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Sample records for suspension-cultured tobacco cells

  1. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  2. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles, electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases or imaging (contrast agents. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis — total protein content, thiols — reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension

  3. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis—total protein content, thiols—reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  4. Affinity Purification and Characterization of Functional Tubulin from Cell Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis and Tobacco1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Seiichi; Noguchi, Masahiro; Demura, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules assemble into several distinct arrays that play important roles in cell division and cell morphogenesis. To decipher the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics and organization of this versatile cytoskeletal component, it is essential to establish in vitro assays that use functional tubulin. Although plant tubulin has been purified previously from protoplasts by reversible taxol-induced polymerization, a simple and efficient purification method has yet to be developed. Here, we used a Tumor Overexpressed Gene (TOG) column, in which the tubulin-binding domains of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) TOG homolog are immobilized on resin, to isolate functional plant tubulin. We found that several hundred micrograms of pure tubulin can readily be purified from cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The tubulin purified by the TOG column showed high assembly competence, partly because of low levels of polymerization-inhibitory phosphorylation of α-tubulin. Compared with porcine brain tubulin, Arabidopsis tubulin is highly dynamic in vitro at both the plus and minus ends, exhibiting faster shrinkage rates and more frequent catastrophe events, and exhibits frequent spontaneous nucleation. Furthermore, our study shows that an internal histidine tag in α-tubulin can be used to prepare particular isotypes and specifically engineered versions of α-tubulin. In contrast to previous studies of plant tubulin, our mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses failed to detect posttranslational modification of the isolated Arabidopsis tubulin or detected only low levels of posttranslational modification. This novel technology can be used to prepare assembly-competent, highly dynamic pure tubulin from plant cell cultures. PMID:26747285

  5. Changes in cell wall properties coincide with overexpression of extensin fusion proteins in suspension cultured tobacco cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tan

    Full Text Available Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. These data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  6. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    of growth regulators were observed to be 3 × 10−6M indoleacetic acid (JAA) combined with 3 × 10−6M benzylaminopurin (BAP) or 10−6M 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) alone. IAA + BAP caused a 100 fold increase in fresh weight over 4 weeks at 25°C. Addition of casein hydrolysate increased growth further....... Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  7. Phosphatidylinositol species of suspension cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, S.; Wagner, K.G.

    Suspension cultured Nicotiana tabacum and Catharanthus roseus cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, the phospholipid fraction extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography. Three different solvent systems and reference compounds were used to assign the different /sup 3/H-labeled species by autoradiography. The ratio of (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into PI, PIP and PIP/sub 2/ was found to be 95:4:1; with some preparations a lyso-PI band was obtained which incorporated about a tenth of the label of the PIP band. With Catharanthus roseus cells a very faint band between PI and lyso-PI was detected which could not be assigned to a reference compound.

  8. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... This study describes the establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for use in proteomics studies. ... Key words: Sorghum, proteomics, callus, cell suspension cultures, total soluble protein, secretome. INTRODUCTION ..... system, are dynamic and heterogeneous, being com- posed of a ...

  9. Independent pathways leading to apoptotic cell death, oxidative burst and defence gene expression in response to elicitin in tobacco cell suspension culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasabe, M.; Takeuchi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ichinose, Y.; Govers, F.; Toyoda, K.; Shiraishi, T.; Yamada, T.

    2000-01-01

    We characterized pharmacologically the hypersensitive cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells that followed treatments with Escherichia coli preparations of INF1, the major secreted elicitin of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. INF1 elicitin treatments resulted in fragmentation and 180 bp

  10. Establishment and characterization of American elm cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven M. Eshita; Joseph C. Kamalay; Vicki M. Gingas; Daniel A. Yaussy

    2000-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Dutch elm disease (DED)-tolerant and DED-susceptible American elms clones have been established and characterized as prerequisites for contrasts of cellular responses to pathogen-derived elicitors. Characteristics of cultured elm cell growth were monitored by A700 and media conductivity. Combined cell growth data for all experiments within a...

  11. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Datura innoxia Mill, were successfully grown on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium with 2,4–D, NAA or BAP as growth substances, provided the micronutrient levels were reduced to 1/10. Normal amounts of micronutrients were toxic. Attempts to identify the toxic elements did...... malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  12. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... plant growth regulators on the callus induction and accumulation of condensed tannins, and (iii) determine the optimum medium and the hormone combination for cell suspension culture of E. angustifolia. This paper presents the feasibility of condensed tannins production in callus and cell culture of E.

  13. Biotransformation of Dydrogesterone by Cell Suspension Cultures of Azadirachta indica

    OpenAIRE

    KHAN, Saifullah; CHOUDHARY, Muhammad Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    Biotransformation of dydrogesterone (1) by using cell suspension cultures of Azadirachta indica yielded a metabolite 20R-hydroxy-9b ,10a-pregna-4,6-diene-3-one (2). The structure of this compound was deduced on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was the optimization of the conditions of callus and cell suspension culture of Elaeagnus angustifolia for the production of condensed tannins. The effects of different conditions on the callus growth and the production of condensed tannins were researched. The leaf tissue part of E. angustifolia was ...

  15. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of Azadirachta indica. 113. J. Biosci. 33(1), March 2008. 1. Introduction. Chemical pesticides, once considered a boon for increasing the yield of food crops, have now become a bane owing to the numerous cases of pesticide poisoning. Alternative pesticides ...

  16. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... In vitro plant regeneration was achieved from embryogenic cell suspension culture of Astragalus chrysochlorus. When 30-day-old aseptically ... previous study, cytotoxic activities of stem and root ex-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: ... For callus induction, 30-day-old mesocotyl parts of seedlings were used.

  17. Characterization of transmembrane auxin transport in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifertová, Daniela; Skůpa, Petr; Rychtář, Jan; Laňková, Martina; Pařezová, Markéta; Dobrev, Petre I; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Polar auxin transport is a crucial process for control and coordination of plant development. Studies of auxin transport through plant tissues and organs showed that auxin is transported by a combination of phloem flow and the active, carrier-mediated cell-to-cell transport. Since plant organs and even tissues are too complex for determination of the kinetics of carrier-mediated auxin uptake and efflux on the cellular level, simplified models of cell suspension cultures are often used, and several tobacco cell lines have been established for auxin transport assays. However, there are very few data available on the specificity and kinetics of auxin transport across the plasma membrane for Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells. In this report, the characteristics of carrier-mediated uptake (influx) and efflux for the native auxin indole-3-acetic acid and synthetic auxins, naphthalene-1-acetic and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acids (NAA and 2,4-D, respectively) in A. thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta suspension-cultured cells (LE line) are provided. By auxin competition assays and inhibitor treatments, we show that, similarly to tobacco cells, uptake carriers have high affinity towards 2,4-D and that NAA is a good tool for studies of auxin efflux in LE cells. In contrast to tobacco cells, metabolic profiling showed that only a small proportion of NAA is metabolized in LE cells. These results show that the LE cell line is a useful experimental system for measurements of kinetics of auxin carriers on the cellular level that is complementary to tobacco cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Study on enzymatic browning in suspension cultures of licorice cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic browning is one of the main obstacles encountered in the establishment of suspension systems of licorice cells. Browning of cells may result in decreased viability, poor growth and even death. The present study investigated the mechanism of browning reactions and the effective controlling methods. The results showed that the cell viability and membrane permeabilization obviously changed when the cells were transferred to liquid medium. The transformation caused rapid increase in the levels of polyphenol oxidase activity and in the production of polyphenols. Osmotic and hydrodynamic stresses arising from liquid culture were regarded as the major causes of enzymatic browning. Ascorbic acid and L-cysteine were found to be the most significant anti-browning agents that could decrease the degree of browning with 55.8% and 52.2%, respectively, at the end of the suspension culture's lag phase. When cultured with a cycle of 21 days, the maximum biomass of the cells cultured with ascorbic acid and L-cysteine increased with 31.1% and 26.5%, respectively, when compared to the control. These findings may be essential for the development of licorice cell cultures devoted to browning prevention and cell viability maintaining.

  19. Metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Williams, Daniel A; Xiong, Quanbo; Thornburgh, Scott

    2013-01-09

    Strobilurin fungicides are a leading class of antifungal chemicals used today in agricultural applications. Although degradation of some strobilurin fungicides has been assessed in plant residues, little information has appeared in the literature concerning the rates of metabolism of these fungicides in plants. In this study, we explored plant metabolism of three strobilurin fungicides, azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl, and trifloxystrobin, using wheat cell suspension cultures. Trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl were completely metabolized within 24 h, whereas the metabolism of azoxystrobin was relatively slow with half-lives up to 48 h depending on specific experimental conditions. Metabolic rates of these fungicides were affected by the amounts of compound and cells added to the media. Structural analysis of metabolites of trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) indicated that trifloxystrobin was first demethylated followed by subsequent hydroxylation, whereas kresoxim-methyl was largely demethylated. In contrast, a number of minor metabolites of azoxystrobin were present suggesting a differential metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cells.

  20. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    this problem, we sought an expression system in which heterologous gene expression could be induced at high levels. We selected a rice amylase expression system in which the promoter Ramy3D is induced to express recombinant protein by sucrose starvation. This induction system was found to give good yield......Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  1. Diacylglycerol Kinase from Suspension Cultured Plant Cells 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Josef B.; Wagner, Karl G.

    1992-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (adenosine 5′-triphosphate:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.107), purified from suspension cultured Catharanthus roseus cells (J Wissing, S Heim, KG Wagner [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 1546-1551), was further characterized and its subcellular location was investigated. The enzyme revealed a complex dependency on lipids and surfactants; its activity was stimulated by certain phospholipids, with phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol as the most effective species, and by deoxycholate. In the presence of Triton X-100, used for its purification, a biphasic dependency upon diacylglycerol was observed and the apparent Michaelis constant values for diacylglycerol decreased with decreasing Triton concentration. The enzyme accepted both adenosine 5′-triphosphate and guanosine 5′-triphosphate as substrate and showed rather low apparent inhibition constant values for all nucleoside diphosphates tested. Diacylglycerol kinase is an intrinsic membrane protein and no activity was found in the cytosol. An investigation of different cellular membrane fractions confirmed its location in the plasma membrane. PMID:16668739

  2. Nitration of plant apoplastic proteins from cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Wojtaszek, Przemysław

    2015-04-29

    Nitric oxide causes numerous protein modifications including nitration of tyrosine residues. This modification, though one of the greatest biological importance, is poorly recognized in plants and is usually associated with stress conditions. In this study we analyzed nitrotyrosines from suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, treated with NO modulators and exposed to osmotic stress, as well as of BY2 cells long-term adapted to osmotic stress conditions. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that the cell wall area is one of the compartments most enriched in nitrotyrosines within a plant cell. Subsequently, we analyzed nitration of ionically-bound cell-wall proteins and identified selected proteins with MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Proteomic analysis indicated that there was no significant increase in the amount of nitrated proteins under the influence of NO modulators, among them 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), considered a donor of nitrating agent, peroxynitrite. Moreover, osmotic stress conditions did not increase the level of nitration in cell wall proteins isolated from suspension cells, and in cultures long-term adapted to stress conditions; that level was even reduced in comparison with control samples. Among identified nitrotyrosine-containing proteins dominated the ones associated with carbon circulation as well as the numerous proteins responding to stress conditions, mainly peroxidases. High concentrations of nitric oxide found in the cell wall and the ability to produce large amounts of ROS make the apoplast a site highly enriched in nitrotyrosines, as presented in this paper. Analysis of ionically bound fraction of the cell wall proteins indicating generally unchanged amounts of nitrotyrosines under influence of NO modulators and osmotic stress, is noticeably different from literature data concerning, however, the total plant proteins analysis. This observation is supplemented by further nitroproteome analysis, for cells long

  3. A phytochemical study of lignans in whole plants and cell suspension cultures of Anthriscus sylvestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulman, A; Kubbinga, M.E.; Batterman, S; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Pras, N.; Woolley, J.G.; Quax, Wim

    2003-01-01

    In the roots of Anthriscus sylvestris 12 different lignans were detected. Arctigenin, dimethylmatairesinol, dimethylthujaplicatin, podophyllotoxin, 7-hydroxyyatein and 7-hydroxyanhydropodorhizol have not been previously reported to be present in A. sylvestris. In the cell suspension cultures, which

  4. Cytological changes associated with induction of anthraquinone synthesis in photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Tabata, M; Leistner, E

    1987-06-01

    Differences in subcellular structures between anthraquinone-producing and non-producing cells were investigated using photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida. Irregular or distorted plastids containing starch grains were observed in the anthraquinone-producing cells, together with a highly elongated rough endoplasmic reticulum. The possible participation of plastids and rough endoplasmic reticulum in the anthraquinone biosynthesis is discussed.

  5. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  6. Ultrastructure of paraquat-treated pine cells (Pinus elliottii Engelm. ) in suspension culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchem, R.; Henk, W.G.; Brown, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructure of liquid suspension cultures of Pinus elliottii was studied, noting characteristics of dividing and senescent cells. The cultures were treated with 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg 1/sup -1/ paraquat, an herbicide which stimulates oleoresin synthesis and resinosis in the xylem of treated pine trees. The ultrastructural effects of the toxin were studied at each paraquat concentration over a period of 24 days. The ultrastructural observations are correlated with physiological studies in suspension culture and in living trees.

  7. Extraction and Estimation of Secondary Metabolites from Date Palm Cell Suspension Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2017-01-01

    The health benefits of dates arise from their content of phytochemicals, known for having pharmacological properties, including flavonoids, carotenoids, phenolic acids, sterols, procyanidins, and anthocyanins. In vitro cell culture technology has become an attractive means for the production of biomass and bioactive compounds. This chapter describes step-by-step procedures for the induction and proliferation of callus from date palm offshoots on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with plant growth regulators. Subsequently cell suspension cultures are established for optimum biomass accumulation, based on the growth curve developed by packed cell volume as well as fresh and dry weights. The highest production of biomass occurs at the 11th week after culturing. Moreover, this chapter describes methodologies for the extraction and analysis of secondary metabolites of date palm cell suspension cultures using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum level of catechin, caffeic acid, apigenin, and kaempferol from the cell suspension cultures establishes after the 11th and 12th weeks of culture. This protocol is useful for scale-up production of secondary metabolites from date palm cell suspension cultures.

  8. Regulation of DNA synthesis and cell division by polyamines in Catharanthus roseus suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Minocha; S.C. Minocha; A. Komamine; W.C. Shortle

    1991-01-01

    Various inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis were used to study the role of polyamines in DNA synthesis and cell division in suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L) G. Don. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) was the major enzyme responsible for putrescine production. DL α-difluoromethylarginine inhibited ADC activity, cellular...

  9. Fetal calf serum-free suspension culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells employing fish serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masashi; Aizu, Yu; Shioya, Itaru; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2010-03-01

    The effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum (FS) on cell growth in a suspension culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) 1-15(500) (ATCC CRL-9606) cells were investigated. An increase in FS concentration from 1% to 4% markedly increased cell density. On the other hand, heat treatment of FS showed nearly no effect on cell density. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Suspension culture of pluripotent stem cells: effect of shear on stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin C; Rodrigues, Beatriz; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant promise, the routine usage of suspension cell culture to manufacture stem cell-derived differentiated cells has progressed slowly. Suspension culture is an innovative way of either expanding or differentiating cells and sometimes both are combined into a single bioprocess. Its advantages over static 2D culturing include a homogeneous and controllable culture environment and producing a large quantity of cells in a fraction of time. This feature makes suspension cell culture ideal for use in stem cell research and eventually ideal in the large-scale production of differentiated cells for regenerative medicine. Because of their tremendous differentiation capacities and unlimited growth properties, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in particular are considered potential sources for future cell-replacement therapies. Currently, expansion of PSCs is accomplished in 2D, which only permits a limited amount of cell growth per culture flask before cells need to be passaged. However, before stem cells can be applied clinically, several aspects of their expansion, such as directed growth, but also differentiation, need to be better controlled. This review will summarize recent advantages in suspension culture of PSCs, while at the same time highlighting current challenges.

  11. [Effects of fungal elicitor on inophyllums production in suspension cultured cells of Calophyllum inophyllum L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huan-liang; Guo, Yong; Cui, Tang-bing; Dai, Jian-guo; Zhang, Jun-song; Xu, Bai-qiu

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the effects of fungal elicitors on inophyllums production in suspension cultured cell of Calophyllum inophyllum Linn. The pathogen of leaf spot disease of C. inophyllum L. was isolated and prepared as fungal elicitor. The fungal elicitor was added to the medium with different concentrations and culture period. Their effects on biomass and inophyllums content of the suspension of cultured cells were studied. The optimum effects of S-I fungal elicitor concentrations on inophyllums content was 60 mg GE x L(-1). Adding the fungi elicitor into the cell suspension culture system at stationary phase (being cultured for 18 days) resulted in a highest inophyllum content of 59.174 mg x L(-1) at the 3rd day with 27% higher than control. Fungal elicitor treatment promoted the inophyllums accumulation in medium. Adding the Stagonospora curtisii (Berk.) Sacc. to the medium was effective approaches to enhance inophyllums yield in the suspension of C. inophyllum L culture cell.

  12. Effects of Selected Physicochemical Parameters on Zerumbone Production of Zingiber zerumbet Smith Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanom Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber zerumbet Smith is an important herb that contains bioactive phytomedicinal compound, zerumbone. To enhance cell growth and production of this useful compound, we investigated the growth conditions of cell suspension culture. Embryogenic callus generated from shoot bud was used to initiate cell suspension culture. The highest specific growth rate of cells was recorded when it was cultured in liquid Murashige and Skoog basal medium containing 3% sucrose with pH 5.7 and incubated under continuous shaking condition of 70 rpm for 16 h light and 8 h dark cycle at 24°C. Our results also revealed that the type of carbohydrate substrate, light regime, agitation speed, and incubation temperature could affect the production of zerumbone. Although the zerumbone produced in this study was not abundant compared to rhizome of Z. zerumbet, the possibility of producing zerumbone during early stage could serve as a model for subsequent improvement.

  13. Study on enzymatic browning in suspension cultures of licorice cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yali Li; Tingting Meng; Yuxi Wang; Xiaoli Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic browning is one of the main obstacles encountered in the establishment of suspension systems of licorice cells. Browning of cells may result in decreased viability, poor growth and even death. The present study investigated the mechanism of browning reactions and the effective controlling methods. The results showed that the cell viability and membrane permeabilization obviously changed when the cells were transferred to liquid medium. The transformation caused rapid increase in the...

  14. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Emine Sema; Babalik, Zehra; Hallac-Turk, Filiz; Gokturk-Baydar, Nilgun

    2014-09-23

    Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM) to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols) production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols) and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g), total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g), total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g) and trans-resveratrol (490.76 μg/100 g) were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 μg/100 g) were detected in the cell cultures collected at day 6

  15. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Sema Cetin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. RESULTS: Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g, total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g, total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g and trans-resveratrol (490.76 µg/100 g were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 µg/100 g were detected in the cell

  16. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of nutritional alteration on biomass content and azadirachtin production in cell suspensions of the elite neem variety crida-8. Variations in total nitrogen availability in the medium in terms of different ratios of nitrate:ammonium showed that the ratio 4:1 revealed a profound effect, ...

  17. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total soluble proteins (TSP) and culture filtrate (CF) proteins were extracted from the cell culture system and solubilised in urea buffer (9 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 4% CHAPS). Both onedimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gel analysis of these two proteomes show that the TSP and CF proteomes have different ...

  18. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  19. Establishment of cell suspension cultures of two Costa Rican Jatropha species (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yesenia Solís-Ramos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available J. curcas has been studied in different countries and some interesting agronomic, pharmacological and industrial properties have been reported. More recently, it has been considered an important alternative source for biofuel production. The objective of this study was to establish a long-term method for the maintenance of calli and cell suspension cultures of the local species J. curcas and J. gossypifolia, in order to allow future studies for novel compounds with pharmaceutical or industrial applications. For this, friable calli were successfully induced from hypocotyl segments of J. curcas and J. gossypifolia that were cultured in semisolid MS media supplemented with 1.5mg/L, and 0.5mg/L of 2,4-D, respectively. Cell suspension cultures of J. curcas were established using 1g of 35 and 60-day calli, in 50mL of liquid MS media supplied with 1.5mg/L of 2,4-D; sucrose and maltose were additionally evaluated as carbon sources. After 35 days, cell suspension cultures initiated with 35-day calli, showed greater cell growth with a maximum biomass of 194.9g/L fresh weight, 6.59g/L dry weight and 17.3% packed volume. The exponential phase ended at day 35 for cultures initiated with 35-day calli, and at day 21 for cultures initiated with 60-day calli. Higher biomass production was obtained with sucrose. Cell cultures were established with 35-day calli in MS media with the same 2,4-D concentration used for calli induction and 30g/L sucrose. This medium was considered optimum for the maintenance and growth of cell suspensions for both species, with sub-cultures every 20 days. The biotechnological potential for the production of bioactive compounds in these species for pharmacological, agricultural and industrial applications is being evaluated.

  20. Comparison of Cuminaldehyde Contents from Cell Suspension Cultures and Seeds of [Bunium persicum (Boiss. B. Fedtsch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara KHOSRAVINIA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The cell suspension culture and seed samples of Bunium persicum were extracted by supercritical fluid, hydrodistillation and solvent methods and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. In this study to compare the different methods of extractions, cuminaldehyde was targeted as one of the Black zira essential oil constitute. For callus induction the germinated seeds were cultured as explants on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l kinetin (treatment A as well as 2 mg/l ?-naphthalene acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l 6-benzyl aminopurine (treatment B and followed by cells suspension cultures establishment for the first time. The results of cell culture showed that cells from treatment B have a growth rate higher than A. All extracts were dissolved in 1 ml hexane and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. According to the Gas Chromatography analysis, cuminaldehyde was not detected in the supercritical fluid samples, while it was present in hydrodistillation and solvent extract. Cuminaldehyde percentage in cell and seed solvent extracts was 4.65% and 18.61% respectively. Gas Chromatography results also showed that no cuminaldehyde is present in media extracts, means no cuminaldehyde has been secreted into the medium.

  1. Five 2-(2-Phenylethylchromones from Sodium Chloride-Elicited Aquilaria sinensis Cell Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiu Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Five 2-(2-phenylethylchromones including a new one, (5S,6R,7S,8R-5,8-dichloro-6,7-dihydroxy-2-phenylethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromen-4-one (1, and four known ones (2–5, were isolated from 150 mM NaCl-elicited Aquilaria sinensis cell suspension cultures. In addition, three feruloyl amides (6–8, six nucleosides (9–14, (+-syringaresinol (15, indole-3-carboxaldehyde (16, and two glycosides (17–18 were also obtained. The structures were unambiguously identified by analysis of their UV, IR, NMR, and HRESIMS data. The absolute configuration of the new 2-(2-phenylethylchromone (1 was established by a dimolybdenum tetraacetate-induced circular dichroism experiment. Compared to un-elicited cell lines, the appearance of 2-(2-phenylethylchromones in NaCl-treated cells occurred on the 3rd and 5th days of their treatment. 2-(2-Phenylethylchromones, feruloyl amides, nucleosides, and lignins have been reported to be closely related to plant defense; therefore, the identification of these compounds from NaCl-elicited A. sinensis cell suspension cultures would be useful for further exploring the mechanism of agarwood formation.

  2. Improvement of catechin productivity in suspension cultures of tea callus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Takeishi, Junna; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2003-01-01

    In the suspension cultures of tea callus cells, C.sinensis cv. Yabukita, the effects of the culture conditions, such as culture period and light irradiation, on cell growth and catechin production were investigated. The production of flavonoids (catechins + proanthocyanidins) was promoted by inoculating the cells into the fresh medium at the culture period giving the maximum flavonoid content in the cells. The cultivation under light irradiation was repeated several times by inoculating the cells with the maximum flavonoid content. The flavonoid production was significantly increased without inhibiting the cell growth. We obtained the maximum flavonoid production, 1.5 g/dm(3) medium, and the maximum content, 150 mg/(g of dry cell weight (DCW)). The latter value was larger than that in the leaves of the tea plant.

  3. [The production of gastrodin through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension culture of Datura stramonium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jia-Shun; Ma, Wei-Peng; Pu, Jun-Xue; Xu, Shu-Guan; Zheng, Shuang-Qing; Xiao, Chun-Jie

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the production of p-hydroxymethylphenol-beta-D-glucoside (gastrodin) through biotransformation by plant cell suspension cultures. Using cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium to convert the exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin was conducted and the converted compounds were separated with a combination of multi-chromatography. Their chemical structures were determined on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical evidence. The conversion procedure of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin by Datura stramonium cell suspension cultures was established. The synthesized gastrodin (II) was isolated from the fermental liquor and identified by spectral analysis. At the same time, the p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (I) converted through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium was also isolated and identified. Two compounds were also isolated from the cell cultures and they were identified as beta-D-furanoallulose (III) and n-butyloxystyryl-beta-D-pyranoallulose (IV). Datura stramonium grown in suspension cultures can convert exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into the corresponding gastrodin.

  4. CALLUS INDUCTION AND PHYTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF Cannabis sativa CELL SUSPENSION CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Joko Raharjo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Callus of Cannabis sativa has been successfully induced from C. sativa explants and seedings. It seems that flowers are the best explant for callus induction and induction under light also give better results than induction in dark. Four cell culture lines were established from flower induced callus. Phytochemical profiles of C. sativa suspension cell cultures were investigated using HPLC and 1H-NMR. Cannabinoids and phenolic compounds related to cannabinoids such as flavonoids could not be found in the cell suspension cultures and there is no major chemical difference between the cell lines though they can visually be distinguished by their colors. Only in one cell line some aromatic compounds in the water/methanol extract could be observed in the 1H-NMR. Further investigations showed that none of these compounds are flavonoids. It seems that lack of cannabinoids in the cell cultures is related to lack of polyketide synthase activity.   Keywords: Callus, Cannabis, phytochemical

  5. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45......% at the start of the phase of rapid cell division. If the culture is continued beyond 7 days, the vacuole volume reaches 90% of cell volume by day 12.Attempts to measure relative cytoplasmic volumes by compartmental analysis of nonelectrolyte efflux were unsuccessful. The proportion of cell volume occupied...... by cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  6. Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured catharanthus roseus cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Sagishima, Kyoko; Kubota, Kaoru (Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    The Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were investigated. Substantially all the sucrose in the culture medium was hydrolyzed to glucose and fructose before being taken up by the cells. The activity of invertase bound to cell walls, determined in situ, was high at the early stage of culture. Glucose was more easily taken up by the cells than was fructose. Tracer experiments using (U-{sup 14}C)glucose and (U-{sup 14}C)fructose indicated that glucose is a better precursor for respiration than fructose, while fructose is preferentially utilized for the synthesis of sucrose, especially in the early phase of cell growth. These results suggest that fructose is utilized for the synthesis of sucrose via the reaction catalyzed by sucrose synthase, prior to the phosphorylation by hexokinase or fructokinase.

  7. Impact of fluidic agitation on human pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampe, Daniel; Joshi, Ronak; Keller, Kevin; Zur Nieden, Nicole I; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    The success of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of future cell therapies hinges, in part, on the availability of a robust and scalable culture system that can readily produce a clinically relevant number of cells and their derivatives. Stirred suspension culture has been identified as one such promising platform due to its ease of use, scalability, and widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry (e.g., CHO cell-based production of therapeutic proteins) among others. However, culture of undifferentiated hPSCs in stirred suspension is a relatively new development within the past several years, and little is known beyond empirically optimized culture parameters. In particular, detailed characterizations of different agitation rates and their influence on the propagation of hPSCs are often not reported in the literature. In the current study, we systematically investigated various agitation rates to characterize their impact on cell yield, viability, and the maintenance of pluripotency. Additionally, we closely examined the distribution of cell aggregates and how the observed culture outcomes are attributed to their size distribution. Overall, our results showed that moderate agitation maximized the propagation of hPSCs to approximately 38-fold over 7 days by keeping the cell aggregates below the critical size, beyond which the cells are impacted by the diffusion limit, while limiting cell death caused by excessive fluidic forces. Furthermore, we observed that fluidic agitation could regulate not only cell aggregation, but also expression of some key signaling proteins in hPSCs. This indicates a new possibility to guide stem cell fate determination by fluidic agitation in stirred suspension cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2109-2120. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Thiruvengadam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones (AQs and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs, media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA, and salicylic acid (SA for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM; 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  9. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-11-16

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum . We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum . The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum . This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  10. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities. PMID:27854330

  11. Jasmonic and salicylic acids enhanced phytochemical production and biological activities in cell suspension cultures of spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Thiruvengadam, Muthu

    2017-03-01

    In vitro cell suspension culture was established for the production of commercially valuable phytochemicals in Momordica dioica. The influence of elicitors in jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) increased their effect on phytochemical production and biomass accumulation in M. dioica. The results indicate that compared with non-elicited cultures, JA- and SA-elicited cell suspension cultures had significantly enhanced phenolic, flavonoid, and carotenoid production, as well as antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative activities. Furthermore, elicited cultures produced 22 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids, and hydroxybenzoic acids. Greater biomass production, phytochemical accumulation, and biological activity occurred in JA- than in SA-elicited cell cultures. This study is the first to successfully establish M. dioica cell suspension cultures for the production of phenolic compounds and carotenoids, as well as for biomass accumulation.

  12. Optimizing Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Expansion in Stirred Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shiying; Poon, Anna; Rancourt, Derrick Emile

    2017-10-10

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great hopes for application in regenerative medicine due to their inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells from the three embryonic germ layers. For clinical applications, a large quantity of hiPSCs produced in standardized and scalable culture processes is required. Several groups including ours have developed methodologies for scaled-up hiPSC production in stirred bioreactors in chemically defined medium. Here, we optimized the critical steps and factors that affect hiPSC expansion and yield in stirred suspension cultures including inoculation conditions, seeding density, aggregate size, agitation rate, and cell passaging method. After multiple passages in stirred suspension bioreactors, hiPSCs remained pluripotent, karyotypically normal, and capable of differentiating into all three germ layers.

  13. Histology of embryoid development in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songrat Tinnongjig

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryos of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. variety tenera were cultured on Eeuwens or Y3 (1976; 1978 medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-D. Calluses were initiated from these embryos. The eight-weekold calluses derived from embryos were transferred to modified Y3 liquid medium devoid of 2,4-D and supplemented with NAA, BA and coconut water to establish cell suspension culture. After a period of culture,these cells were then subcultured to the same medium without plant growth regulators to induce embryoid formation. The calluses and embryoids were harvested at various times, fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically. Histological study revealed that embryoid occurred from meristematic cells with dense cytoplasm along the callus clumps.

  14. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  15. Production and elicitation of benzalacetone and the raspberry ketone in cell suspension cultures of Rubus idaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedapudi, S; Chin, C K; Pedersen, H

    2000-01-01

    Production levels of p-coumaric acid (p-CA), p-hydroxyphenylbut-3-ene-2-one (benzalacetone), and p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butanone (raspberry ketone) were measured in raspberry cell suspension cultures to investigate metabolite dynamics in a short (two-step) pathway. Intracellular concentrations of benzalacetone and the raspberry ketone fluctuated during the time course of a normal batch culture cycle but showed higher levels during periods of rapid growth. Cells elicited with the signal coupler methyl jasmonate yielded a 2- to 3-fold increase in metabolite concentrations after 24 h. The results suggest that raspberry ketone production is rapidly inducible during periods of high carbohydrate utilization. It is not an end product, however, and undergoes conversion to subsequent metabolites.

  16. Up-scaling single cell-inoculated suspension culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harmeet; Mok, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Rahmat, Siti Norfiza Binte; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We have systematically developed single cell-inoculated suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in defined media. Cell survival was dependent on hESC re-aggregation. In the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (Ri) only approximately 44% of the seeded cells were rescued, but an optimized heat shock treatment combined with Ri significantly increased cell survival to approximately 60%. Mechanistically, our data suggest that E-cadherin plays a role in hESC aggregation and that dissociation and re-aggregation upon passaging functions as a purification step towards a pluripotency markers-enriched population. Mass expansion of hESC was readily achieved by up-scaling 2 ml cultures to serial passaging in 50 ml spinner flasks. A media comparison revealed that mTeSR was superior to KnockOut-SR in supporting cell proliferation and pluripotency. Persistent expression of pluripotency markers was achieved for two lines (hES2, hES3) that were used at higher passages (>86). In contrast, rapid down regulation of Oct4, Tra-1-60, and SSEA4 was observed for ESI049, a clinically compliant line, used at passages 20-36. The up-scaling strategy has significant potential to provide pluripotent cells on a clinical scale. Nevertheless, our data also highlights a significant line-to-line variability and the need for a critical assessment of novel methods with numerous relevant cell lines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of boron deficiency in cell suspension cultures of Populus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakegawa, Koichi; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Toshiro

    2005-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Populus alba L. (original cells) require at least 10 microM boron for appropriate growth. Using original cells we established a cell line, T-5B, which can grow in a medium containing low levels of boron (5 microM). The level of boron localized in the cell walls of T-5B cells was one-half that found in the cell walls of original cells maintained in medium containing 100 microM boron, and the level of the rhamnogalacturonan II dimer, cross-linked by a borate ester, also decreased in the former. The sugar composition of whole cell walls of the T-5B cell line was similar that of the original cells, however pectic polysaccharides composed of arabinose or galacturonic acid were easily extracted from T-5B cell walls with 50 mM trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Our results suggest that boron deficiency causes a weakening of the interaction among pectic polysaccharides due to a decrease in boron-rhamnogalacturonanII cross-linkage.

  18. Induction of linalool as a pharmaceutical and medicinal metabolite via cell suspension culture of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N; Kahrizi, D; Mansouri, M; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Khanahmadi, M; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-05-30

    Cumin is an important medicinal plant in Iran. Plant cell suspension culture is a method for the production of medicinal and secondary metabolites. The linalool is a plant secondary metabolite that has been recognized as a neuroprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salicylic acid elicitor on induction of linalool in cell suspension culture of cumin. For this purpose, the cumin seeds were prepared, to obtain sterile seedling, were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and alcohol, and were cultured on MS basal medium. This research was conducted in two separate experiments including callus induction and suspension cultures. Leaf explants were prepared from sterile seedlings and used to produce callus on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA and 0.5 mg/l BAP. In order to establish suspension culture, the appropriate calli were transferred to liquid medium. Then cell cultures were treated with elicitors. The effects of elicitor on the production of linalool secondary metabolite and cell viability were assessed by GC-Mass and tetrazolium test respectively. For this purpose, the salicylic acid (at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/l) was used. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications. The results of cell culture and GC-Mass analysis showed that salicylic acid had significant effects on the linalool production (cumin. It is necessary to determine the best combination of medium and elicitor.

  19. Guggulsterone production in cell suspension cultures of the guggul tree, Commiphora wightii, grown in shake-flasks and bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Meeta; Ramawat, K G

    2007-06-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Commiphora wightii, grown in modified MS medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (0.5 mg l(-1)) and kinetin (0.25 mg l(-1)), produced approximately 5 microg guggulsterone g(-1) dry wt. In a 2 l stirred tank bioreactor, the biomass was 5.5 g l(-1) and total guggulsterone was 36 microg l(-1).

  20. Increased podophyllotoxin production in Podophyllum hexandrum cell suspension cultures after feeding coniferyl alcohol as a β-cyclodextrin complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdenbag, H J; van Uden, W; Frijlink, H W; Lerk, C F; Pras, N; Malingré, T M

    Cell suspension cultures, derived from roots of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle (Berberidaceae), accumulate podophyllotoxin. In this study the use of β-cyclodextrin in feeding the poorly water-soluble precursor coniferyl alcohol to these cultures is described. By complexation with β-cyclodextrin, a

  1. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Flow cytometry and phytochemical analysis of a sunflower cell suspension culture in a 5-L bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Christiane; Weber, Jost; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Deponte, Sandra; Bley, Thomas; Georgiev, Milen

    2008-01-01

    A cell suspension culture of sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a producer of immunologically active polysaccharides, was cultivated in a 5-L stirred tank bioreactor, operated in batch mode. After some changes in the internal bioreactor design a stable growth of Helianthus cells was achieved and the accumulated biomass reached 15.2 g/L (only approximately 5% lower compared to the accumulated biomass in shake-flasks). Flow cytometry used for measuring the cell cycle parameters of suspended Helianthus cells did not reveal significant differences between shake-flasks and bioreactor cultivation modes. For both cultivation methods significant enhancement of the percentage of S-phase cells was observed at the beginning of the cultivation process. Concerning the metabolite production the maximum in exopolysaccharides was reached at day 9 of the cultivation period (1.9 g/L), while the highest amounts of alpha-tocopherol were accumulated at the beginning of the cultivation process (day 2 of the cultivation). These finding were related to the respective stress levels caused by the inoculation procedure. The kinetic parameters of growth and polysaccharide production as well as the time course of carbon source utilization were monitored and discussed.

  3. [Adherent and single-cell suspension culture of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in serum-free medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Zhao, Liang; Tan, Wensong

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, there are tremendous economic and social losses across the world because of virus-related diseases. It is well known that Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are easily handled, quickly amplified and efficiently infected with influenza virus. Therefore, they are considered as one of the most important cell lines for the production of influenza vaccine. In this work, we first developed a serum-free adherent culture process for MDCK cells with an in-house prepared serum-free medium MDCK-SFM. Next, we derived a cell line named ssf-MDCK, which was amenable for single-cell suspension culture in the serum-free medium. We found that during serum-free batch culture of MDCK cells, the peak viable cell density and maximum specific growth rate were 3.81 x 10(6) cells/mL and 0.056 h(-1), respectively; 3.6- and 1.6-fold increase compared with those in serum-containing adherent batch culture. In addition, we compared growth and metabolic characteristics of MDCK cells in serum-containing adherent culture, serum-free adherent culture and serum-free single-cell suspension culture. We found that less metabolic by-products were produced in both serum-free cultures. In serum-free single-cell suspension batch culture, the viable cell density was highest. These results are critical for establishing large-scale suspension culture of MDCK cells as subsequent well as large-scale influenza vaccine production.

  4. Growth arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in suspension culture using low-acyl gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Tomomi; Fujiyoshi, Masachika; Uchida, Masashi; Abe, Natsuki; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishii, Itsuko

    2017-03-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes restenosis in biomaterial vascular grafts. The purposes of this study were to establish a suspension culture system for SMCs by using a novel substrate, low-acyl gellan gum (GG) and to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition. When SMCs were cultured in suspension with GG, their proliferation was inhibited. Their viability was 70% at day 2, which was maintained at more than 50% until day 5. In contrast, the viability of cells cultured in suspension without GG was 5.6% at day 2. By cell cycle analysis, the ratio of SMCs in the S phase when cultured in suspension with GG was lower than when cultured on plastic plates. In SMCs cultured in suspension with GG, the ratio of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein to Rb protein was decreased and p27Kip1 expression was unchanged in comparison with SMCs cultured on plastic plates. In addition, SMCs could be induced to proliferate again by changing the culture condition from suspension with GG to plastic plates. These results suggest that our established culturing method for SMCs is useful to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition with high viability.

  5. Controlling Expansion and Cardiomyogenic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Scalable Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Kempf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To harness the potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, an abundant supply of their progenies is required. Here, hPSC expansion as matrix-independent aggregates in suspension culture was combined with cardiomyogenic differentiation using chemical Wnt pathway modulators. A multiwell screen was scaled up to stirred Erlenmeyer flasks and subsequently to tank bioreactors, applying controlled feeding strategies (batch and cyclic perfusion. Cardiomyogenesis was sensitive to the GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021 concentration, whereas the aggregate size was no prevailing factor across culture platforms. However, in bioreactors, the pattern of aggregate formation in the expansion phase dominated subsequent differentiation. Global profiling revealed a culture-dependent expression of BMP agonists/antagonists, suggesting their decisive role in cell-fate determination. Furthermore, metallothionein was discovered as a potentially stress-related marker in hPSCs. In 100 ml bioreactors, the production of 40 million predominantly ventricular-like cardiomyocytes (up to 85% purity was enabled that were directly applicable to bioartificial cardiac tissue formation.

  6. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelliah Jayabaskaran

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc and strictosidine synthase (Str. In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated. Results Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3–4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s, Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed.

  7. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Shilpa; Chelliah, Jayabaskaran

    2007-01-01

    Background Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) and strictosidine synthase (Str). In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated. Results Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3–4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s), Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed. PMID:17988378

  8. Treatment strategies for high resveratrol induction in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu V. Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioprocesses capable of producing large scales of resveratrol at nutraceutical grade are in demand. This study herein investigated treatment strategies to induce the production of resveratrol in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures. Among seven investigated elicitors, jasmonic acid (JA, salicylic acid, β-glucan (GLU, and chitosan enhanced the production of intracellular resveratrol manyfold. The combined treatment of JA and GLU increased extracellular resveratrol production by up to tenfold. The application of Amberlite XAD-7 resin for in situ removal and artificial storage of secreted resveratrol further increased resveratrol production by up to four orders of magnitude. The level of resveratrol produced in response to the combined treatment with 200 g/L XAD-7, 10 μM JA and 1 mg/mL GLU was approximately 2400 mg/L, allowing the production of resveratrol at an industrial scale. The high yield of resveratrol is due to the involvement of a number of mechanisms working in concert.

  9. Design of serum-free medium for suspension culture of CHO cells on the basis of general commercial media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Hideo; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2015-08-01

    The design of serum-free media for suspension culture of genetically engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using general commercial media as a basis was investigated. Subcultivation using a commercial serum-free medium containing insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 with or without FCS necessitated additives other than IGF-1 to compensate for the lack of FCS and improve cell growth. Suspension culture with media containing several combinations of growth factors suggested the effectiveness of addition of both IGF-1 and the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) for promoting cell growth. Subcultivation of CHO cells in suspension culture using the commercial serum-free medium EX-CELL™302, which contained an IGF-1 analog, supplemented with LPA resulted in gradually increasing specific growth rate comparable to the serum-containing medium and in almost the same high antibody production regardless of the number of generations. The culture with EX-CELL™302 supplemented with LPA in a jar fermentor with pH control at 6.9 showed an apparently higher cell growth rate than the cultures without pH control and with pH control at 6.8. The cell growth in the medium supplemented with aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), which was much cheaper than IGF-1, in combination with LPA was synergistically promoted similarly to that in the medium supplemented with IGF-1 and LPA. In conclusion, the serum-free medium designed on the basis of general commercial media could support the growth of CHO cells and antibody production comparable to serum-containing medium in suspension culture. Moreover, the possibility of cost reduction by the substitution of IGF-1 with ATA was also shown.

  10. Abscisic acid is involved in brassinosteroids-induced chilling tolerance in the suspension cultured cells from Chorispora bungeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajie; Jiang, Haifeng; Zhao, Zhiguang; An, Lizhe

    2011-06-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether abscisic acid (ABA), a second messenger in chilling stress responses, is involved in brassinosteroids (BRs)-induced chilling tolerance in suspension cultured cells from Chorispora bungeana. The suspension cells were treated with 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), ABA, ABA biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone (Flu) and EBR in combination with Flu. Their effects on chilling tolerance, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense system were analyzed. The results showed that EBR treatment markedly alleviated the decrease of cell viability and the increases of ion leakage and lipid peroxidation induced by chilling stress, suggesting that application of EBR could improve the chilling tolerance of C. bungeana suspension cultures. In addition, similar results were observed when exogenous ABA was applied. Treatment with Flu alone and in combination with EBR significantly suppressed cell viability and increased ion leakage and lipid peroxidation under low temperature conditions, indicating that the inhibition of ABA biosynthesis could decrease the chilling tolerance of C. bungeana suspension cultures and the EBR-enhanced chilling tolerance. Further analyses showed that EBR and ABA enhanced antioxidant defense and slowed down the accumulation of ROS caused by chilling. However, Flu application differentially blocked these protective effects of EBR. Moreover, EBR was able to mimic the effect of ABA by markedly increasing ABA content in the suspension cells under chilling conditions, whereas the EBR-induced ABA accumulation was inhibited by the addition of Flu. Taken together, these results demonstrate that EBR may confer chilling tolerance to C. bungeana suspension cultured cells by enhancing the antioxidant defense system, which is partially mediated by ABA, resulting in preventing the overproduction of ROS to alleviate oxidative injury induced by chilling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Dipto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX, the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level.

  12. A novel terpenoid indole alkaloid derived from catharanthine via biotransformation by suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuijie; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Zhou, Pengfei; Liang, Jincai; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    Although catharanthine (1) is well known as a biosynthetic precursor of the anticancer alkaloid, vinblastine, its alternative metabolic pathways are unclear. Biotransformation of 1 by suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus gave a new oxidative-cleavage product (2). The structure of 2 was determined as 3-hydroxy-4-imino-catharanthine by spectroscopic methods. Maximum conversion (9.75 %) of 2 was observed after 120 h adding 6 mg of 1/100 ml to 12-day-old suspension-cultured cells of C. roseus. Furthermore, qRT-PCR experiment was performed to reveal the effect of 1 on the expression of the genes in the biosynthetic pathway of TIA 1 up-regulated the transcript level of D4H whilst down-regulating the transcript levels of G10H, LAMT, GES, and IRS. A new metabolite of catharanthine, 3-hydroxy-4-imino-catharanthine, is reported.

  13. Culture medium refinement by dialysis for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman Chandra; Nagamori, Eiji; Horie, Masanobu; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) secrete essential autocrine factors that are removed along with toxic metabolites when the growth medium is exchanged daily. In this study, after determining the minimum inhibitory level of lactic acid for hiPSCs, a medium refining system was constructed by which toxic metabolites were removed from used culture medium and autocrine factors as well as other growth factors were recycled. Specifically, about 87 % of the basic fibroblast growth factor and 80 % of transforming growth factor beta 1 were retained in the refined medium after dialysis. The refined medium efficiently potentiated the proliferation of hiPS cells in adherent culture. When the refining system was used to refresh medium in suspension culture, a final cell density of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 106 cells mL-1 was obtained, with 99.5 ± 0.2 % OCT 3/4 and 78.3 ± 1.1 % TRA-1-60 expression, on day 4 of culture. These levels of expression were similar to those observed in the conventional suspension culture. With this method, culture medium refinement by dialysis was established to remove toxic metabolites, recycle autocrine factors as well as other growth factors, and reduce the use of macromolecules for the expansion of hiPSCs in suspension culture.

  14. Isolation and culture of protoplasts of Ma-phut (Garcinia dulcis derived from cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Te-chato

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Friable callus induced from young leaves of Ma-phut on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 3% sucrose,1 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, 0.5 mg/l benzyladenine (BA and 500 mg/l polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, was cultured in liquid medium with the same components. Various ages of cell suspension at weekly intervals were then incubated in various kinds and concentrations of cell wall digestion enzymes combined with 1% macerozyme R-10 on a rotary shaker at 100 rpm under 1500 lux illumination at 26±4oC. Purified protoplasts were cultured at various densities in MS medium (adjusted osmoticum to 0.4 M by mannitol supplemented with 3% sucrose and two types of auxin, 2,4-D and NAA at four concentrations (1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/l together with 1 mg/l BA. The results revealed that a four-day old cell suspension culture incubated in 2% cellulase Onozuka R-10 (CR10 in combination with 1% macerozyme R-10 gave an optimum result in both yield and viability of protoplasts at 5.7x106/1 ml PCV and 80%, respectively. Embedding protoplasts at a density of 2.5x105/ml in 0.2% phytagel containing MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/l NAA and 1 mg/l BA promoted the most effective division of the protoplasts (20%. The first division of the protoplasts was obtained after 2 days of culture and further divisions to form micro- and macro-colonies could be observed after 7-10 days of culture. However, callusformation and plantlet regeneration was not obtained.

  15. Alternative formation of anthraquinones and lipoquinones in heterotrophic and photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbavboa, U; Sieweke, H J; Leistner, E; Röwer, I; Hüsemann, W; Barz, W

    1985-12-01

    Photoheterotrophic and photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures were raised from a callus tissue derived from a Morinda lucida Benth. plant (Rubiaceae). The cultures were characterized with regard to fresh weight, dry weight, cell number, pH, chlorophyll and quinoid natural products. The amount of lipoquinones (phylloquinone, α-tocopherol, plastoquinone, ubiquinone) isolated from the photoautotrophic cultures matched the amount detected in an intact leaf. Anthraquinone glycosides which are found in the roots of Morinda plants were not present in the photoautotrophic culture. The photoheterotrophic culture contained only trace amounts of these pigments. Abundant anthraquinone synthesis was observed when photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic suspension cultures were transferred into darkness, provided sucrose was present in the medium. Induction of synthesis of anthraquinone pigments coincided with a rapid disappearance of lipoquinones from the culture. Thus, in the suspension culture, photoautotrophy correlates with lipoquinone synthesis and heterotrophy correlates with anthraquinone synthesis. This reflects the situation in the intact plants where lipoquinones are chloroplast-associated whereas anthraquinones occur in the roots.

  16. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. (Hangzhou Univ. (China)); Cullen, W.R. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls.

  18. Changes of Respiration Activities in Cells of Winter Wheat and Sugar Cane Suspension Cultures During Programmed Cell Death Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Process of cell death in suspension cultures of winter wheat and sugar cane under high (50 °С and negative (-8 °С temperature treatment has been studied. It has been shown, that programmed cell death (PCD process caused by the negative temperature in the culture of winter wheat was noted for slow rate of realization and it was carried out for 10 days. It has been state that rate of cell respiration was significantly higher than in the control culture. At the same time PCD processes induced by the high temperature in the culture of sugar cane and winter wheat and by the negative temperature in the culture of sugar cane realized for 24-48 h and was accompanied by graduate decrease of respiration activities. We can conclude that the main reason of PCD processes realization differences was a different level of respiration metabolism resistance to high and negative temperatures action.

  19. Immune suppression of human lymphoid tissues and cells in rotating suspension culture and onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Chen, Silvia; Walz, Carl; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses of human lymphoid tissue explants or cells isolated from this tissue were studied quantitatively under normal gravity and microgravity. Microgravity was either modeled by solid body suspension in a rotating, oxygenated culture vessel or was actually achieved on the International Space Station (ISS). Our experiments demonstrate that tissues or cells challenged by recall antigen or by polyclonal activator in modeled microgravity lose all their ability to produce antibodies and cytokines and to increase their metabolic activity. In contrast, if the cells were challenged before being exposed to modeled microgravity suspension culture, they maintained their responses. Similarly, in microgravity in the ISS, lymphoid cells did not respond to antigenic or polyclonal challenge, whereas cells challenged prior to the space flight maintained their antibody and cytokine responses in space. Thus, immune activation of cells of lymphoid tissue is severely blunted both in modeled and true microgravity. This suggests that suspension culture via solid body rotation is sufficient to induce the changes in cellular physiology seen in true microgravity. This phenomenon may reflect immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space flights. If so, the ex vivo system described above can be used to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction. PMID:19609626

  20. Effect of heavy metal treatments on metallothionein expression profiles in white poplar (Populus alba L. cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca MACOVEI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Populus species and hybrids are intensively cultivated as sources of woody biomass and are good candidates for phytoremediation because of their rapid growth rate, extensive root system and ease of propagation and transformation. To date, the molecular mechanisms that regulate heavy metal tolerance have not been fully investigated. In the present work, white poplar (Populus alba L. cell suspension cultures were used as model system to investigate the response to heavy metal treatments. The VFMT2 cDNA, encoding a type 2 metallothionein from P. alba, was isolated by RT-PCR approach. The expression profiles of the VFMT2 gene were then investigated by Quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR under oxidative stress conditions. The latter were induced by exposing the cell suspension cultures to different doses of cadmium (75 and 150 μM CdSO4, copper (50 and 100 μM CuCl2 and zinc (1 and 2 mM ZnSO4. Cell death was evidenced by Evans blue staining. The VFMT2 gene was up-regulated in response to heavy metal treatments and the highest mRNA level (up to 5-fold was observed 4 h following exposure to 100 μM CuCl2.

  1. Partially acetylated chitosan oligo- and polymers induce an oxidative burst in suspension cultured cells of the gymnosperm Araucaria angustifolia.

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    dos Santos, André Luis Wendt; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Trombotto, Stéphane; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria

    2008-12-01

    Suspension-cultured cells were used to analyze the activation of defense responses in the conifer A. angustifolia , using as an elicitor purified chitosan polymers of different degrees of acetylation (DA 1-69%), chitin oligomers of different degrees of polymerization (DP 3-6), and chitosan oligomer of different DA (0-91%). Suspension cultured cells elicited with chitosan polymers reacted with a rapid and transient generation of H2O2, with chitosans of high DA (60 and 69%) being the most active ones. Chitosan oligomers of high DA (78 and 91%) induced substantial levels of H2O2, but fully acetylated chitin oligomers did not. When cultivated for 24-72 h in the presence of 1-10 microg mL(-1) chitosan (DA 69%), cell cultures did not show alterations in the levels of enzymes related to defense responses, suggesting that, in A. angustifolia , the induction of an oxidative burst is not directly coupled to the induction of other defense reactions.

  2. Serum-Free Suspension Culture of MDCK Cells for Production of Influenza H1N1 Vaccines.

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    Huang, Ding; Peng, Wen-Juan; Ye, Qian; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Xia-Hou, Kang; Jia, Han-Jing; Luo, Jian; Zhou, Lin-Ting; Li, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shi-Lei; Xu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Ze; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Development of serum-free suspension cell culture processes is very important for influenza vaccine production. Previously, we developed a MDCK suspension cell line in a serum-free medium. In the present study, the growth kinetics of suspension MDCK cells and influenza virus production in the serum-free medium were investigated, in comparison with those of adherent MDCK cells in both serum-containing and serum-free medium. It was found that the serum-free medium supported the stable subculture and growth of both adherent and suspension cells. In batch culture, for both cell lines, the growth kinetics in the serum-free medium was comparable with those in the serum-containing medium and a commercialized serum-free medium. In the serum-free medium, peak viable cell density (VCD), haemagglutinin (HA) and median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) titers of the two cell lines reached 4.51×106 cells/mL, 2.94Log10(HAU/50 μL) and 8.49Log10(virions/mL), and 5.97×106 cells/mL, 3.88Log10(HAU/50 μL), and 10.34Log10(virions/mL), respectively. While virus yield of adherent cells in the serum-free medium was similar to that in the serum-containing medium, suspension culture in the serum-free medium showed a higher virus yield than adherent cells in the serum-containing medium and suspension cells in the commercialized serum-free medium. However, the percentage of infectious viruses was lower for suspension culture in the serum-free medium. These results demonstrate the great potential of this suspension MDCK cell line in serum-free medium for influenza vaccine production and further improvements are warranted.

  3. Relationships between hydroxyproline-containing proteins secreted into the cell wall and medium by suspension-cultured Acer psedoplatanus cells

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    Pope, D.G.

    1977-05-01

    The pathway of hydroxyproline-containing proteins to the cell wall and to the growth medium in suspension-cultured Acer pseudoplatanus cells is traced by following the kinetics of the transfer of protein-bound /sup 14/C-hydroxyproline into various fractions, and by comparing the hydroxyproline-arabinoside profiles of these fractions after alkaline hydrolysis. Hydroxyproline-rich protein passes directly from a membrane-bound compartment in the cytoplasm to the cell wall, not via an intermediate salt-soluble pool in the wall. There are at least three hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins in the cell wall. One which possesses mono-, tri-, and tetraarabinoside side chains accounts for over 90% of the total hydroxyproline. This glycoprotein is ''extensin.'' The hydroxyproline-containing proteins secreted into the medium have a glycosylation pattern markedly different from that of the major cell wall glycoprotein. It appears that there is little or no wall-like extensin in the medium. Approximately half of the protein-bound hydroxyproline secreted into the medium is linked to an arabinogalactan. This linkage is also found in a particulate wall protein precursor fraction from the cytoplasm, but only trace amounts can be detected in the cell wall.

  4. Detection of Changes in the Medicago sativa Retinoblastoma-Related Protein (MsRBR1) Phosphorylation During Cell Cycle Progression in Synchronized Cell Suspension Culture.

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    Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kotogány, Edit; Ábrahám, Edit; Horváth, Gábor V

    2017-01-01

    Deepening our knowledge on the regulation of the plant cell division cycle depends on techniques that allow for the enrichment of cell populations in defined cell cycle phases. Synchronization of cell division can be achieved using different plant tissues; however, well-established cell suspension cultures provide large amount of biological sample for further analyses. Here, we describe the methodology of the establishment, propagation, and analysis of a Medicago sativa suspension culture that can be used for efficient synchronization of the cell division. A novel 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based method is used for the estimation of cell fraction that enters DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle and we also demonstrate the changes in the phosphorylation level of Medicago sativa retinoblastoma-related protein (MsRBR1) during cell cycle progression.

  5. Optimization of BY-2 cell suspension culture medium for the production of a human antibody using a combination of fractional factorial designs and the response surface method.

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    Vasilev, Nikolay; Grömping, Ulrike; Lipperts, Anja; Raven, Nicole; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a strategy for the optimization of plant cell suspension culture media using a combination of fractional factorial designs (FFDs) and response surface methodology (RSM). This sequential approach was applied to transformed tobacco BY-2 cells secreting a human antibody (M12) into the culture medium, in an effort to maximize yields. We found that the nutrients KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂ and the hormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) had the most significant impact on antibody accumulation. The factorial screening revealed strong interactions within the nutrients group (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂) and also individually between 2,4-D and three other components (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and BAP). The RSM design resulted in a fivefold increase in the antibody concentration after 5 days and a twofold reduction in the packed cell volume (PCV). Longer cultivation in the optimized medium led to the further accumulation of antibody M12 in the culture medium (up to 107 μg/mL, day 10). Because the packed cell volume was reduced in the optimized medium, this enhanced the overall yield by 20-fold (day 7) and 31-fold (day 10) compared to the conventional MS medium. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Simple suspension culture system of human iPS cells maintaining their pluripotency for cardiac cell sheet engineering.

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    Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a simple three-dimensional (3D) suspension culture method for the expansion and cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is reported. The culture methods were easily adapted from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D culture without any additional manipulations. When hiPSCs were directly applied to 3D culture from 2D in a single-cell suspension, only a few aggregated cells were observed. However, after 3 days, culture of the small hiPSC aggregates in a spinner flask at the optimal agitation rate created aggregates which were capable of cell passages from the single-cell suspension. Cell numbers increased to approximately 10-fold after 12 days of culture. The undifferentiated state of expanded hiPSCs was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, and the hiPSCs differentiated into three germ layers. When the hiPSCs were subsequently cultured in a flask using cardiac differentiation medium, expression of cardiac cell-specific genes and beating cardiomyocytes were observed. Furthermore, the culture of hiPSCs on Matrigel-coated dishes with serum-free medium containing activin A, BMP4 and FGF-2 enabled it to generate robust spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes and these cells expressed several cardiac cell-related genes, including HCN4, MLC-2a and MLC-2v. This suggests that the expanded hiPSCs might maintain the potential to differentiate into several types of cardiomyocytes, including pacemakers. Moreover, when cardiac cell sheets were fabricated using differentiated cardiomyocytes, they beat spontaneously and synchronously, indicating electrically communicative tissue. This simple culture system might enable the generation of sufficient amounts of beating cardiomyocytes for use in cardiac regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Recombinant human IGF-1 produced by transgenic plant cell suspension culture enhances new bone formation in calvarial defects.

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    Poudel, Sher Bahadur; Bhattarai, Govinda; Kook, Sung-Ho; Shin, Yun-Ji; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Lee, Seung-Youp; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2017-10-01

    Transgenic plant cell suspension culture systems have been utilized extensively as convenient and efficient expression systems for the production of recombinant human growth factors. We produced insulin-like growth factor-1 using a plant suspension culture system (p-IGF-1) and explored its effect on new bone formation in calvarial defects. We also compared the bone regenerating potential of p-IGF-1 with commercial IGF-1 derived from Escherichia coli (e-IGF-1). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent calvarial defect surgery, and the defects were loaded with absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) only (ACS group) or ACS impregnated with 13μg of p-IGF-1 (p-IGF-1 group) or e-IGF-1 (e-IGF-1 group). The sham group did not receive any treatment with ACS or IGFs after surgery. Live μCT and histological analyses showed critical-sized bone defects in the sham group, whereas greater bone formation was observed in the p-IGF-1 and e-IGF-1 groups than the ACS group both 5 and 10weeks after surgery. Bone mineral density, bone volume, and bone surface values were also higher in the IGF groups than in the ACS group. Local delivery of p-IGF-1 or e-IGF-1 more greatly enhanced the expression of osteoblast-specific markers, but inhibited osteoclast formation, in newly formed bone compared with ACS control group. Specifically, p-IGF-1 treatment induced higher expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in the defect site than did e-IGF-1. Furthermore, treatment with p-IGF-1, but not e-IGF-1, increased mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells, with the attendant upregulation of osteogenic marker genes. Collectively, our findings suggest the potential of p-IGF-1 in promoting the processes required for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

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    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie L. Long; Walter C. Shortle

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminum (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic...

  9. Cell death induction and nitric oxide biosynthesis in white poplar (Populus alba) suspension cultures exposed to alfalfa saponins.

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    Balestrazzi, Alma; Agoni, Valentina; Tava, Aldo; Avato, Pinarosa; Biazzi, Elisa; Raimondi, Elena; Macovei, Anca; Carbonera, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    The present work reports on the biological activity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) saponins on white poplar (Populus alba, cultivar 'Villafranca') cell suspension cultures. The extracts from alfalfa roots, aerial parts and seeds were characterized for their saponin content by means of thin layer chromatography (TLC) and electrospray ionisation coupled to mass spectrometry. The quantitative saponin composition from the different plant extracts was determined considering the aglycone moieties and determined by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses. Only soyasapogenin I was detected in the seed extract while several other saponins were found in the root and leaf extracts. Actively proliferating white poplar cell cultures were challenged with the different saponin extracts. Only alfalfa root saponins, at 50 µg ml⁻¹, induced significant cell death rates (75.00 ± 4.90%). Different cell subpopulations with peculiar cell death morphologies were observed and the programmed cell death (PCD)/necrosis ratio was reduced at increasing saponin concentrations. Enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) production was observed in white poplar cells treated with root saponins (RSs) at 50 µg ml⁻¹ and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the culture medium was also demonstrated. Saponin-induced NO production was sensitive to sodium azide and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, two specific inhibitors of distinct pathways for NO biosynthesis in plant cells. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  10. Comparison of the Production of Recombinant Protein in Suspension Culture of CHO Cells in Spinner Flask and Shake Flask System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N.Z Zainul Abidin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells have been most widely used as the production host for the commercial production of biopharmaceuticals product. They have been extensively studied and developed, and today provide a stable platform for producing monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. This study was focusing on comparison of suspension culture system by using spinner flask and shake flask for the growth and production of recombinant protein in CHO cell line. The CHO cells were transfected with an expression of DNA plasmid containing lac Z gene which codes for β-galactosidase. The recombinant genes in these CHO cells and the β-galactosidase expressing cells were adapted to suspension culture. The agitation speed for both spinner and shake flask were adjusted accordingly. The experiments were carried out in duplicate and samples were taken for cell count, determination of glucose consumption, lactate production and protein level by using biochemical assay. The result showed that, the cell growth in spinner flask is more favorable then in shake flask. The cell concentration in spinner flask is 58% higher than in shake flask. On the other hand, specific activity of β-galactosidase is 25% higher in spinner flask compared to shake flask, at the same agitation speed.ABSTRAK: Sel ovari hamster China (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO digunakan secara meluas dalam hos pembiakan untuk tujuan komersil produk biofarmaseutikal. Ia telah dikaji dan dibangunkan secara ekstensif, dan kini ia menyediakan landasan yang stabil untuk penghasilan antibodi monoklon dan protein rekombinan. Kajian ini memfokuskan tentang penghasilan protein rekombinan menggunakan kultur ampaian sel CHO di dalam kelalang putar dan kelalang goncang. Sel CHO dimasukkan dengan plasmid DNA yang mengandungi gen lac Z yang juga memberikan kod untuk β-galaktosidase. Sel CHO β-galaktosidase-terungkap dimasukkan ke dalam kultur ampaian. Kelajuan agitasi untuk kedua-dua kelalang putar

  11. Interaction between abscisic acid and nitric oxide in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures.

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    Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Lu, Li; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Yu, Qin; Xu, Hongke; Yang, Fengxia; Fu, Mengna; Li, Shengchao; Wang, Huizhong; Xu, Maojun

    2013-01-01

    Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy to improve production of secondary metabolites of plant cell cultures. However, mechanisms responsible for the elicitor-induced production of secondary metabolites of plant cells have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we report that treatment of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures with PB90, a protein elicitor from Phytophthora boehmeriae, induced rapid increases of abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO), subsequently followed by the enhancement of catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc, two important genes in catharanthine biosynthesis. PB90-induced catharanthine production and the gene expression were suppressed by the ABA inhibitor and NO scavenger respectively, showing that ABA and NO are essential for the elicitor-induced catharanthine biosynthesis. The relationship between ABA and NO in mediating catharanthine biosynthesis was further investigated. Treatment of the cells with ABA triggered NO accumulation and induced catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc. ABA-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions were suppressed by the NO scavenger. Conversely, exogenous application of NO did not stimulate ABA generation and treatment with ABA inhibitor did not suppress NO-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions. Together, the results showed that both NO and ABA were involved in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that ABA acted upstream of NO in the signaling cascade leading to PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. Elicitation of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) cell suspension culture for enhancement of inulin production and altered degree of polymerisation.

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    Ma, Chunquan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Haitao; Han, Dongming; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures have emerged as a potential source of secondary metabolites for food additives and pharmaceuticals. In this study inulin accumulation and its degree of polymerisation (DP) in the treated cells in the same medium were investigated after treatment with six types of elicitors. An in vitro cell suspension culture of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) was optimised by adding an extra nitrogen source. According to the growth kinetics, a maximum biomass of 5.48 g L -1 was obtained from the optimal cell suspension medium consisted of Murashige and Skoog basic medium (MS) + 1.0 mg L -1 α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) + 1.0 mg L -1 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) + 0.5 mg L -1 proline + 1.0 mg L -1 glutamine. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA, 250 µmol L -1 ) treatment for 15 days led to the highest levels of inulin (2955.27 ± 9.81 mg L -1 compared to control of 1217.46 ± 0.26 mg L -1 ). The elicited effect of five elicitors to the suspension cells of Jerusalem artichoke is as follows: AgNO 3 (Ag, 10 µmol L -1 ), salicylic acid (SA, 75 µmol L -1 ), chitosan (KJT, 40 mg L -1 ), Trichoderma viride (Tv, 90 mg L -1 ), yeast extract (YE, 0.25 mg L -1 ), and the corresponding content of inulin is increased by 2.05-, 1.93-, 1.76-, 1.44- and 1.18-fold compared to control, respectively. The obvious effect on the percentage of lower DP in inulin was observed in cells treated with 40 mg L -1 KJT, 0.25 mg L -1 YE and 10 µmol L -1 Ag. Among the six types of elicitors, the descending order of inulin content is MeJA > Ag > SA > KJT > Tv > YE. For the purpose inulin with lower DP and its application to prebiotic food, three elicitors, including KJT, YE and Ag, can be used for the elicitation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

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    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Accumulation of ixerin F and activities of some terpenoid bisynthetic enzymes in a cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L.

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    Anna Stojakowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L. (Asteraceae, tribe Lactuceae is capable of synthesizing sesquiterpene lactones of which ixerin F is the main compound. The culture was characterized on growth (by dissimilation rates, on ixerin F accumulation (by RP-HPLC and on some enzyme activities involved in early steps of terpenoid biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (AACT, E.C. 2.3.1.9 and 3S-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS, E.C. 4.13.5 activities of the cells were assayed spectrophotometrically. HMGS activity increased during the culture period and reached a maximum during the stationary phase (190 pkat/mg protein, while AACT showed relatively high level of activity throughout the growth cycle, with transient decrease at the logarithmic growth phase and the beginning of stationary phase. Ixerin F accumulated inside the cells and the maximum concentration of 0.08% (on dry weight basis was found in the early stationary phase of the growth cycle of the culture.

  15. Role of Changes in Cell Fatty Acids Composition in the Increasing of Frost Resistance of Winter Wheat Suspension Culture

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    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Influences of low temperatures (4 and 8 ° С on the frost tolerance and fatty acid compositions of cells in a winter wheat suspension culture have been studied. It has been found that treatment of the culture with 4 °C (7 days did not protect cells from subsequent freezing temperature action (-8 °С, 6 h and was not accompanied significant changes in the fatty acid composition. On the contrary, the treatment of the culture with the temperature 8 °C (7 days prevented the death caused by freezing temperature and the content of saturated fatty acids decreased: pentadecanoic acid (by 35,0%, palmitic acid (by 19,9% and stearic acid (by 65,4%, and the content of α-linolenic acid increased by 94%. That was the cause of the double bond index (DBI increase by 16%. The role of fatty acids composition changes in the process of increasing frost tolerance in plants are discussed.

  16. Enhanced extracellular production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells by using cyclodextrins and coronatine.

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    Almagro, Lorena; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, María A

    2015-12-01

    In the present work the effect of cyclodextrin and coronatine on both trans-resveratrol production and the expression of stilbene biosynthetic genes in Vitis vinifera L. cv Monastrell suspension cultured cells were evaluated. The results showed the maximum level of trans-resveratrol produced by cells and secreted to the culture medium with 50 mM cyclodextrins and 1 μM coronatine. Since the levels of trans-resveratrol produced in the combined treatment were higher than the sum of the individual treatments, a synergistic effect between both elicitors was assumed. In addition, all the analysed genes were induced by cyclodextrins and/or coronatine. The expression of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase and stilbene synthase genes was greatly enhanced by coronatine although an increase in the amount of trans-resveratrol in the spent medium was not detected. Therefore, despite the fact that trans-resveratrol production is related with the expression of genes involved in the biosynthetic process, other factors may be involved, such as post-transcriptional and post-traductional regulation. The expression maximal levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase genes were found with cyclodextrins alone or in combination with coronatine suggesting that the activity of these enzymes could be not only important for the formation of intermediates of trans-R biosynthesis but also for those intermediates involved in the biosynthesis of lignins and/or flavonoids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of use of Vero cell line and suspension culture of murine macrophage to attenuation of virulence of Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadmehr, Monireh; Namavari, Mehdi; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Mansourian, Maryam; Rahimian, Abdollah; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2013-10-01

    In this study the tachyzoite yields of Neospora caninum were compared in two cell lines: Vero (African Green Monkey Kidney) and suspension culture of murine macrophage (J774) cell lines. Then, N. caninum were continuously passaged in these cell lines for 3 months and the effect of host cells on virulence of tachyzoites was assessed by broiler chicken embryonated eggs. Inoculation was performed in the chorioallantoic (CA) liquid of the embryonated eggs with different dilutions (0.5 × 10(4), 1.0 × 10(4), 1.5 × 10(4)) of tachtzoites isolated from these cell cultures. The mortality pattern and pathological changes of the dead embryos and hatched chickens were noted. Tissue samples of brain, liver and heart were examined by histopathological and detection of DNA of parasite by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also, consecutive sections of the tissues examined histologically were used for immunohistochemical (IHC) examination. Embryos inoculated with tachyzoites derived from Vero cell line (group V) showed a higher mortality rate (100%) than the embryos that received tachyzoites derived from J774 cell line (group J) (10% mortality rate). The results of this study indicated that the culture of N. caninum in J774 cell led to a marked increase in the number of tachyzoite yields and rapid attenuation in comparison to Vero, so the results were confirmed by IHC and PCR. This study is the first report of the significant effect of host cell on the attenuation of virulence of N. caninum tachyzoites. These findings could potentially provide a practical approach in the mass production of N. caninum tachyzoites, and also in producing live attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment and characterization of a Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) cell suspension culture: a new in vitro source of rosmarinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraroo, Amir; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein; Corchete, Purificación; Babalar, Mesbah; Fattahi Moghadam, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    An in vitro approach to the production of rosmarinic acid (RA), a medicinally important caffeic acid ester, in a cell suspension culture (CSC) of Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) has been investigated for the first time. The CSC was established from friable calli derived from shoot tip explants in Gamborg's B5 liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/L sucrose, 20 mg/L L-glutamine, 200 mg/L casein hydrolysate, 5 mg/L benzyladenine (BA) and 1 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The effect of nitrogen source (KNO3 and (NH4)2SO4) and their different concentrations on the fresh and dry weight (g/L), as well as RA content (mg/g dry weight) were measured. CSC growth measurements indicated a maximum specific cell growth rate of 1.5/day, a doubling time of 7.6 days and a high percentage of cell viability (96.4 %) throughout the growth cycle. Maximum cell fresh weight (353.5 g/L), dry weight (19.7 g/L) and RA production (180.0 mg/g) were attained at day 21 of culture. Cell growth and RA content were affected by nitrogen deficiency. Media containing 8.3 mM of total nitrogen (¼ of B5 standard medium) led to a minimum cell fresh weight (243.0 g/L), dry weight (17.4 g/L) and RA content (38.0 mg/g) after 21 days. The established CSC provided useful material for further optimization experiments aimed at a large-scale production of RA.

  19. Adaption of FMDV Asia-1 to Suspension Culture: Cell Resistance Is Overcome by Virus Capsid Alterations

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    Dill, Veronika; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease with catastrophic economic impact for affected countries. BHK21 suspension cells are preferred for the industrial production of FMDV vaccine antigen, but not all virus strains can be successfully propagated in these cells. Serotype Asia-1 is often affected by this phenomenon. In this study, the Asia-1 strain Shamir was used to examine viral, cellular and environmental factors that contribute to resistance to cell culture infection. Cell media composition, pH and ammonium chloride concentration did not affect Asia-1 differently than other serotypes. Virus replication after transfection of viral genome was not impaired, but the adhesion to the cells was markedly reduced for Asia-1 in comparison to serotype A. The Asia-1 Shamir virus was successfully adapted to grow in the resistant cells by using a closely related but susceptible cell line. Sequence analysis of the adapted virus revealed two distinct mutations in the capsid protein VP1 that might mediate cell attachment and entry. PMID:28820470

  20. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

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    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  1. Role of polyamines in DNA synthesis of Catharanthus roseus cells grown in suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Atsushi Komamine; Walter C. Shortle

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for polyamines in the proliferation of cells was first demonstrated in bacteria (3). While significant progress has been made in this field using animal cell cultures, only preliminary studies have been reported with plant tissues. Serafini-Fracassini et al. (9) showed a marked increase in polyamine synthesis early during the G 1 phase, concomitant with...

  2. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Manivannan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 3.0 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA in a combination with 2 mg·L−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa, salicylic acid (SA, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  3. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-03-18

    Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 3.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) in a combination with 2 mg·L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa), salicylic acid (SA), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  4. Propagation of Brazilian Zika virus strains in static and suspension cultures using Vero and BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Alexander; Castilho, Leda R; Reichl, Udo; Genzel, Yvonne

    2017-03-23

    The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and the Pacific has reached alarming levels in more than 60 countries. However, relatively little is known about the disease on a virological and epidemiological level and its consequences for humans. Accordingly, a large demand for in vitro derived Brazilian ZIKV material to support in vitro and in vivo studies has arisen. However, a prompt supply of ZIKV and ZIKV antigens cannot be guaranteed as the production of this virus typically using Vero or C6/36 cell lines remains challenging. Here we present a production platform based on BHK-21 suspension (BHK-21 SUS ) cells to propagate Brazilian ZIKV at larger quantities in perfusion bioreactors. Scouting experiments performed in tissue culture flasks using adherent BHK-21 and Vero cells have demonstrated similar permissivity and virus yields for four different Brazilian ZIKV isolates. The cell-specific yield of infectious virus particles varied between respective virus strains (1-48PFU/cell), and the ZIKV isolate from the Brazilian state Pernambuco (ZIKV PE ) showed to be a best performing isolate for both cell lines. However, infection studies of BHK-21 SUS cells with ZIKV PE in shake flasks resulted in poor virus replication, with a maximum titer of 8.9×10 3 PFU/mL. Additional RT-qPCR measurements of intracellular and extracellular viral RNA levels revealed high viral copy numbers within the cell, but poor virus release. Subsequent cultivation in a perfusion bioreactor using an alternating tangential flow filtration system (ATF) under controlled process conditions enabled cell concentrations of about 1.2×10 7 cells/mL, and virus titers of 3.9×10 7 PFU/mL. However, while the total number of infectious virus particles was increased, the cell-specific yield (3.3PFU/cell) remained lower than determined in adherent cell lines. Nevertheless, the established perfusion process allows to provide large amounts of ZIKV material for research and is a first step towards

  5. Innovative, non-stirred bioreactors in scales from milliliters up to 1000 liters for suspension cultures of cells using disposable bags and containers--a Swiss contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sören; Eibl, Regine; Lettenbauer, Christine; Röll, Marcel; Eibl, Dieter; De Jesus, Maria; Zhang, Xiaowei; Stettler, Matthieu; Tissot, Stephanie; Bürki, Cedric; Broccard, Gilles; Kühner, Markus; Tanner, Rolf; Baldi, Lucia; Hacker, David; Wurm, Florian M

    2010-01-01

    Innovative mixing principles in bioreactors, for example using the rocking of a platform to induce a backwards and forwards 'wave', or using orbital shaking to generate a 'wave' that runs round in a cylindrical container, have proved to be successful for the suspension cultures of cells, especially when combined with disposable materials. This article presents an overview of the engineering characteristics when these new principles are applied in bioreactors, and case studies covering scales of operation from milliliters to 1000 liters.

  6. Characterization of lentiviral vector production using microwell suspension cultures of HEK293T-derived producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Heather M; McCloskey, Laura; Lye, Gary J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit K

    2013-04-01

    ProSavin(®) is a lentiviral vector (LV)-based gene therapy for Parkinson's disease. ProSavin(®) is currently in a Phase I/II clinical trial using material that was generated by transient transfection of adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK)293T cells. For future large-scale productions of ProSavin(®), we have previously reported the development and characterization of two inducible producer cell lines, termed PS5.8 and PS46.2. PS46.2 has been successfully adapted to grow in suspension cultures. The present study describes the creation of a small-scale (combined with statistical design of experiments (DoE) techniques to enable rapid characterization of the process conditions that impact cell growth and LV production. The effects of postinduction period, microwell liquid fill volume, and concentration of inducer (doxycycline) on ProSavin(®) titer and the particle:infectivity (P:I) ratio was investigated using three rounds of DoE, in order to identify appropriate factor ranges and optimize production conditions. We identified an optimal "harvest window" between approximately 26-46 hr within which maximal titers of around 6×10(4) transducing units (TU)/ml were obtained (an approximately 30-fold improvement compared to starting microwell conditions), providing that the fill volume was maintained at or below 1 ml and the doxycycline concentration was at least 1.0 μg/ml. Insights from the microwell studies were subsequently used to rapidly establish operating conditions for ProSavin(®) production in a 0.5-L wave bioreactor culture. The information presented herein thus aids the design and evaluation of scalable production processes for LVs.

  7. Establishment of cell suspension culture in Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. for the optimum production of flavonoids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnan, Remya; Anil Kumar, V S; Murugan, K

    .... Chlorophyll-containing callus cells of Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. is able to grow under low light in the presence of organic carbon source and retain the ability to produce flavonoids...

  8. Establishment of Cell Suspension Culture and Plant Regeneration in Abrus precatorius L., a Rare Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Serajur RAHMAN

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new protocol has been developed for cell culture and in vitro regeneration of Abrus precatorius that holds enormous potentiality for preparation of medicines. In vitro grown calli were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS liquid media in agitated condition fortified with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine. Growth curve of cells revealed that the cells continued to grow until 12 days of culture and got the highest peak from day 6-8. Isolated cell was found to produce highest 8.2% calli when suspended on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. Callus derived from single cell produced highest number of embryo (25-28% cultured on MS medium fortified with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.2 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The bipolar embryos were selected and optimum shoot formation was recorded on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The optimum root induction was noticed in MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l 3-Indolebutyric acid. Rooted plantlets were successfully transferred to potting soil and acclimatized to outdoor conditions.

  9. Evaluation of simulated microgravity environments induced by diamagnetic levitation of plant cell suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamal, K.Y.; Herranz, R.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Medina, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Ground-Based Facilities (GBF) are essetial tools to understand the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity and they are necessary to prepare and complement space experiments. It has been shown previously that a real microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell

  10. Serum-free spheroid suspension culture maintains mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimperti, Stella; Lei, Pedro; Wen, Yuan; Tian, Jun; Campbell, Andrew M; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2014-01-01

    There have been many clinical trials recently using ex vivo-expanded human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat several disease states such as graft-versus-host disease, acute myocardial infarction, Crohn's disease, and multiple sclerosis. The use of MSCs for therapy is expected to become more prevalent as clinical progress is demonstrated. However, the conventional 2-dimensional (2D) culture of MSCs is laborious and limited in scale potential. The large dosage requirement for many of the MSC-based indications further exacerbates this manufacturing challenge. In contrast, expanding MSCs as spheroids does not require a cell attachment surface and is amenable to large-scale suspension cell culture techniques, such as stirred-tank bioreactors. In the present study, we developed and optimized serum-free media for culturing MSC spheroids. We used Design of Experiment (DoE)-based strategies to systematically evaluate media mixtures and a panel of different components for effects on cell proliferation. The optimization yielded two prototype serum-free media that enabled MSCs to form aggregates and proliferate in both static and dynamic cultures. MSCs from spheroid cultures exhibited the expected immunophenotype (CD73, CD90, and CD105) and demonstrated similar or enhanced differentiation potential toward all three lineages (osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic) as compared with serum-containing adherent MSC cultures. Our results suggest that serum-free media for MSC spheroids may pave the way for scale-up production of MSCs in clinically relevant manufacturing platforms such as stirred tank bioreactors. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Establishment of cell suspension culture in Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. for the optimum production of flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Remya; Anil Kumar, V S; Murugan, K

    2014-02-01

    Bryophytes are the second largest group in the plant kingdom, but studies conducted to better understand their chemical composition are limited and scattered. Axenically grown bryophytes expressed potential in biotechnological processes. The present study was designed to investigate the in vitro cell growth, culture parameters and their effect on flavonoid synthesis. Chlorophyll-containing callus cells of Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. is able to grow under low light in the presence of organic carbon source and retain the ability to produce flavonoids. Highest flavonoid production was achieved using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as growth hormone. Inoculum size, light intensity, organic carbon source and cations are the culture parameters affecting flavonoid productivity. Maximum flavonoid productivity is observed under low light intensity, with a photon flux density ca. 20 μmol/m2/s. Optimal inoculum size and glucose concentration for flavonoid production are 10-14 and 2-3 %, respectively. Cations like ferrous trigger flavonoid synthesis by increasing its intracellular concentrations. Flavonoid production in the cell culture is shown to be significantly growth related. Osmotic stress is ineffective in triggering flavonoid synthesis. Methyl jasmonate and 2-(2-fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanyl) pyridine-4-carbothioamide elicitors showed positive effect on intracellular flavonoid content in cultured cells. Using the standard plot of quercetin (y = 0.0148x, R2 = 0.975), the flavonoid contents of in vitro samples were found ranging from 4.0 to 17.7 mg quercetin equivalent/g tissue. Flavonoids are fractionated by HPLC-PAD revealed the presence of quercetin (182.5 μg/g), luteolin (464.5 μg/g) and apigenin (297.5 μg/g). Further studies are warranted to analyze the therapeutic potentiality of the flavonoids in the liverwort.

  12. Metabolism of ibuprofen in higher plants: A model Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Šíša, Miroslav; Lacina, O.; Moťková, Kateřina; Langhansová, Lenka; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN (2017), s. 383-392 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Grant - others:European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Ibuprofen * Metabolism * Plant cells * Sequestration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  13. Bioreactor-Based Production of Glycoproteins in Plant Cell Suspension Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Tanja; Buyel, Johannes Felix

    2018-01-01

    Recombinant glycoproteins such as monoclonal antibodies have a major impact on modern healthcare systems, e.g., as the active pharmaceutical ingredients in anticancer drugs. A specific glycan profile is often necessary to achieve certain desirable activities, such as the effector functions of an antibody, receptor binding or a sufficient serum half-life. However, many expression systems produce glycan profiles that differ substantially from the preferred form (usually the form found in humans) or produce a diverse array of glycans with a range of in vivo activities, thus necessitating laborious and costly separation and purification processes. In contrast, protein glycosylation in plant cells is much more homogeneous than other systems, with only one or two dominant forms. Additionally, these glycan profiles tend to remain stable when the process and cultivation conditions are changed, making plant cells an ideal expression system to produce recombinant glycoproteins with uniform glycan profiles in a consistent manner. This chapter describes a protocol that uses fermentations using plant cell cultures to produce glycosylated proteins using two different types of bioreactors, a classical autoclavable STR 3-L and a wave reactor.

  14. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Liping; Liu, RuiE; Chu, Bijue; Yu, Xiushuang; Sun, Jie; Jones, Brian; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Huizhong; Zhu, Shuijin; Sun, Yuqiang

    2012-01-01

    Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel). In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L) and bentazon (4.2 µmol). A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon) tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  15. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Ke

    Full Text Available Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel. In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L and bentazon (4.2 µmol. A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  16. A Novel Hydroxyproline-Deficient Arabinogalactan Protein Secreted by Suspension-Cultured Cells of Daucus carota (Purification and Partial Characterization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, T. C.; McCann, M. C.; Roberts, K.

    1993-09-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are secreted or membrane-associated glycoproteins that have been operationally defined as binding to [beta]-glucosyl Yariv artificial antigen, being rich in arabinose and galactose, and containing high levels of alanine, serine, and hydroxyproline. Using an anti-AGP monoclonal antibody (MAC 207) bound to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B, we have purified by immunoaffinity chromatography an extracellular AGP from the culture medium of suspension-cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota). The apparent molecular mass of this highly glycosylated proteoglycan is 70 to 100 kD as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Although its sugar analysis, [beta]-glucosyl Yariv binding, and high alanine, serine, and proline content are consistent with it being an AGP, the amino acid composition unexpectedly revealed this molecule to have no detectable hydroxyproline. This suggests that this glycoprotein is not a "classical" AGP, but represents the first example of a new class of hydroxyproline-poor AGPs. Deglycosylation of the AGP with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride revealed that the purified proteoglycan contains probably a single core protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kD. Direct visualization of the native AGP in the electron microscope showed ellipsoidal putative AGP monomers, approximately 25 nm by 15 nm, that showed a strong tendency to self assemble into higher-order structures. Upon desiccation, the glycosylated AGP formed paracrystalline arrays visible in the light microscope. Polarized Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy of these arrays demonstrated a high degree of polarization of the sugar moieties under these conditions. These results put possible constraints on current models of AGP structure; a putative role for these novel AGPs as pectin-binding proteins is discussed.

  17. Jasmonic Acid Effect on the Fatty Acid and Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitele Dalia Goldhaber-Pasillas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The stress response after jasmonic acid (JA treatment was studied in cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus. The effect of JA on the primary and secondary metabolism was based on changes in profiles of fatty acids (FA and terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA. According to multivariate data analyses (MVDA, three major time events were observed and characterized according to the variations of specific FA and TIA: after 0–30 min of induction FA such as C18:1, C20:0, C22:0 and C24:0 were highly induced by JA; 90–360 min after treatment was characterized by variations of C14:0 and C15:0; and 1440 min after induction JA had the largest effect on both group of metabolites were C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C16:0, C20:0, C22:0, C24:0, catharanthine, tabersonine-like 1, serpentine, tabersonine and ajmalicine-like had the most significant variations. These results unambiguously demonstrate the profound effect of JA particularly on the accumulation of its own precursor, C18:3 and the accumulation of TIA, which can be considered as late stress response events to JA since they occurred only after 1440 min. These observations show that the early events in the JA response do not involve the de novo biosynthesis of neither its own precursor nor TIA, but is due to an already present biochemical system.

  18. Growth and production optimization of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranbakhsh, A R; Oshagi, M A; Ebadi, M

    2007-04-15

    Abstract: A number of physicochemical conditions such different concentration of glucose, sucrose, potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, calcium chloride and temperatures were tested to optimize growth and production of tropane alkaloids from Datura stramonium (Solanaceae) plants. Cell suspension from semi-clear calli of leave explants developed in MS medium containing kinetin (0.5 mg L(-1)) and NAA (2 mg L(-1)) hormones was used to measure biomass and total alkaloids and comparison of treatments. The results showed that 30 and 40 g L(-1) glucose led to the highest level of alkaloids and biomass productions, respectively. 20 and 40 g L(-1) sucrose concentrations resulted in order the most rates of alkaloids and biomass productions. The results showed that increasing of nitrate concentration led to the reduction of the alkaloids. The best concentration of potassium nitrate for the production of tropane alkaloids and biomass were in order 9.4 and 3.76 mM. Also it was evinced that the optimized concentration of ammonium nitrate for alkaloids production was 10.3 mM and for the biomass was 41.22 mM. The best concentration of calcium chloride for growth and production of the alkaloids was 7.92 mM. Testing different temperature specified that the best condition for production of the alkaloids was 20 degrees C whereas it was 25 degrees C for biomass production. The results of this study could be recommended to farmers involved in production of D. stramonium for tropain alkaloids at industrial and semi-industrial scales.

  19. Light-induced fluctuations in biomass accumulation, secondary metabolites production and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-11-01

    Light is an important factor influencing plant morphogenesis and biochemical pathways, including biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites. In the present study, we investigated the differential effect of light on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolites production in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L. A prolonged log phase of 21 days was followed by light-grown cultures. Light-grown cultures displayed 3.9-fold maximum increase (8.88 g/l) in dry biomass on day 30 of culture which was comparable to 3.7-fold maximum increase (9.2 g/l) on day 27 in dark-grown cultures. Compared to dark grown-cultures, enhanced levels of total phenolic content (5.32 mg/g DW), total phenolic production (42.96 mg/l) and total secondary metabolites (6.79 mg/g) were found in light-grown suspension cultures during the log phase of growth. Further, a positive correlation among maximum levels of antioxidant activity (63.8%), total phenolic production (42.96 mg/l) and total secondary metabolites (6.79 mg/g DW) was displayed by light-grown suspension cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Purification to homogeneity and properties of glucosidase II from mung bean seedlings and suspension-cultured soybean cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Hatanaka, K; Elbein, A D

    1990-09-25

    Glucosidase II was purified approximately 1700-fold to homogeneity from Triton X-100 extracts of mung bean microsomes. A single band with a molecular mass of 110 kDa was seen on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This band was susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H or peptide glycosidase F, and the change in mobility of the treated protein indicated the loss of one or two oligosaccharide chains. By gel filtration, the native enzyme was estimated to have a molecular mass of about 220 kDa, suggesting it was composed of two identical subunits. Glucosidase II showed a broad pH optima between 6.8 and 7.5 with reasonable activity even at 8.5, but there was almost no activity below pH 6.0. The purified enzyme could use p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside as a substrate but was also active with a number of glucose-containing high-mannose oligosaccharides. Glc2Man9GlcNAc was the best substrate while activity was significantly reduced when several mannose residues were removed, i.e. Glc2Man7-GlcNAc. The rate of activity was lowest with Glc1Man9GlcNAc, demonstrating that the innermost glucose is released the slowest. Evidence that the enzyme is specific for alpha 1,3-glucosidic linkages is shown by the fact that its activity on Glc2Man9GlcNAc was inhibited by nigerose, an alpha 1,3-linked glucose disaccharide, but not by alpha 1,2 (kojibiose)-, alpha 1,4(maltose)-, or alpha 1,6 (isomaltose)-linked glucose disaccharides. Glucosidase II was strongly inhibited by the glucosidase processing inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and 2,6-dideoxy-2,6-imino-7-O-(beta-D- glucopyranosyl)-D-glycero-L-guloheptitol, but less strongly by castanospermine and not at all by australine. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the mung bean glucosidase II reacted with a 95-kDa protein from suspension-cultured soybean cells that also showed glucosidase II activity. Soybean cells were labeled with either [2-3H]mannose or [6-3H]galactose, and the glucosidase II was isolated by immunoprecipitation

  1. Diadenosine triphosphate is a novel factor which in combination with cyclodextrins synergistically enhances the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell suspension cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Czekała, Łukasz; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Pedreño, María Angeles; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Dinucleoside polyphosphates are considered as signal molecules that may evoke response of plant cells to stress. Other compounds whose biological effects have been recognized are cyclodextrins. They are cyclic oligosaccharides that chemically resemble the alkyl-derived pectic oligosaccharides naturally released from the cell walls during fungal attack, and they act as true elicitors, since, when added to plant cell culture, they induce the expression of genes involved in some secondary metabolism pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that some dinucleoside polyphosphates triggered the biosynthesis of enzymes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells, cyclodextrins were shown to enhance the accumulation of trans-resveratrol, one of the basic units of the stilbenes derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here, we show that diadenosine triphosphate, applied alone or in combination with cyclodextrins to the grapevine suspension-cultured cells, increased the transcript level of genes encoding key phenylpropanoid-pathway enzymes as well as the trans-resveratrol production inside cells and its secretion into the extracellular medium. In the latter case, these two compounds acted synergistically. However, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside trans-piceid inside cells were stimulated much better by diadenosine triphosphate than by cyclodextrins. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. [Establishment of embryogenic cell suspension culture and plant regeneration of edible banana Musa acuminata cv. Mas (AA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yue-Rong; Huang, Xue-Lin; Li, Jia; Huang, Xia; Li, Zhe; Li, Xiao-Ju

    2005-01-01

    Conventional breeding for dual resistance of disease and pest of Musa cultivars remains a difficult endeavor, as the plant is polyploidic and high in sterility. Biotechnological techniques, eg., genetic engineering, in vitro mutation breeding, or protoplast fusion, may overcome the difficulties and improve the germplasm. Establishment of a stable embryogenic cell suspension (ECS) is a prerequisite for any of the biotechnological breeding methods. In this study an embryogenic cell suspension was established from immature male flower of Musa acuminata cv. Mas (AA), a popular commercial variety of banana in the South-East Asian region. After culture for 5-6 months on callus induction media, which consisted of MS salts, different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4.1 micromol/L biotin, 5.7 micromol/L indoleacetic acid (IAA), 5.4 micromol/L naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), other vitamins, 87 mmol/L sucrose, and solidified with 7 g/L agarose, meristematic globules and yellow, friable embryogenic cultures were induced from the explants of 1-15th row young floral hands of immature male flowers. Of the four treatments of 2,4-D, 9 micromol/L was the most effective on the callus induction, it transformed 40.96% and 7.45% of the cultivated male floral hands into callus and embryogenic callus respectively. The explants to produce highest frequency of the embryogenic calli were floral hands of 6 to 12th rows, which generated 5.79% of the embryogenic calli. Suspension cultures were initiated from these embryogenic calli in liquid medium supplemented with 4.5 micromol/L 2, 4-D. After sieving selection of the cultures using a stainless steel metallic strainer with pore sizes of 154 microm at 15 day intervals for 3 months, homogeneous and yellow embryogenic cell suspensions, composed of single cells and small cell aggregates, were established. Based upon the growth quantity and growth rate of ECS, it was determined that the appropriate inoculum was 2.0 mL PCV

  3. Serum replacement with albumin-associated lipids prevents excess aggregation and enhances growth of induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ikki; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-08

    Suspension culture systems are currently under investigation for the mass production of pluripotent stem (PS) cells for tissue engineering; however, the control of cell aggregation in suspension culture remains challenging. Existing methods to control aggregation such as microwell culture are difficult to scale up. To address this issue, in this study a novel method that incorporates the addition of KnockOut Serum Replacement (KSR) to the PS cell culture medium was described. The method regulated cellular aggregation and significantly improved cell growth (a 2- to 10-fold increase) without any influence on pluripotency. In addition, albumin-associated lipids as the major working ingredient of KSR responsible for this inhibition of aggregation were identified. This is one of the simplest methods described to date to control aggregation and requires only chemically synthesizable reagents. Thus, this method has the potential to simplify the mass production process of PS cells and thus lower their cost. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1009-1016, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  4. Induction of trans-resveratrol and extracellular pathogenesis-related proteins in elicited suspension cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Almagro, Lorena; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, Maria Angeles

    2013-02-15

    Suspension-cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell were used to investigate the effects of methyljasmonate, ethylene and salicylic acid separately or in combination with cyclodextrins on both trans-resveratrol production and the induction of defense responses. The results showed that the addition of methyljasmonate or ethylene to suspension-cultured cells jointly treated with cyclodextrins and salicylic acid provoked a decrease of trans-resveratrol levels suggesting that salicylic acid has a negative and antagonistic effect with methyljasmonate or ethylene on trans-resveratrol production. Likewise, the exogenous application of these compounds induced the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. Analysis of the extracellular proteome showed the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to an specific β-1,3-glucanase, class III peroxidases and a β-1,4-mannanase, which suggests that these signal molecules could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in V. vinifera cv Monastrell. Apart from these inducible proteins, other proteins were found in both the control and elicited cell cultures of V. vinifera. These included class IV chitinase, polygalacturonase inhibitor protein and reticuline oxidase-like protein, suggesting that their expression is constitutive being involved in the modification of the cell wall architecture during cell culture growth and in the prevention of pathogen attack. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced production of vanillin flavour metabolites by precursor feeding in cell suspension cultures of Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn., in shake flask culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, Pradeep; Parvatam, Giridhar; Shetty, Nandini P

    2017-12-01

    The flavour rich tuberous roots of Decalepis hamiltonii are known for its edible and medicinal use and have become endangered due to commercial over-exploitation. Besides 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxy benzaldehyde (2H4MB), other flavour metabolites in tuberous roots include vanillin, 4-Methoxy Cinnamic acid derivatives, aromatic alcohols etc. So far, there are no reports on the pathway of 2H4MB biosynthesis nor there is an organized work on biotransformation using normal and cell suspension cultures for obtaining these metabolites using precursors. The main aim of the study is to develop a method for enhanced production of flavour attributing metabolites through ferulic acid (FA) feeding to the D. hamiltonii callus culture medium. Biomass of D. hamiltonii cell suspension cultures was maximum (200.38 ± 1.56 g/l) by 4th week. Maximum production of 2H4MB was recorded on 4th week (0.08 ± 0.01 mg/100 g dry weight) as quantified by HPLC. Addition of 0.1-1.5 mM ferulic acid as precursor in the culture medium showed significant (p < 0.001) effect on suspension cultures biomass and respective phenylpropanoid metabolites content and 2H4MB accumulation. The maximum accumulation of vanillin, 2H4MB, vanillic acid, ferulic acid were of 0.1 ± 0.02 mg/100 g, 0.44 ± 0.01 mg/100 g, 0.52 ± 0.04 mg/100 g, 0.18 ± 0.02 mg/100 g DW respectively in 4 weeks of cultured cells supplemented with 1 mM ferulic acid as a precursor. The results indicate that, substantial increase in the levels of flavour metabolites in D. hamiltonii callus suspension culture was achieved. This would be having implications in biosynthesis of respective vanilla flavour attributing metabolites at very high levels for their large scale production.

  6. Production of Limonoids with Insect Antifeedant Activity in a Two-Stage Bioreactor Process with Cell Suspension Culture of Azadirachta indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Rivera, Andrés; Chicaiza-Finley, Diego; Hoyos, Rodrigo A; Orozco-Sánchez, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) cell suspension culture is an alternative for the production of limonoids for insect control that overcomes limitations related to the supply of neem seeds. To establish conditions for cell growth and azadiracthin-related limonoid production, the effect of different sucrose concentrations, nitrate and phosphate in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, and the addition of one precursor and three elicitors was evaluated in shake flasks. The process was scaled up to a 3-l stirred tank bioreactor in one- and two-stage batch cultivation. In shake flasks, more than fivefold increase in the production of limonoids with the modified MS medium was observed (increase from 0.77 to 4.52 mg limonoids/g dry cell weight, DCW), while an increase of more than fourfold was achieved by adding the elicitors chitosan, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid together (increase from 1.03 to 4.32 mg limonoids/g DCW). In the bioreactor, the volumetric production of limonoids was increased more than threefold with a two-stage culture in day 18 (13.82 mg limonoids/l in control single-stage process and 41.44 mg/l in two-stage process). The cultivation and operating mode of the bioreactor reported in this study may be adapted and used in optimization and process plant development for production of insect antifeedant limonoids with A. indica cell suspension cultures.

  7. The mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria induces chitinase activity in roots and in suspension-cultured cells of its host Picea abies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, M; Hager, A

    1989-08-01

    A cell-wall fraction of the mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria increased the chitinase activity in suspension-cultured cells of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) which is a frequent host of Amanita muscaria in nature. Chitinase activity was also increased in roots of spruce trees upon incubation with the fungal elicitor. Non-induced levels of chitinase activity in spruce were higher in suspension cells than in roots whereas the elicitorinduced increase of chitinase activity was higher in roots. Treatment of cells with hormones (auxins and cytokinin) resulted in a severalfold depression of enzyme activity. However, the chitinase activity of hormone-treated as well as hormone-free cells showed an elicitor-induced increase. Suspension cells of spruce secreted a large amount of enzyme into the medium. It is postulated that chitinases released from the host cells in an ectomycorrhizal system partly degrade the fungal cell walls, thus possibly facilitating the exchange of metabolites between the symbionts.

  8. Increasing anthraquinone production by overexpression of 1-deoxy-D: -xylulose-5-phosphate synthase in transgenic cell suspension cultures of Morinda citrifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Carla; Perassolo, María; Alechine, Eugenia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana María; Talou, Julián Rodriguez

    2010-07-01

    A Morinda citrifolia cell line was obtained by overexpresion of 1-deoxy-D: -xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) from Catharanthus roseus, a key enzyme of the metabolic pathway of anthraquinones (AQs). This cell line increased AQs production by about 24% compared to the control cell line. This transgenic cell line which carries dxs cDNA isolated from Catharanthus roseus, was achieved by direct transformation of cell suspension cultures of M. citrifolia using a hypervirulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain. The effects of the overexpression of the dxs gene also resulted in increased levels of dxs mRNA transcripts and DXS activity compared to the control cell line. In addition, total phenolics and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity were evaluated and were significantly higher in the transgenic line than in controls.

  9. Botulinum hemagglutinin-mediated in situ break-up of human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates for high-density suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman C; Tokura, Tomohiro; Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    Large numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are required for making stable cell bank. Although suspension culture yields high cell numbers, there remain unresolved challenges for obtaining high-density of hiPSCs because large size aggregates exhibit low growth rates. Here, we established a simple method for hiPSC aggregate break-up using botulinum hemagglutinin (HA), which specifically bound with E-cadherin and disrupted cell-cell connections in hiPSC aggregates. HA showed temporary activity for disrupting the E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connections to facilitate the break-up of aggregates into small sizes only 9 hr after HA addition. The transportation of HA into the aggregates was mediated by transcellular and paracellular way after HA addition to the culture medium. hiPSC aggregates broken up by HA showed a higher number of live cells, higher cell density, and higher expansion fold compared to those of aggregates dissociated with enzymatic digestion. Moreover, a maximum cell density of 4.5 ± 0.2 × 10 6 cells ml -1 was obtained by aggregate break-up into small ones, which was three times higher than that with the conventional culture without aggregate break-up. Therefore, the temporary activity of HA for disrupting E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connection was key to establishing a simple in situ method for hiPSC aggregate break-up in bioreactors, leading to high cell density in suspension culture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor treatment to dissociate human iPS cells for suspension culture to form embryoid body-like cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ayumi; Yazaki, Koyuki; Aoyagi, Mami; Ohnuki, Yoshitsugu; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Treatment conditions using Y-27632 in the preparation of cell suspension of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were investigated in the context of embryoid body (EB)-like cell aggregates. The effectiveness of a pretreatment with Y-27632 before cell dissociation and that of a Y-27632 treatment during cell dissociation were investigated from the viewpoint of simplicity and robustness. The duration of Y-27632 treatment in the preparation process affected the circularity and agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs. A single application of pretreatment failed to prevent the onset of blebbing. However, a pretreatment promoted the agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs when combined with the addition of Y-27632 to cell suspension. Our results indicate that pretreatment enhances the agglomeration potential of dissociated hiPSCs. When cell dissociation was performed in the presence of Y-27632, dissociated hiPSCs possessed the highest circularity and significant agglomerating property. It was shown that treatment with Y-27632 during cell dissociation is a simple and robust method to prepare dissociated hiPSCs for suspension culture to form EB-like cell aggregates. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced Biosynthesis of Withanolides by Elicitation and Precursor Feeding in Cell Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in Shake-Flask Culture and Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period. PMID:25089711

  12. Enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides by elicitation and precursor feeding in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal in shake-flask culture and bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganeshan Sivanandhan

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg, withanolide B (4826.05 mg, withaferin A (3732.81 mg, withanone (6538.65 mg, 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg, withanoside IV (2623.21 mg and withanoside V (2861.18 mg] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l and squalene (6 mM along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period.

  13. Establishment and validation of new complementing cells for production of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors in serum-free suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rénald; Guilbault, Claire; Gagnon, David; Bernier, Alice; Bourget, Lucie; Elahi, Seyyed Mehdy; Kamen, Amine; Massie, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    E1-deleted adenovirus vectors (AdV) are important gene transfer vehicles for gene therapy and vaccination. Amplification of AdV must take place in cells that express the adenovirus E1A and E1B genes. Sequence homology between AdV and the E1 genes integrated within the complementing cells should be minimal to reduce the odds of generating replication-competent adenovirus (RCA). The present study describes the establishment of AdV complementing cells constructed by stable transfection of the minimal E1A and E1B genes into human lung carcinoma (A549). Because some transgene products can be cytotoxic, the cells were engineered to stably express the repressor of the cumate-switch (CymR) to silence transgene transcription during vector growth. For regulatory compliance and to facilitate the scale-up, the resulting complementing cells (SF-BMAdR) were adapted to serum-free suspension culture. The best clone of SF-BMAdR produced AdV carrying an innocuous transgene to the same level as 293 cells, but titers were better for AdV carrying transgene for a cytotoxic product. Elevated titers were maintained for at least two months in suspension culture in the absence of selective agent and the cells did not produce RCA. Because of their advantageous properties, SF-BMAdR cells should become an important tool for developing large-scale production processes of AdV for research and clinical applications. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Targeted Gene Deletion Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Nuclease Accelerates Adaptation of CHO Cells to Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namil; Shin, JongOh; Park, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Gyun Min; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-11-18

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred host for the production of a wide array of biopharmaceuticals. Thus, efficient and rational CHO cell line engineering methods have been in high demand to improve quality and productivity. Here, we provide a novel genome engineering platform for increasing desirable phenotypes of CHO cells based upon the integrative protocol of high-throughput RNA sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein9) nuclease-based genome editing. For commercial production of therapeutic proteins, CHO cells have been adapted for suspension culture in serum-free media, which is highly beneficial with respect to productivity and economics. To engineer CHO cells for rapid adaptation to a suspension culture, we exploited strand-specific RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed according to their adaptation trajectory in serum-free media. More than 180 million sequencing reads were generated and mapped to the currently available 109,152 scaffolds of the CHO-K1 genome. We identified significantly downregulated genes according to the adaptation trajectory and then verified their effects using the genome editing method. Growth-based screening and targeted amplicon sequencing revealed that the functional deletions of Igfbp4 and AqpI gene accelerate suspension adaptation of CHO-K1 cells. The availability of this strand-specific transcriptome sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease mediated genome editing facilitates the rational design of the CHO cell genome for efficient production of high quality therapeutic proteins.

  15. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Different Explants on the Response of Tissue Culture and Cell Suspension Cultures of German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koohi,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. is one of the most important medicinal plants that its essential oils used in different medicinal industries. In this study which was carried out in 2013 growing season at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, the in vitro response of leaf and hypocotyl explants of German Chamomile in B5 medium supplemented with different levels of plant growth regulators including 2,4-D, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP were investigated in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD.In addition, cell suspension cultures were established and characterized. Hypocotyl and leaf explants exhibited cell proliferation and produced callus within 1-2 weeks. The highest fresh weight of the callus (264.1 mg was produced by leaf explants in the medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l BAP. However, the leaf explants cultured on medium containing 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D showed the lowest cell proliferation and callus yield (40.42 mg. The highest percentage of root induction from leaf explants (58.73% was observed on the medium containing 4 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l Kin, and from hypocotyl explants (48.61% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l NAA. The 42.22% of calli derived from hypocotyl explants on B5 medium supplemented with 4 mg/l NAA and 3 mg/l BAP, were friable. Cell suspension cultures of German chamomile were established by transferring of hypocotyl-derived friable calli into the MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l kinetin. The growth curve of cell proliferations started 4 days after culture and continued to grow until day 13th, where the cells entered stationary phase.

  16. Comparative study of withanolide production and the related transcriptional responses of biosynthetic genes in fungi elicited cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera in shake flask and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Seema; Saxena, Parul; Ali, Athar; Khan, Shazia; Abdin, Malik Z

    2017-05-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is one of the most reputed medicinal plants in the traditional medicinal system. In this study, cell suspension culture of W. somnifera was elicited with cell homogenates of fungi (A. alternata, F. solani, V. dahliae and P. indica) in shake flask and the major withanolides like withanolide A, withaferin A and withanone were analysed. Simultaneously expression levels of key pathway genes from withanolides biosynthetic pathways were also checked via quantitative PCR in shake flask as well as in bioreactor. The results show that highest gene expression of 10.8, 5.8, 4.9, and 3.3 folds were observed with HMGR among all the expressed genes in cell suspension cultures with cell homogenates of 3% P. indica, 5% V. dahliae, 3% A. alternata and 3% F. solani, respectively, in comparison to the control in shake flask. Optimized concentration of cell homogenate of P. indica (3% v/v) was added to the growing culture in 5.0-l bioreactor under optimized up-scaling conditions and harvested after 22 days. The genes of MVA, MEP and withanolides biosynthetic pathways like HMGR, SS, SE, CAS, FPPS, DXR and DXS were up-regulated by 12.5, 4.9, 2.18, 4.65, 2.34, 1.89 and 1.4 folds, respectively in bioreactor. The enhancement of biomass (1.13 fold) and withanolides [withanolide A (1.7), withaferin A (1.5), and withanone (1.5) folds] in bioreactor in comparison to shake flask was also found to be in line with the up-regulation of genes of withanolide biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. An established Arabidopsis thaliana var. Landsberg erecta cell suspension culture accumulates chlorophyll and exhibits a stay-green phenotype in response to high external sucrose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avery; Chung, Michelle; Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Inman, Michael; Maxwell, Denis P; Hüner, Norman P A

    2016-07-20

    An established cell suspension culture of Arabidopsis thaliana var. Landsberg erecta was grown in liquid media containing 0-15%(w/v) sucrose. Exponential growth rates of about 0.40d-1 were maintained between 1.5-6%(w/v) sucrose, which decreased to about 0.30d-1 between 6 and 15%(w/v) sucrose. Despite the presence of external sucrose, cells maintained a stay-green phenotype at 0-15% (w/v) sucrose. Sucrose stimulated transcript levels of genes involved in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway (ChlH, ChlI2, DVR). Although most of the genes associated with photosystem II and photosystem I reaction centers and light harvesting complexes as well as genes associated with the cytochrome b6f and the ATP synthase complexes were downregulated or remained unaffected by high sucrose, immunoblotting indicated that protein levels of PsaA, Lhcb2 and Rubisco per gram fresh weight changed minimallyon a Chl basis as a function of external sucrose concentration. The green cell culture was photosynthetically competent based on light-dependent, CO2-saturated rates of O2 evolution as well as Fv/Fm and P700 oxidation. Similar to Arabidopsis WT seedlings, the suspension cells etiolated in the dark and but remained green in the light. However, the exponential growth rate of the cell suspension cultures in the dark (0.45±0.07d-1) was comparable to that in the light (0.42±0.02d-1). High external sucrose levels induced feedback inhibition of photosynthesis as indicated by the increase in excitation pressure measured as a function of external sucrose concentration. Regardless, the cell suspension culture still maintained a stay-green phenotype in the light at sucrose concentrations from 0 to 15%(w/v) due, in part, to a stimulation of photoprotection through nonphotochemical quenching. The stay-green, sugar-insensitive phenotype of the cell suspension contrasted with the sugar-dependent, non-green phenotype of Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta WT seedlings grown at comparable external sucrose

  18. Suramin inhibits initiation of defense signaling by systemin, chitosan, and a β-glucan elicitor in suspension-cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, Johannes; Scheer, Justin; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2000-01-01

    Systemin-mediated defense signaling in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants is analogous to the cytokine-mediated inflammatory response in animals. Herein, we report that the initiation of defense signaling in suspension-cultured cells of Lycopersicon peruvianum by the peptide systemin, as well as by chitosan and β-glucan elicitor from Phytophtora megasperma, is inhibited by the polysulfonated naphtylurea compound suramin, a known inhibitor of cytokine and growth factor receptor interactions in animal cells. Using a radioreceptor assay, we show that suramin interfered with the binding of the systemin analog 125I-Tyr-2,Ala-15-systemin to the systemin receptor with an IC50 of 160 μM. Additionally, labeling of the systemin receptor with a photoaffinity analog of systemin was inhibited in the presence of suramin. Receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 48-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase and alkalinization of the medium of suspension-cultured cells in response to systemin and carbohydrate elicitors were also inhibited by suramin. The inhibition of medium alkalinization by suramin was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of systemin and carbohydrate elicitors. Calyculin A and erythrosin B, intracellular inhibitors of phosphatases and plasma membrane proton ATPases, respectively, both induce medium alkalinization, but neither response was inhibited by suramin. The polysulfonated compound heparin did not inhibit systemin-induced medium alkalinization. NF 007, a suramin derivative, induced medium alkalinization, indicating that neither NF 007 nor heparin interact with elicitor receptors like suramin. The data indicate that cell-surface receptors in plants show some common structural features with animal cytokine and growth factor receptors that can interact with suramin to interfere with ligand binding. PMID:10922047

  19. Suramin inhibits initiation of defense signaling by systemin, chitosan, and a beta-glucan elicitor in suspension-cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, J; Scheer, J; Ryan, C A

    2000-08-01

    Systemin-mediated defense signaling in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants is analogous to the cytokine-mediated inflammatory response in animals. Herein, we report that the initiation of defense signaling in suspension-cultured cells of Lycopersicon peruvianum by the peptide systemin, as well as by chitosan and beta-glucan elicitor from Phytophtora megasperma, is inhibited by the polysulfonated naphtylurea compound suramin, a known inhibitor of cytokine and growth factor receptor interactions in animal cells. Using a radioreceptor assay, we show that suramin interfered with the binding of the systemin analog (125)I-Tyr-2, Ala-15-systemin to the systemin receptor with an IC(50) of 160 microM. Additionally, labeling of the systemin receptor with a photoaffinity analog of systemin was inhibited in the presence of suramin. Receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 48-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase and alkalinization of the medium of suspension-cultured cells in response to systemin and carbohydrate elicitors were also inhibited by suramin. The inhibition of medium alkalinization by suramin was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of systemin and carbohydrate elicitors. Calyculin A and erythrosin B, intracellular inhibitors of phosphatases and plasma membrane proton ATPases, respectively, both induce medium alkalinization, but neither response was inhibited by suramin. The polysulfonated compound heparin did not inhibit systemin-induced medium alkalinization. NF 007, a suramin derivative, induced medium alkalinization, indicating that neither NF 007 nor heparin interact with elicitor receptors like suramin. The data indicate that cell-surface receptors in plants show some common structural features with animal cytokine and growth factor receptors that can interact with suramin to interfere with ligand binding.

  20. Sucrose-enhanced biosynthesis of medicinally important antioxidant secondary metabolites in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Ahmad, Nisar; Ali, Syed Shujait; Ali, Shahid; Ali, Gul Shad

    2016-12-01

    Natural products are gaining tremendous importance in pharmaceutical industry and attention has been focused on the applications of in vitro technologies to enhance yield and productivity of such products. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of biomass and antioxidant secondary metabolites in response to different carbohydrate sources (sucrose, maltose, fructose and glucose) and sucrose concentrations (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 %). Moreover, the effects of 3 % repeated sucrose feeding (day-12, -18 and -24) were also investigated. The results showed the superiority of disaccharides over monosaccharides for maximum biomass and secondary metabolites accumulation. Comparable profiles for maximum biomass were observed in response to sucrose and maltose and initial sucrose concentrations of 3 and 5 %. Maximum total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were displayed by cultures treated with sucrose and maltose; however, initial sucrose concentrations of 5 and 7 % were optimum for both classes of metabolites, respectively. Following 3 % extra sucrose feeding, cultures fed on day-24 (late-log phase) showed higher biomass, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents as compared to control cultures. Highest antioxidant activity was exhibited by maltose-treated cultures. Moreover, sucrose-treated cultures displayed positive correlation of antioxidant activity with total phenolics and total flavonoids production. This work describes the stimulatory role of disaccharides and sucrose feeding strategy for higher accumulation of phenolics and flavonoids, which could be potentially scaled up to bioreactor level for the bulk production of these metabolites in suspension cultures of A. absinthium.

  1. Enhancement of anthraquinone production in Morinda citrifolia cell suspension cultures after stimulation of the proline cycle with two proline analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Carla V; Perassolo, María; Giulietti, Ana M; Rodríguez Talou, Julián

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of anthraquinones (AQs) involves the shikimate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways. The proline cycle is linked to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to generate NADPH needed in the first steps of this pathway. The effect of two proline analogs, azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (A2C) and thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C), were evaluated in Morinda citrifolia suspension cultures. Both analogs gave higher proline accumulation after 6 and 10 days (68 and 179% after 6 days with A2C at 25 and 50 μM, respectively, and 111% with T4C added at 100 μM). Induction of the proline cycle increased the AQ content after 6 days (~40% for 50 μM A2C and 100 μM T4C). Whereas A2C (50 μM) increased only AQ production, T4C also enhanced total phenolics. However, no induction of the PPP was observed with any of the treatments. This pathway therefore does not limit the supply of carbon skeletons to secondary metabolic pathways.

  2. Influence of a specific xyloglucan-nonasaccharide derived from cell walls of suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota L. on regenerating carrot protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerling, M; Seitz, H U

    1990-09-01

    A xyloglucan oligosaccharide was isolated from cell walls of Daucus carota L. suspension-cultured cells. From analytical data (gel-permeation chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis) it can be concluded that this oligosaccharide preparation consists mainly of a nonasaccharide known as XG9 (Glc4Xyl3GalFuc). This nonasaccharide showed excellent "anti-auxin" properties in the pea-stem bioassay, with 80% inhibition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-induced longitudinal growth of etiolated pea stem segments at concentrations of 1-0.1 nM. Applied in nanomolar concentrations to protoplasts regenerating in a medium containing 4.52 μM 2,4-D, the nonasaccharide influenced the viability of the protoplasts and the activities of glycan synthases in vitro. The effects were similar to those achieved by the omission of 2,4-D from the regeneration medium. The composition of the regenerated cell wall was not changed significantly by the use of 2,4-D-depleted medium or the addition of XG9 to 2,4-D-containing medium.

  3. Identification of the human Lewis(a) carbohydrate motif in a secretory peroxidase from a plant cell suspension culture (Vaccinium myrtillus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, N S; Nimtz, M; Conradt, H S; Fevereiro, P S; Costa, J

    1997-09-29

    This paper reports for the first time the presence of the human Lewis(a) type determinant in glycoproteins secreted by plant cells. A single glycopeptide was identified in the tryptic hydrolysis of the peroxidase VMPxC1 from Vaccinium myrtillus L. by HPLC/ESI-MS. The oligosaccharide structures were elucidated by ESI-MS-MS and by methylation analysis before and after removal of fucose by mild acid hydrolysis. The major structure determined is of the biantennary plant complex type containing the outer chain motif Lewis(a) [structure in text]. A corresponding fucosyltransferase activity catalyzing the formation of Lewis(a) type structures in vitro was identified in cellular extracts of the suspension cultures.

  4. Enrichment in Specific Soluble Sugars of Two Eucalyptus Cell-Suspension Cultures by Various Treatments Enhances Their Frost Tolerance via a Noncolligative Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travert, S.; Valerio, L.; Fouraste, I.; Boudet, A. M.; Teulieres, C.

    1997-08-01

    A cell-suspension culture obtained from the hybrid Eucalyptus gunnii/Eucalyptus globulus was hardened by exposure to lower temperatures, whereas in the same conditions cells from a hybrid with a more frost-sensitive genotype, Eucalyptus cypellocarpa/Eucalyptus globulus, were not able to acclimate. During the cold exposure the resistant cells accumulated soluble sugars, in particular fructose and sucrose, with a limited increase in cell osmolality. In contrast, the cell suspension that was unable to acclimate did not accumulate soluble sugars in response to the same cold treatment. To an extent similar to that induced after a cold acclimation, frost-hardiness of the cells increased after a 14-h incubation with specific soluble sugars such as sucrose, raffinose, fructose, and mannitol. Such hardening was also observed for long-term cultures in mannitol-enriched medium. This cryoprotective effect of sugars without exposure to lower temperatures was observed in both the resistant and the sensitive genotypes. Mannitol was one of the most efficient carbohydrates for the cryoprotection of eucalyptus. The best hardiness (a 2.7-fold increase in relative freezing tolerance) was obtained for the resistant cells by the cumulative effect of cold-induced acclimation and mannitol treatment. This positive effect of certain sugars on eucalyptus freezing tolerance was not colligative, since it was independent of osmolality and total sugar content.

  5. Effect of light wavelength on cell growth, content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Thevetia peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, J P; Zapata, K; Rojano, B; Arias, M

    2016-10-01

    Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana) has been considered as a potentially important plant for industrial and pharmacological application. Among the number of compounds which are produced by T. peruviana, antioxidants and polyphenols are of particular interest due to their benefits on human health. Cell suspension cultures of T. peruviana were established under different conditions: 1) constant illumination (24h/day) at different light wavelengths (red, green, blue, yellow and white), 2) darkness and 3) control (12h/12h: day light/dark) to investigate their biomass, substrate uptake, polyphenols production and oxidizing activity. The results showed biomass concentrations between 17.1g dry weight (DW)/l (green light) and 18.2g DW/l (control) after 13days. The cultures that grew under green light conditions consumed completely all substrates after 10days, while other cultures required at least 13days or more. The total phenolic content was between 7.21 and 9.46mg gallic acid (GA)/g DW for all light conditions. In addition the ferric reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid antioxidant activity ranged from 5.41-6.58mg ascorbic acid (AA)/g DW and 82.93-110.39μmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. Interestingly, the samples which grew under the darkness presented a higher phenolic content and antioxidant capacity when compared to the light conditions. All together, these results demonstrate the extraordinary effect of different lighting conditions on polyphenols production and antioxidant compounds by T. peruviana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra, E-mail: A.Kwiatkows@gmail.com [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Zebrowski, Jacek [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Oklejewicz, Bernadetta [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Czarnik, Justyna [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Halibart-Puzio, Joanna [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wnuk, Maciej [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  7. Rice callus suspension culture inhibits growth of cell lines of multiple cancer types and induces apoptosis in lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nafeesa; Dhadi, Surendar Reddy; Deshpande, Aparna; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2016-11-02

    Cancer is one of the leading cause of mortality. Even though efficient drugs are being produced to treat cancer, conventional medicines are costly and have adverse effects. As a result, alternative treatments are being tried due to their low cost and little or no adverse effects. Our previous study identified one such alternative in rice callus suspension culture (RCSC) which was more efficient than Taxol® and Etoposide, in reducing the viability of human colon and renal cancer cells in culture with minimal or no effect on a normal cell line. In this study, we tested the effect of RCSC by studying the dynamics of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H460 and A549), breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and colorectal cancer cell lines (SW620 and Caco-2) as well as their normal-prototypes. Complementary analysis for evaluating membrane integrity was performed by estimating LDH release in non-lysed cells and cell viability with WST-1 assay. Fluorescence microscopy with stains targeting nucleus and cell membrane as well as caspase 3/7 and Annexin V assays were performed. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was performed to evaluate expression of 92 genes associated with molecular mechanisms of cancer in RCSC treated ling cancer cell line, NCI-H460 and its normal prototype, MRC-5. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to collect RCSC fractions, which were evaluated on NCI-H460 for their anti-cancer activity. Lower dilutions of RCSC showed maximum reduction in total LDH indicating reduced viability in majority of the cancer cell lines tested with minimal or no effect on normal cell lines compared to the control. Complementary analysis based on LDH release in non-lysed cells and WST-1 assay mostly supported total LDH results. RCSC showed the best effect on the lung non-small carcinoma cell line, NCI-H460. Fluorescence microscopy analyses suggested apoptosis as the most likely event in NCI-H460 treated with RCSC. Gene expression

  8. Highly efficient in vitro regeneration, establishment of callus and cell suspension cultures and RAPD analysis of regenerants of Swertia lawii Burkill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthraj R. Kshirsagar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly efficient in vitro regeneration system has been developed for Swertia lawii Burkill, an important herb used as substitute for Swertia chirayita. Shoot tips explants were cultured on MS medium with various phytohormones for multiple shoot production. The best shoot production frequency (100% and maximum shoots (10.4 ± 0.8 were obtained on MS media containing TDZ (3.0 mg l−1 in combination with IBA (0.3 mg l−1. Maximum callus induction (95 ± 4.8% and callus growth (1.7 ± 0.4 gm was achieved on MS medium with 2, 4-D (3.0 mg l−1. Cell suspension cultures were established and studied for their growth kinetics. Shoots were rooted best (22.1 ± 2.5 in 1/2 MS medium with IAA (3.0 mg l−1. The genetic uniformity of the micropropagated clones was assessed using RAPD markers. Out of 405 bands, 400 (98.76% were monomorphic and rest 5 (1.24% were polymorphic. High multiplication frequency and low risk of genetic instability ensures the efficacy of this protocol.

  9. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, R.; Shortle, W.C. (USDA Forest Service, Durham (US)); Minocha, S.C.; Long, S.L. (Dept. of Plant Biology, Univ. of New Hamshire, Durham (US))

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminium (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic polyamines, spermine and spermidine, and their precusor, putrescine, have been implicated in a number of stress responses of plants. Addition of 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0 mM AlCl{sub 3} to cells cultured for 3 days caused a small but significant increase in cellular levels of putrescine at 4 h followed by a sharp decline by 16 h. There was no further decline in levels of putrescine during the next 32 h. Spermidine levels did not change appreciably compared to those in the control cultures. However, spermine levels increased by 2-3-fold at 24 and 48 h. Cellular activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC; EC 4.1.1.50) were both inhibited by 20-25% at 4 and 7 h. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17) was less than 10% of ADC activity at all times. Whereas all concentrations of Al caused a slight decrease in total cell number, cell viability was affected only by 1.0 mM Al. There was a decrease in the cellular levels of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn, P and Fe in the cells treated with Al at 4 h, but a significant increase by 16 and 24 h. The results presented here suggest that both the absolute amounts of Al and the length of exposure to it are important for cell toxicity. (au).

  10. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  11. Scaling up a chemically-defined aggregate-based suspension culture system for neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, M Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-12-01

    The demand of high cell numbers for applications in cellular therapies and drug screening requires the development of scalable platforms capable to generating highly pure populations of tissue-specific cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In this work, we describe the scaling-up of an aggregate-based culture system for neural induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under chemically-defined conditions. A combination of non-enzymatic dissociation and rotary agitation was successfully used to produce homogeneous populations of hiPSC aggregates with an optimal (140 μm) and narrow distribution of diameters (coefficient of variation of 21.6%). Scalable neural commitment of hiPSCs as 3D aggregates was performed in 50 mL spinner flasks, and the process was optimized using a factorial design approach, involving parameters such as agitation rate and seeding density. We were able to produce neural progenitor cell cultures, that at the end of a 6-day neural induction process contained less than 3% of Oct4-positive cells and that, after replating, retained more than 60% of Pax6-positive neural cells. The results here presented should set the stage for the future generation of a clinically relevant number of human neural progenitors for transplantation and other biomedical applications using controlled, automated and reproducible large-scale bioreactor culture systems. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Formation of a series of myo-inositol phosphates during growth of rice plant cells in suspension culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuo, Igaue; Masatoshi, Shimizu; Satoshi, Miyauchi; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University

    1980-01-01

    A series of myo-inositol phosphates including myo-inositol mono- to hexa-phosphates was observed during growth of cultured rice plant cells. We also found that ^Pi and myo-[2-^3H] inositol were incorporated into all these myo-inositol phosphates. myo-inositol phosphorylating activity, which depended on ATP and Mg^ was detected in the soluble fraction from the cells, and the reaction product was identified as myo-inositol-2-phosphate.

  13. Production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes by transient transfection of HEK293 cell suspension cultures for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Parminder Singh; Schulze, Erica; Tran, Rosa; Montes, Johnny; Kamen, Amine A

    2014-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is being used successfully in gene therapy. Different serotypes of AAV target specific organs and tissues with high efficiency. There exists an increasing demand to manufacture various AAV serotypes in large quantities for pre-clinical and clinical trials. A generic and scalable method has been described in this study to efficiently produce AAV serotypes (AAV1-9) by transfection of a fully characterized cGMP HEK293SF cell line grown in suspension and serum-free medium. First, the production parameters were evaluated using AAV2 as a model serotype. Second, all nine AAV serotypes were produced successfully with yields of 10(13)Vg/L cell culture. Subsequently, AAV2 and AAV6 serotypes were produced in 3-L controlled bioreactors where productions yielded up to 10(13)Vg/L similar to the yields obtained in shake-flasks. For example, for AAV2 10(13)Vg/L cell culture (6.8×10(11)IVP/L) were measured between 48 and 64h post transfection (hpt). During this period, the average cell specific AAV2 yields of 6800Vg per cell and 460IVP per cell were obtained with a Vg to IVP ratio of less than 20. Successful operations in bioreactors demonstrated the potential for scale-up and industrialization of this generic process for manufacturing AAV serotypes efficiently. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Positive selection of Wharton's jelly-derived CD105(+) cells by MACS technique and their subsequent cultivation under suspension culture condition: A simple, versatile culturing method to enhance the multipotentiality of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Halabian, Raheleh; Dehgan Harati, Mozhgan; Bahadori, Marzie; Mehdipour, Ahmad; Mohammadi Roushandeh, Amaneh; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2015-05-01

    Wharton's jelly (WJ), an appropriate source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has been shown to have a wide array of therapeutic applications. However, the WJ-derived MSCs are very heterogeneous and have limited expression of pluripotency markers. Hence, improvement of their culture condition would promote the efficiency of WJ-MSCs. This study aims to employ a simple method of cultivation to obtain WJ-MSCs which express more pluripotency markers. CD105(+) cells were separated by magnetic-associated (activated) cell sorting from umbilical cord mucous tissue. CD105(+) cells were added to Methocult medium diluted in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) and seeded in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA)-coated plates for suspension culture preparation. Differentiation capacity of isolated cells was evaluated in the presence of differentiation-inducing media. The expression of pluripotency markers such as Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 was also analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot techniques. Moreover, immunocytochemistry was performed to detect alpha-smooth muscle actin (antigene) (α-SMA) protein. WJ-MSCs grew homogeneously and formed colonies when cultured under suspension culture conditions (Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs). They maintained their growth ability in both adherent and suspension cultures for several passages. Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 both at transcriptional and translational levels in comparison to those cultured in conventional adherent cultures. They also expressed α-SMA protein. In this study, we isolated WJ-MSCs using a slightly modified culture condition. Our simple non-genetic method resulted in a homogeneous population of WJ-MSCs, which highly expressed pluripotency markers. In the future, more multipotent WJ-MSCs can be harnessed as a non-embryonic source of MSCs in MSC-based cell therapy.

  15. Catalase and alternative oxidase cooperatively regulate programmed cell death induced by beta-glucan elicitor in potato suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masashi; Tada, Yasuomi; Uchii, Kimitaka; Kawakami, Sachiko; Mayama, Shigeyuki

    2005-04-01

    In potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) suspension cells, the expression of the gene encoding alternative oxidase (AOX) and H2O2 accumulation were induced by treatment with beta-glucan elicitor. The inhibition of catalase activity enhanced both AOX mRNA expression and the production of H2O2, whereas the ascorbate peroxidase inhibitor did not have any effect on these responses. Simultaneous inhibition of catalase and AOX activities in elicited cells dramatically increased H2O2 accumulation, leading to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and programmed cell death (PCD). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that not only AOX but also catalase plays a central role in the suppression of mitochondrial deltapsi(m) breakdown and PCD induced by beta-glucan elicitor.

  16. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Taxol® (paclitaxel) promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ) elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day) to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation. PMID:22530557

  17. Influence of rare earth elements on metabolism and related enzyme activity and isozyme expression in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Peng; Shuang-Lin, Zhou; Jun-Yao, He; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rare earth elements (REEs) not only on cell growth and flavonoid accumulation of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum suspension cells but also on the isoenzyme patterns and activities of related enzymes were studied in this paper. There were no significant differences in enhancement of flavonoid accumulation in T. hemsleyanum suspension cells among La(3+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+). Whereas their inductive effects on cell proliferation varied greatly. The most significant effects were achieved with 100 μM Ce(3+)and Nd(3+). Under treatment over a 25-day culture period, the maximal biomass levels reached 1.92- and 1.74-fold and the total flavonoid contents are 1.45- and 1.49-fold, than that of control, respectively. Catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activity was activated significantly when the REE concentration range from 0 to 300 μM, whereas no significant changes were found in superoxide dismutase activity. Differences of esterase isozymes under REE treatment only laid in expression level, and there were no specific bands. The expression level of some POD isozymes strengthened with increasing concentration of REEs within the range of 50-200 μM. When REE concentration was higher than 300 μM, the expression of some POD isozymes was inhibited; meanwhile, some other new POD isozymes were induced. Our results also showed REEs did not directly influence PAL activity. So, we speculated that 50-200 μM REEs could activate some of antioxidant enzymes, adjust some isozymes expression, trigger the defense responses of T. hemsleyanum suspension cells, and stimulate flavonoid accumulation by inducing PAL activity.

  18. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sangram K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol® (paclitaxel promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation.

  19. The effect of methyl jasmonate and light irradiation treatments on the stilbenoid biosynthetic pathway in Vitis vinifera cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andi, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Mansour; Ford, Christopher M

    2017-08-29

    Grape stilbenes are a well-known family of plant polyphenolics that have been confirmed to have many biological activities in relation to health benefits. In the present study, we investigated the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitor at four different concentrations (25, 50, 100 and 200 μM) in combination or not with high-level light irradiation (10,000 LUX) on a cell line obtained from the pulp of Vitis vinifera cv. Shahani. Our results showed that the stilbene synthesis pathway is inhibited by high-light conditions. A concentration of 50 μM MeJA was optimum for efficient production and high accumulation of total phenolics and total flavonoids as well as total stilbenoids. Furthermore, we showed that there is a significant negative correlation between the production of these metabolites and cell growth. These data provide valuable information for the future scale-up of cell cultures for the production of these very high value compounds in bioreactor system.

  20. Effect of NaCl on ionic content and distribution in suspension-cultured cells of the halophyte Sonneratia alba versus the glycophyte Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Suechika; Hasegawa, Ai; Tsuchiya, Shinpei; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-09-15

    The effect of a high concentration of NaCl on the intra- (cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole) and extracellular (cell wall) distribution of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca, S, and P was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the mangrove halophyte Sonneratia alba and compared to cultured cells of glycophytic rice (Oryza sativa). No significant differences were observed in ultrastructural features of cluster cells of both species cultured with and without 50mM NaCl. Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of the cells cultured in the presence of 50mM NaCl showed that the Na concentration ([Na]) and Cl concentration ([Cl]) significantly increased in all three cell components measured. In S. alba, the [Na] was highest in the vacuole and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix, while the [Cl] was highest in the cell wall and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. In O. sativa, however, the [Na] and [Cl] were highest in the cell wall, and the [Na] was lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. Thus, the possible activities for Na and Cl transport from the cytoplasmic matrix into the vacuole were greater in S. alba than in O. sativa, suggesting that halophilic mangrove cells gain salt tolerance by transporting Na and Cl into their vacuoles. In O. sativa, the addition of NaCl to the culture medium caused no significant changes to the intracellular concentrations of various elements, such as K, P, S, Ca, and Mg, which suggests the absence of a direct relationship with the transport Na and Cl. In contrast, a marked decrease in the Ca concentration ([Ca]) in the cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole and an approximately two-fold increase in the P concentration ([P]) in the cytoplasmic matrix were found in S. alba, suggesting that the decrease in the [Ca] is related to the halophilic nature of S. alba (as indicated by the inward movement of Na(+) and Cl(-)). The possible roles of a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange mechanism in halophilism and the effect of the [P] on the metabolic activity under saline conditions are

  1. SUSPENSION CULTURE AND PLANT REGENERATION OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study is the first reported attempt to generate a growth curve from Typha latifolia L. (broadleaf cattail) callus cells in suspension culture. Several media and hormone combinations were tested for their capacity to induce callus cell formation from T. latifolia leaf section...

  2. Physiological responses of suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus to aluminum: changes in polyamines and inorganic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhua Zhou; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    1995-01-01

    The effects of aluminum (Al) treatment on polyamines were studied using suspension cultures of Madagascar periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don]. The addition of A1 (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 mM) to the suspension cultures caused a significant increase in putrescine within 24h only in freshly transferred cells. By contrast, Al treatment reduced putrescine...

  3. Lethal impacts of cigarette smoke in cultured tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawano Tomonori

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to understand and generalize the toxic mechanism of cigarette smoke in living cells, comparison of the data between animal systems and other biological system such as microbial and plant systems is highly beneficial. Objective By employing the tobacco cells as model materials for cigarette smoke toxicity assay, the impacts of the combustion by-products such as nitrogen oxides could be highlighted as the toxic impacts of the plant-derived endogenous chemicals could be excluded in the plant cells. Methods Cigarette smoke-induced cell death was assessed in tobacco cell suspension cultures in the presence and absence of pharmacological inhibitors. Results Cigarette smoke was effective in induction of cell death. The smoke-induced cell death could be partially prevented by addition of nitric oxide (NO scavenger, suggesting the role for NO as the cell death mediator. Addition of NO donor to tobacco cells also resulted in development of partial cell death further confirming the role of NO as cell death mediator. Members of reactive oxygen species and calcium ion were shown to be protecting the cells from the toxic action of smoke-derived NO.

  4. Stimulation of taxane production in suspension cultures of Taxus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... biosynthesis in transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium. Phytochemistry 50: 53-56. Zhang CH, Fevereiro PS, He G, Chen Z (2007). Enhanced paclitaxel productivity and release capacity of Taxus chinensis cell suspension cultures adapted to chitosan. Plant Sci. 172: 158-163. Zhang CH, Wu JY, He ...

  5. Microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses of gene expression in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cell suspension cultures after exposure to NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2012-09-01

    The gene expression profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cells in suspension culture after exposure to salinity (NaCl) induced stress were examined by constructing two suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries. cDNA from non-treated cells was used as a driver and cDNA samples from cell suspension cultures exposed to 150 mM NaCl for 2 or 10 h were used as testers. Randomly selected clones from each SSH library were sequenced and 727 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained and analyzed. Four novel ESTs were identified. Between the two libraries, 542 unique SSH clones were selected for placement on a cDNA microarray. In total, 18 differentially expressed genes were identified with 4 and 12 genes being significantly differentially expressed 2 and 10 h after the treatment, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and protein synthesis and several genes whose protein products are implicated in salt or other abiotic stress-related responses were expressed in the salt-stressed cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence that generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate are rapid responses following addition of fungal elicitor which induces phytoalexin synthesis in lucerne (Medicago sativa) suspension culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, T J; Cooke, C J; Newton, R P; Smith, C J

    1993-05-01

    Treatment of lucerne suspension culture cells with glycoprotein elicitor from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium albo-atrum R & B triggers Ca(2+)-mediated induction of antimicrobial secondary metabolites termed phytoalexins. The present study investigated the possible role of polyphosphoinositide signal transduction in phytoalexin elicitation. Within 1 min of addition of elicitor to lucerne suspension culture cells we found a 100-160% (15-25 pmol/g fresh wt) increase in the level of compound with chromatographic and electrophoretic properties expected for an inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) and which was strongly bound by an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3)-specific binding protein; after 3 min the level of this compound had fallen below that observed prior to elicitor challenge. In 32P-prelabelled cells, the relative proportion of radioactivity which cochromatographed with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) was found to have decreased by 48% 1 min after elicitor addition and that rapid depletion of membrane lipid radioactivity was specific to this lipid fraction. The rapid, transient increase in level of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and concomitant fall in PtdIns(4,5)P2 suggests that Ins(1,4,5)P3 generated by hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 may provide a Ca(2+)-mobilizing signal in phytoalexin elicitation in lucerne.

  7. Putting the spotlight back on plant suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell suspension cultures have several advantages that make them suitable for the production of recombinant proteins. They can be cultivated under aseptic conditions using classical fermentation technology, they are easy to scale-up for manufacturing, and the regulatory requirements are similar to those established for well-characterized production systems based on microbial and mammalian cells. It is therefore no surprise that taliglucerase alfa (Elelyso® – the first licensed recombinant pharmaceutical protein derived from plants – is produced in plant cell suspension cultures. But despite this breakthrough, plant cells are still largely neglected compared to transgenic plants and the more recent plant-based transient expression systems. Here, we revisit plant cell suspension cultures and highlight recent developments in the field that show how the rise of plants cells parallels that of Chinese hamster ovary cells, currently the most widespread and successful manufacturing platform for biologics. These developments include medium optimization, process engineering, statistical experimental designs, scale-up/scale-down models and process analytical technologies. Significant yield increases for diverse target proteins will encourage a gold rush to adopt plant cells as a platform technology, and the first indications of this breakthrough are already on the horizon.

  8. Regeneration of soybean via embryogenic suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droste Annette

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to establish an alternative plant regeneration system for soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] cultivars used in Brazilian breeding programs, ten genotypes were tested for their embryogenic potential. Cotyledons were removed as explants from immature seeds harvested from field-grown plants. After 45 days on induction medium, the number of responding cotyledons and the number of somatic embryos per immature cotyledon were evaluated. The percentage of explants that produced somatic embryos varied from 1 to 70% among cultivars. The average number of somatic embryos produced per cotyledon pair ranged from 0.01 to 10.3 with a mean of 3.4. Suspension cultures were initiated with three Agrobacterium tumefaciens susceptible cultivars. Suspensions were successfully developed from Bragg and IAS5 cultivars. The packed cell volume, in one-month growth, increased 8.1 fold for Bragg and 3.5 fold for IAS5 and the fresh weight increased 6.6 and 2.8 fold, respectively. The cultivars differed for the analysed parameters. All tissue from each cultivar was transferred to the maturation medium and subsequently to the germination medium. The germination frequency was 45.7 and 54.9% for Bragg and IAS5, respectively. Plants were gradually exposed to ambient humidity over one week and then planted in soil. All plants yielded seeds in the greenhouse.

  9. Rotary orbital suspension culture of embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells: impact of hydrodynamic culture on aggregate yield, morphology and cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundos, Tiago L; Silva, Joana; Assunção, Marisa; Quelhas, Pedro; Monteiro, Cátia; Oliveira, Carla; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2017-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES)-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (ES-NSPCs) constitute a promising cell source for application in cell therapies for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In this study, a rotary orbital hydrodynamic culture system was applied to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, to obtain homogeneously-sized ES-NSPC cellular aggregates (neurospheres). Hydrodynamic culture allowed the formation of ES-NSPC neurospheres with a narrower size distribution than statically cultured neurospheres, increasing orbital speeds leading to smaller-sized neurospheres and higher neurosphere yield. Neurospheres formed under hydrodynamic conditions (72 h at 55 rpm) showed higher cell compaction and comparable percentages of viable, dead, apoptotic and proliferative cells. Further characterization of cellular aggregates provided new insights into the effect of hydrodynamic shear on ES-NSPC behaviour. Rotary neurospheres exhibited reduced protein levels of N-cadherin and β-catenin, and higher deposition of laminin (without impacting fibronectin deposition), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity and percentage of neuronal cells. In line with the increased MMP-2 activity levels found, hydrodynamically-cultured neurospheres showed higher outward migration on laminin. Moreover, when cultured in a 3D fibrin hydrogel, rotary neurospheres generated an increased percentage of neuronal cells. In conclusion, the application of a constant orbital speed to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, besides allowing the formation of homogeneously-sized neurospheres, promoted ES-NSPC differentiation and outward migration, possibly by influencing the expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of proteases/extracellular matrix proteins. These findings are important when establishing the culture conditions needed to obtain uniformly-sized ES-NSPC aggregates, either for use in regenerative therapies or in in vitro platforms for biomaterial development or

  10. Changes in auxin level in the course of growth of a sunflower crown-gall suspension culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    The auxin level in the cell mass and culture medium was determined by means of the Avena straight caleoptile test in various periods of the suspension culture cycle of the sunflower crown-gall tumour...

  11. Sucrose metabolizing enzymes in cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris Enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em cultura celular de Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ometto de Mello

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the activity of sucrose metabolizing enzymes in extracts of cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Invertase pathway was identified in the three studied species. Sucrose synthase pathway was also responsible for sucrose metabolism in Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris cells. Activity values higher than 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein were found for acid and neutral invertases, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase in the cell extract of the three plant species. Sucrose synthase showed low activity in Bauhinia forficata cells. As sucrose concentration in the culture medium decreased, sucrose synthase activity increased in C. zedoaria and P. vulgaris cells. The glycolytic enzymes activity gradually reduced at the end of the culture period, when carbohydrate was limited.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar as enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em culturas de célula em suspensão de Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe e Phaseolus vulgaris L. A via da invertase foi identificada nas três espécies estudadas. A via da sacarose sintase também foi responsável pelo metabolismo da sacarose em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Foram encontradas atividades maiores que 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 de proteína das enzimas invertase ácida e alcalina, UDPglicose pirofosforilase e fosfoglicomutase no extrato celular das três espécies de plantas. A sacarose sintase mostrou atividade baixa nas células de Bauhinia forficata. À medida que a concentração de sacarose no meio de cultura diminuiu, a atividade da sacarose sintase aumentou em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Ao final do período de cultura, quando os carboidratos se tornaram limitantes, as atividades das enzimas glicolíticas reduziram-se gradualmente.

  12. Gas phase composition effects on suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjalili, N.; Linden, J.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Bioresources Engineering

    1995-10-20

    The effect of different concentrations and combinations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ethylene on cell growth and taxol production in suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata was investigated using several factorial design experiments. Low head space oxygen concentration (10% v/v) promoted early production of taxol. High carbon dioxide concentration (10% v/v) inhibited taxol production.The most effective gas mixture composition in terms of taxol production was 10% (v/v) oxygen, 0.5% (v/v) carbon dioxide, and 5 ppm ethylene. Cultures grown under ambient concentration of oxygen had a delayed uptake of glucose and fructose compared to cultures grown under 10% (v/v) oxygen. Average calcium uptake rates into the cultured cells decreased and average phosphate uptake rates increased as ethylene was increased from 0 to 10 ppm. These results may indicate that gas composition alters partitioning of nutrients, which in turn affects secondary metabolite production.

  13. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots trigger DNA repair and antioxidant enzyme systems in Medicago sativa cells in suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles appear to be promising devices for application in the agriculture and food industries, but information regarding the response of plants to contact with nano-devices is scarce. Toxic effects may be imposed depending on the type and concentration of nanoparticle as well as time of exposure. A number of mechanisms may underlie the ability of nanoparticles to cause genotoxicity, besides the activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. In a previous study, we showed that plant cells accumulate 3-Mercaptopropanoic acid-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD) in their cytosol and nucleus and increased production of ROS in a dose dependent manner when exposed to QD and that a concentration of 10 nM should be cyto-compatible. Results When Medicago sativa cells were exposed to 10, 50 and 100 nM MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD a correspondent increase in the activity of Superoxide dismutase, Catalase and Glutathione reductase was registered. Different versions of the COMET assay were used to assess the genotoxicity of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. The number of DNA single and double strand breaks increased with increasing concentrations of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. At the highest concentrations, tested purine bases were more oxidized than the pyrimidine ones. The transcription of the DNA repair enzymes Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase, Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I and DNA Topoisomerase I was up-regulated in the presence of increasing concentrations of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. Conclusions Concentrations as low as 10 nM MPA-CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots are cytotoxic and genotoxic to plant cells, although not lethal. This sets a limit for the concentrations to be used when practical applications using nanodevices of this type on plants are being considered. This work describes for the first time the genotoxic effect of Quantum Dots in plant cells and demonstrates that both the DNA repair genes (Tdp1β, Top1β and Fpg) and the ROS scavenging mechanisms are activated when MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD contact M. sativa

  14. Reaction of detoxification mechanisms in suspension cultured spruce cells (Picea abies L. Karst.) to heavy metals in pure mixture and in soil eluates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Peter; Fischer, Claudia; Debus, Reinhard; Wenzel, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    INTENTION, GOAL, BACKGROUND: The widespread and unconcerned use of chemicals in the past has led to an accumulation of pollutants in our environment. Numerous sites are polluted with a mixture of organic chemicals and heavy metals. The future use of these sites and the safe consumption of groundwater from these areas depends on our ability to assess risk by determining the bioavailability of trace levels of pollutants in the respective soil solutions. Soil eluates containing heavy metals in mixture as well as pure heavy metals in aqueous solution were added to a spruce cell culture to set up such a test system. The present study aims at evaluating the response of cultured spruce cells to heavy metals in aqueous solution, and at characterizing these basic cellular responses as potential biomarkers. In order to characterize cell reactions toward heavy metals, spruce cell cultures were incubated with CdSO4 (50 to 500 microM), Na2HAsO4 (1.5 to 80 microM) or PbCl2 (10 to 150 microM). Alternatively, the cells were incubated with a standard heavy metal mixture containing 80 microM Na2HAsO4, 150 microM CdSO4 and 150 microM PbCl2 in medium and with aqueous original soil eluates. Measurement of oxidative stress, antioxidants and basic detoxification enzymes involved in plant defence reactions were performed with the treated cells. After 5 hrs of incubation, the onset of a strong oxidative burst was observed. H2O2 concentrations exceeded 40 microM in the culture media after 20 hrs. Concomitantly, glutathione levels showed drastic changes indicating the influence of the metals and/or the H2O2 on antioxidative systems. Following cadmium treatment, GSH and GSSG were elevated by 50 and 200% above controls. Whereas arsenic doubled GSSG levels, treatment with lead did not cause significant changes. However, a mixture of the metals decreased both metabolites by 50%. The effect of the metals was concentration-dependent and disappeared at high concentrations. Furthermore, strong

  15. In vitro morphogenesis and cell suspension culture establishment in Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae Morfogênese in vitro e estabelecimento de culturas de suspensão celular em Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santana Balbuena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Piper solmsianum is a shrub from Southeast Brazil in which many biologically active compounds were identified. The aim of this work was to establish a cell suspension culture system for this species. With this in mind, petiole and leaf explants obtained from in vitro plantlets were cultured in the presence of different plant growth regulator combinations (IAA, NAA, 2,4-D and BA. Root and indirect shoot adventitious formation, detected by histological analysis, was observed. Besides the different combinations of plant growth regulators, light regime and the supplement of activated charcoal (1.5 mg.l-1 were tested for callus induction and growth. Cultures maintained in light, on a 0.2 mg.l-1 2,4-D and 2 mg.l-1 BA supplemented medium, and in the absence of activated charcoal, showed the highest calli fresh matter increment. From a callus culture, cell suspension cultures were established and their growth and metabolite accumulation studied. The achieved results may be useful for further characterization of the activated secondary metabolites pathways in in vitro systems of P. solmsianum.Piper solmsianum é uma espécie herbácea do sudeste brasileiro onde vários compostos biologicamente ativos já foram identificados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer suspensões celulares nesta espécie. Para tanto, foram utilizados explantes de pecíolos e folhas, retirados de plântulas cultivadas in vitro, os quais foram submetidos a diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento (AIA, ANA, 2,4-D e BAP. Foi obtida a neo-formação de raízes e brotos, estes últimos através do processo de organogênese indireta evidenciada por estudos histológicos. Para a indução e crescimento dos calos, foram avaliados, além das diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento, a suplementação ao meio de cultura de carvão ativado (1,5 mg.l-1 e o regime de luz. Culturas mantidas na luz, em meio de cultura suplementado com 0,2 mg.l-1 2,4-D e 2 mg

  16. Purification and characterization of three chitinases and one beta-1,3-glucanase accumulating in the medium of cell suspension cultures of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, K.M.; Jacobsen, S.; Dalgaard Mikkelsen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Three basic chitinases and one basic beta-1,3-glucanase were secreted into the medium when embryogenic cell suspensions of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cv. 'Igri' were cultured as undifferentiated aggregates in the presence of 2,4-D. The enzymes were purified by affinity and ion exchange chromatog......Three basic chitinases and one basic beta-1,3-glucanase were secreted into the medium when embryogenic cell suspensions of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cv. 'Igri' were cultured as undifferentiated aggregates in the presence of 2,4-D. The enzymes were purified by affinity and ion exchange...... chromatography. Two of the chitinases were identified as the previously described endochitinases T and C from barley grain. The third and novel chitinase, designated K, was the major basic chitinase in the medium constituting 4% of the soluble protein. Chitinase K was found to be a 33-kDa endochitinase with p......I at 8.7. Further analysis showed that this enzyme is also expressed in barley grain. The amino acid composition and five partial amino acid sequences covering 93 residues of chitinase K were determined. A high similarity was found between chitinase K and barley chitinase T and C as well as basic...

  17. Production of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in rice cell suspension culture with a human-like N-glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Chong, Yun-Jo; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2011-12-01

    The rice α-amylase 3D promoter system, which is activated under sucrose-starved conditions, has emerged as a useful system for producing recombinant proteins. However, using rice as the production system for therapeutic proteins requires modifications of the N-glycosylation pattern because of the potential immunogenicity of plant-specific sugar residues. In this study, glyco-engineered rice were generated as a production host for therapeutic glycoproteins, using RNA interference (RNAi) technology to down-regulate the endogenous α-1,3-fucosyltransferase (α-1,3-FucT) and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (β-1,2-XylT) genes. N-linked glycans from the RNAi lines were identified, and their structures were compared with those isolated from a wild-type cell suspension. The inverted-repeat chimeric RNA silencing construct of α-1,3-fucosyltransferase and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (Δ3FT/XT)-9 glyco-engineered line with significantly reduced core α-1,3-fucosylated and/or β-1,2-xylosylated glycan structures was established. Moreover, levels of plant-specific α-1,3-fucose and/or β-1,2-xylose residues incorporated into recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced from the N44 + Δ3FT/XT-4 glyco-engineered line co-expressing ihpRNA of Δ3FT/XT and hGM-CSF were significantly decreased compared with those in the previously reported N44-08 transgenic line expressing hGM-CSF. None of the glyco-engineered lines differed from the wild type with respect to cell division, proliferation or ability to secrete proteins into the culture medium. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Surfactant-induced non-lethal release of anthraquinones from suspension culture of Morinda citrifolia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassetti, L.; Hagendoorn, M.J.M.; Tramper, J.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach based on the use of the surfactant Pluronic F-68 to obtain non-lethal release of plant cell intracellular products was investigated. Suspension cultures of Morinda citrifolia (Rubiaceae), producing anthraquinones as secondary metabolites, were selected as model system. By

  19. Spontaneous pepsin C-catalyzed activation of human pepsinogen C in transgenic rice cell suspension culture: Production and characterization of human pepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Reyazul; Kim, Nan-Sun; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kim, Hyo-Boon; Han, So-Chon; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2018-01-01

    A human pepsinogen C (hPGC) gene was synthesized with rice-optimized codon usage and cloned into a rice expression vector containing the promoter, signal peptide, and terminator derived from the rice α-amylase 3D (Ramy3D) gene. In addition, a 6-His tag was added to the 3' end of the synthetic hPGC gene for easy purification. The plant expression vector was introduced into rice calli (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The integration of the hPGC gene into the chromosome of the transgenic rice callus and hPGC expression in transgenic rice cell suspensions was verified via genomic DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification and Northern blot analysis. Western blot analysis indicated both hPGC and its mature form, human pepsin C, with masses of 42- and 36-kDa in the culture medium under sugar starvation conditions. Human pepsin C was purified from the culture medium using a Ni-NTA agarose column and the NH2-terminal 5-residue sequences were verified by amino acid sequencing. The hydrolyzing activity of human pepsin C was confirmed using bovine hemoglobin as a substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for pepsin activity were 2.0 and 40°C, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Estabelecimento de cultura de células em suspensão e identificação de flavonóides em Cordia verbenacea DC. Establishment of cell suspension cultures and flavonoid identification in Cordia verbenacea DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Lameira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivos o estabelecimento de culturas de células em suspensão, extração, separação e identificação de flavonóides em extratos de folhas e de células em suspensão de Cordia verbenacea. Células dessa espécie, após terem sido subcultivadas três vezes no meio MS suplementado com 2,32 µM de cinetina + 10,74 µM de ANA a intervalos de 28 dias, apresentaram cinco estágios de crescimento: as fases lag, exponencial, linear, desaceleração e estacionária. O maior percentual de crescimento (37% ocorreu no período exponencial entre o quarto e o décimo segundo dia e o menor (3% na fase lag até o quarto dia. Para identificação de flavonóides, foram usados extratos submetidos à separação e purificação por CCD e CCL e os componentes obtidos submetidos à Espectroscopia de Ultravioleta, Espectrometria de Infravermelho e Massa e Ressonância Magnética Nuclear de Hidrogênio. Após as frações das amostras de folhas e células terem sido separadas pelo eluente ácido acético, foram identificados os componentes 7,4'-diidróxi-5'-carboximetóxi isoflavona e 7,4'-diidróxi-5'-metil isoflavona. Foi detectado maior concentração dessas substâncias nas células cultivadas in vitro.The aims of this study were to establish cell suspension cultures, as well as to extract, separate and identify flavonoids in Cordia verbenacea leaf extracts and cell suspensions. Cells of this species were subcultivated three times in MS culture medium supplemented with 2.32 µM kinetin + 10.74 µM NAA at 28-day intervals, showing five growth stages: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration and stationary phases. The highest growth rate (37% occurred in the exponential phase between the fourth and the twelfth day and the lowest growth rate (3%, in the lag phase until the fourth day. For flavonoid identification, extracts were separated and purified by TLC and LC and the obtained compounds were subjected to Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

  1. Responses of Cultured Tobacco Cells to Cryptogein, a Proteinaceous Elicitor from Phytophthora cryptogea1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Jean-Pierre; Milat, Marie-Louise; Ricci, Pierre

    1991-01-01

    In culture, the phytopathogenic fungus Phytophthora cryptogea secretes a protein which elicits hypersensitive-like necroses and protects tobacco plants against invasion by the pathogen Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae. This protein, named cryptogein, has been purified and its amino acid sequence determined. In this work, we studied the effect of cryptogein on tobacco cell suspension cultures. Cryptogein was lethal at about 0.10 micromolar. When added at sublethal doses, it elicited the production of ethylene and phytoalexins. It also induced a rapid increase in pH and conductivity of the extracellular medium without affecting the integrity of the plasma membrane. Cryptogein reduced the fusicoccin-induced acidification of the extracellular medium. The concentration which inhibited the fusicoccin response by 50% was 0.8 nanomolar, while 1 micromolar erythrosine B, an ATPase inhibitor, was needed to produce the same inhibition. However, cryptogein did not inhibit the activity of a purified plasma membrane ATPase. Results of binding studies with whole cells suggested the presence of elicitor-binding sites with a high affinity for cryptogein. The involvement of the plasma membrane during the initial interaction between elicitor and cells is discussed. PMID:16668010

  2. Crown gall transformation of tobacco callus cells by cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, A.; Manzara, T.; Lurquin, P.F.

    1984-09-17

    Incubation of cells from squashed tobacco callus tissue with virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens leads to the production of cells displaying a crown gall phenotype. In vitro crown gall transformation of dicotyledonous plant cells has been demonstrated after cocultivation of cell-wall regenerating mesophyll protoplasts with Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells. In addition, it has been shown that protoplasts freshly isolated from suspension cultures, when treated with A. tumefaciens spheroplasts and a fusogen, also generated cells displaying a typical crown gall phenotype, i.e., phytohormone-independent growth and opine synthesis. Subsequently, both techniques were used to transfer and express foreign genes in plant cells via A. tumefaciens T-DNA integration. For practical purposes, it would be advantageous to be able to perform crown gall transformation of plant cells in tissue culture. The authors report here for the first time the production of Nicotiana tabacum crown gall cells after cocultivation of callus tissue with A. tumefaciens A136 cells. 11 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  3. Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Junichiro; Furukawa, Hiroka; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-03-01

    The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.

  4. Regeneration from embryogenic callus and suspension cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from both callus and suspension cultures of the wild medicinal plant Cymbopogon schoenanthus subsp. proximus has been achieved. The species is rare and confined in its distribution to Africa. A range (0.5 to 8 mg/l) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for the induction ...

  5. Changes in cellulase and polygalacturonase activity in Rosa glauca suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseleau, J.P.; Chambat, G.

    The levels of cellulase and polygalacturonase activities in Rosa glauca suspension cultures were measured at 6, 10, 14 and 28 days of growth. Cellulase and polygalacturonase showed the highest activity in the 14-day-old cells. The changes in the activities followed closely the changes in the corresponding levels of cellulose and galacturonic acid-containing polysaccharides in the cell wall. The maximum in both activities coincided with the end of the exponential growth of the cells. These hydrolases are believed to play a role in the cell expansion and the polysaccharides synthesis.

  6. Conjugation of the mycotoxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in tobacco suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Andreas A; Kohn, Beate N; Pfeiffer, Erika; Wefers, Daniel; Metzler, Manfred; Bunzel, Mirko

    2015-05-20

    The mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether (AME) carry three and two phenolic hydroxyl groups, respectively, which makes them candidates for the formation of conjugated metabolites in plants. Such conjugates may escape routine methods of analysis and have therefore been termed masked or, more recently, modified mycotoxins. We report now that AOH and AME are extensively conjugated in suspension cultures of tobacco BY-2 cells. Five conjugates of AOH were identified by MS and NMR spectroscopy as β-D-glucopyranosides (attached in AOH 3- or 9-position) as well as their 6'-malonyl derivatives, and as a gentiobiose conjugate. For AME, conjugation resulted in the d-glucopyranoside (mostly attached in the AME 3-position) and its 6'- and 4'-malonyl derivatives. Pronounced differences were noted for the quantitative pattern of AOH and AME conjugates as well as for their phytotoxicity. Our in vitro study demonstrates for the first time that masked mycotoxins of AOH and AME can be formed in plant cells.

  7. Production of Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Recombinant Factor VIII Expression in Serum-Free Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Luis Caron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer offers several advantages over other gene delivery vectors when considering gene and cell therapy applications. However, using these therapies in clinical applications involves large-scale vector production in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Here we describe a high yield production of a lentivirus encoding recombinant factor VIII in a scalable and GMP-compliant culture system, based on serum free suspension cultures and transient transfection with an inexpensive reagent, polyethylenimine (PEI, reaching a total viral yield of 2.48x108 particles.

  8. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, Björn J; Kieft, Henk; Franssen-Verheijen, Tiny; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant's final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do grow in space and therefore should have a normally functioning microtubule cytoskeleton. Since the main difference between protoplasts and plant cells in a tissue is the presence of a cell wall, we studied single, but walled, tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells during an 8-day space-flight experiment on board of the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station during the 12S mission (March-April 2006). We show that the cortical microtubule density, ordering and orientation in isolated walled plant cells are unaffected by near weightlessness, as are the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils, cell proliferation, and cell shape. Likely, tissue organization is not essential for the organization of these structures in space. When combined with the fact that many recovering protoplasts have an aberrant cortical microtubule cytoskeleton, the results suggest a role for the cell wall, or its production machinery, in structuring the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  10. Influence of NaCl on Growth, Proline, and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Levels in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; De Armond, Richard L.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    The facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum responds to salt stress by increasing the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and other enzymes associated with Crassulacean acid metabolism. A more common response to salt stress in sensitive and tolerant species, including M. crystallinum, is the accumulation of proline. We have established M. crystallinum suspension cultures to investigate whether both these salt-induced responses occur at the cellular level. Leaf-and root-derived cultures maintain 5% of the total soluble amino acids as proline. Cell culture growth slows upon addition of 400 millimolar NaCl, and proline levels increase to 40% of the total soluble amino acids. These results suggest a functional salt-stress and response program in Mesembryanthemum cells. Suspension cultures grown with or without 400 millimolar NaCl have PEPCase levels that compare with those from roots and unstressed leaves. The predominant protein cross-reacting with an anti-PEPCase antibody corresponds to 105 kilodaltons (apparent molecular mass), whereas a second species of approximately 110 kilodaltons is present at low levels. In salt-stressed leaves, the 110 kilodalton protein is more prevalent. Levels of mRNA for both ppc1 (salt stress induced in leaves) and ppc2 (constitutive) genes in salt-treated suspensions cultures are equal to unstressed leaves, and only twice the levels found in untreated suspension cultures. Whereas cells accumulate proline in response to NaCl, PEPCase protein amounts remain similar in salt-treated and untreated cultures. The induction upon salt stress of the 110 kilodalton PEPCase protein and other Crassulacean acid metabolism enzymes in organized tissues is not observed in cell culture and may depend on tissue-dependent or photoautotrophy-dependent programs. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668687

  11. Comparison of tobacco-containing and tobacco-free waterpipe products: effects on human alveolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Alan; Eissenberg, Thomas; Rammah, Mayassa; Salman, Rola; Jaroudi, Ezzat; El-Sabban, Marwan

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, a class of products marketed as "tobacco-free" alternatives for the "health conscious user" has become widely available for waterpipe (hookah, narghile, or shisha) smoking. Their adoption may be in part driven by regulations banning tobacco smoking in public places and by an increasing awareness of the hazards of waterpipe tobacco smoking. Although these products are presented in advertising as a "healthier" choice, very little is known about their health effects. In this study, we compared the effects of smoke generated with tobacco-free and conventional tobacco-derived products on human alveolar cells. Smoke was generated with a smoking machine that precisely mimicked the puffing behavior of 15 experienced waterpipe smokers when they used conventional waterpipe tobacco products of their choice and flavor-matched tobacco-free products. Human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were treated with particulate matter sampled from the smoke, and the effects on cell cycle, proliferation, and doubling time were measured during the subsequent 72hr. We found that smoke from both types of waterpipe products markedly reduced cell proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, and increased cell doubling time. There were no significant differences across product in any measure. Tobacco-free and tobacco-based waterpipe products exert substantial and similar deleterious effects on human lung cells. This study adds to the nascent evidence base indicating that except for exposure to nicotine and its derivatives, use of tobacco-free waterpipe products does not present a reduced health risk relative to the use of conventional tobacco-based products.

  12. Aluminium reduces sugar uptake in tobacco cell cultures: a potential cause of inhibited elongation but not of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Basset, Refat; Ozuka, Shotaro; Demiral, Tijen; Furuichi, Takuya; Sawatani, Ikuo; Baskin, Tobias I; Matsumoto, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2010-06-01

    Aluminium is well known to inhibit plant elongation, but the role in this inhibition played by water relations remains unclear. To investigate this, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension-cultured cells (line SL) was used, treating them with aluminium (50 microM) in a medium containing calcium, sucrose, and MES (pH 5.0). Over an 18 h treatment period, aluminium inhibited the increase in fresh weight almost completely and decreased cellular osmolality and internal soluble sugar content substantially; however, aluminium did not affect the concentrations of major inorganic ions. In aluminium-treated cultures, fresh weight, soluble sugar content, and osmolality decreased over the first 6 h and remained constant thereafter, contrasting with their continued increases in the untreated cultures. The rate of sucrose uptake, measured by radio-tracer, was reduced by approximately 60% within 3 h of treatment. Aluminium also inhibited glucose uptake. In an aluminium-tolerant cell line (ALT301) isogenic to SL, all of the above-mentioned changes in water relations occurred and tolerance emerged only after 6 h and appeared to involve the suppression of reactive oxygen species. Further separating the effects of aluminium on elongation and cell survival, sucrose starvation for 18 h inhibited elongation and caused similar changes in cellular osmolality but stimulated the production of neither reactive oxygen species nor callose and did not cause cell death. We propose that the inhibition of sucrose uptake is a mechanism whereby aluminium inhibits elongation, but does not account for the induction of cell death.

  13. Synchronization of Somatic Embryogenesis in Date Palm Suspension Culture Using Abscisic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwael, Hussain A; Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2017-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is considered the most effective method for commercial propagation of date palm. However, the limitation of obtaining synchronized development of somatic embryos remains an impediment. The synchronization of somatic embryo development is ideal for the applications to produce artificial seeds. Abscisic acid (ABA) is associated with stress response and influences in vitro growth and development. This chapter describes an effective method to achieve synchronized development of somatic embryos in date palm cell suspension culture. Among the ABA concentrations tested (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 μM), the best synchronized growth was obtained in response to 50-100 μM. Here we provide a comprehensive protocol for in vitro plant regeneration of date palm starting with shoot-tip explant, callus initiation and growth, cell suspension establishment, embryogenesis synchronization with ABA treatment, somatic embryo germination, and rooting as well as acclimatized plantlet establishment.

  14. In vitro effect of smokeless tobacco on gingival epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Beklen

    2017-05-01

    Epithelial cells are the first line of defense against pathogens in the oral cavity. The results suggest that smokeless tobacco not only inhibits the growth of epithelial cells but also induce the generation of inflammatory cytokines which leads to smokeless tobacco-exacerbated disease.

  15. Is Tobacco Smoke a Germ-Cell Mutagen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although no international organization exists to declare whether an agent is a germ-cell mutagen, tobacco smoke may be a human germ-cell mutagen. In the mouse, tobacco smoke induces a significant increase in the mutation frequency at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus....

  16. Effects of aluminum on organic acid metabolism and secretion by red spruce cell suspension cultures and the reversal of Al effects on growth and polyamine metabolism by exogenous organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of added Al, the concentration of succinate in cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells was 15-20 times higher (> 600 nmol g-1FW) than that of citrate or oxalate and 4-6 times higher than that of malate. Addition of AICIJ (effective monomeric Al concentrations of 0.23 and 0.48...

  17. Expression of GLUT-1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma in tobacco and non-tobacco users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Neha; Kumari Maurya, Malti; Kar, Meenakshi; Goel, Madhu Mati; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Sagar, Mala; Mehrotra, Divya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    GLUTs are a family of proteins that mediate glucose transport through the membrane, expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. GLUT-1 positivity in malignant cells indicates increased proliferative activity, energy requirements, aggressive behaviour and poor radiation response. To observe the expression of GLUT-1 protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma in tobacco and non-tobacco users and to correlate the expression with histopathological grading and pathological staging. 50 cases (25 tobacco and 25 non-tobacco) of oral squamous cell carcinoma, selected during period of August 2014 to July 2015. Histopathological grading, TNM and staging were done. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using standard protocol for paraffin embedded sections. Analysis was performed on SPSS software (Windows version 17.0). Significant association of GLUT-1 expression was found with history of tobacco (p GLUT-1 expression in stage II, stage III and stage IV was found as compared to stage I. GLUT-1 immunoexpression also shows progressive switch from membranous to cytoplasmic to combined location correlating with histopathologic grade and pTNM stage. GLUT-1 expression correlates significantly with histological grade and pTNM staging of oral squamous cell carcinoma. It also significantly correlates with tobacco addiction. Thus, GLUT-1 expression may serve as a biomarker for patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After two weeks, induction of somatic embryos up to the torpedo stage occured at all tested concentrations of 2,4-D, IAA or NAA. Somatic embryos developed only in MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l IAA within two weeks and 2% of globular embryos were developed into the cotyledonary stage embryos. Eighty one percent of ...

  19. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of indole-3-acetic acid oxidase activity in suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IAA oxidase activity was determined in several growth phases of a suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall. During the short phase of intensive growth (zero passage - PO a negative correlation was noted between enzymatic activity and the rate of growth. IAA oxidase activity increased to a certain level is not a factor limiting cell division. For protraction of the phase of intensive growth (first passage - P1, however, a decrease in the activity of this enzyme seems indispensable. IAA oxidase activity in the tested culture is under the control of inhibitors present in the cells and medium. High enzyme inhibition was observed in PO cells during the phase, of intensive growth and in P1 at the beginning and in the middle part of this phase. These results suggest' that the -auxin level determined in earlier studies in sunflower crown-gall culture is controlled by the IAA oxidase set. During the long phase of intensive growth (P1 this control is of negative feedback type.

  1. Aluminium reduces sugar uptake in tobacco cell cultures: a potential cause of inhibited elongation but not of toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Basset, Refat; Ozuka, Shotaro; Demiral, Tijen; Furuichi, Takuya; Sawatani, Ikuo; Baskin, Tobias I.; Matsumoto, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Aluminium is well known to inhibit plant elongation, but the role in this inhibition played by water relations remains unclear. To investigate this, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension-cultured cells (line SL) was used, treating them with aluminium (50 μM) in a medium containing calcium, sucrose, and MES (pH 5.0). Over an 18 h treatment period, aluminium inhibited the increase in fresh weight almost completely and decreased cellular osmolality and internal soluble sugar content substantially; however, aluminium did not affect the concentrations of major inorganic ions. In aluminium-treated cultures, fresh weight, soluble sugar content, and osmolality decreased over the first 6 h and remained constant thereafter, contrasting with their continued increases in the untreated cultures. The rate of sucrose uptake, measured by radio-tracer, was reduced by approximately 60% within 3 h of treatment. Aluminium also inhibited glucose uptake. In an aluminium-tolerant cell line (ALT301) isogenic to SL, all of the above-mentioned changes in water relations occurred and tolerance emerged only after 6 h and appeared to involve the suppression of reactive oxygen species. Further separating the effects of aluminium on elongation and cell survival, sucrose starvation for 18 h inhibited elongation and caused similar changes in cellular osmolality but stimulated the production of neither reactive oxygen species nor callose and did not cause cell death. We propose that the inhibition of sucrose uptake is a mechanism whereby aluminium inhibits elongation, but does not account for the induction of cell death. PMID:20219776

  2. Factors influencing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) somatic embryogenesis. I. The crucial role of pH and nitrogen in suspension culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeusz Wróblewski; Marcin K. Filipecki; Stefan Malepszy

    2014-01-01

    A method of obtaining and the characteristics of an embryogenic stabilised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) suspension culture which has many similarities to the carrot model are presented. The Specific Type I cells and proembryogenic mass were present in such a suspension. The maintenance of the proembryogenic stage took place in medium containing 2,4-D as the sole growth regulator, subsequent stages of embryogenesis occurred in hormone-free medium. Embryonic structures were also observed in me...

  3. Regeneration from embryogenic callus and suspension cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ehab

    2012-04-25

    Apr 25, 2012 ... D) for the induction of embryogenic callus from seed cultures were used. Results show that .... ii) Seed culture. Sterile seeds were cultured on MS media supplemented with different 2,4-D concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 mg/l) and BA. (0.0, 0.2, 0.5 ...... bioassay with tobacco tissue culture. Plant Physiol.

  4. Development of friable embryogenic callus and embryogenic suspension culture systems in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N J; Edwards, M; Kiernan, R J; Davey, C D; Blakesley, D; Henshaw, G G

    1996-06-01

    Procedures for the production of a new and highly prolific embryogenic culture system have been developed in cassava. The importance of the basal salts and type of auxin in controlling the development of cassava embryogenic tissues has been demonstrated, with culture on Gresshoff and Doy basal medium in the presence of 4-amino-3,5,6,trichloro-picolinic acid (picloram) inducing the formation of friable embryogenic callus from which highly totipotent embryogenic suspension cultures could be established. Plants have been regenerated from these cultures. The availability of embryogenic suspension cultures is considered to have important implications for the application of genetic transformation and other biotechnologies in the agronomic improvement of cassava.

  5. Effect of ultrasonic waves on crocin and safranal content and expression of their controlling genes in suspension culture of saffron (Crocus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Tofigh; Asghari Zakaria, Rasool; Omidi, Mansoor; Zare, Naser

    2017-11-10

    The expression of biosynthesis controlling genes of crocin and safranal in saffron (Crocus sativus) can be influenced by ultrasonic waves. Sterilized saffron corms were cultured in a ½-MS medium supplemented by 2-4-D and BAP.  Saffron callus cells were treated with ultrasonic waves in a cellular suspension culture under optimal growth conditions. The samples were collected at 24 and 72 hours after treatment in three replications. The secondary metabolites were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and the gene expression was analysed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results indicate that this elicitor can influence the expressions of genes CsBCH, CsLYC and CsGT-2; the ultrasonic waves acted as an effective mechanical stimulus to the suspension cultures. The analysis of variance of the ultrasonically produced amounts of safranal and crocin indicates that there is a significant difference between once- and twice-treated samples in that the amount of safranal was the highest within the samples taken from the twice-treated suspension culture at 72 h after the ultrasound treatment, and the crocin was maximised after 24 h passed the twice-applied ultrasound treatment.

  6. Effects of Tobacco Smoke (TS) on Growth of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0347 TITLE: Effects of Tobacco Smoke ( TS ) on growth...0347 Effects of Tobacco Smoke ( TS ) on growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...males than in females1. Tobacco smoking ( TS ), obesity, hypertension, and age are established risk factors for ccRCC development1. Despite the well

  7. The use of morphogenic suspension cultures for the development of a protoplast regeneration system in lily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Famelaer, L.; Bordas, M.; Baliu', E.; Ennik, E.; Meijer, H.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Creemers-Molenaar, J.

    1997-01-01

    The present study reports data on the development of a protoplast regeneration procedure in lily. Established morphogenic suspension cultures were obtained from callus cultures induced on mature embryos from crosses between cultivars of L. longiflorum. The effect on the frequency of protoplast

  8. Growth characteristics and nutrient depletion of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' suspension cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted

    1998-01-01

    The growth characteristics and nutrient depletion in suspension cultures of Miscanthus ogiformis Honda ‘Giganteus' grown in media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal nutrient salts were studied during a culture period of 15 days. Proline was added to both media in concentrations from...

  9. Production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina by Camellia sinensis L suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutini, Sodiq, Mochamad; Muslihatin, Wirdhatul; Indra, Mochamad Rasjad

    2017-06-01

    Bioactive trimethyl xanthina can be obtained from the plant Camellia sinensis L. To obtain bioactive plant of which there are several hurdles for instance to wait up to five years to be harvested, also it needs land at a certain height from the sea level. Therefore, the production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina need to be developed with suspense culture techniques. The purpose of this study obtained the production of bioactive trimethyl xanthina way culturally suspense in large scale with a relatively short time, potentially as anti-oxidants. Research methods include: (1) initiation of callus from pieces of leaves, shoots the youngest of the plant Camellia sinensis L in the media MS with the optimization of the addition of growth regulators, (2) the subculture of callus on media and plant growth regulator that is equal to the stage of initiation, (3) initiation of suspension culture using explants of callus Camellia sinensis L, (4) Analysis of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina growth in suspension culture, (5) the isolation and identification of trimethyl xanthina qualitatively and quantitatively using thin layer chromatography/high performance chromatography column. The results of the study suspension cultures containing bioactive trimethyl xanthina candidates that can be used as an antioxidant.

  10. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Nahazima Mohamad Zuldin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D, kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%. Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47±0.4667 mL. The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275±0.082 mg L−1 that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226±1.98 mg L−1.

  11. Optimization of callus and cell suspension cultures of Barringtonia racemosa (Lecythidaceae family for lycopene production Otimização de culturas de suspensões de calos e células de Barringtonia racemosa (família Lecythidaceae para produção de licopeno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Behbahani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is present in a range of fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in the leaves of Barringtonia racemosa. The traditional lycopene extraction from the plant is being employed instead of an easy propagation technique like cell culture process from the leaf explants. We intend to assess how lycopene could be extracted via tissue culture under light (illuminance: 8,200 lux under white fluorescent lamps, photoperiod 16 h per day at 25ºC and dark. Leaf explants of Barringtonia racemosa were cultured on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS, Woody Plant Medium (WPM and B5 media, supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. Optimal conditions for callus induction and maintenance under both dark and light were investigated, and growth and lycopene accumulation were evaluated. Among media with different concentrations of 2,4-D, fast growing, friable callus initiated within three weeks after culturing on WPM basal medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 (weight per volume of 2,4-D, whereas callus induction in explants cultured on all other media started only after five weeks. Calli were subcultured once every fortnight. Pale yellow and green calli developed under conditions of dark and light respectively were then selected for evaluation of their lycopene contents. An improved reversed phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was used for a selective chemical determination of the lycopene content. Light induced lycopene production; and likewise maximum lycopene level incubated in light was higher than those incubated in darkness. The best growth rates of callus and cell suspension were achieved in WPM and B5 media respectively. The production of lycopene was growth-dependent through analysis of growth and lycopene content of both callus and cell suspension cultures.O licopeno está presente numa série de frutas frescas e hortaliças principalmente na folhas de Barringtonia racemosa. A extra

  12. The characterisation of foaming in suspension cultures of morinda citrifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Cusack, Winifred (Úna)

    1998-01-01

    The characterisation of foaming in plant cell cultures was investigated using Monnda citnfoha, as a test organism Suspensions were cultivated in 250 ml shake flasks, over the course of 21 day batch growth cycles, and were characterised in terms of biomass concentration, conductivity, morphology, pH and metabolite production (extracellular proteins and extracellular polysaccharides (ECP)). The Theological and surface tension profiles of the cell-free broths were assessed, with a view to unders...

  13. High yield derivation of enriched glutamatergic neurons from suspension-cultured mouse ESCs for neurotoxicology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Kyle S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, there has been a strong emphasis on identifying an in vitro model for neurotoxicity research that combines the biological relevance of primary neurons with the scalability, reproducibility and genetic tractability of continuous cell lines. Derived neurons should be homotypic, exhibit neuron-specific gene expression and morphology, form functioning synapses and consistently respond to neurotoxins in a fashion indistinguishable from primary neurons. However, efficient methods to produce neuronal populations that are suitable alternatives to primary neurons have not been available. Methods With the objective of developing a more facile, robust and efficient method to generate enriched glutamatergic neuronal cultures, we evaluated the neurogenic capacity of three mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC lines (R1, C57BL/6 and D3 adapted to feeder-independent suspension culture. Neurogenesis and neuronal maturation were characterized as a function of time in culture using immunological, genomic, morphological and functional metrics. The functional responses of ESNs to neurotropic toxins with distinctly different targets and mechanisms of toxicity, such as glutamate, α-latrotoxin (LTX, and botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, were also evaluated. Results Suspension-adapted ESCs expressed markers of pluripotency through at least 30 passages, and differentiation produced 97×106 neural progenitor cells (NPCs per 10-cm dish. Greater than 99% of embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs expressed neuron-specific markers by 96 h after plating and rapidly developed complex axodendritic arbors and appropriate compartmentalization of neurotypic proteins. Expression profiling demonstrated the presence of transcripts necessary for neuronal function and confirmed that ESN populations were predominantly glutamatergic. Furthermore, ESNs were functionally receptive to all toxins with sensitivities and responses consistent with primary neurons

  14. Establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures of Pinus radiata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of embryonal suspensor mass (ESM) from immature embryos of Pinus radiata on a solidified growth medium containing 0, 5 mgl -1 benzyladenine, 3, 0 mgl -1 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 500 mgl -1 casein hydrolysate and 250 mgl -1 L-glutamine was used as inoculum to establish cell suspension ...

  15. Tobacco smoking-response genes in blood and buccal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Minju; Chang, Seong-Sil; Kim, Soo-Young; Park, Jong Y; Chung, Myeon Woo; Yang, Mihi

    2015-01-22

    Tobacco smoking is a well-known cause of various diseases, however, its toxic mechanisms for diseases are not completely understood, yet. Therefore, we performed biological monitoring to find tobacco smoking-responsive mechanisms including oxidative stress in Korean men (N=36). Whole genome microarray analyses were performed with peripheral blood from smokers and age-matched nonsmokers. We also performed qRT-PCR to confirm the microarray results and compared the gene expression of blood to those of buccal cells. To assess the effects of tobacco smoking on oxidative stress, we analyzed urinary levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation marker, and performed PCR-based arrays on reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related genes. As results, 34 genes were differently expressed in blood between smokers and nonsmokers (ps1.5-fold change). Particularly, the genes involved in immune responsive pathways, e.g., the Fcγ-receptor mediated phagocytosis and the leukocyte transendothelial migration pathways, were differentially expressed between smokers and nonsmokers. Among the above genes, the ACTG1, involved in the maintenance of actin cytoskeleton, cell migration and cancer metastasis, was highly expressed by smoking in both blood and buccal cells. Concerning oxidative stress, smokers showed high levels of urinary MDA and down-regulation of expressions of antioxidant related genes including TPO, MPO, GPX2, PTGR1, and NUDT1 as compared to nonsmokers (pssmoking-responsive biomarker. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of UV-B radiation on some biochemical changes and growth parameters in Echinacea purpurea callus and suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam H. Manaf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of UV-B light force, exposure time and incubation period on producing caffeic acid derivatives and growth parameters in Echinacea purpurea callus and suspension culture were assessed. UV-B led to an increment of all growth parameters and antioxidant activity in callus and cell suspension and caffeic acid derivatives in cell suspension by increasing incubation period. The reverse was true for G-POD activity in cell suspension and PAL activity in both types of cultures. Incubation period 2 weeks was more effective in caffeic acid, total phenols and G-POD activity in callus cells and incubation period one week only for total phenols in cell suspension. The two exposure times 2 and 4 h increased antioxidant activity in the two types of cultures. Exposure time 2 h led to increase caffeic acid and total phenols in callus cells. The maximum increase in caffeic acid, total phenols and PAL activity in cell suspension was achieved by 4 h exposure time. Likewise, using 2 UV-B lamps for 2 h was the most effective in creating more biochemical components than the other treatments.

  17. Caffeine formation by suspension cultures of Coffea dewevrei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Mary Sartor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The low caffeine content in leaves of C. dewevrei (~ 0.5 mg/g is due to a low biosynthesis associated with a fast degradation. On the other hand, high biosynthesis and low degradation confer a higher content (~ 8 mg/g in leaves of C. arabica. In this work it was observed that cell cultures of C. dewevrei recovered the ability to synthesize caffeine almost in similar levels of C. arabica cultures. Tracer experiments with labelled carbon dioxide showed a significant accumulation of radioactivity in caffeine and metabolites, indicating an active biosynthesis. When the cultures were fed with labelled caffeine most of the radioactivity was recovered in caffeine, indicating that although active, degradation was not so efficient as in leaves, and therefore, contributing for the alkaloid accumulation in the cell cultures.O baixo conteúdo de cafeína em folhas de C. dewevrei (~ 0.5 mg/g é devido a uma menor biossíntese associada a uma rápida degradação. Por outro lado, alta taxa de biossíntese e baixa degradação confere o maior conteúdo (~ 8 mg/g em folhas de C. arabica. Neste trabalho estudou-se a produção de cafeína em culturas de células em suspensão de C. dewevrei. Observou-se que culturas desta espécie de café recuperaram a habilidade em sintetizar cafeína, em níveis semelhantes aos de culturas de C. arabica. Em experimento em que carbonato de bário contendo carbono marcado foi adicionado ao meio de cultura observou-se expressivo acúmulo de radioatividade em cafeína e seus metabólitos, indicando ativa biossíntese. Quando culturas receberam cafeína marcada, a maior parte da radioatividade recuperada estava neste alcalóide, indicando que a via de degradação não era tão ativa como em tecidos intactos (folhas para reduzir o teor de cafeína, levando portanto ao seu acúmulo.

  18. Changes in auxin level in the course of growth of a sunflower crown-gall suspension culture

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    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The auxin level in the cell mass and culture medium was determined by means of the Avena straight caleoptile test in various periods of the suspension culture cycle of the sunflower crown-gall tumour. The investigations were performed in the course of the zero passage (PO and first one (Pl, differing in their time of duration of maximum growth and its intensity. In both passages the intra- and extra-cellular auxin levels reach values of the same order. At the beginning of the maximal growth phase the activity corresponding to IAA in the cells prevails over that of the other auxin-like compounds. This disproportion diminishes with further development of the culture, and with the beginning of the stationary phase the cellular IAA level is lower than that of the remaining auxin-like compounds. The short phase of maximal growth (PO occurs with an auxin level decreasing in the cell mass and increasing in the medium, and towards the end of the cycle these levels become equal. During the long phase of maximal growth (Pl the total amount of auxins in the cells increases and is 2-3 times higher than in the medium, whereas IAA in the cells remains at a constant level. These results suggest that the participation of IAA in the intracellular pool of auxin-like substances is decisive for the mitotic activity of the cells and maintenance of growth in the culture.

  19. White poplar (Populus alba L.) suspension cultures as a model system to study apoptosis induced by alfalfa saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrazzi, Alma; Carbonera, Daniela; Avato, Pinarosa; Tava, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    In animal cells, the anticancer function played by plant saponins involves a complex network of molecular processes that still deserves investigation and apoptosis seems to be the outstanding pathway. An intriguing aspect of the biological activity of saponins is related to their effects on genome integrity. As demonstrated by the studies carried out in white poplar (Populus alba L., cv Villafranca) cell suspension cultures, plant cells can as well be used as a model system to unravel the molecular mechanisms activated by plant saponins. These recent studies have evidenced that animal and plant cells share common features in their response to saponins, paving the way for novel opportunities for both basic and applied research. Indeed, there is a certain interest in replacing the animal models for pharmacological research, at least when preliminary large-scale cytotoxicity tests are performed on wide collections of natural extracts and/or purified compounds. The review provides an up-date of the molecular pathways (signal transduction, antioxidant response, DNA repair) associated with plant saponin bioactivity, with an emphasis on apoptosis induced by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) saponins. The comparison between animal and plant cells as tools for the study of saponin bioactivity is also discussed in view of the most recent literature and innovative future applications.

  20. Nitric Oxide Functions as a Signal in Ultraviolet-B-Induced Baicalin Accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jie Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, Nω-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA, and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation.

  1. Pretreatment of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cultures with Methyl Jasmonate Enhances Elicitation of Activated Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauss, H.; Jeblick, W.; Ziegler, J.; Krabler, W.

    1994-05-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) were used to demonstrate an influence of jasmonic acid methyl ester (JAME) on the elicitation of activated oxygen species. Preincubation of the cell cultures for 1 d with JAME greatly enhanced the subsequent induction by an elicitor preparation from cell walls of Phytophtora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg elicitor) and by the polycation chitosan. Shorter preincubation times with JAME were less efficient, and the effect was saturated at about 5 [mu]M JAME. Treatment of the crude Pmg elicitor with trypsin abolished induction of activated oxygen species, an effect similar to that seen with elicitation of coumarin secretion. These results suggest that JAME conditioned the parsley suspension cells in a time-dependent manner to become more responsive to elicitation, reminiscent of developmental effects caused by JAME in whole plants. It is interesting that pretreatment of the parsley cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic and 5-chlorosalicylic acid only slightly enhanced the elicitation of activated oxygen species, whereas these substances greatly enhanced the elicitation of coumarin secretion. Therefore, these presumed inducers of systemic acquired resistance exhibit a specificity different from JAME.

  2. Sidestream tobacco smoke is a male germ cell mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Williams, Andrew; Polyzos, Aris; Berndt-Weis, M Lynn; Yauk, Carole L

    2011-08-02

    Active cigarette smoking increases oxidative damage, DNA adducts, DNA strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and heritable mutations in sperm. However, little is known regarding the effects of second-hand smoke on the male germ line. We show here that short-term exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke or sidestream tobacco smoke (STS), the main component of second-hand smoke, induces mutations at an expanded simple tandem repeat locus (Ms6-hm) in mouse sperm. We further show that the response to STS is not linear and that, for both mainstream tobacco smoke and STS, doses that induced significant increases in expanded simple tandem repeat mutations in sperm did not increase the frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and erythrocytes in the bone marrow and blood of exposed mice. These data show that passive exposure to cigarette smoke can cause tandem repeat mutations in sperm under conditions that may not induce genetic damage in somatic cells. Although the relationship between noncoding tandem repeat instability and mutations in functional regions of the genome is unclear, our data suggest that paternal exposure to second-hand smoke may have reproductive consequences that go beyond the passive smoker.

  3. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hidefumi; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Although more than 600 single-transmembrane receptor kinase genes have been found in the Arabidopsis genome, only a few of them have known physiological functions, and even fewer plant receptor kinases have known specific ligands. Ligand-binding analysis must be operated using the functionally expressed receptor form. However, the relative abundance of native receptor kinase molecules in the plasma membrane is often quite low. Here, we present a method for stable and functional expression of plant receptor kinases in tobacco BY-2 cells that allows preparation of microsomal fractions containing the receptor. This procedure provides a sufficient amount of receptor proteins while maintaining its ligand-binding activities.

  4. Differential cell-specific cytotoxic responses of oral cavity cells to tobacco preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, Gaddamanugu L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of standardized (reference) tobacco preparations on human oral cavity cells, two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (101A, 101B) and normal human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) were treated with cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM), smokeless tobacco extracted with complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS), or whole-smoke conditioned media (WS-CM). EC-50 values, as determined by sulforhodamine B assays, varied among the cell types and agents. When normalized to nicotine content, cytotoxicity for WS-CM and TPM was higher compared to that observed with ST/CAS. Nicotine alone had no or only minimal cytotoxicity for all cell types in the applied range. Activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 was examined in all cell types at their respective EC-50 doses for the three agents. TPM, but not ST/CAS or WS-CM significantly activated caspase-3 in all three cell types. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for expression of the early apoptosis marker Annexin V and for nuclear staining by 7-aminoactinomycin (7-AAD) revealed different extents of apoptosis versus non-apoptotic cell death for the three agents. These data characterize differential responses of normal and malignant oral cells after exposure to TPM, ST/CAS, or WS-CM. They assist in understanding differential effects of combustible versus non-combustible tobacco products, and in identifying novel biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure and effect in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth and accumulation of flavan-3-ol in Camellia sinensis through callus culture and suspension culture method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutini Sutini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to assess flavan-3-ol biomass in C. sinensis through callus cultures and suspension cultures derived from leaf explants. Callus initiation of both cultures were using Murashige and Skoog medium were enriched with plant growth regulators Naphtha-lene Acetic Acid 3.0 mg/L and kinetin 2.0 mg/L. The procedures in this study were: (1 callus initiation by cutting the leaves of C. sinen-sis shoots then planted on Murashige and Skoog medium that were enriched with plant growth regulators, (2 sub callus culture on fresh medium that enriched with the same growth regulators, (3 suspension culture initiation of liquid callus, (4 growth examination of callus and suspension cultures in week 12, (5 examination of qualitative-quantitative content of flavan-3-olin suspension cultures at week 4. The results show that suspension cultures contain biomass flavan-3-ol that increase in the same manner of the increase of callus age and weight

  6. Enhanced camptothecin production by ethanol addition in the suspension culture of the endophyte, Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of a non-camptothecin producing plant, Catharanthus roseus when added in the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani known to produce camptothecin, resulted in enhanced production of camptothecin by 10.6-fold in comparison to that in control (2.8 μg/L). Interestingly, addition of pure ethanol (up to 5% v/v) in the suspension culture of F. solani resulted in maximum enhancement in camptothecin production (up to 15.5-fold) from that obtained in control. In the presence of ethanol, a reduced glucose uptake (by ∼ 40%) and simultaneous ethanol consumption (up to 9.43 g/L) was observed during the cultivation period (14 days). Also, the total NAD level and the protein content in the biomass increased by 3.7- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in comparison to that in control. The study indicates a dual role of ethanol, presumably as an elicitor and also as a carbon/energy source, leading to enhanced biomass and camptothecin production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Suicidal tomato cells: programmed cell death in suspension-cultured tomato cells and ripening fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening involves a series of highly organised biochemical, physiological and structural changes that are under strict genetic control. The plant hormone ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), in synergy

  8. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  9. DNA damage in male gonad cells of Green mussel (Perna viridis) upon exposure to tobacco products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagarajappa; Ganguly, A.; Goswami, U.

    in male gonad cells of Green mussel (Perna viridis) upon exposure to tobacco products Nagarajappa, Anutosh Ganguly And Usha Goswami* Gene Lab, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India, 403 004. Abstract. DNA damage (determined... on the occurrence of these endpoints of DNA damage in the reproductive cells of a marine invertebrate. In the work reported here, gonad cells of Perna viridis (Indian green mussel) were examined for DNA damage upon exposure to extracts of cigar tobacco. Cigar...

  10. Genetic transformation of tobacco NT1 cells with Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Kristin J; Gonzales, Barbara J; Mason, Hugh S

    2006-01-01

    This protocol is used to produce stably transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) NT1 cell lines, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated DNA delivery of a binary vector containing a gene encoding hepatitis B surface antigen and a gene encoding the kanamycin selection marker. The NT1 cultures, at the appropriate stage of growth, are inoculated with A. tumefaciens containing the binary vector. A 3-day cocultivation period follows, after which the cultures are rinsed and placed on solid selective medium. Transformed colonies ('calli') appear in approximately 4 weeks; they are subcultured until adequate material is obtained for analysis of antigen production. 'Elite' lines are selected based on antigen expression and growth characteristics. The time required for the procedure from preparation of the plant cell materials to callus development is approximately 5 weeks. Growth of selected calli to sufficient quantities for antigen screening may require 4-6 weeks beyond the initial selection. Creation of the plasmid constructs, transformation of the A. tumefaciens line, and ELISA and Bradford assays to assess protein production require additional time.

  11. Evaluation of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Biochemical Characterization from Static and Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajit Kanungo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal, is an erect evergreen shrub commonly known as Ashwagandha. It is widely used in Ayurvedic and in the traditional pharmacopeia system of India. It is one of the major ingredients in many formulations prescribed for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and rheumatism. In the present study the variation in quality and quantity of protein and antioxidant enzymes were evaluated biochemically and enzymatically from the static and suspension cultures. The nodal segments had provided maximum callusing of 90.25±0.06 % with (1mg/l of BAP and Kn with (2mg/l of 2, 4-D. The static and suspension cultures were taken for the analysis of total soluble protein and screened for antioxidant enzyme activity [catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX]. The protein content (1.2016 µg/µl was found to be higher in static culture samples (0.870 µg/µl than the protein obtained from the suspension culture. The antioxidant enzyme activity (CAT, SOD and GPX was higher in static culture samples (301.01± 0.42, 198.92 ± 0.29, 103.75 ± 0.11 nkat/ mg of protein than that of suspension culture. Specific activity staining of isozyme pattern exhibited three isoforms (CAT 1, CAT 2 and CAT 3 in static culture samples but CAT 1 was absent in the sample extracted from suspension cultures.  In case of SOD, four bands (SOD 1, SOD 2, SOD 3 and SOD 4 were found in both the samples whereas intensity of GPX activity was found to be more in static culture but both the samples exhibited three isoforms such as  (GPX 1, GPX 2 and GPX 3. The supplementation of required nutrients along with the phytohormones under in vitro condition might be an enhancing factor to yield antioxidant enzymes in the static culture samples. 

  12. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  13. Factors influencing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. somatic embryogenesis. I. The crucial role of pH and nitrogen in suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Wróblewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of obtaining and the characteristics of an embryogenic stabilised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. suspension culture which has many similarities to the carrot model are presented. The Specific Type I cells and proembryogenic mass were present in such a suspension. The maintenance of the proembryogenic stage took place in medium containing 2,4-D as the sole growth regulator, subsequent stages of embryogenesis occurred in hormone-free medium. Embryonic structures were also observed in medium with auxin in the late stages of growth, probably due to the depletion of 2,4-D in the medium during subculture. The choice of the proper inorganic nitrogen sources and the maintenance of correct proportions between them had a significant effect on the formation of these structures. We have shown that the pH of the medium with an embryogenic culture became stabilized regardless of the initial pH value and depended on the medium composition. The inoculum used for the initiation of subsequent subcultures of the stable suspension culture was 1 part tissue to 300 parts medium and was small in comparison to the systems described for the cucumber so far. From 1 ml of basic suspension 7 embryos were obtained on medium without growth regulators 10 days after inoculation, and this amount increased to 21 after 3 weeks. From 3.2% of the somatic embryos it was posible to regenerate plants. The high yield and synchronisation of the process and the development of embryos without passing through callus tissue create the possibility of using this system for molecular investigations and in the technology of somatic seed production.

  14. Sidestream tobacco smoke is a male germ cell mutagen

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Francesco; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Williams, Andrew; Polyzos, Aris; Berndt-Weis, M. Lynn; Yauk, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Active cigarette smoking increases oxidative damage, DNA adducts, DNA strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and heritable mutations in sperm. However, little is known regarding the effects of second-hand smoke on the male germ line. We show here that short-term exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke or sidestream tobacco smoke (STS), the main component of second-hand smoke, induces mutations at an expanded simple tandem repeat locus (Ms6-hm) in mouse sperm. We further show that the response t...

  15. Tobacco smoking alters the number of oral epithelial cells with apoptotic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michcik, Adam; Cichorek, Miroslawa; Daca, Agnieszka; Chomik, Piotr; Wojcik, Slawomir; Zawrocki, Anton; Wlodarkiewicz, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a global problem associated with the occurrence of many systemic diseases and tumors. Oral cavity tumors are common tobacco-related cancers, and of all the anatomical structures that are exposed to the effects of smoking, the oral cavity remains the least-explored area. Changes that occur in the biology of oral epithelial keratinocytes under the influence of the components of tobacco smoke often go unnoticed, if they are asymptomatic. The proper functioning of the oral epithelium is determined by the proliferation and differentiation of the cells in keratinization - the process of programmed cell death, which extends through to the mechanisms of apoptosis. Due to incomplete knowledge of the impact of tobacco smoke on the biology of keratinocytes, an evaluation of the cell cycle was conducted and the apoptosis of oral epithelial keratinocytes was analyzed. The study involved 77 patients divided into four groups according to their intensity of smoking, ranging from 0 to 27 pack-years. There were no differences in the cell count between nonsmokers and smokers in the proper cell-cycle phases. The percentage of proliferating cells in the oral epithelium is about 11%. A reduction in the number of early-apoptotic cells (caspase positive/propidium iodide negative) and an increase in the number of late-apoptotic cells (caspase positive/annexin V positive/propidium iodide positive) were observed to occur with increasing pack-years. The present study demonstrates that smoking does not affect the oral keratinocyte cell cycle, but does modify the number of cells with early and late apoptotic features. An intensification of the impact of tobacco smoke components on the biology of the oral keratinocytes is clearly noticeable at approximately 6 pack-years. This indicates that the biology of the first organ exposed to tobacco smoke - the oral epithelium - is altered by tobacco smoking.

  16. Biomass Yield and Steviol Glycoside Production in Callus and Suspension Culture of Stevia rebaudiana Treated with Proline and Polyethylene Glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced production of steviol glycosides (SGs) was observed in callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana treated with proline and polyethylene glycol (PEG). To study their effect, yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of proline (2.5-10 mM) and PEG (2.5-10 %) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension culture biomass (i.e. both fresh and dry weight content) was increased with 5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, while at further higher concentrations, they got reduced. Further, quantification of SGs content in callus (collected at 15th day) and suspension culture (collected at 10th and 15th day) treated with and without elicitors was analysed by HPLC. It was observed that chemical stress enhanced the production of SGs significantly. In callus, the content of SGs increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.09 and 1.83 % with 7.5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, respectively, which was about 4.0 and 7.0 times higher than control. However, in the case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of proline and polyethylene glycol enhanced the SG content from 1.36 (control) to 5.03 and 6.38 %, respectively, on 10th day which were 3.7 times and 4.7 times higher than control.

  17. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Holcomb

    Full Text Available Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6-4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke.

  18. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Potentials of Nigella sativa L. Suspension Cultures under Elicitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Chaudhry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae is an annual herb of immense medicinal properties because of its major active components (i.e., thymoquinone (TQ, thymohydroquinone (THQ, and thymol (THY. Plant tissue culture techniques like elicitation, Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hairy root culture, and so on, are applied for substantial metabolite production. This study enumerates the antibacterial and antioxidant potentials of N. sativa epicotyl suspension cultures under biotic and abiotic elicitation along with concentration optimization of the elicitors for enhanced TQ and THY production. Cultures under different concentrations of pectin and manganese chloride (MnCl2 elicitation (i.e., 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L showed that the control, MnCl2 10 mg/L, and pectin 15 mg/L suspension extracts greatly inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and S. aureus (MIC against E. coli, i.e., 2.35±0.8, 2.4±0.2, and 2.46±0.5, resp.. Elicitation decreased SOD enzyme activity whereas CAT enzyme activity increased remarkably under MnCl2 elicitation. MnCl2 10 mg/L and pectin 15 mg/L elicitation enhanced the DPPH radical inhibition ability, but ferric scavenging activity was comparable to the control. TQ and THY were quantified by LC-MS/MS in the cultures with high bioactive properties revealing maximum content under MnCl2 10 mg/L elicitation. Therefore, MnCl2 elicitation can be undertaken on large scale for sustainable metabolite production.

  19. Genotoxic Effects of Tobacco on Buccal Epithelium: Cell Nuclear Anomalies as Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohini Das Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use has toxic effects on different organs. This study was carried out to assess the effect of indigenous tobacco both in smoking (bidi and smokeless (gutkha, zarda and khaini forms on buccal cells at chromosomal level, through assessment of different nuclear anomalies as biomarker. Methods:This study was done on people living in Durgapur and its adjacent areas, West Bengal, India during January to July 2011. The samples were collected from 50 smokers (case group, 50 smokeless tobacco consumers or chewers (case group and 50 non-tobacco consumers (control group. Micronucleus assay was used to assess buccal cell nuclear changes. Buccal smears collected from study subjects were prepared on a grease free slide. Prepared slides were observed under light microscope and 2 to 5 fields were observed randomly for counting the different anomalies. In each field, the frequency of each anomaly was assessed in 100 cells and reported with percentage. Results:Chewers had significantly the highest frequency of all nuclear anomalies compared to smokers and healthy controls (HCs. Smokers also had significantly more anomalies compared to HCs. Condensed chromatin (CC, karyolysis (KL and bi-nucleation (BN in chewers and CC, pyknosis and BN in smokers were the most frequent anomalies. KL was significantly more frequent in chewers compared to smokers (59.8 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001, however, the frequency of other nuclear anomalies were not significantly different in these two study groups. Presence of each nuclear anomaly was significantly greater in older ages in all study groups. Conclusion:Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms compared to HCs. The genotoxic effects of tobacco on buccal cells are partly age-related. Cell nuclear anomalies in buccal tissue can be used as biomarker indicating the detrimental effects of tobacco.

  20. Transient expression of P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedas, Lisbeth Rosager; Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression in tobacco cells is a convenient method for several purposes such as analysis of protein-protein interactions and the subcellular localization of plant proteins. A suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells carrying the plasmid of interest is injected into the intracellula...

  1. Retrobiosynthetic study of salicylic acid in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustafa, Natali Rianika

    2007-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signal compound in systemic acquired resistance in plants. The level of this C6C1 compound in plants increases after a pathogenic attack. There are two biosynthetic pathways of SA, the phenylalanine pathway, which is thought to occur in plants, and the

  2. Inhibition of Src family kinases overcomes anoikis resistance induced by spheroid formation and facilitates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Fujita, Yumiko; Tabata, Chiharu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Nakano, Takashi; Fujimori, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells of serous membranes, and forms spheroid-like cell aggregates in pleural and peritoneal effusions. We examined the levels of anoikis, apoptosis induced by the detachment of cells from the extracellur matrix, in suspension culture in the human mesothelioma cell line NCI-H2052. NCI-H2052 cells were adherent in conventional monolayer cultures, but were found to form spheroids in suspension cultures using dishes with ultra-low cell binding capacity. NCI-H2052 cells proliferated in both cultures, but the proliferation rate was markedly lower in suspension cultures than in monolayer cultures. In addition, NCI-H2052 cells in suspension cultures showed little apoptosis, suggesting that the suspension culture induces anoikis resistance. Western blot analysis revealed that suspension cultures induced activation of Src family kinases (SFK) after spheroid formation. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multi-tyrosine kinases including SFK, abolished anoikis resistance in suspension cultures, indicating that SFK activated by spheroid formation are responsible for anoikis resistance. Cisplatin induced apoptosis in NCI-H2052 cells, but the apoptotic rate was significantly lower in suspension cultures than in monolayer cultures, suggesting that spheroid formation is involved in cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, a combination of dasatinib and cisplatin induced apoptosis more significantly than either alone in suspension cultures. These results suggest that spheroid formation induces resistance to anoikis and to cisplatin through SFK activation and that dasatinib facilitates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human mesothelioma cells.

  3. Effect of Alcohol and Tobacco Smoke on Long-Term Memory and Cell Proliferation in the Hippocampus of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rosane; Schneider, Ricardo; Quinteros, Dayane; Santos, Carolina Ferreira; Bandiera, Solange; Thiesen, Flavia Valadão; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Fernandes, Marilda da Cruz; Wieczorek, Marina Godinho

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol is frequently used in combination with tobacco and few studies explore interactions between these two drugs of abuse. Here, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol administration and concomitant exposure to tobacco smoke on long-term memory and on cell proliferation in the hippocampus of rats. Forty male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups and treated with alcohol (2g/kg by gavage) and/or exposed to tobacco smoke (from six cigarettes, by inhalation) twice a day (at 9:00 AM and 2:00 PM) for 30 days. Long-term memory was evaluated in the inhibitory avoidance test and hippocampal cell proliferation was analyzed for bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that alcohol, tobacco smoke, or their combination improved the long-term memory evaluated by the memory index in rats. Moreover, alcohol and tobacco coadministration decreased bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells by 60% when compared to the control group, while alcohol treatment decreased labeled cells by 40%. The tobacco group showed a nonsignificant 26% decrease in labeled cells compared to the control group. Chronic alcohol and tobacco coadministration improves the long-term memory in rats in the inhibitory avoidance test. However, coadministration decreases the cell proliferation in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting a deleterious effect by the combined use of these drugs of abuse. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Silicon does not mitigate cell death in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells subjected to salinity without ethylene emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaolei; Wang, Huahua; Hu, Yanfeng; Mao, Lina; Sun, Lili; Dong, Tian; Nan, Wenbin; Bi, Yurong

    2015-02-01

    Silicon induces cell death when ethylene is suppressed in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. There is a crosstalk between Si and ethylene signaling. Silicon (Si) is beneficial for plant growth. It alleviates both biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. How Si works in plants is still mysterious. This study investigates the mechanism of Si-induced cell death in tobacco BY-2 cell cultures when ethylene is suppressed. Results showed that K2SiO3 alleviated the damage of NaCl stress. Si treatment rapidly increased ethylene emission and the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes. Treatments with Si + Ag and Si + aminooxyacetic acid (AOA, ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced the cell growth and increased cell damage. The treatment with Si + Ag induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and ultimately cell death. Some nucleus of BY-2 cells treated with Si + Ag appeared TUNEL positive. The inhibition of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) production reduced the cell death rate induced by Si + Ag treatment. Si eliminated the up-regulation of alternative pathway by Ag. These data suggest that ethylene plays an important role in Si function in plants. Without ethylene, Si not only failed to enhance plant resistance, but also elevated H2O2 generation and further induced cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

  5. Combusted but not smokeless tobacco products cause DNA damage in oral cavity cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, G L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate genomic DNA damage in human oral cavity cells after exposure to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs). The oral carcinoma cell line 101A, gingival epithelial cells HGEC, and gingival fibroblasts HGF were exposed to TPM (total particulate matter from 3R4F cigarettes), ST/CAS (2S3 smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva), and NIC (nicotine). Treatments were for 24 h using TPM at its EC-50 doses, ST/CAS and NIC at doses with equi-nicotine units, and high doses for ST/CAS and NIC. Comet assays showed that TPM, but not ST/CAS or NIC, caused substantial DNA breaks in cells; only the high ST/CAS dose caused weak DNA damage. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence for γ-H2AX protein. These data revealed that the combusted TPP caused substantial DNA damage in all cell types, whereas the two non-combusted TPPs exerted no or only minimal DNA damage. They support epidemiologic evidence on the relative risk associated with consumption of non-combusted versus combusted tobacco products, and help to understand potential genotoxic effects of such products on oral cavity cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of cell proliferation, cell expansion and differentiation by the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, A; Hernould, M; Castera, S; Mouras, A

    2001-11-01

    Plant development depends upon the control of growth, organization and differentiation of cells derived from shoot and root meristems. Among the genes involved in flower organ determination, the cadastral gene SUPERMAN controls the boundary between whorls 3 and 4 and the growth of the adaxial outer ovule integument by down-regulating cell divisions. To determine the precise function of this gene we overexpressed ectopically the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SUPERMAN gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype. Histologically and cytologically detailed analyses showed that dwarfism is correlated with a reduction in cell number, which is in agreement with the SUPERMAN function in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, a reduction in cell expansion and an impairment of cell differentiation were observed in tobacco organs. These traits were observed in differentiated vegetative and floral organs but not in meristem structures. A potential effect of the SUPERMAN transcription factor in the control of gibberellin biosynthesis is discussed.

  7. Impact of tobacco smoke on upper airway dendritic cell accumulation and regulation by sinonasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jennifer K; O'Connell, Brendan P; Pasquini, Whitney; Mulligan, Ryan M; Smith, Sarah; Soler, Zachary M; Atkinson, Carl; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2017-08-01

    In these studies we examined the impact of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and active smoking on sinonasal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in controls or patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). In subsequent in-vitro investigations, we examined the influence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human sinonasal epithelial cells' (HSNECs) ability to regulate DC functions. Sinonasal tissue, blood, and hair were collected from patients undergoing sinus surgery. Smoking status and ETS exposure were determined by hair nicotine. DC subsets were examined by flow cytometric analysis. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) were treated with conditioned medium from non-smoked-exposed HSNECs (NS-HSNECs) or cigarette-smoke-extract-exposed HSNECs (CSE-HSNECs) to assess the impact of CSE exposure on HSNEC regulation of moDC functions. Control subjects who were active smokers displayed increased sinonasal moDC and myeloid dendritic 1 (mDC1) cells and reduced mDC2 cells, whereas, in CRSwNP patients, only moDC and mDC2 cells were altered. ETS was found to increase only moDCs in the CRSwNP patients. In vitro, CSE stimulated HSNEC secretion of the moDC regulatory products chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20, prostaglandin E2 , and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. CSE exposure also promoted HSNECs to stimulate monocyte and moDC migration. moDCs treated with CSE-HSNEC media stimulated an increase in antigen uptake and expression of CD80 and CD86. Last, CSE-HSNEC-treated moDCs secreted increased levels of interleukin-10, interferon-γ, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Active smoking, and to a lesser degree ETS, alters the sinonasal composition of DCs. A potential mechanism to account for this is that cigarette smoke stimulates HSNECs to induce moDC migration, maturation, and activation. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. Xylanse-Induced cell death events in detached tobacco leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.; Batchvarova, R.B.; Yakimova, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Plant-pathogen interactions are associated with plant defense mechanism known as hypersensitive response (HR), which is a form of programmed cell death (PCD). In the present work we have tested the potency of chemicals, proven as PCD inhibitors in other systems, to prevent the spread of cell death

  9. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  10. Tobacco and e-cigarette products initiate Kupffer cell inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, David A; Hom, Sarah; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Kupffer cells are liver resident macrophages that are responsible for screening and clearing blood of pathogens and foreign particles. It has recently been shown that Kupffer cells interact with platelets, through an adhesion based mechanism, to aid in pathogen clearance and then these platelets re-enter the general systemic circulation. Thus, a mechanism has been identified that relates liver inflammation to possible changes in the systemic circulation. However, the role that Kupffer cells play in cardiovascular disease initiation/progression has not been elucidated. Thus, our objective was to determine whether or not Kupffer cells are responsive to a classical cardiovascular risk factor and if these changes can be transmitted into the general systemic circulation. If Kupffer cells initiate inflammatory responses after exposure to classical cardiovascular risk factors, then this provides a potential alternative/synergistic pathway for cardiovascular disease initiation. We aimed to elucidate the prevalence of this potential pathway. We hypothesized that Kupffer cells would initiate a robust inflammatory response after exposure to tobacco cigarette or e-cigarette products and that the inflammatory response would have the potential to antagonize other salient cells for cardiovascular disease progression. To test this, Kupffer cells were incubated with tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts or pure nicotine. Complement deposition onto Kupffer cells, Kupffer cell complement receptor expression, oxidative stress production, cytokine release and viability and density were assessed after the exposure. We observed a robust inflammatory response, oxidative stress production and cytokine release after Kupffer cells were exposed to tobacco or e-cigarette extracts. We also observed a marginal decrease in cell viability coupled with a significant decrease in cell density. In general, this was not a function of the extract formulation (e.g. tobacco vs. e

  11. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivia, Mahadoon; Sunil, Sukumaran Nair; Rathy, Ravindran; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu Vijayamma

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the third most common cause of oral morbidity in India despite the numerous advances made in the treatment protocol. To compare the cytomorphometric changes of oral mucosal cells in normal subjects (Group I) with that of tobacco users without any lesion (Group II), tobacco users with oral leukoplakia (Group III), and tobacco users with oral SCC (Group IV) through a semi-automated image analysis system. Oral mucosal cells collected from study subjects (n = 100) stained using rapid Papanicolaou stain. Photomicrograph of 50 nonoverlapping cells captured at 50× magnification with a digital image capture system. Cytomorphometric analysis of cells in the captured images was performed with Image-Pro image analysis software. Image analysis was performed to obtain cell diameter (CD), cytoplasmic area (CyA), nuclear diameter (ND), nuclear area (NA), and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. These values were statistically compared among the groups using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney U test. The ND, NA, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio values were found to be increased in the samples collected from leukoplakia and oral SCC. The CD and CyA decreased compared to the normal mucosa in oral SCC samples. The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  12. A role for fibroblasts in mediating the effects of tobacco-induced epithelial cell growth and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Boysen, Megan; Sun, Chung Ho; Wong, Brian J F; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Krtolica, Ana

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoke and smokeless tobacco extracts contain multiple carcinogenic compounds, but little is known about the mechanisms by which tumors develop and progress upon chronic exposure to carcinogens such as those present in tobacco products. Here, we examine the effects of smokeless tobacco extracts on human oral fibroblasts. We show that smokeless tobacco extracts elevated the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen, oxidative DNA damage, and DNA double-strand breaks in a dose-dependent manner. Extended exposure to extracts induced fibroblasts to undergo a senescence-like growth arrest, with striking accompanying changes in the secretory phenotype. Using cocultures of smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts and immortalized but nontumorigenic keratinocytes, we further show that factors secreted by extracts-modified fibroblasts increase the proliferation and invasiveness of partially transformed epithelial cells, but not their normal counterparts. In addition, smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts caused partially transformed keratinocytes to lose the expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1, as well as involucrin, changes that are indicative of compromised epithelial function and commonly associated with malignant progression. Together, our results suggest that fibroblasts may contribute to tumorigenesis indirectly by increasing epithelial cell aggressiveness. Thus, tobacco may not only initiate mutagenic changes in epithelial cells but also promote the growth and invasion of mutant cells by creating a procarcinogenic stromal environment.

  13. Ultrastructural analysis of oral exfoliated epithelial cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers: A scanning electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Sameera Shamim Khan; Balasundari Shreedhar; Mala Kamboj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was undertaken to correlate epithelial surface pattern changes of oral exfoliated cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers and also to compare them with patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of fifty persons were included in the study, out of which thirty formed the study group (15 each tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers) and twenty formed the control group (ten each...

  14. Embryogenic callus formation, growth and regeneration in callus and suspension cultures of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' as affected by proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Krogstrup, Peter; Hansen, Jürgen

    1997-01-01

    The effects of proline additions to culture systems of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda Giganteus' were investigated. Proline was added in concentrations of 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 or 300 mM to the callus induction and suspension culture media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal salts and ...

  15. Evaluation of cytomorphometric changes in tobacco users and diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayashankar, Urmila; Guduru, Vijay Srinivas; Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Ramisetty, Sabitha Devi; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Namala, Srilekha

    2016-01-01

    To determine the cellular and nuclear area of keratinocytes in smears obtained from the oral mucosa of tobacco users, those with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and from normal healthy persons and resolve if any significant difference exists in these three groups. The study group comprised 100 subjects 20 controls, (40 OSCC patients-20 from lesional sites and 20 from nonlesional sites, 20 tobacco smokers and 20 tobacco chewers) in the age group of 25-75 years. Oral mucosal smears obtained by using a cytobrush were stained with Papanicolaou (PAP) stain and using 20X objective in trinocular Olympus model BX53 with Jenoptik scientific grade-dedicated microphotographic camera images were taken. With ProgRes version 8.0 image analysis software, 20 cells with defined borders were evaluated from each slide. Finally, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. Minitab and Excel software were used to analyze the data. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. The mean value of the cell area for groups I, II, III, IV, and V were 2838 ± 275.2, 2762.1 ± 511.4, 2861.9 ± 512.9, 2643.8 ± 333.3, and 3064.3 ± 362.7, respectively, the nuclear area (NA) was 83.88 ± 9.86, 106.19 ± 13.45, 95.11 ± 14.24, 85.55 ± 21.11, and 80.83 ± 13.45, respectively, and nuclear-to-cellular (N:C) ratio was 0.0297, 0.03924, 0.0337, 0.03257, and 0.02678, respectively. Thus, our study elucidates that cytomorphology gauges the effect of tobacco on the oral mucosa and possibly establishes a link between premalignant and malignant transformations even before a lesion is visibly noted.

  16. Interleukin-16-producing NK cells and T-cells in the blood of tobacco smokers with and without COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anders Andersson,1,* Carina Malmhäll,2,* Birgitta Houltz,1 Sara Tengvall,1 Margareta Sjöstrand,2 Ingemar Qvarfordt,1 Anders Lindén,3 Apostolos Bossios2 1Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Krefting Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3Unit for Lung and Airway Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Long-term exposure to tobacco smoke causes local inflammation in the airways that involves not only innate immune cells, including NK cells, but also adaptive immune cells such as cytotoxic (CD8+ and helper (CD4+ T-cells. We have previously demonstrated that long-term tobacco smoking increases extracellular concentration of the CD4+-recruiting cytokine interleukin (IL-16 locally in the airways. Here, we hypothesized that tobacco smoking alters IL-16 biology at the systemic level and that this effect involves oxygen free radicals (OFR.Methods: We quantified extracellular IL-16 protein (ELISA and intracellular IL-16 in NK cells, T-cells, B-cells, and monocytes (flow cytometry in blood samples from long-term tobacco smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and in never-smokers. NK cells from healthy blood donors were stimulated with water-soluble tobacco smoke components (cigarette smoke extract with or without an OFR scavenger (glutathione in vitro and followed by quantification of IL-16 protein.Results: The extracellular concentrations of IL-16 protein in blood did not display any substantial differences between groups. Notably, intracellular IL-16 protein was detected in all types of blood leukocytes. All long-term smokers displayed

  17. Arabidopsis and Tobacco superman regulate hormone signalling and mediate cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibau, Candida; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana superman (SUP) plays an important role during flower development by maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels in the inner two whorls. It was proposed that SUP maintains this boundary by regulating cell proliferation in both whorls, as loss-of-function superman mutants produce more stamens at the expense of carpels. However, the cellular mechanism that underlies SUP function remains unknown. Here Arabidopsis or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SUP was overexpressed in tobacco plants to substantiate SUP's role as a regulator of cell proliferation and boundary definition and provide evidence that its biological role may be mediated via hormonal changes. It was found that moderate levels of SUP stimulated cell growth and proliferation, whereas high levels were inhibitory. SUP stimulated auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes, and cells overexpressing SUP displayed reduced hormone dependency for proliferation and regeneration into plants. SUP also induced proliferation of female traits in the second and third flower whorls and promoted differentiation of petaloid properties in sepals, further supporting a role for SUP as a boundary regulator. Moreover, cytokinin suppressed stamen development and promoted differentiation of carpeloid tissues, suggesting that SUP may regulate male and female development via its effect on cytokinin signalling. Taken together, these observations suggest a model whereby the effect of SUP on cell growth and proliferation involves the modulation of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes. Furthermore, differential SUP expression or different sensitivities of different cell types to SUP may determine whether SUP stimulates or suppresses their proliferation.

  18. Culturing immobilized plant cells for the TUBUL space experiments on the DELTA and 12S Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, Björn J.; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Vos, Jan W.

    2007-09-01

    For the TUBUL experiments during the DELTA mission in April 2004 and 12S mission in March/April 2006 on board the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station we developed a method to culture and chemically fix plant suspension culture cells. The aim of the ten day experiment was to investigate the effect of microgravity on single plant cells. Fully automated experiment cassettes (Plunger Box Units) were developed by Centre for Concepts in Mechatronics (Nuenen, the Netherlands). Tobacco BY- 2 cells were immobilized in a semi- solid agarose matrix that was reinforced by a nylon mesh. This assembly allowed liquid medium refreshment, oxygen supply and chemical fixation, including a post- fixative wash. The method was optimized for post- flight analysis of cell structure, shape and size, cell division, and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The viability of cells in the agarose matrix was similar to cells grown in liquid medium under laboratory conditions, only the stationary growth phase was reached six days later.

  19. Estrogen receptor activation by tobacco smoke condensate in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Toshifumi; Shinagawa, Yuri; Asari, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kanae; Takanobu, Junko; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoke and breast cancer incidence has been studied for many years, but the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy has not been previously reported. We investigated the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy by performing in vitro experiments. We first prepared tobacco smoke condensate (TSC) and examined its effect on estrogen receptor (ER) activity. The ER activity was analyzed using MCF-7-E10 cells into which the estrogen-responsive element (ERE)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene had been stably introduced (GFP assay) and performing an ERE-luciferase assay. TSC significantly activated ERs, and upregulated its endogenous target genes. This activation was inhibited by fulvestrant but more weakly by tamoxifen. These results suggest that the activation mechanism may be different from that for estrogen. Furthermore, using E10 estrogen depletion-resistant cells (EDR cells) established as a hormonal therapy-resistant model showing estrogen-independent ER activity, ER activation and induction of ER target genes were significantly higher following TSC treatment than by estradiol (E2). These responses were much higher than those of the parental E10 cells. In addition, the phosphorylation status of signaling factors (ERK1/2, Akt) and ER in the E10-EDR cells treated with TSC increased. The gene expression profile induced by estrogenic effects of TSC was characterized by microarray analysis. The findings suggested that TSC activates ER by both ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Although TSC constituents will be metabolized in vivo, breast cancer tissues might be exposed for a long period along with hormonal therapy. Tobacco smoke may have a possibility to interfere with hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may have important implications for the management of therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of cytogenic damage in the form of micronuclei in oral epithelial cells in patients using smokeless and smoked form of tobacco and non-tobacco users and its relevance for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motgi, Anagha A; Chavan, Mahesh S; Diwan, Nikhil N; Chowdhery, Asha; Channe, Pallavi P; Shete, Mrinal V

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of cytological damages may help in reduction of morbidity and mortality in patients with oral cancer. (1) The primary aim of this study is to assess the cytogenic damage in the form of micronuclei (MN) in patients with smokeless and smoked tobacco using habit. (2) The secondary aim of this study is to compare the MN score in patients using tobacco and patients with no tobacco habit. (3) To find out incidence of MN according to duration and frequency of tobacco usage. This is a clinical study. A total of 100 patients each with the habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) chewing, smoked tobacco usage and with no habit were included in the study. Epithelial cell smears were prepared and slides were stained with Papanicolaou stain. Scoring of at least 1000 cells was done and a MN frequency score was assigned for exfoliated oral mucosal cells. Analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used. The difference between the total number of cells with MN was not appreciable between the smokeless and smoked tobacco groups, though the total number of MN was higher in subjects using SLT. Total number of cells with MN and the total number of MN were significantly lower in non-tobacco users when compared with tobacco users. There was very weak positive correlation between the total number of MN as per the duration and frequency of the tobacco habit. The use of smokeless and smoked tobacco are associated with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. SLT seems to cause more damaging effects than the smoked form.

  1. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abscisic acid induced freezing tolerance in chilling-sensitive suspension cultures and seedlings of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of abscisic acid (ABA) as a possible activator of cold acclimation process was postulated since endogenous levels of ABA increase temporarily or constitutively during cold-hardening. Exogenous application of ABA has been known to induce freezing tolerance at ambient temperatures in in vitro systems derived from cold hardy plants. Yet, some cell cultures acquired much greater freezing tolerance by ABA than by cold whilst maintaining active growth. This raises questions about the relationships among ABA, cold acclimation and growth cessation. To address this question, we attempted to 1) determine whether exogenous ABA can confer freezing tolerance in chilling-sensitive rice suspension cells and seedlings, which obviously lack the mechanisms to acquire freezing tolerance in response to cold; 2) characterize this phenomenon by optimizing the conditions and compare with the case of cold hardy bromegrass cells. Results Non-embryogenic suspension cells of rice suffered serious chilling injury when exposed to 4°C. When incubated with ABA at the optimal conditions (0.5-1 g cell inoculum, 75 μM ABA, 25-30°C, 7–10 days), they survived slow freezing (2°C/h) to −9.0 ~ −9.3°C (LT50: 50% killing temperature) while control cells were mostly injured at −3°C (LT50: -0.5 ~ −1.5°C). Ice-inoculation of the cell suspension at −3°C and survival determination by regrowth confirmed that ABA-treated rice cells survived extracellular freezing at −9°C. ABA-induced freezing tolerance did not require any exposure to cold and was best achieved at 25-30°C where the rice cells maintained high growth even in the presence of ABA. ABA treatment also increased tolerance to heat (43°C) as determined by regrowth. ABA-treated cells tended to have more augmented cytoplasm and/or reduced vacuole sizes compared to control cultures with a concomitant increase in osmolarity and a decrease in water content. ABA-treated (2–7 days) in vitro grown

  3. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivia, Mahadoon; Sunil, Sukumaran Nair; Rathy, Ravindran; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu Vijayamma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the third most common cause of oral morbidity in India despite the numerous advances made in the treatment protocol. Aim: To compare the cytomorphometric changes of oral mucosal cells in normal subjects (Group I) with that of tobacco users without any lesion (Group II), tobacco users with oral leukoplakia (Group III), and tobacco users with oral SCC (Group IV) through a semi-automated image analysis system. Materials and Methods: Oral mucosal cells collected from study subjects (n = 100) stained using rapid Papanicolaou stain. Photomicrograph of 50 nonoverlapping cells captured at 50× magnification with a digital image capture system. Cytomorphometric analysis of cells in the captured images was performed with Image-Pro image analysis software. Image analysis was performed to obtain cell diameter (CD), cytoplasmic area (CyA), nuclear diameter (ND), nuclear area (NA), and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. These values were statistically compared among the groups using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The ND, NA, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio values were found to be increased in the samples collected from leukoplakia and oral SCC. The CD and CyA decreased compared to the normal mucosa in oral SCC samples. Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions. PMID:26811574

  4. Methyl Jasmonate and Salicylic Acid Induced Oxidative Stress and Accumulation of Phenolics in Panax ginseng Bioreactor Root Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Yoeup Paek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the enzyme variations responsible for the synthesis of phenolics, 40 day-old adventitious roots of Panax ginseng were treated with 200 μM methyl jasmonate (MJ or salicylic acid (SA in a 5 L bioreactor suspension culture (working volume 4 L. Both treatments caused an increase in the carbonyl and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 contents, although the levels were lower in SA treated roots. Total phenolic, flavonoid, ascorbic acid, non-protein thiol (NPSH and cysteine contents and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical reducing activity were increased by MJ and SA. Fresh weight (FW and dry weight (DW decreased significantly after 9 days of exposure to SA and MJ. The highest total phenolics (62%, DPPH activity (40%, flavonoids (88%, ascorbic acid (55%, NPSH (33%, and cysteine (62% contents compared to control were obtained after 9 days in SA treated roots. The activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, substrate specific peroxidases (caffeic acid peroxidase, quercetin peroxidase and ferulic acid peroxidase were higher in MJ treated roots than the SA treated ones. Increased shikimate dehydrogenase, chlorogenic acid peroxidase and β-glucosidase activities and proline content were observed in SA treated roots than in MJ ones. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity remained unaffected by both MJ and SA. These results strongly indicate that MJ and SA induce the accumulation of phenolic compounds in ginseng root by altering the phenolic synthesis enzymes.

  5. New Synthetic Pyridine Derivate as Potential Elicitor in Production of Isoflavonoids and Flavonoids in Trifolium pratense L. Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kašparová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of secondary metabolites in Trifolium pratense L. suspension culture of the family of legume plants (Fabaceae is low, and therefore there was an attempt to increase it by elicitation. New synthetic substance, 2-(2-fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanylpyridine-4-carbothioamide, was tested as elicitor—a substance that showed the best elicitation effect after 48-hour application of 1 μmol L−1 concentration. Maximum contents of genistin (11.60 mg g−1 DW, daidzein (8.31 mg g−1 DW, and genistein (1.50 mg g−1 DW were recorded, and the production of these isoflavonoids thus significantly increased, when compared with the control, by 152%, 151%, and 400%. The maximum content of flavonoids (5.78 mg g−1 DW and the increase in the production by 142%, when compared with the control, were induced by 6-hour application of 100 μmol L−1 concentration. The tested substance showed to be an effective elicitor of phenylpropane metabolism.

  6. Increased of Langerhans Cells in Smokeless Tobacco-Associated Oral Mucosal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    and Eacute;rica Dorigatti de and Aacute;vila

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the changes in the number of Langerhans Cells (LC observed in the epithelium of smokeless tobacco (SLT-induced lesions. Methods: Microscopic sections from biopsies carried out in the buccal mucosa of twenty patients, who were chronic users of smokeless tobacco (SLT, were utilized. For the control group, twenty non-SLT users of SLT with normal mucosa were selected. The sections were studied with routine coloring and were immunostained for S-100, CD1a, Ki-67 and p63. These data were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test to investigate the differences in the expression of immune markers in normal mucosa and in SLT-induced leukoplakia lesions. Results: There was a significant difference in the immunolabeling of all markers between normal mucosa and SLT-induced lesions (p<0.001. The leukoplakia lesions in chronic SLT users demonstrated a significant increase in the number of Langerhans cells and in the absence of epithelial dysplasia. Conclusion: The increase in the number of these cells represents the initial stage of leukoplakia. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 85-93

  7. Regeneration of transgenic cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from microbombarded embryogenic suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpke, C; Taylor, N; Cárcamo, R; Konan, N K; Marmey, P; Henshaw, G G; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C

    1996-06-01

    A protocol was established for the introduction of DNA into embryogenic suspension-derived tissues of cassava via microparticle bombardment, for the selection of genetically transformed cells, and for the regeneration of fully transgenic plants from these cells. The plasmid DNA used for bombardment contained a gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and a gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (uidA). Selection of bombarded tissue with paromomycin resulted in the establishment of putative transgenic embryogenic calli. In most of these calli, beta-glucuronidase was detected histochemically. Molecular analysis of paromomycin-resistant embryogenic calli and of plants regenerated from these calli, confirmed the stable integration of bombarded DNA into the cassava genome.

  8. Femtosecond Optoinjection of Intact Tobacco BY-2 Cells Using a Reconfigurable Photoporation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Claire A.; Kalies, Stefan; Cizmár, Tomás; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Torrance, Lesley; Roberts, Alison G.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2013-01-01

    A tightly-focused ultrashort pulsed laser beam incident upon a cell membrane has previously been shown to transiently increase cell membrane permeability while maintaining the viability of the cell, a technique known as photoporation. This permeability can be used to aid the passage of membrane-impermeable biologically-relevant substances such as dyes, proteins and nucleic acids into the cell. Ultrashort-pulsed lasers have proven to be indispensable for photoporating mammalian cells but they have rarely been applied to plant cells due to their larger sizes and rigid and thick cell walls, which significantly hinders the intracellular delivery of exogenous substances. Here we demonstrate and quantify femtosecond optical injection of membrane impermeable dyes into intact BY-2 tobacco plant cells growing in culture, investigating both optical and biological parameters. Specifically, we show that the long axial extent of a propagation invariant (“diffraction-free”) Bessel beam, which relaxes the requirements for tight focusing on the cell membrane, outperforms a standard Gaussian photoporation beam, achieving up to 70% optoinjection efficiency. Studies on the osmotic effects of culture media show that a hypertonic extracellular medium was found to be necessary to reduce turgor pressure and facilitate molecular entry into the cells. PMID:24244456

  9. Femtosecond optoinjection of intact tobacco BY-2 cells using a reconfigurable photoporation platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A Mitchell

    Full Text Available A tightly-focused ultrashort pulsed laser beam incident upon a cell membrane has previously been shown to transiently increase cell membrane permeability while maintaining the viability of the cell, a technique known as photoporation. This permeability can be used to aid the passage of membrane-impermeable biologically-relevant substances such as dyes, proteins and nucleic acids into the cell. Ultrashort-pulsed lasers have proven to be indispensable for photoporating mammalian cells but they have rarely been applied to plant cells due to their larger sizes and rigid and thick cell walls, which significantly hinders the intracellular delivery of exogenous substances. Here we demonstrate and quantify femtosecond optical injection of membrane impermeable dyes into intact BY-2 tobacco plant cells growing in culture, investigating both optical and biological parameters. Specifically, we show that the long axial extent of a propagation invariant ("diffraction-free" Bessel beam, which relaxes the requirements for tight focusing on the cell membrane, outperforms a standard Gaussian photoporation beam, achieving up to 70% optoinjection efficiency. Studies on the osmotic effects of culture media show that a hypertonic extracellular medium was found to be necessary to reduce turgor pressure and facilitate molecular entry into the cells.

  10. Exposure to ethanol and tobacco smoke in relation to level of PCNA antigen expression in pancreatic and hepatic rat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Dylik, Anna; Kulza, Maksymilian; Florek, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Seńczuk-Przybyłowska, Monika; Marszałek, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Previous results proved that simultaneous effect of tobacco smoke constituents and alcohol consumption may change toxicity of these substances and have a greater effect on hepatic and pancreatic disease and cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate hepatocyte and pancreatic cells regeneration after tobacco and/or ethanol treatment. In the study, four groups of rats were used - alcohol non-addicted and addicted male and female rats. The animals from each group were exposed to tobacco smoke, to ethanol or tobacco smoke and ethanol. After the exposure, pancreas and liver were collected at two time-points--5 and 24 h. Biochemical methods were used to measure concentration of ethanol and cotinine in blood and plasma. Additionally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index (PCNA-LI), an S-phase marker was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and morphometric method. Our experimental results showed that the exposure of rats to tobacco smoke does not have influence on ethanol concentration in blood of non-addicted (male, female) and addicted (male and female) animals. The results also proved that alcohol addiction did not influence nicotine metabolism in all animals exposed to tobacco smoke. Morphological studies of tissues display significant damage in liver of addicted males, including fatty degradation, fibrosis and slight inflammatory infiltrate. Immunohistochemical studies revealed at first, significant increase of PCNA-LI and, thus, increased cell proliferation activity and damage in tissues were observed in hepatic and pancreatic cells of addicted males when compared with non-addicted males. Secondly, comparison between addicted males and addicted females revealed that PCNA-LI in females is significantly lower, both in hepatic and pancreatic tissues. And finally, animals exposed only to ethanol and to tobacco smoke plus ethanol were characterized by higher percentage of PCNA positive cells in relation to animals exposed only to tobacco smoke

  11. Evaluation of cytomorphometric changes in tobacco users and diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma individuals

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    Urmila Udayashankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the cellular and nuclear area of keratinocytes in smears obtained from the oral mucosa of tobacco users, those with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and from normal healthy persons and resolve if any significant difference exists in these three groups. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 100 subjects 20 controls, (40 OSCC patients-20 from lesional sites and 20 from nonlesional sites, 20 tobacco smokers and 20 tobacco chewers in the age group of 25-75 years. Oral mucosal smears obtained by using a cytobrush were stained with Papanicolaou (PAP stain and using 20X objective in trinocular Olympus model BX53 with Jenoptik scientific grade-dedicated microphotographic camera images were taken. With ProgRes version 8.0 image analysis software, 20 cells with defined borders were evaluated from each slide. Finally, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Minitab and Excel software were used to analyze the data. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. Results: The mean value of the cell area for groups I, II, III, IV, and V were 2838 ± 275.2, 2762.1 ± 511.4, 2861.9 ± 512.9, 2643.8 ± 333.3, and 3064.3 ± 362.7, respectively, the nuclear area (NA was 83.88 ± 9.86, 106.19 ± 13.45, 95.11 ± 14.24, 85.55 ± 21.11, and 80.83 ± 13.45, respectively, and nuclear-to-cellular (N:C ratio was 0.0297, 0.03924, 0.0337, 0.03257, and 0.02678, respectively. Conclusions: Thus, our study elucidates that cytomorphology gauges the effect of tobacco on the oral mucosa and possibly establishes a link between premalignant and malignant transformations even before a lesion is visibly noted.

  12. Enhancement of 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    hydroxyecdysone production of. Vitex glabrata suspension .... hydroxyecdysone production in V. glabrata cell suspension cultures. Determination of dry cell ... residue was dissolved in 3 ml methanol and vortexed with 2 ml hexane twice.

  13. Effect of culture conditions on synthesis of triterpenoids in suspension cultures of Lantana camara L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Sisodia, Vikash; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-01-01

    Present report is aimed to study the batch kinetics of Lantana camara. Dynamic changes of parameters, such as pH, conductivity, wet and dry cell concentrations, consumption of major nutrients, carbon source and agitation speeds were investigated to understand the culture characteristics of suspended cells grown on MS + BAP + 2,4-D + NAA in shake flasks. Results indicated that the consumption of phosphate resulted in the onset of stationary phase in cultures. Maltose as carbon source resulted in production of maximum triterpenoid content (31.08 mg/L) while the least was found on glucose (10.69 mg/L). Notably, both did not support accumulation of betulinic acid. Sucrose, although stood second in terms of quantity (21.6 mg/L), supported the production of all the three triterpenoids-oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acids. Maximum viable cultures were obtained at a rotation speed of 120 rpm. The present finding will form a background for further scale-up related studies.

  14. Biotechnological production of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator protein (reteplase) from transplastomic tobacco cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Diego; Abdoli-Nasab, Maryam; Jalali-Javaran, Mokhtar; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Cusidó, Rosa M; Corchete, Purificación; Palazon, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Transplastomic plants are a system of choice for the mass production of biopharmaceuticals due to the polyploidy of the plastid genome and the low risk of pollen-mediated outcrossing because of maternal inheritance. However, as field-grown plants, they can suffer contamination by agrochemicals and fertilizers, as well as fluctuations in yield due to climatic changes and infections. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), a protein used to treat heart attacks, converts plasminogen into plasmine, which digests fibrin and induces the dissolution of fibrin clots. Recently, we obtained transplastomic tobacco plants carrying the K2S gene encoding truncated human tPA (reteplase) with improved biological activity, and confirmed the presence of the target protein in the transgenic plant leaves. Considering the advantages of plant cell cultures for biopharmaceutical production, we established a cell line derived from the K2S tobacco plants. The active form of reteplase was quantified in cultures grown in light or darkness, with production 3-fold higher in light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression, intracellular targeting and purification of HIV Nef variants in tobacco cells

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    Baschieri Selene

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants may represent excellent alternatives to classical heterologous protein expression systems, especially for the production of biopharmaceuticals and vaccine components. Modern vaccines are becoming increasingly complex, with the incorporation of multiple antigens. Approaches towards developing an HIV vaccine appear to confirm this, with a combination of candidate antigens. Among these, HIV-Nef is considered a promising target for vaccine development because immune responses directed against this viral protein could help to control the initial steps of viral infection and to reduce viral loads and spreading. Two isoforms of Nef protein can be found in cells: a full-length N-terminal myristoylated form (p27, 27 kDa and a truncated form (p25, 25 kDa. Here we report the expression and purification of HIV Nef from transgenic tobacco. Results We designed constructs to direct the expression of p25 and p27 Nef to either the cytosol or the secretory pathway. We tested these constructs by transient expression in tobacco protoplasts. Cytosolic Nef polypeptides are correctly synthesised and are stable. The same is not true for Nef polypeptides targeted to the secretory pathway by virtue of a signal peptide. We therefore generated transgenic plants expressing cytosolic, full length or truncated Nef. Expression levels were variable, but in some lines they averaged 0.7% of total soluble proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged Nef was easily purified from transgenic tissue in a one-step procedure. Conclusion We have shown that transient expression can help to rapidly determine the best cellular compartment for accumulation of a recombinant protein. We have successfully expressed HIV Nef polypeptides in the cytosol of transgenic tobacco plants. The proteins can easily be purified from transgenic tissue.

  16. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants.

  17. Melatonin Protects Cultured Tobacco Cells against Lead-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of Cytochrome c Translocation

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    Agnieszka Kobylińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin was discovered in plants more than two decades ago and, especially in the last decade, it has captured the interests of plant biologists. Beyond its possible participation in photoperiod processes and its role as a direct free radical scavenger as well as an indirect antioxidant, melatonin is also involved in plant defense strategies/reactions. However, the mechanisms that this indoleamine activates to improve plant stress tolerance still require identification and clarification. In the present report, the ability of exogenous melatonin to protect Nicotiana tabacum L. line Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2 suspension cells against the toxic exposure to lead was examined. Studies related to cell proliferation and viability, DNA fragmentation, possible translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, cell morphology after fluorescence staining and also the in situ accumulation of superoxide radicals measured via the nitro blue tetrazolium reducing test, were conducted. This work establishes a novel finding by correcting the inhibition of release of mitochondrial ctytocrome c in to the cytoplasm with the high accumulation of superoxide radicals. The results show that pretreatment with 200 nm of melatonin protected tobacco cells from DNA damage caused by lead. Melatonin, as an efficacious antioxidant, limited superoxide radical accumulation as well as cytochrome c release thereby, it likely prevents the activation of the cascade of processes leading to cell death. Fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide documented that lead-stressed cells additionally treated with melatonin displayed intact nuclei. The results revealed that melatonin at proper dosage could significantly increase BY-2 cell proliferation and protected them against death. It was proved that melatonin could function as an effective priming agent to promote survival of tobacco cells under harmful lead-induced stress conditions.

  18. Cardiac development in zebrafish and human embryonic stem cells is inhibited by exposure to tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J Palpant

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking is a risk factor for low birth weight and other adverse developmental outcomes.We sought to determine the impact of standard tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes on heart development in vitro and in vivo.Zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to assess developmental effects in vivo and cardiac differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs was used as a model for in vitro cardiac development.In zebrafish, exposure to both types of cigarettes results in broad, dose-dependent developmental defects coupled with severe heart malformation, pericardial edema and reduced heart function. Tobacco cigarettes are more toxic than e-cigarettes at comparable nicotine concentrations. During cardiac differentiation of hESCs, tobacco smoke exposure results in a delayed transition through mesoderm. Both types of cigarettes decrease expression of cardiac transcription factors in cardiac progenitor cells, suggesting a persistent delay in differentiation. In definitive human cardiomyocytes, both e-cigarette- and tobacco cigarette-treated samples showed reduced expression of sarcomeric genes such as MLC2v and MYL6. Furthermore, tobacco cigarette-treated samples had delayed onset of beating and showed low levels and aberrant localization of N-cadherin, reduced myofilament content with significantly reduced sarcomere length, and increased expression of the immature cardiac marker smooth muscle alpha-actin.These data indicate a negative effect of both tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes on heart development in vitro and in vivo. Tobacco cigarettes are more toxic than E-cigarettes and exhibit a broader spectrum of cardiac developmental defects.

  19. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, R; Yera, R; Ortega, K; Tallman, G

    1985-09-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K(+) accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO(2) concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells.

  20. Arabinogalactan Proteins Are Involved in Salt-Adaptation and Vesicle Trafficking in Tobacco by-2 Cell Cultures

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    Enrique Olmos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse family of glycoproteins that are commonly found in most plant species. However, little is known about the physiological and molecular mechanisms of their function. AGPs are involved in different biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell expansion, tissue development and somatic embryogenesis. AGPs are also involved in abiotic stress response such as salinity modulating cell wall expansion. In this study, we describe how salt-adaptation in tobacco BY-2 cell cultures induces important changes in arabinogalactan proteins distribution and contents. Using the immuno-dot blot technique with different anti-AGP antibodies (JIM13, JIM15, and others, we observed that AGPs were highly accumulated in the culture medium of salt-adapted tobacco cells, probably due to the action of phospholipases. We located these AGP epitopes using immunogold labeling in the cytoplasm associated to the endoplasmic reticulum, the golgi apparatus, and vesicles, plasma membrane and tonoplast. Our results show that salt-adaptation induced a significant reduction of the cytoplasm, plasma membrane and tonoplast content of these epitopes. Yariv reagent was added to the control and salt-adapted tobacco cell cultures, leading to cell death induction in control cells but not in salt-adapted cells. Ultrastructural and immunogold labeling revealed that cell death induced by Yariv reagent in control cells was due to the interaction of Yariv reagent with the AGPs linked to the plasma membranes. Finally, we propose a new function of AGPs as a possible sodium carrier through the mechanism of vesicle trafficking from the apoplast to the vacuoles in salt-adapted tobacco BY-2 cells. This mechanism may contribute to sodium homeostasis during salt-adaptation to high saline concentrations.

  1. Metabolomic fingerprinting of primed tobacco cells provide the first evidence for the biological origin of cis-chlorogenic acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, MI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available , vol. 37(1): 205-209 Metabolomic fingerprinting of primed tobacco cells provide the first evidence for the biological origin of cis-chlorogenic acid Mhlongo MI Piater LA Steenkamp PA Madala NE Dubery IA ABSTRACT: Previous studies suggest...

  2. Involvement of DNA methylation in the control of cell growth during heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centomani, Isabella; Sgobba, Alessandra; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Dipierro, Nunzio; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Dipierro, Silvio; Viggiano, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta

    2015-11-01

    The alteration of growth patterns, through the adjustment of cell division and expansion, is a characteristic response of plants to environmental stress. In order to study this response in more depth, the effect of heat stress on growth was investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results indicate that heat stress inhibited cell division, by slowing cell cycle progression. Cells were stopped in the pre-mitotic phases, as shown by the increased expression of CycD3-1 and by the decrease in the NtCycA13, NtCyc29 and CDKB1-1 transcripts. The decrease in cell length and the reduced expression of Nt-EXPA5 indicated that cell expansion was also inhibited. Since DNA methylation plays a key role in controlling gene expression, the possibility that the altered expression of genes involved in the control of cell growth, observed during heat stress, could be due to changes in the methylation state of their promoters was investigated. The results show that the altered expression of CycD3-1 and Nt-EXPA5 was consistent with changes in the methylation state of the upstream region of these genes. These results suggest that DNA methylation, controlling the expression of genes involved in plant development, contributes to growth alteration occurring in response to environmental changes.

  3. Characterization of xylan in the early stages of secondary cell wall formation in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tadashi; Matsuoka, Keita; Ono, Hiroshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakano, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku; Iwai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Shinobu

    2017-11-15

    The major polysaccharides present in the primary and secondary walls surrounding plant cells have been well characterized. However, our knowledge of the early stages of secondary wall formation is limited. To address this, cell walls were isolated from differentiating xylem vessel elements of tobacco bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cells induced by VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7). The walls of induced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells consisted of cellulose, pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and contained more xylan and cellulose compared with non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells. A reducing end sequence of xylan containing rhamnose and galaturonic acid- residues is present in the walls of induced, uninduced, and non-transformed BY-2 cells. Glucuronic acid residues in xylan from walls of induced cells are O-methylated, while those of xylan in non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced cells are not. Our results show that xylan changes in chemical structure and amounts during the early stages of xylem differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ectopic expression of a tobacco vacuolar invertase inhibitor in guard cells confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Fen; Liang, Ke; Yin, Dong-Mei; Ni, Di-An; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-12-01

    There are several hypotheses that explain stomatal behavior. These include the concept of osmoregulation mediated by potassium and its counterions malate and chlorine and the more recent starch-sugar hypothesis. We have previously reported that the activity of the sucrose cleavage enzyme, vacuolar invertase (VIN), is significantly higher in guard cells than in other leaf epidermal cells and its activity is correlated with stomatal aperture. Here, we examined whether VIN indeed controls stomatal movement under normal and drought conditions by transforming Arabidopsis with a tobacco vacuolar invertase inhibitor homolog (Nt-inhh) under the control of an abscisic acid-sensitive and guard cell-specific promoter (AtRab18). The data obtained showed that guard cells of transgenic Arabidopsis plants had lower VIN activity, stomatal aperture and conductance than that of wild-type plants. Moreover, the transgenic plants also displayed higher drought tolerance than wild-type plants. The data indicate that VIN is a promising target for manipulating stomatal function to increase drought tolerance.

  5. Characterization of the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris lipopolysaccharide substructures essential for elicitation of an oxidative burst in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sebastian G; Meyer, Andreas; Holst, Otto; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten

    2005-07-01

    The lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of gram-negative bacteria are essential for perception of pathogens by animals and plants. To identify the LPS substructure or substructures recognized by plants, we isolated water-phase (w)LPS from different Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris mutants and analyzed their sugar content and ability to elicit an oxidative burst in tobacco cell cultures. The different wLPS species are characterized by lacking repetitive subunits of the O-antigen, the complete O-antigen, or even most of the core region. Because loss of lipid A would be lethal to bacteria, pure lipid A was obtained from X. campestris pv. campestris wild-type wLPS by chemical hydrolysis. The elicitation experiments with tobacco cell cultures revealed that LPS detection is dependent on the bioavailability of the amphiphilic wLPS, which can form micelles in an aqueous environment. By adding deoxycholate to prevent micelle formation, all of the tested wLPS species showed elicitation capability, whereas the lipid A alone was not able to trigger an oxidative burst or calcium transients in tobacco cell cultures. These results suggest that the LPS substructure recognized by tobacco cells is localized in the inner core region of the LPS, consisting of glucose, galacturonic acid, and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acids. Although lipid A alone seems to be insufficient to induce an oxidative burst in tobacco cell cultures, it cannot be ruled out that lipid A or the glucosamine backbone may be important in combination with the inner core structures.

  6. Effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana for Steviol glycoside production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycosides are natural non-caloric sweeteners which are extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana plant. Present study deals the effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia plant for steviol glycoside (SGs) production. Yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of NaCl (0.05-0.20%) and Na2CO3 (0.0125-0.10%) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension biomass cultured on salts showed less growth as well as browning of medium when compared with control. Quantification of SGs content in callus culture (collected on 15th day) and suspension cultures (collected at 10th and 15th days) treated with and without salts were analyzed by HPLC. It was found that abiotic stress induced by the salts increased the concentration of SGs significantly. In callus, the quantity of SGs got increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.43 and 1.57% with 0.10% NaCl, and 0.025% Na2CO3, respectively. However, in case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of NaCl and Na2CO3 enhanced the SGs content from 1.36 (control) to 2.61 and 5.14%, respectively, on the 10th day.

  7. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sucrose concentration in the growth medium affects the cell wall composition of tobacco pollen tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Giovanni; Faleri, Claudia; Cresti, Mauro; Cai, Giampiero

    2014-09-01

    The cell wall of pollen tubes is organized in both spatial and temporal order to allow the pollen tube to grow according to external conditions. The deposition of methyl-esterified and acid pectins in addition to callose/cellulose occurs according to a series of temporally succeeding events. In this work, we attempted to determine how the composition of the external growth medium (in terms of osmolarity) could affect the deposition of cell wall components. Pollen tubes of tobacco were grown in a hypotonic medium and then analyzed for the distribution of pectins and callose/cellulose [as well as for the distribution of the enzyme callose synthase (CALS)]. The data indicate that pollen tubes grown in a hypotonic medium show changes of the initial growth rate followed by modification of the deposition of acid pectins and, to a lesser extent, of CALS. These observations indicate that, under the osmolarity determined by the growth medium, pollen tubes adapt their cell wall to the changing conditions of growth.

  9. Micronucleus Investigation in Buccal Mucosal Cells of Young Waterpipe Tobacco Smokers in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Arbabi Bidgoli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Waterpipe Tobacco Smoke(WTS is an unhealthy life style that may increase the risk of genotoxic responses and chronic diseases such as cancer. Micronucleus test is a successful and reliable method which is used for screening of genetotoxic responses of whole body and also for screening those people who had already exposed to genotoxic compounds. In this study, specific questionnaires were designed and used for studying the role of shisha smoking on the extent of genotoxic responses and cases were looked for MNs with this biomonitoring method. The study population was 20 young adults (12men and 8 women who born and lived in Tehran and had continuously smoked shisha more than 2 times weekly for more than 2 years . The associations between all recorded background, environmental and nutritional factors and increased incidence of Micronucleus in buccal cells of all cases were considered by statistical methods. In order to count Micronucleus levels, buccal cells were collected from buccal mucosa of these people with small-headed toothbrush and was placed the head of tooth brush into buccal cell buffer, slides were prepared and cells were stained with Schiff’s reagent and light green .Finally 1000 differentiated cells were recorded by optical microscope in each slide and the mean level of MN was determined for each volunteer . All steps were performed according to the buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt assay protocol. Increased incidence of Micronucleus was associated with the extent of shisha smoking per week (p=0.021, alcohol consumption ( p=0.021 and BMI ( p=0.027. The other effective factor in the occurrence of Micronucleus was gender/sex ( p=0.011 but nutritional factors didn’t change the level of Micronucleus in our cases. The relationship between other background and environmental factors were not significant too. It seems that long term consumption of shisha in both genders could increase the risk of genetic toxicity and occurrence of

  10. Tobacco smoke control of mucin production in lung cells requires oxygen radicals AP-1 and JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Erin; Gallup, Marianne; Sucher, Anatol; Li, Daizong; Gebremichael, Assefa; Lemjabbar, Hassan; Mengistab, Aklilu; Dasari, Vijay; Hotchkiss, Jon; Harkema, Jack; Basbaum, Carol

    2004-09-10

    In smokers' lungs, excessive mucus clogs small airways, impairing respiration and promoting recurrent infection. A breakthrough in understanding this pathology was the realization that smoke could directly stimulate mucin synthesis in lung epithelial cells and that this phenomenon was dependent on the cell surface receptor for epidermal growth factor, EGFR. Distal steps in the smoke-triggered pathway have not yet been determined. We report here that the predominant airway mucin (MUC5AC) undergoes transcriptional up-regulation in response to tobacco smoke; this is mediated by an AP-1-containing response element, which binds JunD and Fra-2. These transcription factors require phosphorylation by upstream kinases JNK and ERK, respectively. Whereas ERK activation results from the upstream activation of EGFR, JNK activation is chiefly EGFR-independent. Our experiments demonstrated that smoke activates JNK via a Src-dependent, EGFR-independent signaling cascade initiated by smoke-induced reactive oxygen species. Taken together with our earlier results, these data indicate that the induction of mucin by smoke is the combined effect of mutually independent, reactive oxygen species activation of both EGFR and JNK.

  11. Ultrastructural analysis of oral exfoliated epithelial cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers: A scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sameera Shamim; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Kamboj, Mala

    2016-01-01

    The study was undertaken to correlate epithelial surface pattern changes of oral exfoliated cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers and also to compare them with patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy individuals. In this cross-sectional study, a total of fifty persons were included in the study, out of which thirty formed the study group (15 each tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers) and twenty formed the control group (ten each of OSCC patients - positive control and ten normal buccal mucosa - negative control). Their oral exfoliated cells were scraped, fixed, and studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The statistical analysis was determined using ANOVA, Tukey honestly significant difference, Chi-square test, and statistical SPASS software, P characteristics observed by scanning electron microscopy between OSCC, tobacco smokers, betel nut chewers compared to normal oral mucosa have been tabulated. In normal oral mucosa, cell surface morphology depends on the state of keratinization of the tissue. Thus, it could prove helpful in detecting any carcinomatous change at its incipient stage and also give an insight into the ultra-structural details of cellular differentiations in epithelial tissues.

  12. TOBACCO CONTROL

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco-related diseases burden fragile healthcare systems and hinder productivity. Tobacco is ... relatively recent innovation of flavouring the tobacco. IDRC partners at the American. University of ... Tobacco and Taxes: A winning strategy, IDRC 2006 http://www.idrc.ca/en/ev-94887-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html. JA. C. O. B. K.

  13. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Schmeitzl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON, 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON, and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G. This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives.

  14. Influence of growth regulators and sucrose concentrations on growth and rosmarinic acid production in calli and suspension cultures of Coleus blumei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ju; Guiping, Liu; Xiujun, Liu; Xincai, Han; Hongmei, Liu

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid, which is reported to have adstringent, antibacterial, antiviral and antioxidant activities, is one of the most prominent secondary compounds in Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae). Rosmarinic acid (RA) production in different hybrids of C. blumei was estimated by HPLC. Conditions for HPLC were as follows: column, 150 x 4.6 mm; solvent system, methanol -0.1% phosphate (45 : 55); flow rate, 0.9 mL/min; detection: 325 nm. Two out of four hybrids of C. blumei (hy1; hy2) contain better rosmarinic acid production (0.9 and 1.0% dry weight, respectively) and the leaves have the highest rosmarinic acid production, followed by stems and roots. The hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (HPPR) gene expression levels were analysed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Hy3 shows highest level of HPPR gene expression out of four hybrids on genotype-specific patterns, and stems represent the highest level of HPPR gene expression among leaves, roots and stems. This was probably a result of the fact that the RA biosynthetic pathway was regulated by interactions of several enzymes necessary for biosynthesis. The explants from the hy1 leaves were used in subsequent studies on the effect of different growth regulators (2.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl-aminopurine (6-BA), different 2,4-dichlorophenxyaretic acid (2,4-D) and alpha-naphthaleneacetic (NAA) concentrations) and sucrose contents (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6%) on culture growth and rosmarinic acid accumulation. On the effect of different growth regulators, the best result is obtained when the B5-medium supplemented is with 2.0 mg L(-1) 6-BA, 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA, 0.8 mg L(-1) 2,4-D and 2% sugar, and solidified with 0.8% agar. In this case, both growth index and rosmarinic acid accumulation reach a maximum, which is 49.7 and 25.3% (dry weight), respectively. The optimal medium for suspension culture growth contains 2.0 mg L(-1) 6-BA, 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA, 0.8 mg L(-1) 2,4-D, 600 mg L(-1) inositel and 2% sugar, and the rosmarinic acid production is 1.7% (dry weight

  15. Uptake of auxotrophic cells of a heterocyst-forming cyanbacterium by tobacco protoplasts, and the fate of their associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, J.C.; Malmberg, R.L.; Wolk, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Auxotrophic cells of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis Kutz. were introduced into protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. in an attempt to engineer a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiosis. Conditions were established to maximize uptake of the cyanobacteria by use of polyethylene glycol. Culture of the novel association was not successful: tobacco protoplasts with Anabaena inside did not appear to divide. Most of the protoplasts expelled the cyanobacteria and simultaneously disintegrated. The reasons for the incompatibility are not known.

  16. In vitro cytokinin binding to a particulate fraction of tobacco cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, M.R.; Kende, H.

    1978-01-01

    At least two types of cytokinin-binding sites are present in a particulate fraction of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cells that sediments at 80,000 x g. The major binding component has a low affinity towards cytokinins, is resistant to heating at 100/sup 0/C, and is not specific for biologically active cytokinin analogues. The second site occurs in much lower frequency, is heat labile, shows high affinity towards cytokinins, and is specific for biologically active analogs of the hormone. The testing for binding specificity was mainly performed with a series of halogenated benzyladenine derivatives having a wide range of biological activities. The low-affinity binding site shows some of the same features as talcum powder, a non-biological material which binds cytokinins in a non-specific fashion. The properties of the high-affinity binding site are consistent with the expected characteristics of a cytokinin receptor. However, the role of the observed high-affinity binding site with regard to the biological action of cytokinins is not yet known.

  17. [Effects of local induction of ipt-gene in roots on cytokinins content in leaf cells tobacco plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskaia, L B; Akhiiarova, G P; Sharapova, G V; Dedova, M A; Veselov, S Iu; Zaĭtsev, D Iu; Kudoiarova, G P

    2014-01-01

    Identification of cytokinins in differentiated leaf cells has received little attention. We have carried out immunohistochemical localization of cytokinins in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants in which the level of increased due to induced in their roots the expression of ipt-gene controlling cytokinin synthesis. Immuno-labeling of cytokinins with the help of antibodies raised against zeatin riboside was characteristic of mesophyll cells. The label was localized in cytoplasm adjacent to cell walls and was absent in vacuoles. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed the presence of cytokinins in guard cells. Induction of cytokinin synthesis enhanced the immunohistochemical staining of both mesophyll cells and guard cells, which was accompanied by elevated stomatal conductance. The possibility of a direct effect of cytokinins on stomatal conductance and their indirect influence through photosynthesis in the mesophyll cells is discussed.

  18. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  19. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2016-02-01

    Chloride (Cl(-)) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl(-) when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl(-)-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5 mM Cl(-)) and no water limitation, Cl(-) specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1-5 mM range, Cl(-) played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl(-) also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl(-), these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl(-) responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Proliferation of the Golgi apparatus in tobacco BY-2 cells during cell proliferation after release from the stationary phase of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun, Moses; Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We have recently developed a new method aimed at mass photo-conversion of photo-convertible fluorescence protein (PFP) fluorescence in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells. Using this method we reported recently that the Golgi apparatus is generated by the de novo formation from ER and the division of pre-existing Golgi stacks with similar extents In this work we report that the proliferation of the Golgi apparatus in tobacco cells that enter the growing cycle from the non-dividing cycle is quite similar to that in rapidly growing cells and that de novo formation from the ER and division of pre-existing stacks seems to contribute almost equally to the proliferation.

  1. Up-regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in tobacco cells constitutively expressing the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Imara Y.; Love, John; Heilmann, Ingo; Thompson, William F.; Boss, Wendy F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of suppressing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) in plants, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells were transformed with the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (InsP 5-ptase), an enzyme which specifically hydrolyzes InsP(3). The transgenic cell lines showed a 12- to 25-fold increase in InsP 5-ptase activity in vitro and a 60% to 80% reduction in basal InsP(3) compared with wild-type cells. Stimulation with Mas-7, a synthetic analog of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan, resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase in InsP(3) in both wild-type and transgenic cells. However, even with stimulation, InsP(3) levels in the transgenic cells did not reach wild-type basal values, suggesting that InsP(3) signaling is compromised. Analysis of whole-cell lipids indicated that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdInsP(2)), the lipid precursor of InsP(3), was greatly reduced in the transgenic cells. In vitro assays of enzymes involved in PtdInsP(2) metabolism showed that the activity of the PtdInsP(2)-hydrolyzing enzyme phospholipase C was not significantly altered in the transgenic cells. In contrast, the activity of the plasma membrane PtdInsP 5 kinase was increased by approximately 3-fold in the transgenic cells. In vivo labeling studies revealed a greater incorporation of (32)P into PtdInsP(2) in the transgenic cells compared with the wild type, indicating that the rate of PtdInsP(2) synthesis was increased. These studies show that the constitutive expression of the human type I InsP 5-ptase in tobacco cells leads to an up-regulation of the phosphoinositide pathway and highlight the importance of PtdInsP(2) synthesis as a regulatory step in this system.

  2. Smokeless Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cancer Recent research shows the dangers of smokeless tobacco may go beyond the mouth. It might also ... role in other cancers, heart disease and stroke. Smokeless tobacco contains more nicotine than cigarettes. Nicotine is a ...

  3. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, M M; Franken, J; van Aelst, A; Angenent, G C

    2000-08-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the ovule outer integument. Both these functions indicate a role for SUP in cell proliferation. To study the function of the Arabidopsis SUP gene in more detail, we over-expressed the SUP gene in petunia and tobacco in a tissue-specific manner. The petunia FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 1 (FBP1) gene promoter was used to restrict the expression of SUP to petals and stamens. The development of petals and stamens was severely affected in both petunia and tobacco plants over-expressing SUP. Petals remained small and did not unfold, resulting in closed flowers. Stamen filaments were thin and very short. Detailed analysis of these floral organs from the petunia transformants showed that cell expansion was dramatically reduced without affecting cell division. These results reveal a novel activity for SUP as a regulator of cell expansion.

  4. In planta expression of A. cellulolyticus Cel5A endocellulase reduces cell wall recalcitrance in tobacco and maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaylock Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The glycoside hydrolase family 5 endocellulase, E1 (Cel5A, from Acidothermus cellulolyticus was transformed into both Nicotiana tabacum and Zea mays with expression targeted to the cell wall under a constitutive promoter. Here we explore the possibility that in planta expression of endocellulases will allow these enzymes to access their substrates during cell wall construction, rendering cellulose more amenable to pretreatment and enzyme digestion. Tobacco and maize plants were healthy and developed normally compared with the wild type (WT. After thermochemical pretreatment and enzyme digestion, transformed plants were clearly more digestible than WT, requiring lower pretreatment severity to achieve comparable conversion levels. Furthermore, the decreased recalcitrance was not due to post-pretreatment residual E1 activity and could not be reproduced by the addition of exogenous E1 to the biomass prior to pretreatment, indicating that the expression of E1 during cell wall construction altered the inherent recalcitrance of the cell wall.

  5. The combined effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, tobacco products, and ethanol on normal resting blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederblad, Lena; Thunberg, Ulf; Engström, Mats; Castro, Juan; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit

    2013-05-01

    Tobacco and ethanol consumption are crucial factors in the development of various diseases including cancer. In this investigation, we evaluated the combined effects of a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), with ethanol and tobacco products on healthy individuals. Pure nicotine, cigarette smoke extract, and Swedish snuff (snus) extract were used. The effects were examined by means of in vitro cell cycle progression and cell death of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. After 3 days, in vitro, resting PBMCs entered the S and G2 stage in the presence of 100 µM nicotine. The PBMCs only proceeded to S stage, in the presence of 0.2% ethanol. The nicotine- and ethanol-induced normal cell cycle progression correlated to a number of SNPs in the IL12RB2, Rad 52, XRCC2, P53, CCND3, and ABCA1 genes. Certain SNPs in Caspases 8, IL12RB2, Rad 52, MMP2, and MDM2 genes appeared to significantly influence the effects of EtOH-, snus-, and snus + EtOH-induced cell death. Importantly, the highest degree of cell death was observed in the presence of smoke + EtOH. The amount of cell death under this treatment condition also correlated to specific SNPs, located in the MDM2, ABCA1, or GASC1 genes. Cigarette smoke in combination with ethanol strongly induced massive cell death. Long-term exposure to smoke and ethanol could provoke chronic inflammation, and this could be the initiation of disease including the development of cancer at various sites.

  6. Use of cell phones and computers for health promotion and tobacco cessation by American Indian college students in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jo Ann W; Nelson, Lonnie A; Young, Sara L; Buchwald, Dedra; Roll, John

    2017-01-01

    Cell phones and personal computers have become popular mechanisms for delivering and monitoring health information and education, including the delivery of tobacco cessation education and support. Tobacco smoking is prevalent among American Indians (AIs) and Alaska Natives (ANs), with 26% AI/AN adult men smoking compared to 19% of Caucasian adult males and 22% of African American adult males. Smoking is even more prevalent in Northern Plains AI populations, with 42% of men and women reporting current smoking. The literature on the availability and use of cell phones and computers, or the acceptability of use in health promotion among AIs and ANs, is scant. The authors report findings from a survey of AI students regarding their cell phone and computer access and use. The survey was conducted to inform the development and implementation of a text messaging smoking cessation intervention modeled on a program developed and used in Australia. A 22-item paper and pencil survey was administered to students at tribal colleges in rural Montana. The survey questions included cell phone ownership and access to service, use of cell phones and computers for health information, demographics, tobacco use habits, and interest in an intervention study. The study was reviewed and determined exempt by the institutional review boards at the tribal colleges and the lead research university. The study was conducted by researchers at the tribal colleges. Survey respondents received $10 when the survey was completed and returned. Data analysis was performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Among 153 AI respondents, the mean age was 29 years, range was 18-64 years. Overall, 40% reported smoking cigarettes with a mean age of 16 years at initiation. A total of 131 participants (86%) had cell phones and, of those, 122 (93%) had unlimited text messaging. A total of 104 (68%) had smart phones (with internet access), although 40% of those with smart phones reported that

  7. Differential Signaling and Sugar Exchanges in Response to Avirulent Pathogen- and Symbiont-Derived Molecules in Tobacco Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Pfister

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with microbes whose ultimate aim is to exploit plant carbohydrates for their reproduction. Plant–microbe interactions (PMIs are classified according to the nature of their trophic exchanges: while mutualistic microbes trade nutrients with plants, pathogens unilaterally divert carbohydrates. The early responses following microbe recognition and the subsequent control of plant sugar distribution are still poorly understood. To further decipher PMI functionality, we used tobacco cells treated with microbial molecules mimicking pathogenic or mutualistic PMIs, namely cryptogein, a defense elicitor, and chitotetrasaccharide (CO4, which is secreted by mycorrhizal fungi. CO4 was perceived by tobacco cells and triggered widespread transient signaling components such as a sharp cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, NtrbohD-dependent H2O2 production, and MAP kinase activation. These CO4-induced events differed from those induced by cryptogein, i.e., sustained events leading to cell death. Furthermore, cryptogein treatment inhibited glucose and sucrose uptake but not fructose uptake, and promoted the expression of NtSUT and NtSWEET sugar transporters, whereas CO4 had no effect on sugar uptake and only a slight effect on NtSWEET2B expression. Our results suggest that microbial molecules induce different signaling responses that reflect microbial lifestyle and the subsequent outcome of the interaction.

  8. An analysis of chick limb bud intercellular adhesion underlying the establishment of cartilage aggregates in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, J A; von der Mark, K

    1990-07-01

    To examine the mechanism of intercellular adhesion in the establishment of limb skeletal elements we have investigated the process of limb bud cell aggregation in vitro. Limb bud cells are aggregation-competent immediately after their trypsin:collagenase dissociation in the absence of calcium. This aggregation is largely Ca2(+)-independent (CI) and is completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, when limb bud cells are first allowed to recover from Ca2(+)-free trypsin:collagenase dissociation, aggregation of the surviving population is exclusively Ca2(+)-dependent (CD) and completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. The presence of exogenous calcium during initial cell dissociation retains a functional CD aggregation mechanism. However, incubation of such cells with EGTA releases the CD component and converts the cells to a predominantly CI aggregation. Rabbits were immunized with limb bud cells exhibiting the recovered CD aggregation mechanism and the resulting immune sera were screened for their effect on cell aggregation. Relative to pre-immune sera, intact immune IgG agglutinated dissociated limb bud cells whilst immune Fab fragments inhibited their aggregation. The aggregation-inhibiting antiserum recognizes five major limb bud cell surface components with apparent molecular weights of 72K, 50K, 23K, 14.5K and 8.5K (K = 10(3) Mr), respectively. Limb bud cell surface plasma membranes were isolated by sucrose gradient density centrifugation and detergent-solubilized proteins coupled to Sepharose 4B with cyanogen bromide. Equivalent cell surface plasma membrane proteins were 125I-iodinated and applied to the affinity column. Limb bud cell surface protein affinity chromatography in the presence of exogenous calcium yields a single protein with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 8.5 K. This protein molecule elutes at 0.6 M NaCl, indicating a high affinity, is recognized by the aggregation-inhibiting antiserum, and is

  9. Comparative transcriptional profiling analysis of the two daughter cells from tobacco zygote reveals the transcriptome differences in the apical and basal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Tian-Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In angiosperm, after the first asymmetric zygotic cell division, the apical and basal daughter cells follow distinct development pathways. Global transcriptome analysis of these two cells is essential in understanding their developmental differences. However, because of the difficulty to isolate the in vivo apical and basal cells of two-celled proembryo from ovule and ovary in higher plants, the transcriptome analysis of them hasn't been reported. Results In this study, we developed a procedure for isolating the in vivo apical and basal cells of the two-celled proembryo from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, and then performed a comparative transcriptome analysis of the two cells by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH combined with macroarray screening. After sequencing, we identified 797 differentially expressed ESTs corresponding to 299 unigenes. Library sequence analysis successfully identified tobacco homologies of genes involved in embryogenesis and seed development. By quantitative real-time PCR, we validated the differential expression of 40 genes, with 6 transcripts of them specifically expressed in the apical or basal cell. Expression analysis also revealed some transcripts displayed cell specific activation in one of the daughter cells after zygote division. These differential expressions were further validated by in situ hybridization (ISH. Tissue expression pattern analysis also revealed some potential roles of these candidate genes in development. Conclusions The results show that some differential or specific transcripts in the apical and basal cells of two-celled proembryo were successfully isolated, and the identification of these transcripts reveals that these two daughter cells possess distinct transcriptional profiles after zygote division. Further functional work on these differentially or specifically expressed genes will promote the elucidation of molecular mechanism controlling early embryogenesis.

  10. Ethanol and the tobacco-specific carcinogen, NNK, contribute to signaling in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Minoo D F; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Cekanova, Maria; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2006-07-01

    Smoking is a well-documented risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK (4-[methylnitrosamino]-1-[3-pyridyl]-1-butanone), significantly induces pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in laboratory rodents. Recent observations suggest that ethanol enhances the tumorigenic effects of smoking. Ethanol consumption is associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis, also considered a predisposing factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because the precise role of ethanol in pancreatic carcinogenesis is not known, this study sought to elucidate the cumulative effects of ethanol and NNK on particular signal transduction pathways that might play a role in cell proliferation in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. The HPDE6-c7 cells are developed from pancreatic duct epithelial cells, which are the putative cells of origin of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Cell proliferation assays, Western blot, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays were used to demonstrate the effects of ethanol and NNK treatments on these cells. Ethanol cotreatments enhanced the NNK-induced proliferation of these cells. This response was inhibited by the adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A, mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/p44), and epidermal growth factor receptor-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cotreatments of NNK and ethanol also increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation, cAMP response element-binding family of proteins and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and protein kinase A activation. These findings suggest a potential role for these pathways contributing to the development of smoking- and alcohol-related pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  11. Application of rice (Oryza sativa L.) suspension culture in studying senescence in vitro (II).: Changes in DNA integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin,Hosseini; Mulligan,Bernard J.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the DNA content and organisation of senescing rice cell cultures (Taipei 309) were studied, using PCR and Southern blot analyses. A mitochondrial gene (coxII), a plastid gene (psaA) and a nuclear DNA maker (RG64) were analysed. The amplification of mitochondrial (mt), plastid and nuclear DNA produced the expected fragments, indicating that there were still some intact organelles and nuclei in the senescing rice cells. However, in plastid and nuclear DNA, changes in the number and s...

  12. Timing of the G1/S transition in tobacco pollen vegetative cells as a primary step towards androgenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyo, Masaharu; Nagano, Ai; Yamaji, Naoki; Hashimoto, Yuhki

    2014-09-01

    Mid-bicellular pollen vegetative cells in tobacco escape from G1 arrest and proceed to the G1/S transition towards androgenesis within 1 day under glutamine starvation conditions in vitro. In the Nicotiana tabacum pollen culture system, immature pollen grains at the mid-bicellular stage can mature in the presence of glutamine; however, if glutamine is absent, they deviate from their native cell fate in a few days. The glutamine-starved pollen grains cannot undergo maturation, even when supplied with glutamine later. Instead, they undergo cell division towards androgenesis slowly within 10 days in a medium containing appropriate nutrients. During the culture period, they ought to escape from G1 arrest to proceed into S phase as the primary step towards androgenesis. However, this event has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we demonstrated that the pollen vegetative cells proceeded to the G1/S transition within approximately 15-36 h after the start of culture. These results were obtained by analyzing transgenic pollen possessing a fusion gene encoding nuclear-localizing GFP under the control of an E2F motif-containing promoter isolated from a gene encoding one of DNA replication licensing factors. Observations using a 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine DNA labeling and detection technique uncovered that the G1/S transition was soon followed by S phase. These hallmarks of vegetative cells undergoing dedifferentiation give us new insights into upstream events causing the G1/S transition and also provide a novel strategy to increase the frequency of the androgenic response in tobacco and other species, including recalcitrants.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of tobacco pollen transcriptome unveils common pathways in polar cell expansion and underlying heterochronic shift during spermatogenesis

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    Hafidh Said

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many flowering plants produce bicellular pollen. The two cells of the pollen grain are destined for separate fates in the male gametophyte, which provides a unique opportunity to study genetic interactions that govern guided single-cell polar expansion of the growing pollen tube and the coordinated control of germ cell division and sperm cell fate specification. We applied the Agilent 44 K tobacco gene chip to conduct the first transcriptomic analysis of the tobacco male gametophyte. In addition, we performed a comparative study of the Arabidopsis root-hair trichoblast transcriptome to evaluate genetic factors and common pathways involved in polarized cell-tip expansion. Results Progression of pollen grains from freshly dehisced anthers to pollen tubes 4 h after germination is accompanied with > 5,161 (14.9% gametophyte-specific expressed probes active in at least one of the developmental stages. In contrast, > 18,821 (54.4% probes were preferentially expressed in the sporophyte. Our comparative approach identified a subset of 104 pollen tube-expressed genes that overlap with root-hair trichoblasts. Reverse genetic analysis of selected candidates demonstrated that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (CSD1, a WD-40 containing protein (BP130384, and Replication factor C1 (NtRFC1 are among the central regulators of pollen-tube tip growth. Extension of our analysis beyond the second haploid mitosis enabled identification of an opposing-dynamic accumulation of core regulators of cell proliferation and cell fate determinants in accordance with the progression of the germ cell cycle. Conclusions The current study provides a foundation to isolate conserved regulators of cell tip expansion and those that are unique for pollen tube growth to the female gametophyte. A transcriptomic data set is presented as a benchmark for future functional studies using developing pollen as a model. Our results demonstrated previously unknown functions of

  14. Smokeless tobacco extract (STE-induced toxicity in mammalian cells is mediated by the disruption of cellular microtubule network: a key mechanism of cytotoxicity.

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    Amlan Das

    Full Text Available Smokeless tobacco usage is a growing public health problem worldwide. The molecular mechanism(s underlying smokeless tobacco associated tissue damage remain largely unidentified. In the present study we have tried to explore the effects of aqueous extract of smokeless tobacco (STE on tubulin-microtubule, the major cytoskeleton protein that maintains cells morphology and participates in cell division. Exposure to STE resulted in dose-dependent cytotoxicity in a variety of mammalian transformed cell lines such as human lung epithelial cells A549, human liver epithelial cells HepG2, and mouse squamous epithelial cells SCC7, [corrected] as well as non-tumorogenic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMC. Cellular morphology of STE-treated cells was altered and the associated disruption of microtubule network indicates that STE targets tubulin-microtubule system in both cell lines. Furthermore it was also observed that STE-treatment resulted in the selective degradation of cellular tubulin, whereas actin remains unaltered. In vitro, polymerization of purified tubulin was inhibited by STE with the IC50 value∼150 µg/ml and this is associated with the loss of reactive cysteine residues of tubulin. Application of thiol-based antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly abrogates STE-mediated microtubule damage and associated cytotoxicity in both A549 and HepG2 cells. These results suggest that microtubule damage is one of the key mechanisms of STE-induced cytotoxity in mammalian cells.

  15. Overexpression of poplar xylem sucrose synthase in tobacco leads to a thickened cell wall and increased height.

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    Zhigang Wei

    Full Text Available Sucrose synthase (SuSy is considered the first key enzyme for secondary growth because it is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose and UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Although SuSy enzymes preferentially functions in the direction of sucrose cleavage at most cellular condition, they also catalyze the synthetic reaction. We isolated a gene that encodes a SuSy from Populus simonii×Populus nigra and named it PsnSuSy2 because it shares high similarity to SuSy2 in Populus trichocarpa. RT-PCR revealed that PsnSuSy2 was highly expressed in xylem, but lowly expressed in young leaves. To characterize its functions in secondary growth, multiple tobacco overexpression transgenic lines of PnsSuSy2 were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The PsnSuSy2 expression levels and altered wood properties in stem segments from the different transgenic lines were carefully characterized. The results demonstrated that the levels of PsnSuSy2 enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, fructose and glucose increased significantly, while the sucrose level decreased significantly. Consequently, the cellulose content and fiber length increased, whereas the lignin content decreased, suggesting that PsnSuSy2 plays a significant role in cleaving sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose to facilitate cellulose biosynthesis and that promotion of cellulose biosynthesis suppresses lignin biosynthesis. Additionally, the noticeable increase in the lodging resistance in transgenic tobacco stem suggested that the cell wall characteristics were altered by PsnSuSy2 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to study the cell wall morphology of stem, and surprisingly, we found that the secondary cell wall was significantly thicker in transgenic tobacco. However, the thickened secondary cell wall did not negatively affect the height of the plants because the PsnSuSy2- overexpressing lines

  16. Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Mesnard, François; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Bienaimé, Christophe; Robins, Richard J; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2004-05-01

    De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.

  17. Cytoskeletal dynamics in interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis analysed through Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, H; Green, P; Sambade, A; Doonan, J H; Lloyd, C W

    2011-04-01

    Transient transformation with Agrobacterium is a widespread tool allowing rapid expression analyses in plants. However, the available methods generate expression in interphase and do not allow the routine analysis of dividing cells. Here, we present a transient transformation method (termed 'TAMBY2') to enable cell biological studies in interphase and cell division. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression in tobacco BY-2 was analysed by Western blotting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Time-lapse microscopy of cytoskeletal markers was employed to monitor cell division. Double-labelling in interphase and mitosis enabled localization studies. We found that the transient transformation efficiency was highest when BY-2/Agrobacterium co-cultivation was performed on solid medium. Transformants produced in this way divided at high frequency. We demonstrated the utility of the method by defining the behaviour of a previously uncharacterized microtubule motor, KinG, throughout the cell cycle. Our analyses demonstrated that TAMBY2 provides a flexible tool for the transient transformation of BY-2 with Agrobacterium. Fluorescence double-labelling showed that KinG localizes to microtubules and to F-actin. In interphase, KinG accumulates on microtubule lagging ends, suggesting a minus-end-directed function in vivo. Time-lapse studies of cell division showed that GFP-KinG strongly labels preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not the metaphase spindle. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, Richard; Yera, Ramon; Ortega, Kim; Tallman, Gary

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K+ accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO2 concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells. PMID:16664404

  19. Differential responses to high- and low-dose ultraviolet-B stress in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

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    Shinya eTakahashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV-B irradiation leads to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, growth inhibition, and cell death. To evaluate the UV-B stress–induced changes in plant cells, we developed a model system based on tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2 cells. Both low-dose UV-B (low UV-B: 740 J m−2 and high-dose UV-B (high UV-B: 2960 J m−2 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death; these effects were more pronounced at high UV-B. Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest within 1 day after UV-B irradiation; neither low- nor high-UV-B–irradiated cells entered mitosis within 12 h. Cell cycle progression was gradually restored in low-UV-B–irradiated cells but not in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. UV-A irradiation, which activates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD photolyase, reduced inhibition of cell proliferation by low but not high UV-B and suppressed high-UV-B–induced cell death. UV-B induced CPD formation in a dose-dependent manner. The amounts of CPDs decreased gradually within 3 days in low-UV-B–irradiated cells, but remained elevated after 3 days in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Low UV-B slightly increased the number of DNA single-strand breaks detected by the comet assay at 1 day after irradiation, and then decreased at 2 and 3 days after irradiation. High UV-B increased DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay 1 and 3 days after irradiation. Caffeine, an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR checkpoint kinases, reduced the rate of cell death in high-UV-B–irradiated cells. Our data suggest that low-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks inhibit DNA replication and proliferation of BY-2 cells, whereas larger contents of high-UV-B–induced CPDs and/or DNA strand-breaks lead to cell death.

  20. Cadmium-induced programmed cell death signaling in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a summary of our study on cadmium-induced cell death signaling in a model system of suspension-cultured tomato cells. Exposure of the cells to CdSO4 induced typical for PCD (cytoplasm shrinkage and nuclear condensation) morphological changes of the dead cells. Ethylene and hydrogen

  1. Epitope tagging of legume root nodule extensin modifies protein structure and crosslinking in cell walls of transformed tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardo, Sébastien; Rathbun, Elizabeth A; Shanks, Michael; Jenkyns, Susan; Mak, Lora; Durrant, Marcus C; Brewin, Nicholas J

    2005-01-01

    Root nodule extensins (RNEs) are highly glycosylated plant glycoproteins localized in the extracellular matrix of legume tissues and in the lumen of Rhizobium-induced infection threads. In pea and other legumes, a family of genes encode glycoproteins of different overall length but with the same basic composition. The predicted polypeptide sequence reveals repeating and alternating motifs characteristic of extensins and arabinogalactan proteins. In order to monitor the behavior of individual RNE gene products in the plant extracellular matrix, the coding sequence of PsRNE1 from Pisum sativum was expressed in insect cells and in tobacco leaves. RNE products extracted from tobacco tissues were of high molecular weight (in excess of 80 kDa), indicating extensive glycosylation similar to that in pea tissues. Epitope-tagged derivatives of PsRNE1 could be localized in cell walls. However, the introduction of epitope tags at the C-terminus of RNE altered the behavior of RNE in the extracellular matrix, apparently preventing intermolecular crosslinking of RNE molecules and their covalent association with other cell wall components. These observations are discussed in the light of a computational model for the RNE glycoprotein that is consistent with an extended rod-like structure. It is proposed that RNE can undergo three classes of tyrosine-based crosslinking. Intramolecular crosslinking of vicinal Tyr residues is rod stiffening, end-to-end linkage is rod lengthening, and side-to-side intermolecular crosslinking is rod bundling. The control of these interconversions could have important implications for the biomechanics of infection thread growth.

  2. Dramatic secretion of recombinant protein expressed in tobacco cells with a designer glycopeptide tag is highly impacted by medium composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ningning; Dolan, Maureen; Wu, Di; Phillips, Gregory C; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    Cell growth medium composition has profound impacts on the O -glycosylation of a "designer" arabinogalactan protein-based module; full glycosylation is essential in directing efficient extracellular secretion of the tagged recombinant protein. Expression of recombinant proteins in plant cells as fusion with a de novo designed hydroxyproline (Hyp)-O-glycosylated peptide (HypGP) tag, termed HypGP engineering technology, resulted in dramatically increased secreted protein yields. This is due to the function of the HypGP tag as a molecular carrier in promoting efficient transport of conjoined proteins into culture media. To optimize the cell culture to achieve the best secreted protein yields, the medium effects on the cell growth and protein secretion were investigated using as a model system the tobacco BY-2 cell expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) fused with a (SP)32 tag (32 tandem repeats of "Ser-Pro" motif). The (SP)32 tag was found to undergo two-stage Hyp-O-glycosylation in plant cells with the dramatic secretion of the conjoined EGFP correlating with the triggering of the second-stage glycosylation. The BY-2 cell culture in SH medium generated a high secreted protein yield (125 mg/L) with a low cell biomass accumulation (~7.5 gDW/L). In contrast, very low secreted protein yields (~1.5 mg/L) with a high cell biomass accumulation (13.5 gDW/L) were obtained in MS medium. The macronutrients, specifically, the nitrogen supply greatly impacted the glycosylation of the (SP)32 tag and subsequent protein secretion. Modified MS medium with reduced nitrogen levels boosted the secreted EGFP yields to 168 mg/L. This study demonstrates the profound impacts of medium composition on the secreted yields of a HypGP-tagged protein, and provides a basis for medium design to achieve the highest productivity of the HypGP engineering technology.

  3. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

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    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  4. Promiscuous, non-catalytic, tandem carbohydrate-binding modules modulate the cell-wall structure and development of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olawole, O.; Jacobsen, E.; Timmers, J.F.P.; Gilbert, H.J.; Blake, W.; Knox, J.P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vincken, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We have compared heterologous expression of two types of carbohydrate binding module (CBM) in tobacco cell walls. These are the promiscuous CBM29 modules (a tandem CBM29-1-2 and its single derivative CBM29-2), derived from a non-catalytic protein1, NCP1, of the Piromyces equi cellulase/hemicellulase

  5. GSTM1 null polymorphism prevalence in tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma patients in South Indian population: A polymerase chain reaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Renu; Iyengar, Asha R; Nagesh, K S; Patil, Seema; Subhash, B V

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco abuse is a well-known risk factor for potentially malignant disorders as well as oral squamous cell carcinoma. Factors that influence tobacco-exposed individuals developing a malignancy may include the combination of total tobacco exposure and genetic susceptibility. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null polymorphism in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma patients in South Indian population. This case-control study was conducted in hospital setting on South Indian population. About 280 subjects with history of tobacco use, oral leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma were included in this study. Three milliliter of blood was collected and transported under cold cycle and taken for evaluation of GSTM1 null polymorphism using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. On comparing the prevalence of GSTM1 null polymorphism among the group with subjects with habits and no oral lesions, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma, it was observed that there was a statistically significant association between GSTM1 null polymorphism and the different groups (P leukoplakia and thereby increases the susceptibility of lesion to undergo malignant changes.

  6. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants.

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    Le Li

    Full Text Available Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR. HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum-a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901-1978. A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15 of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminalby SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server. Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1-45 bp in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall.

  7. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum-a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901-1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1-45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall.

  8. Bioprocess development for mass production of size-controlled human pluripotent stem cell aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Larijani, Mehran Rezaei; Samadian, Azam; Baharvand, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Current protocols for the scalable suspension culture of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are limited by multiple biological and technical challenges that need to be addressed before their use in clinical trials. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a novel bioprocess platform for large-scale expansion of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines as three-dimensional size-controlled aggregates. This novel bioprocess utilizes the stepwise optimization of both static and dynamic suspension culture conditions. After screening eight xeno-free media in static suspension culture and optimizing single-cell passaging in dynamic conditions, the scale-up from a static to a dynamic suspension culture in the stirred bioreactor resulted in a two- to threefold improvement in expansion rates, as measured by cell counts and metabolic activity. We successfully produced size-specific aggregates through optimization of bioreactor hydrodynamic conditions by using combinations of different agitation rates and shear protectant concentrations. The expansion rates were further improved by controlling oxygen concentration at normoxic conditions, and reached a maximum eightfold increase for both types of hPSCs. Subsequently, we demonstrated a simple and rapid scale-up strategy that produced clinically relevant numbers of hPSCs (∼2×10(9) cells) over a 1-month period by the direct transfer of "suspension-adapted frozen cells" to a stirred suspension bioreactor. We omitted the required preadaptation passages in the static suspension culture. The cells underwent proliferation over multiple passages in the demonstrated xeno-free dynamic suspension culture while maintaining their self-renewal capabilities, as determined by marker expressions and in vitro spontaneous differentiation. In conclusion, suspension culture protocols of hPSCs could be used to mass produce homogenous and pluripotent undifferentiated cells by identification and optimization of key bioprocess

  9. A multidirectional non-cell autonomous control and a genetic interaction restricting tobacco etch virus susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

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    Suresh Gopalan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery.An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV, a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement.The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery.

  10. Do tobacco stimulate the production of nitric oxide by up regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in cancer: Immunohistochemical determination of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma - A comparative study in tobacco habituers and non-habituers

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    B Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate the enhanced expression in OSCC of tobacco habituers when compared to OSCC of tobacco non-habituers indicating the effect of tobacco on nitric oxide. Carcinogenic chemical compounds in Tobacco induce nitric oxide production by iNOS, by its tumor-promoting effects which may enhance the process of carcinogenesis.

  11. The cytological changes of tobacco zygote and proembryo cells induced by beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent suggest the involvement of arabinogalactan proteins in cell division and cell plate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Miao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In dicotyledonous plant, the first asymmetric zygotic division and subsequent several cell divisions are crucial for proembryo pattern formation and later embryo development. Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a family of extensively glycosylated cell surface proteins that are thought to have important roles in various aspects of plant growth and development, including embryogenesis. Previous results from our laboratory show that AGPs are concerned with tobacco egg cell fertilization and zygotic division. However, how AGPs interact with other factors involved in zygotic division and proembryo development remains unknown. Results In this study, we used the tobacco in vitro zygote culture system and series of meticulous cell biology techniques to investigate the roles of AGPs in zygote and proembryo cell division. For the first time, we examined tobacco proembryo division patterns detailed to every cell division. The bright-field images and statistical results both revealed that with the addition of an exogenous AGPs inhibitor, beta-glucosyl Yariv (beta-GlcY reagent, the frequency of aberrant division increased remarkably in cultured tobacco zygotes and proembryos, and the cell plate specific locations of AGPs were greatly reduced after beta-GlcY treatment. In addition, the accumulations of new cell wall materials were also significantly affected by treating with beta-GlcY. Detection of cellulose components by Calcofluor white stain showed that strong fluorescence was located in the newly formed wall of daughter cells after the zygotic division of in vivo samples and the control samples from in vitro culture without beta-GlcY treatment; while there was only weak fluorescence in the newly formed cell walls with beta-GlcY treatment. Immunocytochemistry examination with JIM5 and JIM7 respectively against the low- and high-esterified pectins displayed that these two pectins located in opposite positions of zygotes and proembryos in

  12. Effects of several physiochemical factors on cell growth and gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... physiochemical factors and chemical substances effect on the cell growth and the production of gallic acid were .... Effect of different combination of 2, 4-D and KT on cell growth and gallic acid production in cell suspension culture. 0.008 mg. ..... a bottleneck in the commercialization of plant cell cultures,.

  13. Smokeless Tobacco and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Smokeless Tobacco and Cancer On This Page What is smokeless tobacco? Are there harmful chemicals in smokeless tobacco? Does ...

  14. Tobacco and estrogen metabolic polymorphisms and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Michele L; Yoo, Wonsuk; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Prysak, Geoffrey M; Santer, Susan K; Claeys, Gina B; Van Dyke, Alison L; Land, Susan J; Schwartz, Ann G

    2009-04-01

    To explore the potential role for estrogen in lung cancer susceptibility, candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in tobacco and estrogen metabolism genes were evaluated. Population-based cases (n = 504) included women aged 18-74, diagnosed with NSCLC in metropolitan Detroit between November 2001 and October 2005. Population-based controls (n = 527) were identified through random digit dialing and matched on race and age. Eleven SNPs in 10 different genes were examined in relation to risk: CYP1A1 Msp1, CYP1A1 Ile462Val, CYP1B1 Leu432Val, CYP17, CYP19A1, XRCC1 Gln399Arg, COMT Val158Met, NQO1 Pro187Ser, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105Val. Lung cancer risk associated with individual SNPs was seen for GSTP1 [A allele; odds ratio (OR) = 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-3.27] and XRCC1 (A/A genotype; OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.01-2.79) in white women and CYP1B1 (G allele; OR = 11.1; 95% CI, 1.18-104) in black women smokers. White women smokers carrying two risk genotypes at the following loci were at increased risk of lung cancer compared with individuals not carrying risk alleles at these loci: CYP17 and GSTM1, COMT and GSTM1, CYP17 and GSTT1, XRCC1 and GSTP1, CYP1B1 and XRCC1 and COMT and XRCC1. The most parsimonious model of lung cancer risk in white smoking women included age, family history of lung cancer, history of chronic lung disease, pack-years, body mass index, XRCC1 A/A genotype, GSTM1 null and COMT A/G or G/G genotype. These findings support the need for continued study of estrogen in relation to lung cancer risk. Polymorphisms in the tobacco metabolism, estrogen metabolism and DNA repair pathways will be useful in developing more predictive models of individual risk.

  15. Sucrose Synthase Is Associated with the Cell Wall of Tobacco Pollen Tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persia, D.; Cai, G.; Casino, C.; Willemse, M.T.M.; Cresti, M.

    2008-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (Sus; EC 2.4.1.13) is a key enzyme of sucrose metabolism in plant cells, providing carbon for respiration and for the synthesis of cell wall polymers and starch. Since Sus is important for plant cell growth, insights into its structure, localization, and features are useful for

  16. Transcriptome-wide analysis of jasmonate-treated BY-2 cells reveals new transcriptional regulators associated with alkaloid formation in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuping; Yan, Pengcheng; Yi, Che; Li, Wenzheng; Chai, Yuhui; Fei, Lingling; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Heping; Wang, Yingdian; Timko, Michael P; Wang, Bingwu; Han, Shengcheng

    2017-08-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are well-known regulators of stress, defence, and secondary metabolism in plants, with JA perception triggering extensive transcriptional reprogramming, including both activation and/or repression of entire metabolic pathways. We performed RNA sequencing based transcriptomic profiling of tobacco BY-2 cells before and after treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to identify novel transcriptional regulators associated with alkaloid formation. A total of 107,140 unigenes were obtained through de novo assembly, and at least 33,213 transcripts (31%) encode proteins, in which 3419 transcription factors (TFs) were identified, representing 72 gene families, as well as 840 transcriptional regulators (TRs) distributed among 19 gene families. After MeJA treatment BY-2 cells, 7260 differentially expressed transcripts were characterised, which include 4443 MeJA-upregulated and 2817 MeJA-downregulated genes. Of these, 227 TFs/TRs in 36 families were specifically upregulated, and 102 TFs/TRs in 38 families were downregulated in MeJA-treated BY-2 cells. We further showed that the expression of 12 ethylene response factors and four basic helix-loop-helix factors increased at the transcriptional level after MeJA treatment in BY-2 cells and displayed specific expression patterns in nic mutants with or without MeJA treatments. Our data provide a catalogue of transcripts of tobacco BY-2 cells and benefit future study of JA-modulated regulation of secondary metabolism in tobacco. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. [Smokeless tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, M; Perriot, J

    2011-10-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco (ST) (chewing tobacco and snuff) can lead to a number of consequences detrimental to health. ST rapidly delivers high doses of nicotine, which can lead to dependence and is also a source of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Changes usually develop in the mouth area where the ST is most often placed. Non-malignant oral lesions include leuko-oedema, hyperkeratotic lesions of the oral mucosa and localised periodontal disease. Oral premalignant lesions are leukoplakia, erythroplakia, submucosal fibrosis and lichen planus. Betel chewing, with or without tobacco, may increase the incidence of oral cancer. There is conflicting evidence with regard to snuff users about the risk of oral and gastro-oesophageal cancer. ST use is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and may increase the risk of fatal myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. During pregnancy, ST is associated with an increase in pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and stillbirth. Nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion reduce withdrawal symptoms and tobacco craving during ST cessation. However, they have not been shown to help long-term abstinence. Information concerning the potential hazards of ST products should be incorporated into educational programmes to discourage its use and to help users to quit. Smokeless tobacco is not recommended to help smoking cessation. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Tobacco Use and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DON'T START SAY IT - SHARE IT Home > Health Effects > Tobacco Use and Pregnancy HEALTH EFFECTS Nicotine Addiction and Your Health Secondhand Smoke Effects of Smoking on Your Health Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health Tobacco Use and Fertility Tobacco ...

  19. The ROOT MERISTEMLESS1/CADMIUM SENSITIVE2 Gene Defines a Glutathione-Dependent Pathway Involved in Initiation and Maintenance of Cell Division during Postembryonic Root Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernoux, Teva; Wilson, Robert C.; Seeley, Kevin A.; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Muroy, Sandra; Brown, Spencer; Maughan, Spencer C.; Cobbett, Christopher S.; Van Montagu, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; May, Mike J.; Sung, Zinmay R.

    2000-01-01

    Activation of cell division in the root apical meristem after germination is essential for postembryonic root development. Arabidopsis plants homozygous for a mutation in the ROOT MERISTEMLESS1 (RML1) gene are unable to establish an active postembryonic meristem in the root apex. This mutation abolishes cell division in the root but not in the shoot. We report the molecular cloning of the RML1 gene, which encodes the first enzyme of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and which is allelic to CADMIUM SENSITIVE2. The phenotype of the rml1 mutant, which was also evident in the roots of wild-type Arabidopsis and tobacco treated with an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, could be relieved by applying GSH to rml1 seedlings. By using a synchronized tobacco cell suspension culture, we showed that the G1-to-S phase transition requires an adequate level of GSH. These observations suggest the existence of a GSH-dependent developmental pathway essential for initiation and maintenance of cell division during postembryonic root development. PMID:10634910

  20. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions are early events in narciclasine-induced programmed cell death in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongxia; Wan, Qi; Wang, Huahua; Na, Xiaofan; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2012-01-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is a plant growth inhibitor isolated from the secreted mucilage of Narcissus tazetta bulbs. It is a commonly used anticancer agent in animal systems. In this study, we provide evidence to show that NCS also acts as an agent in inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cell cultures. NCS treatment induces typical PCD-associated morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA degradation. To investigate possible signaling events, we analyzed the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the function of mitochondria during PCD induced by NCS. A biphasic behavior burst of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was detected in TBY-2 cells treated with NCS, and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss occurred after a slight increase. Pre-incubation with antioxidant catalase (CAT) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) not only significantly decreased the H(2)O(2) production but also effectively retarded the decrease of MTP and reduced the percentage of cells undergoing PCD after NCS treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that NCS induces PCD in plant cells; the oxidative stress (accumulation of H(2)O(2)) and the MTP loss play important roles during NCS-induced PCD. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  1. Tobacco taxes as a tobacco control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaloupka, Frank J; Yurekli, Ayda; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2012-03-01

    Increases in tobacco taxes are widely regarded as a highly effective strategy for reducing tobacco use and its consequences. The voluminous literature on tobacco taxes is assessed, drawing heavily from seminal and recent publications reviewing the evidence on the impact of tobacco taxes on tobacco use and related outcomes, as well as that on tobacco tax administration. Well over 100 studies, including a growing number from low-income and middle-income countries, clearly demonstrate that tobacco excise taxes are a powerful tool for reducing tobacco use while at the same time providing a reliable source of government revenues. Significant increases in tobacco taxes that increase tobacco product prices encourage current tobacco users to stop using, prevent potential users from taking up tobacco use, and reduce consumption among those that continue to use, with the greatest impact on the young and the poor. Global experiences with tobacco taxation and tax administration have been used by WHO to develop a set of 'best practices' for maximising the effectiveness of tobacco taxation. Significant increases in tobacco taxes are a highly effective tobacco control strategy and lead to significant improvements in public health. The positive health impact is even greater when some of the revenues generated by tobacco tax increases are used to support tobacco control, health promotion and/or other health-related activities and programmes. In general, oppositional arguments that higher taxes will have harmful economic effects are false or overstated.

  2. Microtubule reorganization in tobacco BY-2 cells stably expressing GFP-MBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Microtubule organization plays an important role in plant morphogenesis; however, little is known about how microtubule arrays transit from one organized state to another. The use of a genetically incorporated fluorescent marker would allow long-term observation of microtubule behavior in living cells. Here, we have characterized a Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) cell line that had been stably transformed with a gfp-mbd construct previously demonstrated to label microtubules (J. Marc et al., 1998, Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939). Fluorescence levels were low, but interphase and mitotic microtubule arrays, as well as the transitions between these arrays, could be observed in individual gfp-mbd-transformed cells. By comparing several attributes of transformed and untransformed cells it was concluded that the transgenic cells are not adversely affected by low-level expression of the transgene and that these cells will serve as a useful and accurate model system for observing microtubule reorganization in vivo. Indeed, some initial observations were made that are consistent with the involvement of motor proteins in the transition between the spindle and phragmoplast arrays. Our observations also support the role of the perinuclear region in nucleating microtubules at the end of cell division with a progressive shift of these microtubules and/or nucleating activity to the cortex to form the interphase cortical array.

  3. Promoter activity associated with the intergenic regions of banana bunchy top virus DNA-1 to -6 in transgenic tobacco and banana cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, B; Beetham, P R; Becker, D K; Harding, R M; Dale, J L

    1998-10-01

    Promoter regions associated with each of the six ssDNA components of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) have been characterized. DNA segments incorporating the intergenic regions of BBTV DNA-1 to -6 were isolated and fused to the uidA (beta-glucuronidase) reporter gene to assess promoter activity. In tobacco cell suspensions, the BBTV DNA-2 and -6 promoters generated levels of GUS expression 2-fold greater and similar to the 800 bp CaMV 35S promoter, respectively. Deletion analysis of the BBTV DNA-6 promoter suggested all the necessary promoter elements required for strong expression were located within 239 nucleotides upstream of the translational start codon. In transgenic tobacco plants, the BBTV-derived promoters generally provided a weak, tissue-specific GUS expression pattern restricted to phloem-associated cells. However, in callus derived from tobacco leaf tissue, GUS expression directed by the BBTV DNA-6 promoter was strong and, in some lines, comparable to the CaMV 35S promoter. Detectable promoter activity associated with the BBTV promoters in banana embryogenic cells was only observed using a sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Promoters derived from BBTV DNA-4 and -5 generated the highest levels of transient activity, which were greater than that of the maize ubi-1 promoter. In transgenic banana plants, the activity of the BBTV DNA-6 promoter was restricted to the phloem of leaves and roots, stomata and root meristems.

  4. ATM activation accompanies histone H2AX phosphorylation in A549 cells upon exposure to tobacco smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traganos Frank

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In response to DNA damage or structural alterations of chromatin, histone H2AX may be phosphorylated on Ser139 by phosphoinositide 3-kinase related protein kinases (PIKKs such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, ATM-and Rad-3 related (ATR kinase, or by DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs. When DNA damage primarily involves formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, H2AX is preferentially phosphorylated by ATM rather than by the other PIKKs. We have recently reported that brief exposure of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells or normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE to cigarette smoke (CS induced phosphorylation of H2AX. Results We report here that H2AX phosphorylation in A549 cells induced by CS was accompanied by activation of ATM, as revealed by ATM phosphorylation on Ser1981 (ATM-S1981P detected immunocytochemically and by Western blotting. No cell cycle-phase specific differences in kinetics of ATM activation and H2AX phosphorylation were observed. When cells were exposed to CS from cigarettes with different tobacco and filter combinations, the expression levels of ATM-S1981P correlated well with the increase in expression of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX (R = 0.89. In addition, we note that while CS-induced γH2AX expression was localized within discrete foci, the activated ATM was distributed throughout the nucleoplasm. Conclusion These data implicate ATM as the PIKK that phosphorylates H2AX in response to DNA damage caused by CS. Based on current understanding of ATM activation, expression and localization, these data would suggest that, in addition to inducing potentially carcinogenic DSB lesions, CS may also trigger other types of DNA lesions and cause chromatin alterations. As checkpoint kinase (Chk 1, Chk2 and the p53 tumor suppressor gene are known to be phosphorylated by ATM, the present data indicate that exposure to CS may lead to their phosphorylation, with the downstream consequences

  5. Biotransformation of isonitrosoacetophenone (2-keto-2-phenyl-acetaldoxime) in tobacco cell suspensions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madala, NE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotiana tabacum cell suspensions, 2g wet wt/ml, rapidly took up 1 mM isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP), a plant-derived stress metabolite with anti-oxidative and anti-fungal properties, producing 40-hexopyranosyloxy-30-methoxyisonitrosoacetophenone...

  6. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus among oral potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinomas in the South Indian tobacco-chewing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sujatha S; Sharma, Shivani; Mysorekar, Vijaya

    2017-07-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Viruses are the causative agents of approximately 10-15% of all cancers worldwide (Cancers, 6, 2014 and 2155). The tumorigenic roles of Epstein-Barr virus in oral cancer are unclear. Literature search results are conflicting and dependent on various factors such as geographical/regional variations, sociocultural lifestyles, dietary habits, chewing/smoking tobacco habit. This study is the first original observation about frequency of Epstein-Barr virus among South Indian tobacco-chewing patients to elucidate its involvement in oral carcinogenesis and to know whether this can be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator. A total number of 75 tobacco chewer subjects aged between 23 and 76 years with histopathologically confirmed oral potentially malignant disorders (25), oral squamous cell carcinoma (25), and age-matched healthy controls (25) formed the study group. Immunohistochemical expression of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 was assessed among cases and healthy controls. Out of the total 75 subjects, six subjects (8%) were positive for Epstein-Barr virus antigen and 69 subjects (92%) negative. The antigen positivity was observed among two cases of moderately differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma, two cases of leukoplakia, and two healthy controls. No significant association between Epstein-Barr virus positivity was observed among oral potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma among South Indian tobacco-chewing patients. This can be partially explained by the methodology employed, by the patient population analyzed and different habits in various geographical regions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Silver(I Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes―Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Krizkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip or 10 nM (carbon pencil. Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I ions (0, 5 and 10 μM on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells during a fourday exposition was investigated. Silver(I ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM on guppies (Poecilia reticulata. Content of Ag(I increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes.

  8. Promiscuous, non-catalytic, tandem carbohydrate-binding modules modulate the cell-wall structure and development of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obembe, Olawole O.; Jacobsen, Evert; Timmers, Jaap; Gilbert, Harry; Blake, Anthony W.; Knox, J. Paul; Visser, Richard G. F.

    2007-01-01

    We have compared heterologous expression of two types of carbohydrate binding module (CBM) in tobacco cell walls. These are the promiscuous CBM29 modules (a tandem CBM29-1-2 and its single derivative CBM29-2), derived from a non-catalytic protein1, NCP1, of the Piromyces equi cellulase/hemicellulase complex, and the less promiscuous tandem CBM2b-1-2 from the Cellulomonas fimi xylanase 11A. CBM-labelling studies revealed that CBM29-1-2 binds indiscriminately to every tissue of the wild-type tobacco stem whereas binding of CBM2b-1-2 was restricted to vascular tissue. The promiscuous CBM29-1-2 had much more pronounced effects on transgenic tobacco plants than the less promiscuous CBM2b-1-2. Reduced stem elongation and prolonged juvenility, resulting in delayed flower development, were observed in transformants expressing CBM29-1-2 whereas such growth phenotypes were not observed for CBM2b-1-2 plants. Histological examination and electron microscopy revealed layers of collapsed cortical cells in the stems of CBM29-1-2 plants whereas cellular deformation in the stem cortical cells of CBM2b-1-2 transformants was less severe. Altered cell expansion was also observed in most parts of the CBM29-1-2 stem whereas for the CBM2b-1-2 stem this was observed in the xylem cells only. The cellulose content of the transgenic plants was not altered. These results support the hypothesis that CBMs can modify cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. PMID:17622484

  9. Induced accumulation of 20-hydroxyecdysone in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the effects of culture medium, culture temperature, sucrose concentration and cholesterol feeding on cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production in suspension cultures of Vitex glabrata, an important medicinal plant in Thailand. Cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production were not significantly ...

  10. Mevastatin-induced inhibition of cell growth in avocado suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell suspension cultures were established using soft, friable callus derived from nucellar tissue of 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana Mill.) seed from fruit harvested 190 days after full bloom. Cell cultures were maintained in liquid medium supplemented with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), isopentenyl adenine (iP) and ...

  11. Heterologous expression of plant cell wall glycosyltransferases in Pichia, pea and tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent Larsen; Damager, Iben; Faber, Kirsten

    The plant cell wall (CW) consists of numerous complex and uniqe carbohydrate polymer structures. Although the structure (sugar composition) of the various plant CW components are known in some detail, functional characterisation of of the more than 300 glycosyltransferases (GTs), that are believed...... to participate in plant CW biosynthesis, has been achieved in only a few cases. We have previously reported the characterisation of two highly homologous plant-specific membrane-bound GTs, which when expressed as secreted tagged soluble proteins in the baculo virus system, catalysed the transfer of xylose from...... UDP-xylose on to the monosaccharide sugar fucose. Partly based on these data, the two genes were proposed to function in the biosynthesis of pectic rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and designated RhamnoGalacturonan XylosylTransferase 1 and -2 (RGXT1 and -2), accordingly (Egelund et al. 2006, The Plant...

  12. DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-03-13

    Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

  13. Human papillomavirus (HPV) status of non-tobacco related squamous cell carcinomas of the lateral tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, JS; Ma, X-J; Bui, S; Luo, Y; Li, R; Koch, WM; Westra, WH

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important cause of some head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), but its role in cancer of the lateral tongue is debatable. Suspicion of HPV causation is heightened when these lateral tongue carcinomas arise in patients that are young and/or have never smoked. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of transcriptionally active high risk HPV in these tumors, with a particular emphasis on non-smoking patients who are often presumed to have HPV-positive tumors. Methods We evaluated 78 HNSCCs of the lateral tongue for the presence of HPV using p16 immunohistochemistry and an RNA in situ hybridization assay targeting HPV E6/E7 mRNA. The study population was enriched for patients without traditional risk factors such as smoking and drinking. Results P16 overexpression was detected in 9 (11.5%) of 78 cases, but HPV E6/E7 mRNA transcripts were detected in only 1 (1.3%) case (positive predictive value of p16 staining for the presence of transcriptionally active HPV = 0.12). HPV mRNA transcripts were not detected in any patient under 40 (n = 11), or in patients who had never smoked (n=44), had quit smoking (n=15), and/or were only light consumers of alcohol (n = 57). Conclusions HPV is not detected in the vast majority of lateral tongue carcinomas. In light of the observation that HPV plays little if any role in the development of these cancers, routine HPV testing is unwarranted , even for patients without traditional risk factors. P16 staining is not a reliable marker for the presence of transcriptionally active HPV at this particular anatomic site. PMID:24485566

  14. Risks of tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondhand smoke - risks; Cigarette smoking - risks; Smoking and smokeless tobacco - risks; Nicotine - risks ... tobacco that are known to cause cancer. HEALTH RISKS OF SMOKING OR USING SMOKELESS TOBACCO Knowing the ...

  15. Establishment of callus, cell suspension and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. and diterpene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, W

    1995-10-01

    Callus cultures, cell suspension cultures and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. (Motherwort) were established and growth conditions optimized. Shoot cultures showed constant growth whether in the dark or under continuous light, accumulating varying amounts of the furanic labdane diterpenes leosibiricin, preleosibirin, leosibirin and isoballotenol acetate, which are also present in the soil-grown plants. Only traces of leosibiricin were detected in callus cultures, while cell suspension cultures did not produce any furanic diterpenes. A small amount of furanic labdane diterpenes was found in the medium of shoot cultures. Callus and shoot culture induction of several other Lamiaceae species is also described.

  16. Growth of Suspension Cultured Cell of Populus euphratica, Populus alba cv. Pyramidalis and Populus maximowiczii×Populus plantierensis in NaCl Containing Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hailong; Watanabe, Shin; IDE, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    Populus euphratica, Populus alba cv. Pyramidalis, Populus maximowiczii×Populus plantierensisの3種のポプラの培養細胞について,培地へのNaClの添加量を徐々に増加させた場合の耐性を評価した。NaClを添加した最初の培養では,P. euphratica, P. maximowiczii×P. plantierensisの細胞は,200mMのNaCl添加では成長が著しく抑制された。また,P. alba cv. Pyramidalisの細胞では150mMのNaCl添加で成長が抑制された。しかし,培養を繰り返すうちに細胞はNaClに対する適応性を発達させ,6回目の継代培養終了時には,P. euphraticaの細胞は200mM, P. alba cv. Pyramidalisの細胞は150mMのNaCl添加培地でも良好な成長が可能になった。しかし,P. maximowiczii×P. plantierensisの細胞は,100mMまででしか良好な成長を示さなくなった。高NaCl条件下において種ごと...

  17. Protective Effects of Tormentic Acid, a Major Component of Suspension Cultures of Eriobotrya japonica Cells, on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ping Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An acetaminophen (APAP overdose can cause hepatotoxicity and lead to fatal liver damage. The hepatoprotective effects of tormentic acid (TA on acetaminophen (APAP-induced liver damage were investigated in mice. TA was intraperitoneally (i.p. administered for six days prior to APAP administration. Pretreatment with TA prevented the elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (T-Bil, total cholesterol (TC, triacylglycerol (TG, and liver lipid peroxide levels in APAP-treated mice and markedly reduced APAP-induced histological alterations in liver tissues. Additionally, TA attenuated the APAP-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β, and IL-6. Furthermore, the Western blot analysis showed that TA blocked the protein expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, as well as the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs activation in APAP-injured liver tissues. TA also retained the superoxidase dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT in the liver. These results suggest that the hepatoprotective effects of TA may be related to its anti-inflammatory effect by decreasing thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activation. Antioxidative properties were also observed, as shown by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction in the liver, and decreases in lipid peroxides and ROS. Therefore, TA may be a potential therapeutic candidate for the prevention of APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation.

  18. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadoon Nivia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  19. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-06-01

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pK a values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pK a1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pK a1 3.73), β-alanine (pK a1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pK a1 2.95; pK a2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H 2 A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Longoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  1. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  2. Enhancement of 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most effective. The maximum 20-hydroxyecdysone productivity of about 1.31 mg/L/day was observed in culture with 10 mg/L 7-dehydrocholesterol. This data is the first indication that 7-dehydrocholesterol and ergosterol feeding are effective precursors for 20-hydroxyecdysone formation in plant cell suspension culture.

  3. EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION ON THE GROWTH OF CATTAIL CALLUS CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation examined the growth of Typha latifolia (cattail) callus cells grown in 5 different (0, 11, 22, 33, 44, jg/L(-1) phosphosur concentrations. The cells were grown for two successive subcultures on semi-solid media, and subsequently in suspension culture with the s...

  4. The impact of tobacco additives on cigarette smoke toxicity: a critical appraisal of tobacco industry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Oliveira, Ana Cecilia Amado Xavier de

    2017-09-21

    Cigarette production involves a number of substances and materials other than just tobacco, paper and a filter. Tobacco additives include flavorings, enhancers, humectants, sugars, and ammonium compounds. Although companies maintain that tobacco additives do not enhance smoke toxicity and do not make cigarettes more attractive or addictive, these claims are questioned by independent researchers. This study reviewed the studies on the effects of tobacco additives on smoke chemistry and toxicity. Tobacco additives lead to higher levels of formaldehyde and minor changes in other smoke analytes. Toxicological studies (bacterial mutagenicity and mammalian cytoxicity tests, rat 90 days inhalation studies and bone-marrow cell micronucleus assays) found that tobacco additives did not enhance smoke toxicity. Rodent assays, however, poorly predicted carcinogenicity of tobacco smoke, and were clearly underpowered to disclose small albeit toxicologically relevant differences between test (with tobacco additives) and control (without tobacco additives) cigarettes. This literature review led to the conclusion that the impact of tobacco additives on tobacco smoke harmfulness remains unclear.

  5. Tobacco smoking differently influences cell types of the innate and adaptive immune system-indications from CpG site methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Mario; Fink, Beate; Thürmann, Loreen; Eszlinger, Markus; Herberth, Gunda; Lehmann, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoke is worldwide one of the main preventable lifestyle inhalative pollutants causing severe adverse health effects. Epidemiological studies revealed association of tobacco smoking with epigenetic changes at single CpGs in blood. However, the biological relevance of the often only marginal methylation changes remains unclear. Comparing genome-wide changes in CpG methylation of three recently reported epidemiological datasets, two obtained on whole blood and one on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), it becomes evident that the majority of methylation changes (86.7 and 93.3 %) in whole blood account for changes in granulocytes. Analyzing, in more detail, seven highly significant reported smoking-induced methylation changes at single CpGs in different blood cell types of healthy volunteers (n = 32), we confirmatively found a strong cell-type specificity. Two CpGs in GFI1 and F2RL3 were significantly hypomethylated in granulocytes (-11.3 %, p = 0.001; -8.7 %, p = 0.001, respectively) but not in PBMCs of smokers while two CpGs in CPOX and GPR15 were found to be hypomethylated in PBMC (-4.3 %, p = 0.003; -4.2 %, P = 0.009, respectively) and their subtypes of GPR15 non-expressing (-3.2 %, p = 0.027; -2.5 %, p = 0.032, respectively) and smoking-evoked GPR15 expressing T cells (-15.8 %, p smoking behavior at individual level and could therefore serve as valuable biomarkers indicating a disturbed homeostasis in smokers. In contrast to the reported long-term persistent methylation changes in adult smokers after cessation, the hypomethylation at cg05575921 in prenatally tobacco smoke-exposed children (n = 13) from our LINA cohort was less stable and disappeared already within 2 years after birth. Studying cell type-specific methylation changes provides helpful information regarding the biological relevance of epigenetic modifications. Here, we could show that smoking differently affects both cells of the innate and

  6. Myofibroblast presence in apparently normal mucosa adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with chronic tobacco/areca nut use: evidence for field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Punnya V; Patil, Prakash V; Kale, Alka D; Hallikerimath, Seema; Babji, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Myofibroblasts are primary cellular components of activated tumor stroma, associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, their role in field cancerization has not been addressed. This study aims to evaluate the presence of myofibroblasts in patient-matched histologically normal mucosa adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma (HNMAOSCC) and OSCC tissues. Fifty patient-matched tissues of OSCC and HNMAOSCC associated with chronic areca nut/tobacco use were subjected to immunohistochemistry using α-SMA for detection of myofibroblasts. Normal oral mucosa (n = 15) were stained as controls. The number of α-SMA stained myofibroblasts in OSCC and HNMAOSCC were significantly increased as compared to that of the normal controls (p cancerization and their potential use as a field effect marker.

  7. Production of a functional human acid maltase in tobacco seeds: biochemical analysis, uptake by human GSDII cells, and in vivo studies in GAA knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniuk, Frank; Reggi, Serena; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N; Busconi, Matteo; Fogher, Corrado

    2013-10-01

    Genetic deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) results in glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) or Pompe's disease. To investigate whether we could generate a functional recombinant human GAA enzyme (tobrhGAA) in tobacco seeds for future enzyme replacement therapy, we subcloned the human GAA cDNA into the plant expression plasmid-pBI101 under the control of the soybean β-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and biochemically analyzed the tobrhGAA. Tobacco seeds contain the metabolic machinery that is more compatible with mammalian glycosylation-phosphorylation and processing. We found the tobrhGAA to be enzymatically active was readily taken up by GSDII fibroblasts and in white blood cells from whole blood to reverse the defect. The tobrhGAA corrected the enzyme defect in tissues at 7 days after a single dose following intraperitoneal (IP) administration in GAA knockout (GAA(-/-)) mice. Additionally, we could purify the tobrhGAA since it bound tightly to the matrix of Sephadex G100 and can be eluted by competition with maltose. These data demonstrate indirectly that the tobrhGAA is fully functional, predominantly proteolytically cleaved and contains the minimal phosphorylation and mannose-6-phosphate residues essential for biological activity.

  8. Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use and Pregnancy Text Size: A A A Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health Can smokeless tobacco affect my ... smokeless tobacco use cause other health problems? Can smokeless tobacco affect my oral health? It may cause tooth ...

  9. Youth and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanski, S E; Prokhorov, A V; Klein, J D

    2004-12-01

    Youth around the world take up smoking and use tobacco products at high rates. Young people may not grasp the long-term consequences of tobacco use, although tobacco consumption and exposure has been shown to have significant negative health effects. Youth use a variety of tobacco products that are smoked, chewed, or sniffed, including machine-manufactured cigarettes, cigars, bidis, kreteks, sticks, and snuff. Prevention efforts have focused on countering those aspects that are believed to contribute to smoking uptake, such as tobacco industry advertising and promotion, and access to tobacco. There are many aspects of tobacco promotion through the media that have been more difficult to control, however, such as product placement within popular cinema movies. Once a youth has taken up tobacco, he or she is more likely than an adult to become addicted and should be offered treatment for tobacco cessation. Although there is not yet sufficient evidence to prove efficacy, the same treatments are suggested for youth as are recommended for adults, including nicotine replacement products. Given the severity of the tobacco epidemic worldwide and the devastating health effects on an individual and population basis, there are currently many efforts to curtail the tobacco problem, including the World Health Organization (WHO) sponsored Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. It is through comprehensive and collaborative efforts such as this that the global hazard of tobacco is most likely to be overcome.

  10. A cell wall extract from the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica promotes growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induces intracellular calcium elevation in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Ranf, Stefanie; Drzewiecki, Corinna; Mithöfer, Axel; Mazars, Christian; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2009-07-01

    Calcium (Ca2+), as a second messenger, is crucial for signal transduction processes during many biotic interactions. We demonstrate that cellular [Ca2+] elevations are early events in the interaction between the plant growth-promoting fungus Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis thaliana. A cell wall extract (CWE) from the fungus promotes the growth of wild-type seedlings but not of seedlings from P. indica-insensitive mutants. The extract and the fungus also induce a similar set of genes in Arabidopsis roots, among them genes with Ca2+ signalling-related functions. The CWE induces a transient cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+](cyt)) elevation in the roots of Arabidopsis and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, as well as in BY-2 suspension cultures expressing the Ca2+ bioluminescent indicator aequorin. Nuclear Ca2+ transients were also observed in tobacco BY-2 cells. The Ca2+ response was more pronounced in roots than in shoots and involved Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular space as revealed by inhibitor studies. Inhibition of the Ca2+ response by staurosporine and the refractory nature of the Ca2+ elevation suggest that a receptor may be involved. The CWE does not stimulate H2O2 production and the activation of defence gene expression, although it led to phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The involvement of MAPK6 in the mutualistic interaction was shown for an mpk6 line, which did not respond to P. indica. Thus, Ca2+ is likely to be an early signalling component in the mutualistic interaction between P. indica and Arabidopsis or tobacco.

  11. Culturing immobilized plant cells for the TUBUL space experiments on the DELTA and 12S Missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Emons, A.M.C.; Vos, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract For the TUBUL experiments during the DELTA mission in April 2004 and 12S mission in March/April 2006 on board the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station we developed a method to culture and chemically fix plant suspension culture cells. The aim of the ten day experiment was to

  12. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm.

  13. Allegheny County Tobacco Vendors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The tobacco vendor information provides the location of all tobacco vendors in Allegheny County in 2015. Data was compiled from administrative records managed by...

  14. Smokeless Tobacco - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Smokeless Tobacco URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Smokeless Tobacco - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. A new strategy to enhance the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol by overexpressing stilbene synthase gene in elicited Vitis vinifera cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Mingyu; Pedreño, M A; Alburquerque, Nuria; Faize, Lydia; Burgos, Lorenzo; Almagro, Lorena

    2017-04-01

    In this work, transgenic lines of suspension cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell containing the plasmid pMOG800-sts have been obtained. The cell growth of these transgenic cell lines decreased slightly as compared to non-transgenic suspension cultured cells, while cell viability was not affected. In addition, the elicitation with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate enhanced the production of trans-resveratrol, observing the highest levels of this compound in sts-expressing transgenic Vitis suspension cultured cells with the sts expression cassette in the forwards orientation. Moreover, the forwards 2 (F2) transgenic cell line produced the greater levels of trans-resveratrol in comparison with the non-transgenic cell line. In fact, when suspension cultured cells were treated with both elicitors, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol outside the cells in the F2 transgenic suspension cultured cells increased twice (1458 mg.L-1) as compared to non-transgenic cell lines (724 mg.L-1). In both cases, the levels of trans-resveratrol detected in the treatment with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate were greater than the sum of the individual treatments, and therefore we observed a synergistic effect in the presence of both elicitors. Moreover, the expression profile of sts gene in transgenic V. vinifera cell lines was similar to the expression profile detected for the endogenous sts gene in non-transgenic V. vinifera cell lines, being the expression levels greater in the treatment with methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, which was related to the high levels of trans-resveratrol found in the presence of both elicitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Multinational Tobacco Companies and Tobacco Consumption (China)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Until recently, the Chinese tobacco industry has been run as a state-owned monopoly. It is reported, however, that two mainland tobacco firms have begun making Marlboro cigarettes under license from Philip Morris International. The combination of low-cost Marlboro cigarettes and Western marketing practices is likely to ...

  17. You(th) & Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tobacco use on TV and in movies, music videos, billboards and magazines–most teens, adults, and athletes DON’T use tobacco. Make friends, develop athletic skills, control weight, be independent, be cool … play sports. Don’t waste (burn) money on tobacco. Spend ...

  18. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  19. Generation of functionally competent single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells from cell aggregates using the neutral protease dispase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, Gale L

    2004-08-30

    A simple and efficient procedure has been developed to enzymatically dissociate aggregates of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in suspension culture into viable, responsive single cells. For dissociation, the neutral protease dispase is added directly to the culture medium for a minimum of 3 h, followed by incubation of the cells in Hank's calcium-magnesium-free balanced salt solution at 37 degrees C with intermittent trituration to facilitate dispersion. This procedure generates a population of phase-bright single cells that are round in morphology, take up the dye neutral red, exclude the dye trypan blue and readily attach to tissue culture dishes coated with collagen, fibronectin or polylysine, thereby permitting applications that require plated-down conditions. When transferred to culture medium, the cells begin to reaggregate. By altering the length of time the cells are incubated in culture medium prior to attachment, the degree of reaggregation can be controlled to obtain plate-down profiles that consist of both isolated cells and cells in aggregates of varying sizes. Returning dissociated cells to suspension culture results in the reformation of large cell aggregates. Several measures of chromaffin cell function were indistinguishable for dissociated cells placed either in monolayer culture or suspension culture versus non-dissociated cells, implying that the dissociation procedure does not alter cellular responses or cause cellular damage.

  20. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberer, B.; Kieft, H.; Franssen-Verheijen, M.A.W.; Emons, A.M.C.; Vos, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant?s final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do gr...

  1. Tobacco, Nicotine, and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2015-01-01

    Migraineurs variably attribute the cause of their headache to tobacco exposure, whereas tobacco is often stated to cause headache-related disability worldwide. Given tobacco's physiological and emotional addictiveness and migraine's substantial economic impact, improved functionality can be difficult for those with migraine exposed to tobacco products. Environmental tobacco exposure in indoor spaces and workplaces is associated with exacerbation of headache. Avoidance of headache triggers is included in most comprehensive migraine treatment programs, yet tobacco awareness, avoidance, or coping is rarely emphasized as part of that regimen. The aims of this study were to examine the various types of tobacco products to which headache sufferers are exposed and the known basic mechanisms by which tobacco (nicotine) exposure promotes headache pain, and to review the extensive literature on tobacco related to headache with a detailed descriptive narrative providing the basis for conclusions regarding association of noncluster headache-related tobacco exposure. Tobacco-related recommendations are offered. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched without yearly restriction through the date of submission (May 2015), using the MeSH terms "tobacco," "tobacco products," "smoking," "tobacco use," "headache," and "headache disorders." The selection of articles was not limited to English studies or to humans. Articles were excluded when "headache" and "tobacco" were not both mentioned with data provided. Case series were included. Bibliographies of all articles were screened for additional relevant articles. Although migraineurs worldwide report tobacco smoke among triggers, it is rarely among the highest in frequency, and biases abound with predominantly noncontrolled retrospective data. Prospective population-based diary data are extremely limited, and no controlled trials exist to confirm a cause and effect for headache of any type. Although some studies are

  2. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Kieft, H.; Franssen-Verheijen, M.A.W.; Emons, A.M.C.; Vos, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant’s final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g.

  3. Immunogenicity of an adeno-vector vaccine expressing the F protein of a respiratory syncytial virus manufactured from serum-free suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Huai-Sheng; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Hu, Kai-Chieh; Chang, Ching-Kun; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an efficient cell culture process to scale up the production of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses the membrane-trunked fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; Ad-F0ΔTM). Adherent cells of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293-derived cell, 293A, which supports the production of E1/E3-deleted Ad-F0ΔTM when cultured in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), were adapted to suspension growth under serum-free medium. In doing so, we studied the immunogenicity of Ad-F0ΔTMsus, which propagated in a bioreactor that was cultured with serum-free suspension of 293A, in comparison with Ad-F0ΔTMadh, which was produced from parental 293A cells that were adherently cultured in medium containing FBS. The size and morphology of Ad-F0ΔTMsus and Ad-F0ΔTMadh virions were identical upon inspection with electron microscopy. The results showed that anti-F IgG and RSV-neutralizing titer were raised in the serum of both mice that were intranasally immunized twice with Ad-F0ΔTMsus or Ad-F0ΔTMadh at two-week injection intervals. Furthermore, the immune responses persisted for six months after vaccination. Activation of F protein-specific CD8(+) T cell's epitope associated IFN-ɣ and IL-4 was induced in both Ad-F0ΔTMsus- and Ad-F0ΔTMadh, but not in Ad-LacZsus, -immunized mouse splenocytes. No vaccine-enhanced lung inflammation, airway mucus occlusion or eosinophils infiltration were observed in Ad-immunized mice followed by RSV challenge; however, these symptoms were observed following immunization with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. These results indicate that the safety and potency of Ad-F0ΔTM produced from either adherent cells or suspension and serum-free cells are the same. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological impact of cigarette smoke compared to an aerosol produced from a prototypic modified risk tobacco product on normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogel, U; Gonzalez Suarez, I; Xiang, Y; Dossin, E; Guy, P A; Mathis, C; Marescotti, D; Goedertier, D; Martin, F; Peitsch, M C; Hoeng, J

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes serious and fatal diseases. The best way for smokers to avoid health risks is to quit smoking. Using modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) may be an alternative to reduce the harm caused for those who are unwilling to quit smoking, but little is known about the toxic effects of MRTPs, nor were the molecular mechanisms of toxicity investigated in detail. The toxicity of an MRTP and the potential molecular mechanisms involved were investigated in high-content screening tests and whole genome transcriptomics analyses using human bronchial epithelial cells. The prototypic (p)MRTP that was tested had less impact than reference cigarette 3R4F on the cellular oxidative stress response and cell death pathways. Higher pMRTP aerosol extract concentrations had impact on pathways associated with the detoxification of xenobiotics and the reduction of oxidative damage. A pMRTP aerosol concentration up to 18 times higher than the 3R4F caused similar perturbation effects in biological networks and led to the perturbation of networks related to cell stress, and proliferation biology. These results may further facilitate the development of a systems toxicology-based impact assessment for use in future risk assessments in line with the 21st century toxicology paradigm, as shown here for an MRTP. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracellular salicylic acid is involved in signal cascade regulating low ammonium-induced taxoid biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2011-05-01

    It was previously reported that low initial ammonium (2 mM) in medium had significant stimulating effects on the biosynthesis of taxuyunnanine C (Tc) by Taxus chinensis cells. However, the secondary metabolism induction mechanism of the low initial ammonium is yet unknown in plant cells. To provide an insight into the defense signals response to the low initial ammonium, oxidative burst and intracellular salicylic acid (SA) were detected, and their influences on the expression of important genes in taxoid biosynthetic pathway were examined in the cell cultures of T. chinensis. Induced H(2)O(2) production, elevated phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, and enhanced SA biosynthesis were observed. Interestingly, inhibition of SA biosynthesis by paclobutrazol and (BOC-aminooxy) acetic acid significantly depressed the Tc stimulation and up-regulation of Tc biosynthetic genes of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase and taxadiene synthase. The role of intracellular SA in regulating Tc biosynthesis was further confirmed by applying exogenous SA in normal ammonium (20 mM) medium. The results indicated that SA acted as a signal in low initial ammonium-induced Tc biosynthesis. A signal transduction cascade from defense signal response to activated transcription of taxoid biosynthetic genes and enhanced Tc production is proposed.

  6. Sugar uptake analysis of suspension Arabidopsis, tobacco, and rice cells in various media using an FT-IR/ATR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehara, Ken-ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic behavior of the sugar uptake phenomena of a suspension of Arabidopsis cells was investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform infrared spectrometers and attenuated total reflection techniques. The kinetic behavior of the cell growth was also studied and the growth and the sugar uptake behaviors were discussed for three typical plant cells (Arabidopsis, TBY-2, and rice cells). The cell growth rate and the lag period were influenced by not only the types of the plant cells, but also the sugar species used as the carbon source. The characteristics of the sugar uptake behavior were clarified based on the difference in the three types of plant cells. The cell growth and the sugar uptake progressed at approximately the same time in the TBY-2 cells. In the rice cells, the sugar uptake rate was relatively lower than that of the others. On the other hand, the sugar uptake of the Arabidopsis cells started before the cell growth. Furthermore, glucose as the carbon source of the Arabidopsis cell cultivation seems to significantly influence the sugar metabolism. Glucose had a significant influence on the sugar metabolism of the other sugar under the conditions for the mixture of glucose and the other sugar. The characteristics of the sugar uptake phenomena based on the cell growth stage was typical for each plant cell except for some sugars, such as galactose and trehalose, and the behavior of the total sugar uptake had not changed. These results suggested that the cell growth and the sugar uptake in the plant cell cultivation processes may be controlled by the combined supply of the sugar species as the carbon source. The detailed data for plant cell cultivation using each sugar obtained in this study would be useful for bioscience research and for cultivation process control using various sugars, for example, purified or sugar mixtures formed from biomass materials.

  7. Nitric oxide enhances osmoregulation of tobacco ( Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further study indicated that SNP treatments led to relatively lower cell solute potential and higher water potential, which was beneficial for maintaining cell pressure potential under PEG stress. These results indicate that NO could improve the tolerance of tobacco cells to osmotic stress by enhancing their osmoregulation ...

  8. Cell wall biochemical alterations during Agrobacterium-mediated expression of haemagglutinin-based influenza virus-like vaccine particles in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mauff, François; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Bardor, Muriel; Berard, Caroline; Doucet, Alain; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Vezina, Louis-Philippe; Driouich, Azeddine; Couture, Manon M-J; Lerouge, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) have been shown to induce a safe and potent immune response through both humoral and cellular responses. They represent promising novel influenza vaccines. Plant-based biotechnology allows for the large-scale production of VLPs of biopharmaceutical interest using different model organisms, including Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Through this platform, influenza VLPs bud from the plasma membrane and accumulate between the membrane and the plant cell wall. To design and optimize efficient production processes, a better understanding of the plant cell wall composition of infiltrated tobacco leaves is a major interest for the plant biotechnology industry. In this study, we have investigated the alteration of the biochemical composition of the cell walls of N. benthamiana leaves subjected to abiotic and biotic stresses induced by the Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation and the resulting high expression levels of influenza VLPs. Results show that abiotic stress due to vacuum infiltration without Agrobacterium did not induce any detectable modification of the leaf cell wall when compared to non infiltrated leaves. In contrast, various chemical changes of the leaf cell wall were observed post-Agrobacterium infiltration. Indeed, Agrobacterium infection induced deposition of callose and lignin, modified the pectin methylesterification and increased both arabinosylation of RG-I side chains and the expression of arabinogalactan proteins. Moreover, these modifications were slightly greater in plants expressing haemagglutinin-based VLP than in plants infiltrated with the Agrobacterium strain containing only the p19 suppressor of silencing. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  10. Multiple elements of the S2-RNase promoter from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) are required for cell type-specific expression in transgenic potato and tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ficker, M.; Kirch, H.H.; Eijlander, R.; Jacobsen, E.; Thompson, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    A functional analysis of the promoter of the S2-RNase gene from potato was performed in transgenic potato and tobacco plants, using a deletion series of S2-RNase promoter GUS fusions. A detailed histochemical and quantitative analysis of the transgenic tobacco plants revealed that S2 promoter

  11. Tobacco-control policies in tobacco-growing states: where tobacco was king.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallin, Amanda; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-06-01

    POLICY POINTS: The tobacco companies prioritized blocking tobacco-control policies in tobacco-growing states and partnered with tobacco farmers to oppose tobacco-control policies. The 1998 Master Settlement Agreement, which settled state litigation against the cigarette companies, the 2004 tobacco-quota buyout, and the companies' increasing use of foreign tobacco led to a rift between the companies and tobacco farmers. In 2003, the first comprehensive smoke-free local law was passed in a major tobacco-growing state, and there has been steady progress in the region since then. Health advocates should educate the public and policymakers on the changing reality in tobacco-growing states, notably the major reduction in the volume of tobacco produced. The 5 major tobacco-growing states (Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia) are disproportionately affected by the tobacco epidemic, with higher rates of smoking and smoking-induced disease. These states also have fewer smoke-free laws and lower tobacco taxes, 2 evidence-based policies that reduce tobacco use. Historically, the tobacco farmers and hospitality associations allied with the tobacco companies to oppose these policies. This research is based on 5 detailed case studies of these states, which included key informant interviews, previously secret tobacco industry documents (available at http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu), and media articles. This was supplemented with additional tobacco document and media searches specifically for this article. The tobacco companies were particularly concerned about blocking tobacco-control policies in the tobacco-growing states by promoting a pro-tobacco culture, beginning in the late 1960s. Nevertheless, since 2003, there has been rapid progress in the tobacco-growing states' passage of smoke-free laws. This progress came after the alliance between the tobacco companies and the tobacco farmers fractured and hospitality organizations stopped opposing smoke

  12. Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study regarding Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshadpour, F.; Konings, S.; Speel, E.J.; Hordijk, G.J.; Koole, R.A.; Blokland, M. van; Slootweg, P.J.; Kummer, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to determine the role of HPV in the pathogenesis and outcome of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in lifelong nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. A case-case analysis was performed to compare the presence of HPV-DNA in tumor cells of 16 nonsmoking and nondrinking with 16 matched

  13. Online Tobacco Marketing and Subsequent Tobacco Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Yang, JaeWon; Knutzen, Kristin E; Moran, Meghan Bridgid; Tan, Andy S L; Sargent, James; Choi, Kelvin

    2018-02-01

    Nearly 2.9 million US adolescents engaged with online tobacco marketing in 2013 to 2014. We assess whether engagement is a risk factor for tobacco use initiation, increased frequency of use, progression to poly-product use, and cessation. We analyzed data from 11 996 adolescents sampled in the nationally representative, longitudinal Population Assessment for Tobacco and Health study. At baseline (2013-2014), we ascertained respondents' engagement with online tobacco marketing. At follow-up (2014-2015), we determined if respondents had initiated tobacco use, increased frequency of use, progressed to poly-product use, or quit. Accounting for known risk factors, we fit a multivariable logistic regression model among never-users who engaged at baseline to predict initiation at follow-up. We fit similar models to predict increased frequency of use, progression to poly-product use, and cessation. Compared with adolescents who did not engage, those who engaged reported higher incidences of initiation (19.5% vs 11.9%), increased frequency of use (10.3% vs 4.4%), and progression to poly-product use (5.8% vs 2.4%), and lower incidence of cessation at follow-up (16.1% vs 21.5%). Accounting for other risk factors, engagement was positively associated with initiation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.57), increased frequency of use (aOR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.24-2.00), progression to poly-product use (aOR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.20-2.43), and negatively associated with cessation (aOR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.50-1.00). Engagement with online tobacco marketing represents a risk factor for adolescent tobacco use. FDA marketing regulation and cooperation of social-networking sites could limit engagement. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2013-2014. The National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS) was created to assess the prevalence of tobacco use, as well as the factors promoting and impeding tobacco use...

  15. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  16. Molecular modeling of major tobacco alkaloids in mainstream cigarette smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Kurgat, Caren; Kibet, Joshua; Cheplogoi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Consensus of opinion in literature regarding tobacco research has shown that cigarette smoke can cause irreparable damage to the genetic material, cell injury, and general respiratory landscape. The alkaloid family of tobacco has been implicated is a series of ailments including addiction, mental illnesses, psychological disorders, and cancer. Accordingly, this contribution describes the mechanistic degradation of major tobacco alkaloids including the widely studied nicotine and tw...

  17. Assessment of mitochondrial function following short- and long-term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to total particulate matter from a candidate modified-risk tobacco product and reference cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malińska, Dominika; Szymański, Jędrzej; Patalas-Krawczyk, Paulina; Michalska, Bernadeta; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Prill, Monika; Partyka, Małgorzata; Drabik, Karolina; Walczak, Jarosław; Sewer, Alain; Johne, Stephanie; Luettich, Karsta; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; Duszyński, Jerzy; Szczepanowska, Joanna; van der Toorn, Marco; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2018-02-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by cigarette smoke is involved in the oxidative stress-induced pathology of airway diseases. Reducing the levels of harmful and potentially harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco may reduce mitochondrial changes that contribute to oxidative stress and cell damage. We evaluated mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells following 1- and 12-week exposures to total particulate matter (TPM) from the aerosol of a candidate modified-risk tobacco product, the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 (THS2.2), in comparison with TPM from the 3R4F reference cigarette. After 1-week exposure, 3R4F TPM had a strong inhibitory effect on mitochondrial basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates compared to TPM from THS2.2. Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation were accompanied by increased mitochondrial superoxide levels and increased levels of oxidatively damaged proteins in cells exposed to 7.5 μg/mL of 3R4F TPM or 150 μg/mL of THS2.2 TPM, while cytosolic levels of reactive oxygen species were not affected. In contrast, the 12-week exposure indicated adaptation of BEAS-2B cells to long-term stress. Altogether, the findings indicate that 3R4F TPM has a stronger effect on oxidative phosphorylation, gene expression and proteins involved in oxidative stress than TPM from the candidate modified-risk tobacco product THS2.2. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Assessment of cellular and serum proteome from tongue squamous cell carcinoma patient lacking addictive proclivities for tobacco, betel nut and alcohol: Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowal, Sapna; Naqvi, Samar Husain; Monga, Seema; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Wajid, Saima

    2017-12-13

    The intriguing molecular pathways involved in oral carcinogenesis are still ambiguous. The oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) ranks as the most common type constituting more than 90% of the globally diagnosed oral cancers cases. The elevation in the OSCC incidence rate during past ten years has an alarming impression on human healthcare. The major challenges associated with OSCC include delayed diagnosis, high metastatic rates, and low five-year survival rates. The present work foundations on reverse genetic strategy and involves the identification of genes showing expressional variability in an OSCC case lacking addictive proclivities for tobacco, betel nut and/or alcohol, major etiologies. The expression modulations in the identified genes were analyzed in sixteen patients comprising oral pre-cancer and cancer histo-pathologies. The genes: SCCA1 and KRT1 were found to down regulate while DNAJC13, GIPC2, MRPL17, IG -Vreg, SSFA2, and UPF0415 upregulated in the oral pre-cancer and cancer pathologies, implicating the genes as crucial players in oral carcinogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Michael; Hemmerlin, Andrea; Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Gerber, Esther; Tritsch, Denis; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL). By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1), shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  20. Polyclonal antibodies for specific detection of tobacco host cell proteins can be efficiently generated following RuBisCO depletion and the removal of endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Zulfaquar Ahmad; Hellwig, Stephan; Drossard, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer; Buyel, Johannes Felix

    2016-03-01

    The production of biopharmaceutical proteins in plants requires efficient downstream processing steps that remove impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and adventitious endotoxins produced by bacteria during transient expression. We therefore strived to develop effective routines for endotoxin removal from plant extracts and the subsequent use of the extracts to generate antibodies detecting a broad set of HCPs. At first, we depleted the superabundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) for which PEG precipitation achieved the best results, preventing a dominant immune reaction against this protein. We found that a mixture of sera from rabbits immunized with pre-depleted or post-depleted extracts detected more HCPs than the individual sera used alone. We also developed a powerful endotoxin removal procedure using Polymyxin B for extracts from wild type plants or a combination of fiber-flow filtration and EndoTrap Blue for tobacco plants infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The antibodies we generated will be useful for quality and performance assessment in future process development and the methods we present can easily be transferred to other expression systems rendering them useful in the field of plant molecular farming. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Tobacco control and tobacco farming in African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-wei; Lee, Anita H

    2015-02-01

    During the past decade, tobacco leaf production has shifted from high-income countries to developing countries, particularly those in Africa. Most African governments promote tobacco farming as a way to alleviate poverty. The economic benefit of tobacco farming has been used by the tobacco industry to block tobacco control policies. The tobacco industry is active in promoting the alleged positive aspects of tobacco farming and in 'protecting' farmers from what they portray as unfair tobacco control regulations that reduce demand. Tobacco farming has many negative consequences for the health and well-being of farmers, as well as for the environment and the long-term well-being of the countries concerned. We provide an overview of tobacco farming issues in Africa. Encompassing multi-dimensional issues of economic development, there is far more to it than tobacco control questions.

  2. Cancer and Tobacco Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... friends, family, and coworkers to quit using tobacco. Teach children and adolescents about the health risks of tobacco ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: English (US) Español ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  3. Tobacco Cessation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labani Satyanarayana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is the most common cause of non-communicable disease related morbidity and mortality worldwide despite being preventable. Almost fifty percent or more than seven million tobacco users get killed each year and about 13 percent of them are non-smokers being exposed to second hand smoke (1. According to the recent National family health survey (NFHS-4 study for the year 2015-16, there were 38.9% men who use any kind of tobacco in urban while 48% in rural areas of India. On the other hand, 4.4% of women in urban and 8.1% in rural use any kind of tobacco. Prevalence of tobacco use in the ages of 13-15 among boys was 19% and girls 8.3 % according to global youth tobacco survey of 2009. The tobacco dependence was considered as disease by the international classification of diseases (ICD 10. Proportion of tobacco related cancers in comparison to all other cancers were reported to be as high as 25% in men and 18% in women (2.

  4. Tobacco packaging design for reducing tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Ann; Gravely, Shannon; Hitchman, Sara C; Bauld, Linda; Hammond, David; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie

    2017-04-27

    Tobacco use is the largest single preventable cause of death and disease worldwide. Standardised tobacco packaging is an intervention intended to reduce the promotional appeal of packs and can be defined as packaging with a uniform colour (and in some cases shape and size) with no logos or branding, apart from health warnings and other government-mandated information, and the brand name in a prescribed uniform font, colour and size. Australia was the first country to implement standardised tobacco packaging between October and December 2012, France implemented standardised tobacco packaging on 1 January 2017 and several other countries are implementing, or intending to implement, standardised tobacco packaging. To assess the effect of standardised tobacco packaging on tobacco use uptake, cessation and reduction. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and six other databases from 1980 to January 2016. We checked bibliographies and contacted study authors to identify additional peer-reviewed studies. Primary outcomes included changes in tobacco use prevalence incorporating tobacco use uptake, cessation, consumption and relapse prevention. Secondary outcomes covered intermediate outcomes that can be measured and are relevant to tobacco use uptake, cessation or reduction. We considered multiple study designs: randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental and experimental studies, observational cross-sectional and cohort studies. The review focused on all populations and people of any age; to be included, studies had to be published in peer-reviewed journals. We examined studies that assessed the impact of changes in tobacco packaging such as colour, design, size and type of health warnings on the packs in relation to branded packaging. In experiments, the control condition was branded tobacco packaging but could include variations of standardised packaging. Screening and data extraction followed standard Cochrane methods. We used different 'Risk of bias' domains for

  5. Tobacco documents research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey J; McCandless, Phyra M; Klausner, Kim; Taketa, Rachel; Yerger, Valerie B

    2011-05-01

    Tobacco documents research has developed into a thriving academic enterprise since its inception in 1995. The technology supporting tobacco documents archiving, searching and retrieval has improved greatly since that time, and consequently tobacco documents researchers have considerably more access to resources than was the case when researchers had to travel to physical archives and/or electronically search poorly and incompletely indexed documents. The authors of the papers presented in this supplement all followed the same basic research methodology. Rather than leave the reader of the supplement to read the same discussion of methods in each individual paper, presented here is an overview of the methods all authors followed. In the individual articles that follow in this supplement, the authors present the additional methodological information specific to their topics. This brief discussion also highlights technological capabilities in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and updates methods for organising internal tobacco documents data and findings.

  6. Anxiety and Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mae Wood

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is the first preventable cause of death. This is associated not only with physical illness and a shorter life expectancy, but also with different mental disorders such as anxiety disorders. Given the low risk perception of use, this paper reports a systematic review of the scientific literature on the relationship between anxiety and tobacco from an emotional perspective, including data on smoking prevalence, factors associated with the onset and maintenance of tobacco use, as well as those factors that hamper smoking cessation and increase relapse rates. The high rates of comorbidity between tobacco use and anxiety disorders make necessary the development of new and better tobacco cessation treatments, especially designed for those smokers with high state anxiety or anxiety sensitivity, with the aim of maximizing the efficacy.

  7. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia an tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, M.M.; Franken, J.; Aelst, van A.; Angenent, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the

  8. Ultrastructural analysis of oral exfoliated epithelial cells of tobacco smokers and betel nut chewers: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Shamim Khan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In normal oral mucosa, cell surface morphology depends on the state of keratinization of the tissue. Thus, it could prove helpful in detecting any carcinomatous change at its incipient stage and also give an insight into the ultra-structural details of cellular differentiations in epithelial tissues.

  9. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M. Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs...

  10. Evidence that proliferation of golgi apparatus depends on both de novo generation from the endoplasmic reticulum and formation from pre-existing stacks during the growth of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun, Moses Olabiyi; Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-04-01

    In higher plants, the numbers of cytoplasmic-distributed Golgi stacks differ based on function, age and cell type. It has not been clarified how the numbers are controlled, whether all the Golgi apparatus in a cell function equally and whether the increase in Golgi number is a result of the de novo formation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or fission of pre-existing stacks. A tobacco prolyl 4-hydroxylase (NtP4H1.1), which is a cis-Golgi-localizing type II membrane protein, was tagged with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, mKikGR (monomeric Kikume green red), and expressed in tobacco bright yellow 2 (BY-2) cells. Transformed cells were exposed to purple light to convert the fluorescence from green to red. A time-course analysis after the conversion revealed a progressive increase in green puncta and a decrease in the red puncta. From 3 to 6 h, we observed red, yellow and green fluorescent puncta corresponding to pre-existing Golgi; Golgi containing both pre-existing and newly synthesized protein; and newly synthesized Golgi. Analysis of the number and fluorescence of Golgi at different phases of the cell cycle suggested that an increase in Golgi number with both division and de novo synthesis occurred concomitantly with DNA replication. Investigation with different inhibitors suggested that the formation of new Golgi and the generation of Golgi containing both pre-existing and newly synthesized protein are mediated by different machineries. These results and modeling based on quantified results indicate that the Golgi apparatuses in tobacco BY-2 cells are not uniform and suggest that both de novo synthesis from the ER and Golgi division contribute almost equally to the increase in proliferating cells.

  11. Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming: Separating Myth from Reality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming: Separating Myth from Reality. Book cover Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming. Directeur(s) : Wardie Leppan, Natacha Lecours, and Daniel Buckles. Maison(s) d'édition : Anthem Press, IDRC. 10 septembre 2014. ISBN : 9781783082933. 250 pages. e-ISBN : 9781552505823.

  12. Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming : Separating Myth from Reality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-09-10

    Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming : Separating Myth from Reality. Couverture du livre Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming. Editor(s):. Wardie Leppan, Natacha Lecours et Daniel Buckles. Publisher(s):. Anthem Press, CRDI. September 10, 2014. ISBN: 9781783082933. 250 pages. e-ISBN: 9781552505823.

  13. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  14. Multinational Tobacco Companies and Tobacco Consumption (China)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will support the collection of baseline data against which to measure future changes in smoking patters and amount of tobacco consumed. Surveys will be carried out at six months and one, two ... Tabagisme, tabagisme passif, maladies chroniques et pauvreté en Chine. La mondialisation de l'industrie du tabac ...

  15. Tobacco Use among ARV Treated HIV Infected Rural South Africans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tobacco use remains one of the major cardiovascular risk factors and its use in antiretroviral (ARV) treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected people may lead to activation of immune cells and rendering them ... Keywords: Tobacco Use, Cardiovascular Disease, Antiretroviral, Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

  16. Similar, but different: structurally related azelaic acid and hexanoic acid trigger differential metabolomic and transcriptomic responses in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T; Ncube, Efficient N; Steenkamp, Paul A; Dubery, Ian A

    2017-11-29

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating an enhanced broad-spectrum defensive ability. The development of novel resistance inducers represents an attractive, alternative crop protection strategy. In this regard, hexanoic acid (Hxa, a chemical elicitor) and azelaic acid (Aza, a natural signaling compound) have been proposed as inducers of plant defense, by means of a priming mechanism. Here, we investigated both the mode of action and the complementarity of Aza and Hxa as priming agents in Nicotiana tabacum cells in support of enhanced defense. Metabolomic analyses identified signatory biomarkers involved in the establishment of a pre-conditioned state following Aza and Hxa treatment. Both inducers affected the metabolomes in a similar manner and generated common biomarkers: caffeoylputrescine glycoside, cis-5-caffeoylquinic acid, feruloylglycoside, feruloyl-3-methoxytyramine glycoside and feruloyl-3-methoxytyramine conjugate. Subsequently, quantitative real time-PCR was used to investigate the expression of inducible defense response genes: phenylalanine ammonia lyase, hydroxycinnamoyl CoA quinate transferase and hydroxycinnamoyl transferase to monitor activation of the early phenylpropanoid pathway and chlorogenic acids metabolism, while ethylene response element-binding protein, small sar1 GTPase, heat shock protein 90, RAR1, SGT1, non-expressor of PR genes 1 and thioredoxin were analyzed to report on signal transduction events. Pathogenesis-related protein 1a and defensin were quantified to investigate the activation of defenses regulated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid respectively. The qPCR results revealed differential expression kinetics and, in general (except for NPR1, Thionin and PR1a), the relative gene expression ratios observed in the Hxa-treated cells were significantly greater than the expression observed in the cells treated with Aza. The results indicate that Aza and Hxa have a similar priming effect through activation of genes

  17. Predictors of Smokeless Tobacco Abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbert, Jon O.; Glover, Elbert D.; Shinozaki, Eri; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Dale, Lowell C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate predictors of tobacco abstinence among smokeless tobacco (ST) users. Methods: Logistic regression analyses assessed characteristics associated with tobacco abstinence among ST users receiving bupropion SR. Results: Older age was associated with increased tobacco abstinence in both placebo and bupropion SR groups at end…

  18. Isolation and characterization of spheroid cells from the HT29 colon cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinlan; Ouyang, Nengyong; Teng, Hong; Yao, Herui

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Cr-CSCs) are involved in the growth of colon cancer, but their specific role in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still unclear. Currently, methods for sorting Cr-CSCs are based on the expression of surface markers (e.g., CD133(+), CD44(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1(+))); however, the specificity of these markers for Cr-CSCs is uncertain. This study aimed to develop more effective ways of isolating and purifying Cr-CSCs. Suspension culture was used for isolation of Cr-CSCs. And spheroid cells were performed by side population technology, and the putative molecular marker analysis of colorectal cancer stem cell. Migration assay and chemoresistance experiment were conducted between the adherent cells and spheroid cells. HT29 colon cancer cells grew well in suspension culture. The percentage of CD44(+) cancer cell of spheroid cells was 68 times higher than that of adherent cells (89.5% vs. 1.3%), but there was no obvious difference in the percentage of CD133(+) cells (6.25% vs. 5.6%). Moreover, it is worth noting that the percent of CD133 (+)/CD44(+) cells remarkably rose (from 0.6% to 5.4%). The expression of ALDH1 was markedly increased (7.5% vs. 20.5%) for the spheroid cells than the adherent cells. The side population within the spheroid population dramatically increased from 0.2% to 6.3%. The resistance of spheroid cells to 5-FU was higher than that of adherent cells, as was their ability to migrate in the presence of SDF-1α. Suspension culture is an effective approach for enriching Cr-CSCs and can provide an inexhaustible supply of genetically stable colon cancer stem cells for targeted Cr-CSC studies. Spheroid cell models also enable the study of colon cancer chemoresistance and metastasis and may help to elucidate the role of cancer stem cells in colon cancer.

  19. Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study regarding Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Farshadpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the role of HPV in the pathogenesis and outcome of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in lifelong nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. A case-case analysis was performed to compare the presence of HPV-DNA in tumor cells of 16 nonsmoking and nondrinking with 16 matched smoking and drinking patients (matching criteria: age at incidence, gender, tumor sublocation, tumor stage. HPV was detected using 2 PCR tests, FISH analysis, and p16INK4A immunostaining. Nonsmoking and nondrinking patients had more HPV-positive tumors than smoking and drinking patients (n=12; 75% versus n=2; 13%; P<0.001. All HPV-positive tumors showed p16INK4A overexpression, and 1 HPV-negative tumor had p16INK4A overexpression, (P<0.001. Overall survival and disease-specific survival were higher for HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative cases (P=0.027, P=0.039, resp.. In conclusion, HPV is strongly associated with OSCC of nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. Specific diagnostic and therapeutic actions should be considered for these patients to achieve a better prognosis.

  20. Youth and Tobacco Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cycle Glossary of Terms FAQ Infographics Shareable Media Subscription Services Publication Catalog Get Email Updates To receive ... 770-488-5493. Fact Sheets Adult Data Cessation Economics Fast Facts Health Effects Secondhand Smoke Smokeless Tobacco ...

  1. Youth and Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cigar use have generally declined, sharp increases in e-cigarette and hookah tobacco use among teens in previous ... dangers of using electronic nicotine delivery systems, like e-cigarettes. Many e-cigarettes contain nicotine, the same highly ...

  2. NAAG Tobacco Settlement Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2017. National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG). Policy—Tobacco Settlement Payments. The National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) provides...

  3. Smoked Tobacco Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cigarette, emphasizing its cool and refreshing taste. In reality, menthol reduces the harshness of cigarette smoke, which ... the use of non-cigarette smoked tobacco products increased dramatically. The largest increases were in use of ...

  4. NAAG Tobacco Settlement Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2016. National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG). Policy—Tobacco Settlement Payments. The National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) provides...

  5. Price and consumption of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Saxena, Puneet; Meena, Hardayal; Mangal, Daya Krishan

    2012-07-01

    It is thought that price increase in tobacco products leads to reduced consumption. Though many studies have substantiated this concept, it has not been well studied in India. Recently, price of tobacco products was increased due to ban on plastic sachets of chewing tobacco and increased tax in Rajasthan. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of price rise on overall consumption of tobacco in Jaipur city, Rajasthan. This study was carried out in Jaipur city. Two-staged stratified sampling was used. In the first phase of study, cost and consumption of various tobacco products in the months of February and April were enquired from 25 retail tobacco shops. In the second phase, tobacco consumption was enquired from 20 consecutive consumers purchasing any tobacco product from all the above retail tobacco shops. The data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired "t" test. The comparison of prices of tobacco products between February and April revealed that the price of cigarette, bidi, and chewing tobacco has increased by 19%, 21%, and 68%, respectively. Average decrease in sales of cigarettes, bidi, and chewing tobacco at shops included in the study were 14%, 23%, and 38%, respectively. The consumers purchasing tobacco also reported decreased consumption. Chewing tobacco showed the maximum reduction (21%). Consumption of cigarette and bidi has also reduced by 15% and 13%, respectively. It may be concluded that reduction in consumption is associated with increased price of tobacco products. Reduced consumption is comparative to the magnitude of price increase.

  6. Tobacco and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatan Pal Singh Balhara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality globally. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, raised blood pressure, insulin resistance (with and without glucose intolerance, pro-inflammatory state, and pro-thrombotic state. Tobacco use is associated with various core components of metabolic syndrome. It has been found to play a causal role in various pathways leading on to development this condition, the current article discusses various facets of this association.

  7. The p53 tumour suppressor gene and the tobacco industry: research, debate, and conflict of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Bitton, A; Neuman, M D; Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene lead to uncontrolled cell division and are found in over 50% of all human tumours, including 60% of lung cancers. Research published in 1996 by Denissenko and colleagues demonstrated patterned in-vitro mutagenic effects on p53 of benzo[a]pyrene, a carcinogen present in tobacco smoke. We investigated the tobacco industry's response to p53 research linking smoking to cancer. We searched online tobacco document archives, including the Legacy Tobacco Do...

  8. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  9. Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2012. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) – Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco...

  10. An endgame for tobacco?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Kenneth E

    2013-05-01

    Since its origins in the 1960s, tobacco control has achieved remarkable success against the scourge of tobacco-produced disease and death. Yet tobacco use, especially cigarette smoking, remains the world's leading cause of preventable premature death and is likely to do so for decades to come. Evidence-based policies seem incapable of substantially hastening the demise of smoking. Slowness in the decline of smoking in developed nations, and increasing smoking in many low- and middle-income countries has sparked interest in novel, even radical 'endgame' strategies to eliminate the toll of tobacco. This paper identifies the principal endgame proposals and, with the other papers in this volume, has the goal of expanding and deepening the endgame conversation by engaging the broader tobacco control community. While we struggle today with often widely divergent perspectives and beliefs about what is possible and how it might be achieved, we all share the same vision of the final words to this story: 'The end'.

  11. Effects of Glyphosate on the Shikimate Pathway and Regulation of Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase in Cryptomeria and Perilla Cell Suspension Cultues

    OpenAIRE

    Nariyuki, Ishikura; Susumu, Teramoto; Yasunobu, Takeshima; Seiji, Mitsui; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University; Biological Laboratory, College of Medical Science, Kumamoto University

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Cryptomeria and Perilla cell suspension cultures with glyphosate resulted in a marked suppression of the formation of flavans and caffeic acid derivatives, respectively, while it caused only a slight decline in the cell growth. In contrast with 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate (DAHP) synthase-Mn isozyme, DAHP synthase-Co isozyme from Cryptomeria and Perilla cells was much more sensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. The addition of 1 to 2 mM glyphosate caused an accumulation of shi...

  12. Tobacco Taxes and Tobacco Control Policies in Brazil, Mexico, and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco control initiative. IDRC and Cancer Research UK are pleased to announce the launch of a new five-year initiative aimed at preventing tobacco-related diseases. View moreIDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco control initiative ...

  13. Tobacco Taxation, Smuggling, and Street Tobacco Vendors in Eritrea

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Eritrea has taken steps to control tobacco use. Its 2004 proclamation aims to curb consumption, as do higher tax rates on cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, in spite of these measures, tobacco consumption is increasing. Enforcement of the proclamation is weak, and cheap, smuggled cigarettes and other ...

  14. Tobacco Taxes and Tobacco Control Policies in Brazil, Mexico, and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco Taxes and Tobacco Control Policies in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. Tobacco use in many Latin American countries is high among boys, girls, men, and women. However, research has yet to explore differences in cigarette smoking rates between lower- and higher-income groups in middle-income countries such ...

  15. Tobacco Control and Tobacco Farming: Separating Myth from Reality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-09-10

    Sep 10, 2014 ... The bulk of the world's tobacco is produced in low- and middle-income countries. In order to dissuade these countries from implementing policies aimed at curbing tobacco consumption (such as increased taxes, health warnings, advertising bans, and smoke-free environments), the tobacco industry claims ...

  16. BeTobaccoFree.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Electronic Cigarettes New FDA Regulations HEALTH EFFECTS Nicotine Addiction ... Proposes New Tobacco Regulations Proposed new rule would cover cigars, e-cigarettes, pipe tobacco and other retail products not currently ...

  17. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Convenience Stores Not Your Grandfather's Cigar Global Marlboro Campaign YOUTH INITIATIVES Kick Butts Day Taking Down Tobacco ... Advocacy Incubator draws on lessons from tobacco control campaigns in over 50 countries to provide training and ...

  18. TOBACCO SMOKING AND LUNG DISEASES: EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents data on the significant increase of tobacco smoking prevalence and its harmful effect on the development and course of chronic respiratory diseases: tuberculosis, pneumonia, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Negative consequences of tobacco smoking are caused by chronic intoxication of the host by the components of tobacco smoke providing impact on various organs and cells of the host, thus causing a big variety of diseases. Both active and passive smoking deteriorates their course and increase the risk of exacerbation, hinders taking control over the disease and interferes with adequate response to drugs.Current approaches to treatment of tobacco addiction have been presented. There are several ways to overcome nicotine addiction – drug therapy and the other forms of therapy. Integrated approach to tobacco smoking management allows achieving success in 30% of cases within short period of time with continuous and quality remissions. 

  19. Tobacco Use among Sexual Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Lawrence O.; Bowman, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter addresses tobacco use among sexual minorities. It examines research on the prevalence of tobacco use in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community and discusses why tobacco use within this group continues to significantly exceed that of the general population.

  20. What we fund Tobacco control

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    NCDP

    Analysis of the influence of the tobacco industry's direct and indirect activities on policy-makers, researchers, funding agencies, and opinion leaders. Appraisal of the perceived economic value of the tobacco industry to national economies and those whose livelihoods include income from tobacco production, marketing, or ...

  1. The tobacco industry, state politics, and tobacco education in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begay, M E; Traynor, M; Glantz, S A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Proposition 99 added 25 cents to the California state cigarette tax and mandated that 20% of the new revenues be spent on tobacco education and prevention programs. This paper examines the implementation of these programs and the tobacco industry's response to Proposition 99. METHODS. Political expenditure data for twelve tobacco firms and associations were gathered from California's Fair Political Practices Commission and secretary of state's Political Reform Division. Tobacco education expenditure data were collected from Governor's Budgets and the Department of Finance. RESULTS. Since Proposition 99 passed, tobacco industry political expenditures in California have risen 10-fold, from $790,050 in the 1985-1986 election to $7,615,091 in the 1991-1992 election. The tobacco industry is contributing more heavily to the California legislature than to Congress. A statistical analysis of data on campaign contributions indicates that California legislators' policy-making is influenced by campaign contributions from the tobacco industry. Since fiscal year 1989-1990, the state has ignored the voters' mandate and spent only 14.7% of the new revenues to tobacco education. Medical care programs received more money than permitted by the voters. CONCLUSIONS. The tobacco industry has become politically active in California following the passage of Proposition 99. One result may be that the state has underfunded tobacco education by $174.7 million through the 1993-1994 fiscal year. The estimated redirection of funds to medical care would essentially eliminate the tobacco education campaign by the year 2000. PMID:8362994

  2. Tobacco Harm to Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014. 18 See, e.g., Tonetti, MS, “Cigarette Smoking and Periodontal Disease: Etiology and Management of Disease,” Annals of Periodontology , ... Burgan, SW, “The Role of Tobacco Use in Periodontal Diseases: A Literature ... Krall, EA, “Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Tooth Loss,” Journal of Dental ...

  3. Psychopathology and tobacco demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Aston, Elizabeth R; Zvolensky, Michael J; Abrantes, Ana M; Metrik, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Behavioral economic measurement of the relative value of tobacco (Cigarette Purchase Task; CPT) is used to examine individual differences in motivation for tobacco under certain contexts. Smokers with psychopathology, relative to those without, may demonstrate stronger demand for tobacco following a period of smoking deprivation, which could account for disparate rates of smoking and cessation among this subgroup. Participants (n=111) were community-recruited adult daily smokers who completed the CPT after a deprivation period of approximately 60min. Presence of psychopathology was assessed via clinical interview; 40.5% (n=45) of the sample met criteria for past-year psychological diagnosis. Specifically, 31.5% (n=35) had an emotional disorder (anxiety/depressive disorder), 17.1% (n=19) had a substance use disorder, and 19.1% of the sample had more than one disorder. Smokers with any psychopathology showed significantly higher intensity (demand at unrestricted cost; $0) and Omax (peak expenditure for a drug) relative to smokers with no psychopathology. Intensity was significantly higher among smokers with an emotional disorder compared to those without. Smokers with a substance use disorder showed significantly higher intensity and Omax, and lower elasticity, reflecting greater insensitivity to price increases. Having≥2 disorders was associated with higher intensity relative to having 1 or no disorders. Findings suggest that presence of psychopathology may be associated with greater and more persistent motivation to smoke. Future work is needed to explore the mechanism linking psychopathology to tobacco demand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  5. Price and consumption of tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is thought that price increase in tobacco products leads to reduced consumption. Though many studies have substantiated this concept, it has not been well studied in India. Recently, price of tobacco products was increased due to ban on plastic sachets of chewing tobacco and increased tax in Rajasthan. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of price rise on overall consumption of tobacco in Jaipur city, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in Jaipur city. Two-staged stratified sampling was used. In the first phase of study, cost and consumption of various tobacco products in the months of February and April were enquired from 25 retail tobacco shops. In the second phase, tobacco consumption was enquired from 20 consecutive consumers purchasing any tobacco product from all the above retail tobacco shops. The data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired "t" test. Results: The comparison of prices of tobacco products between February and April revealed that the price of cigarette, bidi, and chewing tobacco has increased by 19%, 21%, and 68%, respectively. Average decrease in sales of cigarettes, bidi, and chewing tobacco at shops included in the study were 14%, 23%, and 38%, respectively. The consumers purchasing tobacco also reported decreased consumption. Chewing tobacco showed the maximum reduction (21%. Consumption of cigarette and bidi has also reduced by 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion: It may be concluded that reduction in consumption is associated with increased price of tobacco products. Reduced consumption is comparative to the magnitude of price increase.

  6. FUELS IN TOBACCO PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Čavlek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy production from biomass can reduce „greenhouse effect” and contribute to solving energy security especially in the agricultural households which rely on energy from fossil fuels. In Croatia fuel-cured tobacco is produced on about 5000 ha. Gross income for the whole production is about 180 000 000 kn/year. Flue-cured tobacco is a high energy consuming crop. There are two parts of energy consumption, for mechanization used for the field production (11% and, energy for bulk-curing (89%. In each case, presently used fuels of fossil origin need to be substituted by an alternative energy source of organic origin. Hereafter attention is paid to finding a more economic and ecologically acceptable fuel for curing tobacco. Curing flue-cured tobacco is done by heated air in curing burns. Various sources of heat have been used; wood, coal, oil and gas. In each case different burning facilities of different efficiency have been used. This has had an impact on curing costs and ecology. Recently, mostly used fuel has been natural gas. However, gas is getting expensive. Consequently, an alternative fuel for curing tobacco is sought for. According to literature, agricultural crops suitable for the latter purpose could be wheat, barley, maize, sorghum, sugar beet and some other annual and perennial plant species. Wooden pellets (by-products are suitable for combustion too. Ligno-cellulose fuels have been used for heating since long time. However, not sufficient research has been done from an applied point of view (Venturi and Venturi, 2003. Fuel combustion is getting more efficient with developing technological innovations. The curing barn manufacturers are offering technology for combusting wooden pellets (by-products for curing tobacco. The pellets are available on domestic market. The same technology can be used for combustion of maize grain. Within “Hrvatski duhani” research on suitability of using wooden pellets and maize grain and whole

  7. Environmental Health Organisations against Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Gerard Hastings

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61% and absence of a coherent strategy (39%.

  8. Environmental health organisations against tobacco.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulcahy, Maurice

    2009-04-01

    Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH) in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61%) and absence of a coherent strategy (39%).

  9. Permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship undermines tobacco control support in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A; Olutola, Bukola G; Agaku, Israel T

    2016-06-01

    School personnel, who are respected members of the community, may exert significant influence on policy adoption. This study assessed the impact of school personnel's permissiveness toward tobacco industry sponsorship activities on their support for complete bans on tobacco advertisements, comprehensive smoke-free laws and increased tobacco prices. Representative data were obtained from the Global School Personnel Survey for 29 African countries (n = 17 929). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated using multi-variable Poisson regression models to assess the impact of permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship activities on support for tobacco control policies (p advertisements (84.9%); comprehensive smoke-free laws (92.4%) and tobacco price increases (80.8%). School personnel who believed that the tobacco industry should be allowed to sponsor school events were significantly less likely to support complete bans on tobacco advertisements [aPR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.95] and comprehensive smoke-free laws (aPR = 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98). In contrast, support for complete tobacco advertisement bans was more likely among those who believed that the tobacco industry encourages youths to smoke (aPR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.17-1.37), and among those who taught about health sometimes (aPR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.11) or a lot (aPR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10) compared with those who did not teach about health at all. These findings underscore the need to educate school personnel on tobacco industry's strategies to undermine tobacco control policies. This may help to build school personnel support for laws intended to reduce youth susceptibility, experimentation and established use of tobacco products. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Tobacco industry strategies for influencing European Community tobacco advertising legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Mark; Bitton, Asaf; Glantz, Stanton

    2002-04-13

    Restrictions on tobacco company advertising and sponsorship are effective parts of tobacco control programmes worldwide. Through Council Directive 98/43/EC, the European Community (EC) sought to end all tobacco advertising and sponsorship in EC member states by 2006. Initially proposed in 1989, the directive was adopted in 1998, and was annulled by the European Court of Justice in 2000 following a protracted lobbying campaign against the directive by a number of interested organisations including European tobacco companies. A new advertising directive was proposed in May, 2001. We reviewed online collections of tobacco industry documents from US tobacco companies made public under the US Master Settlement Agreement of 1998. Documents reviewed dated from 1978 to 1994 and came from Philip Morris, R J Reynolds, and Brown and Williamson (British American Tobacco) collections. We also obtained approximately 15,000 pages of paper records related to British American Tobacco from its documents' depository in Guildford, UK. This information was supplemented with information in the published literature and consultations with European tobacco control experts. The tobacco industry lobbied against Directive 98/43/EC at the level of EC member state governments as well as on a pan-European level. The industry sought to prevent passage of the directive within the EC legislature, to substitute industry-authored proposals in place of the original directive, and if necessary to use litigation to prevent implementation of the directive after its passage. The tobacco industry sought to delay, and eventually defeat, the EC directive on tobacco advertising and sponsorship by seeking to enlist the aid of figures at the highest levels of European politics while at times attempting to conceal the industry's role. An understanding of these proposed strategies can help European health advocates to pass and implement effective future tobacco control legislation.

  11. Tobacco control in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D T; Kosik, R O; Mandell, G A; Chen, Y A; Su, T P; Chiu, A W; Fan, A P

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the use of tobacco in Vietnam. Review study. Data were collected through a review of tobacco-related literature in Vietnam. Grey literature and web content from agencies such as the World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were consulted. Tobacco smoking is still common in Vietnam, although numerous policies have been issued and implemented over the last two decades. Based on the most recent data (2010), the prevalence of smoking among adults aged >15 years was 23.8%, with a higher percentage among males (47.4%) than females (1.4%). The prevalence of smoking among students aged 13-15 was 3.8% (2007), with a similar gender pattern. The prevalence of exposure to secondhand smoke is of concern, with 73.1% and 55.9% of adults reporting exposure to secondhand smoke at home and at work or other places, respectively. Of the adult respondents, 55.5% believed that smoking may cause lung cancer, stroke and heart disease. Most students (93.4%) and adults (91.6%) had seen anti-smoking media messages. Of the students, 56.4% had seen pro-cigarette advertisements on billboards, 36.9% had seen pro-cigarette advertisements in newspapers or magazines, and 8.2% had been offered free cigarettes by tobacco company representatives. The price of cigarettes decreased by approximately 5% between 1995 and 2006, whereas gross domestic product per capita increased by more than 150%. On average, smokers smoked 13.5 cigarettes per day, and spent US$86 on cigarettes per year. Despite such high levels of tobacco exposure in Vietnam, the total tax on cigarettes remains at 45% of the retail price. Furthermore, only 29.7% of smokers had been advised to quit by a healthcare provider in the past 12 months. Strong enforcement and evidence-based regulations which rounded on MPOWER are needed to help protect current smokers and non-smokers from the devastating effects of tobacco. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by

  12. Wide-range high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals morphological and distributional changes of endomembrane compartments during log to stationary transition of growth phase in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Higaki, Takumi; Sawaki, Fumie; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Goto, Yumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Nagata, Noriko; Matsuoka, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Rapid growth of plant cells by cell division and expansion requires an endomembrane trafficking system. The endomembrane compartments, such as the Golgi stacks, endosome and vesicles, are important in the synthesis and trafficking of cell wall materials during cell elongation. However, changes in the morphology, distribution and number of these compartments during the different stages of cell proliferation and differentiation have not yet been clarified. In this study, we examined these changes at the ultrastructural level in tobacco Bright yellow 2 (BY-2) cells during the log and stationary phases of growth. We analyzed images of the BY-2 cells prepared by the high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution technique with the aid of an auto-acquisition transmission electron microscope system. We quantified the distribution of secretory and endosomal compartments in longitudinal sections of whole cells by using wide-range gigapixel-class images obtained by merging thousands of transmission electron micrographs. During the log phase, all Golgi stacks were composed of several thick cisternae. Approximately 20 vesicle clusters (VCs), including the trans-Golgi network and secretory vesicle cluster, were observed throughout the cell. In the stationary-phase cells, Golgi stacks were thin with small cisternae, and only a few VCs were observed. Nearly the same number of multivesicular body and small high-density vesicles were observed in both the stationary and log phases. Results from electron microscopy and live fluorescence imaging indicate that the morphology and distribution of secretory-related compartments dramatically change when cells transition from log to stationary phases of growth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Smokeless tobacco, viruses and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Lars; Wallström, Mats; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél

    2014-06-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common epithelial malignancy in the oral cavity. OSCCs and their variants constitute over 90% of oral malignancies, and the disease is associated with poor prognosis. OSCC is a complex malignancy where environmental factors, viral infections, and genetic alterations most likely interact, and thus give rise to the malignant condition. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2007 concluded: "there is sufficient evidence in humans to establish smokeless tobacco as carcinogenic, i.e. smokeless tobacco causes cancer of the oral cavity and pancreas". ST products contain a large array of carcinogens, although the number found is actually smaller than in cigarette smoke. Worldwide, ST products have many different names depending on the region where it is produced. However, there are two main types of ST, chewing tobacco and snuff. It is estimated that approximately 150 million people in the world use ST. Herein, we review available literature regarding smokeless tobacco and oral Carcinogenesis. We also discuss the role of viral infections in combination with ST in OSCC development.

  14. New media and tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Becky

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews how the tobacco industry is promoting its products online and examines possible regulation models to limit exposure to this form of marketing. Opportunities to use new media to advance tobacco control are also discussed and future research possibilities are proposed. Published articles and grey literature reports were identified through searches of the electronic databases, PUBMED and Google Scholar using a combination of the following search terms: tobacco or smoking and new media, online media, social media, internet media, Web 2.0, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. A possible obstacle to fully realising the benefits of regulating tobacco marketing activities and effectively communicating tobacco control messages is the rapid evolution of the media landscape. New media also offer the tobacco industry a powerful and efficient channel for rapidly countering the denormalising strategies and policies of tobacco control. Evidence of tobacco promotion through online media is emerging, with YouTube being the most researched social media site in the tobacco control field. The explosive rise in Internet use and the shift to these new media being driven by consumer generated content through social platforms may mean that fresh approaches to regulating tobacco industry marketing are needed.

  15. Tobacco and Nicotine Product Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Lois; Leischow, Scott J.; Zeller, Mitch R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco product testing is a critical component of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA), which grants the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products. The availability of methods and measures that can provide accurate data on the relative health risks across types of tobacco products, brands, and subbrands of tobacco products on the validity of any health claims associated with a product, and on how consumers perceive information on products toxicity or risks is crucial for making decisions on the product's potential impact on public health. These tools are also necessary for making assessments of the impact of new indications for medicinal products (other than cessation) but more importantly of tobacco products that may in the future be marketed as cessation tools. Objective: To identify research opportunities to develop empirically based and comprehensive methods and measures for testing tobacco and other nicotine-containing products so that the best science is available when decisions are made about products or policies. Methods: Literature was reviewed to address sections of the FSPTCA relevant to tobacco product evaluation; research questions were generated and then reviewed by a committee of research experts. Results: A research agenda was developed for tobacco product evaluation in the general areas of toxicity and health risks, abuse liability, consumer perception, and population effects. Conclusion: A cohesive, systematic, and comprehensive assessment of tobacco products is important and will require building consensus and addressing some crucial research questions. PMID:21460383

  16. Tobacco and nicotine product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Biener, Lois; Leischow, Scott J; Zeller, Mitch R

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco product testing is a critical component of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA), which grants the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products. The availability of methods and measures that can provide accurate data on the relative health risks across types of tobacco products, brands, and subbrands of tobacco products on the validity of any health claims associated with a product, and on how consumers perceive information on products toxicity or risks is crucial for making decisions on the product's potential impact on public health. These tools are also necessary for making assessments of the impact of new indications for medicinal products (other than cessation) but more importantly of tobacco products that may in the future be marketed as cessation tools. To identify research opportunities to develop empirically based and comprehensive methods and measures for testing tobacco and other nicotine-containing products so that the best science is available when decisions are made about products or policies. Literature was reviewed to address sections of the FSPTCA relevant to tobacco product evaluation; research questions were generated and then reviewed by a committee of research experts. A research agenda was developed for tobacco product evaluation in the general areas of toxicity and health risks, abuse liability, consumer perception, and population effects. A cohesive, systematic, and comprehensive assessment of tobacco products is important and will require building consensus and addressing some crucial research questions.

  17. Tobacco and the Movies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, Stanton

    2005-09-19

    America's leading health organizations agree. Smoking on screen is the No.1 recruiter of new adolescent smokers in the United States - 390,000 kids a year, of whom 120,000 will die from tobacco-caused diseases. That's more Americans than die from drunk driving, criminal violence, illicit drugs, and HIV/AIDS combined. Why does Hollywood still promote smoking? Is it corrupt? Or stupid?

  18. Health warnings on tobacco products - worldwide, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-22

    Many countries require that tobacco product packaging includes health warnings about the risks associated with tobacco use. Health warnings on tobacco product packages are effective in highlighting the perception of health risk, supporting the intention to quit tobacco use, discouraging the intention to begin tobacco use, and increasing cessation rates. Prominent displays of health warnings increase their effectiveness; larger warnings, with pictures, are more likely to be noticed, better communicate health risks, provoke greater emotional response, and further motivate tobacco users to quit. This report assesses the current status of tobacco packaging health warning requirements worldwide. Governments could further discourage tobacco use by requiring prominent health warnings on tobacco packaging.

  19. Tobacco Industry Manipulation of Tobacco Excise and Tobacco Advertising Policies in the Czech Republic: An Analysis of Tobacco Industry Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Risako; Smith, Katherine; Ross, Hana; Silver, Karin E.; Williams, Simon; Gilmore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background The Czech Republic has one of the poorest tobacco control records in Europe. This paper examines transnational tobacco companies' (TTCs') efforts to influence policy there, paying particular attention to excise policies, as high taxes are one of the most effective means of reducing tobacco consumption, and tax structures are an important aspect of TTC competitiveness. Methods and Findings TTC documents dating from 1989 to 2004/5 were retrieved from the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library website, analysed using a socio-historical approach, and triangulated with key informant interviews and secondary data. The documents demonstrate significant industry influence over tobacco control policy. Philip Morris (PM) ignored, overturned, and weakened various attempts to restrict tobacco advertising, promoting voluntary approaches as an alternative to binding legislation. PM and British American Tobacco (BAT) lobbied separately on tobacco tax structures, each seeking to implement the structure that benefitted its own brand portfolio over that of its competitors, and enjoying success in turn. On excise levels, the different companies took a far more collaborative approach, seeking to keep tobacco taxes low and specifically to prevent any large tax increases. Collective lobbying, using a variety of arguments, was successful in delaying the tax increases required via European Union accession. Contrary to industry arguments, data show that cigarettes became more affordable post-accession and that TTCs have taken advantage of low excise duties by raising prices. Interview data suggest that TTCs enjoy high-level political support and continue to actively attempt to influence policy. Conclusion There is clear evidence of past and ongoing TTC influence over tobacco advertising and excise policy. We conclude that this helps explain the country's weak tobacco control record. The findings suggest there is significant scope for tobacco tax increases in the Czech Republic and

  20. Tobacco industry manipulation of tobacco excise and tobacco advertising policies in the Czech Republic: an analysis of tobacco industry documents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Shirane

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic has one of the poorest tobacco control records in Europe. This paper examines transnational tobacco companies' (TTCs' efforts to influence policy there, paying particular attention to excise policies, as high taxes are one of the most effective means of reducing tobacco consumption, and tax structures are an important aspect of TTC competitiveness.TTC documents dating from 1989 to 2004/5 were retrieved from the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library website, analysed using a socio-historical approach, and triangulated with key informant interviews and secondary data. The documents demonstrate significant industry influence over tobacco control policy. Philip Morris (PM ignored, overturned, and weakened various attempts to restrict tobacco advertising, promoting voluntary approaches as an alternative to binding legislation. PM and British American Tobacco (BAT lobbied separately on tobacco tax structures, each seeking to implement the structure that benefitted its own brand portfolio over that of its competitors, and enjoying success in turn. On excise levels, the different companies took a far more collaborative approach, seeking to keep tobacco taxes low and specifically to prevent any large tax increases. Collective lobbying, using a variety of arguments, was successful in delaying the tax increases required via European Union accession. Contrary to industry arguments, data show that cigarettes became more affordable post-accession and that TTCs have taken advantage of low excise duties by raising prices. Interview data suggest that TTCs enjoy high-level political support and continue to actively attempt to influence policy.There is clear evidence of past and ongoing TTC influence over tobacco advertising and excise policy. We conclude that this helps explain the country's weak tobacco control record. The findings suggest there is significant scope for tobacco tax increases in the Czech Republic and that large (rather than small

  1. Tobacco industry manipulation of tobacco excise and tobacco advertising policies in the Czech Republic: an analysis of tobacco industry documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Risako; Smith, Katherine; Ross, Hana; Silver, Karin E; Williams, Simon; Gilmore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The Czech Republic has one of the poorest tobacco control records in Europe. This paper examines transnational tobacco companies' (TTCs') efforts to influence policy there, paying particular attention to excise policies, as high taxes are one of the most effective means of reducing tobacco consumption, and tax structures are an important aspect of TTC competitiveness. TTC documents dating from 1989 to 2004/5 were retrieved from the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library website, analysed using a socio-historical approach, and triangulated with key informant interviews and secondary data. The documents demonstrate significant industry influence over tobacco control policy. Philip Morris (PM) ignored, overturned, and weakened various attempts to restrict tobacco advertising, promoting voluntary approaches as an alternative to binding legislation. PM and British American Tobacco (BAT) lobbied separately on tobacco tax structures, each seeking to implement the structure that benefitted its own brand portfolio over that of its competitors, and enjoying success in turn. On excise levels, the different companies took a far more collaborative approach, seeking to keep tobacco taxes low and specifically to prevent any large tax increases. Collective lobbying, using a variety of arguments, was successful in delaying the tax increases required via European Union accession. Contrary to industry arguments, data show that cigarettes became more affordable post-accession and that TTCs have taken advantage of low excise duties by raising prices. Interview data suggest that TTCs enjoy high-level political support and continue to actively attempt to influence policy. There is clear evidence of past and ongoing TTC influence over tobacco advertising and excise policy. We conclude that this helps explain the country's weak tobacco control record. The findings suggest there is significant scope for tobacco tax increases in the Czech Republic and that large (rather than small, incremental

  2. 27 CFR 40.1 - Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture of tobacco... MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations § 40.1 Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This part contains...

  3. Receptivity to Tobacco Advertising and Susceptibility to Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, John P; Sargent, James D; White, Martha M; Borek, Nicolette; Portnoy, David B; Green, Victoria R; Kaufman, Annette R; Stanton, Cassandra A; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Strong, David R; Pearson, Jennifer L; Coleman, Blair N; Leas, Eric; Noble, Madison L; Trinidad, Dennis R; Moran, Meghan B; Carusi, Charles; Hyland, Andrew; Messer, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Non-cigarette tobacco marketing is less regulated and may promote cigarette smoking among adolescents. We quantified receptivity to advertising for multiple tobacco products and hypothesized associations with susceptibility to cigarette smoking. Wave 1 of the nationally representative PATH (Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health) study interviewed 10 751 adolescents who had never used tobacco. A stratified random selection of 5 advertisements for each of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, smokeless products, and cigars were shown from 959 recent tobacco advertisements. Aided recall was classified as low receptivity, and image-liking or favorite ad as higher receptivity. The main dependent variable was susceptibility to cigarette smoking. Among US youth, 41% of 12 to 13 year olds and half of older adolescents were receptive to at least 1 tobacco advertisement. Across each age group, receptivity to advertising was highest for e-cigarettes (28%-33%) followed by cigarettes (22%-25%), smokeless tobacco (15%-21%), and cigars (8%-13%). E-cigarette ads shown on television had the highest recall. Among cigarette-susceptible adolescents, receptivity to e-cigarette advertising (39.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.9%-41.6%) was higher than for cigarette advertising (31.7%; 95% CI: 29.9%-33.6%). Receptivity to advertising for each tobacco product was associated with increased susceptibility to cigarette smoking, with no significant difference across products (similar odds for both cigarette and e-cigarette advertising; adjusted odds ratio = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09-1.37). A large proportion of US adolescent never tobacco users are receptive to tobacco advertising, with television advertising for e-cigarettes having the highest recall. Receptivity to advertising for each non-cigarette tobacco product was associated with susceptibility to smoke cigarettes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  5. Plant isoprenoid biosynthesis via the MEP pathway: in vivo IPP/DMAPP ratio produced by (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase in tobacco BY-2 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritsch, Denis; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Rohmer, Michel

    2010-01-04

    Feeding tobacco BY-2 cells with [2-(13)C,4-(2)H]deoxyxylulose revealed from the (13)C labeling that the plastid isoprenoids, synthesized via the MEP pathway, are essentially derived from the labeled precursor. The ca. 15% (2)H retention observed in all isoprene units corresponds to the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP)/dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) ratio (85:15) directly produced by the hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate reductase, the last enzyme of the MEP pathway. (2)H retention characterizes the isoprene units derived from the DMAPP branch, whereas (2)H loss represents the signature of the IPP branch. Taking into account the enantioselectivity of the reactions catalyzed by the (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase, the IPP isomerase and the trans-prenyl transferase, a single biogenetic scheme allows to interpret all labeling patterns observed in bacteria or plants upon incubation with (2)H labeled deoxyxylulose.

  6. The hazardous effects of tobacco smoking on male fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jing-Bo; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Qiao, Zhong-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The substantial harmful effects of tobacco smoking on fertility and reproduction have become apparent but are not generally appreciated. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4000 kinds of constituents, including nicotine, tar, carbonic monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. Because of the complexity of tobacco smoke components, the toxicological mechanism is notably complicated. Most studies have reported reduced semen quality, reproductive hormone system dysfunction and impaired spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and spermatozoa function in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Underlying these effects, elevated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis may play important roles collaboratively in the overall effect of tobacco smoking on male fertility. In this review, we strive to focus on both the phenotype of and the molecular mechanism underlying these harmful effects, although current studies regarding the mechanism remain insufficient. PMID:25851659

  7. The hazardous effects of tobacco smoking on male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jing-Bo; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Qiao, Zhong-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The substantial harmful effects of tobacco smoking on fertility and reproduction have become apparent but are not generally appreciated. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4000 kinds of constituents, including nicotine, tar, carbonic monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. Because of the complexity of tobacco smoke components, the toxicological mechanism is notably complicated. Most studies have reported reduced semen quality, reproductive hormone system dysfunction and impaired spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and spermatozoa function in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Underlying these effects, elevated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis may play important roles collaboratively in the overall effect of tobacco smoking on male fertility. In this review, we strive to focus on both the phenotype of and the molecular mechanism underlying these harmful effects, although current studies regarding the mechanism remain insufficient.

  8. Determination of Heavy Metal Ions in Tobacco and Tobacco Additives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    high stability.1,3,5 Porphyrin reagents have therefore received increasing attention and are widely applied for the simulta- neous determination of metal ions.9–19. The determination of trace amounts of lead, cadmium, mercury, nickel, cobalt and tin in tobacco and tobacco additives is important because of the biological ...

  9. How to stop tobacco use? Tobacco user′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To explore the tobacco-dependent subject′s perspectives of what measures are likely to work for tobacco cessation. Materials and Methods: Nicotine-dependent male subjects attending a tertiary level de-addiction center in North India were recruited. Demographic and clinical data was recorded. Open-ended questions were asked to know user′s perspective about the measures by which tobacco use can be effectively stopped in the country. The subjects were allowed as many responses as they desired. Results: A total of 46 subjects were recruited. The median age of the sample was 35 years, with median duration of tobacco use being 12 years. All subjects were males, and most were married, employed, and had urban residence. Supply reducing measures were the most commonly reported to stop tobacco (67.4% of subjects followed by people quitting tobacco use by themselves (19.6% and raising awareness through media (13.1%. Conclusion: This pilot study reflects the perspectives of tobacco users for the measures likely to be effective in tobacco cessation. Evaluating the effect of implementation of individual policies may help focusing towards measures that yield greatest benefits.

  10. Tobacco Taxation, Smuggling, and Street Tobacco Vendors in Eritrea

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    There are also strong indications that the tobacco industry sees Eritrea as a strategic gateway to east and northeast Africa. The industry may be planning to develop Eritrea as a distribution hub for its products. This will make the country even more vulnerable. This project will assess the impact of tobacco taxation, smuggling, ...

  11. Tobacco alkaloids and tobacco-specific nitrosamines in dust from homes of smokeless tobacco users, active smokers, and nontobacco users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Todd P; Havel, Christopher; Metayer, Catherine; Benowitz, Neal L; Jacob, Peyton

    2015-05-18

    Smokeless tobacco products, such as moist snuff or chewing tobacco, contain many of the same carcinogens as tobacco smoke; however, the impact on children of indirect exposure to tobacco constituents via parental smokeless tobacco use is unknown. As part of the California Childhood Leukemia Study, dust samples were collected from 6 homes occupied by smokeless tobacco users, 6 homes occupied by active smokers, and 20 tobacco-free homes. To assess children's potential for exposure to tobacco constituents, vacuum-dust concentrations of five tobacco-specific nitrosamines, including N'-nitrosonornicotine [NNN] and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [NNK], as well as six tobacco alkaloids, including nicotine and myosmine, were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We used generalized estimating equations derived from a multivariable marginal model to compare levels of tobacco constituents between groups, after adjusting for a history of parental smoking, income, home construction date, and mother's age and race/ethnicity. The ratio of myosmine/nicotine was used as a novel indicator of the source of tobacco contamination, distinguishing between smokeless tobacco products and tobacco smoke. Median dust concentrations of NNN and NNK were significantly greater in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. In multivariable models, concentrations of NNN and NNK were 4.8- and 6.9-fold higher, respectively, in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. Median myosmine/nicotine ratios were lower in homes with smokeless tobacco users (1.8%) compared to homes of active smokers (7.7%), confirming that cigarette smoke was not the predominant source of tobacco constituents in homes with smokeless tobacco users. Children living with smokeless tobacco users may be exposed to carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines via contact with contaminated dust and household surfaces.

  12. Tobacco Products Production and Operations Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Monthly statistical reports on tobacco products production and operations. Data for Tobacco Statistical Release is derived directly from the Report – Manufacturer of...

  13. Snuffing Out Smokeless Tobacco Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Susan; Martin, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Major League Baseball's ban on players using tobacco during minor league games may provide physicians with a timely excuse to discuss smokeless tobacco with young patients. Chewing and dipping remain a significant health problem, especially among young men, many of whom view it as a secret ingredient in sports success. (SM)

  14. Job strain and tobacco smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major contributor to the public health burden and healthcare costs worldwide, but the determinants of smoking behaviours are poorly understood. We conducted a large individual-participant meta-analysis to examine the extent to which work-related stress, operationalised as job...... strain, is associated with tobacco smoking in working adults....

  15. Hollywood on tobacco: how the entertainment industry understands tobacco portrayal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, D L; Carol, J; Balbach, E D; McGee, S

    1999-01-01

    To determine how people in the California-based entertainment industry think about the portrayal of tobacco use in movies and on television. Specifically, to explore who decides when to include tobacco in a project; how that decision is made; what issues are considered; what messages are intended; whether and how the issue of second-hand smoke is considered; and what advocacy methods might be useful in influencing future decisions about tobacco portrayal. Qualitative in-depth interviews of entertainment industry personnel,with a semi-structured interview protocol to guide the interview. 54 subjects drawn from a convenience sample of writers, actors, directors, producers, studio executives, and others involved in the film industry. Hollywood is heterogeneous with varying perspectives on rates of tobacco use portrayal; intentionality of the decision to use and the necessity to portray tobacco use; and its degree of acceptance of responsibility for influencing societal smoking. Tobacco depiction may originate with the writer, actor, or director and is included most frequently to elucidate character or portray reality. On-camera smoking is influenced by actors' off-camera tobacco use. The research presented can help advocates better understand the norms and values of those working within the entertainment industry and thereby assist them in creating more effective change strategies.

  16. The Philippine tobacco industry: "the strongest tobacco lobby in Asia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alechnowicz, K; Chapman, S

    2004-12-01

    To highlight revelations from internal tobacco industry documents about the conduct of the industry in the Philippines since the 1960s. Areas explored include political corruption, health, employment of consultants, resisting pack labelling, and marketing and advertising. Systematic keyword Minnesota depository website searches of tobacco industry internal documents made available through the Master Settlement Agreement. The Philippines has long suffered a reputation for political corruption where collusion between state and business was based on the exchange of political donations for favourable economic policies. The tobacco industry was able to limit the effectiveness of proposed anti-tobacco legislation. A prominent scientist publicly repudiated links between active and passive smoking and disease. The placement of health warning labels was negotiated to benefit the industry, and the commercial environment allowed it to capitalise on their marketing freedoms to the fullest potential. Women, children, youth, and the poor have been targeted. The politically laissez faire Philippines presented tobacco companies with an environment ripe for exploitation. The Philippines has seen some of the world's most extreme and controversial forms of tobacco promotion flourish. Against international standards of progress, the Philippines is among the world's slowest nations to take tobacco control seriously.

  17. Tobacco industry use of flavourings to promote smokeless tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostygina, Ganna; Ling, Pamela M

    2016-11-01

    While fruit, candy and alcohol characterising flavours are not allowed in cigarettes in the USA, other flavoured tobacco products such as smokeless tobacco (ST) continue to be sold. We investigated tobacco manufacturers' use of flavoured additives in ST products, the target audience(s) for flavoured products, and marketing strategies promoting products by emphasising their flavour. Qualitative analysis of internal tobacco industry documents triangulated with data from national newspaper articles, trade press and internet. Internally, flavoured products have been consistently associated with young and inexperienced tobacco users. Internal studies confirmed that candy-like sweeter milder flavours (eg, mint, fruit) could increase appeal to starters by evoking a perception of mildness, blinding the strong tobacco taste and unpleasant mouth feel; or by modifying nicotine delivery by affecting product pH. Similar to cigarettes, flavoured ST is likely to encourage novices to start using tobacco, and regulations limiting or eliminating flavours in cigarettes should be extended to include flavoured ST products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Roadmap to a tobacco epidemic: transnational tobacco companies invade Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard D; Ebbert, Jon O; Achadi, Anhari; Croghan, Ivana T

    2012-05-01

    Indonesia is the world's fifth largest cigarette market in the world but for decades, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) have had limited success infiltrating this market, due to their inability to compete in the kretek market. Kreteks are clove/tobacco cigarettes that most Indonesians smoke. To determine how Phillip Morris International (PMI) and British American Tobacco (BAT) have now successfully achieved a substantial market presence in Indonesia. We analyzed previously secret, tobacco industry documents, corporate reports on Indonesia operations, the Tobacco Trade press, Indonesia media, and "The Roadmap". Internal, corporate documents from BAT and PMI demonstrate that they had known for decades that kreteks are highly carcinogenic. Despite that knowledge, BAT and PMI now own and heavily market these products, as well as new more westernised versions of kreteks. BAT and PMI used their successful basic strategy of keeping cigarettes affordable by maintaining the social responsibility of smoking and opposing smoke-free workplace laws but in the 21st century, they added the acquisition of and westernisation of domestic kretek manufacturers as an additional strategy. These acquisitions allowed them to assert influences on health policy in Indonesia and to grow their business under current government policy embodied in the 2007-2020 Roadmap of Tobacco Products Industry and Excise Policy which calls for increased cigarette production by 12% over the next 15 years. PMI and Bat have successfully entered and are expanding their share in the Indonesia cigarette market. Despite the obvious and pervasive influence of the tobacco industry on policy decisions, the Indonesian government should ratify the FCTC and implement effective legislation to reduce tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke and revise the Roadmap to protect future generations of Indonesians.

  19. Mechanisms of Cancer Induction by Tobacco-Specific NNK and NNN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiaping [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Yang, Suping; Seng, Seyha, E-mail: sseng@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Tobacco use is a major public health problem worldwide. Tobacco-related cancers cause millions of deaths annually. Although several tobacco agents play a role in the development of tumors, the potent effects of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are unique. Metabolically activated NNK and NNN induce deleterious mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppression genes by forming DNA adducts, which could be considered as tumor initiation. Meanwhile, the binding of NNK and NNN to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promotes tumor growth by enhancing and deregulating cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion, thereby creating a microenvironment for tumor growth. These two unique aspects of NNK and NNN synergistically induce cancers in tobacco-exposed individuals. This review will discuss various types of tobacco products and tobacco-related cancers, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which nitrosamines, such as NNK and NNN, induce cancer.

  20. The Multiparametric Effects of Hydrodynamic Environments on Stem Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Sargent, Carolyn Y.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells possess the unique capacity to differentiate into many clinically relevant somatic cell types, making them a promising cell source for tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine therapies. However, in order for the therapeutic promise of stem cells to be fully realized, scalable approaches to efficiently direct differentiation must be developed. Traditionally, suspension culture systems are employed for the scale-up manufacturing of biologics via bioprocessing systems that heavily rely upon various types of bioreactors. However, in contrast to conventional bench-scale static cultures, large-scale suspension cultures impart complex hydrodynamic forces on cells and aggregates due to fluid mixing conditions. Stem cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental perturbations, thus motivating the need for a more systematic understanding of the effects of hydrodynamic environments on stem cell expansion and differentiation. This article discusses the interdependent relationships between stem cell aggregation, metabolism, and phenotype in the context of hydrodynamic culture environments. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the multifactorial response of stem cells to mixed culture conditions will enable the design of bioreactors and bioprocessing systems for scalable directed differentiation approaches. PMID:21491967

  1. Cyclin D1 Gene Expression in Oral Mucosa of Tobacco Chewers”–An Immunohistochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Basnaker, Maharudrappa; SP, Srikala; BNVS, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of cyclin D1 in normal oral mucosa of both non tobacco habituated and tobacco habituated individuals histologically and also compare and correlate cyclin D1 expression with histopathologically confirmed cases of oral squamous cell carcinomas.

  2. Proinflammatory effects of tobacco smoke xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Milnerowicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke capability of stimulating local and systemic inflammation is considered to be a pathogenetic mechanism leading to the development of pulmonary and extrapulmonary diseases. The study was aimed at reviewing information concerning the pathomechanisms for the pro-inflammatory effect of tobacco smoke components, which lead to initiating cascade processes resulting in tissue damage. A retained lungs macrophages contributing to the development of local inflammatory response by the release of cytokines, proteases and radicals were shown. Cytokine release induced by tobacco smoke with intracellular signaling pathways, mainly NF-κB activation, is associated with this. Developing inflammatory process as a driving mechanism for further oxidants production was shown, which caused the intensification of inflammatory response. Tobacco smoke components stimulating cyclooxygenase-2 expression and an increase in prostaglandins and acute phase proteins synthesis were demonstrated. It was shown that most of the changes induced by smoking is reversible, but the level of some inflammatory mediators remains still high even when the damaging agent is removed. It is believed that aldehydes present in the environment that are components of the smoke can make a covalent bond with nucleophilic amino groups of lysine, arginine or histidine in proteins. They can cause radicals formation and weaken an intracellular antioxidant mechanisms. The glutathione depletion leading to change in cells redox status was demonstrated. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms impairments and intensification of neutrophils myeloperoxidase release causing vascular homeostasis disruption were shown. Myeloperoxidase can cause proteins oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Lipids peroxidation and increased acute phase proteins level associated with smoking, may exert a direct effect promoting the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases and play a role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and