation to acute ... Right foot: lateral view. Posterior talofibular ligament. Calcaneofibular ligament. Anterior talofibular ligament. Components of lateral. (collateral) ligament of ankle.

  15. The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahr-Wagner L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lene Rahr-Wagner, Martin Lind Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry was established in 2005 as a web-based nationwide clinical database with the purpose of improving the monitoring and quality of both primary and revision knee ligament reconstructions in Denmark. All primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions as well as collateral ligament and multiligament reconstructions are recorded. Main variables include sex, age, cause of injury, objective ligament instability, and surgical data, such as affected ligament, graft- and implant choice, operation technique among other things. The operating surgeon prospectively collects the data. Hence, detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and 1-year follow-up data are recorded by the operating surgeon using a standardized form and a secured Internet portal. The number of procedures registered in the database each year is ~2,500 and the first 9 years, in total, 22,775 procedures have been registered. Since the beginning of the database multiple papers have been published in international peer-reviewed journals, improving the knowledge of patients treated with knee ligament reconstruction surgery. This paper reviews the content, organization, and published research from the Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry. Keywords: ligament reconstruction, anterior cruciate ligament, operation technique, database, graft choice, femoral tunnel drilling, patient-reported outcome measure

  16. Extrinsic wrist ligaments: prevalence of injury by magnetic resonance imaging and association with intrinsic ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Atul K; Bredella, Miriam A; Chang, Connie Y; Joseph Simeone, F; Kattapuram, Susan V; Torriani, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of extrinsic wrist ligament injury by magnetic resonance imaging and its association with intrinsic ligament tears. We reviewed conventional magnetic resonance images performed over a 5-year period from adult patients in the setting of wrist trauma. Two musculoskeletal radiologists examined the integrity of wrist ligaments and presence of bone abnormalities. In a cohort of 75 subjects, extrinsic ligament injury was present in 75%, with radiolunotriquetral being most frequently affected (45%). Intrinsic ligament injury was present in 60%. Almost half of subjects had combined intrinsic and extrinsic ligament injury. Bone abnormalities were seen in 69%. The rate of extrinsic injury was higher in subjects with bone injury (P = 0.008). There is high prevalence of extrinsic ligament injury in the setting of wrist trauma, especially in the presence of bone abnormalities, with combined injury of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments in about half of cases.

  17. Characteristics of the three ligaments of human spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Taniguchi, Akira; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate characteristics of the three ligaments constituting the spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements, the authors investigated age-related changes of elements, relationships among their elements, relationships among ligaments in the elements, and gender differences in the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex, the superomedial calcaneonavicular (SMCN), inferoplantar longitudinal calcaneonavicular (ICN), and third or medioplantar oblique calcaneonavicular (TCN) ligaments. After ordinary dissection at Nara Medical University was finished, the SMCN, ICN, and TCN ligaments of the spring ligament complex were removed from the subjects. The subjects consisted of 10 men and 12 women, ranging in age from 62 to 99 years (average age = 80.5 ± 9.7 years). After incineration with nitric acid and perchloric acid, the element contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. It was found that although the Ca and P content hardly changed in the SMCN ligament with aging, the Ca and P content in the ICN ligament increased to about three and five times higher in the 80s in comparison with the 60s, respectively, whereas in the TCN ligament, it increased about 40% and 90% higher in the 80s compared with the 60s, respectively. Regarding the relationships among elements, significant direct correlations were found among the contents of Ca, P, and Mg in all the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex. This finding was in agreement with the previous finding obtained with the three ligaments of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior longitudinal ligament, and ligamentum capitis femoris. Whether there were significant correlations among the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex with regard to the Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, and Fe contents was examined using Pearson's correlation. It was found that there were significant direct correlations between the SMCN and TCN ligaments in all the Ca, P, Mg, and Zn contents and

  18. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  19. variability of the lateral ligamentous complex of the knee

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ligaments on the lateral aspect of the knee namely lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral and triradiate collateral ... lateral knee stability and prevention of excessive internal ... anterior cruciate ligaments were repaired. It therefore becomes ...

  20. Imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wing Hung Alex; Griffith, James Francis; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee; Paunipagar, Bhawan; Law, Billy Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick Shu Hang

    2011-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important structure in maintaining the normal biomechanics of the knee and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. However, the oblique course of the ACL within the intercondylar fossa limits the visualization and assessment of the pathology of the ligament. This pictorial essay provides a comprehensive and illustrative review of the anatomy and biomechanics as well as updated information on different modalities of radiological investigation of ACL, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22474639

  1. Hypertrophy of Ligament of Treitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth P. Dubhashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital duodenal obstruction commonly occurs due to malrotation, atresia, stenosis and annular pancreas in decreasing order of frequency. This is a case report of a 12 year old male child who presented with complaints of non-projectile vomiting and abdominal distension and pain after meals since 7 years. Barium study showed narrowing of the Duodeno-jejunal(DJ junction due to hypertrophied ligament of Treitz. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a dilated stomach and collapsed bowel loops. There were adhesions at DJ junction and other parts of the small intestine. Adhesiolysis was done. The followup revealed a weight gain of 2 kg. The barium study was repeated which also revealed a normal study. Congenital obstruction of duodeno-jejunal junction due to extrinsic band or due to narrower attachment of ligament of Treitz at duodeno-jejunal flexure is a rare cause of bilious vomiting in the newborn period. A broad attachment of the ligament of Treitz makes a smooth obtuse angle at the duodeno-jejunum junction whereas a narrower insertion creates an acute angle that predisposes to obstruction.Duodenal obstruction may rarely occur in the presence of a normally rotated gut.

  2. Ultrasonographic assessment of the equine palmar tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padaliya, N R; Ranpariya, J J; Kumar, Dharmendra; Javia, C B; Barvalia, D R

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the equine palmar tendon by ultrasonography (USG) in standing the position. USG of palmar tendons was performed in 40 adult horses using linear transducer having frequency of 10-18 MHz (e-soate, My Lab FIVE) and L52 linear array transducer (Titan, SonoSite) with frequencies ranging from 8 to 10 MHz. Palmar tendon was divided into 7 levels from distal to accessory carpal bone up to ergot in transverse scanning and 3 levels in longitudinal scanning. The USG evaluation was very useful for diagnosis of affections of the conditions such as chronic bowed tendon, suspensory ligament desmitis, carpal sheath tenosynovitis and digital sheath effusions. The mean cross-sectional area (cm(2)) of affected tendons was significantly increased in affected than normal tendons. The echogenicity was also found reduced in affected tendons and ligaments along with disorganization of fiber alignment depending on the severity of lesion and injury. USG proved ideal diagnostic tool for diagnosis and post-treatment healing assessment of tendon injuries in horses.

  3. Frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study determined the frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses. It was possible to establish 141 specific orthopedic diagnoses in 1955 horses with lameness. In 14.58 % horses, multiple pathologic orthopedic changes were determined. In 61.84 % cases, the pathologic changes were present on the thoracic limb, 28,86 % on the pelvic limb and other parts of the oganism (neck, spine, muscles in 9.29 % cases. Pathologic changes on the tendons, ligaments, tendon sheats, bursae and muscles were determined in 31.51 % cases. Diseases of the hoof were present in 25.82 % cases. According to our investigation the most frequent orthopedic diseases are: podarthritis (acute, chronic, septic (5.04 %, navicular disease (4.69 %, tendinitis m. flexor digitalis superfacialis (4.51 %, kissing spine syndrom (4.30 % periarthritis et osteoarthrosis tarsi (3.30 %, distal metacarpal/metatarzophalengeal tendovaginitis (3.30 % and high suspensory ligament desmitis (3.12 %. Most frequent fractures were diagnosed on the metacarpal/metatarsal bone II and IV (2.56 %. Osteochondrossis dissecans was most frequently determined in the tarsocrural (1.26 % and the metacarpophalengeal joint (1.56 %.

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit.

  5. Dimensions and attachments of the ankle ligaments: evaluation for ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenny, Raphael; Duscher, Dominik; Meytap, Emmy; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2015-06-01

    For operative reconstruction, precise anatomic information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments is important and can help to optimize these procedures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the length and width dimensions of the ankle ligaments and to contrast the results with the published literature. Seventeen non-paired adult, formalin-fixed ankle specimen were dissected to expose the capsuloligamentous structures. The following ligaments were investigated: tibiofibular syndesmosis (anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligament/ATiFL and PTiFL), lateral ankle ligaments (anterior and posterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament/ATFL, PTFL and CFL), medial ankle ligaments (deltoid ligament, anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament/ATTL and PTTL). After identification of the ligaments, the dimensions were measured with a ruler and a sliding caliper. Additionally, the attachment area and the center of insertion (COI) were evaluated. The dimensions of the ligaments were recorded. Measurements were calculated and discussed according to the existing literature. The tibial COI of the ATiFL was situated 8.35 ± 2.05 mm from the inferior articular surface of the tibia and 5.04 ± 1.32 mm from the fibular notch. Its fibular COI was situated 25.45 ± 5.84 mm from the tip of the lateral malleolus and 3.12 ± 1.01 mm from the malleolar articular surface. The calcaneal COI of the CFL was situated 20.63 ± 3.56 mm anterior and 5.73 ± 1.89 mm plantar to the superior edge of the calcaneal. Its fibular attachment of the CFL was directly at the tip of the lateral malleolus, dorsal to the fibular attachment of the ATFL. Studies of the therapeutic options in severe ankle ligament injuries have shown better results in anatomical reconstructions compared to other operative treatments. To optimize these procedures, exact anatomical information on the dimensions of the ankle ligaments should be beneficial.

  6. The sacroiliac part of the iliolumbar ligament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Pool-Goudzwaard (Annelies); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); C.J. Snijders (Chris); C.A. Entius; R. Stoeckart (Rob)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe iliolumbar ligament has been described as the most important ligament for restraining movement at the lumbosacral junction. In addition, it may play an important role in restraining movement in the sacroiliac joints. To help understand its presumed restraining

  7. Instructive materials for tendon and ligament augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro Pereira Simões Crispim, João Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/L) are the connective tissue that connect muscles to bone and bone to bone, respectively. The main function of tendons is to translate muscle contractions into join motion and consequently generate movement. Ligaments function to stabilize joints and guide them during their

  8. Trends in Materials Science for Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Oana Roxana; Sava, Daniel Florin; Radulescu, Marius; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Ficai, Denisa; Veloz-Castillo, Maria Fernanda; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel Angel; Ficai, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The number of ligament injuries increases every year and concomitantly the need for materials or systems that can reconstruct the ligament. Limitations imposed by autografts and allografts in ligament reconstruction together with the advances in materials science and biology have attracted a lot of interest for developing systems and materials for ligament replacement or reconstruction. This review intends to synthesize the major steps taken in the development of polymer-based materials for anterior cruciate ligament, their advantages and drawbacks and the results of different in vitro and in vivo tests. Until present, there is no successful polymer system for ligament reconstruction implanted in humans. The developing field of synthetic polymers for ligament reconstruction still has a lot of potential. In addition, several nano-structured materials, made of nanofibers or in the form of ceramic/polymeric nanocomposites, are attracting the interest of several groups due to their potential use as engineered scaffolds that mimic the native environment of cells, increasing the chances for tissue regeneration. Here, we review the last 15 years of literature in order to obtain a better understanding on the state-of-the-art that includes the usage of nano- and poly-meric materials for ligament reconstruction, and to draw perspectives on the future development of the field. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of five ligaments in the knee that are important for stability and kinematics. It is also the most commonly injured ligament of the knee and due to its poor healing potential, severe damage warrants surgical intervention including complete replacement. Ligaments ...

  10. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of five ligaments in the knee that are important for stability and kinematics. It is also the most commonly injured ligament of the knee and due to its poor healing potential, severe damage warrants surgical intervention including complete replacement. Ligaments are longitudinally ...

  11. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, P.; Vega, J.; de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Malagelada, F.; Manzanares, M.C.; Götzens, V.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  12. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  13. Variability of the lateral ligamentous complex of the knee | Ashaolu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study examined the prevalence and morphometric values of three extracapsular ligaments on the lateral aspect of the knee namely lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral and triradiate collateral ligaments in human cadavers. Twenty knees were used. The lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral and triradiate ...

  14. Tissues from equine cadaver ligaments up to 72 hours of post-mortem: a promising reservoir of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikh Alsook, Mohamad Khir; Gabriel, Annick; Piret, Joëlle; Waroux, Olivier; Tonus, Céline; Connan, Delphine; Baise, Etienne; Antoine, Nadine

    2015-12-18

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harvested from cadaveric tissues represent a promising approach for regenerative medicine. To date, no study has investigated whether viable MSCs could survive in cadaveric tissues from tendon or ligament up to 72 hours of post-mortem. The purpose of the present work was to find out if viable MSCs could survive in cadaveric tissues from adult equine ligaments up to 72 hours of post-mortem, and to assess their ability (i) to remain in an undifferentiated state and (ii) to divide and proliferate in the absence of any specific stimulus. MSCs were isolated from equine cadaver (EC) suspensory ligaments within 48-72 hours of post-mortem. They were evaluated for viability, proliferation, capacity for tri-lineage differentiation, expression of cell surface markers (CD90, CD105, CD73, CD45), pluripotent transcription factor (OCT-4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin (TUJ-1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). As well, they were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). EC-MSCs were successfully isolated and maintained for 20 passages with high cell viability and proliferation. Phase contrast microscopy revealed that cells with fibroblast-like appearance were predominant in the culture. Differentiation assays proved that EC-MSCs are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages (osteogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic). Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that EC-MSCs expressed CD90, CD105, and CD73, while being negative for the leukocyte common antigen CD45. Immunofluorescence analysis showed a high percentage of positive cells for OCT-4 and SSEA-1. Surprisingly, in absence of any stimuli, some adherent cells closely resembling neuronal and glial morphology were also observed. Interestingly, our results revealed that approximately 15 % of the cell populations were TUJ-1 positive, whereas GFAP expression was detected in only a few cells. Furthermore, TEM analysis

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF CRUCIATE LIGAMENTS OF KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravanthi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF STU DY: T o measure length and width of Cruciate Ligaments and to observe for any variations in the parameters. PERIOD OF STUDY : 2008 - 2011 . MATERIALS AND METHODS : 100 d isarticulated limbs were collected from department of anatomy , K akatiya M edical C ollege , Warangal. Telangana. Which were preserved in 10% formalin , 50 MRIs of Knee joint were studied and measurements were taken from Vijaya Diagnostic center , Hanamkonda , Wa rangal , Telangana. To expose cruciate ligament a systematic dissection procedure has been adopted . The cruciate ligaments were exposing and their attachments were defined on to the femur and tibia. OBSERVATIONS: Average of parameters for anterior and poste rior cruciate ligaments were calculated for all 100 limbs and 50 knee joint MRI scans. The observations were similar to the previous studies. CONCLUSION: T he parameters which were measure are help full in selection and preparation of the graft and in re co nstruction of ligaments. The aim of re - construction is not just to substitute a torn ligament , but to restore the morphology inherent in the ligament

  16. Oblique popliteal ligament - an anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pinto D'Amico Fam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the anatomy of the oblique popliteal ligament, as regards its dimensions, expansion and anatomical relationships. METHODS: Eleven cadaver knees were dissected in order to study the anatomy and take mea-surements of anatomical structures and relationships of the oblique popliteal ligament. The dissection was for posterior access to the proper exposure of the oblique popliteal ligament, the semimembranosus muscle and its expansions. For measurement of dimensions, 40 × 12 needles were used for marking the specific points and a caliper. The angles were calculated using the software ImagePro Plus(r . RESULTS: The distance from the origin of the oblique popliteal ligament to the tibial plateau was 7.4 mm, the thickness at its origin was 7.3 mm, length was 33.6 mm and the tibial plateau angle 34.8°. The length of the expansion of the proximal oblique popliteal ligament was 39.2 mm, thickness 7.8 mm and angle of the oblique popliteal ligament with its expansion 32.2°. CONCLUSION: The oblique popliteal ligament is thick, rises in the semimembranosus and protrudes proximally forming an acute angle with the joint interline, crossing the popliteal fossa. In some cases it has a proximal expansion.

  17. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail. PMID:20309522

  18. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    OpenAIRE

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  19. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  20. The anatomy and function of Cleland's ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, R L; Werker, P M N; McGrouther, D A

    2014-06-01

    The cutaneous ligaments of the digits have been recognized by anatomists for several centuries, but the best known description is that of John Cleland. Subsequent varying descriptions of their morphology have resulted in the surgical community having an imprecise view of their structure and dynamic function. We micro-dissected 24 fresh frozen fingers to analyze the individual components of Cleland's ligamentous system. Arising from the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, proximal, and sometimes middle phalanx, we found strong ligaments that ran proximally (PIP-P) and distally (PIP-D). On each side of each finger there was a PIP-P ligament present, which passed obliquely from the lateral side of the proximal and sometimes middle phalanx towards its insertion into the skin at the level of the proximal phalanx. The distal (PIP-D) ligaments were found to pass obliquely distally on the radial and ulnar aspects of the digit towards cutaneous insertions around the middle phalanx. A similar arrangement exists more distally with fibres originating from the DIP joint and middle phalanx (the DIP-P pass obliquely proximally, and the DIP-D, distally). Each individual PIP ligament consisted of three different layers originating from fibres overlying the flexor tendon sheath, periosteum or joint capsule, and extensor expansion. Ligaments arising at the DIP joint had two layers equivalent to the anterior two layers of the proximal ligaments. Cleland's ligaments act as skin anchors maintaining the skin in a fixed relationship to the underlying skeleton during motion and functional tasks. They also prevent the skin from 'bagging', protect the neurovascular bundle, and create a gliding path for the lateral slips of the extensor tendon. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Trapeziometacarpal Ligaments Biomechanical Study: Implications in Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, Mireia; Lluch-Bergada, Alex; Mobargha, Nathalie; Llusa-Perez, Manuel; Hagert, Elisabet; Garcia-Elias, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the presence of early osteoarthritis, changes to the trapeziometacarpal joint (TMJ) often result in pain and is associated with joint instability and a tendency of dorsoradial subluxation. In these instances, arthroscopy may be indicated to: (1) assess the extent of cartilage disease and the laxity of ligaments and to (2) treat TMJ instability. The purpose of our study was to biomechanically analyze which ligaments are the primary stabilizers of the TMJ. Methods Overall, 11 fresh-frozen human cadaver specimens were dissected and attached to a testing device with the thumb positioned in neutral abduction, neutral flexion, and neutral opposition. The four extrinsic and five intrinsic muscle tendons acting on the TMJ were simultaneously loaded with weights proportional to their physiological cross-sectional area. The dorsal, volar, and ulnar groups of ligaments were dissected. A motion-tracking device, FasTrak (Polhemus Inc., Colchester, VT), was used to study the spatial position of the base of the first metacarpal bone (MC1), before and after random sectioning of each of the ligaments. Statistical analysis of the MC1 translation along the transverse XY plane was performed using one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test, with a significance level of p ligaments, the MC1 moved dorsoradially with an average of 0.150 mm (standard deviation [SD]: 0.072) and 0.064 mm (SD: 0.301), respectively. By contrast, the destabilization of the MC1 after sectioning of the dorsal ligaments was substantially larger (0.523 mm; SD: 0.0512; p = 0.004). Conclusion Sectioning of the dorsal ligament group resulted in the greatest dorsoradial translation of the MC1. Consequently, the dorsal ligaments may be regarded as the primary TMJ stabilizers. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that stabilizing arthroscopic shrinkage of the TMJ should be targeted toward the dorsal TMJ ligaments. PMID:27777818

  2. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  3. Unilateral aplasia of both cruciate ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aplasia of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 28-year-old male presented with pain and the feeling of instability of his right knee after trauma. The provided MRI and previous arthroscopy reports did not indicate any abnormalities except cruciate ligament tears. He was referred to us for reconstruction of both cruciate ligaments. The patient again underwent arthroscopy which revealed a hypoplasia of the medial trochlea and an extremely narrow intercondylar notch. The tibia revealed a missing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL footprint and a single bump with a complete coverage with articular cartilage. There was no room for an ACL graft. A posterior cruciate ligament could not be identified. The procedure was ended since a ligament reconstruction did not appear reasonable. A significant notch plasty if not a partial resection of the condyles would have been necessary to implant a ligament graft. It is most likely that this would not lead to good knee stability. If the surgeon would have retrieved the contralateral hamstrings at the beginning of the planned ligament reconstruction a significant damage would have occurred to the patient. Even in seemingly clear diagnostic findings the arthroscopic surgeon should take this rare abdnormality into consideration and be familiar with the respective radiological findings. We refer the abnormal finding of only one tibial spine to as the "dromedar-sign" as opposed to the two (medial and a lateral tibial spines in a normal knee. This may be used as a hint for aplasia of the cruciate ligaments.

  4. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE) approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally. PMID:20492676

  5. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Medial Collateral Ligament Injured Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Kevin M; Bailey, James R; Moorman, Claude T

    2017-01-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament in conjunction with the MCL. Most MCL injuries can be treated nonoperatively, whereas the ACL often requires reconstruction. A good physical examination is essential for diagnosis, whereas radiographs and MRI of the knee confirm diagnosis and help guide treatment planning. Preoperative physical therapy should be completed before surgical management to allow for return of knee range of motion and an attempt at MCL healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Histological analysis of the structural composition of ankle ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Susanne; Hagert, Elisabet; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Fieguth, Armin; Zwipp, Hans

    2015-02-01

    Various ankle ligaments have different structural composition. The aim of this study was to analyze the morphological structure of ankle ligaments to further understand their function in ankle stability. One hundred forty ligaments from 10 fresh-frozen cadaver ankle joints were dissected: the calcaneofibular, anterior, and posterior talofibular ligaments; the inferior extensor retinaculum, the talocalcaneal oblique ligament, the canalis tarsi ligament; the deltoid ligament; and the anterior tibiofibular ligament. Hematoxylin-eosin and Elastica van Gieson stains were used for determination of tissue morphology. Three different morphological compositions were identified: dense, mixed, and interlaced compositions. Densely packed ligaments, characterized by parallel bundles of collagen, were primarily seen in the lateral region, the canalis tarsi, and the anterior tibiofibular ligaments. Ligaments with mixed tight and loose parallel bundles of collagenous connective tissue were mainly found in the inferior extensor retinaculum and talocalcaneal oblique ligament. Densely packed and fiber-rich interlacing collagen was primarily seen in the areas of ligament insertion into bone of the deltoid ligament. Ligaments of the lateral region, the canalis tarsi, and the anterior tibiofibular ligaments have tightly packed, parallel collagen bundles and thus can resist high tensile forces. The mixed tight and loose, parallel oriented collagenous connective tissue of the inferior extensor retinaculum and the talocalcaneal oblique ligament support the dynamic positioning of the foot on the ground. The interlacing collagen bundles seen at the insertion of the deltoid ligament suggest that these insertion areas are susceptible to tension in a multitude of directions. The morphology and mechanical properties of ankle ligaments may provide an understanding of their response to the loads to which they are subjected. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  8. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ronald; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a

  9. Round Ligament Varicosities During Pregnancy: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Chang Kyu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    There are various causes of a painful palpable mass in the groin during pregnancy. The differential diagnoses of an inguinal mass include hernia, lymphadenopathy, mesothelial cyst, cystic lymphangioma, neoplasms (lipoma, leiomyoma and sarcoma), endometriosis, embryonic remnants and round ligament varicosities. Among them, round ligament varicosities can be easily misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia in a pregnant woman. These lesions should be managed conservatively because they resolve spontaneously during the postpartum period. Ultrasonography can help make the diagnosis of round ligament varicosities and so prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and the associated morbidity. Herein we report on a case of round ligament varicosities that presented during pregnancy and this condition was readily diagnosed via Doppler sonography

  10. How to treat knee ligament injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, M; Kannus, P; Johnson, R J

    1991-01-01

    Indications for conservative treatment of knee ligament injuries can be established for all grade I or II sprains (partial tears), as well as isolated grade III sprains (complete tears) of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). These injuries should be treated with immediate mobilization. Only in isolated partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears without a positive pivot shift phenomenon is conservative treatment justified. However, many of these injuries may require operative reconstruction later. In complete ACL tears the surgical treatment consists of primary reconstruction or augmented primary repair. Today, the middle third of the patella tendon with the bone blocks is regarded as the "gold standard" for augmented repairs and late reconstructions. For the present, there is no place for synthetic prostheses in the treatment of an acute ACL rupture. Allograft replacement of the ACL must now be considered an experimental procedure. In the reconstruction of the PCL the above mentioned patella tendon graft is also preferable. Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears, especially if they are combined with ruptures of posterolateral ligament complex, should be repaired immediately after the injury. In these injuries late reconstructions are difficult and the results are poor. Conservative treatment of partial tears and postoperative treatment of reconstructed ligaments is twofold: on the one hand, the healing tissue should be protected and on the other hand, atrophy and wasting of uninjured tissue should be avoided. Overload and stretching of the injured ligaments should be eliminated with the aid of a suitable knee brace, but early range of motion exercises of the knee are allowed immediately.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  12. A mechanistic damage model for ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeff M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2017-08-16

    The accuracy of biomechanical models is predicated on the realism by which they represent their biomechanical tissues. Unfortunately, most models use phenomenological ligament models that neglect the behaviour in the failure region. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to test whether a mechanistic model of ligamentous tissue portrays behaviour representative of actual ligament failure tests. The model tracks the time-evolution of a population of collagen fibres in a theoretical ligament. Each collagen fibre is treated as an independent linear cables with constant stiffness. Model equations were derived by assuming these fibres act as a continuum and applying a conservation law akin to Huxley's muscle model. A breaking function models the rate of collagen fibre breakage at a given displacement, and was chosen to be a linear function for this preliminary analysis. The model was fitted to experimental average curves for the cervical anterior longitudinal ligament. In addition, the model was cyclically loaded to test whether the tissue model behaves similarly. The model agreed very well with experiment with an RMS error of 14.23 N and an R(2) of 0.995. Cyclic loading exhibited a reduction in force similar to experimental data. The proposed model showcases behaviour reminiscent of actual ligaments being strained to failure and undergoing cyclic load. Future work could incorporate viscous effects, or validate the model further by testing it in various loading conditions. Characterizing the breaking function more accurately would also lead to better results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The in situ force in the calcaneofibular ligament and the contribution of this ligament to ankle joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Yamakawa, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kota; Kimura, Kei; Suzuki, Daisuke; Otsubo, Hidenori; Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujimiya, Mineko; Fujie, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Numerous biomechanical studies of the lateral ankle ligaments have been reported; however, the isolated function of the calcaneofibular ligament has not been clarified. We hypothesize that the calcaneofibular ligament would stabilize the ankle joint complex under multidirectional loading, and that the in situ force in the calcaneofibular ligament would change in each flexed position. Using seven fresh frozen cadaveric lower extremities, the motions and forces of the intact ankle under multidirectional loading were recorded using a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic system. On repeating these intact ankle joint complex motions after the calcaneofibular ligament transection, the in situ force in the calcaneofibular ligament and the contribution of the calcaneofibular ligament to ankle joint complex stability were calculated. Finally, the motions of the calcaneofibular ligament-transected ankle joint complex were recorded. Under an inversion load, significant increases of inversion angle were observed in all the flexed positions following calcaneofibular ligament transection, and the calcaneofibular ligament accounted for 50%-70% of ankle joint complex stability during inversion. The in situ forces in the calcaneofibular ligament under an anterior force, inversion moment, and external rotation moment were larger in the dorsiflexed position than in the plantarflexed position. The calcaneofibular ligament plays a role in stabilizing the ankle joint complex to multidirectional loads and the role differs with load directions. The in situ force of the calcaneofibular ligament is larger at the dorsiflexed position. This ligament provides the primary restraint to the inversion ankle stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities are associated with peripheral ligament and osseous injuries in acute ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Leão, Renata Vidal; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have used MRI to identify the ALL. As it was shown that it is not possible to precisely characterize this ligament in all examination, it is important to identify concomitant lesions that can help in diagnosing ALL abnormalities. It is important to characterise this injury due to its association with anterolateral knee instability. Thus, the present study was performed to determine the frequency of ALL injuries in patients with acute ACL rupture and to analyse its associated knee lesions. Patients with acute ACL injuries were evaluated by MRI. Among this population, the ALL was classified as non-visualised, injured or normal. The possible abnormalities of the meniscus, collateral ligaments, popliteus tendon, posterior cruciate ligament, Iliotibial band (ITB), anterolateral capsule and osseus injuries were evaluated. The association of an ALL injury with these other knee structures as well as sex and age was calculated. Among the 228 knees evaluated, the ALL could not be entirely identified in 61 (26.7%). Of the remaining 167, 66 (39.5%) presented an ALL abnormality and only four (6.1%) were Segond fractures. ALL abnormalities were associated with lesions of the lateral collateral ligament, medial collateral ligament, popliteus tendon, ITB, anterolateral capsule and osseous contusions of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau. No correlation was found with medial meniscus, lateral meniscus and posterior cruciate ligament injuries. There was no association between ALL injuries and gender, and older patients were more likely to present an ALL injury. ALL injuries are present in approximately 40% of ACL injuries, and a minority of these are Segond fractures. These injuries are associated with peripheral ligament injuries, anterolateral structures lesions and bone contusions, but there is no association with meniscal injuries. Surgeons must be aware of these associations to consider an ALL lesion even if it is not completely clear in imaging evaluation

  15. Development of Tissue-Engineered Ligaments: Elastin Promotes Regeneration of the Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kageyama, Satoshi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yoshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2017-12-21

    When ligaments are injured, reconstructive surgery is sometimes required to restore function. Methods of reconstructive surgery include transplantation of an artificial ligament and autotransplantation of a tendon. However, these methods have limitations related to the strength of the bone-ligament insertion and biocompatibility of the transplanted tissue after surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new reconstruction methods and pursue the development of artificial ligaments. Elastin is a major component of elastic fibers and ligaments. However, the role of elastin in ligament regeneration has not been described. Here, we developed a rabbit model of a medial collateral ligament (MCL) rupture and treated animal knees with exogenous elastin [100 µg/(0.5 mL·week)] for 6 or 12 weeks. Elastin treatment increased gene expression and protein content of collagen and elastin (gene expression, 6-fold and 42-fold, respectively; protein content, 1.6-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively), and also increased the elastic modulus of MCL increased with elastin treatment (2-fold) compared with the controls. Our data suggest that elastin is involved in the regeneration of damaged ligaments. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rick W.; Haas, Amanda K.; Anderson, Joy; Calabrese, Gary; Cavanaugh, John; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lorring, Dawn; McKenzie, Christopher; Preston, Emily; Williams, Glenn; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation has evolved over the past 20 years. This evolution has been driven by a variety of level 1 and level 2 studies. Evidence Acquisition: The MOON Group is a collection of orthopaedic surgeons who have developed a prospective longitudinal cohort of the ACL reconstruction patients. To standardize the management of these patients, we developed, in conjunction with our physical therapy committee, an evidence-based rehabilitation guideline. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Results: This review was based on 2 systematic reviews of level 1 and level 2 studies. Recently, the guideline was updated by a new review. Continuous passive motion did not improve ultimate motion. Early weightbearing decreases patellofemoral pain. Postoperative rehabilitative bracing did not improve swelling, pain range of motion, or safety. Open chain quadriceps activity can begin at 6 weeks. Conclusion: High-level evidence exists to determine appropriate ACL rehabilitation guidelines. Utilizing this protocol follows the best available evidence. PMID:26131301

  17. Ligament strain on the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments in cadaver specimens: biomechanical measurement and anatomical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Egi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Izumi, Tomoki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2014-10-01

    The iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments are major structures that stabilize the hip joint. We have sought evidence on which to base more effective hip stretching positions. The purpose of this study was to measure strains on these ligaments and to observe them. Eight fresh/frozen translumbar cadaver specimens were used. Clinically available stretching positions for these ligaments were adopted. Strain on each ligament was measured by a displacement sensor during passive torque to the hip joint. Hip motion was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. The strained ligaments were captured on clear photographs. Significantly, high strains were imposed on the superior iliofemoral ligament by external rotation of the hip (3.48%); on the inferior iliofemoral ligament by maximal extension and 10° or 20° of external rotation with maximal extension (1.86%, 1.46%, 1.25%); on the pubofemoral ligament by maximal abduction and 10°, 20°, or 30° of external rotation with maximal abduction (3.18%, 3.28%, 3.11%, 2.99%); and on the ischiofemoral ligament by 10° or 20° of abduction with maximal internal rotation (7.11%, 7.83%). Fiber direction in each ligament was clearly identified. Significantly, high strains on hip ligaments corresponded with the anatomical direction of the ligament fibers. Positions were identified for each ligament that imposed maximal increase in strain on it. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A visco-hyperelastic constitutive model for human spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yugang; Wang, Yu; Peng, Xiongqi

    2015-03-01

    Human spine ligaments show a highly non-linear, strain rate dependent biomechanical behavior under tensile tests. A visco-hyperelastic fiber-reinforced constitutive model was accordingly developed for human ligaments, in which the energy density function is decomposed into two parts. The first part represents the elastic strain energy stored in the soft tissue, and the second part denotes the energy dissipated due to its inherent viscous characteristics. The model is applied to various human spinal ligaments including the anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments, ligamentum flavum, capsular ligament, and interspinous ligament. Material parameters for each type of ligament were obtained by curve-fitting with corresponding experimental data available in the literature. The results indicate that the model presented here can properly characterize the visco-hyperelastic biomechanical behavior of human spine ligaments.

  19. Kinematics of the lateral ligamentous constraints of the elbow joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Dalstra, Michel

    1996-01-01

    Thirty osteoligamentous elbow joint specimens were included in a study of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). The morphologic characteristics of the LCLC were examined, and then three-dimensional kinematic measurements were undertaken after selective ligament dissections were performe...

  20. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Staelens, Barbara; Scheerlinck, Thierry [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Brussels (Belgium); Overstraeten, Luc van [Hand and Foot Surgery Unit (HFSU), Tournai (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies. (orig.)

  1. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  2. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allogr...

  3. Characteristics of bone tunnel changes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System artificial ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-ming; Liu, Hao-yuan; Chen, Feng-rong; Jian, Guo-jian; Chen, Qi; Wang, Zi-min; Kang, Yi-fan

    2012-11-01

    There are different materials used for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. It has been reported that both autologous grafts and allografts used in ACL reconstruction can cause bone tunnel enlargement. This study aimed to observe the characteristics of bone tunnel changes and possible causative factors following ACL reconstruction using Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) artificial ligament. Forty-three patients underwent ACL reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament and were followed up for 3 years. X-ray and CT examinations were performed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery, to measure the width of tibial and femoral tunnels. Knee function was evaluated according to the Lysholm scoring system. The anterior and posterior stability of the knee was measured using the KT-1000 arthrometer. According to the Peyrache grading method, grade 1 femoral bone tunnel enlargement was observed in three cases six months after surgery. No grade 2 or grade 3 bone tunnel enlargement was found. The bone tunnel enlargement in the three cases was close to the articular surface with an average tunnel enlargement of (2.5 ± 0.3) mm. Forty cases were evaluated as grade 0. The average tibial and femoral tunnel enlargements at the last follow-up were (0.8 ± 0.3) and (1.1 ± 0.3) mm, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in bone tunnel width changes at different time points (P > 0.05). X-ray and CT measurements were consistent. There was no marked bone tunnel enlargement immediately following ACL reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament. Such enlargement may, however, result from varying grafting factors involving the LARS artificial ligament or from different fixation methods.

  4. Mechanical Analysis of Extra-Articular Knee Ligaments. Part One: Native knee ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Kristof; Slane, Joshua; Scheys, Lennart; Claes, Steven; Bellemans, Johan

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a characterization of the tensile properties of the medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), anterolateral ligament (ALL) and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). Our hypothesis was that extra-articular knee ligaments are heterogeneous in nature and possess distinct material properties. MCL (n=12), LCL (n=11), MPFL (n=12) and ALL (n=19) samples from fresh frozen human cadaveric knees were subjected to uniaxial tensile testing to failure and analyzed for their material properties. The elastic modulus (slope of the linear portion of the stress/strain curve), ultimate stress (stress at failure), ultimate strain (strain at failure) and strain energy density (area under the stress/strain curve) were calculated. The MCL had the highest elastic modulus (441.8±117.2MPa) and was significantly greater than the MPFL (294.6±190.4MPa) and LCL (289.0±159.7MPa) (Pligaments (ALL 7.8±3.1MPa, MCL 7.5±2.9MPa and MPFL 5.0±2.9MPa). Extra-articular knee ligaments are a heterogeneous group with respect to material characteristics. Each ligament has tensile properties that are significantly different from others and treatment strategies should take these findings into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Syndesmosis and deltoid ligament injuries in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCollum, Graham A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Injury to the syndesmosis and deltoid ligament is less common than lateral ligament trauma but can lead to significant time away from sport and prolonged rehabilitation. This literature review will discuss both syndesmotic and deltoid ligament injuries without fracture in the professional athlete. A

  6. The fibre bundle anatomy of human cruciate ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommersteeg, T. J.; Kooloos, J. G.; Blankevoort, L.; Kauer, J. M.; Huiskes, R.; Roeling, F. Q.

    1995-01-01

    The cruciate ligaments of the knee consist of numerous fascicles, groups of which comprise fibre bundles. The stabilising function of these ligaments is established by changes in the lengths and orientations of the fascicles. Understanding the function of knee ligaments thus requires an

  7. Thoracolumbar spinal ligaments exhibit negative and transverse pre-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Daniel J; Von Forell, Gregory A; Alsup, Jeremy; Bowden, Anton E

    2013-07-01

    The present work represents the first reported bi-axial spinal ligament pre-strain data for the thoracic and lumbar spine. Ligament pre-strain (in-situ strain) is known to significantly alter joint biomechanics. However, there is currently a lack of comprehensive data with regards to spinal ligament pre-strain. The current work determined the pre-strain of 71 spinal ligaments (30 anterior longitudinal ligaments, 27 supraspinous ligaments and 14 interspinous ligaments). The interspinous ligament and the anterior longitudinal ligament exhibited bi-axial pre-strain distributions, demonstrating they are not uniaxial structures. The supraspinous ligament frequently exhibited large amounts of negative pre-strain or laxity suggesting it makes no mechanical contribution to spinal stability near the neutral posture. Upon implementing multi-axial pre-strain results into a finite element model of the lumbar spine, large differences in spinal biomechanics were observed. These results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for ligament pre-strain in biomechanical models. In addition, the authors present a unique experimental method for obtaining ligament pre-strain that presents a number of advantages when compared to standard techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  9. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the thumb carpometacarpal ligaments: a cadaveric study of ligament anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy L; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-08-15

    Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p histologic appearance of capsular tissue with low cellularity. The dorsal deltoid ligament complex is uniformly stout and robust; this ligament complex is the thickest morphometrically, has the highest cellularity histologically, and shows the greatest degree of sensory nerve endings. The hypocellular anterior oblique ligament is thin, is variable in its location, and

  10. Thumb Ligament Injuries in the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owings, F Patterson; Calandruccio, James H; Mauck, Benjamin M

    2016-10-01

    Hand injuries account for up to 15% of sports injuries and are common in contact sports and in sports with a high risk of falling. Appropriate management requires knowledge of the type of injury, demands of the sport and position, competitive level of the athlete, future athletic demands and expectations, and the role of rehabilitation and protective splints for return to play. Management of the athlete requires aggressive and expedient diagnostic intervention and treatment. This article describes ligamentous injuries to the thumb, including thumb carpometacarpal dislocations, thumb metacarpophalangeal dislocations, collateral ligament injuries and interphalangeal dislocations, their evaluation, treatment and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating the Femoral-Side Critical Corner in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: The Effect of Outside-In Versus Inside-Out Creation of Femoral Tunnels on Graft Contact Pressure in a Synthetic Knee Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvy, Steven J; Hatch, George F; Ihn, Hansel E; Heckmann, Nathanael D; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2017-07-01

    To characterize and compare the graft contact characteristics of outside-in (OI) and inside-out (IO) femoral tunnels during single-bundle reconstruction of the anterolateral bundle of the posterior cruciate ligament in a synthetic knee model. Femoral tunnels were separately made in 16 synthetic femora (8 OI and 8 IO). Achilles tendon allografts were fixed using suspensory fixation with a pressure sensor between the allograft and femoral tunnel. Grafts were cyclically loaded; force, contact area, contact pressure, and peak pressure at the aperture were measured. This process was repeated using the same allograft to assess the other tunnel angle in a separate specimen. IO specimens showed higher mean contact pressure at all loading cycles, with significance shown at 50 N (P = .02). Peak pressure was also greater in IO specimens at all loading cycles and reached statistical significance at 100 N (P = .04). IO specimens had a lower contact area at 150 N (P = .04). No statistically significant differences in force were observed between the 2 groups. OI creation of the femoral tunnel for anterolateral bundle reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament resulted in decreased mean and peak contact pressures at the femoral aperture compared with IO tunnel creation at the specific trajectories and loading parameters tested in this synthetic femoral model. These biomechanical data suggest that OI creation of the femoral tunnel may help reduce in vivo graft contact pressure at the femoral aperture. These data suggest that a tunnel drilled from OI may result in less graft pressure at the femoral aperture, which may prevent graft elongation and optimize graft survival. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Injury of the ligaments of the knee: Magnetic resonance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Sung Moon; Seong, Sang Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    To evaluation the value of MR imaging in the examination of ligament injury of the knee, we retrospectively analysed the MR images of 61 injured knees of 60 patients. The presence of tear was determined by arthroscopy in all caes. Anterio/posterior cruciate ligaments(ACL/PCL) were demonstrated by sagittal images. Medial/lateral collateral ligaments(MCL/ LCL) were evaluated on coronal images. The diagnostic accuracy were 91.8%, 96.7% and 100% for ACL, PCL and MCL, respectively. The specificity for the lateral collateral ligament was 100%. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate method in detecting injury of the ligaments of the knee.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [One-stage repair and reconstruction of knee anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and medial collateral ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pingquan; Zhu, Zhenkang; Wang, Sheng

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction combined with limited open repair of medial collateral ligament (MCL) in recovering the stability and the function of the knee. Between April 2003 and October 2010, 14 patients (14 knees) with multiple injuries of ACL, PCL, and MCL were treated. There were 10 males and 4 females with an average age of 41 years (range, 21-71 years). Injury was caused by traffic accident in 11 cases and falling in 3 cases. The average time from injury to admission was 2 days (range, 1-4 days). Lysholm score was 17.00 +/- 8.29, and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 20.93 +/- 8.28. The complicated injuries included dislocation of the knee joint in 9 cases and meniscus injury in 5 cases. Allogeneic tendons (2 cases) and autologous harmstring tendon (12 cases) were used to reconstruct ACL and PCL under arthroscopy, and all cases underwent limited open repair of MCL. All incisions healed by first intention. Numbness of the lower limb occurred in 3 cases and alleviated spontaneously. All patients were followed up 14 months on average (range, 12-18 months). The knee flexion was 120 degrees and extension was 0 degrees at 3 months of follow-up. After 1 year of follow-up, IKDC score and Lysholm score were 89.93 +/- 6.26 and 88.93 +/- 4.82, respectively, showing significant differences when compared with preoperative scores (P injuries of the knee ligaments, an arthroscope with limited open repair and reconstruction of the knee ligament can avoid open joint chamber, reduce postoperative articular adhesion, and encourage the joint function recovery.

  15. Smart instrumentation for determination of ligament stiffness and ligament balance in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkamp, W; Villard, J; Delaloye, J R; Arami, A; Bertsch, A; Jolles, B M; Aminian, K; Renaud, P

    2014-06-01

    Ligament balance is an important and subjective task performed during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedure. For this reason, it is desirable to develop instruments to quantitatively assess the soft-tissue balance since excessive imbalance can accelerate prosthesis wear and lead to early surgical revision. The instrumented distractor proposed in this study can assist surgeons on performing ligament balance by measuring the distraction gap and applied load. Also the device allows the determination of the ligament stiffness which can contribute a better understanding of the intrinsic mechanical behavior of the knee joint. Instrumentation of the device involved the use of hall-sensors for measuring the distractor displacement and strain gauges to transduce the force. The sensors were calibrated and tested to demonstrate their suitability for surgical use. Results show the distraction gap can be measured reliably with 0.1mm accuracy and the distractive loads could be assessed with an accuracy in the range of 4N. These characteristics are consistent with those have been proposed, in this work, for a device that could assist on performing ligament balance while permitting surgeons evaluation based on his experience. Preliminary results from in vitro tests were in accordance with expected stiffness values for medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trapeziometacarpal joint stability: the evolving importance of the dorsal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James D; Karl, John W; Strauch, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Trapeziometacarpal (TMC) arthritis of the thumb is a common source of hand pain and disability. TMC ligamentous instability may play a role in TMC degeneration. However, the relative importance of the TMC ligaments in the etiology of degeneration and the use of surgery to treat instability in early-stage arthritis are unclear. In this review, we addressed several questions: (1) What are the primary ligamentous stabilizers of the thumb TMC joint? (2) What is the evidence for ligament reconstruction or ligament imbrication in the treatment of thumb TMC joint osteoarthritis? And (3) what is the evidence for thumb metacarpal osteotomy in the treatment of thumb TMC joint osteoarthritis? We performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed (MEDLINE(®)) and Scopus(®) (EMBASE(®)) for peer-reviewed articles published until November 2012. Fifty-two studies fit the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were anatomic, biomechanical, or histopathologic studies on TMC joint ligamentous anatomy, 16 studies were clinical studies concerning ligament reconstruction, and 12 studies were clinical studies on thumb metacarpal osteotomy. Over the past two decades, increasing evidence suggests the dorsoradial ligament is the most important stabilizer of the TMC joint. Other ligaments consistently identified are the superficial anterior oblique, deep anterior oblique, intermetacarpal, ulnar collateral, and posterior oblique ligaments. Ligament reconstruction and metacarpal osteotomy relieve pain and improve grip strength based on Level IV studies. The dorsal ligaments are the primary stabilizers of the TMC joint. Ligament reconstruction and metacarpal osteotomy ameliorate ligamentous laxity and relieve pain based on Level IV studies.

  17. Strain rate dependent properties of younger human cervical spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Moulton, Jeffrey A; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Cronin, Duane S

    2012-06-01

    The cervical spine ligaments play an essential role in limiting the physiological ranges of motion in the neck; however, traumatic loading such as that experienced in automotive crash scenarios can lead to ligament damage and result in neck injury. The development of detailed neck models to evaluate the response and the potential for injury requires accurate ligament mechanical properties at relevant loading rates. The objective of this study was to measure the mechanical properties of the cervical spine ligaments, by performing tensile tests at elongation rates relevant to car crash scenarios, using younger specimens (≤50 years), in simulated in vivo conditions, and to provide a comprehensive investigation of gender and spinal level effects. The five ligaments investigated were the anterior longitudinal ligament, posterior longitudinal ligament, capsular ligament, ligamentum flavum, and interspinous ligament. Ligaments were tested in tension at quasi-static (0.5 s(-1)), medium (20 s(-1)) and high (150-250 s(-1)) strain rates. The high strain rates represented typical car crash scenarios as determined using an existing cervical spine finite element model. In total, 261 ligament tests were performed, with approximately even distribution within elongation rate, spinal level, and gender. The measured force-displacement data followed expected trends compared to previous studies. The younger ligaments investigated in this study demonstrated less scatter, and were both stiffer and stronger than comparable data from older specimens reported in previous studies. Strain rate effects were most significant, while spinal level effects were limited. Gender effects were not significant, but consistent trends were identified, with male ligaments having a higher stiffness and failure force than female ligaments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The anatomy and function of Cleland's ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, R L; Werker, P M N; McGrouther, D A

    The cutaneous ligaments of the digits have been recognized by anatomists for several centuries, but the best known description is that of John Cleland. Subsequent varying descriptions of their morphology have resulted in the surgical community having an imprecise view of their structure and dynamic

  19. Causes of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, Vladimir; Ninković, Srdan; Harhaji, Vladimir; Milankov, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    In order to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries it is necessary to define risk factors and to analyze the most frequent causes of injuries--that being the aim of this study. The study sample consisted of 451 surgically treated patients, including 400 sportsmen (65% of them being active and 35% recreational sportsmen), 29% female and 71% male; of whom 90% were younger than 35. Sports injuries, as the most frequent cause of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, were recorded in 88% of patients (non-contact ones in 78% and contact ones in 22%), injuries occurring in everyday activities in 11% and in traffic in 1%. Among sportsmen, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was most frequently performed in football players (48%), then in handball players (22%), basketball players (13%), volleyball players (8%), martial arts fighters (4%). However, the injury incidence was the highest among the active basketball players (1 injured among 91 active players). Type of footwear, warming up before the activity, genetic predisposition and everyday therapy did not have a significant influence on getting injured. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened three times more often during matches, in the middle and at the end of a match and training session (79%), at landing after the jump or when changing direction of movement (75%) without a contact with other competitors, on dry surfaces (79%), among not so well prepared sportsmen.

  20. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Current Concepts Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pache

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL is the largest and strongest ligament in the human knee, and the primary posteriorstabilizer. Recent anatomy and biomechanical studies have provided an improved understanding of PCL function. PCLinjuries are typically combined with other ligamentous, meniscal and chondral injuries. Stress radiography has becomean important and validated objective measure in surgical decision making and post-operative assessment. Isolatedgrade I or II PCL injuries can usually be treated non-operatively. However, when acute grade III PCL ruptures occurtogether with other ligamentous injury and/or repairable meniscal body/root tears, surgery is indicated. Anatomic singlebundlePCL reconstruction (SB-PCLR typically restores the larger anterolateral bundle (ALB and represents the mostcommonly performed procedure. Unfortunately, residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after SB-PCLR hasled to the development of an anatomic double-bundle (DB PCLR to restore the native PCL footprint and co-dominantbehavior of the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles and re-establish normal knee kinematics. The purpose of thisarticle is to review the pertinent details regarding PCL anatomy, biomechanics, injury diagnosis and treatment options,with a focus on arthroscopically assisted DB-PCLR.

  1. Novel Insights into Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common sports injuries of the knee. ACL reconstruction has become, standard orthopaedic practice worldwide with an estimated 175,000 reconstructions per year in the United States.6 The ACL remains the most frequently studied

  2. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: In young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, do patient reported or radiographic outcomes after five years differ between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  3. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U

    1999-01-01

    We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000...

  4. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  5. Medial ankle pain after lateral ligament rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    After a severe ankle sprain the incidence of residual complaints, particularly on the medial side of the joint, is high. We studied a consecutive series of 30 patients who had operative repair of acute ruptures of lateral ligaments. During operation, arthroscopy revealed a fresh injury to the

  6. [Collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillukat, T; Schädel-Höpfner, M; Windolf, J; Prommersberger, K-J

    2012-07-01

    Collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpal joints of the fingers are rare conditions. The injury should be diagnosed by clinical investigation and standard radiographs. Leading symptoms are local tenderness and joint instability. Instability is verified by clinical stress testing of the metacarpophalangeal joint in 90° of flexion. In Grade I injuries stability is preserved due to ligament attenuation or small partial tears. Grade II injuries show laxity with firm endpoint according to incomplete tear. In Grade III injuries instability without endpoint can be found as a result of complete tears. Radiographs may show avulsed bone fragments.In Grade I and II tears or non- displaced avulsion fragments treatment is conservative with buddy taping for 6 weeks. In case of persistent instability or grade III tears suturing or refixation of the ligament are performed. Small avulsion fragments are removed and the ligament is fixed to the bone. Greater avulsion fragments are fixed by suitable small implants. Adequate treatment will lead to reliable good results. Even in chronic tears reconstruction with local material or tendon transplants is usually successful.

  7. Ligament-induced sacral fractures of the pelvis are possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hanno; Hammer, Niels; Lingslebe, Uwe; Höch, Andreas; Klink, Thomas; Böhme, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    Pelvic ring stability is maintained passively by both the osseous and the ligamentous apparatus. Therapeutic approaches focus mainly on fracture patterns, so ligaments are often neglected. When they rupture along with the bone after pelvic ring fractures, disrupting stability, ligaments need to be considered during reconstruction and rehabilitation. Our aim was to determine the influence of ligaments on open-book injury using two experimental models with body donors. Mechanisms of bone avulsion related to open-book injury were investigated. Open-book injuries were induced in human pelves and subsequently investigated by anatomical dissection and endoscopy. The findings were compared to CT and MRI scans of open-book injuries. Relevant structures were further analyzed using plastinated cross-sections of the posterior pelvic ring. A fragment of the distal sacrum was observed, related to open-book injury. Two ligaments were found to be responsible for this avulsion phenomenon: the caudal portion of the anterior sacroiliac ligament and another ligament running along the ventral surface of the third sacral vertebra. The sacral fragment remained attached to the coxal bone by this second ligament after open-book injury. These results were validated using plastination and the structures were identified. Pelvic ligaments are probably involved in sacral avulsion caused by lateral traction. Therefore, ligaments should to be taken into account in diagnosis of open-book injury and subsequent therapy. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ligament structures in the tarsal sinus and canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Yuan; Hou, Zhi-Dian; Zhang, Peng; Li, Hong-Liang; Ding, Zi-Hai; Liu, Yu-Jie

    2013-12-01

    The concrete anatomy and functional characteristics of the subtalar ligaments have been a matter of debate that some believe has hampered the progress of clinical ligament reconstruction. In 32 fresh-frozen cadaver feet, the course of the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) and other subtalar ligaments was carefully measured and photographed both from the portal of the tarsal sinus and from a posterior view. The IER inserted inside the tarsal sinus and canal by means of 3 roots: a lateral, an intermediate, and a medial one. These roots, along with the tarsal canal, divided the subtalar space into 3 parts. In front of the IER and inside the tarsal sinus, the thick cervical ligament (CL) lay at a 45-degree angle to the calcaneus. Behind the IER and inside the posterior capsule, in most cases (25 of 32 specimens), the posterior capsular ligament (PCaL) lay directly in front of the posterior talocalcaneal facet. Inside the tarsal canal, the fan-shaped medial root of the IER spread from outside upper lateral to lower medial, and the interosseous talocalcaneal ligament (ITCL) ran from upper medial to lower lateral; fibers of these 2 ligaments blended tightly together to form a V-shaped ligament complex. Just anterior to this complex in some cases (20 of 32 specimens), a short narrow upright ligament, the tarsal canal ligament (TCL), was located behind the middle talocalcaneal joint. The results of this study show that the CL is the primary ligament in the tarsal sinus and that the ITCL is a thin single band rather than a strong bilaminar ligament located inside the tarsal canal. Instead, the medial root of the IER is the primary ligamentous structure in the tarsal canal. The anatomical description provided here may provide a more accurate theoretical foundation for clinical subtalar stability restoration.

  9. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1 were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95 mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash

  10. Tenogenically Induced Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Allogeneic Platelet-Rich Plasma: 2-Year Follow-up after Tendon or Ligament Treatment in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Beerts

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Poor healing of tendon and ligament lesions often results in early retirement of sport horses. Therefore, regenerative therapies are being explored as potentially promising treatment for these injuries. In this study, an intralesional injection was performed with allogeneic tenogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma 5–6 days after diagnosis of suspensory ligament (SL (n = 68 or superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT (n = 36 lesion. Clinical, lameness and ultrasonographic evaluation was performed at 6 and 12 weeks. Moreover, a survey was performed 12 and 24 months after treatment to determine how many horses were competing at original level and how many were re-injured. At 6 weeks, 88.2% of SL (n = 68 and 97.3% of SDFT lesions (n = 36 demonstrated moderate ultrasonographic improvement. At 12 weeks, 93.1% of SL (n = 29 and 95.5% of SDFT lesions (n = 22 improved convincingly. Moreover, lameness was abolished in 78.6% of SL (n = 28 and 85.7% (n = 7 of SDFT horses at 12 weeks. After 12 months (n = 92, 11.8% of SL and 12.5% of SDFT horses were re-injured, whereas 83.8 of SL and 79.2% of SDFT returned to previous performance level. At 24 months (n = 89 after treatment, 82.4 (SL and 85.7% (SDFT of the horses returned to previous level of performance. A meta-analysis was performed on relevant published evidence evaluating re-injury 24 months after stem cell-based [17.6% of the SL and 14.3% of the SDFT group (n = 89] versus conventional therapies. Cell therapies resulted in a significantly lower re-injury rate of 18% [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.11–0.25] 2 years after treatment compared to the 44% re-injury rate with conventional treatments (95% CI, 0.37–0.51 based on literature data (P < 0.0001.

  11. Radiologic analysis of the medical collateral ligament rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chung Che; Lee, Chang Jun; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The medical collateral ligament rupture is the most common injury involving the knee joint ligaments. The ruptured medical collateral ligaments of 73 cases with clinical and surgical confirmations were radiologically analyzed. The results were obtained as follows: 1. The most risky age for tearing of the medical collateral ligament was third to fifth decades (50 cases of male and 23 of females). 2. The most common cause of the medical collateral ligament rupture was traffic accident (82.2%). 3. The mean distance of medial knee joint space was 7.9 {+-} 2.0 mm on the normal side and 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mm on the affected side. 4. The mean degree of knee joint space was 10.1 {+-} 2.5 on the normal side and 14.7 {+-} 3.8 on the affected side. 5. The fibula was the bone fractured most frequently in association with the medial collateral ligament rupture (30.6%)

  12. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-03-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a traumatic event that can lead to significant functional impairment and inability to participate in high-level sports-related activities. ACL reconstruction is considered the treatment of choice for symptomatic ACL-deficient patients and can assist in full functional recovery. Furthermore, ACL reconstruction restores ligamentous stability to normal, and, therefore, can potentially fully reinstate kinematics of the knee joint. As a consequence, the natural history of ACL injury could be potentially reversed via ACL reconstruction. Evidence from the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of ACL reconstruction in preventing the development of knee cartilage degeneration. This editorial aims to present recent high-level evidence in an attempt to answer whether ACL injury inevitably leads to osteoarthritis and whether ACL reconstruction can prevent this development or not.

  14. Macroscopic and Microscopic Analysis of the Thumb Carpometacarpal Ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Amy L.; Lee, Julia; Hagert, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Background: Stability and mobility represent the paradoxical demands of the human thumb carpometacarpal joint, yet the structural origin of each functional demand is poorly defined. As many as sixteen and as few as four ligaments have been described as primary stabilizers, but controversy exists as to which ligaments are most important. We hypothesized that a comparative macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint would further define their role in joint stability. Methods: Thirty cadaveric hands (ten fresh-frozen and twenty embalmed) from nineteen cadavers (eight female and eleven male; average age at the time of death, seventy-six years) were dissected, and the supporting ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified. Ligament width, length, and thickness were recorded for morphometric analysis and were compared with use of the Student t test. The dorsal and volar ligaments were excised from the fresh-frozen specimens and were stained with use of a triple-staining immunofluorescent technique and underwent semiquantitative analysis of sensory innervation; half of these specimens were additionally analyzed for histomorphometric data. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate differences between ligaments. Results: Seven principal ligaments of the thumb carpometacarpal joint were identified: three dorsal deltoid-shaped ligaments (dorsal radial, dorsal central, posterior oblique), two volar ligaments (anterior oblique and ulnar collateral), and two ulnar ligaments (dorsal trapeziometacarpal and intermetacarpal). The dorsal ligaments were significantly thicker (p thumb carpometacarpal joint provides further evidence regarding the stability and mobility of this joint that is often affected by osteoarthritis. PMID:22992815

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. DESIGN...... and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion...

  16. Strength of round and uterosacral ligaments: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Pedro; Silva-Filho, Agnaldo Lopes; Fonseca, Andrea M R M; Santos, Agostinho; Santos, Liliana; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Jorge, Renato M N; Ferreira, António M

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the tensile biomechanical properties of round and uterosacral ligaments. Tissue samples were obtained from 15 female cadavers without pelvic organ prolapse. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to obtain stiffness and maximum stress of round and uterosacral ligaments. Correlations were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Statistical differences between groups were tested using Student's paired and unpaired t test. There was a great variability in the measurements of stiffness and maximum stress in pelvic ligaments. The round ligaments demonstrated stiffness of 9.1 ± 1.6 MPa (mean ± SEM) (ranging from 2 to 25.6 MPa) and maximum stress of 4.3 ± 0.7 MPa (ranging from 1.2 to 11.5 MPa). The stiffness of the uterosacral ligaments was 14.1 ± 1.4 MPa (ranging from 5.7 to 26.1 MPa) with maximum stress of 6.3 ± 0.8 MPa (ranging from 2.2 to 11.9 MPa). There was a strong positive correlation between stiffness and maximum stress in female pelvic ligaments (ρ = 0.851; p ligaments demonstrated higher stiffness and maximum stress compared to the round ligaments (p = 0.006 and p = 0.034; respectively). Age, body mass index and menopausal status were not associated with the biomechanical proprieties of round and uterosacral ligaments. Nulliparous women had lower uterosacral stiffness (15.5 ± 1.3 vs. 10 ± 1.8 MPa; p = 0.033) and maximum stress (8.2 ± 0.9 vs. 4.2 ± 1.1 MPa; p = 0.028) compared to parous women. The uterosacral ligaments are significantly more resistant than round ligaments. Parturition seems to enhance the stiffness and maximum stress of the ligaments.

  17. Validation of Cooper's ligament thickness in software breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperavage, Adam J.; Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew; Pokrajac, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropomorphic breast phantoms are important tools for a wide range of tasks including pre-clinical validation of novel imaging techniques. In order to improve the realism in the phantoms, assessment of simulated anatomical structures is crucial. Thickness of simulated Cooper's ligaments influences the percentage of dense tissue, as well as qualitative and quantitative properties of simulated images. We introduce three methods (2-dimensional watershed, 3-dimensional watershed, and facet counting) to assess the thickness of the simulated Cooper's ligaments in the breast phantoms. For the validation of simulated phantoms, the thickness of ligaments has been measured and compared with the input thickness values. These included a total of 64 phantoms with nominal ligament thicknesses of 200, 400, 600, and 800 μm. The 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional watershed transformations were performed to obtain the median skeleton of the ligaments. In the 2-dimensional watershed, the median skeleton was found cross-section by cross-section, while the skeleton was found for the entire 3-dimensional space in the 3-dimensional watershed. The thickness was calculated by taking the ratio of the total volume of ligaments and the volume of median skeleton. In the facet counting method, the ligament thickness was estimated as a ratio between estimated ligaments' volume and average ligaments' surface area. We demonstrated that the 2-dimensional watershed technique overestimates the ligament thickness. Good agreement was found between the facet counting technique and the 3-dimensional watershed for assessing thickness. The proposed techniques are applicable for ligaments' thickness estimation on clinical breast images, provided segmentation of Cooper's ligaments has been performed.

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Seron, Juan Antonio; Medina-Porqueres, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Distinct exercises have been proposed for knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. There is a need to understand ACL strain behavior during different rehabilitation exercises to protect the graft from excessive strain that could interfere with its healing process. Objective: To critically review studies that directly measured normal ACL strain in vivo during different movements, conditions, or exercises to gain insight into which of them may produce more strain on the ligament or the ligament graft in the case of reconstructed knees. Data Sources: A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro databases was conducted. Keywords included anterior cruciate ligament, strain, stress, deformation, transducer, rehabilitation, rehabilitation exercise, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria were (1) peer-reviewed studies published in English or Spanish, (2) research conducted on adult human subjects with normal ACLs and healthy knees, and (3) ACL strain directly measured during different movements, conditions, or exercises by using a transducer. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: Specific data were abstracted from the selected studies, including isometric quadriceps and hamstrings activity, active and passive flexion-extension of the knee, closed kinetic chain exercises, and application of joint compressive load. Results: A total of 10 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. The strain values produced by closed kinetic chain and open kinetic chain exercises were similar. However, closed kinetic chain exercises appear to attenuate the strain increase that occurs in open kinetic chain exercises when increasing resistance. Conclusion: These data may be relevant to develop rehabilitation exercises or programs that do not endanger the healing ACL graft and to provide a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:27418161

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Wakeboarding

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Harlan M.; Sanders, Brett,

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. Hypothesis: The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. M...

  20. Ulnar nerve entrapment by anconeus epitrochlearis ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2012-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow is the second most common upper limb entrapment neuropathy other than carpal tunnel syndrome. There have been many causes identified ranging from chronic aging joint changes to inflammatory conditions or systemic disorders. Among them, uncommon anatomical variants accounts for a small number of cases. Here, we report our experience in managing ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a rare vestigial structure, anconeus epitrochlearis ligament, and provide a brief review of the literature of its management.

  1. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known an...

  2. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unkn...

  3. Median arcuate ligament syndrome in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Jeffrey N; Haskins, Ivy N; Brody, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) is a common entity in young athletes. Most occurrences are due to a "cramp" or "stitch," but an uncommon, and often overlooked, etiology of ETAP is median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS). The initial presentation of MALS typically includes postprandial nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, but in athletes, the initial presentation may be ETAP. We present a case series of three athletes who presented with exercise-related transient abdominal pain and were ultimately diagnosed and treated for MALS. Unlike other patients with median arcuate ligament syndrome, these athletes presented with exercise-induced pain, rather than the common postprandial symptoms. These symptoms persisted despite conservative measures. Work-up of patients with suspected MALS include a computed tomography or magnetic resonance angiography showing compression of the celiac artery with post-stenotic dilation, or a celiac artery ultrasound demonstrating increased velocities (>200 cm/s(2)) with deep exhalation. All patients underwent a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release. Postoperatively, there were no complications, and all were discharged home on postoperative day #2. All patients have subsequently returned to athletics with resolution of their symptoms. ETAP is common in athletes and often resolves with preventative or conservative strategies. When ETAP persists despite these methods, alternative causes, including MALS, should be considered. A combination of a thorough history and physical exam, as well as radiographic data, is essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and treatment strategy.

  4. Roentgenologic diagnostics of capsular ligament lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, C.J.; Jaeger, M.

    1981-10-01

    The X-ray diagnostic is of obvious importance and relevance in the detection of acute or old capsular ligament lesions of the limb joint. On the one hand it serves as the plain radiograph (roentgenogram without contrast medium) for the assessment of osseous secondary lesions, for the documentation of luxationary positions of the joint partners, and in old capsular ligament lesions for the detection of an already existing arthrosis. On the other hand the X-ray images are of main importance, which are made from the hand-held limb in order to permit a comparison of the two sides, and which beyond the clinical detection of a joint instability indicate the extent and the direction of this instability and which also document it, and which allow in adolescents to recognize a separation of the epiphysis as an alternative to the capsular ligament rupture. Only in particular cases arthrography can provide some additional information, so for example in the case of an isolated syndesmosis rupture, ruptures of the rosette of the rotator muscle or of a damaged triangular disk in the hand. Angiography is only required in cases of traumatic luxations of the knee in order to exclude an intimal lesion of the popliteal artery.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A ganglion is a cystic formation close to joints or tendinous sheaths, frequently found in the wrist, foot or knee. Intra-articular ganglia of the knee are rare, and most of them are located in the anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical picture for these ganglia comprises pain and movement restrictions in the knee, causing significant impairment to the patient. Symptoms are non-specific, and anterior cruciate ligament ganglia are usually diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy. Not all ganglia diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging need to undergo surgical treatment: only those that cause clinical signs and symptoms do. Surgical results are considered good or excellent in the vast majority of cases. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male presented with pain in the left knee during a marathon race. Physical examination revealed limitation in the maximum range of knee extension and pain in the posterior aspect of the left knee. Radiographs of the left knee were normal, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multi-lobed cystic structure adjacent to the anterior cruciate ligament, which resembled a ganglion cyst. The mass was removed through arthroscopy, and pathological examination revealed a synovial cyst. Patient recovery was excellent, and he resumed his usual training routine five months later.

  6. Ligament Mediated Fragmentation of Viscoelastic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; Houze, Eric C.; Moore, John R.; Koerner, Michael R.; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2016-10-01

    The breakup and atomization of complex fluids can be markedly different than the analogous processes in a simple Newtonian fluid. Atomization of paint, combustion of fuels containing antimisting agents, as well as physiological processes such as sneezing are common examples in which the atomized liquid contains synthetic or biological macromolecules that result in viscoelastic fluid characteristics. Here, we investigate the ligament-mediated fragmentation dynamics of viscoelastic fluids in three different canonical flows. The size distributions measured in each viscoelastic fragmentation process show a systematic broadening from the Newtonian solvent. In each case, the droplet sizes are well described by Gamma distributions which correspond to a fragmentation-coalescence scenario. We use a prototypical axial step strain experiment together with high-speed video imaging to show that this broadening results from the pronounced change in the corrugated shape of viscoelastic ligaments as they separate from the liquid core. These corrugations saturate in amplitude and the measured distributions for viscoelastic liquids in each process are given by a universal probability density function, corresponding to a Gamma distribution with nmin=4 . The breadth of this size distribution for viscoelastic filaments is shown to be constrained by a geometrical limit which can not be exceeded in ligament-mediated fragmentation phenomena.

  7. Posttraumatic incarceration of medial collateral ligament into knee joint with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Sunil-Gurpur; du Pre, Karel; Bruce, Warwick

    2015-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament of the knee is an important coronal stabiliser and often injured in isolation or as combination of injuries. The article reports a case of incarcerated medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 20 year old male who presented to us 4 weeks after injury. Clinical examination and MRI was correlated to complete ACL tear with torn distal MCL and incarceration into the joint. Patient was taken up for ACL hamstring graft reconstruction with mini-arthrotomy and repair of the torn MCL. Patient was followed up with dedicated rehabilitation protocol with good functional results. At one year follow-up, patient exhibited full range of motion with negative Lachman, Pivot shift and valgus stress tests. This article highlights the rare pattern of MCL tear and also reviews the literature on this pattern of injury.

  8. Thumb ulnar collateral and radial collateral ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Nicole S; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar and radial collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the competitive athlete. Collateral ligament integrity is essential to joint stability, pinch strength, and pain-free motion. Acute rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament is due to a sudden radial deviation force on the abducted thumb and is referred to as skier's thumb. An ulnar-directed force causes injury to the radial collateral ligament. The degree of joint instability on clinical examination allows classification of these injuries and guides management. Surgical repair of acute, complete tears results in good outcomes and allows for return to sporting activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ligaments of the rectum: anatomical and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charran, Ordessia; Muhleman, Mitchel; Shah, Sameer; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-03-01

    The ligaments of the rectum have been the subject of controversy for decades. Not only have their contents and components been a source of contention, but also the very existence of these ligaments has been called into question. This article explores the anatomical features of these ligaments with implications for surgical treatment of rectal prolapse, rectal cancer, and resection of the rectum and mesorectum. A theory about the evolution of the lateral rectal ligaments and the mesorectum in humans and higher mammals is also presented.

  10. Loading rate effect on mechanical properties of cervical spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Ana; Omerovic, Senad; Krasna, Simon; Prebil, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of cervical spine ligaments are of great importance for an accurate finite element model when analyzing the injury mechanism. However, there is still little experimental data in literature regarding fresh human cervical spine ligaments under physiological conditions. The focus of the present study is placed on three cervical spine ligaments that stabilize the spine and protect the spinal cord: the anterior longitudinal ligament, the posterior longitudinal ligament and the ligamentum flavum. The ligaments were tested within 24-48 hours after death, under two different loading rates. An increase trend in failure load, failure stress, stiffness and modulus was observed, but proved not to be significant for all ligament types. The loading rate had the highest impact on failure forces for all three ligaments (a 39.1% average increase was found). The observed increase trend, compared to the existing increase trends reported in literature, indicates the importance of carefully applying the existing experimental data, especially when creating scaling factors. A better understanding of the loading rate effect on ligaments properties would enable better case-specific human modelling.

  11. The Anterolateral Ligament Does Exist: An Anatomic Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Grassi, Alberto; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Raggi, Federico; Romagnoli, Matteo; Bondi, Alice; Calderone, Salvatore; Signorelli, Cecilia

    2018-01-01

    The debate around the existence, anatomy, and role of the so-called anterolateral ligament of the knee represents one of the main sources of recent controversy among orthopedic surgeons. In the modern era of sports medicine, several content experts have contributed to the understanding of the anatomy of the anterolateral aspect of the knee. This article analyzes the historical, phylogenetic, anatomic, arthroscopic, and radiological evidence regarding the anterolateral ligament. The existence of the anterolateral ligament as a distinct ligamentous structure and its exact anatomic features are still matters of controversy and ongoing study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Acute injuries of lateral ankle joint ligaments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, M; Sidor, Z; Stolfa, S; Cellár, R; Vasko, G

    2010-08-01

    Acute injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments are one of the most common form of injury involving the musculoskeletal apparatus. Treatment usually range from cast immobilisation or acute surgical repair to functional rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of different grades of acute injuries of lateral ligaments of the ankle joint in our patients group and to compare the results of non surgical versus surgical treatment of third grade injuries. 3148 patients were treated for acute lateral ankle sprain in a period of 5 years at our department. Each patient had stress X-ray of the ankle for evaluation of instability at the first visit. From the 234 patients with third grade injury, 39 were enrolled in our study with non surgical treatment and 18 with surgical treatment. Each group was divided regarding to the age in two subgroups. Functional outcome was evaluated 12 and 24 months after injury with AOFAS clinical rating scale and Sports Ankle Rating System--Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation. Statistical analysis was done with Pearson's Chi quadrate test with P < 0.05. First grade injury was present in 62%, second grade in 31% and only 7% of the patients had third grade injury of the lateral ankle ligaments. Further only third grade injuries were studied. Statistically significant better results were seen in patients under the age of 25, in the patient group with surgical treatment compared to patients over 25 years of age. Also statistically significant better results were seen in patient with surgical treatment to non surgical treatment in each age group. No significant difference was observed in the non surgical treatment group regarding to age. Although the injuries of the ankle ligaments belong to the most common injuries of the musculoskeletal system, there is no consensus in the treatment of such disorders. Our experiences and the results of our study show, that surgical treatment in indicated cases provides better results in

  13. Surgical Treatment of Acute Grade III Medial Collateral Ligament Injury Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Anatomic Ligament Repair Versus Triangular Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiao Feng; Men, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Junjun; Walker, Garth N; Zheng, Xiao Zuo; Gao, Jin Bao; Chen, Baicheng; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yingze; Gao, Shi Jun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of medial collateral ligament (MCL) anatomic ligament repair (ALR) and triangular ligament reconstruction (TLR) in treating acute grade III MCL injury with respect to imaging and functional results. Between January 2009 and October 2011, a total of 69 patients with an acute grade III MCL tear combined with an anterior cruciate ligament tear were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent ALR and those who underwent TLR. Single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was also performed in all patients. A radiographic stress-position imaging test was performed to evaluate excessive medial opening of the knee. In addition, the Slocum test was carried out to assess anteromedial rotatory instability before surgery and at follow-up. The subjective symptoms and functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) assessment. Sixty-four patients with a mean follow-up period of 34 months were included in the final analysis. The measurement results for medial opening at the last follow-up appointment decreased significantly from the pretreatment measurements and fell within the normal range, without a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P > .05). The overall incidence of anteromedial rotatory instability was reduced to 21.9% compared with 62.5% preoperatively. However, the incidence of anteromedial rotatory instability in the TLR group (9.4%) decreased significantly compared with that in the ALR group (34.4%) (P .05). The comparison of IKDC extension and flexion deficit scores between the 2 groups showed no significant differences. Eleven patients in the ALR group and 4 in the TLR group complained of medial knee pain. The comparison between the 2 groups showed no significant difference (P > .05). The clinical outcomes of this study showed that no major difference existed in the ALR and TLR groups based on IKDC

  14. Strain rate dependent properties of human craniovertebral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Moulton, Jeffrey A; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Cronin, Duane S

    2013-07-01

    Craniovertebral ligaments were tested to failure under tensile loading. Ligaments tested included: transverse ligament, anterior atlanto occipital membrane, posterior atlanto occipital membrane, capsular ligaments between Skull-C1 and C1-C2, anterior atlantoaxial membrane, posterior atlantoaxial membrane and the tectorial membrane/vertical cruciate/apical/alar ligament complex. The objective of this study was to obtain mechanical properties of craniovertebral ligaments of a younger population, at varying strain rates representative of automotive crash scenarios, and investigate rate and gender effects for use in numerical models of the cervical spine. There have been few studies conducted on the mechanical properties of human craniovertebral ligaments. Only one study has tested all of the ligaments, and previous studies use older age specimens (mean age 67, from most complete study). Further, tests were often not performed at elongation rates representative of car crash scenarios. Previous studies did not perform tests in an environment resembling in vivo conditions, which has been shown to have a significant effect on ligament tensile behaviour. Fifty-four craniovertebral ligaments were isolated from twenty-one spines, and tested to failure in tension under simulated in vivo temperature and hydration levels, at quasi-static (0.5 s(-1)) and high strain rates (150 s(-1)). Values for failure force, failure elongation, stiffness, and toe region elongation were obtained from force-displacement curves. Values were analyzed for strain rate and gender effects. Increased strain rate produced several significant effects including: higher failure forces for the transverse ligament and capsular ligament (Skull-C1), lower failure elongation for the tectorial membrane complex, higher stiffness for the tectorial membrane complex and capsular ligament (Skull-C1), and lower toe region elongation for capsular ligament (Skull-C1). Gender effects were limited. Ligament tests

  15. MRI appearance of surgically proven abnormal accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhas, Naveen [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vinson, Emily N.; Cothran, R.L.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Santangelo, James R. [Womack Army Medical Center, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Fort Bragg, NC (United States); Nunley, James A. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, P.O. Box 2923, Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-01-15

    A thickened accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament) of the ankle can be a cause of ankle impingement. Its imaging appearance is not well described. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ligament could be identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to determine associated abnormalities, and to determine if MRI could be used to differentiate normal from abnormal. Eighteen patients with a preoperative ankle MRI and an abnormal Bassett's ligament reported at surgery were found retrospectively. A separate cohort of 18 patients was selected as a control population. The presence of Bassett's ligament and its thickness were noted. The integrity and appearance of the lateral ankle ligaments, talar dome cartilage, and anterolateral gutter were also noted. In 34 of the 36 cases (94%), Bassett's ligament was identified on MRI. The ligament was seen in all three imaging planes and most frequently in the axial plane. The mean thickness of the ligament in the surgically abnormal cases was 2.37 mm, compared with 1.87 mm in the control with a p value = 0.015 (t test). Nine of the 18 abnormal cases (50%) had talar dome cartilage lesions as a result of contact with the ligament at surgery, with only 3 cases of high-grade defects seen on MRI. Fourteen of the 18 abnormal cases (78%) had of synovitis or scarring in the lateral gutter at surgery, with only 5 cases with scarring seen on MRI. The anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament was abnormal or torn in 8 of the 18 abnormal cases (44%) by MRI and confirmed in only 3 cases at surgery. Bassett's ligament can be routinely identified on MRI and was significantly thicker in patients who had it resected at surgery. An abnormal Bassett's ligament is often present in the setting of a normal anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament. The cartilage abnormalities and synovitis associated with an abnormal Bassett's ligament are poorly detected by conventional MRI

  16. ACL/MCL transection affects knee ligament insertion distance of healing and intact ligaments during gait in the Ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Janet E; Funakoshi, Yusei; Hariu, Mitsuhiro; Marchuk, Linda; Thornton, Gail M; Ronsky, Janet L; Zernicke, Ron; Shrive, Nigel G; Frank, Cyril B

    2009-08-25

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of combined transection of the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments on the intact and healing ligaments in the ovine stifle joint. In vivo 3D stifle joint kinematics were measured in eight sheep during treadmill walking (accuracy: 0.4+/-0.4mm, 0.4+/-0.4 degrees ). Kinematics were measured with the joint intact and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after either surgical ligament transection (n=5) or sham surgery without transection (n=3). After sacrifice at 20 weeks, the 3D subject-specific bone and ligament geometry were digitized, and the 3D distances between insertions (DBI) of ligaments during the dynamic in vivo motion were calculated. Anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) transection resulted in changes in the DBI of not only the transected ACL, but also the intact lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), while the DBI of the transected MCL was not significantly changed. Increases in the maximal ACL DBI (2 week: +4.2mm, 20 week: +5.7mm) caused increases in the range of ACL DBI (2 week: 3.6mm, 20 week: +3.8mm) and the ACL apparent strain (2 week: +18.9%, 20 week: +24.0%). Decreases in the minimal PCL DBI (2 week: -3.2mm, 20 week: -4.3mm) resulted in increases in the range of PCL DBI (2 week: +2.7mm, 20 week: +3.2mm). Decreases in the maximal LCL DBI (2 week: -1.0mm, 20 week: -2.0mm) caused decreased LCL apparent strain (2 week: -3.4%, 20 week: -6.9%). Changes in the mechanical environment of these ligaments may play a significant role in the biological changes observed in these ligaments.

  17. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    Background: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and

  18. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and

  19. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  20. Nonuniform distribution of collagen density in human knee ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommersteeg, T. J.; Blankevoort, L.; Kooloos, J. G.; Hendriks, J. C.; Kauer, J. M.; Huiskes, R.

    1994-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the mechanical properties of soft connective tissues are affected by their structural components. We documented collagen density distributions in human knee ligaments to quantify differences in density within and between these ligaments. In order to explain the

  1. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  2. Stiffness of the healing medial collateral ligament of the mouse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijssen, Y.; Sierevelt, I.N.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Blankevoort, L.

    2004-01-01

    The knee joints of mice can serve as a model for studying knee ligament properties. The goal of our study was to measure the structural stiffness of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the murine knee. A tensile test was developed for this purpose. First 84 femur-MCL-tibia complexes of

  3. Features extraction in anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research is finding the feature vectors of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL). These feature vectors have to clearly define the ligaments structure and make it easier to diagnose them. Extraction of feature vectors is obtained by analysis of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. This procedure is performed after the extraction process of both ligaments. In the first stage in order to reduce the area of analysis a region of interest including cruciate ligaments (CL) is outlined in order to reduce the area of analysis. In this case, the fuzzy C-means algorithm with median modification helping to reduce blurred edges has been implemented. After finding the region of interest (ROI), the fuzzy connectedness procedure is performed. This procedure permits to extract the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures. In the last stage, on the basis of the extracted anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures, 3-dimensional models of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament are built and the feature vectors created. This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested on clinical T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of the knee joint. The 3D display is based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament : Alternative Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term results of reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with an allograft. Due to the poor results found, further studies were performed to investigate alternative strategies for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the field of tissue

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries and Outcome of Arthroscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the results of arterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs using arthroscopic assisted reconstructions using harmstrings. A follow-up rehabilitation programme of immediate mobilisation, weight bearing and extension. Subjects: Twenty arthroscopic reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament using the ...

  6. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  7. Gastro-Pancreatic and Gastro-Duodenopancreatic Ligaments: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports a cadaveric case of two unusual peritoneal structures; namely, the gastro-pancreatic and gastro-duodeno-pancreatic ligaments. The gastropancreatic ligament is a broad peritoneal structure that holds the stomach and the pancreas together and has occasionally been reported while ...

  8. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  9. Medial patellotibial ligament and medial patellomeniscal ligament: anatomy, imaging, biomechanics, and clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-13

    The purpose of this article is to review anatomical, biomechanical, and clinical data of the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) and medial patellomeniscal ligament (MPML), as well as studies focusing on the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) but with relevant data about the MPTL and MPML. A literature search of articles specifically addressing the MPTL and/or MPML was included along with studies focusing on the MPFL but with relevant data about the MPTL and MPML. The medial patellar ligaments responsible for maintaining the stability of the patellofemoral (PF) joint include the MPFL, the MPTL, and the MPML. The MPFL is considered the primary restraint to lateral patellar translation, while the latter two are considered secondary restraints. There is robust literature on the anatomical, imaging, and biomechanical characteristics of the MPFL, and also the clinical outcome of its injury and surgical reconstruction; much less is known about the MPTL and MPML. Isolated MPFL reconstruction has good clinical and functional outcomes, with a low failure rate when defined as frank re-dislocation. Complications, including continued episodes of patellar apprehension and subluxation, remain present in most series. In addition, the current literature primarily includes a homogeneous population with few excessive anatomic dysplastic factors. There is lack of knowledge on the role of MPTL and MPML in (potentially) aiding patella stabilization and improving clinical outcomes. Understanding the role of the medial-sided patellar ligaments, in particular the role of the secondary stabilizers, in PF function and injury will aid in this goal. MPTL and MPML have consistent basic science literature, as well as favorable clinical outcomes of surgical patellar stabilization with reconstruction of the MPTL. However, there is much heterogeneity among clinical case series and lack of comparative studies to allow clear indication for the role of isolated or combined surgical reconstruction

  10. Outcomes in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Mihai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Improving the outcomes in reconstructive surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL requires a rigorous and permanent assessment of specific parameters. Therefore, we can increase the degree of reproducibility of the procedure and identify particular aspects in order to achieve an adequate and individualized therapeutic approach for each case. In order to accomplish this goal, the use of complex means (scores of quantifying results is required. That includes objective means of verifying the parameters in knee surgery, and a subjective evaluation of the patient in order to compare the results.

  11. [Surgical treatment of multiple ligament injuries of knee joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Chen, Yi-min; Zhai, Li-feng; Bi, Da-wei

    2016-05-01

    To study operative effects for the treatment of multiple ligament injuries of knee joints. From 2008 to 2013, 26 patients (17 males and 9 females) with multiple ligament injuries of knee joints were treated surgically. The average age was 40.7 years old, ranging from 29 to 55 years old. All the patients were treated with arthroscopic reconstruction of cruiate ligament with autogenous or allogeneic hamstrings and tendon, and at the same time received repair of medial collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament, as well as the treatment of exterior and interior complex injuries. Nine patients received second stage operation after the initial operation for mistake or missed diagnosis, and other patients were treated at the first stage. The Lysholm scoring system was used to evaluate function and stability of knee joints before and after operation. All the patients were followed up for an average duration of 1.6 years (ranged, 0.8 to 3.2 years). The mean awaiting time for operation was 1.2 months. The Lysholm score was improved from preoperative 42.5 +/- 4.5 (ranged, 33 to 48) to the latest follow-up 78.1 +/- 3.9 (ranged, 57 to 95). The function of knee joint was improved obviously in the arthroscopic reconstruction patients, with joint range of motion exceeding 900 and with Varus & Valgus tests near to normal. All the patients had negative findings in the Lachman test at 70 degrees of flexion. Arthroscopic reconstruction should be the first choice in treating multiple ligament injuries of knee joints. If the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injuries can't be treated simultaneously, the posterior cruciate ligament injuries should be treated preferentially at the first stage and the anterior cruciate ligament injuries should be treated at the second stage. The diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament is easy to be missed.

  12. Skeletal ligament healing using the recombinant human amelogenin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhan, Salem; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Goren, Koby; Saba, Faris; Suki, Yarden; Sharon, Shay; Shilo, Dekel; Waxman, Jacob; Spitzer, Elad; Shahar, Ron; Atkins, Ayelet; Liebergall, Meir; Blumenfeld, Anat; Deutsch, Dan; Haze, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Injuries to ligaments are common, painful and debilitating, causing joint instability and impaired protective proprioception sensation around the joint. Healing of torn ligaments usually fails to take place, and surgical replacement or reconstruction is required. Previously, we showed that in vivo application of the recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)) resulted in enhanced healing of the tooth-supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether amelogenin might also enhance repair of skeletal ligaments. The rat knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) was chosen to prove the concept. Full thickness tear was created and various concentrations of rHAM(+), dissolved in propylene glycol alginate (PGA) carrier, were applied to the transected MCL. 12 weeks after transection, the mechanical properties, structure and composition of transected ligaments treated with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) were similar to the normal un-transected ligaments, and were much stronger, stiffer and organized than control ligaments, treated with PGA only. Furthermore, the proprioceptive free nerve endings, in the 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) treated group, were parallel to the collagen fibres similar to their arrangement in normal ligament, while in the control ligaments the free nerve endings were entrapped in the scar tissue at different directions, not parallel to the axis of the force. Four days after transection, treatment with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) increased the amount of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers at the injured site. In conclusion application of rHAM(+) dose dependently induced mechanical, structural and sensory healing of torn skeletal ligament. Initially the process involved recruitment and proliferation of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. A New Snowboard Injury Caused by "FLOW" Bindings A Complete Deltoid Ligament and Anterior Talofibular Ankle Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and

  14. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  15. The relationship of the marginal mandibular nerve to the mandibular osseocutaneous ligament and lesser ligaments of the lower face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettner, Franziska; Rueda, Steven; Ozturk, Cemile N; Ozturk, Can; Drake, Richard; Langevin, Claude-Jean; Zins, James E

    2015-02-01

    An in-depth understanding of the nuances of facial anatomy is the best means of preventing complications during facelift surgery. An appreciation of the operative details is complicated not only by the complexity of the anatomy but also by the variability in the nomenclature used. The authors have attempted to clarify these issues by detailing the relationships of the ligaments of the lower face both to each other and to the marginal mandibular nerve. The mandibular ligament, the platysma mandibular ligament, and the marginal mandibular nerve were identified in 22 cadaver halves. The gonial angle, and the lower mandibular border were used as perpendicular reference lines. The mean length, height, and depth of the mandibular ligament and the platysma mandibular ligament were calculated. The mean distance of the mandibular ligament from the gonial angle along the mandibular border was also noted:it was always located superior to the platysma mandibular ligament. The marginal mandibular "danger zone" was identified a quarter of the length of the mandibular body along the lower jaw border. Finally variability in nomenclature of the lower face ligaments was clarified. A topographic map of the structures of surgical importance in the lower face was constructed in the hope that this will prevent surgical errors during facelift surgery. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Ossification of the Ligaments in the Cervical Spine, Including Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament, Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament, and Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yukoh

    2018-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL), and ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) sometimes are seen in the same patients, but the exact coexisting frequencies are not clear especially in the cervical region. The most frequent combination is OPLL and OALL. Cervical OPLL can coexist with thoracic OLF but is rarely associated with cervical OLF. All of these ossifying diseases of the cervical spinal ligaments are influenced by dynamic factors of the spinal column. The most frequent levels in the cervical spine affected by OPLL, OALL, and OLF are different because of anatomic differences inherent to each ligament. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Howell, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common procedures in sports medicine. Several areas of controversy exist in ACL tear management which have engaged surgeons and researchers in debates towards identifying an ideal approach for these patients. This instructional review discusses the principles of ACL reconstruction in an attempt to provide guidelines and initiate a critical thinking approach on the most common areas of controversy regarding ACL reconstruction. Using high-level evidence from the literature, as presented in randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, operative versus conservative treatment, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation are discussed. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of the most common types of autografts, such as patellar tendon and hamstrings as well as allografts are presented. Key considerations for the anatomical, histological, biomechanical and clinical data (‘IDEAL’) graft positioning are reviewed. Cite this article: Paschos NK, Howell SM. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment. EFORT Open Rev 2016;398-408. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160032. PMID:28461919

  18. MR imaging of normal extrinsic wrist ligaments using thin slices with clinical and surgical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpour, M; De Maeseneer, M; Pouders, C; Van Overstraeten, L; Ceuterick, P; Fierens, Y; Goubau, J; De Mey, J

    2011-02-01

    Eighty-nine MR examinations of the wrist were retrospectively analyzed. MRI results were compared with clinical findings and/or arthroscopy. Thin proton density and T2 weighted sequences and 3D DESS weighted sequences were applied on a 1.5T scanner. On the palmar side three radiocarpal ligaments are recognized including the radioscaphocapitate, radiolunotriquetral, radioscapholunate, and midcarpal triquetroscaphoidal ligaments. Ulnocarpal ligaments include the ulnolunate ligament and the ulnotriquetral ligament. On the dorsal side three ligaments are recognized: the dorsal radiolunotriquetral, and the midcarpal triquetroscaphoidal and triquetro-trapezoido-trapezial. The collateral ligaments include the radial and ulnar collateral ligament. MR is a valuable technique in the assessment of the extrinsic and midcarpal ligaments. Depiction of the extrinsic ligaments can best be accomplished with coronal 3D DESS sequences and sagittal and transverse proton density and T2 weighted sequences with thin slices. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament repair with LARS (ligament advanced reinforcement system: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machotka Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL of the knee is common. Following complete rupture of the ACL, insufficient re-vascularization of the ligament prevents it from healing completely, creating a need for reconstruction. A variety of grafts are available for use in ACL reconstruction surgery, including synthetic grafts. Over the last two decades new types of synthetic ligaments have been developed. One of these synthetic ligaments, the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS, has recently gained popularity. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the current best available evidence for the effectiveness of the LARS as a surgical option for symptomatic, anterior cruciate ligament rupture in terms of graft stability, rehabilitation time and return to pre-injury function. Method This systematic review included studies using subjects with symptomatic, ACL ruptures undergoing LARS reconstruction. A range of electronic databases were searched in May 2010. The methodological quality of studies was appraised with a modified version of the Law critical appraisal tool. Data relating to study characteristics, surgical times, complication rates, outcomes related to knee stability, quality of life, function, and return to sport as well as details of rehabilitation programs and timeframes were collected. Results This review identified four studies of various designs, of a moderate methodological quality. Only one case of knee synovitis was reported. Patient satisfaction with LARS was high. Graft stability outcomes were found to be inconsistent both at post operative and at follow up periods. The time frames of rehabilitation periods were poorly reported and at times omitted. Return to pre-injury function and activity was often discussed but not reported in results. Conclusions There is an emerging body of evidence for LARS with comparable complication rates to traditional surgical techniques, and high patient

  20. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Prasad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The ankle joint is one of the most frequently injured joint. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. The talocrural joint is a major weight bearing joint of the body. The weight of the body is transmitted from the tibia and fibula to the talus which distributes the weight anteriorly and posteriorly within the foot. One sixth of the static load of the leg is carried by the fibula at the tibiofibular joint. These require a high degree of stability which is determined by the passive and dynamic factors. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. Conventionally, X-ray techniques have been used to diagnose ligament injuries. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has opened new horizons in the diagnosis and treatment of many musculoskeletal diseases of the ankle and foot. It demonstrates abnormalities in the bones and soft tissues before they become evident at other imaging modalities. The anatomy of the deltoid ligament

  1. Human cervical spine ligaments exhibit fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Kevin L; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2011-02-01

    Spinal ligaments provide stability and contribute to spinal motion patterns. These hydrated tissues exhibit time-dependent behavior during both static and dynamic loading regimes. Therefore, accurate viscoelastic characterization of these ligaments is requisite for development of computational analogues that model and predict time-dependent spine behavior. The development of accurate viscoelastic models must be preceded by rigorous, empirical evidence of linear viscoelastic, quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) or fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. This study utilized multiple physiological loading rates (frequencies) and strain amplitudes via cyclic loading and stress relaxation experiments in order to determine the viscoelastic behavior of the human lower cervical spine anterior longitudinal ligament, the posterior longitudinal ligament and the ligamentum flavum. The results indicated that the cyclic material properties of these ligaments were dependent on both strain amplitude and frequency. This strain amplitude-dependent behavior cannot be described using a linear viscoelastic formulation. Stress relaxation experiments at multiple strain magnitudes indicated that the shape of the relaxation curve was strongly dependent on strain magnitude, suggesting that a QLV formulation cannot adequately describe the comprehensive viscoelastic response of these ligaments. Therefore, a fully nonlinear viscoelastic formulation is requisite to model these lower cervical spine ligaments during activities of daily living. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Morphological study of mechanoreceptors in collateral ligaments of the ankle joint

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaochuan; Song, Weidong; Zheng, Cuihuan; Zhou, Shixiong; Bai, Shengbin

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern and types of sensory nerve endings in ankle collateral ligaments using histological techniques, in order to observe the morphology and distribution of mechanoreceptors in the collateral ligaments of cadaver ankle joint, and to provide the morphological evidence for the role of the ligament in joint sensory function. Methods Twelve lateral collateral ligaments including anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL; n?=?6), posterior talofibula...

  3. A comparison of spinal ligaments--differences between bipeds and quadrupeds.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, H.; Moreau, M.; Raso, V. J.; Russell, G.; Bagnall, K

    1995-01-01

    Following dissection, the spinal ligaments were observed in a selection of bipedal, pseudobipedal and quadrupedal animals during a search for an appropriate animal model for investigating the innervation of these ligaments. Midline spinal ligaments were found in all animals while lateral spinal ligaments could only be observed in bipedal (human) and pseudobipedal (avian) species. The presence of lateral spinal ligaments in these animals and their absence in quadrupeds suggests that the develo...

  4. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V.

  5. How isometric are the medial patellofemoral, superficial medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments of the knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Jan; Wong, Pius; Witvrouw, Eric; Sloten, Jos Vander; Bellemans, Johan

    2009-10-01

    Ligament isometry is a cornerstone in the description of normal knee function and thorough knowledge is mandatory for successful repair of torn ligaments. This study was undertaken to validate a novel experimental model for the study of ligament strains and to determine the length changes in the superficial medial collateral, lateral collateral, and medial patellofemoral ligaments. Descriptive laboratory study. Passive motions and loaded squats of 12 cadaveric specimens were performed while controlling ankle load and optically tracking the motion of the bones. Preexperiment and postexperiment computed axial tomography scans allow the transformation of rigid body motion to relative motion of relevant anatomic landmarks on the femur, tibia, and patella. The superficial medial collateral ligament is a near-isometric ligament with a strain of less than 2%. The ligament is a little more slack in midflexion (30 degrees to 50 degrees ) and in deep flexion, but length changes are not significant (P > .05). The lateral collateral ligament behaves near isometric (tension from the collateral ligaments (P superficial medial collateral ligament is a near-isometric ligament with no significant length changes. The medial patellofemoral ligament behaves differently in its cranial and caudal parts. In knees with chronic medial collateral ligament insufficiency, isometric repair of the superficial medial collateral ligament can be attempted. A medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction with a double fixation on the medial patellar border is supported. The cranial bundle should be tightened at full extension and the caudal bundle at 30 degrees of knee flexion.

  6. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... electrodes were inserted during arthroscopy into the normal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the reconstructed ACL in 11 patients who had a successful ACL re-construction 8 months to 12 years earlier. After the anesthesia had subsided, the PCL was stimulated electrically through the electrodes...

  7. Segmentation of Bony Structures with Ligament Attachment Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Heiko; Lamecker, Hans; Heller, Markus; Zachow, Stefan

    This work presents an approach towards reconstructing ligament and tendon attachment sites from 3D medical image data. We apply statistical shape models with an additional free form step to reconstruct the anatomical shape of the distal femur from CT data. After the shape fitting process the locations of ligament attachment sites, which are incorporated in the geometric model, are extracted and their positions optimized via an image based approach. To show the potential of our method we manually extracted the surface of 11 distal femora and their corresponding ligament attachment sites in clinical CT data and compared them to the results of our method.

  8. Mechanical behavior of nanoporous Au with fine ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pia, Giorgio; Delogu, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical model relating the overall mechanical behavior of NP metals to the bending response of thick ligaments is developed based on an idealized regular lattice of massive cubic nodes and thick ligaments with square cross section. The model predictions are compared with the Young's modulus and yield strength of nanoporous Au with ligaments a few nanometers in size obtained by numerical simulation and available in literature. It is shown that the model provides a quantitative description of the elastic and plastic deformation of nanoporous Au, reproducing to a considerable extent the numerically estimated Young's modulus and yield strength values.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament remnant and its values for preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Muneta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds the remnant-preserving anterior cruciate ligament surgery. Advantages of remnant preservation have been reported in regard to better healing and knee function, although no consensus has been reached. This review article discussed the value and meaning of anterior cruciate ligament remnant preservation in several sections such as effects on healing, remnant classification, biomechanical evaluation, relation to proprioception, animal studies, and clinical studies. We hope that this review will facilitate further discussion and investigation for better treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. So far, the current reviews have not provided sufficient scientific evidence to support the value of preserving the remnant.

  10. The fibular collateral ligament of the knee: a detailed review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Bin; Watanabe, Koichi; Hogan, Elizabeth; D'Antoni, Anthony V; Dilandro, Anthony C; Apaydin, Nihal; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-07-01

    The fibular collateral ligament (FCL) is one of the larger ligaments of the knee. The FCL, along with the popliteus tendon, arcuate popliteal ligament, and joint capsule, make up the posterolateral corner of the knee. Recently, there has there been an increased awareness and research on the structures of the posterolateral corner of the knee, particularly the FCL. Studying the detailed structure of the FCL may provide a better understanding that can lead to better diagnosis and treatments following injury. Therefore, this article reviews the FCL, which appears to be the primary restraint to varus rotation but is poorly oriented to resist external rotation of the knee. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Lateral Patellofemoral Ligament: An Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kalpit N; DeFroda, Steven F; Ware, James Kristopher; Koruprolu, Sarath C; Owens, Brett D

    2017-12-01

    Medial instability of the patellofemoral joint is a rare but known phenomenon that may result from an incompetent lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL). Surgical reconstruction of the LPFL has been described. However, anatomic details of the ligament have not been the subject of scrutiny. To describe the anatomic origin and insertion of the LPFL. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen, unpaired human cadaveric knees (mean age, 57 years) were dissected to identify the LPFL. The dissection was carried out by elevating the iliotibial band to expose the deep capsular layer of the knee joint, followed by a medial parapatellar approach to the knee. Then the quadriceps and patellar tendons were sectioned, and the LPFL was isolated by visualization and palpation. The LPFL was dissected to reveal its origin and insertion; these were measured with respect to the lateral epicondyle and the superior-inferior axis of the lateral patella, respectively. On average, the LPFL had a variable point of origin in location as well as width about the lateral epicondyle. The LPFL originated, on average, 2.6 mm distal (range, 13.1 mm proximal to 11.4 mm distal) and 10.8 mm anterior (range, 7.3 mm posterior to 14.9 mm anterior) to the lateral epicondyle. The LPFL insertion on the patella was more reliably found to be about 45% (range, 23.7%-58.4%) of its lateral articular surface. The insertion on the patella was found to be in the middle third of the lateral patella. The LPFL has an origin that is variable but, on average, was found to be distal and anterior to the lateral epicondyle. The patella insertion was more reliably found to be in the middle third of the lateral patella. These anatomic relationships can help the surgeon reconstruct the LPFL in a more anatomic fashion. Surgeons who are tasked with reconstruction of the LPFL of a patient with idiopathic medial instability or a previous aggressive lateral release of the knee may reference this article to perform an anatomic

  12. The phenomenon of "ligamentization": anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autogenous patellar tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, D; Kleiner, J B; Roux, R D; Harwood, F L; Akeson, W H

    1986-01-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with patellar tendon (PT) is a common procedure for the symptomatic ACL-deficient knee. Questions regarding graft incorporation, viability, and nutrition of the transplanted tissue are of concern. This relates to the graft's response to its new intrasynovial milieu and new physical forces. These factors were studied in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using PT and were evaluated with histological and biochemical parameters with respect to time. A histological and biochemical metamorphosis of the grafted PT occurred in this study. Autografts demonstrated a gradual assumption of the microscopic properties of normal ACL; by 30 weeks postoperatively, cell morphology was ligamentous in appearance. Normally, type III collagen is not observed in PT, however, a gradual increase in its concentration was seen in the grafts; by 30 weeks its concentration (10%) was the same as in normal ACL. Similarly, glycosaminoglycans content increased from its normally low level in PT to that found in native ACL. Collagen-reducible crosslink analysis demonstrated that grafted tissue changed from the normal PT pattern of low dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL) and high histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (HHMD) to the pattern seen in normal ACL (high DHLNL and low HHMD) by 30 weeks. These data suggest that when PT is placed in the anatomic and environmental milieu of the ACL, a "ligamentization" of the grafted tissue results; also the autograft initially depends on synovial fluid nutrition, as revascularization occurs after 6 weeks.

  13. Does the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament promote ligamentization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ill; Kim, Byoung Min; Kho, Duk Hwan; Kwon, Sai Won; Kim, Hyeung June; Hwang, Hyun Ryong

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in ligamentization between the remnant-preserving (RP) and remnant-sacrificing (RS) techniques in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective comparative study was carried out on 98 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction using either an RP (n=56) or RS (n=42) technique. MRI was performed at one of four time points postoperatively, and the signal intensity of the ACL graft was analyzed using the signal to noise quotient (SNQ) ratio and inter-bundle high signal intensity, along with an analysis of the survival rate of remnant tissue. The mean SNQ ratio of grafted tendons in the RP group was significantly higher than that seen in the RS group in the proximal and middle regions two to four months after surgery (Pligamentization of grafts in the RP group proceeded more quickly. Preserving the remnant in ACL reconstruction appears to have a positive effect on ligamentization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Proprioception in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees and its relevance in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL not only causes mechanical instability but also leads to a functional deficit in the form of diminished proprioception of the knee joint. "Functional" recovery is often incomplete even after "anatomic" arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, as some patients with a clinically satisfactory repair and good ligament tension continue to complain of a feeling of instability and giving way, although the knee does not sublux on clinical testing. Factors that may play a role could be proprioceptive elements, as the intact ACL has been shown to have significant receptors. Significant data have come to light demonstrating proprioceptive differences between normal and injured knees, and often between injured and reconstructed knees. ACL remnants have been shown to have proprioceptive fibers that could enhance functional recovery if they adhere to or grow into the reconstructed ligament. Conventionally the torn remnants are shaved off from the knee before graft insertion; modern surgical techniques, with remnant sparing methods have shown better outcomes and functional recovery, and this could be an avenue for future research and development. This article analyzes and reviews our understanding of the sensory element of ACL deficiency, with specific reference to proprioception as an important component of functional knee stability. The types of mechanoreceptors, their distribution and presence in ACL remnants is reviewed, and suggestions are made to minimize soft tissue shaving during ACL reconstruction to ensure a better functional outcome in the reconstructed knee.

  15. Mechanical Analysis of Extra-Articular Knee Ligaments. Part two: Tendon grafts used for knee ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Kristof; Bellemans, Johan; Scheys, Lennart; Eijnde, Bert O; Slane, Joshua; Claes, Steven

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information about the mechanical properties of grafts used for knee ligament reconstructions and to compare those results with the mechanical properties of native knee ligaments. Eleven cadaveric knees were dissected for the semitendinosus, gracilis, iliotibial band (ITB), quadriceps and patellar tendon. Uniaxial testing to failure was performed using a standardized method and mechanical properties (elastic modulus, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, strain energy density) were determined. The elastic modulus of the gracilis tendon (1458±476MPa) (Pligament reconstructions often differ significantly from the original knee ligament which the graft is supposed to emulate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: etiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Silvers, Holly J; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-03-01

    The relatively high risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture among female athletes has been a major impetus for investigation into the etiology of this injury. A number of risk factors have been identified, both internal and external to the athlete, including neuromuscular, anatomical, hormonal, shoe-surface interaction, and environmental, such as weather. The anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors, often gender related, are the focus of most ACL injury prevention programs. Although studies have shown that biomechanic- centered prevention programs can reduce the risk of ACL injury, many questions remain unanswered. More research is needed to increase our understanding of the risk factors for ACL injury; how injury prevention programs work and can the clinical application of such programs be optimized.

  17. J. Leonard Goldner Award 2010. Ligament balancing for total ankle arthroplasty: an in vitro evaluation of the elongation of the hind- and midfoot ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merian, Marc; Glisson, Richard R; Nunley, James A

    2011-05-01

    The changes in length of the hindfoot ligaments in response to alterations in ankle and subtalar joint orientation under physiologic load in eight fresh-frozen cadaver limbs were documented. In eversion, the tibiocalcaneal (11% ± 4%, mean ± SD], calcaneofibular (6% ± 4%), posterior talofibular (7% ± 4%), posterolateral talocalcaneal (21% ± 9%), posteromedial talocalcaneal (33% ± 45%) and calcaneonavicular (bifurcate) (8% ± 7%) ligaments were elongated relative to their lengths in inversion. In inversion, the anterior capsular (talocalcaneal) (5% ± 3%) and the plantar cuboidnavicular (5% ± 6%) ligaments were elongated relative to their everted lengths. In dorsiflexion, the superficial (26% ± 8%) and deep posterior tibiotalar (30% ± 13%), calcaneofibular (8% ± 4%), tibiocalcaneal (4% ± 2%) and lateral talocalcaneal (cervical) (2% ± 1%) ligaments were elongated. In plantarflexion, the tibionavicular (26% ± 5%) and the anterior talofibular (7% ± 4%) ligaments were lengthened. No statistically significant elongation was documented in any ankle position for the anterior tibiotalar, talocalcaneal interosseous, plantar calcaneocuboid, calcaneocuboid (bifurcate), all components of the spring ligament, and the dorsal cuboidnavicular ligaments. Components of the deltoid ligament complex elongated largest at the ankle joint with any hindfoot movement but inversion. Therefore, selective release of components of the deltoid ligament complex may provide a means for achieving optimal ligament balancing in total ankle arthroplasty. Specifically, release of the superficial and deep posterior tibiotalar ligament may improve range of motion in total ankle arthroplasties, whereas the release of the tibiocalcaneal ligament may correct a varus talar tilt.

  18. Knee-ligament injuries associated with leg fractures. Prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, A; Kasić, M; Hudolin, I

    1992-09-01

    It has been proved in 25-35% of the cases that knee-ligament injuries are associated with fracture of the femoral diaphysis. No such association has been confirmed between leg fractures and knee ligaments. In order to find out if this is a coincidence, a prospective study was conducted on 229 patients who had undergone operations for leg fractures at various locations and of variable intensity. It was established in 41 cases (17.34%) that the leg fracture was associated with knee-ligament injuries, resulting in joint instability. A significantly higher percentage of associated ligament lesions was found in open fractures as opposed to closed leg fractures. The examination was carried out with the patient under general or block anesthesia. On the basis of what was established it is recommended that the knee be examined clinically in all leg osteosynthesis cases.

  19. Telomere length of anterior crucial ligament after rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsot, Elodie; Langberg, Henning; Krogsgaard, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) obtained during ACL reconstruction: the macroscopically injured proximal part and macroscopically noninjured mid- and distal portions in eight subjects (age 28 ± 8 years). The mean telomere length in ACL was within normal range of values usually reported for other......The regeneration of ligaments following injury is a slow process compared to the healing of many other tissues and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the proliferative potential of ligaments by assessing telomere length within three distinct parts...... tissues indicating that the endogenous machinery responsible for the proliferative potential of ligament is not implicated in its poor healing capacity. The three ACL parts showed similar mean TRF lengths (distal part: 11.5 ± 0.8 kbp, mid-portion: 11.8 ± 1.2 kbp, proximal part: 11.9 ± 1.6 kbp...

  20. Tendon and ligament adaptation to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, T A; Beaupré, G S; Carter, D R

    2000-01-01

    This study provides a theoretical and computational basis for understanding and predicting how tendons and ligaments adapt to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization. In a previous study, we introduced a model that described the growth and development of tendons and ligaments. In this study, we use the same model to predict changes in the cross-sectional area, modulus, and strength of tendons and ligaments due to increased or decreased loading. The model predictions are consistent with the results of experimental exercise and immobilization studies performed by other investigators. These results suggest that the same fundamental principles guide both development and adaptation. A basic understanding of these principles can contribute both to prevention of tendon and ligament injuries and to more effective rehabilitation when injury does occur.

  1. Ligament tissue engineering: an evolutionary materials science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T; Freeman, Joseph W

    2005-12-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is important for knee stabilization. Unfortunately, it is also the most commonly injured intra-articular ligament. Due to poor vascularization, the ACL has inferior healing capability and is usually replaced after significant damage has occurred. Currently available replacements have a host of limitations, this has prompted the search for tissue-engineered solutions for ACL repair. Presently investigated scaffolds range from twisted fiber architectures composed of silk fibers to complex three-dimensional braided structures composed of poly (L-lactic acid) fibers. The purpose of these tissue-engineered constructs is to apply approaches such as the use of porous scaffolds, use of cells, and the application of growth factors to promote ligament tissue regeneration while providing mechanical properties similar to natural ligament.

  2. Creep behaviour and creep mechanisms of normal and healing ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Gail Marilyn

    Patients with knee ligament injuries often undergo ligament reconstructions to restore joint stability and, potentially, abate osteoarthritis. Careful literature review suggests that in 10% to 40% of these patients the graft tissue "stretches out". Some graft elongation is likely due to creep (increased elongation of tissue under repeated or sustained load). Quantifying creep behaviour and identifying creep mechanisms in both normal and healing ligaments is important for finding clinically relevant means to prevent creep. Ligament creep was accurately predicted using a novel yet simple structural model that incorporated both collagen fibre recruitment and fibre creep. Using the inverse stress relaxation function to model fibre creep in conjunction with fibre recruitment produced a superior prediction of ligament creep than that obtained from the inverse stress relaxation function alone. This implied mechanistic role of fibre recruitment during creep was supported using a new approach to quantify crimp patterns at stresses in the toe region (increasing stiffness) and linear region (constant stiffness) of the stress-strain curve. Ligament creep was relatively insensitive to increases in stress in the toe region; however, creep strain increased significantly when tested at the linear region stress. Concomitantly, fibre recruitment was evident at the toe region stresses; however, recruitment was limited at the linear region stress. Elevating the water content of normal ligament using phosphate buffered saline increased the creep response. Therefore, both water content and fibre recruitment are important mechanistic factors involved in creep of normal ligaments. Ligament scars had inferior creep behaviour compared to normal ligaments even after 14 weeks. In addition to inferior collagen properties affecting fibre recruitment and increased water content, increased glycosaminoglycan content and flaws in scar tissue were implicated as potential mechanisms of scar creep

  3. Complications following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the English NHS.

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, Simon S.; Dowen, Daniel; James, Philip; Serrano Pedraza, Ignacio; Reed, Mike R; Deehan, David

    2012-01-01

    Unlike the English National Joint Registry (NJR) for arthroplasty, no surgeon driven national database currently exists for ligament surgery in England. Therefore information on outcome and adverse events following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery is limited to case series. This restricts the ability to make formal recommendations upon surgical care. Prospectively collected data, which is routinely collected on every NHS patient admitted to hospital in England, was analysed to determi...

  4. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm(2) in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm(2) in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura.

  5. Spring Ligament Complex and Posterior Tibial Tendon: MR Anatomy and Findings in Acquired Adult Flatfoot Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengiardi, Bernard; Pinto, Clinton; Zanetti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    The spring ligament complex is an important stabilizer of the medial ankle, together with the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) and the deltoid ligament complex. Lesions in these stabilizers result in acquired adult flatfoot deformity. The spring ligament complex includes three ligaments: the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament, the medioplantar oblique calcaneonavicular ligament, and the inferoplantar longitudinal calcaneonavicular ligament. Normal MR imaging anatomy of the spring ligament complex and the PTT are described and illustrated in detail. Isolated lesions of the spring ligament complex are rare. In most cases, spring ligament complex lesions are secondary to PTT dysfunction. The best criteria for an injury of the clinically relevant superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament are increased signal on proton-density or T2-weighted sequences with thickening (> 5 mm), thinning (lesion seen by the orthopedic foot surgeon at the junction between the tibiospring ligament and the superomedial portion of the calcaneonavicular ligament is commonly classified as a spring ligament injury. In addition, an overview of MR imaging findings in different stages of the acquired adult flatfoot deformity is provided. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Cervical ligamentous instability in a canine in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, R; Moran, D J; Fechner, R E; Ruch, W W; Drucker, S; Hooper, W E; McCoig, J A

    1987-12-01

    A canine in vivo model of midcervical ligamentous instability was developed by dividing the anterior longitudinal ligament, anulus fibrosus, and all posterior ligamentous structures including the ligamentum flavum. The natural history of healing in the model, the effect on its healing by an adjacent one-level arthrodesis, and the effect of a one-level arthrodesis on normal adjacent ligamentous structures were studied radiographically, mechanically, and histologically. The authors determined that healing takes place primarily by anterior scar formation in their instability model but not to a degree sufficient to recreate normal mechanical stability. After three months, healing in the model was not affected by an adjacent arthrodesis; however, acutely, instability apparently was increased as three animals became quadriplegic between the second and fourth postoperative days. Arthrodesis did not affect adjacent normal ligamentous structures, during this period. Incomplete healing in the authors' model supports those who advocate arthrodesis as the treatment of choice for destabilizing cervical ligamentous injury. The authors previously reported the case of a patient who sustained bilateral facet dislocations adjacent to an arthrodesed segment and questioned whether this resulted from a stress-concentrating effect. This study indicates that this could well have been the case acutely. Thus, inadvertent exclusion of an unstable segment from an arthrodesis has potentially catastrophic results. Finally, the authors also have previously questioned whether arthrodesis of a midcervical segment could lead to instability of adjacent normal segments. This project does not support such a concern, at least for the three postoperative months of study.

  7. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Sun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  8. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok

    2013-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability.

  9. [VARIANT ANATOMY OF SPLENIC LIGAMENTS AND ARTERIES PASSING THROUGH THEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaivoronskiy, I V; Kotiv, B N; Alekseyev, V S; Nichiporuk, G I

    2015-01-01

    The research was performed on 15 non embalmed bodies and 32 abdominal complexes of adult individuals. The comparative study of variant anatomy of splenic ligaments and architectonics of arteries passing through them was carried out to substantiate the mobilization of splenopancreatic complex. Anatomical and angiographic restudied were carried out using preparation, morphometry, injection of gastric, pancreatic and splenic vascular bed with red lead suspension. It was established that the form and sizes of splenic ligaments and their interrelation with the branches of the splenic artery were variable. The minimal and maximal sizes of gastrolienal, phrenicosplenic and splenocolic ligaments differed 2-3 times. In most cases, spleen was fixed in abdominal cavity by many short ligaments. It was shown that architectonics and topography of main branches of spleen artery were determined by morphometric characteristics of the spleen proper and its ligaments. The knowledge of splenic ligament variant anatomy allows a new perspective to approach to substantiate different methods of the mobilization of spleno-pancreatic complex during surgical operations on organs of the upper part of the peritoneal cavity and organ-preserving surgery of the spleen.

  10. Chronic multiple knee ligament injuries: epidemiological analysis of more than one hundred cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalvo Zosimo Bispo Júnior

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diagnosis and treatment of multiple ligament injuries of the knee remain a real challenge for most surgeons. OBJECTIVE: To find out the epidemiological profile of patients surgically treated at a Reference Service with more than one chronic ligament injury in the knee joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Of a total of 978 operated patients, 109 presented at least two associated ligament injuries in the same knee. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated. RESULTS: The anterior cruciate ligament group presented a larger number of cases of ligament injuries related with sports practice and falls, while the posterior cruciate ligament and anterior cruciate ligament + posterior cruciate ligament groups presented more cases related to traffic accidents and trauma with object (weight on the knee (p<0.001. The varus group presented significantly higher values of time since injury (p<0.01. In the group with new anterior cruciate ligament injury (neoligament associated with other ligament injuries the disruption times were higher, showing statistical significance (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Anterior cruciate ligament injury associated with other ligament injuries other than posterior cruciate ligament injury are related to sports practice and falls. Posterior cruciate ligament injury associated to other ligament injuries, including or not anterior cruciate ligament injury, are related to traffic accidents and direct trauma caused by an object on the knee. Significant delay between primary ligament injuries and their reconstructions generates varus deformity of the affected knee. In spite of the large delay in seeking medical treatment, few patients with neoligament anterior cruciate ligament injury and other combined disruptions will develop varus deformity.

  11. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 2: Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitri, Marco; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent biomechanical studies have demonstrated that an extra-articular lateral knee structure, most recently referred to as the anterolateral ligament (ALL), contributes to overall rotational stability of the knee. However, the effect of anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) has not been biomechanically investigated or validated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical function of anatomic ALLR in the setting of a combined ACL and ALL injury. More specifically, this investigation focused on the effect of ALLR on resultant rotatory stability when performed in combination with concomitant ACLR. It was hypothesized that ALLR would significantly reduce internal rotation and axial plane translation laxity during a simulated pivot-shift test compared with isolated ACLR. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were evaluated with a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Knee kinematics were evaluated with simulated clinical examinations including a simulated pivot-shift test consisting of coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques, a 5-N·m internal rotation torque, and an 88-N anterior tibial load. Kinematic differences between ACLR with an intact ALL, ACLR with ALLR, and ACLR with a deficient ALL were compared with the intact state. Single-bundle ACLR tunnels and ALLR tunnels were placed anatomically according to previous quantitative anatomic attachment descriptions. Combined anatomic ALLR and ACLR significantly improved the rotatory stability of the knee compared with isolated ACLR in the face of a concurrent ALL deficiency. During a simulated pivot-shift test, ALLR significantly reduced internal rotation and axial plane tibial translation when compared with ACLR with an ALL deficiency. Isolated ACLR for the treatment of a combined ACL and ALL injury was not able to restore stability of the knee, resulting in a significant increase in

  12. Primary Anterolateral Ligament Rupture in Patients Requiring Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Retrospective Magnetic Resonance Imaging Review

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, James Bradley; Yildirim, Baris; Richter, Dustin L.; Etier, Brian Edward; Diduch, David R.; Anderson, Mark W.; Pierce, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), only 60% of patients are able to return to their pre-injury level of sports with nearly 15% experiencing persistent rotatory instability. Young patients returning to pivoting sports experience high rates of graft tear and subsequent need for revision ACLR. Recently, the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has gained attention as an important rotatory stabilizer about the knee in prevention of the pivot shift phenomenon. It is theori...

  13. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Results Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. Conclusions The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage. PMID:23557095

  14. Morphology of the transverse ligament of the atlas and the alar ligaments in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes var).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynska, Marta; Barszcz, Karolina; Janczyk, Pawel; Wasowicz, Michal; Czubaj, Norbert

    2013-04-04

    Recent new anatomical and histological features of craniocervical junction in dogs and cats were described providing evidence of differences between the carnivore species. No information on these structures in foxes exists. Two parts of the alar ligaments were found. A longer one aroused from dens of axis to the internal (medial) surface of the occipital condyles and was called apical part. A shorter part originated from the entire length of the lateral edge of the dens of axis and terminated on the internal wall of the vertebral foramen of atlas and thus was called the lateral part. The transverse ligament of the atlas was widened in the mid region, above the dens of axis, and thickened at enthesis. Periosteal fibrocartilage was detected in the transverse ligament of the atlas at the enthesis, and sesamoid fibrocartilage was present on periphery in the middle of the ligament. The craniocervical junction in foxes differs in part from other carnivores such as dogs and cats but resembles that of mesaticephalic dogs. The sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilage supports the transverse ligament of the atlas whereas the alar ligaments have no cartilage.

  15. Gross, Arthroscopic, and Radiographic Anatomies of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Foundations for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irarrázaval, Sebastián; Albers, Marcio; Chao, Tom; Fu, Freddie H

    2017-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the more studied structures in the knee joint. It is not a tubular structure, but is much narrower in its midsubstance and broader at its ends, producing an hourglass shape. The ACL is composed of 2 functional bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles, that are named for their location of insertion on the anterior surface of the tibial plateau. Although the relative contribution in terms of total cross-sectional area of the ACL has been noted to be equal in regards to each bundle, dynamically these bundles demonstrate different properties for knee function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In-vivo glenohumeral translation and ligament elongation during abduction and abduction with internal and external rotation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massimini, Daniel F; Boyer, Patrick J; Papannagari, Ramprasad; Gill, Thomas J; Warner, Jon P; Li, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    ...) compare the inferred glenohumeral ligament functions with previous literature and 3) create a baseline data of healthy adult shoulder glenohumeral ligament lengths as controls for future studies...

  17. Quantitative morphology of the lateral ligaments of the spine. Assessment of their importance in maintaining lateral stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Raso, J V; Moreau, M J; Russell, G; Hill, D L; Bagnall, K M

    1994-12-01

    This study used human cadaveric material to examine the three-dimensional morphology and biomechanics of the superior and lateral costotransverse ligaments and the intertransverse ligament of the spine. To provide descriptive and quantitative data on the morphology of the lateral ligaments of the spine and to assess their importance in maintaining lateral stability, especially regarding the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis. Ligaments have been reported as being able to stabilize the spine by mechanical constraint and by neurologic feed-back. Midline spinal ligaments have been well studied but do not appear to be effective in maintaining lateral stability because of their sites of attachment. Lateral ligaments of the spine have not been adequately documented in the literature. The morphology, sites of attachment, and dimensions of the superior costotransverse ligament, lateral costotransverse ligament, and intertransverse ligament from thoracic level 7 to thoracic level 10 were determined on 32 human cadavers. The intertransverse ligament was found not to be a true ligament. The lateral costotransverse ligament was a true ligament but did not have the characteristics appropriate for involvement in lateral stability. The superior costotransverse ligament also was a true ligament and had all of the characteristics appropriate for involvement in the active lateral balancing of the spine. In contrast to the midline ligaments of the spine, the superior costotransverse ligament perhaps is the most important ligament for active lateral balancing of the spine and warrants further study, particularly regarding the development of idiopathic scoliosis.

  18. Prevalence and progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia in the Welsh springer spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J A C; Ekiri, A; Mellersh, C S

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia in a large group of Welsh springer spaniels; to investigate associations between pectinate ligament dysplasia and age, sex and intraocular pressure and between intraocular pressure and age and sex; and to investigate progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia in individual dogs. In a prospective study, gonioscopy was performed in both eyes of 227 Welsh springer spaniels and intraocular pressure measured by rebound tonometry. Eyes were classified as "unaffected" if 0% of the iridocorneal angle was affected with pectinate ligament dysplasia (grade 0), "mildly affected" if 90% was affected (grade 3). In a retrospective study, progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia over time was investigated for 65 dogs. One hundred and thirty-nine of 227 dogs (61·2%) were affected by pectinate ligament dysplasia (grades 1 to 3) and 82/227 (36·2%) were moderately or severely affected. There was a significant association between pectinate ligament dysplasia and age. There were no associations between pectinate ligament dysplasia and intraocular pressure or pectinate ligament dysplasia and sex. Thirty-five of 65 dogs (53·8%) demonstrated progression of pectinate ligament dysplasia. Prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia was high despite widespread screening and selection against the condition. Our data indicate that gonioscopic features of pectinate ligament dysplasia can progress in the Welsh springer spaniel. Dogs deemed unaffected at an early age may subsequently be diagnosed with pectinate ligament dysplasia. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. Pitfalls of magnetic resonance imaging of alar ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sumit; Hol, Per Kristian; Tillung, Terje [Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Laerum, L. Thea [Anglo-European College of Chiropractic, Bournemouth (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    An observational study of variations in the appearance of the alar ligament on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the normal range of lateral flexion and rotation of the atlas was performed to validate some of the premises underlying the use of MRI for the detection of injuries to the alar ligament. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included. Three sets of coronal proton-density images, and axial T2-weighted images of the craniovertebral junction, were obtained at 0.5 T with the neck in neutral position and laterally flexed (coronal proton density) or rotated (axial T2). Five of the subjects also underwent imaging at 1.5 T. The scans were independently examined twice by two radiologists. The presence of alar ligaments was recorded and a three-point scale used to grade the extent of hyperintensity exhibited by the structures: the ligament were graded as 2 and 3 if, respectively, less or more of its cross-section was hyperintense, whereas grade 1 represented a hypointense ligament. The effect of lateral flexion on image quality was assessed. Concordance analysis of the data were performed before and after dichotomising the data on grading. The atlanto-axial angle and rotation of the atlas were measured. The magnitude of movement to right was normalised to that to the left to give, respectively, the flexion index and the rotation index. The alar ligaments were most reliably seen on coronal proton-density scans, with a Maxwell's RE of 0.96 as compared with 0.46 for sagittal images. Flexion of the neck improved definition of the ligaments in only rare instances. (orig.)

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel dynamic posterior cruciate ligament brace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Christian H; Schmoelz, Werner; Mayr, Raul; Keiler, Alexander; Schöttle, Philip B; Attal, René

    2016-03-01

    Use of a rigid brace or cast immobilization is recommended in conservative treatment or postoperative rehabilitation after a posterior cruciate ligament injury. To prevent the loss of knee joint function and muscle activity often associated with this, a flexible knee brace has been developed that allows an adjustable anteriorly directed force to be applied to the calf in order to prevent posterior tibial translation. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the impact of this novel dynamic brace on posterior tibial translation after posterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. A Telos stress device was used to provoke posterior tibial translation in seven human lower limb specimens, and stress radiographs were taken at 90° of knee flexion. Posterior tibial translation was measured in the native knees with an intact posterior cruciate ligament; after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament dissection with and without a brace; and after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with and without a brace. The force applied with the brace was measured using a pressure sensor. Posterior tibial translation was significantly reduced (P=0.032) after application of the brace with an anteriorly directed force of 50N to the knees with the dissected posterior cruciate ligament. The brace also significantly reduced posterior tibial translation after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in comparison with reconstructed knees without a brace (P=0.005). Posterior tibial translation was reduced to physiological values using this dynamic brace system that allows an anteriorly directed force to be applied to the calf. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang-Yun; Feng, Jiang-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Zi-Quan

    2017-08-25

    The receiver operator characteristic(ROC) curve was used to determine the best Blumensaat angle for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury, so as to objectively evaluate the diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Total 167 patients who had knee arthroscopic treatment in a hospital from January 2015 to January 2016 were retrospectively studied, and the patients' age, gender, left and right limb condition were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups according to Blumensaat angle measured on the MRI: group A(Blumensaat angle0°). The ROC curve was drawn from the statistical data of the group B to get the best critical value of the anterior cruciate ligament injury when the Blumensaat angle was more than 0°. According to the best critical value obtained by ROC curve, the coincidence rate of the total sample was obtained. There were no significant differences in patients' age, gender, and affected limbs. There were 51 patients in group A, in which 49 patients were diagnosed as anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy(gold standard for diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury), and 2 patients were diagnosed as no anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy. When the Blumensaat angle was=15°, the probability of anterior cruciate ligament injury was greater. When the Blumensaat angle was 0° to 15°, the anterior cruciate ligament was more likely to be not injured. The Blumensaat angle=15° were used to diagnose the injury of anterior cruciate ligament. Compared with the results of arthroscopy, the coincidence rate of the total sample was 92.8%. Blumensaat angle is helpful to diagnose the ACL injuries. When the Blumensaat angle was =15°, the probability of ACL injury is greater.

  2. Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in major league baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brett W; Webner, David; Huffman, G Russell; Sennett, Brian J

    2007-04-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction is commonly performed in major league pitchers, but little is known about pitching performance after a return to major league play. Pitching performance after ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction returns to baseline by the second season after surgery. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Data were reviewed for 68 major league pitchers who pitched in at least 1 major league game before undergoing ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction between 1998 and 2003. Mean innings pitched per season, earned run average, and walks and hits per inning pitched were compared for each major league pitcher before and after surgery. All demographic and performance variables were analyzed for an association with ulnar collateral ligament insufficiency and a successful return to major league play. Fifty-six (82%) pitchers returned to major league play at a mean of 18.5 months after surgery with no significant change in mean earned run average or walks and hits per inning pitched. The mean innings pitched per season was not statistically different from controls by the second season after surgery. Starting pitchers demonstrated a higher risk of ulnar collateral ligament injury requiring reconstruction. More experienced pitchers and those with a higher earned run average were less likely to require ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction. No factors predictive of a successful return to play were identified. Most major league pitchers return from ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction by the second season after surgery with no statistical change in mean innings pitched, earned run average, or walks and hits per inning pitched from preinjury levels.

  3. Mastication and the Postorbital Ligament: Dynamic Strain in Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Susan W.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Lemme, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although the FEED database focuses on muscle activity patterns, it is equally suitable for other physiological recording and especially for synthesizing different types of information. The present contribution addresses the interaction between muscle activity and ligamentary stretch during mastication. The postorbital ligament is the thickened edge of a septum dividing the orbital contents from the temporal fossa and is continuous with the temporal fascia. As a tensile element, this fascial complex could support the zygomatic arch against the pull of the masseter muscle. An ossified postorbital bar has evolved repeatedly in mammals, enabling resistance to compression and shear in addition to tension. Although such ossification clearly reinforces the skull against muscle pull, the most accepted explanation is that it helps isolate the orbital contents from contractions of the temporalis muscle. However, it has never been demonstrated that the contraction of jaw muscles deforms the unossified ligament. We examined linear deformation of the postorbital ligament in minipigs, Sus scrofa, along with electromyography of the jaw muscles and an assessment of changes in pressure and shape in the temporalis. During chewing, the ligament elongated (average 0.9%, maximum 2.8%) in synchrony with the contraction of the elevator muscles of the jaw. Although the temporalis bulged outward and created substantial pressure against the braincase, the superficial fibers usually retracted caudally, away from the postorbital ligament. In anesthetized animals, stimulating either the temporalis or the masseter muscle in isolation usually elongated the ligament (average 0.4–0.7%). These results confirm that contraction of the masticatory muscles can potentially distort the orbital contents and further suggest that the postorbital ligament does function as a tension member resisting the pull of the masseter on the zygomatic arch. PMID:21593142

  4. Concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Shu; Li, Rui; Yue, Xianhu

    2015-01-01

    To identify and characterize the concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee. A total of 37 cases of floating knee were enrolled. Arthroscopic or open surgical examination of the knee, Lachman test, posterior drawer's test, and varus and valgus stress tests under anesthesia were carried out to determine the incidence of knee injury. Through arthroscopic and open surgical examinations, a medial meniscal tear was detected in 14 (37.8%) cases and a lateral meniscal tear in 11 (29.7%). Twenty-one (56.8%) patients had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury including complete injury in 6 and incomplete injury in 15 cases. Three (8.1%) patients had posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear, including complete injury in 1 and incomplete injury in 2. Varus and valgus stress tests revealed that 10 (27.0%) and 7 (18.9%) patients had medial and lateral collateral ligament (MCL and LCL) laxity, respectively. Lachman test showed positive in 8 (21.6%) cases. Posterior drawer test showed positive in 3 (8.1%) cases. Twenty-six (70.3%) patients had knee ligamentous injuries. ACL injury was the most common ligamentous injury. ACL injury in 15 (71.4%) cases was associated with meniscal injury, including medial meniscal injury in 9 (42.9%) and lateral meniscal injury in 6 (28.6%). Physicians should pay attention to the concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee. Careful clinical examination with aid of arthroscopic examination is helpful for the early diagnosis and treatment of these injuries.

  5. Knee Bracing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Merchán, E Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Although some articles in the literature are in favor of the use of a postoperative brace after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, this review found that several systematic reviews and other reports on the topic do not support the use of a postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. There is no scientific evidence so far to support the routine use of a functional knee brace following a successful ACL reconstruction in the postoperative course. Most authors believe that bracing is not necessary. There is insufficient evidence to inform current practice. Good-quality randomized trials are required to remedy this situation. Future studies should better define the role of a brace following ACL surgery. A search of MEDLINE for articles published between January 1, 1995, and September 30, 2013, was performed. Key search terms used were ACL reconstruction and knee brace. Ninety-one articles were found, but only 28 focused on the subject of bracing after ACL reconstruction and were selected for this review. Several systematic reviews and randomized, controlled trials on the topic do not recommend the use of postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. Postoperative bracing after ACL reconstruction does not seem to help with pain, function, rehabilitation, and stability. The literature does not support the use of a postoperative brace following ACL reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e602-e609.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Current trends in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquin, Thomas R; Wind, William M; Fineberg, Marc S; Smolinski, Robert J; Buyea, Cathy M

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, a survey regarding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was mailed to physician members of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. A total of 993 responses were received from 1747 possible respondents (57%). The number of ACL reconstructions per year ranged from 1 to 275 (mean=55). The most important factors in the timing of surgery were knee range of motion and effusion. Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft was most commonly preferred (46%), followed by hamstring tendon autograft (32%) and allografts (22%). Five years earlier, BPTB grafts were more frequent and hamstring tendon and allografts were less frequent (63%, 25%, and 12%, respectively). A single-incision arthroscopic technique was used by 90%. Most allowed return to full activity at 5 to 6 months, with a trend toward earlier return for BPTB grafts; quadriceps strength was an important factor in the decision. There was limited experience (4%) with double-bundle and computer-assisted ACL reconstruction. Arthroscopic-assisted, single-incision reconstruction using a BPTB autograft fixed with metal interference screws remains the most common technique used for primary ACL reconstruction. In the past 5 years, the use of alternative graft sources and methods of fixation has increased. Consensus regarding the best graft type, fixation method, and postoperative protocol is still lacking.

  7. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  8. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  9. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Samitier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient.

  10. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Samitier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient.

  11. Biomechanics and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vercillo Fabio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For years, bioengineers and orthopaedic surgeons have applied the principles of mechanics to gain valuable information about the complex function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. The results of these investigations have provided scientific data for surgeons to improve methods of ACL reconstruction and postoperative rehabilitation. This review paper will present specific examples of how the field of biomechanics has impacted the evolution of ACL research. The anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL as well as the discovery of new tools in ACL-related biomechanical study are first introduced. Some important factors affecting the surgical outcome of ACL reconstruction, including graft selection, tunnel placement, initial graft tension, graft fixation, graft tunnel motion and healing, are then discussed. The scientific basis for the new surgical procedure, i.e., anatomic double bundle ACL reconstruction, designed to regain rotatory stability of the knee, is presented. To conclude, the future role of biomechanics in gaining valuable in-vivo data that can further advance the understanding of the ACL and ACL graft function in order to improve the patient outcome following ACL reconstruction is suggested.

  12. Morphological Analysis of the Transverse Carpal Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacek, Corey A.; Chakan, Matthew; Goitz, Robert J.; Kaufmann, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Transection of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) for carpal tunnel syndrome is commonly performed, yet actual knowledge of TCL morphology is rudimentary and the anatomical terminology is inconsistently used. The purpose of this study was to perform a morphological analysis of the TCL, to redefine the anatomical terminology concerning the TCL and surrounding structures, and to evaluate any correlation between external, measurable hand dimensions, and TCL dimensions. A silicone casting technique and digitization were employed to measure the morphology of the TCL in cadaveric specimens and to construct a three-dimensional TCL model. The TCL was the thickest distally at the midline and ulnar segments and the thickest proximally at the radial segment. External hand dimensions did not significantly correlate with TCL dimensions. The TCL thickness distribution is variable along the radioulnar axis. The thickness of the TCL was 2.1 ± 0.8 mm, ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 mm. PMID:19701670

  13. Early mobilization of rabbit medial collateral ligament repairs: biomechanic and histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, W M; Barmada, R

    1984-05-01

    The postoperative management of repaired medial collateral ligaments is controversial. There are proponents for either early mobilization or immobilization. To contribute to an understanding of the issues, 24 adult Dutch rabbits were divided into four groups and a comparative study was made of their incised medial collateral ligaments, contrasting early immobilization with mobilization at three and six weeks. The ligaments were studied histologically and biomechanically. At three weeks, the immobilized ligaments were twice as strong as mobilized ligaments. Histologically, the immobilized ligaments demonstrated more fibroblastic reaction while the mobilized ligaments showed more mature tissue development at the repair site. There were no statistically significant differences between knees mobilized for six weeks and knees immobilized for three weeks and then subsequently mobilized for three weeks. In view of these results, the authors conclude that the deleterious effects of immobilization should be considered when planning postoperative or postinjury treatment of torn medial collateral ligaments.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with double bundle versus single bundle: experimental study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberto F. Mota e Albuquerque; Sandra Umeda Sasaki; Marco Martins Amatuzzi; Fabio Janson Angelini

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test an intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee in 10 human cadavers by replacing 2 anterior cruciate ligament bundles, with the purpose of producing...

  15. Craniocervical junction in dogs revisited--new ligaments and confirmed presence of enthesis fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynska, M; Wieladek, A; Janczyk, P

    2012-06-01

    The study was performed to investigate and to describe features of gross and microscopic morphology of craniocervical junction (CCJ) in dogs. Seventy mature dogs (38 females, 32 males) of different body weight, representing small, medium and large breeds of dolicho-, mesati-, and brachycephalic morphotype were dissected. Morphological details were localised using an operating microscope with integrated video channel. Occurrence and distribution of fibrocartilage in the ligaments from 10 dogs was analysed histologically. Three new pairs of ligaments were described and named: dorsal ligaments of atlas, cranial internal collateral ligaments of atlas, and caudal internal collateral ligaments of atlas. Several new findings in the course of the known ligaments were found relating to breed and body weight. For the first time enthesis fibrocartilage was identified in ligaments of CCJ in dogs. Sesamoidal fibrocartilage was identified in the transversal ligament of atlas in large dogs. The findings are discussed for clinical importance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of a mono-centric knee brace on the tension of the collateral ligaments in knee joints after sectioning of the anterior cruciate ligament--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterwimmer, S; Graichen, H; Baumgart, R; Plitz, W

    2004-08-01

    To analyze the influence of knee bracing on the tension of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. The tension of the collateral ligaments in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees was measured with and without knee bracing using an in vitro model. Anterior cruciate ligament deficiency increases the tension in both collateral ligaments at the knee joint. Therefore knee braces should reduce that tension increase. However, that effect has never been proven quantitatively. After anterior cruciate ligament-transection, the forces of the medial (anterior/posterior part) and lateral collateral ligament were measured in ten fresh human cadaver knees at 0 degrees, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, 60 degrees, 80 degrees and 100 degrees of flexion, with and without application of a mono-centric knee brace. To quantify the ligament forces, strain gauges were fixed at the bony origins of the ligaments. Bracing led to a significant decrease of ligament forces (20-100 degrees: P anterior part of the medial collateral ligament in all joint positions. In the posterior aspect, this effect was observed only at 40 degrees (P ligament, bracing caused a strain reduction from 60 degrees to 100 degrees of flexion (P knee bracing on the strain was seen in the posterior aspect of the medial and in the lateral collateral ligament in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee joints. Application of a mono-centric knee brace leads to a significant position dependent reduction of collateral ligament tension after anterior cruciate ligament-rupture.

  17. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  18. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Shows Variable Anatomy in Pediatric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Milewski, Matthew D; Cannamela, Peter C; Ganley, Theodore J; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Styhl, Alexandra C; Anderson, Allen F; Polousky, John D

    2017-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure rates are highest in youth athletes. The role of the anterolateral ligament in rotational knee stability is of increasing interest, and several centers are exploring combined ACL and anterolateral ligament reconstruction for these young patients. Literature on the anterolateral ligament of the knee is sparse in regard to the pediatric population. A single study on specimens younger than age 5 years demonstrated the presence of the anterolateral ligament in only one of eight specimens; therefore, much about the prevalence and anatomy of the anterolateral ligament in pediatric specimens remains unknown. We sought to (1) investigate the presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament in prepubescent anatomic specimens; (2) describe the anatomic relationship of the anterolateral ligament to the lateral collateral ligament; and (3) describe the anatomic relationship between the anterolateral ligament and the physis. Fourteen skeletally immature knee specimens (median age, 8 years; range, 7-11 years) were dissected (12 male, two female specimens). The posterolateral structures were identified in all specimens, including the lateral collateral ligament and popliteus tendon. The presence or absence of the anterolateral ligament was documented in each specimen, along with origin, insertion, and dimensions, when applicable. The relationship of the anterolateral ligament origin to the lateral collateral ligament origin was recorded. The anterolateral ligament was identified in nine of 14 specimens. The tibial attachment point was consistently located in the same region on the proximal tibia, between the fibular head and Gerdy's tubercle; however, the femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament showed considerable variation with respect to the lateral collateral ligament origin. The median femoral origin of the anterolateral ligament was 10 mm (first interquartile 6 mm, third interquartile 13) distal to the distal

  19. Sonoanatomy and injection technique of the iliolumbar ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The iliolumbar ligament plays an important biomechanic role in anchoring the spine to the pelvic ring and stabilizing the sacroiliac joint. Iliolumbar syndrome is a back pain condition caused by pathology of the iliolumbar ligament. History and physical examination are important in the assessment of back pain, but they lack sufficient specificity. Injection of small volumes of local anesthetic into the structure considered to be the source of the pain (i.e. the iliolumbar ligament) increases the specificity of the diagnostic workup. OBJECTIVE: To describe an ultrasound - guided technique for injecting the iliolumbar ligament. STUDY DESIGN: Case report based on knowledge of topographic anatomy and sonoanatomy. SETTING: Outpatient clinic. METHODS: A patient with a clinical picture suggestive of iliolumbar syndrome was selected. An ultrasound-guided injection of the iliolumbar ligament with local anesthetic was performed. We recorded the patient\\'s subjective assessment of pain and the change in range of movement and pain scores during provocative tests. RESULTS: Following the injection, the patient\\'s pain score decreased, provocation tests became negative, and the range of movement increased. LIMITATIONS: Case report. Target specificity and dispersion of local anesthetic spread not confirmed with an independent technique (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound guidance allows the selective deposition of small volumes of local anesthetic into structures believed to cause soft tissue back pain and thus to confirm or exclude the working diagnosis. Further studies are needed to confirm our conclusions and to prove the clinical feasibility of this technique.

  20. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte Junior, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study.

  1. STUDY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tummala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament is the weaker of the two cruciate ligaments stabilizing the knee joint, and therefore gets torn easier than the posterior cruciate ligament. OBJECTIVE To determine pattern of anterior cruciate ligament injury and its management in a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out for two years, 28 patients with ACL injury were included. A detailed history regarding the pattern of injury was noted and ACL reconstruction was done using BT Bautograft with mini-arthrotomy and arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The mean age of the study subjects was 30.6±7.3 years & majority were males. Majority of the ACL injury was sports related & was on the right knee. 64% underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction & majority of them had normal range of motion of the knee. CONCLUSION Our present study concludes that most common age group involved was 20-30 years & ACL injury was more common among males. Patients with an early ACL reconstruction were more satisfied with the end result. Also, ACL reconstruction techniques using BTB auto graft leads to good ligamentous stability and function of the knee.

  2. Reduction of artifacts in computer simulation of breast Cooper's ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrajac, David D.; Kuperavage, Adam; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been introduced as a tool for quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Efficacy of the validation results depends on the realism of phantom images. The recursive partitioning algorithm based upon the octree simulation has been demonstrated as versatile and capable of efficiently generating large number of phantoms to support virtual clinical trials of breast imaging. Previously, we have observed specific artifacts, (here labeled "dents") on the boundaries of simulated Cooper's ligaments. In this work, we have demonstrated that these "dents" result from the approximate determination of the closest simulated ligament to an examined subvolume (i.e., octree node) of the phantom. We propose a modification of the algorithm that determines the closest ligament by considering a pre-specified number of neighboring ligaments selected based upon the functions that govern the shape of ligaments simulated in the subvolume. We have qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated that the modified algorithm can lead to elimination or reduction of dent artifacts in software phantoms. In a proof-of concept example, we simulated a 450 ml phantom with 333 compartments at 100 micrometer resolution. After the proposed modification, we corrected 148,105 dents, with an average size of 5.27 voxels (5.27nl). We have also qualitatively analyzed the corresponding improvement in the appearance of simulated mammographic images. The proposed algorithm leads to reduction of linear and star-like artifacts in simulated phantom projections, which can be attributed to dents. Analysis of a larger number of phantoms is ongoing.

  3. Biaxial mechanical properties of swine uterosacral and cardinal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Winston R; De Vita, Raffaella

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical alterations to pelvic floor ligaments may contribute to the development and progression of pelvic floor disorders. In this study, the first biaxial elastic and viscoelastic properties were determined for uterosacral ligament (USL) and cardinal ligament (CL) complexes harvested from adult female swine. Biaxial stress-stretch data revealed that the ligaments undergo large strains. They are orthotropic, being typically stiffer along their main physiological loading direction (i.e., normal to the upper vaginal wall). Biaxial stress relaxation data showed that the ligaments relax equally in both loading directions and more when they are less stretched. In order to describe the experimental findings, a three-dimensional constitutive law based on the Pipkin-Rogers integral series was formulated. The model accounts for incompressibility, large deformations, nonlinear elasticity, orthotropy, and stretch-dependent stress relaxation. This combined theoretical and experimental study provides new knowledge about the mechanical properties of USLs and CLs that could lead to the development of new preventive and treatment methods for pelvic floor disorders.

  4. Combined chronic anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: functional and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denti, Matteo; Tornese, Davide; Melegati, Gianluca; Schonhuber, Herbert; Quaglia, Alessandro; Volpi, Piero

    2015-10-01

    Multiligamentous injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is an uncommon but debilitating event. Patients with combined ligament injuries typically complain of painful, debilitating knee instability that restricts their sports and daily activities. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate functional and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic ACL and PCL deficiency who underwent simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction of the central pivot. Medical records of 20 consecutive patients with chronic ACL and PCL deficiency who underwent simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction of the central pivot were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had received either an allograft (group A) or a semitendinosus-gracilis graft for ACL repair and a bone-patellar tibial-bone graft for PCL repair (group B). Functional outcomes, after the initial follow-up period at 24-month FU, were assessed with concentric isokinetic knee extensor-flexor testing at 60 and 180°/s. The secondary aim was to compare long-term clinical recovery by the administration of the IKDC (International Knee Document Committee) Knee Ligament Evaluation Form, the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and the Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale. The mean per cent quadriceps strength deficit in the operated as compared to the healthy knee was 13.5 % in group A and 15 % in group B (angular velocity 60°/s) and 13.5 % in group A and 9.4 % in group B (angular velocity 180°/s). The mean per cent flexor strength deficit in the operated as compared to the healthy knee was 10.4 % in group A and 12.3 % in group B (angular velocity 60°/s) and 12.2 % in group A and 9 % in group B (angular velocity of 180°/s). The flexor-quadriceps ratio was 49.4 % in group A and 48.8 % in group B in the healthy knee and 53.2 % in group A and 53.8 % in group B in the operated knee (angular velocity 60°/s) and 63.9 % in group A and 60.7 % in group B in

  5. An osteogenesis/angiogenesis-stimulation artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Jinyan; Jiang, Jia; Lv, Fang; Chang, Jiang; Chen, Shiyi; Wu, Chengtie

    2017-05-01

    To solve the poor healing of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament in bone tunnel, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial ligaments were successfully prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It was hypothesized that Cu-BG coated PET (Cu-BG/PET) grafts could enhance the in vitro osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) and in vivo graft-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a goat model. Scanning electron microscope and EDS mapping analysis revealed that the prepared nanocoatings had uniform element distribution (Cu, Ca, Si and P) and nanostructure. The surface hydrophilicity of PET grafts was significantly improved after depositing Cu-BG nanocoatings. The in vitro study displayed that the Cu-BG/PET grafts supported the attachment and proliferation of rBMSCs, and significantly promoted the expression of HIF-1α gene, which up-regulated the osteogenesis-related genes (S100A10, BMP2, OCN) and angiogenesis-related genes (VEGF) in comparison with PET or BG coated PET (BG/PET) grafts which do not contain Cu element. Meanwhile, Cu-BG/PET grafts promoted the bone regeneration at the graft-host bone interface and decreased graft-bone interface width, thus enhancing the bonding strength as well as angiogenesis (as indicated by CD31 expression) in the goat model as compared with BG/PET and pure PET grafts. The study demonstrates that the Cu-containing biomaterials significantly promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis in the repair of bone defects of large animals and thus offering a promising method for ACL reconstruction by using Cu-containing nanobioglass modified PET grafts. It remains a significant challenge to develop an artificial graft with distinct osteogenetic/angiogenetic activity to enhance graft-bone healing for ligament reconstruction. To solve these problems, copper-containing bioactive glass (Cu-BG) nanocoatings on PET artificial

  6. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60?/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non...

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of sensory nerve endings in ankle ligaments: a cadaver study.

    OpenAIRE

    Rein, Susanne; Hagert, Elisabet; Hanisch, Uwe; Lwowski, Sophie; Fieguth, Armin; Zwipp, Hans

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern and types of sensory nerve endings in ankle ligaments using immunohistochemical techniques, in order to gain more insight into functional ankle stability. METHODS: One hundred forty ligaments from 10 cadaver feet were included: the calcaneofibular and anterior/posterior talofibular ligaments from the lateral complex; inferior extensor retinaculum complex, talocalcaneal oblique and canalis tarsi ligaments from the sinus tarsi; d...

  8. [The value of MRI in diagnosis of ligament injuries of knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chen-Di; Qiu, Qian-De

    2010-10-01

    To study the performance of MRI and its diagnostic value for ligament injuries of knee joint. Form June 2008 to February 2010, the MRI of 74 patients with ligament injuries of knee joint were retrospectively analyzed. There were 47 males and 27 females in the group, which course was from 2 h to 10 d, with an average age of 37.3 years (ranged from 12 to 76). The clinical symptom included knee swelling, pain, joint instability, extension-flexion movement disorder. The physical examination showed valgus test or drawer test positive, and tenderness of medial knee positive. There were ligament injuies in 74 cases, among them, 19 cases were anterior cruciate ligament (25.7%),18 were posterior cruciate ligament (24.3%), 13 were lateral collateral ligament (17.6%), 24 were medial collateral (32.4%), the ligament of 12 cases were completely broken (included 8 cases cruciate ligament and 4 cases collateral ligament presented as discontinued signals of the ligament, and swelling and thickening of the ligament with medium signal in PDWI and high signal intensity in T2WI and in SPIR). The MRI of 62 patients with partial longitudinal tearing ligaments showed continuity, swelling and thickening of the ligaments with medium signal in PDWI and high signal intensity in T2WI and in SPIR. Forty-four cases were examined with surgery and arthroscopy, 41 ligaments were accorded with MRI, diagnosis rate of MRI was 95%. MRI can accurately diagnose the ligament injuries of knee joint,which is an ideal technique in the diagnosis of ligament injuries of knee joint, and should be used as a routine examining method.

  9. MRI of knee joint without surgery and knee joint after alloplastic cruciate ligament prothesis (polyethylene terephthalate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, H.; Kuehnert, A.; Sundermeyer, R.

    1987-09-01

    When using the spin-echo technique natural, ligament and menisci have practically nearly no signal. Degenerative lesions, lesions of cartilage, and osteochondrosis dissecans are visible. After ligament plastic the borecanal for the alloplastic ligament is visible. The advantages of MRI are pointed out.

  10. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Ligament-bone interaction in a three-dimensional model of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, R.

    1991-01-01

    In mathematical knee-joint models, the ligaments are usually represented by straight-line elements, connecting the insertions of the femur and tibia. Such a model may not be valid if a ligament is bent in its course over bony-surfaces, particularly not if the resulting redirection of the ligament

  12. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  13. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... electrodes were inserted during arthroscopy into the normal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the reconstructed ACL in 11 patients who had a successful ACL re-construction 8 months to 12 years earlier. After the anesthesia had subsided, the PCL was stimulated electrically through the electrodes...... and the sensory threshold was determined. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and inhibitory reflexes could be elicited from PCL in the quadriceps during active extension and in the hamstrings muscles during active flexion in all patients. Subsequently the ACL re-constructions...

  14. Medial collateral ligament recession for chronic medial knee laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Jeffrey R; Wiltfong, Roger E; Steensen, Robert N

    2013-06-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the primary restraint to valgus stress of the knee. Although the MCL has demonstrated an ability to reliably heal with conservative management, chronic medial instability has been well described following an isolated MCL injury or in combination with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. When the MCL heals with persistent medial laxity surgical treatment may be necessary to prevent chronic medial instability and valgus overload of a reconstructed cruciate ligament. We present a simple technique for MCL recession that can be used for isolated MCL laxity as well as in chronic ACL/MCL knee injuries. This technique allows for secure fixation with bone-to-bone healing, avoids donor-site morbidity, maintains relative MCL isometry, and can be performed through a modest incision. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. The Collateral Ligaments and Posterolateral Corner: What Radiologists Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevska Nikodinovska, Violeta; Gimber, Lana H; Hardy, Jolene C; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2016-02-01

    Ligamentous and tendinous structures of the posterolateral corner of the knee provide important static and dynamic stability to the knee joint and act in conjunction with anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Injuries of these structures are not uncommon. Failure to treat posterolateral corner injuries leads to posterolateral instability of the knee and subsequently poor outcome of cruciate ligament reconstructions. Currently, MRI is the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of posterolateral corner injuries of the knee. We review normal MR imaging anatomy of the complex anatomical structures of the posterolateral corner of the knee, their biomechanical function, injuries, and current treatment options. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Distal radio-ulnar ligament motion during supination and pronation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, R; Hnat, W; Scheker, L R

    1993-08-01

    The dorsal and palmar distal radio-ulnar ligaments (DRUL) play an important role in the stability of the distal radio-ulnar joint (DRUJ). Various authorities, however, hold opposite opinions regarding DRUL motion during DRUJ pronation and supination, thus implying opposite techniques for reconstruction of the unstable DRUJ. With the hypothesis that relative displacement would increase in the dorsal DRUL during pronation and would increase in the palmar DRUL during supination, measurements were made of the relative DRUL displacement with a Hall-effect displacement transducer during DRUJ pronation and supination in six fresh cadaver wrists. The hypothesis was confirmed that the dorsal radio-ulnar ligament undergoes relative displacement during pronation, while the palmar radio-ulnar ligament undergoes relative displacement during supination.

  17. Incidence rate of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csintalan, Rick P; Inacio, Maria C S; Funahashi, Tadashi T

    2008-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are among the most common sports medicine procedures performed in the US each year. Differences have been reported in the incidence rates (IRs) of ACL tears among male and female national elite athletes. However, there is little information in the published literature that assesses IRs for ACL reconstructions done in the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) setting specifically. Different populations may show variation in ACL reconstruction IRs. This study reports on the IR of ACL reconstructions in a predefined population and compares the differences in age and sex over time. A retrospective analysis of 4485 ACL reconstructions performed within Kaiser Permanente Southern California between 2001 and 2005 was completed by a query of an administrative database. Trends in IRs per 100,000 members were calculated and compared across age, sex, and the five-year study period. Linear regression was used to test trends in IR. Sex distribution was compared using the χ(2) test. Analysis of variance was used to compare the mean age from year to year in males and females. The independent sample t-test was used to compare mean age between males and females for each independent year. The IR of ACL reconstructions in females rose significantly (p = 0.010) from 14.4 in 2001 (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.6-16.3) to 19.3 in 2005 (95% CI, 17.2-21.5). Within specific age groups, IR increased significantly for females age 14 to 17 (p = 0.013), 18 to 21 (p = 0.017), and 45 to 49 years (p = 0.014). The most dramatic change was seen in the female age category of 14 to 17 years, which increased at a rate of 8.14 cases/100,000 members per year. Identifying the sex and age groups with most rapidly increasing rates of ACL reconstructions is important in implementing ACL injury-prevention programs.

  18. Familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury have been evaluated in the literature, there are few reports on familial predisposition. This study investigated the familial predisposition to ACL injury. The study included 350 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and September 2008. All patients were surveyed by telephone or a written questionnaire about family history (FH of ACL injury, sports played by family members, and mechanisms of injury. We also compared age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, Tegner activity score, general joint laxity, and tibial slope between an FH group (with FH and a control group (without FH. In addition, we compared the incidence of ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL rupture 2 years after primary surgery. Complete information was obtained from 316 patients, 38 (12.0% of whom had FH of ACL injury. Two families had three members with ACL injuries. Of the 40 family members with ACL injuries, 38 (95% had noncontact injuries and 34 (85% shared a similar mechanism of injury with the related patient. No significant differences were identified between the two groups, except that tibial slope was significantly greater in the FH group than in the control group. Although the incidence of repeat ACL injury was greater in the FH group (23.7% than in the control group (16.4%, there was no significant difference. Our results indicated a high probability of familial predisposition to many of the identified risk factors for ACL injury. In addition, patients with FH of ACL injury might be at high risk for initial and repeat ACL injuries. Therefore, prevention programs should be implemented for patients with FH of ACL injury in order to decrease the risk of these injuries.

  19. Mechanoreceptors of the ligaments and tendons around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çabuk, Haluk; Kuşku Çabuk, Fatmagül

    2016-09-01

    Proprioceptive inputs from the joints and limbs arise from mechanoreceptors in the muscles, ligaments and tendons. The knee joint has a wide range of movements, and proper neuroanatomical organization is critical for knee stability. Four ligaments (the anterior (ACL) and posterior (PCL) cruciate ligaments and the medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligaments) and four tendons (the semitendinosus (STT), gracilis (GT), popliteal (PoT), and patellar (PaT) tendons) from eight fresh frozen cadavers were harvested. Each harvested tissue was divided into its bone insertion side and its tendinous part for immunohistochemical examination using S100 staining. Freeman-Wyke's classification was used to identify the mechanoreceptors. The mechanoreceptors were usually located close to the bone insertion. Free nerve endings followed by Ruffini endings were the most common mechanoreceptors overall. No Pacini corpuscles were observed; free nerve endings and Golgi-like endings were most frequent in the PCL (PCL-PaT: P = 0.0.1, PCL-STT: P = 0.00), and Ruffini endings in the popliteal tendon (PoT-PaT: P = 0.00, Pot-STT: P = 0.00, PoT-LCL: P = 0.00, PoT-GT: P = 0.00, PoT-ACL: P = 0.09). The cruciate ligaments had more mechanoreceptors than the medial structures (MS) or the patellar tendon (CR-Pat: P = 0.000, CR-MS: P = 0.01). The differences in mechanoreceptor distributions between the ligaments and tendons could reflect the different roles of these structures in the dynamic coordination of knee motion. Clin. Anat. 29:789-795, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Reducing time to surgery after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, H; Sutherland, A G

    2016-05-01

    Recent work suggests that reconstruction of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament within 12 months of injury results in better outcomes. We present a complete audit cycle examining the effect of establishment of an Acute Knee Clinic on time to surgery. Records of 20 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions undertaken by the senior author between June 2003 and May 2004 were examined to identify the time to surgery. The Acute Knee Clinic was established in December 2004. Prospectively collected data on patients attending the Acute Knee Clinic between May 2005 and July 2007 and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction from September 2006 to 2007 were reviewed with respect to referral route, time from injury to specialist review and time to surgery. Mean time from injury to surgery of the initial cohort was 14 months (range 3-56). After establishment of the Acute Knee Clinic, 90% of referrals from Accident and Emergency (A&E) were seen by a specialist within four weeks. Between September 2006 and September 2007, 49 patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 21 came via the Acute Knee Clinic, with a mean time from injury to surgery of 6 months; 28 patients from the elective clinic had a mean time to surgery of 25 months. 95% of Acute Knee Clinic patients and 53 % of elective clinic patients had surgery within 12 months of injury. The Acute Knee Clinic has been shown to reduce the time from injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Acute Knee Clinic only accounts for the referral of 40% of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in this series: Further education work is required with A&E staff and GPs regarding the referral of knee injuries. Access to the Acute Knee Clinic could be extended to GPs, although this could create service overload. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Cysto-duodeno-colic ligament and its clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwajit Ravindra Deshmukh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During a routine dissection class for the undergraduate students at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, a rare uncommon variation of the peritoneal ligament was found. Information regarding variation in such type of accessory peritoneal reflections is necessary for anatomists, surgeons, and radiologists. Normally there was no peritoneal reflection between gallbladder, duodenum and transverse colon, but in the present case report, it was present and termed as cysto-duodeno-colic ligament. Knowledge of such variation is necessary during gallbladder surgeries and liver transplantation surgeries.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS. There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario.

  3. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  4. Rare case of giant broad ligament fibroid with myxoid degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Godbole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant fibroids are known to arise from the uterus, although very rarely from extra-uterine sites. Among extra-uterine fibroids, broad ligament fibroids generally achieve enormous size and generally present with pressure symptom like bladder and bowel dysfunction. Myxoid degeneration is a rare complication of benign fibroid, where presence of cystic changes mimics the metastatic malignant ovarian tumor. We report a case of true broad ligament fibroid measured about 13 kg. This case is reported for its rarity and the diagnostic difficulties in differentiating malignant ovarian tumor and benign fibroid with myxoid degeneration.

  5. [Integration of the musculoskeletal components by tendons and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukunami, Chisa

    Tendons transmit the mechanical force of skeletal muscle contraction to the bones, whereas ligaments connect the two bones together to stabilize the joint. During embryonic development, each component in the musculoskeletal system, initially develops as an individual primordium of tendon, ligament, skeletal muscle, and cartilage. Later, mutual interaction between these tissues plays an important role for the integration of the musculoskeletal components. Accumulating evidence suggests that myotendinous and osteotendinous/osteoligamentous junctions are important structures to maintain homeostasis of the integrated musculoskeletal components. In this review, we will focus on the establishment and maintenance of these junctions.

  6. Ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty—Medial stabilizing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Matsuda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ligament balancing is one of the most important surgical techniques for successful total knee arthroplasty. It has traditionally been recommended that medial and lateral as well as flexion and extension gaps are equal. This article reviews the relevant literature and discusses the clinical importance of the aforementioned gaps. Current evidence indicates that achieving medial stability throughout the range of motion should be a high priority in ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty. Finally, the medial stabilising surgical technique, which aims to achieve good medial stability in posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty, is introduced.

  7. The Role of Bioreactors in Ligament and Tendon Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, James; Wheelton, Andy; Khan, Wasim S; Anand, Sanj

    2016-01-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal to the emerging field of tissue engineering. The formation of neotissue from pluripotent cell lineages potentially offers a source of tissue for clinical use without the significant donor site morbidity associated with many contemporary surgical reconstructive procedures. Modern bioreactor design is becoming increasingly complex to provide a both an expandable source of readily available pluripotent cells and to facilitate their controlled differentiation into a clinically applicable ligament or tendon like neotissue. This review presents the need for such a method, challenges in the processes to engineer neotissue and the current designs and results of modern bioreactors in the pursuit of engineered tendon and ligament.

  8. Anatomic study and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzi; Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Zhou, Zhilai; Jin, Anmin; Ding, Zihai; Lv, Hai; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-15

    A dissection-based study of 18 embalmed thoracic specimens. To investigate the properties and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater. Previously, we performed a comprehensive anatomic study on the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the lumbosacral and cervical regions, whereby we concluded that the ligaments were an anatomic factor leading to dural laceration and hemorrhage during flavectomy and laminectomy. Unfortunately, thus far, no systematic anatomic study has been undertaken to examine the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the thoracic dura mater. Eighteen adult embalmed cadavers were studied, and the morphology, orientation, attachment site, and distribution traits of the dorsal meningovertebal ligaments were observed. In addition, the length, width, or diameter and thickness of the ligaments were measured using a Vernier caliper. Two meningovertebal ligaments were removed for histological examination. In the thoracic region, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments anchored the dura mater to the lamina or ligamentum flavum. The meningovertebral ligaments displayed a relatively even distribution along the upper thoracic region (T1-T7) and a gradual increase in frequency in the lower thoracic region from T7 to T12. The meningovertebral ligaments protrude into the dura and correspondingly become an integral part of the dura. Some ligaments are accompanied by or are attached to blood vessels. Histological examination of the meningovertebral ligaments revealed fibrous connective tissue. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the dural sac and ligamentum flavum or lamina in the thoracic spine. Based on their anatomic features, meningovertebral ligaments may be one potential cause for dural laceration and epidural hemorrhage. We propose that, during thoracic flavectomy and laminectomy, the meningovertebral ligaments should first be identified and properly handled, thereby minimizing the occurrence

  9. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of round ligament varicosities mimicking inguinal hernia: report of two cases with literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Kyeong Hwa; Yoon, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Round ligament varicosities are rare, and the mass mimics an inguinal hernia. Round ligament varicosities should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a groin swelling in a female, especially during pregnancy. The diagnosis of round ligament varicosities can be established on grayscale and color Doppler ultrasonography. We report two cases of round ligament varicosities in a 33-year-old non pregnant woman and a 28-year-old pregnant woman, and these patients were diagnosed using ultrasonography. We also reviewed the literature on round ligament varicosities including the present cases. Ultrasonography is diagnostic and can prevent unnecessary surgical intervention and associated morbidity.

  10. Surgical technique: medial collateral ligament reconstruction using Achilles allograft for combined knee ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Robert G; Hetsroni, Iftach

    2012-03-01

    Previous approaches for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction have been associated with extensive exposure, risk of donor site morbidity with autografts, loss of motion, nonanatomic graft placement, and technical complexity with double-bundle constructs. Therefore, we implemented a technique that uses Achilles allograft, small incisions, and anatomic insertions to reconstruct the MCL. The MCL femoral insertion was identified, and a socket reamed over a guide pin. The Achilles bone plug was fixed in the socket and the tendon passed distally under the skin and fixed on the tibia, creating isometric reconstruction. We evaluated 14 patients who had this MCL reconstruction. We determined range of knee motion, knee ligament laxity, functional outcome scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC]-subjective, Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS]), and activity level scores (Tegner, Marx). Followup range was 24 to 61 months. Knee motion was maintained in 12 cases. Grade 0-1 + valgus stability was obtained in all 14 cases. In cases of MCL with primary ACL reconstruction, IKDC-subjective, Lysholm, and KOOS-sports scores were 91 ± 6, 92 ± 6, and 93 ± 12, respectively, and return to preinjury activity levels was achieved. In cases of MCL with revision ACL reconstruction, function was inferior, and patients did not return to their preinjury activity levels. This technique uses allograft that provides bone-to-bone healing on the femur, requires small incisions, and creates isometric reconstruction. When performed with a cruciate reconstruction, knee stability can be restored at 2 to 5 years followup. In patients with MCL with primary ACL reconstruction, return to preinjury activity level in recreational athletes can be achieved.

  11. Imaging of the coracoglenoid ligament: a third ligament in the rotator interval of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappia, Marcello [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Varelli Institute, Naples (Italy); Castagna, Alessandro [Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Barile, Antonio [University of L' Aquila, Applied Clinical Science and Biotechnology, L' Aquila (Italy); Chianca, Vito [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Brunese, Luca [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Pouliart, Nicole [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Basic Biomedical Sciences - Human Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-08-15

    The coracoglenoid ligament (CGL) forms part of the anterosuperior capsuloligamentous complex of the shoulder. Although it has received attention in the anatomical literature, it has not been investigated on imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage value and the interobserver agreement of identification and classification of the CGL on MR and MR arthrography (MRA) imaging. Retrospectively, 280 MR and 150 MRA examinations were evaluated for detection of the CGL by two musculoskeletal radiologists. On the MRA examinations the CGL configuration in relation to the superior glenohumeral (SGHL) and coracohumeral ligament (CHL) was classified into five types. Additionally, the percentage of intra-articular appearance of the CGL and its mean thickness value were calculated. Finally, a possible correlation between pathological condition and anatomical type was evaluated on MRA. The CGL could be identified in 56%/54% of MRI and in 76%/77% of MRA examinations. On MRA, the CGL was detected as distinct structures in 37%/35% of cases and it appeared fused (partially or totally) with the SGHL and/or CHL in 39%/42%; it was absent in 12%/12% and it appears undistinguishable in the remaining cases. The interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98 for detection on MRI; p = 0.927 for classification of anterosuperior anatomy on MRA; κ = 0.873 and 0.978 for identification on sagittal and axial external rotation MRA respectively; κ = 0.943 for classification as intra- or extra-articular on MRA). The CGL can be reliably identified on MRI and MRA. (orig.)

  12. Sex Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Data From the Swedish Knee Ligament Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Forssblad, Magnus; Herbertsson, Pär

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female gender is a risk factor for sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, little is known about possible sex differences in patients with ACL injury/reconstruction. PURPOSE: To study sex differences in patient-reported outcomes before and at 1 and 2 years after ACL...... reconstruction and to present reference values. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2008, 10 164 patients (mean age, 27 years; SD, 9.8; 42% females) with primary ACL reconstruction were registered in the Swedish national knee ligament register. There were 4438 (44...

  13. Biomechanics of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masouros, S D; McDermott, I D; Amis, A A; Bull, A M J

    2008-12-01

    The menisci of the knee act primarily to redistribute contact force across the tibio-femoral articulation. This meniscal function is achieved through a combination of the material, geometry and attachments of the menisci. The main ligaments that attach the menisci to the tibia (insertional ligaments, deep medial collateral ligament), the femur (meniscofemoral ligaments, deep medial collateral ligament) and each other (the anterior intermeniscal ligament) are the means by which the contact force between tibia and femur is distributed into hoop stresses in the menisci to reduce contact pressure at the joint. This means that the functional biomechanics of the menisci cannot be considered in isolation and should be considered as the functional biomechanics of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct. This article presents the current knowledge on the anatomy and functional biomechanics of the meniscus and its associated ligaments. Much is known about the function of the meniscus-meniscal ligament construct; however, there still remain significant gaps in the literature in terms of the properties of the anterior intermeniscal ligament and its function, the properties of the insertional ligaments, and the most appropriate ways to reconstruct meniscal function surgically.

  14. An anatomical study of the lumbar external foraminal ligaments: appearance at MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marić, Dušica L; Krstonošić, Bojana; Erić, Mirela; Marić, Dušan M; Stanković, Milan; Milošević, Nebojša T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the MRI appearance of the ligaments within the external space of the lumbar intervertebral foramen by correlating MR images with the corresponding anatomic dissection of the cadaver lumbar spine. This was a two part study. Part I of the anatomic study consisted of the dissection of lumbar specimens from one embalmed adult male cadaver. At each lumbar level the external ligamentous structures were identified and their origin, insertion and position were determined. Part II of the study consisted of the anatomical analysis of the external transforaminal ligaments in the 180 lumbar intervertebral foramina on the MR images (1.5 T) in the sagittal plane. The diagnostic procedure was performed on 18 individuals from 18 to 25 years of age. The external transforaminal ligaments were observed at all levels and from both sides in the lumbar intervertebral foramen. The presence of the superior corporotransverse ligament was found in 45.56% intervertebral foramina, while the inferior corporotransverse ligament was found in 61.67% intervertebral foramina in the MRI. Our results confirm that external transforaminal ligaments are common structures in the intervertebral foramen. The results of this study show that the external transforaminal ligaments can be clearly visualized in MR images. It is crucial to have previous knowledge of the cadaveric specimens to recognize the transforaminal ligaments in MR images. The presence of these ligaments is clinically important because the ligaments could be the cause of nerve root compression or the low back pain syndrome.

  15. The role of the antebrachiocarpal ligaments in the prevention of hyperextension of the antebrachiocarpal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Joshua; Milshtein, Tomer; Meiner, Yaron

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, and the palmar carpal ligaments in the prevention of hyperextension of the antebrachiocarpal (AC) joint. In vitro experiment. Cadaveric canine thoracic limbs (n = 12 pair). Thoracic limbs from 12 healthy mixed breed dogs, free of carpal joint pathology, were assigned to 1 of 6 groups, defined by the order in which the ligaments stabilizing the AC joint were cut. The antebrachium, carpus, and proximal metacarpal (MC) bones were stripped of all muscle tissue, preserving the carpal joint capsule. After specimens were prepared for biomechanical testing, the manus was loaded using a system of weights and pulleys to extend the carpus. Extension was measured using a single motion tracking sensor fixed to the MC bones. All specimens were tested with all ligaments intact and after cutting each of the ligaments. Cutting each of the ligaments resulted in a significant change in the angle of extension of the carpus when compared with carpal extension with the ligaments intact. Cutting the palmar AC ligaments resulted in a significantly larger change in extension angle than occurred after cutting the medial and lateral collateral ligaments. Each of the ligaments tested contribute to the prevention of hyperextension of the AC joint. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. The response of periodontal ligament collagen fibres and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites of fixed orthodontic appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noengki Prameswari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that there were several reactions in cellular activity and periodontal ligament collagen fibre as a response after orthodontic force application. Cementum has function to give attachment to collagen fibres of the periodontal ligament, maintaining the integrity of the root, helping to maintain the tooth in its functional position in the mouth, and being involved in tooth repair and regeneration so in the orthodontic tooth movement can induce changes in the cementum. The aim of this research is to investigate that fixed orthodontic appliance can change the amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at pressure site of cementum. This experimental study was held in laboratory with post test only control group design. Twenty two (22 premolar sample from 11 patient were divided into 2 groups. K group as control group (without treatment and P group as treatment group (with using fixed orthodontic appliance. The amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles was examined by light microscopy and measured by image tool program. In the summary, there are increasing amount of periodontal ligament collagen fibre and the thickness of inserting periodontal ligament fibre bundles at cementum pressure sites as a normal response to remodeling and regenerating to orthodontic appliance and have function for strengthen adhering tooth cementum to the periodontal ligament.

  17. Emerging Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budny, Jacob; Fox, Joseph; Rauh, Michael; Fineberg, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed and researched orthopedic procedures. As technology and comparative research have advanced, surgical practices have changed to achieve a superior outcome. Our group performed a survey of orthopedic surgeons to evaluate current practice trends and techniques as a follow-up to similar surveys performed in 1999 and 2006. In a survey between 2013 and 2014 consisting of 35 questions regarding the surgical technique, graft choice, fixation method, and perioperative care in ACL reconstruction was sent electronically to the members of the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine and the Arthroscopy Association of North America. Responses were recorded and compared with previous results. Survey responses were received from 824 active surgeons. Of the respondents, 89.4% are subspecialty trained, 98% of which in sports medicine. Preoperatively, full-knee extension was the only "very significant" factor in surgical timing. Approach preference via an arthroscopic-assisted single-incision approach predominated (89%)-similar to earlier results. Bone-patellar-tendon-bone use decreased relative to hamstring allograft at 45 and 41%, respectively. Tibial tunnel placement shifted anteriorly and femoral tunnel placement shifted posterosuperiorly as compared with the results obtained 5 years ago. Femoral drilling through a low medial portal was preferred in 47% of responses, increased from 15%. Preferred fixation on both the tibial and femoral sides was either metal or bioabsorbable interference screws. The use of transfixation pins and other devices decreased. Postoperative rehab protocols did not significantly change, 68.7% preferred full-weight bearing, 55% using a range of motion knee brace locked in extension, 66.4% starting physical therapy 1 week postoperatively, with unrestricted activity at 6 to 9 months. Overall, an increasing trend toward using hamstring autograft and drilling the

  18. Morphological study of mechanoreceptors in collateral ligaments of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaochuan; Song, Weidong; Zheng, Cuihuan; Zhou, Shixiong; Bai, Shengbin

    2015-06-12

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern and types of sensory nerve endings in ankle collateral ligaments using histological techniques, in order to observe the morphology and distribution of mechanoreceptors in the collateral ligaments of cadaver ankle joint, and to provide the morphological evidence for the role of the ligament in joint sensory function. Twelve lateral collateral ligaments including anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL; n = 6), posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL; n = 6), and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL; n = 6) were harvested from six fresh frozen cadavers. The ligaments were embedded in paraffin, sectioned at 4 μm, and then stained using a modified gold-chloride staining methods. The collateral ligament was divided into three segments: proximal, middle, and distal segments. Fifty-four ATFL slides, 90 PTFL slides, and 108 CFL slides were analyzed. Mechanoreceptors were classified based on Freemen and Wyke's classification. Mechanoreceptor distribution was analyzed statistically. One-way ANOVA (postHoc LSD) was used for statistical analysis. All the four typical types of nerve endings (the Ruffini corpuscles, Pacinian corpuscles, Golgi tendon organs, and free nerve endings) were identified in these ligaments. Pacinian corpuscles were the predominant in all four complexes. More mechanoreceptors were found in synovial membrane near both ends of the ligaments attached to the bone. No statistical differences were found in the amount of mechanoreceptors among distal, middle, and proximal parts of the ligaments. The four typical types of mechanoreceptors were all identified in the collateral ligaments of the human ankle. Pacinian corpuscles were the predominant in all four complexes. This indicates that the main function of ankle collateral ligaments is to sense joint speeds in motions.

  19. Anterior Cruciate Reconstruction Using Bone-patellar Ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Thirty five patients with anterior cruciate ligament tear in one knee and a normal contralateral knee were evaluated and followed up for six years. Clinical history, physical evaluation, X-ray and athroscopies were done to rule out concomitant meniscal lesions and facilitate their treatment accurately. Follow up ...

  20. Palmar annular ligament desmotomy in horses with the Arthrex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-01-25

    Jan 25, 2018 ... Published: 07/02/2018. Palmar annular ligament desmotomy in horses with the Arthrex-Centerline™ ... Ten horse distal front limbs from horses free of PAL disease were prepared for tenoscopy of the digital flexor tendon sheath .... operative field, a better diagnosis and a reduction in both the surgical wound.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    Bagouri, E; Smith, Jon; Geutjens, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum as a complication of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease, which was misdiagnosed initially as a post-operative wound infection. An early dermatology opinion and skin biopsy should be considered in cases of suspected infection where thorough surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy has failed to improve the clinical picture.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcome Following Ulnotriquetral Ligament Split Tear Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Camelia Qian Ying; Lai, Sean Wei Hong; Leow, Geraldine; Tay, Shian Chao

    2017-12-01

    While the clinical presentation and mechanism of injury of ulnotriquetral (UT) ligament split tear had been well described, there has been no other studies that has reported on the outcome of a UT ligament repair. This study aims to look at the patient-reported outcomes following UT ligament split tear repair. 18 wrists (13 right and 5 left) in 17 patients (12 males and 5 females, mean age 25.0 ± 8.4 years, range 16-50 years) who had UT ligament split tear and undergone surgical repair between November 2007 and December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Patient-reported outcome of resolution of pain, and objective measurements such as improvement in grip strength and range of movement of the wrist were recorded. Patients were followed up until the pain was completely resolved or the last documented consultation. The mean follow-up duration was 16.2 months. 94% reported improvements post-surgery, of which 63% reported complete resolution of pain. 6% reported no improvement in pain post-operatively. No patient reported worsening of pain after the surgery. There was significant improvement in grip strength from a mean of 23.5 kg to 27.1 kg. There was no significant change in range of motion of the wrist. The majority of patients reported resolution or improvement of pain after surgical repair. In addition, there was statistically significant improvement in grip strength recorded.

  3. Extra Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma in the Broad Ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The embryonic remnants of the gonadal ridge and the genital duct apparatus, the Mullerian apparatus, remain atretic throughout the life of a woman. The definitive organs arising from these, the Ovary, Fallopian tubes, Uterus, Cervix and the Broad ligaments share common coelomic origin. Epithelial metaplasia in any of ...

  4. Ultrasonographic evaluation of fetlock annular ligament constriction in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, K J; van den Belt, A J; Keg, P R

    1991-07-01

    The diagnosis of restriction of free movement of the flexor tendons through the fetlock canal usually rests on the characteristic clinical appearance of this condition, or airtendography. In a series of seven normal Warmblood horses and 16 diseased horses of various breeds, the efficacy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of this condition was determined. In normal limbs, the annular ligament is a very thin structure usually not visible on sonograms. In diseased limbs, ultrasonography outlined flexor tendon injury, distension and thickening of the digital sheath, peritendovaginal tissue proliferation and thickening of the annular ligament. Four different types of constriction syndrome were noticed. The first type (nine cases), was characterised by thickening of the annular ligament and distension of the digital sheath; the second type (three cases) was dominated by distension of the digital sheath; the third type (three cases) was characterised by superficial digital flexor tendon injury and thickening of the annular ligament and in the fourth type (one case), the constriction resulted from distension of the digital sheath and extensive peritendovaginal tissue proliferation.

  5. Post abortal broad ligament. abscess: report of a case

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infrequently with endotoxic shock, pelvic abscess, anaemia. cervical incompetence, chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy and infertility. Deaths from unsafe abortions are principally attributed to haemorrhage, anaemia, sepsis and renal failure. 7'8. Broad ligament abscess is rare. lntraligamentous haematoma is however ...

  6. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Elaine X. L.; Cheong, Elaine Y.L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.; McKew, Genevieve L.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis.

  7. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate Ligament: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Mucoid degeneration of the ACL is a very rare cause of knee pain. There have been only some reported cases of mucoid degeneration of the ACL in the English literature. We reviewed previous reports and summarized clinical features and ...

  8. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods: Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic ...

  9. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...

  10. Healing Potential of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant Stump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocan, Ilie; Ceausu, Raluca A; Jitariu, Andreea A; Haragus, Horia; Damian, Gratian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the microstructural architecture and cellular differentiation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stumps in different stages after injury, as this could augment graft biointegration. The histological appearance and immunoreaction for cluster of differentiation 34 antigen (CD34) of 54 biopsies from 27 remnants were compared to 10 biopsies from 5 normal cruciate ligaments. CD34 reaction in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and fibrocytes was consistently positive in small synovial vessels. Remnants also exhibited CD34(+) cells among collagen fibers. Blood vessel density varied between specimens. The mean vascular microdensity was 43 per ×200 field in remnants compared to 15.2 in controls. A total of 94.44% of remnant ACL samples had significant hyperplasia of stellate and fusiform stromal cells, CD34(+); 22.4% had developed capillary vessels inside the ligament; 33% exhibited ongoing angiogenesis. Significant differences exist between torn and intact ACL regarding microvascularization. The remnants contain stellate stromal cells and CD34(+) fibrocytes, and display angiogenesis both at synovia as well as in the ligament itself. These findings underline the potential contribution to neoligament healing when remnants are preserved. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, Marcus; Muller, Bart; Wolf, Megan; Forsythe, Brian; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, intense research of the function of the 2 distinct bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral, of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has led to pronounced changes in the technical concepts of ACL reconstruction. Recently, the renewed focus of ACL reconstruction has been to

  12. Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelić, Zoran; Jovanović, Savo; Wertheimer, Vjekoslav; Sarić, Gordan; Biuk, Egon; Gulan, Gordan

    2012-03-01

    Results of the surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using as a graft fourfold hamstring tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) and middle third of the patellar ligament, were compared. In all patients that were participating in this study clinical examination and magnetic resonance showed ACL rupture, and apart from the choice of the graft, surgical technique was identical. We evaluated 112 patients with implemented patellar ligament graft and fourfold hamstring tendons graft six months after the procedure. Both groups were similar according to age, sex, activity level, knee instability level and rehabilitation program. The results showed that there was no significant difference between groups regarding Lysholm Knee score, IKDC 2000 score, activity level, musculature hypotrophy, and knee joint stability 6 months after the surgery. Anterior knee pain incidence is significantly higher in the group with patellar ligament graft (44% vs. 21%). Both groups had a significant musculature hypotrophy of the upper leg of the knee joint that was surgically treated, six months after the procedure. Both grafts showed good subjective and objective results.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized joint laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2010-09-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation.

  14. ACL graft can replicate the normal ligament's tension curve.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    The anatomical femoral insertion of the normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lies on the deep portion of the lateral wall of the intercondylar fossa. Following the deep bone-cartilage border, it stretches from 11 o'clock high in the notch all the way down to its lowest border at 8 o'clock. The

  15. ACL graft can replicate the normal ligament's tension curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    2005-01-01

    The anatomical femoral insertion of the normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lies on the deep portion of the lateral wall of the intercondylar fossa. Following the deep bone-cartilage border, it stretches from 11 o'clock high in the notch all the way down to its lowest border at 8 o'clock. The

  16. Comparative ultrasound study of acute lateral ankle ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the difference in rehabilitation outcomes between the Jump Stretch Flex Band (JSFB) programme and conventional ankle rehabilitation programmes of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. This study compares the process of healing under the guidance of ultrasound in both groups.

  17. The concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, M.; Muller, B. [=Bart; Murawski, C. D.; van Eck, C. F.; Fu, F. H.

    2014-01-01

    To describe the concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The PubMed/Medline database was searched using keywords pertaining to ACL reconstruction. Relevant articles were reviewed in order to summarize important concepts of individualized surgery in ACL

  18. Anatomy and histology of the transverse humeral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brian J; Narvy, Steven J; Omid, Reza; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The classic literature describes the transverse humeral ligament (THL) as a distinct anatomic structure with a role in biceps tendon stability; however, recent literature suggests that it is not a distinct anatomic structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gross and microscopic anatomy of the THL, including a specific investigation of the histology of this ligament. Thirty frozen, embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to determine the gross anatomy of the THL. Seven specimens were evaluated histologically for the presence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings. Two tissue layers were identified in the area described as the THL. In the deep layer, fibers of the subscapularis tendon were found to span the bicipital groove with contributions from the coracohumeral ligament and the supraspinatus tendon. Superficial to this layer was a fibrous fascial covering consisting of distinct bands of tissue. Neurohistology staining revealed the presence of free nerve endings but no mechanoreceptors. This study's findings demonstrate that the THL is a distinct structure continuous with the rotator cuff tendons and the coracohumeral ligament. The finding of free nerve endings in the THL suggests a potential role as a shoulder pain generator. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament: The J sign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lesion resulting from humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) is an important cause of anterior glenohumeral instability and can be seen in isolation or combination with an antero-inferior labral complex lesion. A conclusive magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis is aided when either a joint effusion is ...

  20. Extraforaminal ligaments of the cervical spinal nerves in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, Gerald A.; Smit, Theo H.; Hoogland, Piet V. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last 120 years, several mechanisms to protect the spinal nerve against traction have been described. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Ligaments with a comparable function just outside the intervertebral foramen are

  1. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. A Soft Gripper with Rigidity Tunable Elastomer Strips as Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasab, Amir Mohammadi; Sabzehzar, Amin; Tatari, Milad; Majidi, Carmel; Shan, Wanliang

    2017-12-01

    Like their natural counterparts, soft bioinspired robots capable of actively tuning their mechanical rigidity can rapidly transition between a broad range of motor tasks-from lifting heavy loads to dexterous manipulation of delicate objects. Reversible rigidity tuning also enables soft robot actuators to reroute their internal loading and alter their mode of deformation in response to intrinsic activation. In this study, we demonstrate this principle with a three-fingered pneumatic gripper that contains "programmable" ligaments that change stiffness when activated with electrical current. The ligaments are composed of a conductive, thermoplastic elastomer composite that reversibly softens under resistive heating. Depending on which ligaments are activated, the gripper will bend inward to pick up an object, bend laterally to twist it, and bend outward to release it. All of the gripper motions are generated with a single pneumatic source of pressure. An activation-deactivation cycle can be completed within 15 s. The ability to incorporate electrically programmable ligaments in a pneumatic or hydraulic actuator has the potential to enhance versatility and reduce dependency on tubing and valves.

  3. Benign Multicystic Mesothelioma in the Left Round Ligament: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, So Young; Yi, Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Park, Seong Jin; Cho, Gyu Seok; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Benign multicystic mesothelioma is a rare mesothelial lesion that forms multicystic masses in the upper abdomen, pelvis, and retroperitoneum. Most cases have a benign course. We present the ultrasound and MR findings of benign multicystic mesothelioma in the left round ligament, which caused a left inguinal hernia in a 46-year-old woman.

  4. SPECT bone scintigraphy of medial collateral ligament/meniscus injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micallef, L.; Larcos, G. [Westmead Medical Imaging, Westmead, NSW (Australia)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Acute or chronic knee pain is common amongst athletic persons. MRI is generally regarded as the best test, but is not widely available and may lack specificity in meniscal tears and cruciate injury. Bone scan with SPECT is an appealing alternative since it is relatively cheap and easily obtained. Further, a number of investigators have published data indicating sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85%. The purpose of the study is to determine typical scintigraphic findings in medial collateral ligament or medial meniscus injury. We present a small group of patients with acute knee trauma in whom arthroscopy and/or clinical follow-up indicated medial collateral ligament injury. Bone scans were undertaken after 900-1000 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP with immediate blood pool, delayed planar images and SPECT acquired on a Picker Prism 2000. SPECT was obtained with high resolution collimators and 20 sec/stop for 180 deg each. SPECT images showed focal radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the medial proximal tibial shaft and medial femoral condyle, corresponding to the superficial layer of the medial collateral ligament (best seen on coronal images). Disruption of the deep layer and/or medial meniscus can be suspected with abnormal uptake in part or all of the meniscus (best seen on transverse images). We conclude that acute/chronic medial collateral ligament injury can be detected on bone scintigraphy with abnormal uptake at the predicted anatomic site of attachment

  5. The Influence of Interleukin-4 on Ligament Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S; Leiferman, Ellen M; Frisch, Kayt E; Wang, Sijian; Yang, Xipei; Brickson, Stacey L; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Despite a complex cascade of cellular events to reconstruct the damaged extracellular matrix, ligament healing results in a mechanically inferior scarred ligament. During normal healing, granulation tissue expands into any residual normal ligamentous tissue (creeping substitution), resulting in a larger region of healing, greater mechanical compromise, and an inefficient repair process. To control creeping substitution and possibly enhance the repair process, the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4) was administered to rats prior to and after rupture of their medial collateral ligaments. In vitro experiments demonstrated a time-dependent effect on fibroblast proliferation after interleukin-4 treatment. In vivo treatments with interleukin-4 (100 ng/ml i.v.) for 5 days resulted in decreased wound size and type III collagen and increased type I procollagen, indicating a more regenerative early healing in response to the interleukin-4 treatment. However, continued treatment of interleukin-4 to day 11 antagonized this early benefit and slowed healing. Together, these results suggest that interleukin-4 influences the macrophages and T-lymphocytes but also stimulates fibroblasts associated with the proliferative phase of healing in a dose-, cell-, and time-dependent manner. Although treatment significantly influenced healing in the first week after injury, interleukin-4 alone was unable to maintain this early regenerative response. PMID:21518087

  6. Morphology and History of Spinal Ligaments from Three Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    anatomical geometry of the vertebrae has been described in the literature by Swindler and Wood (1973), Kapandji (1974), Hamilton (1976), Gray (1977...131, 1978. 6. Heyling, D.J.A., "The supraspinous and Intraspinous Ligaments in the Dog, Cat and Baboon," J. Anati, 130(2):223-228, 1980. -. Kapandji

  7. Application and experience of anterior vitrectomy in phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bo Zeng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe and discuss the clinical application and effect of anterior vitrectomy in phacoemulsification for the treatment of vitreous prolapse caused by posterior capsular rupture or suspensory ligament transection.METHODS:Retrospective analysis of 28 cases(35 eyeswith cataract in whom vitreous prolapse caused by posterior capsular rupture or suspensory ligament transection occurred in phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation and anterior vitrectomy were performed was conducted. RESULTS:Anterior vitrectomy for timely and accurate treatment for vitreous prolapse caused by posterior capsular rupture or suspensory ligament transection occurred in phacoemulsification was satisfied. CONCLUSION: Anterior vitrectomy has good curative effect for vitreous prolapse caused by posterior capsular rupture or suspensory ligament transection occurred in phacoemulsification and is effective with less severe complications.

  8. Stress changes of lateral collateral ligament at different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHONG Yan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To create a 3-dimensional finite element model of knee ligaments and to analyse the stress changes of lateral collateral ligament (LCL with or without displaced movements at different knee flexion conditions. Methods: A four-major-ligament contained knee specimen from an adult died of skull injury was prepared for CT scanning with the detectable ligament insertion footprints, locations and orientations precisely marked in advance. The CT scanning images were converted to a 3-dimensional model of the knee with the 3-dimensional reconstruction technique and transformed into finite element model by the software of ANSYS. The model was validated using experimental and numerical results obtained by other scientists. The natural stress changes of LCL at five different knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and under various motions of anterior-posterior tibial translation, tibial varus rotation and internal-external tibial rotation were measured. Results: The maximum stress reached to 87%-113% versus natural stress in varus motion at early 30° of knee flexions. The stress values were smaller than the peak value of natural stress at 0° (knee full extension when knee bending was over 60° of flexion in anterior-posterior tibial translation and internal-external rotation. Conclusion: LCL is vulnerable to varus motion in almost all knee bending positions and susceptible to anterior- posterior tibial translation or internal-external rotation at early 30° of knee flexions. Key words: Knee joint; Collateral ligaments; Finite element analysis

  9. Arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair in the treatment of chronic scapho-lunate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L; Mathoulin, Christophe L

    2013-05-01

    Introduction Scapholunate ligament injuries usually result due to a fall on the outstretched hand leading to scapholunate instability. The natural history of untreated scapholunate instability remains controversial and usually results in late arthritic changes- the so-called "SLAC" wrist. The advent of wrist arthroscopy helps in early diagnosis and treatment of these serious injuries. In selected cases with reducible scapholunate instability (Garcia-Elias stages 2, 3 and 4) we propose a new "all arthroscopic dorsal capsulo- ligamentous repair" with the added advantage of early rehabilitation and prevention of post-operative stiffness. Material and Methods We report the results of our series of 57 consecutive patients suffering from chronic wrist pain refractory to conservative measures. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination in addition to a standard set of radiographs and MRI exam; and they were treated by an all-arthroscopic dorsal capsulo-ligamentous repair under loco-regional anesthesia on an ambulatory basis. All patients were available for follow-up at regular intervals during the post-operative period. At follow-up, the wrist ROM in all directions, the grip strength, DASH questionnaire and pain relief based on the VAS were recorded for both- the operated and contra-lateral sides. Results There were 34 males & 23 females with a mean age of 38.72 ± 11.33 years (range 17-63 years). The dominant side was involved in 52 cases. The mean time since injury was 9.42 ± 6.33 months (range 3-24 months) and the mean follow-up was 30.74 ± 7.05 months (range 18-43 months). The mean range of motion improved in all directions. The mean difference between the post- and pre-operative extension was 14.03° (SEM = 1.27°; p < 0.001); while the mean difference between the post-and pre-operative flexion was 11.14° (SEM = 1.3°; p < 0.0001) with flexion and radial deviation reaching 84.3% and 95.72% respectively of the

  10. Biomechanical evaluation against calcaneofibular ligament repair in the Brostrom procedure: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Tai; Lee, Jung Il; Sung, Ki Sun; Kim, J-Young; Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Wang, Joon Ho

    2008-08-01

    The modified Brostrom procedure is commonly recommended for reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) with an advancement of the inferior retinaculum. However, some surgeons perform the modified Bostrom procedure with an semi-single ATF ligament reconstruction and advancement of the inferior retinaculum for simplicity. This study evaluated the initial stability of the modified Brostrom procedure and compared a two ligaments (ATF + CF) reconstruction group with a semi-single ligament (ATF) reconstruction group. Sixteen paired fresh frozen cadaveric ankle joints were used in this study. The ankle joint laxity was measured on the plane radiographs with 150 N anterior drawer force and 150 N varus stress force. The anterior displacement distances and varus tilt angles were measured before and after cutting the ATF and CF ligaments. A two ligaments (ATF + CF) reconstruction with an advancement of the inferior retinaculum was performed on eight left cadaveric ankles, and an semi-single ligament (ATF) reconstruction with an advancement of the inferior retinaculum was performed on eight right cadaveric ankles. The ankle instability was rechecked after surgery. The decreases in instability of the ankle after surgery were measured and the difference in the decrease was compared using a Mann-Whitney U test. The mean decreases in anterior displacement were 3.4 and 4.0 mm in the two ligaments reconstruction and semi-single ligament reconstruction groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.489). The mean decreases in the varus tilt angle in the two ligaments reconstruction and semi-single ligament reconstruction groups were 12.6 degrees and 12.2 degrees , respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.399). In this cadaveric study, a substantial level of initial stability can be obtained using an anatomical reconstruction of the anterior talofibular

  11. Meniscus and ligament injuries; Meniskus- und Bandlaesionen

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    Glaser, C.; Trumm, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Scheidler, J.; Heuck, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen, Pasing (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The knee is one of the major weight-bearing joints and is relatively exposed to trauma. Capsuloligamentous structures are essential to provide joint stability and - in turn - persistent instability bears a risk for osteoarthritis that needs timely and comprehensive diagnosis. Using MRI it may be beneficial to routinely apply (T)SE sequences in all three major planes as a basic protocol and to add additional sequences according to the clinical information available and imaging findings in the basic protocol. Especially fat-suppressed sequences (STIR, T2w/PDw FS TSE) are very useful because they sensitively depict bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP)-like changes. This finding often alerts the reader to - sometimes only discrete - underlying pathologies and may - if found in typical locations - give information about the mechanism of injury and thus lead the radiologist to look for specific concomitant capsuloligamentous, cartilage, and/or meniscal injury. BMEP is quite prominent in contusion injury, whereas often it is but discrete in avulsion lesions. There is extensive literature about the signs, possible pitfalls, and the accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of specific pathologies such as meniscal tears or cruciate or collateral ligament ruptures. However, combined injuries of more than one structure are frequent and affect the therapeutic approach. Thus, the primary goal of the radiologist is to go beyond the description of any isolated lesion and to give a comprehensive description of (or to reliably exclude) any injury to other structures. A necessary prerequisite to accomplish this is a thorough knowledge of the - in some locations - complex anatomic relationships, pitfalls, and locations where lesions typically occur and where they may be overlooked. (orig.) [German] Das Knie ist vergleichsweise exponiert gegenueber Traumata. Sein Kapsel-Band-Apparat ist ein wesentlicher Faktor fuer die Gelenkstabilitaet. Umgekehrt erhoeht persistierende Instabilitaet das Risiko

  12. [MRI of the thumb collateral ligament at the metacarpophalangeal joint: anatomy and injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Zhan, Huili; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Li, Yaxiong; Wu, Bodong

    2015-05-05

    To explore the anatomy and injuries features of the thumb collateral ligamentat the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. The study was reviewed and approved by an institutional review board of hospital. Clinical imaging data of 7 healthy volunteers who without injuries and 20 patients with thumb collateral ligament injuries were retrospectively analyzed. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance examination, then comparative analysis of the normal anatomy and the thumb collateral ligament injury at MCP joints of MRI features in healthy volunteers and patients with injury. Imaging findings were compared with the surgical results and confirmed by followed up in patients. Seven volunteers without ligament injures showed homogeneous low-signal-intensity on T1-weighted and proton fat saturation sequence (PD-FS) images. The average thickness of the ulnarcollateral ligament is about 2.0 to 2.3 mm, however, the normal radial collateral ligament is thinner, the average thickness is about 1.4-1.5 mm. There were 20 patients with thumb collateral ligament injuresat MCP joints, including 12 cases of ulnar collateral ligament injury and 8 cases of radial collateral ligament injury, which demonstrated poor definition, discontinuity and heterogeneously increased signal intensity in proton fat saturation sequence (PD-FS) of the involved collateral ligament. There was edema in the soft tissues surrounding the injured sites. MRI is an accurate method for evaluation of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of the thumb collateral ligamentsat MCP joints, and it is a useful tool for early diagnosis and treatment of the thumb collateral ligaments injuries.

  13. A real-time computational model for estimating kinematics of ankle ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Zhang, Yanxin; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2016-01-01

    An accurate assessment of ankle ligament kinematics is crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms and can help to improve the treatment of an injured ankle, especially when used in conjunction with robot-assisted therapy. A number of computational models have been developed and validated for assessing the kinematics of ankle ligaments. However, few of them can do real-time assessment to allow for an input into robotic rehabilitation programs. An ankle computational model was proposed and validated to quantify the kinematics of ankle ligaments as the foot moves in real-time. This model consists of three bone segments with three rotational degrees of freedom (DOFs) and 12 ankle ligaments. This model uses inputs for three position variables that can be measured from sensors in many ankle robotic devices that detect postures within the foot-ankle environment and outputs the kinematics of ankle ligaments. Validation of this model in terms of ligament length and strain was conducted by comparing it with published data on cadaver anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging. The model based on ligament lengths and strains is in concurrence with those from the published studies but is sensitive to ligament attachment positions. This ankle computational model has the potential to be used in robot-assisted therapy for real-time assessment of ligament kinematics. The results provide information regarding the quantification of kinematics associated with ankle ligaments related to the disability level and can be used for optimizing the robotic training trajectory.

  14. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth.

  15. Healing ligaments have shorter lifetime and greater strain rate during fatigue than creep at functional stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Gail M; Bailey, Soraya J

    2013-09-01

    Healing ligaments have compromised strength, which makes them susceptible to damage during daily activities at normal functional stresses. Daily activities expose ligaments to cyclic (fatigue) and static (creep) loading. A gap injury was created in the midsubstance of both hindlimb medial collateral ligaments of 40 female 1-year-old New Zealand White rabbits. After a 14-week healing interval, medial collateral ligament gap scars were exposed to long-term fatigue and creep loading over a range of functional force/stress levels. Lifetime and strain behavior were compared during fatigue and creep. The contribution of time-dependent mechanisms to fatigue lifetime was modeled using creep data. Fatigue-loaded healing ligaments had shorter lifetime, greater steady-state strain rate and greater increase in strain at 0.8 h than creep-loaded healing ligaments. The actual fatigue lifetime was less than the predicted fatigue lifetime which was derived from time-dependent damage alone, indicating an important role for cycle-dependent damage mechanisms in healing ligaments during fatigue loading. Cyclic loading decreased lifetime and increased strain rate and strain prior to rupture compared to static loading in healing ligaments. These findings suggest that, after a ligament injury, more care should be taken when exercises result in cyclic loading rather than static loading of the healing ligament even at functional stresses.

  16. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  17. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application;Ligamentos humanos radioesterilizados y su aplicacion clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G., E-mail: daniel.luna@inin.gob.m [Centro Estatal de Trasplantes del Estado de Mexico, Pablo Sidar No. 602, Col. Universidad, 50130 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  18. Tensile Engagement of the Peri-Ankle Ligaments in Stance Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochigi, Yuki; Rudert, M. James; Amendola, Annunziato; Brown, Thomas D.; Saltzman, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The efficacy of reconstructive surgical procedures that attempt to restore normal ankle kinematics theoretically requires a full biomechanical understanding of the natural human ankle during gait. The contribution of the peri-ankle ligaments versus the articular surfaces to ankle motion control is not yet well understood. Knowledge of the tensile engagement of the peri-ankle ligaments during stance phase is necessary in order to achieve physiologic motion patterns. Methods Eleven fresh-frozen cadaver ankles were subjected to a dynamic loading sequence simulating the stance phase of normal level gait. Simultaneously, ligament strain was continuously monitored in the anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular ligaments, as well as in the anterior, middle, and posterior superficial deltoid ligaments. Eight of these specimens underwent further quasi-static range of motion testing, where ligament tension recruitment was assessed at 30° plantar flexion and 30° dorsiflexion. Results In the dynamic loading tests, none of the ligaments monitored showed a reproducible strain pattern consistent with playing a role in ankle stabilization. However, in the extended range of motion tests, most ligaments were often taut in plantar flexion or dorsiflexion. Conclusions A consistent combination of individual ligament strain patterns that principally control ankle motion was not manifest; rather, none of the ligaments under study were reproducibly recruited to be a primary stabilizing structure. The peri-ankle ligaments are likely to be secondary restraining structures that serve to resist motion, to avoid extreme positions. Stance phase ankle motion appears to be primarily controlled by articular congruity, not by peri-ankle ligament tension. Clinical Relevance Reconstructive ankle surgeries which aim to restore normal kinematics should focus on optimizing motion control by means of the articulating surface topography, rather than relying

  19. [Treatment of isolated and multiple ligament injuries of the knee: anatomy, biomechanics, diagnosis, indications for repair, surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebov, O; Lobenhoffer, P

    2009-06-01

    Complex knee ligament injuries are characterized by simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and/or the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and at least one collateral ligament. Isolated injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and PCL have a high healing capacity and can be treated conservatively in many cases. Ruptures of the MCL can also be treated conservatively in complex injuries if the cruciate ligaments are reconstructed. Ruptures of the lateral structures usually need surgical reconstruction. Indications for acute surgical repair include meniscus dislocation, entrapment of collateral ligament portions in the joint, knee dislocation with severe knee instability, and displaced bony avulsions. The anatomy of the knee ligaments must be carefully respected in surgical reconstruction. Acute repair of collateral ligament injuries is possible only in the first 2 weeks after trauma. Acute arthroscopy is indicated only in combination with reconstructive surgery.

  20. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  1. Anatomy and Histology of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common procedures in orthopaedic surgery. However, even with advances in surgical techniques and implants, some patients still have residual anterolateral rotatory laxity after reconstruction. A thorough study of the anatomy of the anterolateral region of the knee is needed. To study the anterolateral region and determine the measurements and points of attachments of the anterolateral ligament (ALL). Descriptive laboratory study. Dissections of the anterolateral structures of the knee were performed in 20 human cadavers. After isolating the ALL, its length, thickness, width, and points of attachments were determined. The femoral attachment of the ALL was based on the anterior-posterior and proximal-distal distances from the attachment of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The tibial attachment point was based on the distance from the Gerdy tubercle to the fibular head and the distance from the lateral tibial plateau. The ligaments from the first 10 dissections were sent for histological analysis. The ALL was found in all 20 knees. The femoral attachment of the ALL at the lateral epicondyle averaged 3.5 mm distal and 2.2 mm anterior to the attachment of the LCL. Two distal attachments were observed: one inserts into the lateral meniscus, the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head, approximately 4.4 mm distal to the tibial articular cartilage. The mean measurements for the ligament were 37.3 mm (length), 7.4 mm (width), and 2.7 mm (thickness). The histological analysis of the ligaments revealed dense connective tissue. The ALL is consistently present in the anterolateral region of the knee. Its attachment to the femur is anterior and distal to the attachment of the LCL. Moving distally, it bifurcates at close to half of its length. The ALL features 2 distal attachments, one at the lateral meniscus and the other between the Gerdy tubercle and the fibular head. The ALL may be

  2. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament injury: associated findings

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    Han, Gi Seok; Kang, Heung Sik; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Chu Wan; Cho, Kyu Hyung; Seong, Sang Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-15

    Authors investigated the associated findings and their value in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in MR image. The knee MR images of 47 patients with ACL injury (complete;24, partial;23) and 61 patients with normal ACL confirmed by the knee arthroscopy or operation were reviewed retrospectively. The degree of anterior translocation of tibia and the degree of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) buckling were evaluated. The prevalence and pattern of associated adjacent bone, ligament and meniscus injuries were studied. The means({+-} 2 standard errors) of anterior translocation were different significantly in statistical analysis ({rho} < 0.001, student t-test) between injury group (7.51 {+-} 1.16 mm) and normal group (-0.56 {+-} 0.92mm). In the level of 5mm of anterior translocation for the criteria of ACL injury, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy were 78.7%, 89.5%, 84.3% for each. The means of PCL buckling ratio were also different statistically between injury group(0.23 {+-} 0.02) and normal group(0.17 {+-} 0.01)({rho} < 0.001). In the level of 0.20 for diagnostic criteria of ACL injury, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy were 71.4%, 83.6%, 78.4% for each. Thirty one medial meniscus tear (66%), thirteen lateral meniscus tear (28%), ten medial collateral ligament injury (28%), one PCL injury(2%) were associated with ACL injury. The twenty nine bone marrow changes were found in twenty patients (43%) which included acutely injured seven patients. In acute cases, the bone marrow changes were depicted as diffuse or focal high signal intensity lesions in lateral femoral or tibial condyles in contrast to the changes in chronic cases depicted as focal low signal intensity lesions in variable location. Lateral femoral condylar notch depression were found in nine patients (19%) and avulsion fractures of anterior tibial spine in four patients(9%). The associated findings with ACL injury (anterior translocation, buckling of PCL, associated bone

  3. The role of the medial ligaments in lateral stabilization of the ankle joint: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, Pejman; Benca, Emir; Skrbensky, Gobert V; Wenzel, Florian; Auffarth, Alexander; Krpo, Selma; Windhager, Reinhard; Buchhorn, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    The deltoid ligament complex is known as medial stabilizer in the ankle against pronation/eversion. Lateral dual-ligament laxity often results in chronic ankle instability with recurring ankle sprain trauma. The goal of this study is to examine the lateral stabilizing role of the deltoid ligament complex against supination/inversion in case of existing lateral ligament instability. A torsion simulation was performed on 12 fresh human lower leg cadaver specimens in a loading frame and a specially designed mounting platform. The preset torsion between tibia and calcaneus was primarily set at 30° of internal rotation on specimen in plantar flexion and hindfoot inversion. The measured variable was the resisting torque recorded around mechanical tibial axis, which ensures stability in ankle sprain trauma. The first series of measurements were performed on healthy specimens and the following after transecting structures in following order: anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) in combination with calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), followed by anterior tibiotalar ligament and posterior tibiotalar ligament and finally tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL). The combined lateral ATFL and CFL instability showed a decrease in the resisting torque, which ensures stability in ankle sprain trauma. Only a transection of TCL (superficial layer of deltoid ligament complex) with existing lateral dual-ligament instability results in a significant decrease in torque (pankle joint in case of repetitive sprain trauma at a present lateral ligament lesion. Diagnostics of and treatment for lateral ligament instability need to consider the deltoid ligament complex,especially TCL in clinical routine.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Craniovertebral Junction Ligaments: Normal Anatomy and Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidecker, Anna E.; Shen, Peter Y.

    2016-01-01

    The superb stability and flexibility of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) are enabled by the ligaments that connect the occipital bone and the C1 and C2 vertebral bodies. Radiographically, these ligaments are best assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent soft tissue contrast, but typically poor spatial resolution. With the advent of advanced MRI techniques, including volumetric sequences, high spatial resolution and contrast resolution can both be attained, allowing for detailed analysis of the ligaments, particularly in trauma settings. We have instituted a cervical spine trauma protocol which utilizes a high resolution (1-mm voxel) volumetric proton density sequence to detect injuries to the ligaments of the CVJ in all trauma patients who receive a cervical spine MRI in our emergency room. In this article, we review techniques for imaging the ligaments at the CVJ, the normal imaging anatomy and the function of the CVJ ligaments, and their appearance in cases of traumatic injury. PMID:27648395

  5. Ultrasonographic visualization and assessment of the anterolateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo, Jason; Kaplan, Daniel J; Fralinger, David J; Adler, Ronald S; Campbell, Kirk A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Alaia, Michael J

    2017-10-01

    Injury to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee has recently received attention as a potential risk factor for failure of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, evaluation of the anterolateral ligament is currently difficult, and radiologic data are sparse with regard to the normal appearance of this ligament. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the ALL could be identified and visualized using ultrasonography. Ten non-paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric knees underwent ultrasound by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist using a Siemens S2000 Acuson Ultrasound machine with a 14-MHz linear transducer. After first identifying anatomical landmarks by palpation, a thin band of tissue originating in the vicinity of the fibular collateral ligament (FCL) origin was identified and followed up distally. The tibia was held at 30° of flexion and internally rotated to verify tightening of the structure. Under ultrasound guidance, 25-gauge hypodermic needles were placed at what were sonographically determined to be the origin and insertion points of the ligament. One-tenth of a CC of aniline blue dye was injected. The specimens were then dissected to confirm the presence and location of the ALL. If an ALL was found, distances between the epicentre of the injected dye and the actual origin and insertion points were calculated. Additionally, ligament length based on dissection images and ultrasound images was calculated. Eight of ten specimens had an anterolateral structure that originated from the lateral femoral epicondyle just posterior and superior to the origin of the FCL and inserted on the lateral plateau approximately halfway between Gerdy's tubercle and the fibular head. The average length based on ultrasound was 3.8 cm (±.7; range 3.1-4.7) and 4.1 cm (±1.1; range 2.6-6.1) based on dissection. Length based on dissection and ultrasound had minimal agreement (ICC = .308; 95 % confidence interval .257-.382, p = .265). The

  6. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuske Komiyama

    Full Text Available Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain.

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury, Reconstruction, and the Optimization of Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James Philip

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) provides an established surgical intervention to control pathological tibiofemoral translational and rotational movement. ACLR is a safe and reproducible intervention, but there remains an underlying rate of failure to return to preinjury sporting activity levels. Postoperative pathological laxity and graft reinjury remain concerns. Previously, unrecognized meniscal lesions, disruption of the lateral capsule, and extracapsular structures offer potential avenues to treat and to therefore improve kinematic outcome and functional results, following reconstruction. Addressing laterally based injuries may also improve the durability of intraarticular ACLR. Improving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replication of the normal ACL attachment points on the femur and the tibia, using either double bundle or anatomical single bundle techniques, improves kinematics, which may benefit outcome and functionality, following reconstruction. PMID:28966384

  8. Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. How Do We Do It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are frequently seen in current practice mostly affecting the young, active subjects, and usually require ligament reconstruction in order to restore normal knee kinematics. As worldwide interest in anatomic reconstruction grew over the last decade, we have also refined our technique in order to restore the anatomical function as near to the normal as possible. This anatomical restoration concept is believed to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis, which the non-anatomic reconstructions fail to attain. The knowledge gained from the ACL anatomy, function and kinematics has helped in developing the current anatomic methods of reconstruction, which take into account patient anatomy, the rupture pattern, as well as the comorbidities. We present our approach to anatomical single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  9. Acute longitudinal ligament rupture following acute spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Hansom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL rupture in a 47- year-old gentleman following a bicycle accident. The ALL is a continuous band of a variable thickness that acts as a primary spinal stabiliser. Stress, strain or rupture of the ALL usually occurs as a result of hyperextension, with the primary perpetrator being whiplash injuries. Such injuries have been shown to result in cervical spine instability during extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending modes. Spine radiographs of such patients may be routinely assessed as normal, therefore this specific type of injury does not lend itself to identification by traditional imaging methods. This account demonstrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion of a ligamentous neck injury in the setting of normal plain radiographs but abnormal clinical examination.

  10. A Brief History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Davarinos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL are among the most frequently performed procedures in knee surgery nowadays. The history of ACL surgery can be traced as far back as the Egyptian times. The early years reflect the efforts to establish a viable, consistently successful reconstruction technique while, during the early 20th century, we witness an increasing awareness of, and interest in, the ligament and its lesions. Finally, we highlight the most important steps in the evolution of the ACL reconstruction surgery by discussing the various techniques spanning the years using not only autologous grafts (fascia lata, meniscal, hamstring, patella tendon, bone-patella tendon-bone, and double bundle grafts but also synthetic ones and allografts.

  11. Cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, L; Merlini, L; Savini, R; Davidovits, P

    1983-09-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine may be a cause of cervical myelopathy. This ossification has often been encountered in Japan, but only sporadically among the Caucasian races. It is therefore probable that racial factors are relevant to the pathology. During the past four years, due to the routine use of computerised axial tomography (CAT) in the pre-operative study of cervical myelopathy, we were able to show that in 13 cases stenosis of the vertebral canal was due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. This was visible in the standard radiographs in only two out of these 13 cases. The clinical data, diagnostic criteria and results of treatment are reported. This is the largest series yet reported outside Japan.

  12. Deltoid ligament reconstruction: a novel technique with biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Steven L; Dedhia, Sunil; Ren, Yupeng; Rotstein, Jason; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-07-01

    Deltoid ligament insufficiency has been shown to decrease tibiotalar contact area and increase peak pressures within the lateral ankle mortise. This detrimental effect may create an arthritic ankle joint if left unresolved. Reconstructive efforts thus far have been less than satisfactory. We describe a novel technique that reconstructs both main limbs of the deltoid ligament in anatomic orientation while providing secure graft fixation. Six pairs of fresh frozen cadaveric lower extremities were utilized. Matched right and left lower limbs (one pair) were allocated either to a deltoid reconstruction group or an intact deltoid group. The anterior tibial tendon was chosen as the graft for ligament reconstruction, and was harvested from the ipsilateral specimen. Tunnels were created in the distal tibia at the deltoid origin, and at the talus (deep) and calcaneus (superficial) deltoid insertions. Following measurement, the graft was cut to the appropriate size and endobuttons weaved into both tendon ends. The graft ends were passed through the talus and calcaneus respectively. The residual graft loop was then routed through the tibial tunnel and secured proximally with a cancellous screw post and spiked washer. Following specimen mounting, a multiaxis testing apparatus with three separate motors allowed three planes (dorsiflexion/plantarflexion; inversion/eversion; and internal/external rotation) of motion. Angular rotations and linear translations of the tibia in the X-Y-Z directions were measured for a given torque in external/internal rotation, dorsiflexion/plantarflexion, or eversion/inversion, under a constant velocity of 2 degrees per second. Testing consisted of a 2 Nm preload for 20 cycles in internal rotation/external rotation and inversion/eversion prior to data collection of 10 cycles at this level of torque. Similarly, a preload of 1 Nm for 20 cycles was used in dorsiflexion/plantarflexion prior to data collection of 10 cycles at this torque level. Data were

  13. Casuistry of physiotherapy care of patient after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery of knee

    OpenAIRE

    Škráčková, Barbora

    2017-01-01

    Title: Casuistry of physiotherapy care of patient after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery of knee Objectives: The purpose of the theoretical part of the thesis is to introduce the issue of soft tissue injury of the knee joint, especially anterior cruciate ligament. Acquaintance with conservative and surgical treatment, physical therapy and physiotherapeutical care after ligament reconstruction surgery. The special part of the thesis presents casuistry of physiotherapy care of ...

  14. Scaphoid and lunate translation in the intact wrist and following ligament resection: A cadaver study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Frederick W.; Sutton, Levi G.; Allison, Mari A.; Gilula, Louis A.; Short, Walter H.; Wollstein, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The two purposes of this study were a) to determine the amount of scaphoid and lunate translation that occurs in normal cadaver wrists during wrist motion and b) to quantify the change in ulnar translation when specific dorsal and volar wrist ligaments were sectioned. Methods The scaphoid and lunate motion of 37 cadaver wrists were measured during wrist radioulnar deviation and flexion-extension motions using a wrist joint motion simulator. The location of centroids of the bones were quantified during each motion in the intact wrists and after sectioning either two dorsal ligaments along with the scapholunate interosseous ligament or two volar ligaments and the scapholunate interosseous ligament. Results In the intact wrist the scaphoid and lunate statistically translated radially with wrist ulnar deviation. With wrist flexion the scaphoid moved volarly and the lunate dorsally. After sectioning either the dorsal or volar ligaments, the scaphoid moved radially. After sectioning the dorsal or volar ligaments, the lunate statistically moved ulnarly and volarly. Conclusion These results indicate that measureable changes in the scaphoid and lunate translation occur with wrist motion and change with ligament sectioning. However, for the ligaments that were sectioned, these changes are small and an attempt to clinically measure these translations of the scaphoid and lunate radiographically may be limited. The results support the conclusion that ulnar translocation does not occur unless multiple ligaments are sectioned. Injury of more than the scapholunate interosseous ligament along with either the dorsal intercarpal and dorsal radiocarpal or the radioscaphocapitate and scaphotrapezial ligaments are needed to have large amounts of volar and ulnar translation. PMID:21276893

  15. Isolated lateral collateral ligament complex injury in rock climbing and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bryan A; Hiller, Lucas P; Imbesi, Steven G; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-08-01

    We report two occurrences of high-grade tears of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC), consisting of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and fibular collateral ligament (FCL). One injury occurred in a rock climber and the other in a martial artist. Increasing awareness of isolated injuries of the LCLC will allow for appropriate diagnosis and management. We review and discuss the anatomy of the LCLC, the unique mechanism of isolated injury, as well as physical and imaging examination findings.

  16. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.).

  17. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  18. Ultrastructure and innervation of thumb carpometacarpal ligaments in surgical patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobargha, Nathalie; Ludwig, Cassie; Ladd, Amy L; Hagert, Elisabet

    2014-04-01

    The complex configuration of the thumb carpometacarpal (CMC-1) joint relies on musculotendinous and ligamentous support for precise circumduction. Ligament innervation contributes to joint stability and proprioception. Evidence suggests abnormal ligament innervation is associated with osteoarthritis (OA) in large joints; however, little is known about CMC-1 ligament innervation characteristics in patients with OA. We studied the dorsal radial ligament (DRL) and the anterior oblique ligament (AOL), ligaments with a reported divergent presence of mechanoreceptors in nonosteoarthritic joints. This study's purposes were (1) to examine the ultrastructural architecture of CMC-1 ligaments in surgical patients with OA; (2) to describe innervation, specifically looking at mechanoreceptors, of these ligaments using immunohistochemical techniques and compare the AOL and DRL in terms of innervation; and (3) to determine whether there is a correlation between age and mechanoreceptor density. The AOL and DRL were harvested from 11 patients with OA during trapeziectomy (10 women, one man; mean age, 67 years). The 22 ligaments were sectioned in paraffin and analyzed using immunoflourescent triple staining microscopy. In contrast to the organized collagen bundles of the DRL, the AOL appeared to be composed of disorganized connective tissue with few collagen fibers and little innervation. Mechanoreceptors were identified in CMC-1 ligaments of all patients with OA. The DRL was significantly more innervated than the AOL. There was no significant correlation between innervation of the DRL and AOL and patient age. The dense collagen structure and rich innervation of the DRL in patients with OA suggest that the DRL has an important proprioceptive and stabilizing role. Ligament innervation may correlate with proprioceptive and neuromuscular changes in OA pathophysiology and consequently support further investigation of innervation in disease prevention and treatment strategies.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues: application to knee ligaments and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    Pioletti, Dominique P.; Meister, Jean-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Ligaments play a central role in the stability of the knee. Due to the increase in sport activities of the young population, rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become a frequent clinical problem. A surgical procedure replacing the deficient ligament is performed to restore the knee's initial stability. Although this surgical technique is widespread and well established, long term clinical results are inconsistent and the stability of the knee is not always restored, leading t...

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Facet Joints and Interspinous Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-01-01

    A descriptive in vitro study on isolation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments. To isolate cells from the facet joints and interspinous ligaments and investigate their surface marker profile and differentiation potentials. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament are progressive conditions characterized by the hypertrophy and ossification of ligaments and joints within the spinal canal. MSCs are believed to play a role in the advancement of these diseases and the existence of MSCs has been demonstrated within the ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these cells could also be found within facet joints and interspinous ligaments. Samples were harvested from 10 patients undergoing spinal surgery. The MSCs from facet joints and interspinous ligaments were isolated using direct tissue explant technique. Cell surface antigen profilings were performed via flow cytometry. Their lineage differentiation potentials were analyzed. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs have the tri-lineage potential to be differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells under appropriate inductions. Flow cytometry analysis revealed both cell lines expressed MSCs markers. Both facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs expressed marker genes for osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments may provide alternative sources of MSCs for tissue engineering applications. The facet joints and interspinous ligaments-derived MSCs are part of the microenvironment of the human ligaments of the spinal column and might play a crucial role in the development and progression of degenerative spine conditions.

  1. [Simultaneous bilateral rupture in both cruciate knee ligaments (about a case)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaoui, Mounir; Derfoufi, Abdelhafid; Abbassi, Najib; Daoudi, Abdelkarim; Agoumi, Omar; Yacoubi, Hicham; Najib, Abdeljaouad

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral cruciate ligament rupture is rare while simultaneous rupture in both anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) is exceptional; that's why post-traumatic simultaneous bilateral cruciate ligament rupture has never been described in the literature making this case study based on patient's observation, follow-up and therapeutic discussion very interesting. The procedure was performed in two surgical steps spaced in time and results were very satisfactory for both us and patient.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain In Vivo: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Seron, Juan Antonio; Medina-Porqueres, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Distinct exercises have been proposed for knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. There is a need to understand ACL strain behavior during different rehabilitation exercises to protect the graft from excessive strain that could interfere with its healing process. To critically review studies that directly measured normal ACL strain in vivo during different movements, conditions, or exercises to gain insight into which of them may produce more strain on the ligament or the ligament graft in the case of reconstructed knees. A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro databases was conducted. Keywords included anterior cruciate ligament, strain, stress, deformation, transducer, rehabilitation, rehabilitation exercise, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were (1) peer-reviewed studies published in English or Spanish, (2) research conducted on adult human subjects with normal ACLs and healthy knees, and (3) ACL strain directly measured during different movements, conditions, or exercises by using a transducer. Systematic review. Level 4. Specific data were abstracted from the selected studies, including isometric quadriceps and hamstrings activity, active and passive flexion-extension of the knee, closed kinetic chain exercises, and application of joint compressive load. A total of 10 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. The strain values produced by closed kinetic chain and open kinetic chain exercises were similar. However, closed kinetic chain exercises appear to attenuate the strain increase that occurs in open kinetic chain exercises when increasing resistance. These data may be relevant to develop rehabilitation exercises or programs that do not endanger the healing ACL graft and to provide a basis for future clinical trials. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Controversies in knee rehabilitation: anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Mathew J; Arundale, Amelia J H; Logerstedt, David S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no reinjury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to preinjury sports. Using these criteria, the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury are reviewed and recommendations are provided for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention and rehabilitation of paediatric anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Grindem, Hege; MOKSNES, HÅVARD

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the current knowledge on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention and ACL rehabilitation in individuals who have not yet reached musculoskeletal maturity. Methods: This is a narrative review based on a targeted and systematic literature search for paediatric ACL injury risk factors, injury prevention and rehabilitation. Results: The search strategies resulted in 119 hits on risk factor studies, 57 hits on prevention and 37 hits on rehabilitat...

  5. Arthroscopy Up to Date: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillhammer, Carl K; Reid, John B; Rister, Jamie; Jani, Sunil S; Marvil, Sean C; Chen, Austin W; Anderson, Chris G; D'Agostino, Sophia; Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    To categorize and summarize up-to-date anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) research published in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine and systematically review each subcategory, beginning with ACL anatomy. After searching for "anterior cruciate ligament" OR "ACL" in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine from January 2012 through December 2014, we excluded articles more pertinent to ACL augmentation; open growth plates; and meniscal, chondral, or multiligamentous pathology. Studies were subcategorized for data extraction. We included 212 studies that were classified into 8 categories: anatomy; basic science and biomechanics; tunnel position; graft selection; graft fixation; injury risk and rehabilitation; practice patterns and outcomes; and complications. Anatomic risk factors for ACL injury and post-reconstruction graft failure include a narrow intercondylar notch, low native ACL volume, and increased posterior slope. Regarding anatomic footprints, the femoral attachment is 43% of the proximal-to-distal lateral femoral condylar length whereas the posterior border of the tendon is 2.5 mm from the articular margin. The tibial attachment of the ACL is two-fifths of the medial-to-lateral interspinous distance and 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic research using radiology and computed tomography to evaluate ACL graft placement shows poor interobserver and intraobserver reliability. With a mind to improving outcomes, surgeons should be aware of anatomic risk factors (stenotic femoral notch, low ligament volume, and increased posterior slope) for ACL graft failure, have a precise understanding of arthroscopic landmarks identifying femoral and tibial footprint locations, and understand that imaging to evaluate graft placement is unreliable. Level III, systematic review of Level III evidence. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of inpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions and concomitant injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; McPherson, April L; Rao, Marepalli B; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this epidemiologic study was to quantify the incidence, expense, and concomitant injuries for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) procedures in the USA from 2003 to 2011 that required an inpatient stay. It was hypothesized that the relative reported rates of concomitant knee injuries would be greater with the MCL and menisci compared to all other concomitant knee injuries. The National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2011 was retrospectively sampled using ICD-9-CM codes to identify ACLR patients and to extrapolate national averages. Between the years of 2003-2011, an average of 9,037 ± 1,728 inpatient hospitalization included ACLRs, of which 4,252 ± 1,824 were primarily due to the ACLR. Inpatient visits primarily due to ACLR involved an average hospitalization of 1.7 ± 0.2 days and cost $30,118 ± 9,066 per patient. Knee injuries that were commonly reported along with inpatient ACLRs included medial meniscus damage (18.1 %), lateral meniscus damage (16.8 %), collateral ligament repairs (12.3 %), and medial collateral ligament strains (6.9 %). Prevalence of meniscus injuries was consistent across years, but MCL-related injuries increased over time. ACLR-related inpatient hospitalizations account for approximately 7.1 % of the total ACLRs performed annually in the USA. Inpatient ACLR procedures continue to decrease in frequency; however, the mean cost per patient increased. Meniscus and collateral ligament injuries were the most commonly reported concomitant knee injuries. The clinical relevance of this investigation is that it informs, on a large clinical cohort of patients, the current state of incidence and expense for ACLR surgeries in an inpatient setting. Prognostic, retrospective study, Level II.

  7. Risk factors for knee instability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyun; Lee, Sung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate risk factors that influence postoperative instability after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 152 consecutive patients with symptomatic ACL insufficiency underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between 2005 and 2011. Loss to follow-up and previous ligament reconstruction were exclusion criteria, resulting in 131 patients remaining for this retrospective study. The median follow-up was 55 months (range 25-100 months). Patients were sorted into two groups by anterior translation on stress radiograph and pivot shift test grade and were analysed for the statistical significance of various risk factors including age at surgery, gender, body mass index, preoperative instability, time from injury to surgery, single-bundle reconstruction with preserved abundant remnant versus double-bundle reconstruction with scanty remnant, and concomitant ligament, meniscus, and articular cartilage injury with use of multivariate logistic regression analysis. Time from injury to surgery over 12 weeks was found to be a significant risk factor for postoperative instability [p ligament (MCL) was also a risk factor (p = 0.02, adjusted OR 13.60; 95 % CI 1.24-148.25). The other variables were not found to be a significant risk factor. Among the risk factor variables, concomitant grade 2 MCL injury and surgical delay of more than 12 weeks from injury were significant risk factors for postoperative knee instability after ACL reconstruction. The overall results suggest that surgery <12 weeks from injury and meticulous attention to concomitant MCL injury should be considered. Retrospective case-control study, Level III.

  8. 3-Tesla MRI: Beneficial visualization of the meniscofemoral ligaments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Johanna; Krasny, Andrej; Hartmann, Dinah Maria; Rückbeil, Marcia Viviane; Ritz, Thomas; Prescher, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Recent investigations have confirmed an important stabilizing and protective function of the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) to the knee joint and suggest a clinical relevance. Concerning their incidences, however, there have been discrepancies between data acquired from cadaveric studies and MRI data using 0.3- to 1.5-Tesla field strengths probably due to lower resolution. This study aims to investigate whether imaging with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) is beneficial in gaining information regarding the ligaments' incidence, length, width and anatomic variation. 3-T MRI images of 448 patients (224 males, 224 females, with, respectively, 32 patients of each sex in the age groups: 0-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, >70years) were retrospectively reviewed. The influence of the parameters 'sex' and 'age' was determined. Whereas 71% of the patients had at least one MFL, 22% had an anterior MFL (aMFL), 53% had a posterior MFL (pMFL) and five percent had coexisting ligaments. The pMFLs were more likely to be present in female patients (P<0.05) but if so, they were longer in the males (P<0.05). The pMFL was categorized according to its insertion on the medial femoral condyle. 3-T MRI enables an excellent illustration of the anatomic variations of pMFLs. By modifying an anatomic classification for radiological use we measured lengths and widths of the MFLs without any difficulties. Despite its increased resolution, 3-T MRI lends no diagnostic benefit in visualizing the course of the aMFL or filigree coexisting ligaments as compared to MRI at lower field strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments; Bandverletzungen des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institut, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung nach einem Sprunggelenktrauma basiert auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung hinsichtlich des Stellenwerts der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesondere fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird bei dieser Indikation zurzeit nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenkbaender erlaubt. Sie ist im besonderen Masse geeignet, akute und chronische Verletzungen des Sinus tarsi zu beurteilen. Bei chronischen Beschwerden nach Bandverletzung ist die MRT zur

  10. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  11. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Henrique Frauendorf Cenni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  12. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an individualized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola F. van Eck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction is one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Recently, there has been a shift in interest towards reconstruction techniques that more closely restore the native anatomy of the ACL. This review paper discusses our approach to individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction, including the anatomy of the ACL, the physical exam, imaging modalities, the surgical technique for anatomic reconstruction including pre- and intraoperative considerations and our postoperative rehabilitation protocol.

  13. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-01-01

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore...

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training in Female Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Noyes, Frank R.; Barber Westin, Sue D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Objective: To determine if ACL injury prevention programs have a positive influence on both injury rates and athletic performance tests in female athletes. Data sources: In August 2011, a search was conducted (1995?August 2011) of the PubMed, Science Direct, and CINAHL databases. Study sel...

  15. The development of zebrafish tendon and ligament progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jessica W.; Galloway, Jenna L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of tendons and ligaments for transmitting movement and providing stability to the musculoskeletal system, their development is considerably less well understood than that of the tissues they serve to connect. Zebrafish have been widely used to address questions in muscle and skeletal development, yet few studies describe their tendon and ligament tissues. We have analyzed in zebrafish the expression of several genes known to be enriched in mammalian tendons and ligaments, including scleraxis (scx), collagen 1a2 (col1a2) and tenomodulin (tnmd), or in the tendon-like myosepta of the zebrafish (xirp2a). Co-expression studies with muscle and cartilage markers demonstrate the presence of scxa, col1a2 and tnmd at sites between the developing muscle and cartilage, and xirp2a at the myotendinous junctions. We determined that the zebrafish craniofacial tendon and ligament progenitors are neural crest derived, as in mammals. Cranial and fin tendon progenitors can be induced in the absence of differentiated muscle or cartilage, although neighboring muscle and cartilage are required for tendon cell maintenance and organization, respectively. By contrast, myoseptal scxa expression requires muscle for its initiation. Together, these data suggest a conserved role for muscle in tendon development. Based on the similarities in gene expression, morphology, collagen ultrastructural arrangement and developmental regulation with that of mammalian tendons, we conclude that the zebrafish tendon populations are homologous to their force-transmitting counterparts in higher vertebrates. Within this context, the zebrafish model can be used to provide new avenues for studying tendon biology in a vertebrate genetic system. PMID:24803652

  16. Investigation of the biomechanical behaviour of hindfoot ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestiero, Antonella; Carniel, Emanuele L; Venturato, Chiara; Natali, Arturo N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a computational tool for the mechanical characterization of the hindfoot ligaments. The investigation is performed by a coupled numerical and experimental approach. For this purpose, a numerical model that represents the complex structural configuration of the hindfoot and the typical features of the mechanical behaviour of the ligament tissue is developed. The geometrical analysis of the anatomical site is performed starting from the processing of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Accounting for morphometric measurements, the virtual solid model provides an averaged configuration of the hindfoot structure. In order to specify the mechanical behaviour of the ligament tissue, a fibre-reinforced visco-hyperelastic model is adopted. The formulation accounts for the anisotropic configuration, geometric non-linearity, non-linear elasticity and time-dependent phenomena. Numerical analyses are performed to evaluate the biological tissues and structure mechanics with regard to physiological boundary conditions, accounting for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements. In order to evaluate the reliability of the numerical model developed, the experimental data are compared with the numerical results. The numerical results are in agreement with the range of values obtained by experimental test confirming the accuracy of the procedure adopted.

  17. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well.

  18. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyun Jun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Sang Gook [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  19. Tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Although no consensus has been reached regarding the management of PCL deficiency, in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated whether the tibial inlay technique restores the anatomical site of insertion of the PCL, prevents elongation, stretching, graft failure, and improves long-term PCL stability. A systematic search using PubMed, Ovid, the Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases using 'posterior cruciate ligament tear', 'Tibial inlay technique' and 'posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction' as keywords identified 71 publications, of which 10 were relevant to the topic, and included a total of 255 patients. The tibial inlay technique restores the anatomic insertion site of the PCL, eliminates the killer turn effect, and places the graft at lower potential risk for abrasion and subsequent rupture. It has the disadvantages of increased operating time and risk to the posterior neurovascular structures. There was no evidence of an association between outcome results and Coleman methodology score, but the Coleman methodology scores correlated positively with the level-of-evidence rating. The methodological quality of the studies included has not improved over the years. Given the few reported published findings, we cannot ascertain whether this procedure may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies. The lack of published randomized clinical trials and few reported findings did not allow to ascertain whether the tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies and to demonstrate procedure efficacy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atraumatic medial collateral ligament oedema in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergin, D.; Keogh, C.; O' Connell, M.; Zoga, A. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Rowe, D.; Shah, B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Medical Center; Fitzpatrick, P. [Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, University College Dublin (Ireland); Eustace, S. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); X-Ray Department, Cappagh National Orthopedic Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and determine the prevalence of atraumatic medial collateral oedema identified in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Design and patients: Sixty patients, 30 patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 to 4) and 30 age-matched patients with atraumatic knee pain without osteoarthritis, referred for MR imaging over a 2 year period were included in the study. In each case, severity of osteoarthritis was recorded on radiographs and correlated with the presence or absence of medial collateral ligament oedema at MR imaging. Results: Medial collateral oedema was identified in 27 of the 30 patients with osteoarthritis, of whom 14 had grade 1 oedema and 13 had grade 2 oedema compared with the presence of medial collateral ligament oedema (grade 1) in only two of the 30 control patients without osteoarthritis (P<<0.0001). Conclusion: Medial collateral oedema is common in patients with osteoarthritis in the absence of trauma. When identified, medial collateral ligament oedema should be considered to be a feature of osteoarthritis and should not be incorrectly attributed to an acute traumatic injury. (orig.)

  1. Effect of Ligament Morphology on Electrical Conductivity of Porous Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuruzi, Abu Samah; Mazulianawati, Majid Siti

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of ligament morphology on electrical conductivity of open cell porous silver (Ag). Porous Ag was formed when silver nanoparticles in an organic phase were annealed at 150°C for durations ranging from 1 to 5 min. Electrical conductivity of porous Ag was about 20% of bulk value after 5 min annealing. Porous Ag was modeled as a collection of Kelvin cell (truncated octahedrons) structures comprised of conjoined conical ligaments and spherical vertices. An analytical expression for electrical conductivity was obtained. Electrical conductivity normal to hexagonal faces of the unit cell was computed. Our model indicates contribution of grain boundary to electrical resistance increases significantly after the first minute of annealing and plateaus thereafter. Using experimental electrical conductivity data as an input, the model suggests that the ratio, n, of surfaces of one half of a conjoined cone ligament is between 0.7 and 1.0. Average deviation from experimentally determined relative electrical conductivity, Δ σ r, was minimal when n = 0.9.

  2. Bilateral median nerve compression at the level of Struthers' ligament. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinlioglu, A; Cirak, B; Akpinar, F; Tosun, N; Dogan, A

    2000-04-01

    Struthers' ligament syndrome is a rare cause of median nerve entrapment. Bilateral compression of the median nerve is even more rare. It presents with pain, sensory disturbance, and/or motor function loss at the median nerve's dermatomal area. The authors present the case of a 21-year-old woman with bilateral median nerve compression caused by Struthers' ligament. She underwent surgical decompression of the nerve on both sides. To the authors' knowledge, this case is the first reported bilateral compression of the median nerve caused by Struthers' ligament. The presentation and symptomatology of Struthers' ligament syndrome must be differentiated from median nerve compression arising from other causes.

  3. Biomechanical changes elicited by an anterior cruciate ligament deficiency during steady rate cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Sanderson, David J; Moffet, Hélène; Inglis, J Timothy

    2003-06-01

    To identify any changes to lower limb biomechanics during steady rate cycling as a result of an anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. Comparative study in which healthy and anterior cruciate ligament injured individuals underwent biomechanical analysis during stationary cycling. Individuals with an anterior cruciate ligament deficiency often exhibit reductions in the magnitude of quadriceps muscle activity and subsequent knee joint extensor moments during walking. It is not known whether these compensations are present during cycling, an exercise frequently used to retrain anterior cruciate ligament injured individuals. Ten healthy and 10 unilateral anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals participated. All participants were required to cycle for approximately 30 s at each of six different cycling intensities while lower limb EMG, kinetics, and kinematics were collected bilaterally. Before riding, participants performed submaximal isometric contractions to generate normalizing data. In addition to reduced quadriceps activation and net knee joint extensor moments, the anterior cruciate ligament deficient limbs exhibited decreases in linear impulse of the resultant pedal force, knee joint flexor moments, hip and ankle extensor moments, and muscle activity from gluteus maximus. These decreases were counteracted by an increase in output from the anterior cruciate ligament intact limb. Anterior cruciate ligament injured individuals exhibited a limb attenuation strategy during cycling activities. This study reports lower limb kinetic and electromyographic data from anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals during stationary cycling, and shows that these individuals exhibit a limb attenuation strategy on the very leg that is undergoing rehabilitation.

  4. The morphology and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebra ligaments in the cervical epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Min, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Zhilai; Ding, Zihai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-11-01

    The dural sac is anchored within the vertebral canal by connective tissue called meningovertebral ligaments in the epidural space. During flavectomy and laminectomy, inadvertent disruption of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments may lead to dura laceration and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. All the described dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were located in the lumbar region. A rare study is available about dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the cervical spinal dura to the adjacent vertebrae. To identify and describe the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments at each cervical level and discuss their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of 22 embalmed cadavers. The anatomy was studied in 22 whole cervical cadavers (11 females, 11 males), prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 55 to 78 years. The vertebral canal was divided to expose the dural sac and the spinal nerve roots. At all levels of the cervical vertebra, the morphology, quantity, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were determined and the length, width or diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with vernier calipers. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the cervical region anchored the posterior dural sac to the ligamentum flavum or laminae. The number of attachment points on the ligamentum flavum was relatively larger than that on the lamina, and the occurrence rate of dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was 100% at C1-C2 and C4--C5. The thickest ligaments were observed at the C1 and C2 vertebrae. The length of the ligaments varied from 1.50 to 35.22 mm, and the orientation of the ligaments mostly was craniocaudal. The morphology of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was divided into four types: strip type, cord type, grid type, and thin slice type. In the cervical spine, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the posterior dural sac and the ligamentum flavum or lamina. The dorsal

  5. The Morphology and Prevalence of the Deltoid Complex Ligament of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2017-02-01

    The deltoid ligament is a complex structure of the tibiotalar joint that limits the translation and tilting of the talus. It is often associated with injuries of the ankle joint. The deltoid complex ligament has 2 layers; one superficial with 4 bands and the other deep with 2 bands. Nevertheless, the prevalence and size of its components are reported with some variability in the literature. The aim of this meta-analysis is to generate weighted values of the prevalence, size, and attachment surface areas of its components. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria with a total of 142 ankle specimens. The analyses demonstrate that the most consistent component is the deep posterior tibiotalar (100%), followed by the tibiospring (≈94%), the tibionavicular (≈90%), and the tibiocalcaneal (85%). The superficial posterior ligament and the deep anterior tibiotalar ligament were the least prevalent (≈80% and ≈63%, respectively). The longest ligament was found to be the tibionavicular ligament and the shortest band was the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament. The tibionavicular ligament was the thinnest of all deltoid complex ligament components. This study yielded more accurate data on the frequency and size of its components. The possible absence of a component, particularly of the superficial layer, might compromise joint stability in acute ankle injuries. Systematic review of level III studies: prospective studies.

  6. The Epidural Ligaments (of Hofmann): A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Loukas, Marios; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The epidural space contains the internal vertebral venous plexus, adipose, and other connective tissues. In the anatomical literature, there are nonspecific descriptions of varying fibrous connective tissue bands in the epidural space, mainly mentioned in the lumbar region, that tether the dural sac to the posterior longitudinal ligament, the vertebral canal, and the ligamentum flavum. These ligaments have been termed as Hofmann’s ligaments. This review expands on the anatomy and function of Hofmann’s ligaments, increasing the awareness of their presence and serves as an impetus for further study of their histology, innervation, and function.  PMID:27752405

  7. Facial soft-tissue spaces and retaining ligaments of the midcheek: defining the premaxillary space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin-Ho; Mendelson, Bryan

    2013-07-01

    This anatomical study was undertaken to define the soft-tissue spaces, retaining ligaments, and their relations in the midcheek. Sixty fresh hemifaces were dissected. The retaining ligaments and facial spaces were defined and their dimensions recorded. The course of the key vessels and branches of the facial and infraorbital nerves were defined and their anatomical relations noted. The preseptal and prezygomatic spaces underlie the lid-cheek and malar segments of the midcheek. A previously undocumented soft-tissue space, the premaxillary space, was found to underlie the nasolabial segment. The retaining ligaments of the midcheek are the tear trough-orbicularis retaining ligament complex in the upper midcheek and the zygomatic and maxillary ligaments in the lower midcheek. The tear trough-orbicularis retaining ligament complex separates the preseptal space above from the prezygomatic and premaxillary spaces below. Facial nerve branches in the midcheek are closely associated with the zygomatic ligaments located outside the lower boundary of the prezygomatic space and are protected so long as the dissection is kept within this space. The infraorbital nerve is protected by the floor of the premaxillary space, formed by the levator labii superioris and, at the inferior boundary of the space, by the close relation with the maxillary ligaments. This study completely defined the spaces and retaining ligaments of the midcheek. Knowledge of this anatomy is key to safe and atraumatic suborbicular dissection for effective midcheek lifts.

  8. Injuries to the medial collateral ligament and associated medial structures of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Coen A; Griffith, Chad J; Johansen, Steinar; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2010-05-01

    *The superficial medial collateral ligament and other medial knee stabilizers-i.e., the deep medial collateral ligament and the posterior oblique ligament-are the most commonly injured ligamentous structures of the knee. *The main structures of the medial aspect of the knee are the proximal and distal divisions of the superficial medial collateral ligament, the meniscofemoral and meniscotibial divisions of the deep medial collateral ligament, and the posterior oblique ligament. *Physical examination is the initial method of choice for the diagnosis of medial knee injuries through the application of a valgus load both at full knee extension and between 20 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. *Because nonoperative treatment has a favorable outcome, there is a consensus that it should be the first step in the management of acute isolated grade-III injuries of the medial collateral ligament or such injuries combined with an anterior cruciate ligament tear. *If operative treatment is required, an anatomic repair or reconstruction is recommended.

  9. Repair of collateral ligament ruptures in the metacarpophalangeal joints of the long fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigasio, Adolfo; Marcoccio, Ignazio

    2012-03-01

    Isolated collateral ligament ruptures in the metacarpophalangeal joints of the fingers seem to be more frequent than described. For ligament repair, dorsal access is generally described, but the proper method by which to proceed inside the joint is unclear and left to the surgeon's discretion and experience. With the technique we propose, it is possible to explore the interior of the joint from the top, allowing an easy and complete examination of the entire length of the ligament. This proposed method allows for a better identification of the lesion and the area of ligament reinsertion, facilitating technical decision-making, and reducing the operating time.

  10. Subject-Specific Carpal Ligament Elongation in Extreme Positions, Grip, and the Dart Thrower's Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, Michael J.; Kamal, Robin N.; Moore, Douglas C.; Akelman, Edward; Wolfe, Scott W.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether the radiocarpal and dorsal capsular ligaments limit end-range wrist motion or remain strained during midrange wrist motion. Fibers of these ligaments were modeled in the wrists of 12 subjects over multiple wrist positions that reflect high demand tasks and the dart thrower's motion. We found that many of the volar and dorsal ligaments were within 5% of their maximum length throughout the range of wrist motion. Our finding of wrist ligament recruitment during midrange and end-range wrist motion helps to explain the complex but remarkably similar intersubject patterns of carpal motion. PMID:26367853

  11. Radiodense ligament markers for radiographic evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbas, Paul; Wieser, Karl; Rahm, Stefan; Fucentese, Sandro F; Koch, Peter P; Meyer, Dominik C

    2014-12-01

    Early clinical and radiographic diagnosis of failed or loosened anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions can be challenging. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively evaluate the use of radiologically visible markers in the ACL graft, serving as a potential diagnostic tool in ACL graft rupture and insufficiency. Twenty patients were included in the study. ACL reconstruction was performed with use of a hamstring autograft in hybrid fixation technique. The graft was marked with two radiodense suture knots, one at the tibial and femoral tunnel openings. Radiographs were performed postoperatively, after 6 weeks and 12 months. Four distances between markers and landmarks were measured in anteroposterior and three in lateral radiographic views and the positional change between the timepoints of measurement was calculated. Measurements of the marker distances on radiographs showed an excellent interobserver reliability (κ=0.97). In two measured distal anteroposterior distances statistically significant changes could be detected between 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively in one patient with MRI-documented ACL rerupture and in five patients with ACL elongation defined as anteroposterior-translation with side-to-side difference of ≥3 mm measured with a Rolimeter device. On lateral radiographs, marker distances were highly variable and did not correlate with clinical ACL elongation. The application of radiodense ACL graft markers is a straight-forward, non-expensive and potentially useful diagnostic tool to identify the position of the transplant and for diagnosis of graft elongation or failure. However, the method is sensitive to the radiological projection, which should be further studied and optimized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MRI appearance of the distal insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: an additional criterion for ligament ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldrini, G.; Teixeira, P.G.; Chanson, A.; Osemont, B.; Louis, M.; Blum, A. [CHU Nancy, Service d' imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Erpelding, M.L. [CHU Nancy, Hopitaux de Brabois Allee du Morvan, Service Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-09-15

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears are frequent and if not diagnosed may lead to relevant patient disability. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the non-invasive diagnosis of these tears. Despite the high performance of this method some cases are challenging and the criteria described in the literature are not sufficient to reach a diagnosis. We propose a systematic method for the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament tears based on the aspect of its distal portion. Magnetic resonance studies of 132 knees were evaluated in correlation with arthroscopy. The performance of the proposed method was compared with that of classic imaging signs of anterior cruciate ligament tear. The impact of image quality and reader expertise on the proposed method and the classic signs of tear were taken into account. This method had a sensitivity and specificity of 91.1% and 82.9% for the detection of abnormal ACLs. The interobserver agreement (kappa) of the proposed method was significantly higher than that of the classic signs at all levels of expertise (0.89 vs 0.76). This method was not influenced by image quality. Distal ACL analysis identified more partial tears and synovialization (granulation scar tissue) than the conventional method (71% vs 58.5% for partial tears and 83.5% vs 58.5% for synovialization). The proposed classification has a high performance and reproducibility for the identification of abnormal anterior cruciate ligament. The results were influenced neither by the level of expertise of the readers nor by the image quality. (orig.)

  13. Outcome of hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moghtadaei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this study was to evaluate, functional capacity of the knee in flexion and internal rotation after hamstring ligament harvest for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL reconstruction.Methods: Fifty patients (male and 18-45 years old with isolated ACL injury, randomly allocated in two equal groups (in one group, ACL reconstruction was performed with Tibialis Posterior allograft and in another group with quadruple hamstring ligament auto graft and before and 6 months after surgery in both groups isokinetic flexion strength and isometric internal rotation strength of knee evaluated with Biodex System 4 dynamometer and rotational torque recorder, in order. Isokinetic flexion strength evaluated in sitting and prone position; the later position was performed for deep flexion strength evaluation. Also subjective and objective assessment of all patients pre operatively and 6 months post operatively was documented with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC questionnaire. In this study for first time, rotational torque strength of knee was recorded with new design measure, from isometric aspect and not isokinetic.Results: Although significant improvements in IKDC scores, flexion and internal rotation capacity of the knee were observed in both groups, post operatively in respect to pre operatively; there was no significant difference between 2 groups. (P<0.05 or more than 95% confidence Interval of the differenceConclusion: This study demonstrates that ACL reconstruction surgery, improves knee performance in flexion and internal rotation, regardless of hamstring tendon harvesting. Considering potential complications of allograft (for example: transfer of harmful diseases from donor to recipient, it is logical to use hamstring auto graft ligament for ACL reconstruction surgery. Because result of this study is not longstanding follow up and limited to male sex, for more worthfull conclusion, we suggest future study in both sex

  14. Definition of the to be named ligament and vertebrodural ligament and their possible effects on the circulation of CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zheng

    Full Text Available Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1-C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections. As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case. This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL. In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL. The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal.

  15. TNF-α induced down-regulation of lysyl oxidase family in anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Jiang, Jiahuan; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yanjun; Xu, Chunming; Wang, Chunli; Yin, Lin; Chen, Peter C Y; Sung, K L Paul

    2014-01-01

    The lysyl oxidase (LOX) family has the capacity to catalyze the cross-linking of collagen and elastin, implicating its important fundamental role in injury healing. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is considered to be an important chemical mediator in the acute inflammatory phase of the ligament injury. The role of the lysyl oxidase family induced by TNF-α in the knee ligaments' wound healing process is poorly understood. Our purpose was to determine the different expressions of the LOXs in poorly self-healing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and well functionally self-healing medial collateral ligament (MCL) induced by TNF-α. Semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative real-time PCR and western blot were performed for original research. The results showed that all LOX family members were expressed at higher levels in MCL than those in ACL fibroblasts; the significant differences existed in the down-regulations of the LOXs induced by TNF-α; and the TNF-α-mediated down-regulations of the LOXs were more prominent in ACL than those in MCL fibroblasts. 1-20 ng/ml TNF-α down-regulated mRNA levels in ACL and MCL fibroblasts by up to 76% and 58% in LOX; 90% and 45% in LOXL-1; 97.5% and 90% in LOXL-2; 89% and 68% in LOXL-3; 52% and 25% in LOXL-4, respectively. Protein assay also showed LOXs had lower expressions in ACL than those in MCL. Based on these results, the differential expressions of the LOXs might help to explain the intrinsic differences between the poorly self-healing ACL and well functionally self-healing MCL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Combined anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injury--technique and results of simultaneous arthroscopic reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinek, V; Imhoff, A B

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous ACL and PCL ruptures are rare but serious injuries resulting in distinct instability of the knee joint followed by an early degenerative arthritis. This combined trauma, which is often accompanied by additional ligament lesions, originates from a knee dislocation. While the conservative treatment of this complex instability is abandoned, the operative procedures are not yet standardised. The timing of the cruciate ligament reconstruction depends on the additional injuries, but generally the postprimary treatment is performed. Autografts and allografts, which can be also combined, are available for the reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments. The arthroscopic assisted operation starts with the drilling of all tibial and femoral tunnels using standard ACL and PCL arthroscopic instruments. The PCL is positioned after the graft has been transported into the joint through an anterolateral port, the ACL graft is positioned through the tibial drill hole and both are anchored first on the femoral and then on the tibial site i.e. with interference screws. In the postoperative rehabilitation neither immobilisation nor brace are used and progressive range of motion is allowed. The arthroscopic assisted reconstructions of the ACL and increasingly of the PCL are becoming standard procedures, but the technically difficult combined ACL/PCL reconstruction is restricted to a small number of arthroscopists. The first clinical results demonstrate, that the arthroscopic operation is comparable to the open reconstruction.

  17. Reduced functional loads alter the physical characteristics of the bone-periodontal ligament-cementum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niver, E L; Leong, N; Greene, J; Curtis, D; Ryder, M I; Ho, S P

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive properties of the bone-periodontal ligament-tooth complex have been identified by changing the magnitude of functional loads using small-scale animal models, such as rodents. Reported adaptive responses as a result of lower loads due to softer diet include decreased muscle development, change in structure-function relationship of the cranium, narrowed periodontal ligament space, and changes in the mineral level of the cortical bone and alveolar jaw bone and in the glycosaminoglycans of the alveolar bone. However, the adaptive role of the dynamic bone-periodontal ligament-cementum complex to prolonged reduced loads has not been fully explained to date, especially with regard to concurrent adaptations of bone, periodontal ligament and cementum. Therefore, in the present study, using a rat model, the temporal effect of reduced functional loads on physical characteristics, such as morphology and mechanical properties and the mineral profiles of the bone-periodontal ligament-cementum complex was investigated. Two groups of 6-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed nutritionally identical food with a stiffness range of 127-158 N/mm for hard pellet or 0.3-0.5 N/mm for soft powder forms. Spatio-temporal adaptation of the bone-periodontal ligament-cementum complex was identified by mapping changes in the following: (i) periodontal ligament collagen orientation and birefringence using polarized light microscopy, bone and cementum adaptation using histochemistry, and bone and cementum morphology using micro-X-ray computed tomography; (ii) mineral profiles of the periodontal ligament-cementum and periodontal ligament-bone interfaces by X-ray attenuation; and (iii) microhardness of bone and cementum by microindentation of specimens at ages 6, 8, 12 and 15 wk. Reduced functional loads over prolonged time resulted in the following adaptations: (i) altered periodontal ligament orientation and decreased periodontal ligament collagen birefringence, indicating decreased

  18. Tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament and carpal tunnel complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugbolue, Ukadike C; Gislason, Magnus K; Carter, Mark; Fogg, Quentin A; Riches, Philip E; Rowe, Philip J

    2015-08-01

    A new sophisticated method that uses video analysis techniques together with a Maillon Rapide Delta to determine the tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex has been developed. Six embalmed cadaveric specimens amputated at the mid-forearm and aged (mean (SD)): 82 (6.29) years were tested. The six hands were from three males (four hands) and one female (two hands). Using trigonometry and geometry the elongation and strain of the transverse carpal ligament and carpal arch were calculated. The cross-sectional area of the transverse carpal ligament was determined. Tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex and Load-Displacement data were also obtained. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA together with a post-hoc analysis (Tukey) and t-tests were incorporated. A transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex novel testing method has been developed. The results suggest that there were no significant differences between the original transverse carpal ligament width and transverse carpal ligament at peak elongation (P=0.108). There were significant differences between the original carpal arch width and carpal arch width at peak elongation (P=0.002). The transverse carpal ligament failed either at the mid-substance or at their bony attachments. At maximum deformation the peak load and maximum transverse carpal ligament displacements ranged from 285.74N to 1369.66N and 7.09mm to 18.55mm respectively. The transverse carpal ligament cross-sectional area mean (SD) was 27.21 (3.41)mm(2). Using this method the results provide useful biomechanical information and data about the tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling of failure mode in knee ligaments depending on the strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman William

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The failure mechanism of the knee ligament (bone-ligament-bone complex at different strain rates is an important subject in the biomechanics of the knee. This study reviews and summarizes the literature describing ligament injury as a function of stain rate, which has been published during the last 30 years. Methods Three modes of injury are presented as a function of strain rate, and they are used to analyze the published cases. The number of avulsions is larger than that of ligament tearing in mode I. There is no significant difference between the number of avulsions and ligament tearing in mode II. Ligament tearing happens more frequently than avulsion in mode III. Results When the strain rate increases, the order of mode is mode I, II, III, I, and II. Analytical models of ligament behavior as a function of strain rate are also presented and used to provide an integrated framework for describing all of the failure regimes. In addition, this study showed the failure mechanisms with different specimens, ages, and strain rates. Conclusion There have been several a numbers of studies of ligament failure under various conditions including widely varying strain rates. One issue in these studies is whether ligament failure occurs mid-ligament or at the bone attachment point, with assertions that this is a function of the strain rate. However, over the range of strain rates and other conditions reported, there has appeared to be discrepancies in the conclusions on the effect of strain rate. The analysis and model presented here provides a unifying assessment of the previous disparities, emphasizing the differential effect of strain rate on the relative strengths of the ligament and the attachment.

  20. Review of the Nomenclature of the Retaining Ligaments of the Cheek: Frequently Confused Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeui Seok Seo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the time of its inception within facial anatomy, wide variability in the terminology as well as the location and extent of retaining ligaments has resulted in confusion over nomenclature. Confusion over nomenclature also arises with regard to the subcutaneous ligamentous attachments, and in the anatomic location and extent described, particularly for zygomatic and masseteric ligaments. Certain historical terms—McGregor’s patch, the platysma auricular ligament, parotid cutaneous ligament, platysma auricular fascia, temporoparotid fasica (Lore’s fascia, anterior platysma-cutaneous ligament, and platysma cutaneous ligament—delineate retaining ligaments of related anatomic structures that have been conceptualized in various ways. Confusion around the masseteric cutaneous ligaments arises from inconsistencies in their reported locations in the literature because the size and location of the parotid gland varies so much, and this affects the relationship between the parotid gland and the fascia of the masseter muscle. For the zygomatic ligaments, there is disagreement over how far they extend, with descriptions varying over whether they extend medially beyond the zygomaticus minor muscle. Even the ‘main’ zygomatic ligament’s denotation may vary depending on which subcutaneous plane is used as a reference for naming it. Recent popularity in procedures using threads or injectables has required not only an accurate understanding of the nomenclature of retaining ligaments, but also of their location and extent. The authors have here summarized each retaining ligament with a survey of the different nomenclature that has been introduced by different authors within the most commonly cited published papers.

  1. Characterization of the Cervical Retaining Ligaments During Subplatysmal Facelift Dissection and its Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, Andrew A; Malone, Melanie H

    2017-05-01

    The cervical retaining ligaments anchor the platysma and soft tissues of the neck to the deep cervical fascia and deeper skeletal structures. The cervical retaining ligaments tether the platysma and prohibit free mobilization and redraping of the platysma muscle in rhytidectomy. This ligament system has previously been described in the literature only qualitatively. To define the anatomic dimensions of the cervical retaining ligaments and their relation to the platysma muscle in order to better understand the cervical retaining ligament system and how it limits motion of the platysma during rhytidectomy. Extended deep plane rhytidectomy was performed on 20 fresh cadaveric hemifaces. The extent cervical retaining ligaments were dissected and measured. The anterior extent (width) of the cervical ligament were recorded at three anatomic points on each hemiface: (1) at the level of the inferior border of the mandible; (2) at the top of the thyroid cartilage at the thyroid notch; and (3) at the level of the cricoid. The average width of the cervical retaining ligaments in the neck was 15.3 mm. The width significantly decreased as they became more inferiorly positioned from the top of the neck at the anatomic measurement points, measuring 17.1 mm, 16.1 mm, and 12.6 mm (P ligaments are the support mechanisms of the platysma muscle in the neck. While previously described in only a qualitative manner, this study quantifies the anterior extent of these ligaments and how they invest the lateral platysma muscle. As these ligaments tether the platysma for an average of 1.5 cm, lateral platysma elevation of this distance during rhytidectomy surgery can improve platysmal redraping during rhytidectomy and potentially improve neck rejuvenation.

  2. The effect of distal clavicle excision on in situ graft forces in coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalsky, Marc S; Kremenic, Ian J; Orishimo, Karl F; McHugh, Malachy P; Nicholas, Stephen J; Lee, Steven J

    2010-11-01

    Recently, some have suggested that the acromioclavicular articulation confers stability to the construct after coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint separation. Therefore, it has been suggested that distal clavicle excision should not be performed in this context to protect the graft during healing. Sectioning the acromioclavicular ligaments would significantly increase in situ forces of a coracoclavicular ligament graft, whereas performing a distal clavicle resection would not further increase in situ graft forces. Controlled laboratory study. A simulated coracoclavicular reconstruction was performed on 5 cadaveric shoulders. Static loads of 80 N and 210 N were applied directly to the clavicle in 5 directions: anterior, anterosuperior, superior, posterosuperior, and posterior. The in situ graft force was measured using a force transducer under 3 testing conditions: (1) intact acromioclavicular ligaments, (2) sectioned acromioclavicular ligaments, and (3) distal clavicle excision. For both magnitudes of load, in all directions, in situ graft force with intact acromioclavicular ligaments was significantly less than that with sectioned acromioclavicular ligaments (P ligaments protect the coracoclavicular reconstruction by decreasing the in situ graft force. The slight increase in the in situ graft force only in the posterosuperior and posterior direction after distal clavicle excision suggests only a marginal protective role of the acromioclavicular articulation. Further, the peak graft forces observed represent only a small fraction of the ultimate failure strength of the graft. Distal clavicle excision can perhaps be safely performed in the context of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction without subjecting the graft to detrimental in situ force. Although the acromioclavicular articulation serves only a marginal role in protecting the coracoclavicular ligament graft, reconstruction of the acromioclavicular ligaments may serve an

  3. Review of the Nomenclature of the Retaining Ligaments of the Cheek: Frequently Confused Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeui Seok; Song, Jennifer Kim; Oh, Tae Suk; Kwon, Seong Ihl; Tansatit, Tanvaa; Lee, Joo Heon

    2017-01-01

    Since the time of its inception within facial anatomy, wide variability in the terminology as well as the location and extent of retaining ligaments has resulted in confusion over nomenclature. Confusion over nomenclature also arises with regard to the subcutaneous ligamentous attachments, and in the anatomic location and extent described, particularly for zygomatic and masseteric ligaments. Certain historical terms—McGregor’s patch, the platysma auricular ligament, parotid cutaneous ligament, platysma auricular fascia, temporoparotid fasica (Lore’s fascia), anterior platysma-cutaneous ligament, and platysma cutaneous ligament—delineate retaining ligaments of related anatomic structures that have been conceptualized in various ways. Confusion around the masseteric cutaneous ligaments arises from inconsistencies in their reported locations in the literature because the size and location of the parotid gland varies so much, and this affects the relationship between the parotid gland and the fascia of the masseter muscle. For the zygomatic ligaments, there is disagreement over how far they extend, with descriptions varying over whether they extend medially beyond the zygomaticus minor muscle. Even the ‘main’ zygomatic ligament’s denotation may vary depending on which subcutaneous plane is used as a reference for naming it. Recent popularity in procedures using threads or injectables has required not only an accurate understanding of the nomenclature of retaining ligaments, but also of their location and extent. The authors have here summarized each retaining ligament with a survey of the different nomenclature that has been introduced by different authors within the most commonly cited published papers. PMID:28728321

  4. [Fabrication and in vivo implantation of ligament-bone composite scaffolds based on three-dimensional printing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyou; He, Jiankang; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yaxiong; Bian, Weiguo; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-03-01

    To solve the fixation problem between ligament grafts and host bones in ligament reconstruction surgery by using ligament-bone composite scaffolds to repair the ligaments, to explore the fabrication method for ligament-bone composite scaffolds based on three-dimensional (3-D) printing technique, and to investigate their mechanical and biological properties in animal experiments. The model of bone scaffolds was designed using CAD software, and the corresponding negative mould was created by boolean operation. 3-D printing techinique was employed to fabricate resin mold. Ceramic bone scaffolds were obtained by casting the ceramic slurry in the resin mould and sintering the dried ceramics-resin composites. Ligament scaffolds were obtained by weaving degummed silk fibers, and then assembled with bone scaffolds and bone anchors. The resultant ligament-bone composite scaffolds were implanted into 10 porcine left anterior cruciate ligament rupture models at the age of 4 months. Mechanical testing and histological examination were performed at 3 months postoperatively, and natural anterior cruciate ligaments of the right sides served as control. Biomechanical testing showed that the natural anterior cruciate ligament of control group can withstand maximum tensile force of (1 384 +/- 181) N and dynamic creep of (0.74 +/- 0.21) mm, while the regenerated ligament-bone scaffolds of experimental group can withstand maximum tensile force of (370 +/- 103) N and dynamic creep of (1.48 +/- 0.49) mm, showing significant differences (t = 11.617, P = 0.000; t = 2.991, P = 0.020). In experimental group, histological examination showed that new bone formed in bone scaffolds. A hierarchical transition structure regenerated between ligament-bone scaffolds and the host bones, which was similar to the structural organizations of natural ligament-bone interface. Ligament-bone composite scaffolds based on 3-D printing technique facilitates the regeneration of biomimetic ligament

  5. Clinical diagnosis of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjammse, A.; Gokeler, A.; Van der Schans, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Meta-analysis. Objectives: To define the accuracy of clinical tests for assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Background: The cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL, are among the most commonly injured structures of the knee. Given the increasing injury prevalence,

  6. Clinical diagnosis of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjammse, A; Gokeler, A; van der Schans, CP

    Study Design: Meta-analysis. Objectives: To define the accuracy of clinical tests for assessing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Background: The cruciate ligaments, and especially the ACL, are among the most commonly injured structures of the knee. Given the increasing injury prevalence,

  7. Ligamentous stenosis of the coeliac trunk - a diagnosis of a true pathological entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, E.; Erbe, E.M.; Erbe, W.

    1982-04-01

    The angiographic appearances of a ligamentous stenosis of the coeliac trunk are well known, but the clinical significance of this compression syndrome is slight and nowadays it is rarely regarded as an indication for surgery. The significance of this diagnosis is discussed in relation to 63 patients with angiographically confirmed ligamentous truncus stenosis and the differential diagnosis is reviewed.

  8. Calcification of the alar ligament of the cervical spine in a patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcification of the alar ligament is rare. It usually develops as a result of traumatic injury and is especially prominent in the elderly. CT scanning is the gold standard of the diagnosis. We report a case of a calcification of the transverse and alar ligament in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; ...

  9. Does evaluation of the ligamentous compartment enhance diagnostic utility of sacroiliac joint MRI in axial spondyloarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Maksymowych, Walter P; Chan, Stanley M

    2015-01-01

    in the ligamentous compartment and their potential diagnostic utility in axial SpA. We therefore aimed to evaluate the ligamentous compartment on sacroiliac joint MRI for lesion distribution and potential incremental value towards diagnosis of SpA over and above the traditional assessment of the cartilaginous...

  10. The remains of anterior cruciate ligament graft tension after cyclic knee motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MR; Lie, DTT; Verdonschot, N; de Graaf, R; Amis, AA; van Kampen, A

    Background: There is sometimes a return of excess knee laxity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. One of the contributing factors might be a loss in graft tension. It is unknown whether the tension imposed on an anterior cruciate ligament graft degrades with time and, if so, the effect

  11. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulas, Anthony S.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    Background: Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior

  12. Transposition of the sacrotuberous ligament for the treatment of coxofemoral luxation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, E; Ozaydin, I; Atalan, G; Baran, V

    2002-08-01

    A surgical technique is described for transposition of the sacrotuberous ligament to replace the teres ligament in the treatment of coxofemoral luxation in dogs. Ten dogs with coxofemoral luxation were treated using this technique and all animals regained full limb function within two months of surgery. It is suggested that the technique could be employed in dogs suffering from all types of hip luxations.

  13. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with coracoacromial ligament transfer using the docking technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobezie Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic Acromioclavicular (AC dislocations have historically been surgically treated with Coracoclavicular (CC ligament reconstruction with transfer of the Coracoacromial (CA ligament. Tensioning the CA ligament is the key to success. Methods Seventeen patients with chronic, symptomatic Type III AC joint or acute Type IV and V injuries were treated surgically. The distal clavicle was resected and stabilized with CC ligament reconstruction using the CA ligament. The CA ligament was passed into the medullary canal and tensioned, using a modified 'docking' technique. Average follow-up was 29 months (range 12–57. Results Postoperative ASES and pain significantly improved in all patients (p = 0.001. Radiographically, 16 (94% maintained reduction, and only 1 (6% had a recurrent dislocation when he returned to karate 3 months postoperatively. His ultimate clinical outcome was excellent. Conclusion The docking procedure allows for tensioning of the transferred CA ligament and healing of the ligament in an intramedullary bone tunnel. Excellent clinical results were achieved, decreasing the risk of recurrent distal clavicle instability.

  14. Treatment of ruptures of the lateral ankle ligaments: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, A. C.; van Dijk, C. N.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ruptures of the lateral ankle ligaments are very common; however, treatment remains controversial. The aim of the current study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of existing treatment strategies for acute ruptures of the lateral ankle ligaments.

  15. The remains of anterior cruciate ligament graft tension after cyclic knee motion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Lie, D.T.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Graaf, R. de; Amis, A.A.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is sometimes a return of excess knee laxity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. One of the contributing factors might be a loss in graft tension. It is unknown whether the tension imposed on an anterior cruciate ligament graft degrades with time and, if so, the effect

  16. Viscoelastic properties of the ovine posterior spinal ligaments are strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti-Giudici, Sveva; Gédet, Philippe; Ferguson, Stephen J; Chegini, Salman; Burger, Juergen

    2010-02-01

    The biomechanical role of the posterior spinal ligaments for spinal stability has been stated in previous studies. The investigation of the viscoelastic properties of human lumbar spinal ligaments is essential for the understanding of physiological differences between healthy and degenerated tissues. The stress-relaxation behavior of biological tissues is commonly described with the quasi-linear viscoelastic model of Fung, which assumes that the stress-relaxation response is independent of the applied strain. The goal of this study was to investigate the stress-relaxation response of ovine posterior spinal ligaments at different elongations to verify the above-mentioned hypothesis. Twenty-four ovine lumbar spinal segments, consisting of only the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments and adjoining spinous processes, were elongated uniaxially to different strain levels within the physiological elastic region (5-20%). The experimental data were described with a non-linear viscoelastic model: the modified superposition method of Findley. A linear dependency of the relaxation rate to the applied strains was observed on intact segments, when both ligaments were considered, as well as on each individual ligament. This result can be applied to the human spinal ligaments, due to similarities observed between the sheep and human spinal segment under physiological loading. The non-linear viscoelastic modified superposition method of Findley is an appropriate model for describing the viscoelastic properties of lumbar spinal ligaments in vitro due to its ability to address variation in applied strain during the force relaxation measurements. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lumbar extraforaminal ligaments act as a traction relief and prevent spinal nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, G A; Smit, T H; Hoogland, P V J M; Snijders, C J

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, ligaments that connect the extraforaminal lumbar spinal nerves with the fibrous capsule of the facet joints and the dorsolateral side of the intervertebral disc were described. This anatomical configuration suggests a mechanical role in transferring extraforaminal spinal nerve traction. One embalmed human lumbar spine was dissected from the twelfth thoracic vertebra to the first sacral vertebra to isolate the twelfth thoracic to the fourth lumbar spinal nerves. The spinal nerves from L1 to L4 were pulled at different angles with respect to the axis of the spine. Forces of 1-6N were applied. The displacements of reflective markers glued to the proximal and distal ends of the adjoining ligaments were recorded with a video system. The spinal nerve proximal of the extraforaminal ligaments stays centred in the intervertebral foramen when pulling at an angle. At levels L1-L4 strain reduction by the extraforaminal ligaments was largest when pulling at a wider angle to the spinal axis in the sagittal plane. Proximal to the extraforaminal ligaments less displacement was seen compared to the displacement distal of the extraforaminal ligaments when pulling in longitudinal direction. A graded decrease in the displacement proximal to the extraforaminal ligaments was seen from the levels L1-L4. Extraforaminal ligaments play an important role in the prevention of damage due to spinal nerve traction. The proximal attachments secure a spinal nerve position central in the intervertebral foramen and also reduce longitudinal tension.

  18. A severe case of median arcuate ligament syndrome with successful angioplasty and stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongsakul, Keerati; Rookkapan, Sorracha; Sungsiri, Jitpreedee; Tubtawee, Teeravut

    2012-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MAL) or celiac axis compression syndrome (CACS) is a rare etiology of chronic abdominal pain. Traditional treatment of this syndrome is surgery. We report a case of median arcuate ligament syndrome with a severe compression of the celiac trunk, which was successfully treated by angioplasty with stenting.

  19. A Severe Case of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome with Successful Angioplasty and Stenting

    OpenAIRE

    Keerati Hongsakul; Sorracha Rookkapan; Jitpreedee Sungsiri; Teeravut Tubtawee

    2012-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MAL) or celiac axis compression syndrome (CACS) is a rare etiology of chronic abdominal pain. Traditional treatment of this syndrome is surgery. We report a case of median arcuate ligament syndrome with a severe compression of the celiac trunk, which was successfully treated by angioplasty with stenting.

  20. A Severe Case of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome with Successful Angioplasty and Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerati Hongsakul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MAL or celiac axis compression syndrome (CACS is a rare etiology of chronic abdominal pain. Traditional treatment of this syndrome is surgery. We report a case of median arcuate ligament syndrome with a severe compression of the celiac trunk, which was successfully treated by angioplasty with stenting.

  1. The function of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament : its implications for understanding low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Vleeming, A; Hammudoghlu, D; Stoeckart, R.; Snijders, C.; Mens, Jan M A

    1996-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: In embalmed human bodies the tension of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament was measured during incremental loading of anatomical structures that are biomechanically relevant. OBJECTIVES: To assess the function of the long dorsal sacroiliac ligament. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In many

  2. The intercarpal ligaments of the equine midcarpal joint, Part 2: The role of the palmar intercarpal ligaments in the restraint of dorsal displacement of the proximal row of carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, R C; Rose, R J

    1997-01-01

    To determine the relative contributions of the palmar intercarpal ligaments in the midcarpal joint to the restraint of dorsal displacement of the proximal row of carpal bones. A biomechanical study of cadaver equine carpi. Eight equine forelimbs from six thoroughbred horses. With joints in full extension, the radius was dorsally displaced while midcarpal joint displacement was measured. The restraining force at a joint displacement of 1.5 mm was determined from the load-displacement curve. A ligament or pair of ligaments was then cut and the testing procedure repeated. Their contribution to restraining force was calculated as the percentage change in restraining force after the ligament was sectioned. Relative cross-sectional areas of the ligaments tested were measured at the level of the midcarpal joint. The collateral ligaments were the major contributors to the restraint of dorsal displacement (P ligaments contributed a greater proportion than the palmar carpal ligament (PCL) (P ligaments, 14.5 +/- 1.4 for the PCL, and 22.7 +/- 2.2 for the palmar intercarpal ligaments. Mean cross-sectional area expressed as a percentage (+/-SEM) of the total ligamentous area were 9.0 +/- 0.3 for the palmar intercarpal ligaments, 27.1 +/- 3.0 for the PCL, and 63.8 +/- 2.8 for the collateral ligaments. Despite the small size of the palmar intercarpal ligaments, they play an important role in the restraint of dorsal displacement of the proximal row of carpal bones. Interpretation, as well as prevention and treatment of intercarpal ligament tearing requires an understanding of their function.

  3. Full term viable secondary broad ligament pregnancy – A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH. Sheethal, Dr.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Broad ligament pregnancy is also known as inter ligamentous pregnancy which is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy. Very few successful live births have been reported in this condition, where such pregnancies reached term and with live birth of a baby. A case of 28 year old primigravida of 35 weeks gestation with oligoamnios was referred to our hospital. A right broad ligament pregnancy was confirmed after an ultrasound and an MRI. She was taken up for surgery and an incision was given on the anterior leaf of the broad ligament and a male live fetus was extracted. Placenta was found on the posterior leaf of the broad ligament and it was removed without any undue haemorrhage. Uterus was lying medial to the sac and was around ten weeks in size. Both mother and baby were discharged on seventh postoperative day in good health condition.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament bracing: evidence in providing stability and preventing injury or graft re-rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodendorfer, Blake M; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Feeley, Brian T; Gallo, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Ligamentous knee injuries are common and costly, both in financial terms and time missed from work and recreational activities. Furthermore, ligamentous injuries appear to predispose patients to future osteoarthritis and other morbidities. Therefore, prevention strategies are important in limiting the potential impact of these injuries. Knee braces are one of the most often prescribed devices in the billion-dollar orthotic industry. Despite widespread use of prophylactic and functional knee braces, the evidence supporting their efficacy in reducing and/or preventing injury remains limited. Knee braces have been shown to be more effective in preventing medial collateral ligament injuries than anterior cruciate ligament injuries in both cadaveric and clinical studies. The use of functional braces after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been supported and refuted in both postoperative and long-term studies.

  5. The Collateral Ligament of the Digits of the Hand: Anatomy, Physiology, Biomechanics, Injury, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmaryn, Leo M

    2017-11-01

    Ligament injuries are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen in clinical practice and ligaments are the most frequently injured structures in a joint. Ligaments play an important role in balancing joint mobility and joint stability. Disruption of joint ligaments severely impairs joint function. Over the past 10 years, a new appreciation of a neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of joint ligaments and its biofeedback loops to surrounding muscles and tendons has emerged to explain the relationship between primary and secondary restraints that allow normal joint motion yet prevent pathological motion. This review focuses on this recent information with a view to new clinical approaches to these common problems. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Retaining ligaments of the face: review of anatomy and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghoul, Mohammed; Codner, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The retaining ligaments of the face are important in understanding concepts of facial aging and rejuvenation. They are located in constant anatomic locations where they separate facial spaces and compartments. Their superficial extensions form subcutaneous septa that separate facial fat compartments. Their main significance relates to their surgical release in order to achieve the desired aesthetic outcome. Furthermore, they have a sentinel role in their anatomic relationship to facial nerve branches. When performing facial aesthetic surgery, plastic surgeons should select a plane of dissection, release the appropriate ligaments depending on the desired aesthetic goals, and avoid nerve injury by using the ligaments as anatomic landmarks. Descriptions of the retaining ligaments are variable in the literature; due to different interpretations of anatomy, several classifications, locations, and nomenclature systems have been proposed. This article will review and clarify the anatomy of the retaining ligaments of the face, including the cheek, mandible, temporal, and periorbital areas.

  7. The Importance of Calcified Stylohyoid Ligament to the Neck Injury a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürcan Altun

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Stylohyoid ligament (LS is an anatomical structure between the styloid processes of temporal bone and cornu minus of hyoid bone. LS may calcify as elongated styloid processes and it may occur partly or completely. Elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament gives a complex of symptoms described by Eagle such as craniofacial and cervical pain, dysphagia and foreign body sensation, and it is called Eagle's Syndrome. An 82-year-old man died due to mechanical asphyxia from hanging. Calcified stylohyoid ligaments were showed on examination of the internal structures of his neck. According to forensic medicine, the importance of calcified stylohyoid ligament reviewed to the autopsies has neck injuries. Key words: Neck injury, stylohyoid ligament, hanging

  8. Osseous femoral avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Shah, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament are commonly encountered in clinical practice, and occur in a wide variety of settings, from sports-related injuries to polytrauma. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament supersede osseous avulsion in the adult demographic; however, in the pediatric population, osseous avulsion reflects the most frequent injury. When osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament occurs in children or adults, the injury typically occurs at the level of the tibial eminence. Conversely, osseous avulsion injuries from the femur are rare, with all cases reported in the literature occurring in the skeletally immature. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who suffered an osseous avulsion of her anterior cruciate ligament from her lateral femoral condyle. To our knowledge, this reflects the first reported case of femoral osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult.

  9. Kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eygendaal, D; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Jensen, Steen Lund

    2000-01-01

    In this study the kinematics of partial and total ruptures of the medial collateral ligament of the elbow are investigated. After selective transection of the medial collateral ligament of 8 osteoligamentous intact elbow preparations was performed, 3-dimensional measurements of angular displacement...... ligament and was maximum between 70 degrees to 90 degrees of flexion. No radial head movement was seen after partial or total transection of the anterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament was performed. In conclusion, this study indicates that valgus or internal rotatory elbow instability should...... be evaluated at 70 degrees to 90 degrees of flexion. Detection of partial ruptures in the anterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament based on medial joint opening and increased valgus movement is impossible....

  10. Automated fiber tracking and tissue characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Priya S.; Guo, Jiaqi; Yao, Xinwen; Qu, Dovina; Lu, Helen H.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    The directionality of collagen fibers across the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as well as the insertion of this key ligament into bone are important for understanding the mechanical integrity and functionality of this complex tissue. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional fiber directionality is of particular interest due to the physiological, mechanical, and biological heterogeneity inherent across the ACL-to-bone junction, the behavior of the ligament under mechanical stress, and the usefulness of this information in designing tissue engineered grafts. We have developed an algorithm to characterize Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) image volumes of the ACL. We present an automated algorithm for measuring ligamentous fiber angles, and extracting attenuation and backscattering coefficients of ligament, interface, and bone regions within mature and immature bovine ACL insertion samples. Future directions include translating this algorithm for real time processing to allow three-dimensional volumetric analysis within dynamically moving samples.

  11. Morphology of the medial collateral ligament of the knee

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    Gill Thomas J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative knowledge on the anatomy of the medial collateral ligament (MCL is important for treatment of MCL injury and for MCL release during total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The objective of this study was to quantitatively determine the morphology of the MCL of human knees. Methods 10 cadaveric human knees were dissected to investigate the MCL anatomy. The specimens were fixed in full extension and this position was maintained during the dissection and morphometric measurements. The outlines of the insertion sites of the superficial MCL (sMCL and deep MCL (dMCL were digitized using a 3D digitizing system. Results The insertion areas of the superficial MCL (sMCL were 348.6 ± 42.8 mm2 and 79.7 ± 17.6 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The insertion areas of the deep MCL (dMCL were 63.6 ± 13.4 mm2 and 71.9 ± 14.8 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The distances from the centroids of the tibial and femoral insertions of the sMCL to the tibial and femoral joint line were 62.4 ± 5.5 mm and 31.1 ± 4.6 mm, respectively. The distances from the centroids of dMCL in the tibial insertion and the femoral insertion to the tibial and femoral joint line were 6.5 ± 1.3 mm and 20.5 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The distal portion of the dMCL (meniscotibial ligament - MTL was approximately 1.7 times wider than the proximal portion of the dMCL (meniscofemoral ligament - MFL, whereas the MFL was approximately 3 times longer than the MTL. Conclusions The morphologic data on the MCL may provide useful information for improving treatments of MCL-related pathology and performing MCL release during TKA.

  12. Microarray gene expression analysis of uterosacral ligaments in uterine prolapse.

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    Ak, Handan; Zeybek, Burak; Atay, Sevcan; Askar, Niyazi; Akdemir, Ali; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2016-11-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health problem that impairs the quality of life with a wide clinical spectrum. Since the uterosacral ligaments provide primary support for the uterus and the upper vagina, we hypothesize that the disruption of these ligaments may lead to a loss of support and eventually contribute to POP. In this study, we therefore investigated whether there are any differences in the transcription profile of uterosacral ligaments in patients with POP when compared to those of the control samples. Seventeen women with POP and 8 non-POP controls undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions were included in the study. Affymetrix® Gene Chip microarrays (Human Hu 133 plus 2.0) were used for whole genome gene expression profiling analysis. There was 1 significantly down-regulated gene, NKX2-3 in patients with POP compared to the controls (p=4.28464e-013). KIF11 gene was found to be significantly down-regulated in patients with ≥3 deliveries compared to patients with <3 deliveries (p=0.0156237). UGT1A1 (p=2.43388e-005), SCARB1 (p=1.19001e-006) and NKX2-3 (p=2.17966e-013) genes were found to be significantly down-regulated in the premenopausal patients compared to the premenopausal controls. UGT1A1 gene was also found to be significantly down-regulated in the post menopausal patients compared to the postmenopausal controls (p=0.0005). This study provides evidence for a significant down-regulation of the genes that take role in cell cycle, proliferation and embryonic development along with cell adhesion process on the development of POP for the first time. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI appearance of the superior transverse scapular ligament

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    Simeone, F.J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The superior transverse scapular ligament (STSL) forms the roof of the suprascapular notch, which is the most common location of entrapment of the suprascapular nerve, a cause of shoulder pain and weakness. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of visualization of the STSL on routine shoulder MRIs, to identify the sequences and imaging planes on which it is visualized most frequently, and to describe its typical MRI appearance, none of which have been previously addressed in the radiologic literature. One hundred twenty-one consecutive shoulder MRIs were reviewed for the presence or absence of the STSL, including the imaging plane and sequence that best depicted the ligament. Dimensions of the ligament were recorded. Fifty four of 121 shoulder MRIs were technically adequate for visualization of the STSL, and it was identified on 51 of these studies (94 %). There was no statistically significant difference between 1.5-T and 3-T systems. The best individual sequence for visualizing the STSL was the sagittal T1-weighted sequence, in which the STSL was visible on 75/80 technically adequate sequences (94 %). The sagittal plane was the best plane for visualizing the STSL, in which it was visible on 65/69 technically adequate studies (94 %). The STSL on average measured 12.8 ± 1.5 mm in transverse dimension. The STSL can be visualized on the majority of shoulder MRIs and is best seen on sagittal T1-weighted images on our imaging protocol. Evaluation of the STSL can potentially help in identifying pathologic conditions affecting the suprascapular nerve. (orig.)

  14. Spatial anatomy of the round ligament, gallbladder, and intrahepatic vessels in patients with right-sided round ligament of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibukuro, Kenji; Takeguchi, Takaya; Fukuda, Hozumi; Abe, Shoko; Tobe, Kimiko

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the vascular structure of the liver in patients with a right-sided round ligament. We reviewed 16 patients with a right-sided round ligament and 3 polysplenia and situs inversus patients with a left-sided round ligament who underwent multidetector row CT with contrast media. The patient population consisted of 13 men and 6 women (mean 62 years). We analyzed the axial and volume-rendered images for the location of the round ligament, gallbladder, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic artery. The following imaging findings for the patients with polysplenia and situs inversus were horizontally reversed. The prevalence of a right-sided round ligament with and without polysplenia was 75 and 0.11 %, respectively. The gallbladder was located to the right, below, and left of the round ligament in 27.7, 38.8 and 33.3 %, respectively. Independent branching of the right posterior portal vein was noted in 57.8 %. PV4 was difficult to identify in 36.8 %. The middle hepatic vein was located to the left of the round ligament. Two branching patterns for the lateral and medial branches of the right anterior hepatic artery were noted: the common (44.4 %) and separated types (55.5 %). Both of the right anterior hepatic artery and portal vein ramified into two segments; the lateral segment with many branches and the medial segment with a few branches. The right-sided round ligament divided the right anterior section into the lateral and medial segments based on the portal vein and hepatic artery anatomy.

  15. Connective tissue disorders in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Jaroslava

    2014-01-01

    Though soft tissue disorders have been recognized and described to some detail in several types of domestic animals and small mammals for some years, not much progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical basis and pathogenesis of these diseases in animals. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome described in dogs already in 1943 and later in cats affects mainly skin in these animals. The involved skin is thin and hyperextensible with easily inflicted injuries resulting in hemorrhagic wounds and atrophic scars. Joint laxity and dislocation common in people are less frequently found in dogs. No systemic complications, such as organ rupture or cardiovascular problems which have devastating consequences in people have been described in cats and dogs. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and on light or electron microscopic features of disorganized and fragmented collagen fibrils. Several cases of bovine and ovine dermatosparaxis analogous to human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC were found to be caused by mutations in the procollagen I N-proteinase (pnPI) or ADAMTS2 gene, though mutations in other sites are likely responsible for other types of dermatosparaxis. Cattle suffering from a form of Marfan syndrome were described to have aortic dilatation and aneurysm together with ocular abnormalities and skeletal involvement. As in people mutations at different sites of bovine FBN1 may be responsible for Marfan phenotype. Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), or hyperelastosis cutis, has been recognized in several horse breeds as affecting primarily skin, and, occasionally, tendons. A mutation in cyclophilin B, a chaperon involved in proper folding of collagens, has been identified in some cases. Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD) affects primarily tendons and ligaments of certain horse breeds. New data from our laboratory showed excessive accumulation of proteoglycans in organs with high content of connective tissues. We have

  16. Fetlock annular ligament desmotomy: a report of 24 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerring, E L; Webbon, P M

    1984-03-01

    Restriction of free movement of the flexor tendons through the fetlock canal results in lameness. The commonest cause was chronic synovitis of the digital sheath. The condition is characterised by an unremitting lameness, synovial distension and a notch on the caudal aspect of the limb. The condition can be relieved by section of the annular ligament of the fetlock. In a series of 24 cases 16 horses returned to work with no recurrence of lameness, three cases were lost to follow up and five animals remained lame; three of these had intercurrent disease.

  17. A perioperative rehabilitation program for anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T; Shelbourne, K D

    2000-01-01

    Rehabilitation programs have progressed alongside surgical advances in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A perioperative program has been successfully used at our clinic for more than 10 years to reduce postoperative complications and return patients to activity safely and quickly. The four-phase program starts at the time of injury and preoperatively includes aggressive swelling reduction, hyperextension exercises, gait training, and mental preparation. Goals after surgery are to control swelling while regaining full knee range of motion. After quadriceps strengthening goals are reached, patients can shift to sport-specific exercises.

  18. Periodontal ligament stem cells: an update and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamila Prageeth Pandula, P K; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L J; Zhang, Chengfei

    2014-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a serious infectious and inflammatory oral disease of humans worldwide. Conventional treatment modalities are effective for controlling periodontal disease. However, the regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues remains a major challenge in clinical practice due to the complex structure of the periodontium. Stem cell-based regenerative approaches combined with the usage of emerging biomaterials are entering a new era in periodontal regeneration. The present review updates the current knowledge of periodontal ligament stem cell-based approaches for periodontal regeneration, and elaborates on the potentials for clinical application. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

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    Julio Cesar Gali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP. The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-intechnique is used and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  20. Radiological diagnosis of fibulo-talar ligamentous lesions

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    Langer, R.; Langer, M.; Gloeckler, W.T.; Schumacher, K.A.; von Dewitz, H.

    1980-08-01

    Of 343 patients with sprained ankles the results of conventional stress a.p. roentgenograms in supination and stressed X-ray in lateral view with a device, similar to the technique, described by Noesberger, are compared. In 63 of 91 pathological findings the lesions could only be diagnosed in X-rays in lateral view. The advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed. In our opinion the stressed X-ray in lateral projection are a useful method for diagnosis of ligamentous lesions of the ankle joint.

  1. Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament: The J sign

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    Pieter J. Oberholzer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The lesion resulting from humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL is an important cause of anterior glenohumeral instability and can be seen in isolation or combination with an antero-inferior labral complex lesion. A conclusive magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis is aided when either a joint effusion is present or a contrast arthrography of the shoulder is performed.It is important to be familiar with the J sign as it represents contrast leaking through the defect in the lateral attachment of the joint capsule.

  2. Management and rehabilitation of ligamentous injuries to the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduini, F C; Vegso, J J; Torg, J S; Torg, E

    1987-01-01

    The management of ligamentous injuries to the ankle is controversial. Neither the methods for classification and diagnosis, or the procedures for treatment are clear cut. Ankle sprains are a common occurrence, with the majority involving the lateral ligament complex. Within this complex, the anterior talofibular ligament is injured most frequently, usually while the foot is in the plantar flexed position. Ankle injuries can be diagnosed through physical exam, including the anterior drawer test and/or a stress exam, or through roentgenographic evaluation. The purpose of the stress roentgenogram is to measure the degree of talar tilt. However, it does not always yield consistent, reliable results. This inconsistency has led to the use of arthrography. There is debate over its use as well, however, Ankle sprains can be classified into three groups, according to functional loss. Treatment for first and second degree sprains is usually non-operative. The best approach to Grade III sprains is debatable. The issues in the treatment of Grade III sprains are first, whether treatment should be operative or non-operative, and second, whether non-operative treatment should emphasise immobilisation or mobilisation. Brostrom's work is cited as noteworthy. He recommended adhesive strapping followed by mobilisation as the treatment of choice, and reserves surgery for cases of chronic instability. Results demonstrated that strapping yielded shorter disability periods, while surgery produced less instability. The prevention of functional instability is a major concern in the treatment of ankle injuries. There is no consensus for treating a lateral ligament rupture. The authors suggest immobilisation followed by a rehabilitative programme. Three methods of immobilisation are plaster casting, adhesive strapping, and the air-stirrup. The physiological mechanism of cryotherapy and thermotherapy are discussed briefly and recommendations for their use are provided. Aspiration is also

  3. A nonlinear poroelastic model for the periodontal ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favino, Marco; Bourauel, Christoph; Krause, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    A coupled elastic-poroelastic model for the simulation of the PDL and the adjacent tooth is presented. A poroelastic constitutive material model for the periodontal ligament (PDL) is derived. The solid phase is modeled by means of a Fung material law, accounting for large displacements and strains. Numerical solutions are performed by means of a multigrid Newton method to solve the arising large nonlinear system. Finally, by means of numerical experiments, the biomechanical response of the PDL is studied. In particular, the effect of the hydraulic conductivity and of the mechanical parameters of a Fung potential is investigated in two realistic applications.

  4. The anatomy of the coracohumeral ligament and its relation to the subscapularis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuzo; Nimura, Akimoto; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Hideya; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Saji, Takahiko; Matsuda, Shuichi; Akita, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Only a few reports describe the extension of the coracohumeral ligament to the subscapularis muscle. The purposes of this study were to histo-anatomically examine the structure between the ligament and subscapularis and to discuss the function of the ligament. Nineteen intact embalmed shoulders were used. In 9 shoulders, the expansion of the ligament was anatomically observed, and in 6 of these 9, the muscular tissue of the supraspinatus and subscapularis was removed to carefully examine the attachments to the tendons of these muscles. Five shoulders were frozen and sagittally sectioned into 3-mm-thick slices. After observation, histologic analysis was performed on 3 of these shoulders. In the remaining 5 shoulders, the coracoid process was harvested to investigate the ligament origin. The coracohumeral ligament originated from the horizontal limb and base of the coracoid process and enveloped the cranial part of the subscapularis muscle. The superficial layer of the ligament covered a broad area of the anterior surface of the muscle. Laterally, it protruded between the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis and attached to the tendinous floor, which extended from the subscapularis insertion. Histologically, the ligament consisted of irregular and sparse fibers abundant in type III collagen. The coracohumeral ligament envelops the whole subscapularis muscle and insertion and seems to function as a kind of holder for the subscapularis and supraspinatus muscles. The ligament is composed of irregular and sparse fibers and contains relatively rich type III collagen, which would suggest flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sonography of injury of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow - initial experience

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    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Boulevard, 11021, Great Neck, NY (United States); Adler, Ronald S. [Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, 10021, New York, NY (United States); Friedman, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Hamilton Health Sciences - Henderson Division, 711 Concession Street, L8V 1C3, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the sonographic appearance of injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow. Eight non-professional male baseball pitchers, ages 13-35 years, with medial elbow pain and clinical suspicion of ulnar collateral ligament injury, were referred for imaging. All eight underwent sonography of the affected and contralateral asymptomatic elbow, and six also underwent MR imaging. Neither valgus stress nor power Doppler was used during the sonographic examinations. Time from onset of symptoms to imaging was 1.5 weeks to 6 months. Three patients had surgical confirmation of their injuries, with time from imaging to surgery of 2 days to 9 months. In four patients, the UCL was ruptured, manifest sonographically in three cases as discontinuity of the normally hyperechoic ligament with anechoic fluid in the gap and in one case as non-visualization of the ligament with heterogeneous echogenicity in the expected location of the ligament. Two adolescent patients had avulsions of the UCL from the medial epicondyle, with sonographic demonstration of the avulsed echogenic bony fragment in both cases. One patient had a mild sprain, manifest as mild thickening and decreased echogenicity of the ligament sonographically compared with the contralateral normal elbow, with mild surrounding hypoechoic edema. The eighth patient had a small partial tear of the deep surface of the distal aspect of the ligament, visualized as a hypoechoic focus between the deep surface of the ligament and its ulnar attachment. Tears of the ulnar collateral ligament are manifested sonographically as non-visualization of the ligament or alteration of the normal morphology. (orig.)

  6. Do Tibial Plateau Fractures Worsen Outcomes of Knee Ligament Injuries? A Matched Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Mark E; Godin, Jonathan A; Moatshe, Gilbert; Chahla, Jorge; Kruckeberg, Bradley M; Pogorzelski, Jonas; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-08-01

    Tibial plateau fractures account for a small portion of all fractures; however, these fractures can pose a surgical challenge when occurring concomitantly with ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare 2-year outcomes of soft tissue reconstruction with or without a concomitant tibial plateau fracture and open reduction internal fixation. We hypothesized that patients with a concomitant tibial plateau fracture at the time of soft tissue surgery would have inferior outcomes compared with patients without an associated tibial plateau fracture. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Forty patients were included in this study: 8 in the fracture group and 32 in the matched control group. Inclusion criteria for the fracture group included patients who were at least 18 years old at the time of surgery and sustained a tibial plateau fracture and a concomitant injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, or fibular collateral ligament in isolation or any combination of cruciate or collateral ligaments and who subsequently underwent isolated or combined ligament reconstruction. Patients were excluded if they underwent prior ipsilateral knee surgery, sustained additional bony injuries, or sustained an isolated extra-articular ligament injury at the time of injury. Each patient with a fracture was matched with 4 patients from a control group who had no evidence of a tibial plateau fracture but underwent the same soft tissue reconstruction procedure. Patients in the fracture group improved significantly from preoperatively to postoperatively with respect to Short Form-12 (P plateau fracture in conjunction with a ligamentous knee injury did not have a negative effect on postoperative patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcome scores after surgery in both the fracture and control groups improved beyond the minimally clinically important difference, indicating that the presence of a fracture did not

  7. Evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee by means of magnetic resonance examination

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    Camilo Partezani Helito

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of the anterolateral ligament (ALL of the knee in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations.METHODS: Thirty-three MRI examinations on patients' knees that were done because of indications unrelated to ligament instability or trauma were evaluated. T1-weighted images in the sagittal plane and T2-weighted images with fat saturation in the axial, sagittal and coronal planes were obtained. The images were evaluated by two radiologists with experience of musculoskeletal pathological conditions. In assessing ligament visibility, we divided the analysis into three portions of the ligament: from its origin in the femur to its point of bifurcation; from the bifurcation to the meniscal insertion; and from the bifurcation to the tibial insertion. The capacity to view the ligament in each of its portions and overall was taken to be a dichotomous categorical variable (yes or no.RESULTS: The ALL was viewed with signal characteristics similar to those of the other ligament structures of the knee, with T2 hyposignal with fat saturation. The main plane in which the ligament was viewed was the coronal plane. Some portion of the ligament was viewed clearly in 27 knees (81.8%. The meniscal portion was evident in 25 knees (75.7%, the femoral portion in 23 (69.6% and the tibial portion in 13 (39.3%. The three portions were viewed together in 11 knees (33.3%.CONCLUSION: The anterolateral ligament of the knee is best viewed in sequences in the coronal plane. The ligament was completely characterized in 33.3% of the cases. The meniscal portion was the part most easily identified and the tibial portion was the part least encountered.

  8. Prediction of three-dimensional contact stress and ligament tension in the ankle during stance determined from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Naoki; Armiger, Robert S; Myerson, Mark S; Campbell, John T; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2009-02-01

    Our goal was to quantify and visualize the three-dimensional loading relationship between the ligaments and articular surfaces of the ankle to identify and determine the stabilizing roles of these anatomical structures during the stance phase of gait. We applied discrete element analysis to computationally model the three-dimensional contact characteristics and ligament loading of the ankle joint. Physiologic loads approximating those at five positions in the stance phase of a normal walk cycle were applied. We analyzed joint contact pressures and periankle ligament tension concurrently. Most ankle joint loading during the stance phase occurred across the articular surfaces of the joint, and the amount of ligament tension was small. The tibiotalar articulation showed full congruency throughout most of the stance phase, with peak pressure developing anteriorly toward the toe-off frame. Of the periankle ligaments, the deep deltoid ligament transferred the most force during the stance phase (57.2%); the superficial deltoid ligament transferred the second-most force (26.1%). The anterior talofibular ligament transferred force between the talus and fibula continuously, whereas the calcaneofibular ligament did not carry force during gait. The distal tibiofibular ligaments and the interosseous membrane were loaded throughout the stance phase. Force transmission through the ankle joint during the stance phase is predominantly through the articular surfaces, and the periankle ligaments do not play a major stabilizing role in constraining ankle motion. The medial ligaments have a more important role than do the lateral ligaments in stabilizing the ankle joint. In addition to ligament insufficiency, other factors, such as varus tilt of the tibial plafond, may be important in the development of recurrent instability. Continuous loading of syndesmosis ligaments provides a theoretical basis for evidence of syndesmosis screw breakage or loosening. The analysis method has

  9. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons

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    Marcos George de Souza Leao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G, by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS and the Lysholm scale. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. RESULTS: From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients' functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results ( p= >0.05, in all the comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS): Longitudinal MRI-based whole joint assessment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, L Stefan; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. Baseline and follow-up 1.5 T MRI examinations from 20 patients of the KANON study, a randomized controlled study comparing a surgical and non-surgical treatment strategy, were assessed for up to six longitudinal visits using a novel MRI scoring system incorporating acute structural tissue damage and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis. Cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal (all time points and change) intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated using weighted (w) kappa statistics and overall percent agreement on a compartmental basis (medial tibio-femoral, lateral tibio-femoral, patello-femoral). Altogether 87 time points were evaluated. Intra-observer reliability ranged between 0.52 (baseline, Hoffa-synovitis) and 1.00 (several features), percent agreement between 52% (all time points, Hoffa-synovitis) and 100% (several features). Inter-observer reliability ranged between 0.00 and 1.00, which is explained by low frequency of some of the features. Altogether, 73% of all assessed 142 parameters showed w-kappa values between 0.80 and 1.00 and 92% showed agreement above 80%. ACLOAS allows reliable scoring of acute ACL injury and longitudinal changes. This novel scoring system incorporates features that may be relevant for structural outcome not covered by established OA scoring instruments. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reverse Segond Fracture Associated with Anteromedial Tibial Rim and Tibial Attachment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fractures

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    Yehia H. Bedeir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse Segond fracture is an uncommon avulsion fracture of the tibial attachment of the deep portion of the medial collateral ligament of the knee. We report a reverse Segond fracture associated with anterior cruciate ligament tibial avulsion fracture and anteromedial tibial rim fracture. Unlike previous reports, the combination of reverse Segond fracture, anteromedial tibial rim fracture, and anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture was not associated with posterior cruciate ligament injury, posterolateral corner injury, or tibial plateau fracture. This new combination of injuries provides better understanding of the mechanisms of ligamentous injuries of the knee and highlights the importance of meticulous assessment of these injuries for accurate diagnosis and subsequent management.

  12. Severe Degeneration of the Medial Collateral Ligament in Hallux Valgus: A Histopathologic Study in 12 Consecutive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasitdumrong, Ittipol; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Reeboonlarb, Nitit; Poonpracha, Tara; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the degree and location of degenerative changes of the medial collateral ligament of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, using the lateral collateral ligament as a control, in patients undergoing hallux valgus correction. Materials and Methods A strip of medial and lateral collateral ligaments were biopsied from 12 consecutive patients (age 45 ± 4.8 years) with symptomatic hallux valgus. A blinded analysis of histopathology was performed by an experienced pathologist. Results The medial collateral ligament was significantly more degenerated compared to the lateral collateral ligament (x2 = 23.41, DF = 2, p hallux valgus correction. The Authors received no financial support for this study. PMID:24027461

  13. Surgical Indications and Technique for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Combined with Lateral Extra-articular Tenodesis or Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vundelinckx, Bart; Herman, Benjamin; Getgood, Alan; Litchfield, Robert

    2017-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, anteroposterior and rotational laxity in the knee causes instability, functional symptoms, and damage to other intra-articular structures. Surgical reconstruction aims to restore the stability in the knee, and to improve function and ability to participate in sports. It also protects cartilage and menisci from secondary injuries. Because of persistent rotational instability after ACL reconstruction, combined intra-articular and extra-articular procedures are more commonly performed. In this article, an overview of anatomy, biomechanical studies, current gold standard procedures, techniques, and research topics are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  15. Simultaneous Reconstruction of the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments for Chronic Combined Ligament Injuries of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Tsujinaka, Seiya; Neo, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    Objective data on chronic injuries of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the ankle are scarce. Chronic MCL injuries are frequently associated with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) injuries. For patients with chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries, the authors have performed simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments. Simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments may be effectively used to treat chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Surgical outcomes were evaluated in 29 consecutive patients presenting with chronic MCL and LCL injuries (30 ankles; 15 men and 14 women; mean age, 31 years; 13 competitive and 10 recreational athletes). Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Karlsson score and the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) ankle-hindfoot scale score. The patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and a radiological examination. In addition, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, arthroscopic findings, and histology of the MCL were evaluated. Preoperatively, the deep fibers of the MCL did not appear striated in 29 ankles, and high-intensity signal changes were observed in 23 ankles on T2-weighted or gradient echo MRI. MCL ruptures were confirmed with arthroscopic surgery. Medial impingement lesions and focal chondral lesions were confirmed in 10 and 21 ankles, respectively. Histology of the reconstructed MCL showed dense collagen fibers with vessels. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 30 months (range, 24-52 months). There was a significant change between preoperative and postoperative Karlsson scores (69.0 vs 96.1 points, respectively; P < .0001) and JSSF scores (69.8 vs 94.5 points, respectively; P < .0001). On varus and valgus stress radiography, the postoperative talar tilt angle was significantly lower than the preoperative angle. Postoperative anterior displacement on stress radiography was significantly lower than

  16. A comparison of lateral ankle ligament suture anchor strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Crates, John M

    2013-06-01

    Lateral ankle ligament repairs increasingly use suture anchors instead of bone tunnels. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of a knotted and knotless suture anchor appropriate for a lateral ankle ligament reconstruction. In porcine distal fibulae, 10 samples of 2 different PEEK anchors were inserted. The attached sutures were cyclically loaded between 10N and 60N for 200 cycles. A destructive pull was performed and failure loads, cyclic displacement, stiffness, and failure mode recorded. PushLock 2.5 anchors failed before 200 cycles. PushLock 100 cycle displacement was less than Morphix 2.5 displacement (panchors completing 200 cycles was 86.5N (PushLock) and 252.1N (Morphix) (psuture breaking for all PushLocks while the Morphix failed equally by anchor breaking and suture breakage. The knotted Morphix demonstrated more displacement and greater failure strength than the knotless PushLock. The PushLock failed consistently with suture breaking. The Morphix anchor failed both by anchor breaking and by suture breaking. Copyright © 2012 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fracture of the patella after the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milankov, Miroslav; Rasović, Predrag; Kovacev, Nemanja; Milović, Milan; Bojat, Veselin

    2012-01-01

    Fracture of the patella, after harvesting the central third of the patellar tendon for a bone-tendon-bone autograft, is a rare complication. We made 1714 reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee using bone-patellar tendon-bone technique, and 7 patients had fracture of the patella (0.42%). The fracture was immediately recognized in the patients with vertical non-displaced patellar fracture and the broken screw osteosynthesis was carried out without changes in the rehabilitation period. One patient was treated non-operatively and patellar fracture in four patients was treated with operative reduction and osteosynthesis. The patients were invited for the check-up 5 years (2-8 years) after surgery on average. The mean Lysholm score was 92 (85-100). All of them continued to engage in sporting activities at the same or greater level after 9 months on average (6-12 months). In all patients the Lachman test was with the firm stop compared to the other leg. X-ray changes in the patella were found in 2 patients who had multifragmentary fractures. The fracture of patella can be prevented by avoiding to take too much bone graft, by using the most precise tools for cutting, while rehabilitation must be carefully planned. The optimal treatment of the fracture of the patella after the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is a firm osteosynthesis, which allows healing of the bone and continuation of the rehabilitation program.

  18. Factors informing fear of reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cheryl A; Clifford, Amanda; Louw, Quinette A

    2017-02-01

    Fear of reinjury is associated with cessation of sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite normal postoperative knee function. The objective of this study is to describe factors informing athletes' experience of fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction, in athletes who cited fear as the sole reason for not returning to their pre-injury level of sport. Mixed-methods study design of qualitative and a preliminary quantitative component. A conveniently selected private hospital. Ten male and two female athletes, aged between 19 and 45 years, were eligible for the interview from 68 male and 32 female potential participants (age range 17-50) who underwent an ACL reconstruction using any graft type, excluding revision or multi-ligament surgery. To explore factors informing fear of reinjury in participants citing fear of reinjury as the sole reason for not returning to sport, albeit normal knee function. From the participant interview, four themes emerged: undergoing the surgery and recovery again, nature of the pre-injury sport imposing risk of reinjury, personality traits, and social priorities. Clinicians should be aware of factors informing fear of reinjury post ACL reconstruction. Modifiable fears including pain, mode and length of rehabilitation and psychological factors should be considered during rehabilitation to potentially improve the return to sport rate.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Hongsen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic resonance (MR imaging is a useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of knee joint injury. Anterior cruciate ligament repair is a commonly performed orthopaedic procedure. This paper examines the concordance between MR imaging and arthroscopic findings. Methods Between February, 1996 and February, 1998, 48 patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging of the knee were reported to have complete tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Of the 48 patients, 36 were male, and 12 female. The average age was 27 years (range: 15 to 45. Operative reconstruction using a patellar bone-tendon-bone autograft was arranged for each patient, and an arthroscopic examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis immediately prior to reconstructive surgery. Results In 16 of the 48 patients, reconstructive surgery was cancelled when incomplete lesions were noted during arthroscopy, making reconstructive surgery unnecessary. The remaining 32 patients were found to have complete tears of the ACL, and therefore underwent reconstructive surgery. Using arthroscopy as an independent, reliable reference standard for ACL tear diagnosis, the reliability of MR imaging was evaluated. The true positive rate for complete ACL tear diagnosis with MR imaging was 67%, making the possibility of a false-positive report of "complete ACL tear" inevitable with MR imaging. Conclusions Since conservative treatment is sufficient for incomplete ACL tears, the decision to undertake ACL reconstruction should not be based on MR findings alone.

  20. Use of the orbicularis retaining ligament in lower eyelid reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, J; Hardy, T; Kirkpatrick, N; Joshi, N; Kelly, M

    2009-07-01

    The orbicularis retaining ligament (ORL) is a distinct anatomical structure that has only been recently characterised. A variety of techniques, based on Hamra's concepts, now divide this ligament during lower lid blepharoplasty. This often produces a substantial skin excess which is discarded. We set out to investigate the validity of this surgical manoeuvre as a means of recruiting anterior lamella for the purposes of lower lid reconstruction. Between September 2002 and August 2004, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the anterior lamella of their lower eyelid using this technique. The mean age of the patients was 56 years (range 26-86 years). The mean follow-up time was 20 months (range 12-36 months). Clinical evaluation was carried out preoperatively and postoperatively to assess the presence of palpebral non occlusion, epiphora, the sensation of a dry eye, ectropion, conjunctivitis and keratitis. Assessment of the tissue deficit was made clinically and with standardised digital photographs. Satisfactory reconstruction of the anterior lamella of the lower eyelid was achieved in 19/23 patients. Preoperative symptoms of epiphora and lower lid position were improved. The visual analogue scale of appearance was improved postoperatively. In some cases, particularly in the atrophic lower lid, the results were short lived and further surgery was required to achieve optimal results. In cases of isolated cutaneous deficit where the lid support mechanisms are intact, the procedure is both successful and aesthetically favourable for resurfacing this challenging area.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament injury: diagnosis, management, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Francesca; Volk, Bradford Scott; Setter, Don

    2010-10-15

    There are an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs in the United States each year. Most ACL tears occur from noncontact injuries. Women experience ACL tears up to nine times more often than men. Evaluation of the ACL should be performed immediately after an injury if possible, but is often limited by swelling and pain. When performed properly, a complete knee examination is more than 80 percent sensitive for an ACL injury. The Lachman test is the most accurate test for detecting an ACL tear. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary study used to diagnose ACL injury in the United States. It can also identify concomitant meniscal injury, collateral ligament tear, and bone contusions. Treatment consists of conservative management or surgical intervention, with the latter being the better option for patients who want to return to a high level of activity. Patients who undergo surgery must commit to appropriate rehabilitation for the best outcome. Long-term sequelae of ACL injury include knee osteoarthritis in up to 90 percent of patients. Primary prevention of ACL injury includes specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training exercises to improve knee stability.

  2. Timing of surgery in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbourne, K D; Patel, D V

    1995-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the surgical techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the past two decades, there is no consensus of opinion as to the ideal timing for ACL surgery. Based on the evolution of management of patients with ACL injuries over the period 1982-1994, we have found that various factors need to be considered in order to provide the best possible long-term result to the patient with minimal or no complications. In this review, we discuss the perioperative factors that one must consider to determine optimum timing for ACL surgery. Factors such as mental preparation of the patient; school, work, family, and social schedules; preoperative condition of the knee [i.e., minimal or no swelling, good strength, good leg control, and full range of motion (ROM) including full hyperextension]; and associated ligamentous and/or meniscal injuries must be considered before undertaking ACL surgery. With careful consideration of the above-mentioned factors and with our preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program, we have been able to obtain predictable, successful, long-term results following ACL reconstruction in our athletic population. We emphasize that every patient should be treated on his or her own merit, and treatment decisions must be individualized.

  3. Changes in human knee ligament stiffness secondary to osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishkin, Zair; Miller, David; Ritter, Christopher; Ziv, Israel

    2002-03-01

    Stiffness of the medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligaments was compared between a group of 10 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for varus degenerative osteoarthritis (OAP), a group of 10 osteoarthritic cadaveric knees (OAC), and a group of 10 non-osteoarthritic cadaveric knees (NOA). A load-elongation curve was obtained for the medial and lateral compartments of each knee using an instrumented Moreland spreader. A strain gage (SG) was attached to the spreader handle and strain was calibrated to load applied against the spread distance. In extension, medial compartment stiffness of the OAP, OAC, and NOA groups was 60.7+/-16, 52.8+/-9.3 and 21.4+/-5.0 N/mm, respectively. Lateral compartment stiffness in extension was 29.2+/-9.2, 33.3+/-10.3 and 19.5+/-5.3 N/mm, for OAP, OAC, and NOA, respectively. Differences in stiffness between the OAP and OAC groups were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the osteoarthritic groups (OAP and OAC) demonstrated a statistically significantly (p < 0.05) increase in ligament stiffness when compared to the NOA group. Following knee arthroplasty, stiffer medial structures in extension may lead to flexion contracture and accelerated polyethylene wear. Adequate bone resection, in conjunction with soft tissue release may alleviate the threefold increase in stiffness observed in the medial compartment secondary to OA without jeopardizing joint stability.

  4. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty combined to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alberto; Legnani, Claudio; Terzaghi, Clara; Iori, Stefano; Borgo, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent combined medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The hypothesis was that this procedure would lead to a high success rate in patients affected by isolated medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL deficiency. Fourteen patients with primary ACL lesion and concomitant medial compartment symptomatic osteoarthritis treated from 2006 to 2010 were followed up for an average time of 26.7 months (SD 4.2). Assessment included KOOS score, Oxford Knee score, American Knee Society scores, WOMAC index of osteoarthritis, Tegner activity level and objective examination including instrumented laxity test with KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiological assessment was done with standard simple radiographs in order to get information about any presence of loosening of the components. KOOS score, OKS, WOMAC index and the AKSS improved significantly after surgery (p reconstruction is a valid therapeutic option for the treatment of combined medial unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis and ACL deficiency in young and active patients and confirms subjective and objective clinical improvement 2 years after surgery. The use of a fixed-bearing prosthesis represents a reliable feature as it allows to overcome problems of improper ligament tensioning during the implantation of the components. IV.

  5. Self-similar impulsive capillary waves on a ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, L.; Le Dizès, S.; Vincent, L.; Villermaux, E.

    2015-05-01

    We study the short-time dynamics of a liquid ligament, held between two solid cylinders, when one is impulsively accelerated along its axis. A set of one-dimensional equations in the slender-slope approximation is used to describe the dynamics, including surface tension and viscous effects. An exact self-similar solution to the linearized equations is successfully compared to experiments made with millimetric ligaments. Another non-linear self-similar solution of the full set of equations is found numerically. Both the linear and non-linear solutions show that the axial depth at which the liquid is affected by the motion of the cylinder scales like √{ t } , a consequence of the imposed radial uniformity of the axial velocity at the cylinder surface, and differs from t2/3 known to prevail in surface-tension-driven flows. The non-linear solution presents the peculiar feature that there exists a maximum driving velocity U⋆ above which the solution disappears, a phenomenon probably related to the de-pinning of the contact line observed in experiments for large pulling velocities.

  6. Core Stabilization Training After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeni, Özge Çınar; Bayramlar, Kezban; Baltacı, Gül; Yanmış, İbrahim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of core stabilization exercises and conventional rehabilitation exercises after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in terms of knee joint laxity, knee muscle strength, postural stability and functional tests. Methods: Twenty eight patients reconstructed with hamstring tendon were included. Thirteen patients evaluated after a conventional rehabilitation and fifteen after a core stabilization programme. Single-limb postural stability assessment, isokinetic knee muscle strength test, instrumented ligament laxity test, functional hop tests were done to both groups after 16th week. Single-limb postural stability was assessed with stabilometer in both eyes open and eyes-closed conditions. Healthy legs were evaluated as internal controls. Results: Knee flexor and extensor strength indices were not different between groups (p>.05). H/Q strength ratio was different at 180 °/s (p.05). Conventional training group had deficit in overall stability score in eyes closed condition (p>.05), but core stabilization group did not have any postural stability deficit (p>.05). Conclusion: Better H/Q strength ratio was seen in core stabilization group. Core stabilization exercises improved postural stability more than classic rehabilitation.

  7. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-07-28

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore required for regeneration of these tissues. In particular, PDL is a dynamic connective tissue that is subjected to continual adaptation to maintain tissue size and width, as well as structural integrity, including ligament fibers and bone modeling. PDL tissue is central in the periodontium to retain the tooth in the bone socket, and is currently recognized to include somatic mesenchymal stem cells that could reconstruct the periodontium. However, successful treatment using these stem cells to regenerate the periodontium efficiently has not yet been developed. In the present article, we discuss the contemporary standpoints and approaches for these stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine in dentistry.

  8. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  9. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography to assess stifle lesions in dogs after cranial cruciate ligament rupture: 13 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnault, F; Cauvin, E; Viguier, E; Kraft, E; Sonet, J; Carozzo, C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonographic diagnosis of lesions in the canine stifle associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Thirteen dogs that had a diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture were included in this prospective clinical study. Two ultrasonographers who were unaware of specific historical and clinical data performed the sonography with a high frequency (8-16 MHz) linear transducer. Surgical treatment of the affected stifle was performed within two days of ultrasonography by a surgeon who was unaware of the ultrasonographic findings. The lesions observed during ultrasonography and arthrotomy were compared at the completion of the study. Visualisation of the superficial tendons (quadriceps and long digital extensor) and ligaments (patellar ligament, collateral ligaments) of the stifle using ultrasonography was excellent. However, the detection of deep stifle ligaments (cranial cruciate ligament and caudal cruciate ligament) was extremely difficult to perform using ultrasonography. For cranial cruciate ligament rupture, the sensitivity for ultrasonographic diagnosis was 15.4%. For meniscal lesions, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for ultrasonographic diagnosis were 82%, 93%, 90% and 88% respectively. High frequency ultrasonography is a non-invasive method for accurately and efficiently detecting superficial ligaments, tendons and meniscal lesions associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the stifle of non-sedated dogs.

  10. [Constraints on the knee caused by meniscal and ligament derangement. Study of the internal condylotibial joint. Experimental cinematic method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frain, P; Fontaine, C; D'Hondt, D

    1984-01-01

    In a previous paper the authors have demonstrated that the polycentric curve of the surface of the medial condyle of the femur is a logarithmic spiral arch whose centre is the point of attachment of the medial ligament. In the present study, the totality of the menisco-ligamentous system was considered and studied on cadavers following a geometric model. It is shown that the ligament system controls combined or successive movements of gliding or rotation of the condyle on the tibial plateau in such a way as to avoid any cam effect or additional strain. Division of ligaments or excision of a meniscus leads to an increase in strain which varies in relation to the type of lesion. The increase is moderate after division of the anterior cruciate ligament, greater after division of the posterior cruciate ligament and severe after meniscectomy especially when associated with ligamentous division.

  11. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist: How to make it simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Messina, Carmelo; Mauri, Giovanni; Aliprandi, Alberto; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2017-02-01

    Wrist ligaments are crucial structures for the maintenance of carpal stability. They are classified into extrinsic ligaments, connecting the carpus with the forearm bones or distal radioulnar ligaments, and intrinsic ligaments, entirely situated within the carpus. Lesions of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist have been demonstrated to occur largely, mostly in patients with history of trauma and carpal instability, or rheumatoid arthritis. Ultrasound allows for rapid, cost-effective, non-invasive and dynamic evaluation of the wrist, and may represent a valuable diagnostic tool. Although promising results have been published, ultrasound of wrist ligaments is not performed in routine clinical practice, maybe due to its technical feasibility regarded as quite complex. This review article aims to enlighten readers about the normal sonographic appearance of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments, and describe a systematic approach for their sonographic assessment with detailed anatomic landmarks, dynamic manoeuvres and scanning technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical treatment of grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injury of knee joint caused by military training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang ZHANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the method and effect of surgical treatment on grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training.Methods Sixteen cases of grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training were involved in the present study.Injuries to insertion of collateral ligament was repaired with suture anchor,fresh rupture of medial collateral ligament parenchyma was sutured directly,old rupture of medial collateral ligament parenchyma was repaired by direct suture and strengthening with autologous semitendinosus-gracilis tendon graft,while both fresh and old rupture of lateral collateral ligament parenchyma was reconstructed with autologous semitendinosus-gracilis tendon graft.Knee function was assessed 1 year after operation by Lysholm scores and compared with that before the operation.Results All the 16 patients were followed-up for 12 to 33 months with a mean of 20.5 months.The Lysholm knee scores of 1 year after peration(92.45±4.03 was significantly higher than that before operation(56.45±11.03,P < 0.05.Conclusions For the grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training,the treatment principle was early diagnosis and early operation,and different surgical methods should be used according to the injury types for the sake of obtaining best therapeutic effects.

  13. Acute neck pain caused by pseudogout attack of calcified cervical yellow ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Abe, Toshiki; Abe, Eiji; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noguchi, Hideaki; Konno, Norikazu; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-05-30

    Calcification of the yellow ligament sometimes compresses the spinal cord and can induce myelopathy. Usually, the calcification does not induce acute neck pain. We report a case of a patient with acute neck pain caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in a calcified cervical yellow ligament. A 70-year-old Japanese woman presented with acute neck pain. She had a moderately high fever (37.5 °C), and her neck pain was so severe that she could not move her neck in any direction. Computed tomography showed a high-density area between the C5 and C6 laminae suspicious for calcification of the yellow ligament. Magnetic resonance imaging showed intermediate-signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging surrounding a low-signal region on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging with cord compression. There was a turbid, yellow fluid collection in the yellow ligament at the time of operation. Histologically, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals were found in the fluid, and she was diagnosed as having a pseudogout attack of the yellow ligament. Pseudogout attack of the cervical yellow ligament is rare, but this clinical entity should be added to the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, especially when calcification of the yellow ligament exists.

  14. The functional anatomy of the human anterior talofibular ligament in relation to ankle sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumai, T; Takakura, Y; Rufai, A; Milz, S; Benjamin, M

    2002-01-01

    The anterior talofibular ligament is the most commonly injured ligament in the ankle. Despite considerable interest in the clinical outcome of treatment protocols, we do not know whether the distinctive pattern of localization of the injuries relates to regional differences in the structure and molecular composition of the ligament. To address this issue, ligaments were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. Differences in the structure of its two attachments (i.e. entheses) were evaluated with quantitative, morphometric techniques, and regional differences in the distribution of collagens, glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans weredetermined qualitatively by immunolabelling. Morphometric analyses showed that bone density was less at the fibular attachment, but that enthesis fibrocartilage was more prominent. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a fibrocartilage (containing type II collagen and aggrecan) at the site where the ligament wraps around the lateral talar articular cartilage ina plantarflexed and inverted foot: the fibrocartilage is regarded as an adaptation to resisting compression. We propose that avulsion fractures are less common at the talar end of the ligament because (1) bone density is greater here than at the fibular enthesis, and (2) stress is dissipated away from the talar enthesis by the ‘wrap-around’ fibrocartilaginous character of the ligament near the talar articular facet. PMID:12090392

  15. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R; Cho, Eunok

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury.

  16. The Effect of Skeletal Maturity on Functional Healing of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Martha M.; Magarian, Elise M.; Harrison, Sophia L.; Mastrangelo, Ashley N.; Zurakowski, David; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The effects of skeletal maturity on functional ligament healing are unknown. Prior studies have suggested that ligament injuries in skeletally mature animals heal with improved mechanical properties. In this study, we hypothesized that skeletally immature animals have improved functional healing compared with skeletally mature animals. Methods: Twenty-one Yucatan minipigs (eight juvenile, eight adolescent, and five adult animals) underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament transection. On one side, the ligament injury was left untreated to determine the intrinsic healing response as a function of age. On the contralateral side, an enhanced suture repair incorporating a collagen-platelet composite was performed. Biomechanical properties of the repairs were measured after fifteen weeks of healing, and histologic analysis was performed. Results: Anterior cruciate ligaments from skeletally immature animals had significantly improved structural properties over those of adult animals at three months after transection in both the untreated and repair groups. Use of the enhanced suture technique provided the most improvement in the adolescent group, in which an increase of 85% in maximum load was noted with repair. The repair tissue in the adult tissue had the highest degree of hypercellularity at the fifteen-week time point. Conclusions: Functional ligament healing depends on the level of skeletal maturity of the animal, with immature animals having a more productive healing response than mature animals. Clinical Relevance: As future investigations assess new techniques of ligament healing in animal models, skeletal maturity should be considered in the design and the interpretation of those experiments. PMID:20810854

  17. [Reconstruction of the inguinal ligament with fascia lata sling. First reported case in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Barabás, Loránd; Tóth, Enikő; Schöller, Andrea; István, Gábor

    2017-06-01

    A technique of reconstructing the inguinal ligament using pedicled fascia lata flap is described. A 66-year-old woman was referred with massive incarcerated left inguinal hernia, following acute surgery on a femoral vein leasion and numerous attempts at repair and subsequent recurrences. There was complete absence of the left inguinal ligament. The inguinal ligament was reconstructed using a strip of fascia lata, pedicled on the anterior superior iliac spine. This was transposed to cover the external iliac vessels, and sutured to the pubic tubercle. The musculoaponeurotic abdominal wall was reconstructed with 15×13 cm sheet of polypropylene mesh, placed preperitoneal and sutured to the remaining abdominal wall muscles and to the neo-Pouoart ligament. Complete destruction of the inguinal ligament is rare but can occur following multiple operative procedures or trauma. Published reports of inguinal ligament reconstruction have been performed using synthetic mesh. The use of autologous tissue should reduce the risk of erosion into the neurovascular bundle, seroma formation, and enhance integration into surrounding tissues. This new technique for autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament provides a safe alternative to the use of synthetic mesh in the operative armamentarium of plastic and general surgeons. This is the first reported case in Hungary.

  18. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B; Parratte, Bernard M; DeLancey, John O L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue.

  19. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B.; Parratte, Bernard M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue. PMID:22618209

  20. Autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament using pedicled fascia lata flap: A new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Alasdair R; Chummun, Shaheel; Rickard, Rory F; Kingsnorth, Andrew N

    2013-01-01

    A technique of reconstructing the inguinal ligament using a pedicled fascia lata flap is described. A 62-year-old man was referred with massive bilateral abdominal wall hernias, following numerous attempts at repair and subsequent recurrences. There was complete absence of the right inguinal ligament. The inguinal ligament was reconstructed using a strip of fascia lata, pedicled on the anterior superior iliac spine. This was transposed to cover the external iliac vessels, and sutured to the pubic tubercle. The musculoaponeurotic abdominal wall was reconstructed with two 20cm×20cm sheets of porcine acellular dermal matrix and an overlying sheet of polypropylene mesh, sutured to the remaining abdominal wall muscles laterally, and to both inguinal ligaments. The cutaneous abdominal wall was closed with an abdominoplasty technique. The reconstruction has remained intact nine months following surgery. Complete destruction of the inguinal ligament is rare but can occur following multiple operative procedures or trauma. To date, the only published reports of inguinal ligament reconstruction have been performed using synthetic mesh. The use of autologous tissue should reduce the risk of erosion into the neurovascular bundle, seroma formation, and enhance integration into surrounding tissues. This new technique for autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament provides a safe alternative to the use of synthetic mesh in the operative armamentarium of plastic and hernia surgeons. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanical model of knee collateral ligament injury with six degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozada, Neriman

    2016-05-01

    Knee ligament injuries cannot be fully described using simplified joint models or by experimentation alone. The study objective was to model the contributions of the collateral ligaments over six degrees of freedom (DOF) of knee joint articulation to aid the diagnosis of knee ligament injuries. A kinematic model of the knee joint with six DOF was developed using the Musculoskeletal Joint Modeller software, and the effects of medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) rupture were evaluated. The centres of mass of the tibia and femur were determined from their surface geometry, and the displacement of the moving tibia was determined by measuring the displacements of the attached ligaments with respect to its centre of mass. Compared to an intact knee, a tibia without the LCL had higher medial translation and lower valgus rotation, while a tibia without the MCL had higher lateral translation and higher valgus rotation. At 0°, 30° and 60° of flexion, the tibia without the LCL had more internal rotation than an intact knee. Understanding the complete kinematics of knee joints may improve the diagnosis of ligament injuries and guide tissue replacement surgery. Predicting joint behaviour in the clinic after treatment might benefit from a combined modelling approach that includes both clinicians and basic researchers.

  2. An update on the constitutive relation of ligament tissues with the effects of collagen types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chao; Hao, Zhixiu; Tong, Lingying; Lin, Jianhao; Li, Zhichang; Wen, Shizhu

    2015-10-01

    The musculoskeletal ligament is a kind of multiscale composite material with collagen fibers embedded in a ground matrix. As the major constituent in ligaments to bear external loads, collagens are composed mainly of two collagen contents with different mechanical properties, i.e., types I and III collagen. The constitutive relation of ligaments plays a critical role in the stability and normal function of human joints. However, collagen types have not been distinguished in the previous constitutive relations. In this paper a constitutive relation for ligament tissues was modified based on the previous constitutive relation by considering the effects of collagen types. Both the collagen contents and the mechanical properties of sixteen ligament specimens from four cadaveric human knee joints were measured for determining their material coefficients in the constitutive relation. The mechanical behaviors of ligaments were obtained from both the uniaxial tensile and simple shear tests. A linear regression between joint kinematic results from in vitro and in silico experiments was made to validate the accuracy of this constitutive relation. The high correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.93) and significance (Pligaments was accurate to be used in studying joint biomechanics. Another finite element analysis with collagen contents changing demonstrated that the effect of variations in collagen ratios on both joint kinematics and ligament biomechanics could be simulated by this constitutive relation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of glucosamine on proteoglycan loss by tendon, ligament and joint capsule explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, M Z; Martinac, B; Samiric, T; Handley, C J

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the effect of glucosamine on the loss of newly synthesized radiolabeled large and small proteoglycans by bovine tendon, ligament and joint capsule. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled large and small proteoglycans from explant cultures of tendon, ligament and joint capsule treated with 10mM glucosamine was investigated over a 10-day culture period. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled small proteoglycans and the formation of free [(35)S]sulfate were determined for the last 10 days of a 15-day culture period. The proteoglycan core proteins were analyzed by gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. The metabolism of tendon, ligament and joint capsule explants exposed to 10mM glucosamine was evaluated by incorporation of [(3)H]serine and [(35)S]sulfate into protein and glycosaminoglycans, respectively. Glucosamine at 10mM stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. This was due to the increased loss of both macromolecular and free [(35)S]sulfate to the medium indicating that glucosamine affected the release of small proteoglycans as well as their intracellular degradation. The degradation pattern of small proteoglycans in ligament was not affected by glucosamine. In contrast, glucosamine did not have an effect on the loss of large or small proteoglycans from tendon and joint capsule or large proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. The metabolism of cells in tendon, ligament and joint capsule was not impaired by the presence of 10mM glucosamine. Glucosamine stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament but did not have an effect on small proteoglycan catabolism in joint capsule and tendon or large proteoglycan catabolism in ligament, tendon or synovial capsule. The consequences of glucosamine therapy at clinically relevant concentrations on proteoglycan catabolism in joint fibrous connective tissues need to be further assessed in an animal model.

  4. Fetal development of ligaments around the tarsal bones with special reference to contribution of muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Eiichi; Kim, Ji Hyun; Abe, Hiroshi; Cho, Baik Hwan; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Through a histological examination of eight mid-term human fetuses (10-15 weeks) and seven late-stage fetuses (30-34 weeks), we attempted to determine how and when fetal ligaments around the tarsal bones form the regular arrangement seen in adults. Ligaments along the dorsal aspect of the tarsal bones developed early as an elongation of the perichondrium, in contrast to the late development of the plantar-sided ligaments. In contrast, a distal elongation of the tibialis posterior tendon was a limited plantar ligament in the early stage; finally, it extended from the navicular, ran obliquely to cross the dorsal side of the fibularis longus tendon, and inserted to the lateral cuneiform and fourth metatarsal. In the late stage, the adductor hallucis muscle origin provided multiple ligamentous structures along the cuneiforms and metatarsals. The tarsal sinus contained multiple fibrous bundles (possibly, the putative interosseous talocalcanean ligaments) that were derived from (1) insertion tendons of the extensor digitorus brevis muscle and (2) the fibrous sheath of the extensor digitorus longus tendon. The aponeurotic origin of the quadratus plantae muscle seemed to contribute to formation of the long plantar ligament. Therefore, tarsal ligaments appeared likely to develop from the long tendons, their fibrous sheaths and aponeuroses and intramuscular tendons of the proper foot muscles. Under in utero conditions with little or no stress from the plantar side of the foot, the muscle-associated connective tissue seems to play a crucial role in providing a regular arrangement of the ligaments in accordance with tensile stress from muscle contraction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Anatomic study of the retaining ligaments of the face and applications for facial rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell-Perry, Percy; Paredes-Leandro, Percy

    2013-06-01

    The retaining ligaments of the face support the facial soft tissue in a normal anatomic position, thereby resisting gravitational change. In this study, a technique utilizing surgical plication of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) to the retaining ligaments of the face and finger-assisted malar elevation (FAME) dissection of the midface is presented. The anatomy of the facial retaining ligaments was studied in 20 half-faces of ten fresh cadavers, and the localization of the ligaments was examined macroscopically. Surgical correction of facial aging with plication of the SMAS to the retaining ligaments and FAME dissection of the midface has been performed in 74 face-lift patients since 2006. Outcomes were determined by case notes, clinical review, and a patient questionnaire. The studied ligaments (zygomatic and masseteric) were present in all cadaver dissections. The zygomatic ligament was located 4.3-5.5 cm from the tragus and originates near the inferior border of the anterior zygomatic arch. The masseteric ligament was located 3.7-5.2 cm from the tragus below the junction of the zygomatic arch and masseter muscle. All the patients answered a satisfaction questionnaire and reported high levels of satisfaction at least 1 year after treatment. We have identified the facial retaining ligaments in all cadaver dissections and their relationship with other structures of the face are described here. This study demonstrates that our face-lift technique is safe and produces highly predictable and natural results. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. Anatomic study of coracoclavicular ligaments for reconstruction of acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nai-Feng; Rui, Bi-Yu; Zhang, Yun-Long; Chen, Yun-Feng

    2016-11-01

    There has been a trend to reconstruct the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments anatomically for management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations. The aim of this study was to determine the location and orientation of the CC ligaments for anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint. The subjects were a total of 40 shoulders from 20 Chinese cadavers. Two K-wires were drilled through the insertion center of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments respectively. The distance from the center of the CC ligaments to the bone landmarks of the clavicle and the oblique angle of the two K-wires was measured respectively. The distance from the center of the trapezoid ligament to the lateral end and the anterior border of the clavicle was 21.7 ± 1.1 mm and 6.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. The valgus angle and retroversion angle of the trapezoid ligament was 39.3°±0.9° and 6.0°±0.6°, respectively. The distance from the center of the conoid ligament to the lateral end and the posterior border of the clavicle was 36.6 ± 0.9 mm and 5.5 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. The valgus angle and retroversion angle of the conoid ligament was 6.6°±0.7° and 11.0°±0.9°, respectively. These findings are important for the anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint dislocations, by predicting the location and orientation of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments accurately. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans. PMID:24128114

  8. Distribution of lymphatic tissues and autonomic nerves in supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Feng, Lanlan; Lu, Yi; Guo, Dongxia; Xi, Tengteng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the distribution of lymphatic tissues and nerves in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri for their tomographical relationship, 9 adult female cadavers were used in this study. Following the incision of all supporting ligaments around the cervix, hematoxylin and esosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining of various sections of these ligaments was performed to enable the distribution of lymph tissues and autonomic nerves to be observed. Four lymph nodes were identified in three cadaver specimens. Three lymph nodes were present at a distance of 2.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the cardinal ligaments (CLs), and one lymph node was located at a distance of 4.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the uterosacral ligament (USL). The lymphatic vessels were dispersed in the CLs, scattered in the cervical side of the USLs, and occasionally distributed in the vesicouterine ligaments (VULs). In the CLs, parasympathetic nerves were located at the pelvic lateral wall and went downwards and medially into the cervix, while sympathetic fibers were located in the middle and lower parts of the ligaments. In the USLs, the autonomic nerves, which consisted primarily of sympathetic fibers, went downwards and laterally from the pelvic wall to the cervix. In the VULs, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves were located in the inner sides of the vesical veins in the deep layers of the ligaments. It is concluded that there are few lymphatic tissues in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri, and that nerve‑sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH) may be a safe method for the treatment of early‑stage cervical cancer.

  9. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-12-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  10. Secondary Stabilizers of Tibial Rotation in the Intact and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel James; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2018-01-01

    The controversy regarding the existence and function of the anterolateral ligament or anterolateral complex has reinvigorated interest in rotational stability of the knee joint. This is particularly true of anterolateral rotary instability, as many patients, despite anatomic reconstruction of their anterior cruciate ligament, continue to experience instability. Many experts point toward compromised anterolateral restraints as the underlying culprit, namely, the anterolateral complex, which includes the iliotibial band, anterolateral capsule, lateral meniscus, and lateral collateral ligament. This article provides a breakdown of these structures, their function, biomechanical properties, and clinical importance, based on a thorough review of available literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesothelial Cyst of the Round Ligament Mimicking a Metastasis: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Ji Young; Han, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Seo, Jung Wook; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cha, Soon Joo; Hur, Gham; Joo, Mee; Lee, Eung Soo [Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, School of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    A mesothelial cyst of the round ligament is a rare cause of an inguinal mass. Clinically, it is frequently misdiagnosed as one of commoner diseases such as an inguinal hernia, femoral hernia, lipoma, and lymphadenopathy upon physical examination. Some previous reports elaborated the sonographic features of a mesothelial cyst of the round ligament. However, to our knowledge, few reports have described the CT features of a mesothelial cyst. We illustrated here the sonographic and multidetector CT features of a case of a mesothelial cyst of the round ligament that presented as an inguinal palpable mass and mimicked a metastasis in a patient with a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor of the ovary.

  12. The morphology and clinical significance of the intraforaminal ligaments at the L5-S1 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinghao; Zhong, Enyi; Shi, Benchao; Li, Yang; Sun, Chao; Ding, Zihai

    2016-08-01

    The extraforaminal ligaments between the L5 and S1 lumbar spinal nerves and the tissues surrounding the intervertebral foramina have been well studied. However, little research has been undertaken to describe the local anatomy of the intraforaminal portion of the L5-S1 spine and detailed anatomical studies of the intraforaminal ligaments (IFLs) of the L5-S1 have not been performed. The objective of this study was to identify and describe the IFLs in relation to the L5-S1 intervertebral foramen (IVF) and to determine their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of five embalmed and five fresh-frozen human cadavers was carried out. Twenty L5-S1 intervertebral foramina from five embalmed cadavers and five fresh cadavers were studied, and the IFLs were identified. The quantity, morphology, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the IFLs in the L5-S1 region were observed. The length, width, diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with a vernier caliper. This study has been supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31271286) without potential conflict of interest-associated biases in the text of the paper. The IFLs could be found from the entrance zone (inside) to the exit zone (outside) of the L5-S1 IVF. These ligaments were found to be of two types: a radiating ligament, which connected the nerve root sleeves that radiated to the transverse processes and wall of the IVF, and a transforaminal ligament, which connected the structures around the IVF. In our study, the radiating ligaments were found more often than the transforaminal ligaments. The results demonstrate that IFLs are common structures in the IVF and that there are two types of IFLs: the transforaminal ligaments and the radiating ligaments. Transforaminal ligaments may be the potential cause of back pain. The radiating ligaments may contribute to dura laceration and epidural hemorrhage during endoscopic spinal adhesiolysis through the

  13. Reoperation rates following ankle ligament procedures performed with and without concomitant arthroscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Youichi; Murawski, Christopher D; Wollstein, Adi; Kennedy, John G

    2017-06-01

    Over 50 % of the patients with chronic lateral ankle instability present with some degree of intra-articular pathology. To date, no consensus regarding the concomitant ankle arthroscopy procedures along with ankle ligament procedures has been reached. The purpose of current study was to investigate reoperation rates and postoperative complications following ankle ligament procedures with and without concomitant arthroscopic procedures. Reoperations and postoperative complications following ankle ligament procedures with and without concomitant arthroscopic procedures were investigated using the PearlDiver Patient Record Database (PearlDiver Technologies, Inc.; Fort Wayne, IN, USA) between 2007 and 2011. Ankle ligament procedures, including ligament repair and reconstruction, and ankle arthroscopic procedures were investigated as primary surgery. Subsequently, the reoperation procedures, including ankle ligament procedures, arthroscopic procedures, autologous osteochondral transplantation, and ankle arthrodesis, as well as wound complications and nerve injury following primary ankle ligament procedures were identified. In 8014 patients receiving ligament repair, the arthroscopic group had a significantly higher reoperation rate in comparison with the non-arthroscopic group (8.8 vs. 6.5 %, odds ratio: 1.1, [p arthroscopic group included 29 open arthrodesis procedures following the primary surgery, whereas arthroscopic group had none. Of the 8055 patients who received a ligament reconstruction, there was no significant difference in reoperation rate between the groups (5.9 vs. 5.9 %, odds ratio: 1.0, [n.s], 95 % CI 0.8-1.2). As seen in the ligament repair group, the non-arthroscopic group had a 4.9 % rate of ankle arthrodesis as a secondary procedure. Arthroscopic group had a significantly lower rate of wound dehiscence following ankle ligament procedures than non-arthroscopic group. Concomitant ankle arthroscopy procedures performed with ankle ligament

  14. Location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomic location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament (MPL). Eleven hemifaces of 10 fresh Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. Nine specimens were used for measurement of dissection and tension, and 2 were used for histologic study. Measurements of tensile strength of each part of the MPL and Horner muscle were performed using a force gauge.The MPL consisted of 2 layers in all specimens dissected. The superficial layer of the palpebral ligament (SMPL) was observed from the anterior lacrimal crest to the upper and lower tarsal plates. The deep layer of the palpebral ligament (DMPL) lay from the anterior lacrimal crest to the posterior lacrimal crest, covering the lacrimal sac. The Horner muscle was observed at the posterior lacrimal crest just lateral to the attachment of the DMPL and ran laterally to the tarsal plate deep to the SMPL. The SMPL began at 4.5 ± 2.3 mm lateral to the nasomaxillary suture line to the upper and lower tarsal plates. Its transverse length was 9.6 ± 1.5 mm, and vertical width was 2.4 ± 0.7 mm, and its thickness was 4.5 ± 2.3 mm. The transverse length of the DMPL was 3.7 ± 0.4 mm, and its vertical width was 2.9 ± 1.3 mm, with a thickness of 0.3 ± 0.1 mm. The transverse length of the Horner muscle was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm, and its vertical width was 4.06 ± 1.5 mm, with a thickness of 0.4 ± 0.1 mm. The tensile strength of the SMPL was 13.4 ± 3.2 N, that of the DMPL was 4.1 ± 1.7 N, and that for Horner muscle was 9.0 ± 3.1 N. The tensile strength of the SMPL was significantly higher than that of the DMPL (P = 0.003).We reconfirmed that the MPL consisted of 2 layers: superficial layer and deep layer. Our results might be of use in surgeries of the medial canthi.

  15. The fifty highest cited papers in anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielgut, Ines; Dauwe, Jan; Leithner, Andreas; Holzer, Lukas A

    2017-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common injured knee ligaments and at the same time, one of the most frequent injuries seen in the sport orthopaedic practice. Due to the clinical relevance of ACL injuries, numerous papers focussing on this topic including biomechanical-, basic science-, clinical- or animal studies, were published. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequently cited scientific articles which address this subject, establish a ranking of the 50 highest cited papers and analyse them according to their characteristics. The 50 highest cited articles related to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury were searched in Thomson ISI Web of Science® by the use of defined search terms. All types of scientific papers with reference to our topic were ranked according to the absolute number of citations and analyzed for the following characteristics: journal title, year of publication, number of citations, citation density, geographic origin, article type and level of evidence. The 50 highest cited articles had up to 1624 citations. The top ten papers on this topic were cited 600 times at least. Most papers were published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The publication years spanned from 1941 to 2007, with the 1990s and 2000s accounting for half of the articles (n = 25). Seven countries contributed to the top 50 list, with the USA having by far the most contribution (n = 40). The majority of articles could be attributed to the category "Clinical Science & Outcome". Most of them represent a high level of evidence. Scientific articles in the field of ACL injury are highly cited. The majority of these articles are clinical studies that have a high level of evidence. Although most of the articles were published between 1990 and 2007, the highest cited articles in absolute and relative numbers were published in the early 1980s. These articles contain well established scoring- or classification systems. The

  16. Association of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Width With Anterior Knee Laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Min; Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J

    2016-06-02

    Greater anterior knee laxity (AKL) has been identified as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk factor. The structural factors that contribute to greater AKL are not fully understood but may include the ACL and bone geometry. To determine the relationship of ACL width and femoral notch angle to AKL. Cross-sectional study. Controlled laboratory. Twenty recreationally active females (age = 21.2 ± 3.1 years, height = 1.66.1 ± 7.3 cm, mass = 66.5 ± 12.0 kg). Anterior cruciate ligament width and femoral notch angle were obtained with magnetic resonance imaging of the knee and AKL was assessed. Anterior cruciate ligament width was measured as the width of a line that transected the ACL and was drawn perpendicular to the Blumensaat line. Femoral notch angle was formed by the intersection of the line parallel to the posterior cortex of the femur and the Blumensaat line. Anterior knee laxity was the anterior displacement of the tibia relative to the femur (mm) at 130 N of an applied force. Ten participants' magnetic resonance imaging data were assessed on 2 occasions to establish intratester reliability and precision. Using stepwise backward linear regression, we examined the extent to which ACL width, femoral notch angle, and weight were associated with AKL. Strong measurement consistency and precision (intraclass correlation coefficient [2,1] ± SEM) were established for ACL width (0.98 ± 0.3 mm) and femoral notch angle (0.97° ± 1.1°). The regression demonstrated that ACL width (5.9 ± 1.4 mm) was negatively associated with AKL (7.2 ± 2.0 mm; R(2) = 0.22, P = .04). Femoral notch angle and weight were not retained in the final model. A narrower ACL was associated with greater AKL. This finding may inform the development of ACL injury-prevention programs that include components designed to increase ACL size or strength (or both). Future authors should establish which other factors contribute to greater AKL in order to best inform injury-prevention efforts.

  17. DYNAMIC SONOGRAPHY OF THE EQUINE METACARPO(TARSO)PHALANGEAL DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON SHEATH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Daria L; Rademacher, Nathalie; Riggs, Laura M; Baumruck, Rebecca A; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-11-01

    Palmar/plantar annular desmitis is a common disease that may be associated with adhesions and structures affecting the flexor tendons, which requires tenoscopy to diagnose. The purpose of this descriptive study was to develop a dynamic sonographic technique for evaluating the motion of normal equine flexor tendons in relation to the palmar/plantar annular ligament and to compare findings with horses previously diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis. Ten healthy adult horses were examined prospectively and the images of four horses diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis were retrospectively evaluated. Dynamic sonography was performed at the level of the metacarpo/metatarsophalangeal joint by maximally extending and flexing the interphalangeal joints. Palmar/plantar annular ligament thickness (mm), size of any gap between the flexor tendons, and subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the superficial digital flexor tendon were measured. The presence of gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and superficial digital flexor tendon was determined by consensus. Twenty-eight healthy control limbs (16 hind/12 fore) and four with palmar/plantar annular desmitis (3 hind/1 fore) were evaluated. Controls had unrestricted gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and flexor tendons and zero to 13° of angulation of the long linear echoes. The four affected horses had restricted gliding motion and between 20-35° angulation of the long linear echoes. Dynamic ultrasound is a feasible technique for detecting restricted flexor tendon and palmar/plantar annular ligament gliding motion, as well as subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the flexor tendon in affected horses compared with controls and warrants further investigation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has grea