WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspension-cultured plant cells

  1. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... plasts in A. adsurgens (Luo and Jia, 1998a, b). There are only few reports available on plant regeneration systems via somatic embryogenesis (Luo et al., 1999; Hou and. Jia, 2004). Here, we report a protocol for plant regenera- tion from embryogenic cell suspension culture of endemic. A. chrysochlorus.

  2. Production of recombinant proteins in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasson, Carole; Michel, Rémy; Lienard, David; Saint-Jore-Dupas, Claude; Sourrouille, Christophe; de March, Ghislaine Grenier; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified suspension-cultured plant cells offer a promising system for production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed, when compared to other plant-based production platforms that have been explored, suspension-cultured plant cells have the advantage of being totally devoid of problems associated with the vagaries of weather, pest, soil and gene flow in the environment. Because of short growth cycles, the timescale needed for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell culture can be counted in days or weeks after transformation compared to months needed for the production in transgenic plants. Moreover, recovery and purification of recombinant proteins from plant biomass is an expensive and technically challenging business that may amount to 80-94% of the final product cost. One additional advantage of plant cell culture is that the recombinant protein fused with a signal sequence can be expressed and secreted into the culture medium, and therefore recovered and purified in the absence of large quantities of contaminating proteins. Consequently, the downstream processing of proteins extracted from plant cell culture medium is less expensive, which may/does balance the higher costs of fermentation. When needed for clinical use, recombinant proteins are easily produced in suspension-cultured plant cells under certified, controllable and sterile conditions that offer improved safety and provide advantages for good manufacturing practices and regulatory compliance. In this chapter, we present basic protocols for rapid generation of transgenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum, Oriza sativa and Arabidopis

  3. The phosphatidylinositol species of suspension cultured plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, S.; Wagner, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    Suspension cultured Nicotiana tabacum and Catharanthus roseus cells were labeled with [ 3 H]inositol, the phospholipid fraction extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography. Three different solvent systems and reference compounds were used to assign the different 3 H-labeled species by autoradiography. The ratio of [ 3 H]inositol incorporation into PI, PIP and PIP 2 was found to be 95:4:1; with some preparations a lyso-PI band was obtained which incorporated about a tenth of the label of the PIP band. With Catharanthus roseus cells a very faint band between PI and lyso-PI was detected which could not be assigned to a reference compound. (orig.)

  4. A phytochemical study of lignans in whole plants and cell suspension cultures of Anthriscus sylvestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulman, A; Kubbinga, M.E.; Batterman, S; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Pras, N.; Woolley, J.G.; Quax, Wim

    2003-01-01

    In the roots of Anthriscus sylvestris 12 different lignans were detected. Arctigenin, dimethylmatairesinol, dimethylthujaplicatin, podophyllotoxin, 7-hydroxyyatein and 7-hydroxyanhydropodorhizol have not been previously reported to be present in A. sylvestris. In the cell suspension cultures, which

  5. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  6. Statistical experimental designs for the production of secondary metabolites in plant cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Christian; Fritsch, Leonie; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan; Rasche, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Statistical experimental designs, also known as the "design of experiments" (DoE) approach, are widely used to improve not only technical processes but also to answer questions in the agricultural, medical and social sciences. Although many articles have been published about the application of DoE in these fields, few studies have addressed the use of DoE in the plant sciences, particularly in the context of plant cell suspension cultures (PCSCs). Compounds derived from PCSCs can be developed as pharmaceuticals, chemical feedstocks and cosmetic ingredients, and statistical experimental designs can be used to improve the productivity of the cells and the yield and/or quality of the target compounds in a cost efficient manner. In this article, we summarize recent findings concerning the application of statistical approaches to improve the performance of PCSCs and discuss the potential future applications of this approach.

  7. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45...

  8. Elicitor-Induced l-Tyrosine Decarboxylase from Plant Cell Suspension Cultures : I. Induction and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, I A; Brodelius, P E

    1988-09-01

    l-Tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) activity was induced in cell suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum Ait. and Eschscholtzia californica Cham. with a yeast polysaccharide preparation (elicitor). The highest l-tyrosine decarboxylase activity in extracts from 7-day-old cell cultures of E. californica was observed 5 hours after addition of 30 to 40 micrograms elicitor per gram cell fresh weight. The enzyme extracted from cells of E. californica was purified 1540-fold to a specific activity of 2.6 micromoles CO(2) produced per minute per milligram protein at pH 8.4 and 30 degrees C. Purified enzyme from T. rugosum showed a specific activity of 0.18 micromoles per minute per milligram protein. The purification procedure involved ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography, ultrafiltration, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the enzyme from the two plant cell cultures had subunits of identical molecular weight (56,300 +/- 300 daltons.

  9. Elicitor-Induced l-Tyrosine Decarboxylase from Plant Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ivano A.; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1988-01-01

    l-Tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) activity was induced in cell suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum Ait. and Eschscholtzia californica Cham. with a yeast polysaccharide preparation (elicitor). The highest l-tyrosine decarboxylase activity in extracts from 7-day-old cell cultures of E. californica was observed 5 hours after addition of 30 to 40 micrograms elicitor per gram cell fresh weight. The enzyme extracted from cells of E. californica was purified 1540-fold to a specific activity of 2.6 micromoles CO2 produced per minute per milligram protein at pH 8.4 and 30°C. Purified enzyme from T. rugosum showed a specific activity of 0.18 micromoles per minute per milligram protein. The purification procedure involved ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography, ultrafiltration, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the enzyme from the two plant cell cultures had subunits of identical molecular weight (56,300 ± 300 daltons. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16666277

  10. Elicitor-Induced l-Tyrosine Decarboxylase from Plant Cell Suspension Cultures : II. Partial Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, I A; Brodelius, P E

    1988-09-01

    Properties of purified l-tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) from elicitor-induced cell suspension cultures of Eschscholtzia californica Cham. and Thalictrum rugosum Ait. are described. l-Tyrosine decarboxylase is a dimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 112,600 +/- 600 daltons. The isoelectric point was estimated to be at pH 5.2 and pH 5.4 for the enzyme from E. californica and T. rugosum, respectively. The purified enzymes were stabilized in the presence of pyridoxal-5-phosphate. Optimum pH for the enzyme from both plants was found to be 8.4. Enzyme activity was dependent on exogeneously supplied pyridoxal-5-phosphate. The enzyme decarboxylated l-tyrosine and l-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine but was inactive toward l-phenylalanine and l-tryptophan. Apparent K(m) values of Eschscholtzia- and Thalictrum-decarboxylase for l-tyrosine were 0.25 +/- 0.03 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 millimolar, respectively. Similar affinities were found for l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Eschscholtzial-tyrosine decarboxylase was strongly inhibited by the phenylalanine analogue l-alpha-aminooxy-beta-phenylpropionate and largely unaffected by d,l-alpha-monofluoromethyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and alpha-difluoromethyltyrosine.

  11. Establishment of Cell Suspension Culture and Plant Regeneration in Abrus precatorius L., a Rare Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Serajur RAHMAN

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new protocol has been developed for cell culture and in vitro regeneration of Abrus precatorius that holds enormous potentiality for preparation of medicines. In vitro grown calli were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS liquid media in agitated condition fortified with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine. Growth curve of cells revealed that the cells continued to grow until 12 days of culture and got the highest peak from day 6-8. Isolated cell was found to produce highest 8.2% calli when suspended on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. Callus derived from single cell produced highest number of embryo (25-28% cultured on MS medium fortified with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.2 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The bipolar embryos were selected and optimum shoot formation was recorded on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The optimum root induction was noticed in MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l 3-Indolebutyric acid. Rooted plantlets were successfully transferred to potting soil and acclimatized to outdoor conditions.

  12. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie L. Long; Walter C. Shortle

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminum (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic...

  13. Metabolism of ibuprofen in higher plants: A model Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Šíša, Miroslav; Lacina, O.; Moťková, Kateřina; Langhansová, Lenka; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN (2017), s. 383-392 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Grant - others:European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Ibuprofen * Metabolism * Plant cells * Sequestration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  14. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the 7 F 2 transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  15. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  16. Critical factors besides treatment dose and duration need to be controlled in Pb toxicity tests in plant cell suspension cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Klaudia Sychta; Janusz Szklarzewicz; Aneta Słomka; Ewa Gregoraszczuk; Elżbieta Kuta

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the proper conditions for suspension culture of Viola tricolor cells in toxicity studies of Pb at different concentrations (0, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 µM) and exposure times (24, 48, 72 h). By forming insoluble salts with ions from the medium, lead (II) nitrate added to the medium decreased the initial 5.7–5.8 pH of the medium, depending on the Pb salt concentration and light intensity. In alamarBlue assays, we found no dose- or time-dependent effect of Pb...

  17. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    by cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  18. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    of growth regulators were observed to be 3 × 10−6M indoleacetic acid (JAA) combined with 3 × 10−6M benzylaminopurin (BAP) or 10−6M 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) alone. IAA + BAP caused a 100 fold increase in fresh weight over 4 weeks at 25°C. Addition of casein hydrolysate increased growth further....... Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  19. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Different Explants on the Response of Tissue Culture and Cell Suspension Cultures of German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koohi,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. is one of the most important medicinal plants that its essential oils used in different medicinal industries. In this study which was carried out in 2013 growing season at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, the in vitro response of leaf and hypocotyl explants of German Chamomile in B5 medium supplemented with different levels of plant growth regulators including 2,4-D, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP were investigated in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD.In addition, cell suspension cultures were established and characterized. Hypocotyl and leaf explants exhibited cell proliferation and produced callus within 1-2 weeks. The highest fresh weight of the callus (264.1 mg was produced by leaf explants in the medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l BAP. However, the leaf explants cultured on medium containing 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D showed the lowest cell proliferation and callus yield (40.42 mg. The highest percentage of root induction from leaf explants (58.73% was observed on the medium containing 4 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l Kin, and from hypocotyl explants (48.61% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l NAA. The 42.22% of calli derived from hypocotyl explants on B5 medium supplemented with 4 mg/l NAA and 3 mg/l BAP, were friable. Cell suspension cultures of German chamomile were established by transferring of hypocotyl-derived friable calli into the MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l kinetin. The growth curve of cell proliferations started 4 days after culture and continued to grow until day 13th, where the cells entered stationary phase.

  20. Embryo forming cells in carrot suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toonen, M.A.J.

    1997-01-01


    Somatic cells of many plant species can be cultured in vitro and induced to form embryos that are able to develop into mature plants. This process, termed somatic embryogenesis, was originally described in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Somatic embryos develop through the same characteristic

  1. Establishment and characterization of American elm cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven M. Eshita; Joseph C. Kamalay; Vicki M. Gingas; Daniel A. Yaussy

    2000-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Dutch elm disease (DED)-tolerant and DED-susceptible American elms clones have been established and characterized as prerequisites for contrasts of cellular responses to pathogen-derived elicitors. Characteristics of cultured elm cell growth were monitored by A700 and media conductivity. Combined cell growth data for all experiments within a...

  2. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  3. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The objective of this work was the optimization of the conditions of callus and cell suspension culture of Elaeagnus angustifolia for the production of condensed tannins. The effects of different conditions on the callus growth and the production of condensed tannins were researched. The leaf tissue part of.

  4. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... Key words: Sorghum, proteomics, callus, cell suspension cultures, total soluble protein, secretome. INTRODUCTION. Sorghum, a cereal crop native to Africa, is drought- tolerant, surviving periods of water deficit (Rosenow et al., 1983). The crop is grown in the semi-arid regions of. Africa and Asia primarily ...

  5. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was the optimization of the conditions of callus and cell suspension culture of Elaeagnus angustifolia for the production of condensed tannins. The effects of different conditions on the callus growth and the production of condensed tannins were researched. The leaf tissue part of E. angustifolia was ...

  6. Rice suspension cultured cells are evaluated as a model system to study salt responsive networks in plants using a combined proteomic and metabolomic profiling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawei; Ford, Kristina L; Roessner, Ute; Natera, Siria; Cassin, Andrew M; Patterson, John H; Bacic, Antony

    2013-06-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant productivity but surprisingly, a thorough understanding of the salt-responsive networks responsible for sustaining growth and maintaining crop yield remains a significant challenge. Rice suspension culture cells (SCCs), a single cell type, were evaluated as a model system as they provide a ready source of a homogenous cell type and avoid the complications of multicellular tissue types in planta. A combination of growth performance, and transcriptional analyses using known salt-induced genes was performed on control and 100 mM NaCl cultured cells to validate the biological system. Protein profiling was conducted using both DIGE- and iTRAQ-based proteomics approaches. In total, 106 proteins were identified in DIGE experiments and 521 proteins in iTRAQ experiments with 58 proteins common to both approaches. Metabolomic analysis provided insights into both developmental changes and salt-induced changes of rice SCCs at the metabolite level; 134 known metabolites were identified, including 30 amines and amides, 40 organic acids, 40 sugars, sugar acids and sugar alcohols, 21 fatty acids and sterols, and 3 miscellaneous compounds. Our results from proteomic and metabolomic studies indicate that the salt-responsive networks of rice SCCs are extremely complex and share some similarities with thee cellular responses observed in planta. For instance, carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways, redox signaling pathways, auxin/indole-3-acetic acid pathways and biosynthesis pathways for osmoprotectants are all salt responsive in SCCs enabling cells to maintain cellular function under stress condition. These data are discussed in the context of our understanding of in planta salt-responses. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Critical factors besides treatment dose and duration need to be controlled in Pb toxicity tests in plant cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Sychta

    2017-08-01

    When effective illumination was adjusted to correct for turbidity at the highest lead concentration and pH was adjusted to 5.7–5.8, cell viability decreased with the increase of Pb(NO32 concentration and with treatment time. These experiments demonstrate that the toxic action of lead on cells in suspension depends strongly on culture conditions, and not only on the metal concentration and duration of treatment.

  8. ( Linum usitatissimum L. cv. Modran cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Seta-Koselska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flax ( Linum usitatissimum L. is an ancient crop that is widely cultivated as a source of oil, fiber, and bioactive compounds. Flax fiber is traditionally used in textile industry, linseed oil is processed for industrial oils, paints, varnishes and bio-petroleum. Flaxseeds are also rich in α-linolenic acid and phytochemicals such as lignans. In addition to the commercial aspects, this species has been used widely and readily in biotechnological, developmental, and plant-pathogen interaction studies. Differences in the levels of endogenous hormones in various cultivars of flax significantly affected the intensity of callogenesis and determined the type and concentration of growth regulators necessary for callus production. The aim of our investigation was to optimize the culture conditions for callus formation and cell proliferation in liquid medium of the Polish cultivar of fiber flax – Modran. In the first step, 4 combinations of phytohormones in the medium were tested to obtain established callus tissue suitable for initiation of suspension culture. Next, we investigated the effect of chosen plant growth regulators on cell divisions, fresh and dry weight, and dispersal of callus cells in liquid medium. Fast growing and friable callus was obtained in a modified MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l BAP and 0.1 mg/l NAA. We determined that for the initiation of cell suspension supplementation with 0.5 mg/l BAP and 0.5 mg/l NAA is optimal. The results obtained indicated that high concentration of cytokinin (BAP in liquid medium limited cell proliferation and decreased biomass formation.

  9. Somatic Embryogenesis of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Through Cell Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2016-01-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the oldest and most economically important plant species distributed in the hot arid regions of the world. Propagation of date palm by seeds produces heterogeneous offspring with inferior field performance and poor fruit quality. Traditionally, date palm is propagated by offshoots, but this method is inefficient for mass propagation because of limited availability of offshoots. Plant regeneration through tissue culture is able to provide technologies for the large-scale propagation of healthy true-to-type plants. The most commonly used technology approach is somatic embryogenesis which presents a great potential for the rapid propagation and genetic resource preservation of this species. Significant progress has been made in the development and optimization of this regeneration pathway through the establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures. This chapter focuses on the methods employed for the induction of callus from shoot tip explants, establishment of cell suspension culture, and subsequent somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration.

  10. Elicitation of Diacetylenic Compounds in Suspension Cultured Cells of Eggplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Setsuko; Ohta, Yoshimoto

    1988-01-01

    Induction of stress metabolites in the suspension cultured cells of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) was examined. When autoclaved RNase A or nigeran, both of which are nonspecific phytoalexin elicitors in bean cells, were added to the cell culture of eggplant, greatly enhanced levels of three compounds were observed. One of them was cis-pentadeca-6-ene-1,3-diyne-5,15-diol, a novel diacetylenic compound. This compound has considerable fungitoxic activity. Also identified was falcarindiol, another fungitoxic diacetylenic compound previously reported as one of the phytoalexins in infected tomato fruits and leaves. Elicited compounds preferentially accumulated in the culture medium rather than in the cells and decreased to original levels during prolonged culturing. The elicitation of these compounds was closely correlated with cellular damage in terms of the decrease of growth rate and was inhibited by 10 micromolar cycloheximide. PMID:16665862

  11. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Emine Sema; Babalik, Zehra; Hallac-Turk, Filiz; Gokturk-Baydar, Nilgun

    2014-09-23

    Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM) to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols) production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols) and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g), total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g), total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g) and trans-resveratrol (490.76 μg/100 g) were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 μg/100 g) were detected in the cell cultures collected at day 6

  12. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Sema Cetin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. RESULTS: Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g, total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g, total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g and trans-resveratrol (490.76 µg/100 g were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 µg/100 g were detected in the cell

  13. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g -1 dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L -1 . Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g -1 DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L -1 FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  14. More for less: Improving the biomass yield of a pear cell suspension culture by design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Stefan; Herwartz, Denise; Schuster, Flora; Jablonka, Natalia; Weber, Andrea; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-03-18

    Plant cell suspension cultures are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins and secondary metabolites. One of the most important steps during process development is the optimization of yields by testing different cultivation parameters, including the components of the growth medium. However, we have shown that the biomass yield of a cell suspension culture derived from the pear cultivar Pyrus communis cv. Champagner Bratbirne can be significantly improved solely by varying the temperature, inoculum density, illumination, and incubation time. In contrast to medium optimization, these simple physical factors are easily controlled and varied, thereby reducing the effort required. Using an experimental design approach, we improved the biomass yield from 146 g fresh weight (FW)/L to 407 g FW/L in only 5 weeks, simultaneously reducing the costs of goods sold per kg biomass from € 125 to € 45. Our simple approach therefore offers a rapid, efficient and economical process for the optimization of plant cell suspension cultures.

  15. [The production of gastrodin through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension culture of Datura stramonium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jia-Shun; Ma, Wei-Peng; Pu, Jun-Xue; Xu, Shu-Guan; Zheng, Shuang-Qing; Xiao, Chun-Jie

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the production of p-hydroxymethylphenol-beta-D-glucoside (gastrodin) through biotransformation by plant cell suspension cultures. Using cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium to convert the exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin was conducted and the converted compounds were separated with a combination of multi-chromatography. Their chemical structures were determined on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical evidence. The conversion procedure of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin by Datura stramonium cell suspension cultures was established. The synthesized gastrodin (II) was isolated from the fermental liquor and identified by spectral analysis. At the same time, the p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (I) converted through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium was also isolated and identified. Two compounds were also isolated from the cell cultures and they were identified as beta-D-furanoallulose (III) and n-butyloxystyryl-beta-D-pyranoallulose (IV). Datura stramonium grown in suspension cultures can convert exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into the corresponding gastrodin.

  16. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities. PMID:27854330

  17. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Thiruvengadam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones (AQs and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs, media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA, and salicylic acid (SA for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM; 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  18. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-11-16

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum . We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum . The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum . This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  19. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  20. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles, electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases or imaging (contrast agents. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis — total protein content, thiols — reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension

  1. Effects of auxins on growth and scopoletin accumulation in cell suspension cultures of Angelica archangelica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2008-01-01

    Scopoletin is a coumarin possessing many interesting biological effects, e.g., spasmolytic, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antifungal, apoptosis-inducing, antiproliferative, acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory, and hypouricemic activities. Plant tissue cultures represent a promising alternative source of valuable plant-derived substances. A number of physical and chemical factors influence the cell growth and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in plant tissue cultures. The mechanism of their action is not completely understood. Besides other factors, plant growth regulators and light conditions play an important role. Effects of four auxins (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-D, alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid, NAA, beta-indoleacetic acid, IAA or beta-indolebutyric acid, IBA) at four concentrations (0.2, 2, 10 or 20 mg/l) on the culture growth and accumulation of scopoletin in the medium were tested in Angelica archangelica cell suspension cultures cultured under continuous light or in the dark. The highest culture growth was achieved with 2 mg/l 2,4-D, and 10 mg/l IAA. The best scopoletin levels were obtained with 0.2 mg/l 2,4-D, 2 mg/l 2,4-D, 10 mg/l NAA, and 20 mg/l IAA. The effects of light conditions were less marked than those of auxins and their concentrations in influencing both the cell growth and scopoletin accumulation in Angelica archangelica cell suspension cultures. The changes brought about by auxins were modified by light conditions.

  2. pH and expansin action on single suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C X; Wang, L; McQueen-Mason, S J; Pritchard, J; Thomas, C R

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure key material properties of the cell walls of single suspension-cultured plant cells and relate these to cell-wall biochemistry. To this end, micromanipulation was used to compress single tomato cells between two flat surfaces until they ruptured, and force-deformation data were obtained. In addition to measuring the bursting force, we also determined the elastic (Young's) modulus of the cell walls by matching low strain (composites and proposed mechanisms of such failure. Through the measurement of cell-wall material properties using micromanipulation, it may be possible to understand more fully how cell-wall composition, structure and biochemistry lead to cell mechanical behaviour.

  3. Plant regeneration in Chlorophytum borivilianum Sant. et Fernand. from embryogenic callus and cell suspension culture and assessment of genetic fidelity of plants derived through somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Mohd Zahid; Kukreja, Arun Kumar; Bisht, Narendra Singh

    2012-07-01

    Efficient in vitro propagation of medicinally important endangered plant C. borivilianum has been achieved through somatic embryogenesis. Solid embryogenic medium [Murashige and Skoog medium containing 1.79 mM NH4NO3, 10.72 mM KNO3, 1.13 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 7.38 μM 2-isopentenyladenine and 0.76 mM proline] supplemented with polyethylene glycol and sucrose (3 % each), exhibited 1.88-fold increase in embryo maturation compared to embryogenic medium containing 3 % sucrose. Liquid embryogenic medium supported better somatic embryo production and maturation. Highest total (79) and mature (cotyledonary stage) somatic embryos (38) as well as highest germination (57.5 %) was observed at inoculum density of 0.4 g/40 ml of liquid medium. 5.86 pH level exhibited optimal growth, maturation and germination of somatic embryos. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of C. borivilianum plants regenerated through somatic embryogenesis revealed that they were genetically similar to the mother plant. The protocol established in the present study can be used for rapid mass multiplication of C. borivilianum in bioreactor employing liquid medium.

  4. Desiccation-Enhanced Maturation and Germination of Date Palm Somatic Embryos Derived from Cell Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufis, Nazim; Titouh, Khayreddine; Khelifi, Lakhdar

    2017-01-01

    In vitro plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis is a powerful tool for rapid, large-scale production of healthy true-to-type plants. This approach is suitable to preserve existing natural genetic variability and propagation of variability generated from genetic improvement programs, including crossing, somaclonal variation, mutagenesis, and somatic hybridization. This chapter outlines a simplified protocol for date palm regeneration via somatic embryogenesis induced in cell suspension cultures. In this protocol, culture medium composition is manipulated, including plant growth regulators and solid (addition of agar) and liquid media to achieve reduction of production cycle of somatic embryogenesis, which increases the multiplication rate of embryogenic callus and improves the quantity and quality of somatic embryos.

  5. Development of a scalable suspension culture for cardiac differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To meet the need of a large quantity of hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CM for pre-clinical and clinical studies, a robust and scalable differentiation system for CM production is essential. With a human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC aggregate suspension culture system we established previously, we developed a matrix-free, scalable, and GMP-compliant process for directing hPSC differentiation to CM in suspension culture by modulating Wnt pathways with small molecules. By optimizing critical process parameters including: cell aggregate size, small molecule concentrations, induction timing, and agitation rate, we were able to consistently differentiate hPSCs to >90% CM purity with an average yield of 1.5 to 2 × 109 CM/L at scales up to 1 L spinner flasks. CM generated from the suspension culture displayed typical genetic, morphological, and electrophysiological cardiac cell characteristics. This suspension culture system allows seamless transition from hPSC expansion to CM differentiation in a continuous suspension culture. It not only provides a cost and labor effective scalable process for large scale CM production, but also provides a bioreactor prototype for automation of cell manufacturing, which will accelerate the advance of hPSC research towards therapeutic applications.

  6. An efficient method for the establishment of cell suspension cultures in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, Z.A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures offers an In vitro system that can be used as a tool for various studies involving mutant selection, mass propagation, protoplast isolation, gene transfer and selection of cell-lines which are resistant to various biotic or abiotic stresses. Research work on the development of cell suspension cultures was carried out to establish the most efficient method in Potato (cv. Desiree). Healthy, well-proliferating tissues from different types of callus cultures (compact, friable, embryogenic or non-embryogenic) were inoculated on various media combinations, i.e., MS, MS2 or AA liquid medium containing 18.09 micro M 2, 4-D. A fixed quantity (0.5-1.0 g) of callus tissue from 60-day-old callus cultures was transferred to 10-25 ml of liquid medium in 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask. Cultures were placed on an orbital shaker and agitated at different speeds (75, 100 or 125 rpm) under 16-h photoperiod at 25 ± 2 degree C. Medium was changed after every 3 days and fractionated tissue was filtered after every 6 days through sterile mesh (100-800 micro m) to develop a cell-line by transferring resulting suspension to fresh medium under the same conditions. Results indicated that eight-week-old translucent, friable, off-white callus cultures were an excellent starting material for the initiation of homogeneous cell suspension cultures as compared to other tested sources. Of the three tested media (MS, MS2 or AA medium containing 18.09 micro M 2, 4-D), MS2 was found to be a better medium for the initiation of cell suspension cultures. Cell suspension cultures, placed in 16-h photoperiod at 25 ± 2 degree C and agitated at 120 rpm using a gyratory shaker showed excellent results. Several other factors influencing quick establishment of cell suspension cultures in this cultivar are also discussed in this communication. (author)

  7. Induction of linalool as a pharmaceutical and medicinal metabolite via cell suspension culture of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N; Kahrizi, D; Mansouri, M; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Khanahmadi, M; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-05-30

    Cumin is an important medicinal plant in Iran. Plant cell suspension culture is a method for the production of medicinal and secondary metabolites. The linalool is a plant secondary metabolite that has been recognized as a neuroprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salicylic acid elicitor on induction of linalool in cell suspension culture of cumin. For this purpose, the cumin seeds were prepared, to obtain sterile seedling, were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and alcohol, and were cultured on MS basal medium. This research was conducted in two separate experiments including callus induction and suspension cultures. Leaf explants were prepared from sterile seedlings and used to produce callus on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA and 0.5 mg/l BAP. In order to establish suspension culture, the appropriate calli were transferred to liquid medium. Then cell cultures were treated with elicitors. The effects of elicitor on the production of linalool secondary metabolite and cell viability were assessed by GC-Mass and tetrazolium test respectively. For this purpose, the salicylic acid (at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/l) was used. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications. The results of cell culture and GC-Mass analysis showed that salicylic acid had significant effects on the linalool production (linalool as a secondary metabolite and pharmaceutical agent in cell culture of cumin. It is necessary to determine the best combination of medium and elicitor.

  8. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Arabidopsis Suspension-Cultured Cells Associated with Growth Phase Using Nano-LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2018-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells (T87 line) are important model system for studies of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses at the cellular level in vitro since the cells have certain advantages compared with the whole plant system. However, the physiological and morphological characteristics of the cells are influenced by the progress of the growth phase of cells, which may result in different stress tolerance. To obtain comprehensive proteome profiles of the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana T87 suspension-cultured cells at the lag, log, or stationary growth phase, a shotgun proteomics method using nano-LC-MS/MS is used. The results obtained indicate that proteome profiles of the plasma membrane with the progress of the growth phase of cells dynamically changed, which may be associated with the physiological and morphological characteristics of the plasma membrane of the suspension-cultured cells. The proteomics results are further applied to explain different responsive patterns in the plasma membrane to cold acclimation and ABA treatment, which lead to understanding of different freezing tolerance associated with the growth phase of the cells.

  9. Monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D.C. cell suspension cultures in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Cell growth, monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid (MOA) production, and morphological properties of Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor were investigated. U. tomentosa (cell line green Uth-3) was able to grow in a stirred tank at an impeller tip speed of 95 cm/s (agitation speed of 400 rpm), showing a maximum biomass yield of 11.9 +/- 0.6 g DW/L and a specific growth rate of 0.102 d(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in a stirred tank achieved maximum volumetric and specific MOA concentration (467.7 +/- 40.0 microg/L, 44.6 +/- 5.2 microg/g DW) at 16 days of culture. MOA chemical profile of cell suspension cultures growing in a stirred tank resembled that of the plant. Depending on culture time, from the total MOA produced, 37-100% was found in the medium in the bioreactor culture. MOA concentration achieved in a stirred tank was up to 10-fold higher than that obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks (agitated at 110 rpm). In a stirred tank, average area of the single cells of U. tomentosa increased up to 4-fold, and elliptical form factor increased from 1.40 to 2.55, indicating enlargement of U. tomentosa single cells. This work presents the first report of U. tomentosa green cell suspension cultures that grow and produce MOA in a stirred tank bioreactor.

  10. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  11. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  12. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropharmacological and neuroprotective activities of some metabolites produced by cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo, Jorge; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Gutiérrez, María Del Carmen; Arellano-García, Jesús; León-Rivera, Ismael; Perea-Arango, Irene

    2017-10-01

    Waltheria americana is a plant used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat some nervous system disorders. The aims of the present study were to isolate and determine the neuropharmacological and neurprotective activities of metabolites produced by a cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana. Submerged cultivation of W. americana cells provided biomass. A methanol-soluble extract (WAsc) was obtained from biomass. WAsc was fractionated yielding the chromatographic fractions 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 . For the determination of anticonvulsant activity in vivo, seizures were induced in mice by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). Neuropharmacological activities (release of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and neuroprotection) of chromatographic fractions were determined by in vitro histological analysis of brain sections of mice post mortem. Fraction 4WAsc-H 2 O (containing saccharides) did not produce neuronal damage, neurodegeneration, interstitial tissue edema, astrocytic activation, nor cell death. Pretreatment of animals with 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 from W. americana cell suspensions induced an increase in: GABA release, seizure latency, survival time, neuroprotection, and a decrease in the degree of severity of tonic/tonic-clonic convulsions, preventing PTZ-induced death of up to 100% of animals of study. Bioactive compounds produced in suspension cell culture of W. americana produce neuroprotective and neuropharmacological activities associated with the GABAergic neurotransmission system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of triterpene acids by cell suspension cultures of Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saimaru, Hiroshi; Orihara, Yutaka; Tansakul, Pimpimon; Kang, Young-Hwa; Shibuya, Masaaki; Ebizuka, Yutaka

    2007-05-01

    Olive (Olea europaea) contains large quantity of triterpene acids including oleanolic acid (6) as a major one. Varieties of biological activities exhibited by triterpene acids attracted our attentions, especially from pharmaceutical viewpoints. Cell culture of olive plant was induced and its triterpene constituents were studied. From the cell suspension cultures, six ursane type triterpene acids; ursolic acid (9), pomolic acid (10), rotundic acid (11), tormentic acid (12), 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid (13) and 19alpha-hydroxyasiatic acid (14), and two oleanane type acids; oleanolic acid and maslinic acid (7), have been isolated. Quantity of ursane type triterpene acids produced by cell cultures was larger than that of oleanane type. Further, a multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) named OEA was cloned by homology based PCRs from the same cultured cells. Major product of OEA is alpha-amyrin (ursane skeleton), showing good accordance to higher content of ursane-type triterpene acids in the cultured cells, and strongly suggesting OEA to be a major contributor OSC for their production.

  15. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Vitis Cv. Monastrell suspension-cultured cells: Determination of critical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Mingyu; Quiñonero, Carmen; Akdemir, Hülya; Alburquerque, Nuria; Pedreño, María Ángeles; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Although some works have explored the transformation of differentiated, embryogenic suspension-cultured cells (SCC) to produce transgenic grapevine plants, to our knowledge this is one of the first reports on the efficient transformation of dedifferentiated Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell SCC. This protocol has been developed using the sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (SAAT) method. A construct harboring the selectable nptII and the eyfp/IV2 marker genes was used in the study and transformation efficiencies reached over 50 independent transformed SCC per gram of infected cells. Best results were obtained when cells were infected at the exponential phase. A high density plating (500 mg/dish) gave significantly better results. As selective agent, kanamycin was inefficient for the selection of Monastrell transformed SCC since wild type cells were almost insensitive to this antibiotic whereas application of paromomycin resulted in very effective selection. Selected eyfp-expressing microcalli were grown until enough tissue was available to scale up a new transgenic SCC. These transgenic SCC lines were evaluated molecularly and phenotypically demonstrating the presence and integration of both transgenes, the absence of Agrobacterium contamination and the ability of the transformed SCC to grow in highly selective liquid medium. The methodology described here opens the possibility of improving the production of valuable metabolites. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:725-734, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Effects of Selected Physicochemical Parameters on Zerumbone Production of Zingiber zerumbet Smith Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanom Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber zerumbet Smith is an important herb that contains bioactive phytomedicinal compound, zerumbone. To enhance cell growth and production of this useful compound, we investigated the growth conditions of cell suspension culture. Embryogenic callus generated from shoot bud was used to initiate cell suspension culture. The highest specific growth rate of cells was recorded when it was cultured in liquid Murashige and Skoog basal medium containing 3% sucrose with pH 5.7 and incubated under continuous shaking condition of 70 rpm for 16 h light and 8 h dark cycle at 24°C. Our results also revealed that the type of carbohydrate substrate, light regime, agitation speed, and incubation temperature could affect the production of zerumbone. Although the zerumbone produced in this study was not abundant compared to rhizome of Z. zerumbet, the possibility of producing zerumbone during early stage could serve as a model for subsequent improvement.

  17. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    to affect the growth and metabolism of cultured cells, and have been studied extensively in different species in .... Specific growth rate of neem cell suspensions in altered nitrate: ammonium ratio. MS, Murashige and Skoog medium; MS medium with .... Stimulated caffeine production has been reported in Coffea arabica cell ...

  18. Affinity Purification and Characterization of Functional Tubulin from Cell Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis and Tobacco1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Seiichi; Noguchi, Masahiro; Demura, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules assemble into several distinct arrays that play important roles in cell division and cell morphogenesis. To decipher the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics and organization of this versatile cytoskeletal component, it is essential to establish in vitro assays that use functional tubulin. Although plant tubulin has been purified previously from protoplasts by reversible taxol-induced polymerization, a simple and efficient purification method has yet to be developed. Here, we used a Tumor Overexpressed Gene (TOG) column, in which the tubulin-binding domains of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) TOG homolog are immobilized on resin, to isolate functional plant tubulin. We found that several hundred micrograms of pure tubulin can readily be purified from cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The tubulin purified by the TOG column showed high assembly competence, partly because of low levels of polymerization-inhibitory phosphorylation of α-tubulin. Compared with porcine brain tubulin, Arabidopsis tubulin is highly dynamic in vitro at both the plus and minus ends, exhibiting faster shrinkage rates and more frequent catastrophe events, and exhibits frequent spontaneous nucleation. Furthermore, our study shows that an internal histidine tag in α-tubulin can be used to prepare particular isotypes and specifically engineered versions of α-tubulin. In contrast to previous studies of plant tubulin, our mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses failed to detect posttranslational modification of the isolated Arabidopsis tubulin or detected only low levels of posttranslational modification. This novel technology can be used to prepare assembly-competent, highly dynamic pure tubulin from plant cell cultures. PMID:26747285

  19. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Tabata M, Mizukami H, Hiroaka N and Konoshima M 1974. Pigment formation in callus cultures of Lithospermum erythrorizon; Phytochemistry 13 927–932. Vander Esch S A, Giagnacovo G, Meccioni O and Vitali F 1993. Preliminary results on the production of azadirachtin by plant tissue culture of Azadirachta indica; G. Bot.

  20. Isolation of fatty acids and aromatics from cell suspension cultures of Lavandula angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Gülaçti; Herrmann, Gabriele; Kolak, Ufuk; Gören, C; Porzel, Andrea; Kutchan, Toni M

    2007-02-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. ssp. angustifolia (syn.: L. officinalis Chaix.) afforded a fatty acid composition, cis and trans p-coumaric acids (=p-hydroxy cinnamic acids), and beta-sitosterol. The fatty acid composition was analyzed by GC-MS, and the structures of the isolated three compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-NMR, and MS spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Opposite extremes in ethylene/nitric oxide ratio induce cell death in suspension culture and root apices of tomato exposed to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, P; Borbély, P; Kovács, Judit; Papp, Anita; Szepesi, Ágnes; Takács, Z; Tari, Irma

    2014-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene or the gaseous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) may enhance salt stress tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, first of all K+/Na+ ratio of tissues. Ethylene and NO accumulation increased in the root apices and suspension culture cells of tomato at sublethal salt stress caused by 100 mM NaCl, however, the induction phase of programmed cell death (PCD) was different at lethal salt concentration. The production of ethylene by root apices and the accumulation of NO in the cells of suspension culture did not increase during the initiation of PCD after 250 mM NaCl treatment. Moreover, cells in suspension culture accumulated higher amount of reactive oxygen species which, along with NO deficiency contributed to cell death induction. The absence of ethylene in the apical root segments and the absence of NO accumulation in the cell suspension resulted in similar ion disequilibrium, namely K+/Na+ ratio of 1.41 ± 0.1 and 1.68 ± 0.3 in intact plant tissues and suspension culture cells, respectively that was not tolerated by tomato.

  2. Feruloyl Oligosaccharides from Cell Walls of Suspension-Cultured Spinach Cells and Sugar Beet Pulp : STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Tadashi, ISHII; Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute

    1994-01-01

    Cell walls of suspension-cultured spinach cells and sugar beet pulp were separately hydrolyzed with Driselase. A feruloyl arabinobiose was isolated from both spinach cells and sugar beet. Four feruloyl oligosaccharides were obtained from sugar beet. The four oligosaccharides were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, methylation analysis and FAB-MS.

  3. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of nutritional alteration on biomass content and azadirachtin production in cell suspensions of the elite neem variety crida-8. Variations in total nitrogen availability in the medium in terms of different ratios of nitrate:ammonium showed that the ratio 4:1 revealed a profound effect, ...

  4. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total soluble proteins (TSP) and culture filtrate (CF) proteins were extracted from the cell culture system and solubilised in urea buffer (9 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 4% CHAPS). Both onedimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gel analysis of these two proteomes show that the TSP and CF proteomes have different ...

  5. Enhanced Production of Bioactive Isoprenoid Compounds from Cell Suspension Cultures of Artemisia annua L. Using β-Cyclodextrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Francesca; De Paolis, Angelo; Durante, Miriana; Blando, Federica; Mita, Giovanni; Caretto, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell cultures as valuable tools for the production of specific metabolites can be greatly improved by the application of elicitors including cyclodextrins (CDs) for enhancing the yields of the desired plant compounds. Here the effects of 2,6-dimethyl-β-cyclodextrins (DIMEB) on the production of carotenoids and quinones from Artemisia annua L. cell suspension cultures were investigated. The addition of 50 mM DIMEB induced an early increase of intracellular carotenoid and quinone contents, which could be observed to a higher extent for lutein (10-fold), Q9 (3-fold) and Q10 (2.5-fold). Real Time PCR analysis revealed that the expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) gene in DIMEB treated cell cultures after three days was 2.5-fold higher than in untreated samples, thus suggesting that the DIMEB induced increase of carotenoids and quinones could be due to the induction of the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthetic route. In addition, the DIMEB treatment induced an enhanced release of carotenoids and quinones into the culture medium of A. annua cell suspension cultures possibly due to the ability of CDs to form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25338048

  6. Influence of auxins and sucrose in monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Growth and alkaloid production in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were studied in Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 10 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for maintenance and with 10 microM indole-3-acetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for production. A U. tomentosa pale Uth-3 cell line, cultured in the production medium, showed a reduced lag phase and a specific growth rate (mu) of 0.27 day(-1), while cells growing in the maintenance medium showed mu = 0.20 day(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in the production medium produced monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (MOA) in amounts of 10.2 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1) dry weight (DW). The chemical profile of MOA produced by in vitro cell cultures was similar to that found in the plant. After 10 subcultures, maximum MOA production decreased to 2.0 +/- 0.7 microg g(-1) DW, while tryptamine alkaloids (TA) were produced with a maximum of 6.2 +/- 0.4 microg g(-1) DW. The increase of initial sucrose concentration up to 145 mM in the production medium enhanced the cell biomass by 3.2-fold (from 10.2 +/- 0.1 to 32.8 +/- 1.1 g DW L(-1)), reduced mu from 0.27 to 0.23 day(-1), and provoked a substantial accumulation of TA (23.1 +/- 4.7 microg g(-1) DW). A high sucrose concentration stimulated MOA production in the maintenance medium (2.7 +/- 0.5 microg g(-1) DW), even in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

  7. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures grown at low and high CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, C.A.; Widholm, J.M.; Ogren, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism was characterized in four photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures. There was no apparent difference between two soybeans (Glycine max) and one cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cell line which required 5% CO 2 for growth, and a unique cotton cell line that grows at ambient CO 2 (660 microliters per liter). Photosynthetic characteristics in all four lines were more like C 3 mesophyll leaf cells than the cell suspension cultures previously studied. The pattern of 14 C-labeling reflected the high ratio of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity and showed that CO 2 fixation occurred primarily by the C 3 pathway. Photorespiration occurred at 330 microliters per liter CO 2 , 21% O 2 as indicated by the synthesis of high levels of 14 C-labeled glycine and serine in a pulse-chase experiment and by oxygen inhibition of CO 2 fixation. Short-term CO 2 fixation in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase showed CO 2 , not HCO 3 - , to be the main source of inorganic carbon taken up by the low CO 2 -requiring cotton cells. The cells did not have a CO 2 -concentrating mechanism as indicated by silicone oil centrifugation experiments. Carbonic anhydrase was absent in the low CO 2 -requiring cotton cells, present in the high CO 2 -requiring soybean cell lines, and absent in other high CO 2 cell lines examined. Thus, the presence of carbonic anhydrase is not an essential requirement for photoautotrophy in cell suspension cultures which grow at either high or low CO 2 concentrations

  8. Induced accumulation of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Romero, Iris; Lazo, Elizabeth; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-06-01

    Increasing sucrose from 20 to 50 g l(-1) in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures enhanced ursolic acid and oleanolic acid production from 129 +/- 61 to 553 +/- 193 microg g(-1) cell dry wt. The maximal concentration of both triterpenes (1680 +/- 39 microg g(-1) cell dry wt) was 8 days after elicitation by jasmonic acid, while yeast extract or citrus pectin treatments produced 1189 +/- 20 or 1120 +/- 26 microg g(-1) cell dry wt, respectively. The ratio of ursolic acid:oleanolic acid was constant at 70:30.

  9. Functional Thyroid Follicular Cells Differentiation from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Arauchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of regenerated thyroid follicular cells (TFCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with hypothyroidism. Here, we have succeeded in inducing functional TFCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in scalable suspension culture. Differentiation of iPSCs with Activin A treatment produced Sox17- and FoxA2-expressing definitive endodermal cells that also expressed thyroid transcription factors Pax8 and Nkx2-1. Further treatment with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH induced TFCs expressing various types of thyroid proteins including TSH receptor, sodium–iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, and thyroid peroxidase. Interestingly, differentiated cells secreted free thyroxine in vitro. These results indicate successful differentiation of human iPSCs to functional TFCs that may enable us to fabricate thyroid tissues for regenerative medicine and disease models.

  10. Signal transduction in artichoke [Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. scolymus (L.) Hayek] callus and cell suspension cultures under nutritional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, Vincenzo; Caretto, Sofia; Linsalata, Vito; Colella, Giovanni; Mita, Giovanni

    2018-03-16

    Stimulated production of secondary phenolic metabolites and proline was studied by using cell cultures of artichoke [Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. scolymus (L.) Hayek] submitted to nutritional stress. Artichoke cell cultures accumulated phenolic secondary metabolites in a pattern similar to that seen in artichoke leaves and heads (capitula). This paper shows that both callus and cell suspension cultures under nutritional stress accumulated phenolic compounds and proline, at the same time their biomass production was negatively affected by nutrient deficiency. The results obtained strongly suggest that plant tissues respond to nutrient deprivation by a defensive costly mechanism, which determines the establishment of a mechanism of trade-off between growth and adaptive response. Furthermore, the results of this research suggest that perception of abiotic stress and increased phenolic metabolites are linked by a sequence of biochemical processes that also involves the intracellular free proline and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. The main conclusion of this paper is that, once calli and cell suspension cultures respond to nutrient deficiency, in acclimated cells the establishment of a negative correlation between primary metabolism (growth) and secondary metabolism (defence compounds) is observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement effect of shikonin in cell suspension culture and transfermanant culture by radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Young Keun; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Young Bok; Hwang Hye Yeon

    2004-10-01

    The cell lines 679, 679-29 and 622-46 of L. erythrorhizon could be selected on LS agar medium for the production shikonin in cell suspension culture. The shikonin was increased moderately in suspension culture of cell line 622-46 in LS liquid medium containing BA 2 mg·L -1 and IAA 0.2 mg·L -1 in the dark, and was increased by adding 1 μM Cu 2+ and 100 μM methyl jasmonate The accumulation of shikonin in the liquid medium was increased significantly by 2 Gy irradiation to callus of cell line 622-46 and culture in LS liquid medium containing BA 2 mg·L -1 and IAA 0.2 mg·L -1 in the dark and shikonin in cell debris was higher by 16 Gy irradiation. The activity of p-hydroxybenzoate geranyltransferase was increased by irradiation of 2 Gy and 16 Gy of γ radiation. Seedling hypocotyles of L. erythrorhizon were infected with Agrogacterium rhizogenes strain 15834 harboring a binary vector with an intron bearing the GUS (β-glucuronidase) gene driven by cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promotor as well as the HPT (hygromycin phosphotransferase) gene as the selection marker. Hairy roots isolated were hygromycin resistant and had integrated GUS gene in DNA. The root tip grown on M-9 medium showed normal pigment production pattern in border cells and root hairs

  12. Comparison of Cuminaldehyde Contents from Cell Suspension Cultures and Seeds of [Bunium persicum (Boiss. B. Fedtsch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara KHOSRAVINIA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The cell suspension culture and seed samples of Bunium persicum were extracted by supercritical fluid, hydrodistillation and solvent methods and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. In this study to compare the different methods of extractions, cuminaldehyde was targeted as one of the Black zira essential oil constitute. For callus induction the germinated seeds were cultured as explants on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l kinetin (treatment A as well as 2 mg/l ?-naphthalene acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l 6-benzyl aminopurine (treatment B and followed by cells suspension cultures establishment for the first time. The results of cell culture showed that cells from treatment B have a growth rate higher than A. All extracts were dissolved in 1 ml hexane and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. According to the Gas Chromatography analysis, cuminaldehyde was not detected in the supercritical fluid samples, while it was present in hydrodistillation and solvent extract. Cuminaldehyde percentage in cell and seed solvent extracts was 4.65% and 18.61% respectively. Gas Chromatography results also showed that no cuminaldehyde is present in media extracts, means no cuminaldehyde has been secreted into the medium.

  13. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. (Hangzhou Univ. (China)); Cullen, W.R. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Accumulation of phenylpropanoid derivatives in chitosan-induced cell suspension culture of Cocos nucifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Moumita; Karun, Anitha; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan-induced elicitation responses of dark-incubated Cocos nucifera (coconut) endosperm cell suspension cultures led to the rapid formation of phenylpropanoid derivatives, which essentially mimics the defense-induced biochemical changes in coconut palm as observed under in vivo conditions. An enhanced accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the major wall-bound phenolics was evident. This was followed by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Along with enhanced peroxidases activities in elicited lines, the increase in activities of the early phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes such as, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), p-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (4CL) and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (HBD) in elicited cell cultures were also observed. Furthermore, supplementation of specific inhibitors of PAL, C4H and 4CL in elicited cell cultures led to suppressed accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, which opens up interesting questions regarding the probable route of the biosynthesis of this phenolic acid in C. nucifera.

  15. Production of Monascus pigments as extracellular crystals by cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengling; Liu, Lujie; Huang, Yaolin; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Monascus pigments are predominantly cell-bound, including both intracellular and surface-bound pigments. This long-term misconception was corrected in the present work. Production of extracellular crystal pigments by submerged culture of Monascus sp. was confirmed by microscopic observation and collection of Monascus pigments from extracellular broth by direct membrane filtration. Following up the new fact, the bioactivity of mycelia as whole-cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis and biodegradation of Monascus pigments had been detailedly examined in both an aqueous solution and a nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution. Based on those experimental results, cell suspension culture in an aqueous medium was developed as a novel strategy for accumulation of high concentration of Monascus pigments. Thus, glucose feeding during submerged culture in the aqueous medium was carried out successfully and high orange Monascus pigments concentration of near 4 g/L was achieved.

  16. Up-scaling single cell-inoculated suspension culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harmeet; Mok, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Rahmat, Siti Norfiza Binte; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We have systematically developed single cell-inoculated suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in defined media. Cell survival was dependent on hESC re-aggregation. In the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (Ri) only approximately 44% of the seeded cells were rescued, but an optimized heat shock treatment combined with Ri significantly increased cell survival to approximately 60%. Mechanistically, our data suggest that E-cadherin plays a role in hESC aggregation and that dissociation and re-aggregation upon passaging functions as a purification step towards a pluripotency markers-enriched population. Mass expansion of hESC was readily achieved by up-scaling 2 ml cultures to serial passaging in 50 ml spinner flasks. A media comparison revealed that mTeSR was superior to KnockOut-SR in supporting cell proliferation and pluripotency. Persistent expression of pluripotency markers was achieved for two lines (hES2, hES3) that were used at higher passages (>86). In contrast, rapid down regulation of Oct4, Tra-1-60, and SSEA4 was observed for ESI049, a clinically compliant line, used at passages 20-36. The up-scaling strategy has significant potential to provide pluripotent cells on a clinical scale. Nevertheless, our data also highlights a significant line-to-line variability and the need for a critical assessment of novel methods with numerous relevant cell lines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Manivannan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 3.0 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA in a combination with 2 mg·L−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa, salicylic acid (SA, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  18. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-03-18

    Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 3.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) in a combination with 2 mg·L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa), salicylic acid (SA), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  19. [Research on ursolic acid production of Eriobotrya japonica cell suspension culture in WAVE bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-hua; Yao, De-heng; Xu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Chang, Qiang; Su, Ming-hua

    2015-05-01

    Through scale-up cultivation of Eriobotrya japonica suspension cells using WAVE bioreactor, the cell growth and ursolic acid (UA) accumulation were studied. The comparison test was carried out in the flask and the reactor with cell dry weight (DW) and UA content as evaluation indexes. The culture medium, DW and UA content were compared in 1 L and 5 L working volumes of bioreactor. The orthogonal test with main actors of inoculation amount, speed and angle of rotation was developed to find the optimal combination, in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. DW of the cell growth and the UA content in bioreactor were higher than those of the shaker by 105.5% and 27.65% respectively. In bioreactor, the dynamic changes of elements in the fluid culture, the dry weight of the cell growth and the UA content in 1 L and 5 L working volumes were similar. Inoculation of 80 g, rotational speed of 26 r · min(-1), and angle of 6 ° was the optimal combination, and the cell biomass of 19.01 g · L(-1) and the UA content of 27.750 mg · g(-1) were achieved after 100 h cultivation in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. WAVE Bioreactor is more suitable than flasks for the E. japonica cell suspension culture, and culture parameters can be achieved from 1 L to 5 L amplification.

  20. Biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Sánchez, Isvett J; Ortega-López, Jaime; del Carmen Montes-Horcasitas, María; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2002-12-01

    Pectin administered to Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures, was found to increase the production of triterpene acids (ursolic and oleanolic acid), however, neither growth nor sterol accumulation were affected. Cell cultures showed that pectin treatment caused a rapid threefold increase in the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of C(5) and C(30 )isoprenoid, such as isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and squalene synthase. The activity of a farnesyl diphosphatase, which could divert the flux of farnesyl diphosphate to farnesol, was two times lower in elicited than in control cells. Elicited cells also transformed more rapidly a higher percentage of [5-(3)H]mevalonic acid into triterpene acids. Interestingly, addition of terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase, to elicited cell cultures inhibited sterol accumulation while triterpene production was not inhibited. These results suggest that in U. tomentosa cells, both the previously mentioned enzymes and those involved in squalene 2,3-oxide formation play an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes.

  1. Biosynthesis of camalexin from tryptophan pathway intermediates in cell-suspension cultures of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, M

    1998-12-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2'-yl-indole) is the principal phytoalexin that accumulates in Arabidopsis after infection by fungi or bacteria. Camalexin accumulation was detectable in Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures 3 to 5 h after inoculation with Cochliobolus carbonum (Race 1), and then increased rapidly from 7 to 24 h after inoculation. Levels of radioactivity incorporated into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]anthranilate also increased with time after fungal inoculation. The levels of radioactive incorporation into camalexin increased rapidly between 7 and 18 h after inoculation, and then decreased along with camalexin accumulation. Relatively low levels of radioactivity from [14C]anthranilate incorporated into camalexin in the noninoculated controls. Autoradiographic analysis of the accumulation of chloroform-extractable metabolites labeled with [14C]anthranilate revealed a transient increase in the incorporation of radioactivity into indole in fungus-inoculated Arabidopsis cell cultures. The time-course measurement of radioactive incorporation into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]indole was similar to that with [14C]anthranilate. These data suggest that indole destined for camalexin synthesis is produced by a separate enzymatic reaction that does not involve tryptophan synthase.

  2. Biosynthesis of Camalexin from Tryptophan Pathway Intermediates in Cell-Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2′-yl-indole) is the principal phytoalexin that accumulates in Arabidopsis after infection by fungi or bacteria. Camalexin accumulation was detectable in Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures 3 to 5 h after inoculation with Cochliobolus carbonum (Race 1), and then increased rapidly from 7 to 24 h after inoculation. Levels of radioactivity incorporated into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]anthranilate also increased with time after fungal inoculation. The levels of radioactive incorporation into camalexin increased rapidly between 7 and 18 h after inoculation, and then decreased along with camalexin accumulation. Relatively low levels of radioactivity from [14C]anthranilate incorporated into camalexin in the noninoculated controls. Autoradiographic analysis of the accumulation of chloroform-extractable metabolites labeled with [14C]anthranilate revealed a transient increase in the incorporation of radioactivity into indole in fungus-inoculated Arabidopsis cell cultures. The time-course measurement of radioactive incorporation into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]indole was similar to that with [14C]anthranilate. These data suggest that indole destined for camalexin synthesis is produced by a separate enzymatic reaction that does not involve tryptophan synthase. PMID:9847113

  3. Elicitation of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) cell suspension culture for enhancement of inulin production and altered degree of polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunquan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Haitao; Han, Dongming; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures have emerged as a potential source of secondary metabolites for food additives and pharmaceuticals. In this study inulin accumulation and its degree of polymerisation (DP) in the treated cells in the same medium were investigated after treatment with six types of elicitors. An in vitro cell suspension culture of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) was optimised by adding an extra nitrogen source. According to the growth kinetics, a maximum biomass of 5.48 g L -1 was obtained from the optimal cell suspension medium consisted of Murashige and Skoog basic medium (MS) + 1.0 mg L -1 α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) + 1.0 mg L -1 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) + 0.5 mg L -1 proline + 1.0 mg L -1 glutamine. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA, 250 µmol L -1 ) treatment for 15 days led to the highest levels of inulin (2955.27 ± 9.81 mg L -1 compared to control of 1217.46 ± 0.26 mg L -1 ). The elicited effect of five elicitors to the suspension cells of Jerusalem artichoke is as follows: AgNO 3 (Ag, 10 µmol L -1 ), salicylic acid (SA, 75 µmol L -1 ), chitosan (KJT, 40 mg L -1 ), Trichoderma viride (Tv, 90 mg L -1 ), yeast extract (YE, 0.25 mg L -1 ), and the corresponding content of inulin is increased by 2.05-, 1.93-, 1.76-, 1.44- and 1.18-fold compared to control, respectively. The obvious effect on the percentage of lower DP in inulin was observed in cells treated with 40 mg L -1 KJT, 0.25 mg L -1 YE and 10 µmol L -1 Ag. Among the six types of elicitors, the descending order of inulin content is MeJA > Ag > SA > KJT > Tv > YE. For the purpose inulin with lower DP and its application to prebiotic food, three elicitors, including KJT, YE and Ag, can be used for the elicitation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Treatment strategies for high resveratrol induction in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu V. Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioprocesses capable of producing large scales of resveratrol at nutraceutical grade are in demand. This study herein investigated treatment strategies to induce the production of resveratrol in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures. Among seven investigated elicitors, jasmonic acid (JA, salicylic acid, β-glucan (GLU, and chitosan enhanced the production of intracellular resveratrol manyfold. The combined treatment of JA and GLU increased extracellular resveratrol production by up to tenfold. The application of Amberlite XAD-7 resin for in situ removal and artificial storage of secreted resveratrol further increased resveratrol production by up to four orders of magnitude. The level of resveratrol produced in response to the combined treatment with 200 g/L XAD-7, 10 μM JA and 1 mg/mL GLU was approximately 2400 mg/L, allowing the production of resveratrol at an industrial scale. The high yield of resveratrol is due to the involvement of a number of mechanisms working in concert.

  5. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen (ROS and RNS) species generation and cell death in tomato suspension cultures--Botrytis cinerea interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska, E; Różalska, S; Kaźmierczak, A; Nawrocka, J; Małolepsza, U

    2015-01-01

    This article reports events connected to cell survival and Botrytis cinerea infection development in cell suspension cultures of two tomato cultivars which show different levels of susceptibility to the pathogen: cv. Corindo (more susceptible) and cv. Perkoz (less susceptible). In parallel changes in reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species generation and in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity were studied. In vivo staining methods with acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) as well as fluorescent microscopy were used to assess tomato and B. cinerea cells death. The biochemical studies of ROS and RNS concentrations in plant cell extract were complemented by in vivo ROS and nitric oxide (NO) imaging using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), diaminobenzidine (DAB) and diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-DA) staining methods, and confocal microscope technique. B. cinerea infection proceeded slower in Perkoz cell cultures. It was evidenced by measuring the pathogen conidia germination and germination tube development in which nuclei revealing cell death dominated. Two different types of tomato cell death were observed: cells with necrotic nuclei dominated in Corindo whereas in Perkoz cells with characteristic of vacuolar death type prevailed. In Perkoz cells, constitutive levels of NO and S-nitrosothiols (SNO) were significantly higher and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and superoxide anion (O₂(-)) concentrations were slightly higher as compared with Corindo cells. Moreover, increases in these molecule concentrations as a result of B. cinerea inoculation were observed in both, Perkoz and Corindo cell cultures. The enzymatic GSNOR activity seems to be an important player in controlling the SNO level in tomato cells. Involvements of the studied compounds in molecular mechanisms of tomato resistance to B. cinerea are discussed in the paper.

  6. Design of serum-free medium for suspension culture of CHO cells on the basis of general commercial media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Hideo; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2015-08-01

    The design of serum-free media for suspension culture of genetically engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using general commercial media as a basis was investigated. Subcultivation using a commercial serum-free medium containing insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 with or without FCS necessitated additives other than IGF-1 to compensate for the lack of FCS and improve cell growth. Suspension culture with media containing several combinations of growth factors suggested the effectiveness of addition of both IGF-1 and the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) for promoting cell growth. Subcultivation of CHO cells in suspension culture using the commercial serum-free medium EX-CELL™302, which contained an IGF-1 analog, supplemented with LPA resulted in gradually increasing specific growth rate comparable to the serum-containing medium and in almost the same high antibody production regardless of the number of generations. The culture with EX-CELL™302 supplemented with LPA in a jar fermentor with pH control at 6.9 showed an apparently higher cell growth rate than the cultures without pH control and with pH control at 6.8. The cell growth in the medium supplemented with aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), which was much cheaper than IGF-1, in combination with LPA was synergistically promoted similarly to that in the medium supplemented with IGF-1 and LPA. In conclusion, the serum-free medium designed on the basis of general commercial media could support the growth of CHO cells and antibody production comparable to serum-containing medium in suspension culture. Moreover, the possibility of cost reduction by the substitution of IGF-1 with ATA was also shown.

  7. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Dipto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX, the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level.

  8. Role of Changes in Cell Fatty Acids Composition in the Increasing of Frost Resistance of Winter Wheat Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Influences of low temperatures (4 and 8 ° С on the frost tolerance and fatty acid compositions of cells in a winter wheat suspension culture have been studied. It has been found that treatment of the culture with 4 °C (7 days did not protect cells from subsequent freezing temperature action (-8 °С, 6 h and was not accompanied significant changes in the fatty acid composition. On the contrary, the treatment of the culture with the temperature 8 °C (7 days prevented the death caused by freezing temperature and the content of saturated fatty acids decreased: pentadecanoic acid (by 35,0%, palmitic acid (by 19,9% and stearic acid (by 65,4%, and the content of α-linolenic acid increased by 94%. That was the cause of the double bond index (DBI increase by 16%. The role of fatty acids composition changes in the process of increasing frost tolerance in plants are discussed.

  9. LC-MS determination of steroidal glycosides from Dioscorea deltoidea Wall cell suspension culture: Optimization of pre-LC-MS procedure parameters by Latin Square design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvin, Boris; Fedorova, Elizaveta; Shpigun, Oleg; Titova, Maria; Nikitin, Mikhail; Kochkin, Dmitry; Rodin, Igor; Stavrianidi, Andrey

    2018-03-30

    In this paper, the ultrasound assisted extraction method for isolation of steroidal glycosides from D. deltoidea plant cell suspension culture with a subsequent HPLC-MS determination was developed. After the organic solvent was selected via a two-factor experiment the optimization via Latin Square 4 × 4 experimental design was carried out for the following parameters: extraction time, organic solvent concentration in extraction solution and the ratio of solvent to sample. It was also shown that the ultrasound assisted extraction method is not suitable for isolation of steroidal glycosides from the D. deltoidea plant material. The results were double-checked using the multiple successive extraction method and refluxing extraction. Optimal conditions for the extraction of steroidal glycosides by the ultrasound assisted extraction method were: extraction time, 60 min; acetonitrile (water) concentration in extraction solution, 50%; the ratio of solvent to sample, 400 mL/g. Also, the developed method was tested on D. deltoidea cell suspension cultures of different terms and conditions of cultivation. The completeness of the extraction was confirmed using the multiple successive extraction method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regeneration of transgenic cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from microbombarded embryogenic suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpke, C; Taylor, N; Cárcamo, R; Konan, N K; Marmey, P; Henshaw, G G; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C

    1996-06-01

    A protocol was established for the introduction of DNA into embryogenic suspension-derived tissues of cassava via microparticle bombardment, for the selection of genetically transformed cells, and for the regeneration of fully transgenic plants from these cells. The plasmid DNA used for bombardment contained a gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and a gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (uidA). Selection of bombarded tissue with paromomycin resulted in the establishment of putative transgenic embryogenic calli. In most of these calli, beta-glucuronidase was detected histochemically. Molecular analysis of paromomycin-resistant embryogenic calli and of plants regenerated from these calli, confirmed the stable integration of bombarded DNA into the cassava genome.

  11. Role of polyamines in DNA synthesis of Catharanthus roseus cells grown in suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Atsushi Komamine; Walter C. Shortle

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for polyamines in the proliferation of cells was first demonstrated in bacteria (3). While significant progress has been made in this field using animal cell cultures, only preliminary studies have been reported with plant tissues. Serafini-Fracassini et al. (9) showed a marked increase in polyamine synthesis early during the G 1 phase, concomitant with...

  12. Comparative study of withanolide production and the related transcriptional responses of biosynthetic genes in fungi elicited cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera in shake flask and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Seema; Saxena, Parul; Ali, Athar; Khan, Shazia; Abdin, Malik Z

    2017-05-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is one of the most reputed medicinal plants in the traditional medicinal system. In this study, cell suspension culture of W. somnifera was elicited with cell homogenates of fungi (A. alternata, F. solani, V. dahliae and P. indica) in shake flask and the major withanolides like withanolide A, withaferin A and withanone were analysed. Simultaneously expression levels of key pathway genes from withanolides biosynthetic pathways were also checked via quantitative PCR in shake flask as well as in bioreactor. The results show that highest gene expression of 10.8, 5.8, 4.9, and 3.3 folds were observed with HMGR among all the expressed genes in cell suspension cultures with cell homogenates of 3% P. indica, 5% V. dahliae, 3% A. alternata and 3% F. solani, respectively, in comparison to the control in shake flask. Optimized concentration of cell homogenate of P. indica (3% v/v) was added to the growing culture in 5.0-l bioreactor under optimized up-scaling conditions and harvested after 22 days. The genes of MVA, MEP and withanolides biosynthetic pathways like HMGR, SS, SE, CAS, FPPS, DXR and DXS were up-regulated by 12.5, 4.9, 2.18, 4.65, 2.34, 1.89 and 1.4 folds, respectively in bioreactor. The enhancement of biomass (1.13 fold) and withanolides [withanolide A (1.7), withaferin A (1.5), and withanone (1.5) folds] in bioreactor in comparison to shake flask was also found to be in line with the up-regulation of genes of withanolide biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After two weeks, induction of somatic embryos up to the torpedo stage occured at all tested concentrations of 2,4-D, IAA or NAA. Somatic embryos developed only in MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l IAA within two weeks and 2% of globular embryos were developed into the cotyledonary stage embryos. Eighty one percent of ...

  14. Biotransformation of artemisinin using cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Lavandula officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Suman; Gaur, Rashmi; Verma, Priyanka; Bhakuni, Rajendra S; Mathur, Archana

    2010-08-01

    Artemisinin, an antimalarial compound, at 5 mg/40 ml, was transformed by cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Lavandula officinalis L. into deoxyartemisinin with yields >78% (3.93 mg deoxyartemisinin from 5 mg artemisinin). Maximum conversion (78.6 and 78%) occurred after 6 and 7 days of adding artemisinin to 20 and 9 days old cultures of C. roseus and L. officinalis, respectively. The procedure was scaled up by and 500 mg artemisinin was transformed into 390 mg deoxyartemisinin. Addition of artemisinin at the beginning of the culture cycle resulted in >50% reduction in dry biomass production with no bioconversion. Conversion of artemisinin occurred intracellularly followed by leaching of the product into the medium.

  15. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Ke

    Full Text Available Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel. In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L and bentazon (4.2 µmol. A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  16. Changes in phytochelatins and their biosynthetic intermediates in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cell suspension cultures under cadmium and zinc stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Thangavel; Stephanie Long; Rakesh Minocha

    2007-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) were selected to study the effects of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) on phytochelatins (PCs) and related metabolites after 24 h exposure. The PC2 and its precursor, γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) increased two to fourfold with Cd concentrations ranging from 12...

  17. Comparison of the Production of Recombinant Protein in Suspension Culture of CHO Cells in Spinner Flask and Shake Flask System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N.Z Zainul Abidin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells have been most widely used as the production host for the commercial production of biopharmaceuticals product. They have been extensively studied and developed, and today provide a stable platform for producing monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. This study was focusing on comparison of suspension culture system by using spinner flask and shake flask for the growth and production of recombinant protein in CHO cell line. The CHO cells were transfected with an expression of DNA plasmid containing lac Z gene which codes for β-galactosidase. The recombinant genes in these CHO cells and the β-galactosidase expressing cells were adapted to suspension culture. The agitation speed for both spinner and shake flask were adjusted accordingly. The experiments were carried out in duplicate and samples were taken for cell count, determination of glucose consumption, lactate production and protein level by using biochemical assay. The result showed that, the cell growth in spinner flask is more favorable then in shake flask. The cell concentration in spinner flask is 58% higher than in shake flask. On the other hand, specific activity of β-galactosidase is 25% higher in spinner flask compared to shake flask, at the same agitation speed.ABSTRAK: Sel ovari hamster China (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO digunakan secara meluas dalam hos pembiakan untuk tujuan komersil produk biofarmaseutikal. Ia telah dikaji dan dibangunkan secara ekstensif, dan kini ia menyediakan landasan yang stabil untuk penghasilan antibodi monoklon dan protein rekombinan. Kajian ini memfokuskan tentang penghasilan protein rekombinan menggunakan kultur ampaian sel CHO di dalam kelalang putar dan kelalang goncang. Sel CHO dimasukkan dengan plasmid DNA yang mengandungi gen lac Z yang juga memberikan kod untuk β-galaktosidase. Sel CHO β-galaktosidase-terungkap dimasukkan ke dalam kultur ampaian. Kelajuan agitasi untuk kedua-dua kelalang putar

  18. Studies on suspension culture of virginia mallow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kasprzyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Virginia mallow (Sida hermaphrodita (L. Rusby belongs to the Malvaceae family. It is a very important industrial and energetic crop (Kasprzyk et al. 2013. In our studies, we used plant cell suspension cultures due to the fact that it is a useful tool to investigate biochemical, molecular and physiological aspects of many cellular functions (Dong et al. 2010. Virginia mallow seeds, obtained from Prof. Borkowska (University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland, were used in this investigation to obtain plants which were grown in sterile conditions in the Department of Plant Anatomy and Cytology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland. The seeds were surface sterilized and washed three times in sterile, distilled water. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, young seedlings were used as a source of explants (to callus induction. Two types of explants were used to form callus culture: leaf and petiole. Callus tissues were then aseptically transferred to an Erlenmeyer flask with liquid medium and placed on an orbital shaker moving at 120 rpm. The observations of this suspense culture were conducted under light and confocal LSM microscopes. The authors observed that depending on the type of explants and composition of medium, callus tissue has varied in color and character of growth.

  19. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Zebrowski, Jacek; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Czarnik, Justyna; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage

  20. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Glycyrrhiza glabra (Linn.) and Lavandula officinalis (L.) cell suspension cultures-based biotransformation of β-artemether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Suman; Gaur, Rashmi; Upadhyaya, Mohita; Mathur, Archana; Mathur, Ajay K; Bhakuni, Rajendra S

    2011-07-01

    The biotransformation of β-artemether (1) by cell suspension cultures of Glycyrrhiza glabra and Lavandula officinalis is reported here for the first time. The major biotransformed product appeared as a grayish-blue color spot on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with transparent crystal-like texture. Based on its infrared (IR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra, the product was characterized as a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-acetate derivative (2). The highest conversion efficiencies of 57 and 60% were obtained when 8-9-day-old cell suspensions of G. glabra and L. officinalis were respectively fed with 4-7 mg of compound 1 in 40 ml of medium per culture and the cells were harvested after 2-5 days of incubation. The addition of compound 1 at the beginning of the culture cycle caused severe growth depression in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in poor bioconversion efficiency of ~25% at 2-5 mg/culture dose only.

  2. Accumulation of ixerin F and activities of some terpenoid bisynthetic enzymes in a cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Stojakowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L. (Asteraceae, tribe Lactuceae is capable of synthesizing sesquiterpene lactones of which ixerin F is the main compound. The culture was characterized on growth (by dissimilation rates, on ixerin F accumulation (by RP-HPLC and on some enzyme activities involved in early steps of terpenoid biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (AACT, E.C. 2.3.1.9 and 3S-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS, E.C. 4.13.5 activities of the cells were assayed spectrophotometrically. HMGS activity increased during the culture period and reached a maximum during the stationary phase (190 pkat/mg protein, while AACT showed relatively high level of activity throughout the growth cycle, with transient decrease at the logarithmic growth phase and the beginning of stationary phase. Ixerin F accumulated inside the cells and the maximum concentration of 0.08% (on dry weight basis was found in the early stationary phase of the growth cycle of the culture.

  3. Hydrodynamic stress induces monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid accumulation by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D. C. cell suspension cultures via oxidative burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Sepúlveda-Jiménez, Gabriela; Trejo-Espino, José Luis; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; de la Torre, Mayra; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2007-09-01

    Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were grown in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor operating at a shear rate gamma(.)(avg)=86 s(-1). The cultures showed an early monophasic oxidative burst measured as H2O2 production (2.15 micromol H2O2 g(-1) dw). This response was followed by a transient production of monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (178 +/- 40 microg L(-1) at 24 h). At the stationary phase (144 h), the increase of the shear rate gamma(.)(avg) up to 150 s(-1) and/or oxygen tension up to 85% generated H2O2, restoring oxindole alkaloid production. U. tomentosa cells cultured in Erlenmeyer flasks also exhibited the monophasic oxidative burst but the H2O2 production was 16-fold lower and the alkaloids were not detected. These cells exposed to H2O2 generated in situ produced oxindole alkaloids reaching a maximum of 234 +/- 40 microg L(-1). A positive correlation was observed between the oxindole alkaloid production and the endogenous H2O2 level. On the other hand, addition of 1 microM diphenyleneiodonium (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor) or 10 microM sodium azide (peroxidases inhibitor) reduced both H2O2 production and oxindole alkaloids build up, suggesting that these enzymes might play a role in the oxidative burst induced by the hydrodynamic stress.

  4. Purification, molecular cloning, and characterization of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) from pigmented Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures as putative anthocyanin transport proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Simon; Curtin, Chris; Bézier, Annie; Franco, Chris; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The ligandin activity of specific glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is necessary for the transport of anthocyanins from the cytosol to the plant vacuole. Five GSTs were purified from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux cell suspension cultures by glutathione affinity chromatography. These proteins underwent Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry fingerprinting, with the resultant fragments aligned with predicted GSTs within public databases. The corresponding coding sequences were cloned, with heterologous expression in Escherichia coli used to confirm GST activity. Transcriptional profiling of these candidate GST genes and key anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes (PAL, CHS, DFR, and UFGT) in cell suspensions and grape berries against anthocyanin accumulation demonstrated strong positive correlation with two sequences, VvGST1 and VvGST4, respectively. The ability of VvGST1 and VvGST4 to transport anthocyanins was confirmed in the heterologous maize bronze-2 complementation model, providing further evidence for their function as anthocyanin transport proteins in grape cells. Furthermore, the differential induction of VvGST1 and VvGST4 in suspension cells and grape berries suggests functional differences between these two proteins. Further investigation of these candidate ligandins may identify a mechanism for manipulating anthocyanin accumulation in planta and in vitro suspension cells. PMID:18836188

  5. Effects of zinc and cadmium ions on cell growth and production of coumarins in cell suspension cultures of Angelica archangelica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, Tomáš; Kašparová, Marie; Spilková, Jiřina

    2012-12-01

    The plant cell may respond to the excess of heavy metals in its environment by various mechanisms, including enhanced biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. In this study, zinc (0 to 1500 μM) and cadmium ions (0 to 100 μM) were tested as potential elicitors of the production of coumarins in angelica cell suspension cultures. In addition, the toxicity of both metals was assessed by evaluating their effect on cell growth (characterized by fresh and dry biomass at the end of a two-week subculture). It has been found that fresh biomass was not influenced up to zinc concentrations of 150 and 300 μM in the dark-grown and light-grown cultures, resp. Then it declined with an increasing zinc level. Zinc at 1500 μM diminished it by 54% and 24% in the dark-grown and light-grown cultures, resp. Dry biomass was influenced in a similar way. Zinc at 1500 μM reduced dry cell weight by 30% and 20% in cultures in the dark and in the light, resp. Cadmium ions did not affect fresh and dry weights of cells up to concentrations of 10 μM and 50 μM in cultures in the dark and in the light, resp. Toxic concentrations of cadmium are by an order of magnitude lower than those of zinc. Cadmium at 50 μM reduced fresh and dry cell weights by 66% and 59%, resp., in the dark-grown cultures. Cadmium at 100 μM caused a decrease in fresh and dry biomass by 40% and 44%, resp., in the light-grown cultures. Neither zinc nor cadmium improved production of coumarins.

  6. Retrobiosynthetic study of salicylic acid in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustafa, Natali Rianika

    2007-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signal compound in systemic acquired resistance in plants. The level of this C6C1 compound in plants increases after a pathogenic attack. There are two biosynthetic pathways of SA, the phenylalanine pathway, which is thought to occur in plants, and the

  7. Differential nuclear envelope assembly at the end of mitosis in suspension-cultured Apium graveolens cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuta; Kuroda, Chie; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    NMCP1 is a plant protein that has a long coiled-coil domain within the molecule. Newly identified NMCP2 of Daucus carota and Apium graveolens showed similar peripheral localization in the interphase nucleus, and the sequence spanning the coiled-coil domain exhibited significant similarity with the corresponding region of NMCP1. To better understand disassembly and assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) during mitosis, subcellular distribution of NMCP1 and NMCP2 was examined using A. graveolens cells. AgNMCP1 (NMCP1 in Apium) disassembled at prometaphase, dispersed mainly within the spindle, and accumulated on segregating chromosomes, while AgNMCP2 (NMCP2 in Apium), following disassembly at prometaphase with timing similar to that of AgNMCP1, dispersed throughout the mitotic cytoplasm at metaphase and anaphase. The protein accumulated at the periphery of reforming nuclei at telophase. A probe for the endomembrane indicated that the nuclear membrane (NM) disappears at prometaphase and begins to reappear at early telophase. Growth of the NM continued after mitosis was completed. NMCP2 in the mitotic cytoplasm localized in vesicular structures that could be distinguished from the bulk endomembrane system. These results suggest that NMCP1 and NMCP2 are recruited for NE assembly in different pathways in mitosis and that NMCP2 associates with NM-derived vesicles in the mitotic cytoplasm.

  8. Growth and production optimization of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranbakhsh, A R; Oshagi, M A; Ebadi, M

    2007-04-15

    Abstract: A number of physicochemical conditions such different concentration of glucose, sucrose, potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, calcium chloride and temperatures were tested to optimize growth and production of tropane alkaloids from Datura stramonium (Solanaceae) plants. Cell suspension from semi-clear calli of leave explants developed in MS medium containing kinetin (0.5 mg L(-1)) and NAA (2 mg L(-1)) hormones was used to measure biomass and total alkaloids and comparison of treatments. The results showed that 30 and 40 g L(-1) glucose led to the highest level of alkaloids and biomass productions, respectively. 20 and 40 g L(-1) sucrose concentrations resulted in order the most rates of alkaloids and biomass productions. The results showed that increasing of nitrate concentration led to the reduction of the alkaloids. The best concentration of potassium nitrate for the production of tropane alkaloids and biomass were in order 9.4 and 3.76 mM. Also it was evinced that the optimized concentration of ammonium nitrate for alkaloids production was 10.3 mM and for the biomass was 41.22 mM. The best concentration of calcium chloride for growth and production of the alkaloids was 7.92 mM. Testing different temperature specified that the best condition for production of the alkaloids was 20 degrees C whereas it was 25 degrees C for biomass production. The results of this study could be recommended to farmers involved in production of D. stramonium for tropain alkaloids at industrial and semi-industrial scales.

  9. Detection of anthraquinones and identification of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone in cell suspension cultures of Rudgea jasminoides (Cham.) Müll. Arg. (Rubiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Marisa de Cacia; Negri, Giusepina; Salatino, Antônio; Braga, Márcia Regina

    2007-01-01

    In Rubiaceae, anthraquinones and naphthoquinones are secondary metabolites characteristic of the subfamily Rubioideae, in which Rudgea jasminoides is included. Thin-layer chromatography using specific solvent systems and spray reagents indicated the presence of anthraquinones constitutively produced by cell suspension cultures of R. jasminoides. GC/MS analysis detected 1,4-naphthohydroquinone as a product of biosynthesis only after elicitation of the cells with yeast extract (Saccharomyces ce...

  10. Effect of sucrose and methyl jasmonate on biomass and anthocyanin production in cell suspension culture of Melastoma malabathricum (Melastomaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koay Suan See

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Melastoma malabathricum, belongs to the Melastomaceae family, is an important medicinal plant widely distributed from Madagascar to Australia, that is used in traditional remedies for the treatment of variousailments. Besides its medicinal properties, it has been identified as a potential source of anthocyanin production.The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of sucrose and methyl jasmonate and feeding time oncell biomass yield and anthocyanin production in cell suspension culture of M. malabathricum. Addition of differentconcentrations of sucrose into the cell culture of M. malabathricum influenced cell biomass and pigment accumulation. The addition of methyl jasmonate was found to have no effect on cell biomass but the presence of higher amount (12.5-50mg/L had caused a reduction in anthocyanin production and accumulation. MS medium supplemented with 30g/L sucrose and 3.5 mg/L of MeJA added on cero day and 3rd day produced high fresh cell mass at the end of nine days of culture but did not support the production of anthocyanins. However, cells cultured in the medium supplemented with 45g/L sucrose without MeJA showed the highest pigment content (0.69±0.22Cv/g-FCM. The cells cultured in MS medium supplemented with 30 g/L sucrose with 3.5mg/L MeJA added on the 3rd and 6th day of culture, showed the lowest pigment content (0.37-0.40Cv/g-FCM. This study indicated that MeJA was not necessary but sucrose was needed for the enhancement of cell growth and anthocyanin production in M. malabathricum cell cultures. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (2: 597-606. Epub 2011 June 01.elastoma malabathricum pertenece a la familia de las melastomáceas, es una planta medicinal importante ampliamente distribuida desde Madagascar hasta Australia, que se utiliza en remedios tradicionales para el tratamiento de diversas dolencias. Además de sus propiedades medicinales, se ha identificado como una fuente potencial de producción de antocianinas. En esta

  11. Propagation of Brazilian Zika virus strains in static and suspension cultures using Vero and BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Alexander; Castilho, Leda R; Reichl, Udo; Genzel, Yvonne

    2017-03-23

    The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and the Pacific has reached alarming levels in more than 60 countries. However, relatively little is known about the disease on a virological and epidemiological level and its consequences for humans. Accordingly, a large demand for in vitro derived Brazilian ZIKV material to support in vitro and in vivo studies has arisen. However, a prompt supply of ZIKV and ZIKV antigens cannot be guaranteed as the production of this virus typically using Vero or C6/36 cell lines remains challenging. Here we present a production platform based on BHK-21 suspension (BHK-21 SUS ) cells to propagate Brazilian ZIKV at larger quantities in perfusion bioreactors. Scouting experiments performed in tissue culture flasks using adherent BHK-21 and Vero cells have demonstrated similar permissivity and virus yields for four different Brazilian ZIKV isolates. The cell-specific yield of infectious virus particles varied between respective virus strains (1-48PFU/cell), and the ZIKV isolate from the Brazilian state Pernambuco (ZIKV PE ) showed to be a best performing isolate for both cell lines. However, infection studies of BHK-21 SUS cells with ZIKV PE in shake flasks resulted in poor virus replication, with a maximum titer of 8.9×10 3 PFU/mL. Additional RT-qPCR measurements of intracellular and extracellular viral RNA levels revealed high viral copy numbers within the cell, but poor virus release. Subsequent cultivation in a perfusion bioreactor using an alternating tangential flow filtration system (ATF) under controlled process conditions enabled cell concentrations of about 1.2×10 7 cells/mL, and virus titers of 3.9×10 7 PFU/mL. However, while the total number of infectious virus particles was increased, the cell-specific yield (3.3PFU/cell) remained lower than determined in adherent cell lines. Nevertheless, the established perfusion process allows to provide large amounts of ZIKV material for research and is a first step towards

  12. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26036699

  13. [Formation of protodioscin and deltoside isomers in suspension cultures of Nepal yam (Dioscorea deltoidea Wall.) cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandy, M T; Titova, M V; Konstantinova, S V; Kochkin, D V; Ivanov, I M; Nosov, A M

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the content of the furostanol glycosides protodioscin and deltoside, particularly that of the (25S)-isomers of the glycosides, during suspension cultivation of different lines of Nepal yam (Dioscorea deltoidea Wall.) cells of the strain IFR-DM-0.5 has been investigated. The composition of furostanol glycosides has been characterized, and the dynamics of the accumulation of individual glycosides during lengthy subcultivation of cells maintained in flasks or in a barbotage bioreactor has been analyzed. A positive correlation between the growth and accumulation of substances that belonged to the class of furostanol glycosides has been demonstrated for cultured dioscorea cells, whereas the content of some of the individual glycosides varied considerably between the lines of the strain, cultures maintained under different conditions, and even between cells in different phases of the growth cycle. The increased content of (25R)-forms of the glycosides (protodioscin and deltoside) was correlated with a decrease in the cellular growth rate, whereas an increase in culture growth intensity occurred concomitantly to an increase of the amount of (25S)-isomers. This may be indicative of the specific stimulatory effect of (25S)-glycosides, but not the (25R)-forms, on cell proliferation in vitro. Thus, the concentration of (25S)-forms may increase due to the autoselection of cells capable of intensive division during prolonged cultivation.

  14. Enhanced Biosynthesis of Withanolides by Elicitation and Precursor Feeding in Cell Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in Shake-Flask Culture and Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withan...

  15. Innovative, non-stirred bioreactors in scales from milliliters up to 1000 liters for suspension cultures of cells using disposable bags and containers--a Swiss contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sören; Eibl, Regine; Lettenbauer, Christine; Röll, Marcel; Eibl, Dieter; De Jesus, Maria; Zhang, Xiaowei; Stettler, Matthieu; Tissot, Stephanie; Bürki, Cedric; Broccard, Gilles; Kühner, Markus; Tanner, Rolf; Baldi, Lucia; Hacker, David; Wurm, Florian M

    2010-01-01

    Innovative mixing principles in bioreactors, for example using the rocking of a platform to induce a backwards and forwards 'wave', or using orbital shaking to generate a 'wave' that runs round in a cylindrical container, have proved to be successful for the suspension cultures of cells, especially when combined with disposable materials. This article presents an overview of the engineering characteristics when these new principles are applied in bioreactors, and case studies covering scales of operation from milliliters to 1000 liters.

  16. Effects of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on cell growth and alkaloid accumulation of protocorm-like bodies in suspension cultures from Dendrobium huoshanense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Sali; Jin Qing; Huang Bei; Cai Yongping; Lin Yi

    2009-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) in suspension cultures from Dendrobium huoshanense were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at doses of 5, 10, 20 and 30Gy, and alkaloid accumulation of PLBs was studied. The results showed that 60 Co γ-rays irradiation could improve the alkaloid content of PLBs, and the suitable dose was 10Gy. The fresh weight of 10Gy irradiated PLBs was 26.54g/flask, and the alkaloid content was 0.035% on the 36th day. The medium pH and electric conductivity of 10Gy irradiated PLBs changed slightly during the suspension culture period. The results suggested such cultural environment was suitable for PLBs growth continuely. Results also showed that 60 Co γ-rays irradiation could increase the activities of POD, SOD, CAT, PAL and decrease the activity of PPO, these were responsible for the improvement of cell growth and alkaloid accumulation in PLBs. (authors)

  17. Effect of light wavelength on cell growth, content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Thevetia peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, J P; Zapata, K; Rojano, B; Arias, M

    2016-10-01

    Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana) has been considered as a potentially important plant for industrial and pharmacological application. Among the number of compounds which are produced by T. peruviana, antioxidants and polyphenols are of particular interest due to their benefits on human health. Cell suspension cultures of T. peruviana were established under different conditions: 1) constant illumination (24h/day) at different light wavelengths (red, green, blue, yellow and white), 2) darkness and 3) control (12h/12h: day light/dark) to investigate their biomass, substrate uptake, polyphenols production and oxidizing activity. The results showed biomass concentrations between 17.1g dry weight (DW)/l (green light) and 18.2g DW/l (control) after 13days. The cultures that grew under green light conditions consumed completely all substrates after 10days, while other cultures required at least 13days or more. The total phenolic content was between 7.21 and 9.46mg gallic acid (GA)/g DW for all light conditions. In addition the ferric reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid antioxidant activity ranged from 5.41-6.58mg ascorbic acid (AA)/g DW and 82.93-110.39μmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. Interestingly, the samples which grew under the darkness presented a higher phenolic content and antioxidant capacity when compared to the light conditions. All together, these results demonstrate the extraordinary effect of different lighting conditions on polyphenols production and antioxidant compounds by T. peruviana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Jasmonic Acid Effect on the Fatty Acid and Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitele Dalia Goldhaber-Pasillas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The stress response after jasmonic acid (JA treatment was studied in cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus. The effect of JA on the primary and secondary metabolism was based on changes in profiles of fatty acids (FA and terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA. According to multivariate data analyses (MVDA, three major time events were observed and characterized according to the variations of specific FA and TIA: after 0–30 min of induction FA such as C18:1, C20:0, C22:0 and C24:0 were highly induced by JA; 90–360 min after treatment was characterized by variations of C14:0 and C15:0; and 1440 min after induction JA had the largest effect on both group of metabolites were C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C16:0, C20:0, C22:0, C24:0, catharanthine, tabersonine-like 1, serpentine, tabersonine and ajmalicine-like had the most significant variations. These results unambiguously demonstrate the profound effect of JA particularly on the accumulation of its own precursor, C18:3 and the accumulation of TIA, which can be considered as late stress response events to JA since they occurred only after 1440 min. These observations show that the early events in the JA response do not involve the de novo biosynthesis of neither its own precursor nor TIA, but is due to an already present biochemical system.

  19. A Novel Hydroxyproline-Deficient Arabinogalactan Protein Secreted by Suspension-Cultured Cells of Daucus carota (Purification and Partial Characterization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, T. C.; McCann, M. C.; Roberts, K.

    1993-09-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are secreted or membrane-associated glycoproteins that have been operationally defined as binding to [beta]-glucosyl Yariv artificial antigen, being rich in arabinose and galactose, and containing high levels of alanine, serine, and hydroxyproline. Using an anti-AGP monoclonal antibody (MAC 207) bound to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B, we have purified by immunoaffinity chromatography an extracellular AGP from the culture medium of suspension-cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota). The apparent molecular mass of this highly glycosylated proteoglycan is 70 to 100 kD as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Although its sugar analysis, [beta]-glucosyl Yariv binding, and high alanine, serine, and proline content are consistent with it being an AGP, the amino acid composition unexpectedly revealed this molecule to have no detectable hydroxyproline. This suggests that this glycoprotein is not a "classical" AGP, but represents the first example of a new class of hydroxyproline-poor AGPs. Deglycosylation of the AGP with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride revealed that the purified proteoglycan contains probably a single core protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kD. Direct visualization of the native AGP in the electron microscope showed ellipsoidal putative AGP monomers, approximately 25 nm by 15 nm, that showed a strong tendency to self assemble into higher-order structures. Upon desiccation, the glycosylated AGP formed paracrystalline arrays visible in the light microscope. Polarized Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy of these arrays demonstrated a high degree of polarization of the sugar moieties under these conditions. These results put possible constraints on current models of AGP structure; a putative role for these novel AGPs as pectin-binding proteins is discussed.

  20. Induction of extracellular defense-related proteins in suspension cultured-cells of Daucus carota elicited with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater-Jara, Ana B; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, María A

    2014-04-01

    Suspension cultured-cells (SCC) of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, separately or in combination, on the induction of defense responses, particularly the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. A comparative study of the extracellular proteome (secretome) between control and elicited carrot SCC pointed to the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to glycoproteins which have inhibitory activity against the cell-wall-degrading enzymes secreted by pathogens and/or are induced when carrot cells are exposed to a pathogen elicitor. Other amino acid sequences were homologous to Leucine-Rich Repeat domain-containing proteins, which play an essential role in defense against pathogens, as well as in the recognition of microorganisms, making them important players in the innate immunity of this plant. Also, some tryptic peptides were shown to be homologous to a thaumatin-like protein, showing high specificity to abiotic stress and to different reticuline oxidase-like proteins that displayed high levels of antifungal activity, suggesting that methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in SCC of D. carota. Apart from these elicitor-inducible proteins, we observed the presence of PR-proteins in both control and elicited carrot SCC, suggesting that their expression is mainly constitutive. These PR-proteins are putative class IV chitinases, which also have inhibitory activity against pathogen growth and the class III peroxidases that participate in response to environmental stress (e.g. pathogen attack and oxidative), meaning that they are involved in defense responses triggered by both biotic and abiotic factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell Suspension Culture of Eriobotrya japonica Regulates the Diabetic and Hyperlipidemic Signs of High-Fat-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Bin Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism in high-fat (HF-fed mice of cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica (TA, which contains a great number of pentacyclic terpenoids. Firstly, C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON group was fed with a low-fat diet (n = 9, whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was orally given TA or rosiglitazone or not for 4 weeks. Blood and visceral adipose tissue, liver tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Treatment with TA reduced body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT (including epididymal, perirenal, mesenteric WAT and visceral fat, and hepatic triacylglycerol content significantly without affecting food intake in diet-induced diabetic mice. TA effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, leptin and HOMA-IR index (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively and attenuated insulin resistance. Treatment with TA, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. TA effectively significantly increased the protein contents of phosphorylation of AMPK-α (Thr172 both in liver and adipose tissue. It is shown that TA exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by decreasing gene expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT 2, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of triglycerides, and antidiabetic properties occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK down- regulation, improved insulin sensitization and TA (at 1.0 g/kg dose decreased expression of hepatic and adipose 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11β-HSD1 gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Futhermore, TA at

  2. Reprogramming of enteroendocrine K cells to pancreatic β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and reaggregation in suspension culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Esder; Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Moon, Sung-Dae; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, a heterogeneous enteroendocrine cell line. •K cells did not express Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. •Combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3 reprogrammed K cells to β-cells. •Reprogramming of K cells to β-cells was not complete. -- Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that adult cells such as pancreatic exocrine cells can be converted to pancreatic β-cells in a process called cell reprogramming. Enteroendocrine cells and β-cells share similar pathways of differentiation during embryonic development. Notably, enteroendocrine K cells express many of the key proteins found in β-cells. Thus, K cells could be reprogrammed to β-cells under certain conditions. However, there is no clear evidence on whether these cells convert to β-cells. K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, an enteroendocrine cell line expressing multiple hormones. K cells were found to express many genes of transcription factors crucial for islet development and differentiation except for Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. A K cell clone stably expressing Nkx6.1 (Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells) was established. Induction of Neurogenin3 expression in Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells, by either treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor or infection with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3, led to a significant increase in Insulin1 mRNA expression. After infection with the adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3 and reaggregation in suspension culture, about 50% of Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells expressed insulin as determined by immunostaining. The intracellular insulin content was increased markedly. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of insulin granules. However, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was defective, and there was no glucose lowering effect after transplantation of these cells in diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that K cells could be reprogrammed partially to β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and

  3. Reprogramming of enteroendocrine K cells to pancreatic β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and reaggregation in suspension culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Esder; Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Moon, Sung-Dae; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, a heterogeneous enteroendocrine cell line. •K cells did not express Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. •Combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3 reprogrammed K cells to β-cells. •Reprogramming of K cells to β-cells was not complete. -- Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that adult cells such as pancreatic exocrine cells can be converted to pancreatic β-cells in a process called cell reprogramming. Enteroendocrine cells and β-cells share similar pathways of differentiation during embryonic development. Notably, enteroendocrine K cells express many of the key proteins found in β-cells. Thus, K cells could be reprogrammed to β-cells under certain conditions. However, there is no clear evidence on whether these cells convert to β-cells. K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, an enteroendocrine cell line expressing multiple hormones. K cells were found to express many genes of transcription factors crucial for islet development and differentiation except for Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. A K cell clone stably expressing Nkx6.1 (Nkx6.1 + -K cells) was established. Induction of Neurogenin3 expression in Nkx6.1 + -K cells, by either treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor or infection with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3, led to a significant increase in Insulin1 mRNA expression. After infection with the adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3 and reaggregation in suspension culture, about 50% of Nkx6.1 + -K cells expressed insulin as determined by immunostaining. The intracellular insulin content was increased markedly. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of insulin granules. However, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was defective, and there was no glucose lowering effect after transplantation of these cells in diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that K cells could be reprogrammed partially to β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and reaggregation

  4. Regeneration of soybean via embryogenic suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droste Annette

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to establish an alternative plant regeneration system for soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] cultivars used in Brazilian breeding programs, ten genotypes were tested for their embryogenic potential. Cotyledons were removed as explants from immature seeds harvested from field-grown plants. After 45 days on induction medium, the number of responding cotyledons and the number of somatic embryos per immature cotyledon were evaluated. The percentage of explants that produced somatic embryos varied from 1 to 70% among cultivars. The average number of somatic embryos produced per cotyledon pair ranged from 0.01 to 10.3 with a mean of 3.4. Suspension cultures were initiated with three Agrobacterium tumefaciens susceptible cultivars. Suspensions were successfully developed from Bragg and IAS5 cultivars. The packed cell volume, in one-month growth, increased 8.1 fold for Bragg and 3.5 fold for IAS5 and the fresh weight increased 6.6 and 2.8 fold, respectively. The cultivars differed for the analysed parameters. All tissue from each cultivar was transferred to the maturation medium and subsequently to the germination medium. The germination frequency was 45.7 and 54.9% for Bragg and IAS5, respectively. Plants were gradually exposed to ambient humidity over one week and then planted in soil. All plants yielded seeds in the greenhouse.

  5. Expression of a fungal ferulic acid esterase in suspension cultures of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) decreases cell wall feruloylation and increases rates of cell wall digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Phillip; Dalton, Sue; Langdon, Tim; Hauck, Barbara; de Buanafina, Marcia M O

    2017-01-01

    In the cell walls of grasses ferulic acid is esterified to arabinosyl residues in arabinoxylans that can then undergo oxidative coupling reactions to form ferulate dehydrodimers, trimers and oligomers which function to cross-link cell-wall polysaccharides, limiting cell wall degradability. Fungal ferulic acid esterase can release both esterified monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids from these cell wall arabinoxylans making the cell wall more susceptible to further enzymatic attack and increasing cell wall degradability. Non-embryogenic cell suspension cultures of Festuca arundinacea expressing a Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase ( faeA ) targeted to either the apoplast, or endoplasmic reticulum under the control of a constitutive actin promoter, or to the vacuole under the control of a soybean heat shock promoter, were established and FAE activity determined in the cells and medium during a growth cycle. Analysis of the ester-linked ferulates of the cell walls showed that all three transformed cell lines had both reduced ferulate levels and increased levels of xylanase mediated release of wall phenolics on autodigestion as well as increased rates of cell wall digestion in a simulated rumen environment, when compared to control non-transformed cells.

  6. Botulinum hemagglutinin-mediated in situ break-up of human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates for high-density suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman C; Tokura, Tomohiro; Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    Large numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are required for making stable cell bank. Although suspension culture yields high cell numbers, there remain unresolved challenges for obtaining high-density of hiPSCs because large size aggregates exhibit low growth rates. Here, we established a simple method for hiPSC aggregate break-up using botulinum hemagglutinin (HA), which specifically bound with E-cadherin and disrupted cell-cell connections in hiPSC aggregates. HA showed temporary activity for disrupting the E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connections to facilitate the break-up of aggregates into small sizes only 9 hr after HA addition. The transportation of HA into the aggregates was mediated by transcellular and paracellular way after HA addition to the culture medium. hiPSC aggregates broken up by HA showed a higher number of live cells, higher cell density, and higher expansion fold compared to those of aggregates dissociated with enzymatic digestion. Moreover, a maximum cell density of 4.5 ± 0.2 × 10 6 cells ml -1 was obtained by aggregate break-up into small ones, which was three times higher than that with the conventional culture without aggregate break-up. Therefore, the temporary activity of HA for disrupting E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connection was key to establishing a simple in situ method for hiPSC aggregate break-up in bioreactors, leading to high cell density in suspension culture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Temperature response of the cell cycle of Haplopappus gracilis in suspension culture and its significance to the G1 transition probability model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A R

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature on the cell cycle of Haplopappus gracilis suspension cultures were analysed by the fraction of labelled mitoses method. Sphase in these cultures shows a different temperature optimum as compared to optima derived for G2 and mitosis. G1 phase has a much lower Q10 than the other cell cycle phases and shows no temperature optimum between 22 and 34° C. These results are discussed in relation to a transition probability model of the cell cycle proposed by Smith and Martin (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 1263-1267, 1973), in which each cell has a time independent probability of initiating the transition into another round of DNA replication and division. The implications of such a model for cell cycle analysis are discussed and a tentative model for a probabilistic transition trigger is advanced.

  8. Effective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor treatment to dissociate human iPS cells for suspension culture to form embryoid body-like cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ayumi; Yazaki, Koyuki; Aoyagi, Mami; Ohnuki, Yoshitsugu; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Treatment conditions using Y-27632 in the preparation of cell suspension of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were investigated in the context of embryoid body (EB)-like cell aggregates. The effectiveness of a pretreatment with Y-27632 before cell dissociation and that of a Y-27632 treatment during cell dissociation were investigated from the viewpoint of simplicity and robustness. The duration of Y-27632 treatment in the preparation process affected the circularity and agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs. A single application of pretreatment failed to prevent the onset of blebbing. However, a pretreatment promoted the agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs when combined with the addition of Y-27632 to cell suspension. Our results indicate that pretreatment enhances the agglomeration potential of dissociated hiPSCs. When cell dissociation was performed in the presence of Y-27632, dissociated hiPSCs possessed the highest circularity and significant agglomerating property. It was shown that treatment with Y-27632 during cell dissociation is a simple and robust method to prepare dissociated hiPSCs for suspension culture to form EB-like cell aggregates. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides by elicitation and precursor feeding in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal in shake-flask culture and bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganeshan Sivanandhan

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg, withanolide B (4826.05 mg, withaferin A (3732.81 mg, withanone (6538.65 mg, 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg, withanoside IV (2623.21 mg and withanoside V (2861.18 mg] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l and squalene (6 mM along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period.

  10. Enhanced Biosynthesis of Withanolides by Elicitation and Precursor Feeding in Cell Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in Shake-Flask Culture and Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period. PMID:25089711

  11. Unexpected features of exponentially growing Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cell suspension culture in relation to excreted extracellular polysaccharides and cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issawi, Mohammad; Muhieddine, Mohammad; Girard, Celine; Sol, Vincent; Riou, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    This article presents a new insight about TBY-2 cells; from extracellular polysaccharides secretion to cell wall composition during cell suspension culture. In the medium of cells taken 2 days after dilution (end of lag phase), a two unit pH decrease from 5.38 to 3.45 was observed and linked to a high uronic acid (UA) amount secretion (47.8%) while, in 4 and 7 day-old spent media, pH increased and UA amounts decreased 35.6 and 42.3% UA, respectively. To attain deeper knowledge of the putative link between extracellular polysaccharide excretion and cell wall composition, we determined cell wall UA and neutral sugar composition of cells from D2 to D12 cultures. While cell walls from D2 and D3 cells contained a large amount of uronic acid (twice as much as the other analysed cell walls), similar amounts of neutral sugar were detected in cells from lag to end of exponential phase cells suggesting an enriched pectin network in young cultures. Indeed, monosaccharide composition analysis leads to an estimated percentage of pectins of 56% for D3 cell wall against 45% D7 cell walls indicating that the cells at the mid-exponential growth phase re-organized their cell wall linked to a decrease in secreted UA that finally led to a stabilization of the spent medium pH to 5.4. In conclusion, TBY-2 cell suspension from lag to stationary phase showed cell wall remodeling that could be of interest in drug interaction and internalization study.

  12. Enhanced production of vanillin flavour metabolites by precursor feeding in cell suspension cultures of Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn., in shake flask culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, Pradeep; Parvatam, Giridhar; Shetty, Nandini P

    2017-12-01

    The flavour rich tuberous roots of Decalepis hamiltonii are known for its edible and medicinal use and have become endangered due to commercial over-exploitation. Besides 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxy benzaldehyde (2H4MB), other flavour metabolites in tuberous roots include vanillin, 4-Methoxy Cinnamic acid derivatives, aromatic alcohols etc. So far, there are no reports on the pathway of 2H4MB biosynthesis nor there is an organized work on biotransformation using normal and cell suspension cultures for obtaining these metabolites using precursors. The main aim of the study is to develop a method for enhanced production of flavour attributing metabolites through ferulic acid (FA) feeding to the D. hamiltonii callus culture medium. Biomass of D. hamiltonii cell suspension cultures was maximum (200.38 ± 1.56 g/l) by 4th week. Maximum production of 2H4MB was recorded on 4th week (0.08 ± 0.01 mg/100 g dry weight) as quantified by HPLC. Addition of 0.1-1.5 mM ferulic acid as precursor in the culture medium showed significant ( p  vanillin, 2H4MB, vanillic acid, ferulic acid were of 0.1 ± 0.02 mg/100 g, 0.44 ± 0.01 mg/100 g, 0.52 ± 0.04 mg/100 g, 0.18 ± 0.02 mg/100 g DW respectively in 4 weeks of cultured cells supplemented with 1 mM ferulic acid as a precursor. The results indicate that, substantial increase in the levels of flavour metabolites in D. hamiltonii callus suspension culture was achieved. This would be having implications in biosynthesis of respective vanilla flavour attributing metabolites at very high levels for their large scale production.

  13. Influence of a specific xyloglucan-nonasaccharide derived from cell walls of suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota L. on regenerating carrot protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerling, M; Seitz, H U

    1990-09-01

    A xyloglucan oligosaccharide was isolated from cell walls of Daucus carota L. suspension-cultured cells. From analytical data (gel-permeation chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis) it can be concluded that this oligosaccharide preparation consists mainly of a nonasaccharide known as XG9 (Glc4Xyl3GalFuc). This nonasaccharide showed excellent "anti-auxin" properties in the pea-stem bioassay, with 80% inhibition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-induced longitudinal growth of etiolated pea stem segments at concentrations of 1-0.1 nM. Applied in nanomolar concentrations to protoplasts regenerating in a medium containing 4.52 μM 2,4-D, the nonasaccharide influenced the viability of the protoplasts and the activities of glycan synthases in vitro. The effects were similar to those achieved by the omission of 2,4-D from the regeneration medium. The composition of the regenerated cell wall was not changed significantly by the use of 2,4-D-depleted medium or the addition of XG9 to 2,4-D-containing medium.

  14. Effects of exogenous growth regulators on cell suspension culture of yin-hong grape (vitis vinifera l.) and establishment of the optimum medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.; Feng, J.C.; Yan, W.Y.; Xiao, Y.; Jun, Y.Y

    2015-01-01

    Callus induced by stem of Yin-hong grape (Vitis vinifera L.) was used as materials and B5 medium as basic medium. The major growth parameters of cell suspension cultures with various levels of 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzyl aminopurine (6-BA) were investigated to provide a basis for the optimum medium of suspension cell cultures of Yin-hong grape regarding cell number, packed cell volume (PCV), dry cell weight (DCW), cell viability, and morphology. All data were analysed by of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results showed that the treatment of 6-BA and NAA would effect the cell growth dynamics, probably causing logarithmic phase in advance at higher levels of 6-BA. Different concentration of 6-BA and NAA had significant effects on cells number, PCV, DCW and viability (p<0.05), while no-significant effect was observed on the cells morphology. The optimum medium for suspension cell cultures of Yin-hong grape was identified as B5+1.5 mg/L6-BA+1.5 mg/LNAA+ 250 mg/L casein hydrolysate + 30 g/L sucrose. With the optimum medium, the maximum number of suspension cells after the logarithmic growth phase was 34.78 * 108 / mL, the highest cell viability reached 86.45%.; DCW reached 3.84 g/L and PCV reached 0.092 mL/mL after eight days cultivating. (author)

  15. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  16. Effects of Growth Regulators on the Induction of Anthocyanin Synthesis in Carrot Suspension Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro, Ozeki; Atsushi, Komamine; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo:(Present)Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo:(Present)Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Tohoku University

    1986-01-01

    The effects of plant growth regulators were investigated on anthocyanin synthesis induced by removing auxin from carrot suspension cultures. Of the auxins tested, 2,4-D showed the strongest inhibiting effect on anthocyanin synthesis and had the strongest promoting effect on undifferentiated growth. When 2,4-D was added to anthocyanin synthesizing cells, in which cell division had ceased, anthocyanin synthesis was repressed immediately, accumulated anthocyanin disappeared and cell division res...

  17. Suspension culture process of MethA tumor cell for the production of heat-shock protein glycoprotein 96: process optimization in spinner flasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ya-Jie; Li, Hong-Mei; Hamel, Jean-François P

    2007-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) act like "chaperones", making sure that the cell's proteins are in the right shape and in the right place at the right time. Heat-shock protein glycoprotein 96 (gp96) is a member of the HSP90 protein family, which chaperones a number of molecules in protein folding and transportation. Heat-shock protein gp96 serves as a natural adjuvant for chaperoning antigenic peptides into the immune surveillance pathways. Currently, heat-shock protein gp96 was only isolated from murine and human tissues and cell lines. An animal cell suspension culture process for the production of heat-shock protein gp96 by MethA tumor cell was developed for the first time in spinner flasks. Effects of culture medium and condition were studied to enhance the MethA tumor cell density and the production and productivity of heat-shock protein gp96. Initial glucose concentration had a significant effect on the heat-shock protein gp96 accumulation, and an initial glucose level of 7.0 g/L was desirable for MethA tumor cell growth and heat-shock protein gp96 production and productivity. Cultures at an initial glutamine concentration of 3 and 6 mM were nutritionally limited by glutamine. At an initial glutamine concentration of 6 mM, the maximal viable cell density of 19.90 x 10(5) cells/mL and the maximal heat-shock protein gp96 production of 4.95 mg/L was obtained. The initial concentration of RPMI 1640 and serum greatly affected the MethA tumor cell culture process. Specifically cultures with lower initial concentration of RPMI 1640 resulted in lower viable cell density and lower heat-shock protein gp96 production. At an initial serum concentration of 8%, the maximal viable cell density of 19.18 x 10(5) cells/mL and the maximal heat-shock protein gp96 production of 5.67 mg/L was obtained. The spin rate significantly affected the cell culture process in spinner flasks, and a spin rate of 150 rpm was desirable for MethA tumor cell growth and heat-shock protein gp96

  18. Human adipose stem cells maintain proliferative, synthetic and multipotential properties when suspension cultured as self-assembling spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, S K; Wang, X; Shang, H; Yun, S; Li, X; Feng, G; Khurgel, M; Katz, A J

    2012-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) have been gaining recognition as an extremely versatile cell source for tissue engineering. The usefulness of ASCs in biofabrication is further enhanced by our demonstration of the unique properties of these cells when they are cultured as three-dimensional cellular aggregates or spheroids. As described herein, three-dimensional formulations, or self-assembling ASC spheroids develop their own extracellular matrix that serves to increase the robustness of the cells to mechanical stresses. The composition of the extracellular matrix can be altered based on the external environment of the spheroids and these constructs can be grown in a reproducible manner and to a consistent size. The spheroid formulation helps preserve the viability and developmental plasticity of ASCs even under defined, serum-free media conditions. For the first time, we show that multiple generations of adherent ASCs produced from these spheroids retain their ability to differentiate into multiple cell/tissue types. These demonstrated properties support the idea that culture-expanded ASCs are an excellent candidate cellular material for ‘organ printing’—the approach of developing complex tissue structures from a standardized cell ‘ink’ or cell formulation. (paper)

  19. Positive selection of Wharton's jelly-derived CD105(+) cells by MACS technique and their subsequent cultivation under suspension culture condition: A simple, versatile culturing method to enhance the multipotentiality of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Halabian, Raheleh; Dehgan Harati, Mozhgan; Bahadori, Marzie; Mehdipour, Ahmad; Mohammadi Roushandeh, Amaneh; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2015-05-01

    Wharton's jelly (WJ), an appropriate source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has been shown to have a wide array of therapeutic applications. However, the WJ-derived MSCs are very heterogeneous and have limited expression of pluripotency markers. Hence, improvement of their culture condition would promote the efficiency of WJ-MSCs. This study aims to employ a simple method of cultivation to obtain WJ-MSCs which express more pluripotency markers. CD105(+) cells were separated by magnetic-associated (activated) cell sorting from umbilical cord mucous tissue. CD105(+) cells were added to Methocult medium diluted in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) and seeded in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA)-coated plates for suspension culture preparation. Differentiation capacity of isolated cells was evaluated in the presence of differentiation-inducing media. The expression of pluripotency markers such as Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 was also analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot techniques. Moreover, immunocytochemistry was performed to detect alpha-smooth muscle actin (antigene) (α-SMA) protein. WJ-MSCs grew homogeneously and formed colonies when cultured under suspension culture conditions (Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs). They maintained their growth ability in both adherent and suspension cultures for several passages. Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 both at transcriptional and translational levels in comparison to those cultured in conventional adherent cultures. They also expressed α-SMA protein. In this study, we isolated WJ-MSCs using a slightly modified culture condition. Our simple non-genetic method resulted in a homogeneous population of WJ-MSCs, which highly expressed pluripotency markers. In the future, more multipotent WJ-MSCs can be harnessed as a non-embryonic source of MSCs in MSC-based cell therapy.

  20. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sangram K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol® (paclitaxel promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation.

  1. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Taxol® (paclitaxel) promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ) elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day) to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation. PMID:22530557

  2. Effect of NaCl on ionic content and distribution in suspension-cultured cells of the halophyte Sonneratia alba versus the glycophyte Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Suechika; Hasegawa, Ai; Tsuchiya, Shinpei; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-09-15

    The effect of a high concentration of NaCl on the intra- (cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole) and extracellular (cell wall) distribution of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca, S, and P was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the mangrove halophyte Sonneratia alba and compared to cultured cells of glycophytic rice (Oryza sativa). No significant differences were observed in ultrastructural features of cluster cells of both species cultured with and without 50mM NaCl. Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of the cells cultured in the presence of 50mM NaCl showed that the Na concentration ([Na]) and Cl concentration ([Cl]) significantly increased in all three cell components measured. In S. alba, the [Na] was highest in the vacuole and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix, while the [Cl] was highest in the cell wall and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. In O. sativa, however, the [Na] and [Cl] were highest in the cell wall, and the [Na] was lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. Thus, the possible activities for Na and Cl transport from the cytoplasmic matrix into the vacuole were greater in S. alba than in O. sativa, suggesting that halophilic mangrove cells gain salt tolerance by transporting Na and Cl into their vacuoles. In O. sativa, the addition of NaCl to the culture medium caused no significant changes to the intracellular concentrations of various elements, such as K, P, S, Ca, and Mg, which suggests the absence of a direct relationship with the transport Na and Cl. In contrast, a marked decrease in the Ca concentration ([Ca]) in the cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole and an approximately two-fold increase in the P concentration ([P]) in the cytoplasmic matrix were found in S. alba, suggesting that the decrease in the [Ca] is related to the halophilic nature of S. alba (as indicated by the inward movement of Na(+) and Cl(-)). The possible roles of a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange mechanism in halophilism and the effect of the [P] on the metabolic activity under saline conditions are

  3. Sucrose metabolizing enzymes in cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris Enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em cultura celular de Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ometto de Mello

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the activity of sucrose metabolizing enzymes in extracts of cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Invertase pathway was identified in the three studied species. Sucrose synthase pathway was also responsible for sucrose metabolism in Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris cells. Activity values higher than 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein were found for acid and neutral invertases, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase in the cell extract of the three plant species. Sucrose synthase showed low activity in Bauhinia forficata cells. As sucrose concentration in the culture medium decreased, sucrose synthase activity increased in C. zedoaria and P. vulgaris cells. The glycolytic enzymes activity gradually reduced at the end of the culture period, when carbohydrate was limited.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar as enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em culturas de célula em suspensão de Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe e Phaseolus vulgaris L. A via da invertase foi identificada nas três espécies estudadas. A via da sacarose sintase também foi responsável pelo metabolismo da sacarose em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Foram encontradas atividades maiores que 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 de proteína das enzimas invertase ácida e alcalina, UDPglicose pirofosforilase e fosfoglicomutase no extrato celular das três espécies de plantas. A sacarose sintase mostrou atividade baixa nas células de Bauhinia forficata. À medida que a concentração de sacarose no meio de cultura diminuiu, a atividade da sacarose sintase aumentou em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Ao final do período de cultura, quando os carboidratos se tornaram limitantes, as atividades das enzimas glicolíticas reduziram-se gradualmente.

  4. Physiological responses of suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus to aluminum: changes in polyamines and inorganic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhua Zhou; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    1995-01-01

    The effects of aluminum (Al) treatment on polyamines were studied using suspension cultures of Madagascar periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don]. The addition of A1 (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 mM) to the suspension cultures caused a significant increase in putrescine within 24h only in freshly transferred cells. By contrast, Al treatment reduced putrescine...

  5. In vitro morphogenesis and cell suspension culture establishment in Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae Morfogênese in vitro e estabelecimento de culturas de suspensão celular em Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santana Balbuena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Piper solmsianum is a shrub from Southeast Brazil in which many biologically active compounds were identified. The aim of this work was to establish a cell suspension culture system for this species. With this in mind, petiole and leaf explants obtained from in vitro plantlets were cultured in the presence of different plant growth regulator combinations (IAA, NAA, 2,4-D and BA. Root and indirect shoot adventitious formation, detected by histological analysis, was observed. Besides the different combinations of plant growth regulators, light regime and the supplement of activated charcoal (1.5 mg.l-1 were tested for callus induction and growth. Cultures maintained in light, on a 0.2 mg.l-1 2,4-D and 2 mg.l-1 BA supplemented medium, and in the absence of activated charcoal, showed the highest calli fresh matter increment. From a callus culture, cell suspension cultures were established and their growth and metabolite accumulation studied. The achieved results may be useful for further characterization of the activated secondary metabolites pathways in in vitro systems of P. solmsianum.Piper solmsianum é uma espécie herbácea do sudeste brasileiro onde vários compostos biologicamente ativos já foram identificados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer suspensões celulares nesta espécie. Para tanto, foram utilizados explantes de pecíolos e folhas, retirados de plântulas cultivadas in vitro, os quais foram submetidos a diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento (AIA, ANA, 2,4-D e BAP. Foi obtida a neo-formação de raízes e brotos, estes últimos através do processo de organogênese indireta evidenciada por estudos histológicos. Para a indução e crescimento dos calos, foram avaliados, além das diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento, a suplementação ao meio de cultura de carvão ativado (1,5 mg.l-1 e o regime de luz. Culturas mantidas na luz, em meio de cultura suplementado com 0,2 mg.l-1 2,4-D e 2 mg

  6. Rotary orbital suspension culture of embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells: impact of hydrodynamic culture on aggregate yield, morphology and cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundos, Tiago L; Silva, Joana; Assunção, Marisa; Quelhas, Pedro; Monteiro, Cátia; Oliveira, Carla; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2017-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES)-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (ES-NSPCs) constitute a promising cell source for application in cell therapies for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In this study, a rotary orbital hydrodynamic culture system was applied to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, to obtain homogeneously-sized ES-NSPC cellular aggregates (neurospheres). Hydrodynamic culture allowed the formation of ES-NSPC neurospheres with a narrower size distribution than statically cultured neurospheres, increasing orbital speeds leading to smaller-sized neurospheres and higher neurosphere yield. Neurospheres formed under hydrodynamic conditions (72 h at 55 rpm) showed higher cell compaction and comparable percentages of viable, dead, apoptotic and proliferative cells. Further characterization of cellular aggregates provided new insights into the effect of hydrodynamic shear on ES-NSPC behaviour. Rotary neurospheres exhibited reduced protein levels of N-cadherin and β-catenin, and higher deposition of laminin (without impacting fibronectin deposition), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity and percentage of neuronal cells. In line with the increased MMP-2 activity levels found, hydrodynamically-cultured neurospheres showed higher outward migration on laminin. Moreover, when cultured in a 3D fibrin hydrogel, rotary neurospheres generated an increased percentage of neuronal cells. In conclusion, the application of a constant orbital speed to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, besides allowing the formation of homogeneously-sized neurospheres, promoted ES-NSPC differentiation and outward migration, possibly by influencing the expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of proteases/extracellular matrix proteins. These findings are important when establishing the culture conditions needed to obtain uniformly-sized ES-NSPC aggregates, either for use in regenerative therapies or in in vitro platforms for biomaterial development or

  7. Effects of gamma irradiation on the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured apple cells. Rapid irreversible inhibition of H+-ATPase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, C.-Z.; Montillet, J.-L.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation, used in post-harvest treatment of fruit and vegetables. were investigated on cultured apple cells (Pyrus malus L. cv. Royal Red) on a short-term period. Irradiation (2 kGy) induced an increase of passive ion effluxes from cells and a decrease of cell capacity to regulate external pH. These alterations are likely due to effects on plasma membrane structure and function and were further investigated by studying the effects of irradiation on plasma membrane H + -ATPase activity. Plasma membrane-enriched vesicles were prepared and the H + -ATPase activity was characterized. Irradiation of the vesicles induced a dose dependent inhibition of H + -ATPase activity. The loss of enzyme activity was immediate, even at low doses (0.5 kGy), and was not reversed by the addition of 2mM dithiothreitol. This inhibition may be the result of an irreversible oxidation of enzyme sulfhydryl moieties and/or the result of changes induced within the lipid bilayer affecting the membrane-enzyme interactions. Further analysis of the H + -ATPase activity was carried out on vesicles obtained from irradiated cells confirming the previous results. In vivo recovery of activity was not observed within 5 h following the treatment, thus explaining the decrease of cell capacity to regulate external pH. This rapid irreversible inhibition of the plasma membrane H + -ATPase must be considered as one of the most important primary biochemical events occurring in irradiated plant material. (author)

  8. Identification of Alternaria alternata Mycotoxins by LC-SPE-NMR and Their Cytotoxic Effects to Soybean (Glycine max Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Rodrigues-Filho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This present work describes the application of liquid chromatograpy-solid phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyse Alternaria alternata crude extracts. Altenusin (1, alternariol (2, 3'-hydroxyalternariol monomethyl ether (3, and alternariol monomethyl ether (4, were separated and identified. High-resolution mass spectrometry confirmed the proposed structures. The cytotoxic effects of these compounds towards plants were determined using soybean (Glycine max cell cultures as a model. EC50 values which range from 0.11 (±0.02 to 4.69 (±0.47 μM showed the high cytotoxicity of these compounds.

  9. Production of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in rice cell suspension culture with a human-like N-glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Chong, Yun-Jo; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2011-12-01

    The rice α-amylase 3D promoter system, which is activated under sucrose-starved conditions, has emerged as a useful system for producing recombinant proteins. However, using rice as the production system for therapeutic proteins requires modifications of the N-glycosylation pattern because of the potential immunogenicity of plant-specific sugar residues. In this study, glyco-engineered rice were generated as a production host for therapeutic glycoproteins, using RNA interference (RNAi) technology to down-regulate the endogenous α-1,3-fucosyltransferase (α-1,3-FucT) and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (β-1,2-XylT) genes. N-linked glycans from the RNAi lines were identified, and their structures were compared with those isolated from a wild-type cell suspension. The inverted-repeat chimeric RNA silencing construct of α-1,3-fucosyltransferase and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (Δ3FT/XT)-9 glyco-engineered line with significantly reduced core α-1,3-fucosylated and/or β-1,2-xylosylated glycan structures was established. Moreover, levels of plant-specific α-1,3-fucose and/or β-1,2-xylose residues incorporated into recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced from the N44 + Δ3FT/XT-4 glyco-engineered line co-expressing ihpRNA of Δ3FT/XT and hGM-CSF were significantly decreased compared with those in the previously reported N44-08 transgenic line expressing hGM-CSF. None of the glyco-engineered lines differed from the wild type with respect to cell division, proliferation or ability to secrete proteins into the culture medium. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Effect of Different Carbon Sources on Relative Growth Rate, Internal Carbohydrates, and Mannitol 1-Oxidoreductase Activity in Celery Suspension Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, JMH.; Pharr, D. M.

    1993-11-01

    Little information exists concerning the biochemical route of mannitol catabolism in higher plant cells. In this study, the role of a recently discovered mannitol 1-oxidoreductase (MDH) in mannitol catabolism was investigated. Suspension cultures of celery (Apium graveolens L. var dulce [Mill.] Pers.) were successfully grown on nutrient media with either mannitol, mannose, or sucrose as the sole carbon source. Cell cultures grown on any of the three carbon sources did not differ in relative growth rate, as measured by packed cell volume, but differed drastically in internal carbohydrate concentration. Mannitol-grown cells contained high concentrations of mannitol and extremely low concentrations of sucrose, fructose, glucose, and mannose. Sucrose-grown cells had high concentrations of sucrose early in the growth cycle and contained a substantial hexose pool. Mannose-grown cells had a high mannose concentration early in the cycle, which decreased during the growth cycle, whereas their internal sucrose concentrations remained relatively constant during the entire growth cycle. Celery suspension cultures on all three carbon substrates contained an NAD-dependent MDH. Throughout the growth cycle, MDH activity was 2- to 4-fold higher in mannitol-grown cells compared with sucrose- or mannose-grown cells, which did not contain detectable levels of mannitol, indicating that MDH functions pre-dominantly in an oxidative capacity in situ. The MDH activity observed in celery cells was 3-fold higher than the minimum amount required to account for the observed rate of mannitol utilization from the media. Cultures transferred from mannitol to mannose underwent a decrease in MDH activity over a period of days, and transfer from mannose to mannitol resulted in an increase in MDH activity. These data provide strong evidence that MDH plays an important role in mannitol utilization in celery suspension cultures.

  11. Chlorogenic acid biosynthesis: characterization of a light-induced microsomal 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase from carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnl, T.K.; Koch, U.; Heller, W.; Wellmann, E.

    1987-10-01

    Microsomal preparations from carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspension cultures catalyze the formation of trans-5-O-caffeoyl-D-quinate (chlorogenate) from trans-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate. trans-5-O-(4-Coumaroyl)shikimate is converted to about the same extent to trans-5-O-caffeoylshikimate. trans-4-O-(4-Coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-3-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-4-coumarate, and cis-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate do not act as substrates. The reaction is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen and on NADPH as reducing cofactor. NADH and ascorbic acid cannot substitute for NADPH. Cytochrome c, Tetcyclacis, and carbon monoxide inhibit the reaction suggesting a cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function monooxygenase. Competition experiments as well as induction and inhibition phenomena indicate that there is only one enzyme species which is responsible for the hydroxylation of the 5-O-(4-coumaric) esters of both D-quinate and shikimate. The activity of this enzyme is greatly increased by in vivo irradiation of the cells with blue/uv light. We conclude that the biosynthesis of the predominant caffeic acid conjugates in carrot cells occurs via the corresponding 4-coumaric acid esters. Thus, in this system, 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate can be seen as the final intermediate in the chlorogenic acid pathway.

  12. Spontaneous pepsin C-catalyzed activation of human pepsinogen C in transgenic rice cell suspension culture: Production and characterization of human pepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Reyazul; Kim, Nan-Sun; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kim, Hyo-Boon; Han, So-Chon; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2018-01-01

    A human pepsinogen C (hPGC) gene was synthesized with rice-optimized codon usage and cloned into a rice expression vector containing the promoter, signal peptide, and terminator derived from the rice α-amylase 3D (Ramy3D) gene. In addition, a 6-His tag was added to the 3' end of the synthetic hPGC gene for easy purification. The plant expression vector was introduced into rice calli (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The integration of the hPGC gene into the chromosome of the transgenic rice callus and hPGC expression in transgenic rice cell suspensions was verified via genomic DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification and Northern blot analysis. Western blot analysis indicated both hPGC and its mature form, human pepsin C, with masses of 42- and 36-kDa in the culture medium under sugar starvation conditions. Human pepsin C was purified from the culture medium using a Ni-NTA agarose column and the NH 2 -terminal 5-residue sequences were verified by amino acid sequencing. The hydrolyzing activity of human pepsin C was confirmed using bovine hemoglobin as a substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for pepsin activity were 2.0 and 40°C, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  14. Development of friable embryogenic callus and embryogenic suspension culture systems in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N J; Edwards, M; Kiernan, R J; Davey, C D; Blakesley, D; Henshaw, G G

    1996-06-01

    Procedures for the production of a new and highly prolific embryogenic culture system have been developed in cassava. The importance of the basal salts and type of auxin in controlling the development of cassava embryogenic tissues has been demonstrated, with culture on Gresshoff and Doy basal medium in the presence of 4-amino-3,5,6,trichloro-picolinic acid (picloram) inducing the formation of friable embryogenic callus from which highly totipotent embryogenic suspension cultures could be established. Plants have been regenerated from these cultures. The availability of embryogenic suspension cultures is considered to have important implications for the application of genetic transformation and other biotechnologies in the agronomic improvement of cassava.

  15. The influence of glutamine on growth and viability of cell suspension cultures of Douglas-fir after exposure to polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leustek, T; Kirby, E G

    1988-12-01

    The response of cell cultures of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) to osmotic stress was studied by measuring cell growth and viability after exposure to polyethylene glycol (PEG) (M(r) 6000-8000). Growth of cells inoculated in a medium containing 10% PEG was slightly inhibited, whereas growth in a medium containing 15% PEG was severely inhibited. Cells grown for 6 days in nutrient medium and then subcultured in a medium containing 15% PEG to induce water stress showed high viabilities, whereas cells grown for longer than 6 days before exposure to PEG showed decreased viabilities after subculture. Cells grown in medium containing 30 mM glutamine were significantly more resistant to PEG-induced water stress, as measured by viability, than cells grown in medium without glutamine.

  16. Effects of chilling on protein synthesis in tomato suspension cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matadial, B.; Pauls, K.P.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of chilling on cell growth, cell viability, protein content and protein composition in suspension cultures of L. esculentum and L. hirsutum was investigated. Cell growth for both species was arrested at 2 degrees C but when cultures were transferred to 25 degree C cell growth resumed. There was no difference in viability between control and chilled cultures of L. esculentum, however, L. hirsutum control cultures exhibited larger amounts of Fluorescein Diacetate induced fluorescence than chilled cultures. 35 S-methionine incorporation into proteins was 2.5-2 times higher in L. hirsutum than in L. esculentum. Quantitative and qualitative differences, in 35 S-methionine labelled proteins, between chilled and control cultures were observed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Protein content in chilled cultures decreased over time but then increased when cultures were transferred to 25 degrees C

  17. Production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina by Camellia sinensis L suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutini, Sodiq, Mochamad; Muslihatin, Wirdhatul; Indra, Mochamad Rasjad

    2017-06-01

    Bioactive trimethyl xanthina can be obtained from the plant Camellia sinensis L. To obtain bioactive plant of which there are several hurdles for instance to wait up to five years to be harvested, also it needs land at a certain height from the sea level. Therefore, the production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina need to be developed with suspense culture techniques. The purpose of this study obtained the production of bioactive trimethyl xanthina way culturally suspense in large scale with a relatively short time, potentially as anti-oxidants. Research methods include: (1) initiation of callus from pieces of leaves, shoots the youngest of the plant Camellia sinensis L in the media MS with the optimization of the addition of growth regulators, (2) the subculture of callus on media and plant growth regulator that is equal to the stage of initiation, (3) initiation of suspension culture using explants of callus Camellia sinensis L, (4) Analysis of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina growth in suspension culture, (5) the isolation and identification of trimethyl xanthina qualitatively and quantitatively using thin layer chromatography/high performance chromatography column. The results of the study suspension cultures containing bioactive trimethyl xanthina candidates that can be used as an antioxidant.

  18. Purification and characterization of three chitinases and one beta-1,3-glucanase accumulating in the medium of cell suspension cultures of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, K.M.; Jacobsen, S.; Dalgaard Mikkelsen, J.

    1991-01-01

    -terminal sequence (24 residues) this enzyme was identified as the previously described beta-1,3-endoglucanase GII from germinating barley grain. The results suggest that secretion of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase from the embryogenic cell suspensions of barley corresponds to accumulation of the same enzymes...... chromatography. Two of the chitinases were identified as the previously described endochitinases T and C from barley grain. The third and novel chitinase, designated K, was the major basic chitinase in the medium constituting 4% of the soluble protein. Chitinase K was found to be a 33-kDa endochitinase with p......I at 8.7. Further analysis showed that this enzyme is also expressed in barley grain. The amino acid composition and five partial amino acid sequences covering 93 residues of chitinase K were determined. A high similarity was found between chitinase K and barley chitinase T and C as well as basic...

  19. Analysis of redox relationships in the plant cell cycle: determinations of ascorbate, glutathione and poly (ADPribose)polymerase (PARP) in plant cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; De Gara, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and low molecular weight antioxidants, such as glutathione and ascorbate, are powerful signaling molecules that participate in the control of plant growth and development, and modulate progression through the mitotic cell cycle. Enhanced reactive oxygen species accumulation or low levels of ascorbate or glutathione cause the cell cycle to arrest and halt progression especially through the G1 checkpoint. Plant cell suspension cultures have proved to be particularly useful tools for the study of cell cycle regulation. Here we provide effective and accurate methods for the measurement of changes in the cellular ascorbate and glutathione pools and the activities of related enzymes such poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase during mitosis and cell expansion, particularly in cell suspension cultures. These methods can be used in studies seeking to improve current understanding of the roles of redox controls on cell division and cell expansion.

  20. Determination of cardiac glycosides and total phenols in different generations of Securigera securidaca suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tofighi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The seeds of Securigera securidaca (L. Deg. & Dorf. (Fabaceae are used as anti-diabetic remedy in Iranian folk medicine. The aim of the present study was to establish the callus and suspension culture of S. securidaca seeds for the first time and to determine the major secondary metabolites including cardiac glycosides and total phenols. Methods: The culture of S. securidaca from seeds was initiated in hormone-supplemented MS medium containing 1 and 0.1 ppm 2, 4-D solution for solid and suspension cultures, respectively, sucrose and vitamins (B1, B2, B6, Folic acid, Biotin, Nicotinamide and Ca pantothenate at 25 °C and 12 h photoperiods. The cardiac glycosides were determined based on the calibration curve of securidaside which was isolated from the seeds extract of S. securidaca. Total phenolic compounds of different generations of suspension culture were determined using Folin Ciocalteu reagent. Results: Callus culture of S. securidaca was grown light cream to pale yellow in color and soft in texture while the cells of suspension culture grew cream to yellow with isolated cells and small aggregates. The production of cardiac glycosides in the 7th generation were more than the seeds extract (p

  1. Growth and accumulation of flavan-3-ol in Camellia sinensis through callus culture and suspension culture method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutini Sutini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to assess flavan-3-ol biomass in C. sinensis through callus cultures and suspension cultures derived from leaf explants. Callus initiation of both cultures were using Murashige and Skoog medium were enriched with plant growth regulators Naphtha-lene Acetic Acid 3.0 mg/L and kinetin 2.0 mg/L. The procedures in this study were: (1 callus initiation by cutting the leaves of C. sinen-sis shoots then planted on Murashige and Skoog medium that were enriched with plant growth regulators, (2 sub callus culture on fresh medium that enriched with the same growth regulators, (3 suspension culture initiation of liquid callus, (4 growth examination of callus and suspension cultures in week 12, (5 examination of qualitative-quantitative content of flavan-3-olin suspension cultures at week 4. The results show that suspension cultures contain biomass flavan-3-ol that increase in the same manner of the increase of callus age and weight

  2. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christoph; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1990-01-01

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxy benzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K1 of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. It is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of 14C-cinnamic acid and 14C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia. PMID:16667725

  3. Efficient embryogenic suspension culturing and rapid transformation of a range of elite genotypes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Bi, Hui-Ping; Fan, Wei-Juan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was developed using embryogenic suspension cell cultures of elite sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) cultivars, including Ayamurasaki, Sushu2, Sushu9, Sushu11, Wanshu1, Xushu18 and Xushu22. Embryogenic suspension cultures were established in LCP medium using embryogenic calli induced from apical or axillary buds on an induction medium containing 2 mg l(-1) 2,4-D. Suspension cultures were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 harboring the binary plasmid pCAMBIA1301 with the hpt gene as a selectable marker and an intron-interrupted uidA gene as a visible marker. Several key steps of the sweet potato transformation system have been investigated and optimized, including the appropriate antibiotics and their concentrations for suppressing Agrobacterium growth and the optimal doses of hygromycin for transformant selection. A total of 485 putative transgenic plant lines were produced from the transformed calli via somatic embryogenesis and germination to plants under 10 mg l(-1) hygromycin and 200 mg l(-1) cefotaxime. PCR, GUS and Southern blot analyses of the regenerated plants showed that 92.35% of them were transgenic. The number of T-DNA insertions varied from one to three in most transgenic plant lines. Plants showed 100% survival when 308 transgenics were transferred to soil in the greenhouse and then to the field. Most of them were morphologically normal, with the production of storage roots after 3 months of cultivation in the greenhouse or fields. The development of such a robust transformation method suitable to a range of sweet potato genotypes not only provides a routine tool for genetic improvement via transgenesis but also allows us to conduct a functional verification of endogenous genes in sweet potato. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Permeabilization of plant cells: (31)P NMR studies on the permeability of the tonoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, P; Linsefors, L; Vogel, H J; Brodelius, P

    1986-02-01

    A suspension culture of Catharanthus roseus has been used to study the permeability of cell membranes after treatment with various concentrations of a permeabilizing agent (DMSO). The uptake and release (after permeabilization) of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by cells have been investigated by (32)P radiotracer and non-invasive phosphorus-31 NMR experiments. These studies have demonstrated that measurements of the Pi-efflux from plant cells provide a reliable measure of the permeability of the tonoplast.

  5. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christoph; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1990-01-01

    Feeding of 4-methoxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid to cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid, respectively. The homologous 4-methoxybenzoic acids were demethylated to the same products. It is concluded that the side chain degrading enzyme system accepts the 4-methoxylated substrates while the demethylation occurs at the benzoic acid level. The demethylating enzyme is specific for the 4-position. Feeding of [O-14C-methyl]-3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid revealed that the first step in the conversion is the glycosylation of the cinnamic acid to its glucose ester. A partial purification of a UDP-glucose: trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase is reported. 4-Methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are better substrates for this enzyme than 4-hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid. It is suggested that 4-methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are intermediates in the biosynthetic conversion of cinnamic acids to benzoic acids in cells of V. planifolia. PMID:16667674

  6. Increasing secondary metabolite production in plant-cell culture by redirecting transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, P; Pedersen, H

    1993-01-01

    Various approaches for redirecting transport of secondary metabolites in plant-cell suspension cultures have been attempted in an effort to increase productivity. Little is understood of the transport mechanisms or their regulation, and many of the extractive methods which involve membrane permeabilization have an adverse effect on cell viability. Increasing the activity of metabolic pathways by elicitation, in conjunction with end-product removal and accumulation in an extractive phase, has proven to be the most successful strategy so far.

  7. Use of plant cell cultures to study the metabolism of environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Scheel, D.; von der Trenck, T.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolism of the following environmental chemicals has been studied in cell suspension cultures of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.):2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorophenol, diethylhexylphthalate , benzo [alpha] pyrene, and DDT. All chemicals tested, including the persistent ones, were partially metabolized. Polar conjugates predominated in all cases. A covalent incorporation into lignin could be demonstrated for 2,4-D and pentachlorophenol. A specific deposition in the cellular vacuole could be demonstrated for the beta-D-glucopyranoside conjugates derived from 2,4-D. A rapid assay procedure to evaluate the metabolism of a given 14 C-labeled chemical in plant cell suspension cultures is described. This procedure requires about 1 week, and the reproducibility of the results obtained has been assessed

  8. Elicitor-induced tyrosine decarboxylase in berberine-synthesizing suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügler, K; Funk, C; Brodelius, P

    1988-01-04

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) was induced in suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum by treatment with a yeast glucan elicitor. Maximum induction was observed at a carbohydrate concentration of 0.4 mg/g fresh weight of cells and maximum enzyme activity was reached 20 h after addition of elicitor. The enzyme was inducible in late exponential and early stationary growth phases. A good correlation between induced tyrosine decarboxylase activity and berberine biosynthesis has been established. It is suggested that tyrosine decarboxylase may be a key enzyme between primary and secondary metabolisms in the biosynthesis of norlaudanosoline-derived alkaloids.

  9. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  10. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  11. Imaging Nuclear Morphology and Organization in Cleared Plant Tissues Treated with Cell Cycle Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Junior, José Dijair Antonino; de Sa, Maria Fatima Grossi; Engler, Gilbert; Engler, Janice de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of root cells through chemical treatment can generate a large number of cells blocked in specific cell cycle phases. In plants, this approach can be employed for cell suspension cultures and plant seedlings. To identify plant cells in the course of the cell cycle, especially during mitosis in meristematic tissues, chemical inhibitors can be used to block cell cycle progression. Herein, we present a simplified and easy-to-apply protocol to visualize mitotic figures, nuclei morphology, and organization in whole Arabidopsis root apexes. The procedure is based on tissue clearing, and fluorescent staining of nuclear DNA with DAPI. The protocol allows carrying out bulk analysis of nuclei and cell cycle phases in root cells and will be valuable to investigate mutants like overexpressing lines of genes disturbing the plant cell cycle.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  13. Preparation of labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, H.K.

    1978-01-01

    The preparation of some radioacitvely labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures is discussed and further applications of the new method are suggested. Cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and soya (Glycine max) have been used for the preparation of lipids labelled with radioisotopes. Radioactive acetic acid as well as various long-chain fatty acids are readily incorporated into the neutral and ionic lipids of plant cell cultures. In addition, 14 C-labelled glycerol, ethanolamine and choline are well utilized by the cells. Randomly labelled lipids have been obtained by incubating cell suspension cultures of rape and soya with [1- 14 C] acetic acid, and uniformly labelled lipids have been isolated from cultures that had been incubated with a mixture of [1- 14 C] acetic acid plus [2- 14 C] acetic acid. The use of techniques of plant cell cultures for the preparation of lipds labelled with stable or radioactive isotopesappears particularly rewarding because the uptake of precursors by the cells and their incorporation into various lipid compounds proceeds rapidly and often quanitatively.This new approach should be useful also for the biosynthesis of lipids whose acyl moieties contain a spn radical, a fluorescent group, or a light-sensitive label. Thus, plant cell cultures constitute valuable new tools for the biosynthetic preparation of a great variety of labelled lipids. (A.G.)

  14. Stimulation of taxane production in suspension cultures of Taxus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... Planta 215: 596-605. Nothnagel EA, McNeil M, Albersheim P, Dell A (1983). Host pathogen interaction XXII: a galacturonic acid oligosaccharide from plant cell wall elicits phytoalexins. Plant Physiol. 71: 916-926. Ramesh NP (1998). Tour de paclitaxel: biocatalysis for semisynthesis. Annu. Rev. Microbiol.

  15. Optimization of callus and cell suspension cultures of Barringtonia racemosa (Lecythidaceae family for lycopene production Otimização de culturas de suspensões de calos e células de Barringtonia racemosa (família Lecythidaceae para produção de licopeno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Behbahani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is present in a range of fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in the leaves of Barringtonia racemosa. The traditional lycopene extraction from the plant is being employed instead of an easy propagation technique like cell culture process from the leaf explants. We intend to assess how lycopene could be extracted via tissue culture under light (illuminance: 8,200 lux under white fluorescent lamps, photoperiod 16 h per day at 25ºC and dark. Leaf explants of Barringtonia racemosa were cultured on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS, Woody Plant Medium (WPM and B5 media, supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. Optimal conditions for callus induction and maintenance under both dark and light were investigated, and growth and lycopene accumulation were evaluated. Among media with different concentrations of 2,4-D, fast growing, friable callus initiated within three weeks after culturing on WPM basal medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 (weight per volume of 2,4-D, whereas callus induction in explants cultured on all other media started only after five weeks. Calli were subcultured once every fortnight. Pale yellow and green calli developed under conditions of dark and light respectively were then selected for evaluation of their lycopene contents. An improved reversed phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was used for a selective chemical determination of the lycopene content. Light induced lycopene production; and likewise maximum lycopene level incubated in light was higher than those incubated in darkness. The best growth rates of callus and cell suspension were achieved in WPM and B5 media respectively. The production of lycopene was growth-dependent through analysis of growth and lycopene content of both callus and cell suspension cultures.O licopeno está presente numa série de frutas frescas e hortaliças principalmente na folhas de Barringtonia racemosa. A extra

  16. Factors influencing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. somatic embryogenesis. I. The crucial role of pH and nitrogen in suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Wróblewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of obtaining and the characteristics of an embryogenic stabilised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. suspension culture which has many similarities to the carrot model are presented. The Specific Type I cells and proembryogenic mass were present in such a suspension. The maintenance of the proembryogenic stage took place in medium containing 2,4-D as the sole growth regulator, subsequent stages of embryogenesis occurred in hormone-free medium. Embryonic structures were also observed in medium with auxin in the late stages of growth, probably due to the depletion of 2,4-D in the medium during subculture. The choice of the proper inorganic nitrogen sources and the maintenance of correct proportions between them had a significant effect on the formation of these structures. We have shown that the pH of the medium with an embryogenic culture became stabilized regardless of the initial pH value and depended on the medium composition. The inoculum used for the initiation of subsequent subcultures of the stable suspension culture was 1 part tissue to 300 parts medium and was small in comparison to the systems described for the cucumber so far. From 1 ml of basic suspension 7 embryos were obtained on medium without growth regulators 10 days after inoculation, and this amount increased to 21 after 3 weeks. From 3.2% of the somatic embryos it was posible to regenerate plants. The high yield and synchronisation of the process and the development of embryos without passing through callus tissue create the possibility of using this system for molecular investigations and in the technology of somatic seed production.

  17. Plant Cell Cultures as Source of Cosmetic Active Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Barbulova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decades witnessed a great demand of natural remedies. As a result, medicinal plants have been increasingly cultivated on a commercial scale, but the yield, the productive quality and the safety have not always been satisfactory. Plant cell cultures provide useful alternatives for the production of active ingredients for biomedical and cosmetic uses, since they represent standardized, contaminant-free and biosustainable systems, which allow the production of desired compounds on an industrial scale. Moreover, thanks to their totipotency, plant cells grown as liquid suspension cultures can be used as “biofactories” for the production of commercially interesting secondary metabolites, which are in many cases synthesized in low amounts in plant tissues and differentially distributed in the plant organs, such as roots, leaves, flowers or fruits. Although it is very widespread in the pharmaceutical industry, plant cell culture technology is not yet very common in the cosmetic field. The aim of the present review is to focus on the successful research accomplishments in the development of plant cell cultures for the production of active ingredients for cosmetic applications.

  18. Changes in gene expression during programmed cell death in tomato cell suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Orzaez, D.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Woltering, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    To identify genes involved in plant programmed cell death (PCD), changes in gene expression during PCD in a model system of suspension-cultured tomato cells were studied. In this system, cell death is triggered by treatment with camptothecin, an inhibitor of topoisomerase I. Cell death was

  19. Antioxidant isoenzyme responses to nickel-induced stress in tobacco cell suspension culture Resposta de isoenzimas antioxidantes ao estresse induzido por níquel em cultura de células em suspensão de fumo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Bertoni Pompeu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to nickel (Ni at high concentrations can lead to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS resulting in oxidative damage at the cellular level. We investigated the antioxidative responses of Nicotiana tabacum cv BY-2 cell suspension to Ni stress (0.075 and 0.75 mM NiCl2 over a 72 h period with special attention to potential alterations in isoenzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione reductase (GR. Two main SOD isoenzymes were observed, a Mn-SOD (band I and a Fe-SOD (band II, as well as one CAT isoenzyme and four GR isoenzymes. Activity staining analysis revealed that CAT activity plays a major role in the early response to Ni-induced oxidative stress, particularly when the Ni concentration used was low, whilst a specific GR isoenzyme appears to respond to the Ni-induced oxidative stress when a much higher Ni concentration was used to induce the stress for the same period of treatment. These results illustrate the importance and advantages of determining individual isoenzyme activities.A exposição ao níquel (Ni, em altas concentrações, pode levar à produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio (EAOs, resultando em danos oxidativos em nível celular. Foram investigadas as respostas antioxidativas de células em suspensão do cultivar BY-2 de Nicotiana tabacum submetidas ao estresse por Ni (0.075 e 0.75 mM de NiCl2 por 72 h, com atenção especial às alterações potencias em isoenzimas de superóxido dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT e glutatione redutase (GR. Duas principais isoenzimas de SOD foram observadas, uma Mn-SOD (banda I e outra Fe-SOD (banda II, bem como uma isoenzima CAT e quatro isoenzimas de GR. As análises revelaram que a atividade de CAT tem papel principal no momento inicial de resposta ao estresse oxidativo induzido por Ni, particularmente, quando sua concentração foi mais baixa, enquanto uma isoenzima específica de GR parece responder a este estresse na concentração mais alta de Ni

  20. Permeabilization of cultivated plant cells by electroporation for release of intracellularly stored secondary products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, P E; Funk, C; Shillito, R D

    1988-05-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures producing secondary metabolites have been permeabilized for product release by electroporation. The two cell cultures studied, i.e. Thalictrum rugosum and Chenopodium rubrum, require about 5 and 10 kV cm(-1), respectively, for complete permeabilization (release of all the intracellularly stored product). The number of electrical pulses and capacitance used had a relatively limited effect on product release while the viability of the cells was strongly influenced by the latter. Conditions for complete product release resulted in total loss of viability of the cells after treatment. The release of product from immobilized cells was also achieved by electroporation. Cells entrapped in alginate required less voltage for permeabilization than free or agarose entrapped cells.

  1. Effects of several physiochemical factors on cell growth and gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of gallic acid in cell suspension culture of Acer ginnala Maxim was studied. Some physiochemical factors and chemical substances effect on the cell growth and the production of gallic acid were investigated. Cells harvested from plant tissue culture were extracted and applied to high performance liquid ...

  2. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. : IV. Induction of Vanillic Acid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C; Brodelius, P E

    1992-05-01

    Kinetin is used as an elicitor to induce vanillic acid formation in cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia. Maximal induction is observed at a kinetin concentration of 20 micrograms per gram of fresh weight of cells. Vanillic acid synthesis is observed a few hours after elicitation. The effects of kinetin on the activity of some enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, i.e. phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, 4-hydroxycinnamate:coenzyme A ligase and uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose:trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase, are reported and compared to the effects of chitosan. The former two enzymes are induced by chitosan with a maximum activity of approximately 25 to 40 hours after elicitation. All three enzymes are induced by kinetin with maximum activities for phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-hydroxycinnamate:coenzyme A ligase at approximately 50 hours after induction, whereas maximum glucosyltransferase activity is seen already after 24 hours. Furthermore, both elicitors induced the formation of lignin-like material, whereas only kinetin induced vanillic acid biosynthesis. Finally, kinetin but not chitosan induces catechol-4-O-methyltransferase activity, catalyzing the formation of 4-methoxycinnamic acids, which were shown to be intermediates of hydroxybenzoic acid biosynthesis within cells of V. planifolia. It is suggested that this methyltransferase is directly involved in the biosynthesis of vanillic acid.

  3. Dynamics of indole-3-acetic acid oxidase activity in suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IAA oxidase activity was determined in several growth phases of a suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall. During the short phase of intensive growth (zero passage - PO a negative correlation was noted between enzymatic activity and the rate of growth. IAA oxidase activity increased to a certain level is not a factor limiting cell division. For protraction of the phase of intensive growth (first passage - P1, however, a decrease in the activity of this enzyme seems indispensable. IAA oxidase activity in the tested culture is under the control of inhibitors present in the cells and medium. High enzyme inhibition was observed in PO cells during the phase, of intensive growth and in P1 at the beginning and in the middle part of this phase. These results suggest' that the -auxin level determined in earlier studies in sunflower crown-gall culture is controlled by the IAA oxidase set. During the long phase of intensive growth (P1 this control is of negative feedback type.

  4. Growth behavior in plant cell cultures based on emissions detected by a multisensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaraiah, Palle; Navratil, Marian; Carlsson, Maria; Jeffers, Paul; Brodelius, Maria; Brodelius, Peter E; Kieran, Patricia M; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    The use of a multisensor array based on chemical gas sensors to monitor plant cell cultures is described. The multisensor array, also referred to as an electronic nose, consisted of 19 different metal oxide semiconductor sensors and one carbon dioxide sensor. The device was used to continuously monitor the off-gas from two plant cell suspension cultures, Morinda citrifolia and Nicotiana tabacum, cultivated under batch conditions. By analyzing the multiarray responses using two pattern recognition methods, principal component analysis and artificial neural networks, it was possible to monitor the course of the cultivations and, in turn, to predict (1) the biomass concentration in both systems and (2) the formation of the secondary metabolite, antraquinone, by M. citrifolia. The results identify the multisensor array method as a potentially useful analytical tool for monitoring plant process variables that are otherwise difficult to analyze on-line.

  5. Induced accumulation of 20-hydroxyecdysone in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the effects of culture medium, culture temperature, sucrose concentration and cholesterol feeding on cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production in suspension cultures of Vitex glabrata, an important medicinal plant in Thailand. Cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production were not significantly ...

  6. Induced accumulation of 20-hydroxyecdysone in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... This study describes the effects of culture medium, culture temperature, sucrose concentration and cholesterol feeding on cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production in suspension cultures of Vitex glabrata, an important medicinal plant in Thailand. Cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production.

  7. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  8. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Potentials of Nigella sativa L. Suspension Cultures under Elicitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Chaudhry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae is an annual herb of immense medicinal properties because of its major active components (i.e., thymoquinone (TQ, thymohydroquinone (THQ, and thymol (THY. Plant tissue culture techniques like elicitation, Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hairy root culture, and so on, are applied for substantial metabolite production. This study enumerates the antibacterial and antioxidant potentials of N. sativa epicotyl suspension cultures under biotic and abiotic elicitation along with concentration optimization of the elicitors for enhanced TQ and THY production. Cultures under different concentrations of pectin and manganese chloride (MnCl2 elicitation (i.e., 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L showed that the control, MnCl2 10 mg/L, and pectin 15 mg/L suspension extracts greatly inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and S. aureus (MIC against E. coli, i.e., 2.35±0.8, 2.4±0.2, and 2.46±0.5, resp.. Elicitation decreased SOD enzyme activity whereas CAT enzyme activity increased remarkably under MnCl2 elicitation. MnCl2 10 mg/L and pectin 15 mg/L elicitation enhanced the DPPH radical inhibition ability, but ferric scavenging activity was comparable to the control. TQ and THY were quantified by LC-MS/MS in the cultures with high bioactive properties revealing maximum content under MnCl2 10 mg/L elicitation. Therefore, MnCl2 elicitation can be undertaken on large scale for sustainable metabolite production.

  9. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  10. Panax ginseng Adventitious Root Suspension Culture: Protocol for Biomass Production and Analysis of Ginsenosides by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Paek, Kee Yoeup

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Korean ginseng) is a popular herbal medicine. It has been used in Chinese and Oriental medicines since thousands of years. Ginseng products are generally used as a tonic and an adaptogen to resist the adverse influence of a wide range of physical, chemical and biological factors, and to restore homeostasis. Ginsenosides or ginseng saponins are the principal active ingredients of ginseng. Since ginseng cultivation process is very slow and needs specific environment for field cultivation, cell and tissue cultures are sought as alternatives for the production of ginseng biomass and bioactive compounds. In this chapter, we focus on methods of induction of adventitious roots from ginseng roots, establishment of adventitious root suspension cultures using bioreactors, procedures for processing of adventitious roots, and analysis of ginsenosides by high pressure liquid chromatography.

  11. Enhancement of 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most effective. The maximum 20-hydroxyecdysone productivity of about 1.31 mg/L/day was observed in culture with 10 mg/L 7-dehydrocholesterol. This data is the first indication that 7-dehydrocholesterol and ergosterol feeding are effective precursors for 20-hydroxyecdysone formation in plant cell suspension culture.

  12. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Nahazima Mohamad Zuldin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D, kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%. Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47±0.4667 mL. The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275±0.082 mg L−1 that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226±1.98 mg L−1.

  13. Sphingolipid long chain base phosphates can regulate apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Keith P; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; McDonald, Kerrie L; Reape, Theresa J; Ng, Carl K-Y; McCabe, Paul F; Leaver, Christopher J

    2011-07-08

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic cells and sphingolipid metabolites, such as the long chain base phosphate (LCB-P), sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) and ceramide (Cer) are important regulators of apoptosis in animal cells. This study evaluated the role of LCB-Ps in regulating apoptotic-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) in plant cells using commercially available S1P as a tool. Arabidopsis cell cultures were exposed to a diverse array of cell death-inducing treatments (including Cer) in the presence of S1P. Rates of AL-PCD and cell survival were recorded using vital stains and morphological markers of AL-PCD. Internal LCB-P levels were altered in suspension cultured cells using inhibitors of sphingosine kinase and changes in rates of death in response to heat stress were evaluated. S1P reduced AL-PCD and promoted cell survival in cells subjected to a range of stresses. Treatments with inhibitors of sphingosine kinase lowered the temperature which induced maximal AL-PCD in cell cultures. The data supports the existence of a sphingolipid rheostat involved in controlling cell fate in Arabidopsis cells and that sphingolipid regulation of cell death may be a shared feature of both animal apoptosis and plant AL-PCD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures of Pinus radiata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of embryonal suspensor mass (ESM) from immature embryos of Pinus radiata on a solidified growth medium containing 0, 5 mgl -1 benzyladenine, 3, 0 mgl -1 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 500 mgl -1 casein hydrolysate and 250 mgl -1 L-glutamine was used as inoculum to establish cell suspension ...

  15. The illuminated plant cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Jaideep

    2007-11-01

    The past decade has provided biologists with a palette of genetically encoded, multicolored fluorescent proteins. The living plant cell turned into a 'coloring book' and today, nearly every text-book organelle has been highlighted in scintillating fluorescent colors. This review provides a concise listing of the earliest representative fluorescent-protein probes used to highlight various targets within the plant cell, and introduces the idea of using the numerous multicolor, subcellular probes for the development of an early intracellular response profile of plants.

  16. Effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana for Steviol glycoside production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycosides are natural non-caloric sweeteners which are extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana plant. Present study deals the effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia plant for steviol glycoside (SGs) production. Yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of NaCl (0.05-0.20%) and Na2CO3 (0.0125-0.10%) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension biomass cultured on salts showed less growth as well as browning of medium when compared with control. Quantification of SGs content in callus culture (collected on 15th day) and suspension cultures (collected at 10th and 15th days) treated with and without salts were analyzed by HPLC. It was found that abiotic stress induced by the salts increased the concentration of SGs significantly. In callus, the quantity of SGs got increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.43 and 1.57% with 0.10% NaCl, and 0.025% Na2CO3, respectively. However, in case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of NaCl and Na2CO3 enhanced the SGs content from 1.36 (control) to 2.61 and 5.14%, respectively, on the 10th day.

  17. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. : II. Effects of Precursor Feeding and Metabolic Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C; Brodelius, P E

    1990-09-01

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxy benzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K(1) of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. It is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of (14)C-cinnamic acid and (14)C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia.

  18. Changes in auxin level in the course of growth of a sunflower crown-gall suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The auxin level in the cell mass and culture medium was determined by means of the Avena straight caleoptile test in various periods of the suspension culture cycle of the sunflower crown-gall tumour. The investigations were performed in the course of the zero passage (PO and first one (Pl, differing in their time of duration of maximum growth and its intensity. In both passages the intra- and extra-cellular auxin levels reach values of the same order. At the beginning of the maximal growth phase the activity corresponding to IAA in the cells prevails over that of the other auxin-like compounds. This disproportion diminishes with further development of the culture, and with the beginning of the stationary phase the cellular IAA level is lower than that of the remaining auxin-like compounds. The short phase of maximal growth (PO occurs with an auxin level decreasing in the cell mass and increasing in the medium, and towards the end of the cycle these levels become equal. During the long phase of maximal growth (Pl the total amount of auxins in the cells increases and is 2-3 times higher than in the medium, whereas IAA in the cells remains at a constant level. These results suggest that the participation of IAA in the intracellular pool of auxin-like substances is decisive for the mitotic activity of the cells and maintenance of growth in the culture.

  19. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. : III. Conversion of 4-Methoxycinnamic Acids into 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C; Brodelius, P E

    1990-09-01

    Feeding of 4-methoxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid to cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid, respectively. The homologous 4-methoxybenzoic acids were demethylated to the same products. It is concluded that the side chain degrading enzyme system accepts the 4-methoxylated substrates while the demethylation occurs at the benzoic acid level. The demethylating enzyme is specific for the 4-position. Feeding of [O-(14)C-methyl]-3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid revealed that the first step in the conversion is the glycosylation of the cinnamic acid to its glucose ester. A partial purification of a UDP-glucose: trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase is reported. 4-Methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are better substrates for this enzyme than 4-hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid. It is suggested that 4-methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are intermediates in the biosynthetic conversion of cinnamic acids to benzoic acids in cells of V. planifolia.

  20. Calcium in plant cells

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    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  1. [Effect of auxins on production of coumarin in a suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2003-07-01

    The paper examined the effect of selected auxins (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, alpha-naphthalene-acetic acid, beta-indoleacetic acid, beta-indoleburytic acid; each in four concentrations--0.2, 2, 10, and 20 mg/l) on the production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L. cultinated in the dark and under permanent lighting(3500 lux). The effect of the light regimen is, in comparison with auxins, less marked--the content of coumarins is mostly comparable both under permanent lighting and in the dark. The highest coumarin content was achieved with the use of alpha-naphthalene-acetic acid in a concentration of 0.2 mg/l with cultivation in the dark.

  2. Differentiation of somatic embryos from protoplasts isolated from embryogenic suspension cultures of Abies alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S; Lang, H; Reuther, G

    1992-10-01

    Embryogenic suspension cultures of Abies alba were established using an embryogenic suspensor mass culture originating from the zygotic embryo in immature seed explants (Schuller et al. 1989). Protoplasts were isolated from the suspension material. The protoplasts were immobilized in alginate layers in order to follow the development of single protoplasts. During the first days of protoplast culture a modified Kao and Michayluk (1975) medium proved to be necessary for subsequent divisions. The formation of proembryos succeeded within 2-3 weeks when subcultured with a modified Schenk and Hildebrandt (1972) liquid medium. Light, enhanced sugar concentration, and the addition of abscisic acid led to the formation of slightly green "torpedo"-shaped somatic embryos after 6-8 weeks from protoplast isolation.

  3. A role for arabinogalactan-proteins in plant cell expansion: evidence from studies on the interaction of ß-glucosyl Yariv reagent with seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; Knox, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were germinated and grown in medium containing ß-glucosyl Yariv reagent (ßGlcY), a synthetic phenyl glycoside that interacts specifically with arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs), a class of plant cell surface proteoglycans. The effect of ßGlcY on the seedlings...... was to reduce the overall growth of both the root and the shoot. ßGlcY only accumulated in the root tissues and the reduced growth of the shoot appeared to be an indirect effect of impaired root growth. Reduced root growth was a consequence of a reduction in cell elongation during the postproliferation phase...... suspension-cultured cells that had been induced to elongate rather than proliferate, cell elongation was inhibited. The AGP-unreactive a-galactosyl Yariv reagent (aGalY) had no biological activity in either of these systems....

  4. Hydrolytic enzymes in the central vacuole of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, T; Kende, H

    1979-06-01

    The hydrolase content of vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of suspension-cultured tobacco cells, of tulip petals, and of pineapple leaves, and the sedimentation behavior of tobacco tonoplasts were studied. Three precautions were found to be important for the analysis of vacuolar hydrolases and of the tonoplast. (a) Purification of protoplasts in a Ficoll gradient was necessary to remove cell debris which contained contaminating hydrolases adsorbed from the fungal cell-wall-degrading enzyme preparation. (b) Hydrolase activities in the homogenates of the intact cells or the tissue used and of the purified protoplasts had to be compared to verify the absence of contaminating hydrolases in the protoplast preparation. (c) Vacuoles obtained from the protoplasts by an osmotic shock had to be purified from the lysate in a Ficoll gradient. Since the density of the central vacuole approximates that of the protoplasts, about a 10% contamination of the vacuolar preparation by surviving protoplasts could not be eliminated and had to be taken into account when the distribution of enzymes and of radioactivity was calculated.THE INTRACELLULAR ACTIVITIES OF THE FOLLOWING ACID HYDROLASES WERE PRIMARILY LOCALIZED IN THE VACUOLE OF TOBACCO CELLS: alpha-mannosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-fructosidase, nuclease, phosphatase, phosphodiesterase. A similar composition of acid hydrolases was found in vacuoles obtained from protoplasts of tulip petals. Proteinase, a hydrolase with low activity in tobacco cells and tulip petals and therefore difficult to localize unequivocally, was found to be vacuolar in pineapple leaves, a tissue containing high levels of this enzyme. Our data support the hypothesis that the central vacuole of higher plant cells has an enzyme composition analogous to that of the animal lysosome.None of the vacuolar enzymes investigated was found to be bound to the tonoplast. When vacuoles were isolated from cells labeled with radioactive choline, the vacuolar

  5. Evaluation of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Biochemical Characterization from Static and Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajit Kanungo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal, is an erect evergreen shrub commonly known as Ashwagandha. It is widely used in Ayurvedic and in the traditional pharmacopeia system of India. It is one of the major ingredients in many formulations prescribed for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and rheumatism. In the present study the variation in quality and quantity of protein and antioxidant enzymes were evaluated biochemically and enzymatically from the static and suspension cultures. The nodal segments had provided maximum callusing of 90.25±0.06 % with (1mg/l of BAP and Kn with (2mg/l of 2, 4-D. The static and suspension cultures were taken for the analysis of total soluble protein and screened for antioxidant enzyme activity [catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX]. The protein content (1.2016 µg/µl was found to be higher in static culture samples (0.870 µg/µl than the protein obtained from the suspension culture. The antioxidant enzyme activity (CAT, SOD and GPX was higher in static culture samples (301.01± 0.42, 198.92 ± 0.29, 103.75 ± 0.11 nkat/ mg of protein than that of suspension culture. Specific activity staining of isozyme pattern exhibited three isoforms (CAT 1, CAT 2 and CAT 3 in static culture samples but CAT 1 was absent in the sample extracted from suspension cultures.  In case of SOD, four bands (SOD 1, SOD 2, SOD 3 and SOD 4 were found in both the samples whereas intensity of GPX activity was found to be more in static culture but both the samples exhibited three isoforms such as  (GPX 1, GPX 2 and GPX 3. The supplementation of required nutrients along with the phytohormones under in vitro condition might be an enhancing factor to yield antioxidant enzymes in the static culture samples. 

  6. High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Plant Cell Cultures for Functional Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoichi; Sakurai, Nozomu; Oikawa, Akira; Kai, Kosuke; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Mori, Kumiko; Moriya, Kanami; Fujii, Fumiko; Aoki, Koh; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Ohta, Daisaku; Saito, Kazuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cell lines from plant species are useful for genetic engineering. However, maintenance of these lines is laborious, involves routine subculturing and hampers wider use of transgenic lines, especially when many lines are required for a high-throughput functional genomics application. Cryopreservation of these lines may reduce the need for subculturing. Here, we established a simple protocol for cryopreservation of cell lines from five commonly used plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Daucus carota, Lotus japonicus, Nicotiana tabacum and Oryza sativa. The LSP solution (2 M glycerol, 0.4 M sucrose and 86.9 mM proline) protected cells from damage during freezing and was only mildly toxic to cells kept at room temperature for at least 2 h. More than 100 samples were processed for freezing simultaneously. Initially, we determined the conditions for cryopreservation using a programmable freezer; we then developed a modified simple protocol that did not require a programmable freezer. In the simple protocol, a thick expanded polystyrene (EPS) container containing the vials with the cell–LSP solution mixtures was kept at −30°C for 6 h to cool the cells slowly (pre-freezing); samples from the EPS containers were then plunged into liquid nitrogen before long-term storage. Transgenic Arabidopsis cells were subjected to cryopreservation, thawed and then re-grown in culture; transcriptome and metabolome analyses indicated that there was no significant difference in gene expression or metabolism between cryopreserved cells and control cells. The simplicity of the protocol will accelerate the pace of research in functional plant genomics. PMID:22437846

  7. [Effect of precursors on the production of coumarins in a suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of potential precursors (cinnamic acid, phenylalanine, tyrosine) in three concentrations (0.01; 0.1; 1 mmol/l) on the growth of the culture and coumarin production was investigated in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L. The cultures were cultivated under constant illumination (3500 lux) and in the dark. The growth of the culture in the dark was not affected by the precursors, cinnamic acid in a concentration of 1 mmol/l exerted toxic action. The growth of the culture cultivated under constant illumination was stimulated by tyrosine in a concentration of 0.1 and 1 mmol/l, and phenylalanine in a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l; phenylalanine and cinnamic acid in a concentration of 1 mmol/l inhibited the growth of the culture. In the cultivation in the dark, coumarin production was increased by phenylalanine in a concentration 0.01 mmol/l and by tyrosine in a concentration of 1 mmol/l. In the cultivation under constant illumination, coumarin production was decreased by the action of cinnamic acid, was not affected by tyrosine, and phenylalanine (0.01 and 0.1 mmol/l) increased it in comparison with the culture without precursors.

  8. Programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomicheva, A S; Tuzhikov, A I; Beloshistov, R E; Trusova, S V; Galiullina, R A; Mochalova, L V; Chichkova, N V; Vartapetian, A B

    2012-12-01

    The modern concepts of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants are reviewed as compared to PCD (apoptosis) in animals. Special attention is focused on considering the potential mechanisms of implementation of this fundamental biological process and its participants. In particular, the proteolytic enzymes involved in PCD in animals (caspases) and plants (phytaspases) are compared. Emphasis is put on elucidation of both common features and substantial differences of PCD implementation in plants and animals.

  9. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  10. The RNase activity of rice probenazole-induced protein1 (PBZ1) plays a key role in cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Gon; Kim, Sun Tae; Wang, Yiming; Yu, Seok; Choi, In Soo; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Woo Taek; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kang, Kyu Young

    2011-01-01

    Cell death is an important process of plant responses to development and biotic/abiotic stresses. In rice plants, PBZ1, a PR10 family protein, has been shown to accumulate in tissues undergoing cell death. However, the function of PBZ1 in cell death remains yet to be demonstrated. Here, we report that exogenous recombinant PBZ1 protein induces cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells (SCCs) and also in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum in a dosedependent manner. This finding was confirmed in vivo in transgenic Arabidopsis lines harboring the PBZ1 gene under the control of a dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible promoter. The DEX-treated leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis induced expression of PBZ1 at transcript and protein levels and showed cell death morphology. TUNEL analysis detected DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of programmed cell death, in rice SCCs treated with the PBZ1 protein. Recombinant PBZ1 protein also exhibited RNase activity and exhibited internalization inside BY-2 cells. Taken together, PBZ1 induces cell death not only in rice, but also in tobacco and Arabidopsis via its RNase activity inside the cell. PBZ1 could be used as a marker to understand the mechanism by which PBZ1 confers the cell death morphology in rice and other model plants.

  11. Induction of Defense-Related Responses in Cf9 Tomato Cells by the AVR9 Elicitor Peptide of Cladosporium fulvum Is Developmentally Regulated1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honée, Guy; Buitink, Julia; Jabs, Thorsten; De Kloe, José; Sijbolts, Fred; Apotheker, Marion; Weide, Rob; Sijen, Titia; Stuiver, Maarten; De Wit, Pierre J.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    The AVR9 elicitor from the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum induces defense-related responses, including cell death, specifically in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants that carry the Cf-9 resistance gene. To study biochemical mechanisms of resistance in detail, suspension cultures of tomato cells that carry the Cf-9 resistance gene were initiated. Treatment of cells with various elicitors, except AVR9, induced an oxidative burst, ion fluxes, and expression of defense-related genes. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Cf9 tomato leaf discs with Avr9-containing constructs resulted efficiently in transgenic callus formation. Although transgenic callus tissue showed normal regeneration capacity, transgenic plants expressing both the Cf-9 and the Avr9 genes were never obtained. Transgenic F1 seedlings that were generated from crosses between tomato plants expressing the Avr9 gene and wild-type Cf9 plants died within a few weeks. However, callus cultures that were initiated on cotyledons from these seedlings could be maintained for at least 3 months and developed similarly to callus cultures that contained only the Cf-9 or the Avr9 gene. It is concluded, therefore, that induction of defense responses in Cf9 tomato cells by the AVR9 elicitor is developmentally regulated and is absent in callus tissue and cell-suspension cultures, which consists of undifferentiated cells. These results are significant for the use of suspension-cultured cells to investigate signal transduction cascades. PMID:9662523

  12. Biomass Yield and Steviol Glycoside Production in Callus and Suspension Culture of Stevia rebaudiana Treated with Proline and Polyethylene Glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced production of steviol glycosides (SGs) was observed in callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana treated with proline and polyethylene glycol (PEG). To study their effect, yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of proline (2.5-10 mM) and PEG (2.5-10 %) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension culture biomass (i.e. both fresh and dry weight content) was increased with 5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, while at further higher concentrations, they got reduced. Further, quantification of SGs content in callus (collected at 15th day) and suspension culture (collected at 10th and 15th day) treated with and without elicitors was analysed by HPLC. It was observed that chemical stress enhanced the production of SGs significantly. In callus, the content of SGs increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.09 and 1.83 % with 7.5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, respectively, which was about 4.0 and 7.0 times higher than control. However, in the case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of proline and polyethylene glycol enhanced the SG content from 1.36 (control) to 5.03 and 6.38 %, respectively, on 10th day which were 3.7 times and 4.7 times higher than control.

  13. Characterization of transmembrane auxin transport in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seifertová, Daniela; Skůpa, Petr; Rychtář, J.; Laňková, Martina; Pařezová, Markéta; Dobrev, Petre; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 171, č. 6 (2014), s. 429-437 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/0797 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Auxin influx * Auxin efflux * Auxin metabolic profiling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.557, year: 2014

  14. Growth characteristics and nutrient depletion of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' suspension cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted

    1998-01-01

    The growth characteristics and nutrient depletion in suspension cultures of Miscanthus ogiformis Honda ‘Giganteus' grown in media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal nutrient salts were studied during a culture period of 15 days. Proline was added to both media in concentrations from...... 0 to 300 mM. The fresh and dry weights of the suspension aggregates and the concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, proline and sugar remaining in the medium were measured at different points in time during the culture period. The results showed an almost total depletion of ammonium but a limited...

  15. The fate of the herbicide propanil in plants of the littoral zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongli; Schäffer, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The anti-seasonal hydrology with 30m water fluctuations in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) of China attracts growing environmental and ecological concerns. We investigated the biotransformation of the herbicide propanil in plants dominating in the littoral zone of the TGR by applying the 14 C-ring-labeled herbicide into non-aseptic hydroponic plant systems (Cynodon dactylon, Nelumbo nucifera and Bidens pilosa), aseptic plants (Lemna minor and Lemna gibba) and cell suspension cultures (C. dactylon and L. minor). (1) Propanil absorbed in plants of the hydroponic systems was (12.46±1.63)% of applied radioactivity (AR) (C. dactylon), (52.36±6.38)% (N. nucifera) and (76.55±6.07)% (B. pilosa), respectively. The 14 C-residues in the plant extractable fractions and the corresponding media were confirmed by radio-Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), radio-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Gas Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry (GC-EIMS) as propanil, 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-β-d-glucopyranosylamine (Glu-DCA). (2) About 8% of AR was taken up by both aseptic plants, from which 7.0% of AR was extracted and identified also as propanil, DCA and Glu-DCA. (3) Concerning cell suspension cultures, (39.22±9.39)% of AR was absorbed by C. dactylon after 72hr, whereas the accumulated 14 C-propanil by L. minor cell suspension culture amounted to (65.04±1.72)% after 7days. The identified compounds in cell cultures are consistent with those in the tested plants. Most of the pesticide residues in the intact plants were un-extractable, which are recognized as the end of the detoxification process. We therefore consider these plants as suitable for the phytoremediation of the herbicide propanil in the TGR region. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. An assay for secologanin in plant tissues based on enzymatic conversion into strictosidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallard, Didier; van der Heijden, Robert; Contin, Adriana

    1998-01-01

    The secoiridoid glucoside secologanin is the terpenoid building block in the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids. A method for its determination in plant tissues and cell suspension cultures has been developed. This assay is based on the condensation of secologanin with tryptamine, yielding...... of STR for secologanin, in combination with a sensitive and selective HPLC system, allows a simple extraction of secologanin from plant tissue. The detection limit of this methos is 15 ng secologanin. Using this assay, secologanin contents were determined in tissues of various plant species; Lonicera...

  17. Regulation of Water in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowles, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    Cell water relationships are important topics to be included in cell biology courses. Differences exist in the control of water relationships in plant cells relative to control in animal cells. One important reason for these differences is that turgor pressure is a consideration in plant cells. Diffusion and osmosis are the underlying factors…

  18. Embryogenic callus formation, growth and regeneration in callus and suspension cultures of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' as affected by proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Krogstrup, Peter; Hansen, Jürgen

    1997-01-01

    to test the effect of proline in suspension cultures. The proline additions affected the formation of embryogenic callus and the growth of suspension cultures. Improvements depended on the proline concentration and the basal salts of the medium. Addition of 12.5 to 50 mM proline to callus induction medium...... with Murashige and Skoog salts increased embryogenic callus formation on shoot apices and leaf explants while proline had no effect on embryogenic callus formation in medium with N6 salts. Increased growth with increasing proline concentration was obtained in suspension aggregates grown in medium with N6 salts......The effects of proline additions to culture systems of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda Giganteus' were investigated. Proline was added in concentrations of 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 or 300 mM to the callus induction and suspension culture media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal salts and 22...

  19. Single-Cell Genomic Analysis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual cells in an organism are variable, which strongly impacts cellular processes. Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled single-cell genomic analysis to become widespread, addressing shortcomings of analyses conducted on populations of bulk cells. While the field of single-cell plant genomics is in its infancy, there is great potential to gain insights into cell lineage and functional cell types to help understand complex cellular interactions in plants. In this review, we discuss current approaches for single-cell plant genomic analysis, with a focus on single-cell isolation, DNA amplification, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. We outline the technical challenges of analysing material from a single plant cell, and then examine applications of single-cell genomics and the integration of this approach with genome editing. Finally, we indicate future directions we expect in the rapidly developing field of plant single-cell genomic analysis.

  20. Embryogenic plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1991-01-01

    In view of circumstantial evidence for the role of gravity (g) in shaping the embryo environment, normal embryo development may not occur reliably and efficiently in the microgravity environment of space. Attention must accordingly be given to those aspects of higher plant reproductive biology in space environments required for the production of viable embryos in a 'seed to seed to seed' experiment. It is suggested that cultured cells can be grown to be morphogenetically competent, and can be evaluated as to their ability to simulate embryogenic events usually associated with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary.

  1. Overexpression of OsEXPA8, a root-specific gene, improves rice growth and root system architecture by facilitating cell extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ma

    Full Text Available Expansins are unique plant cell wall proteins that are involved in cell wall modifications underlying many plant developmental processes. In this work, we investigated the possible biological role of the root-specific α-expansin gene OsEXPA8 in rice growth and development by generating transgenic plants. Overexpression of OsEXPA8 in rice plants yielded pleiotropic phenotypes of improved root system architecture (longer primary roots, more lateral roots and root hairs, increased plant height, enhanced leaf number and enlarged leaf size. Further study indicated that the average cell length in both leaf and root vascular bundles was enhanced, and the cell growth in suspension cultures was increased, which revealed the cellular basis for OsEXPA8-mediated rice plant growth acceleration. Expansins are thought to be a key factor required for cell enlargement and wall loosening. Atomic force microscopy (AFM technology revealed that average wall stiffness values for 35S::OsEXPA8 transgenic suspension-cultured cells decreased over six-fold compared to wild-type counterparts during different growth phases. Moreover, a prominent change in the wall polymer composition of suspension cells was observed, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectra revealed a relative increase in the ratios of the polysaccharide/lignin content in cell wall compositions of OsEXPA8 overexpressors. These results support a role for expansins in cell expansion and plant growth.

  2. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific

  3. Alfalfa cyclins: differential expression during the cell cycle and in plant organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, H; Mink, M; Pfosser, M; Bögre, L; Györgyey, J; Jonak, C; Gartner, A; Dudits, D; Heberle-Bors, E

    1992-12-01

    Cell division in eukaryotes is mediated by the action of the mitosis promoting factor, which is composed of the CDC2 protein kinase and one of the various mitotic cyclins. We have recently isolated a cdc2 gene from alfalfa. Here, we report the isolation of two cyclin genes, cycMs1 and cycMs2, from alfalfa. The cycMs2 gene shows highest similarity to type B cyclins. In contrast, the predicted amino acid sequence of the cycMs1 gene shows similar homology scores to cyclins of all types (25 to 35%). Both genes are expressed in dividing suspension cultured cells but cease to be expressed when the cells enter stationary phase. In synchronized alfalfa suspension cultured cells, the mRNAs of cycMs1 and cycMs2 show maximal expression in the G2 and M phases. Transcripts of cycMs2 are found only in late G2 and M phase cells, an expression pattern typical for cyclin B genes, whereas cycMs1 appears with the onset of G2. This pattern indicates that alfalfa cycMs1 and cycMs2 belong to different classes of cyclins. In young leaves, expression of both genes is high, whereas in mature leaves no transcripts can be detected, indicating that the two cyclin genes are true cell division markers at the mRNA level. In other organs, a more complex expression pattern of the two cyclin genes was found.

  4. Involvement of bacterial TonB-dependent signaling in the generation of an oligogalacturonide damage-associated molecular pattern from plant cell walls exposed to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris pectate lyases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient perception of attacking pathogens is essential for plants. Plant defense is evoked by molecules termed elicitors. Endogenous elicitors or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) originate from plant materials upon injury or pathogen activity. While there are comparably well-characterized examples for DAMPs, often oligogalacturonides (OGAs), generated by the activity of fungal pathogens, endogenous elicitors evoked by bacterial pathogens have been rarely described. In particular, the signal perception and transduction processes involved in DAMP generation are poorly characterized. Results A mutant strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris deficient in exbD2, which encodes a component of its unusual elaborate TonB system, had impaired pectate lyase activity and caused no visible symptoms for defense on the non-host plant pepper (Capsicum annuum). A co-incubation of X. campestris pv. campestris with isolated cell wall material from C. annuum led to the release of compounds which induced an oxidative burst in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plant. Lipopolysaccharides and proteins were ruled out as elicitors by polymyxin B and heat treatment, respectively. After hydrolysis with trifluoroacetic acid and subsequent HPAE chromatography, the elicitor preparation contained galacturonic acid, the monosaccharide constituent of pectate. OGAs were isolated from this crude elicitor preparation by HPAEC and tested for their biological activity. While small OGAs were unable to induce an oxidative burst, the elicitor activity in cell suspension cultures of the non-host plants tobacco and pepper increased with the degree of polymerization (DP). Maximal elicitor activity was observed for DPs exceeding 8. In contrast to the X. campestris pv. campestris wild type B100, the exbD2 mutant was unable to generate elicitor activity from plant cell wall material or from pectin. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the

  5. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  6. Synthesis of plant cell wall oligosaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell walls are structurally complex and contain a large number of diverse carbohydrate polymers. These plant fibers are a highly valuable bio-resource and the focus of food, energy and health research. We are interested in studying the interplay of plant cell wall carbohydrates with proteins such as enzymes, cell surface lectins, and antibodies. However, detailed molecular level investigations of such interactions are hampered by the heterogeneity and diversity of the polymers of intere...

  7. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Doorn, W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about...... the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death......, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during...

  8. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  9. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the

  10. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  12. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  13. Quinoline Alkaloids in Suspension Cultures of Cinchona ledgeriana Treated with Various Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIAH RATNADEWI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinchona alkaloids are in extensive uses, not only for drugs but also for soft drink industries. They are harvested from the bark of trees Cinchona spp. after certain ages and therefore are available over a limited time. Cell culture is an alternative way to continuously produce such secondary metabolites in a much shorter time. Various substances were added in the normal growth media to promote quinoline alkaloids production by cell cultures of Cinchona ledgeriana. At the sixth week of culture, quinine and cinchonine contents were suppressed by paclobutrazol (PBZ, abscisic acid (ABA, or even by precursor tryptophan, while cinchonidine content was enhanced by 0.2 mg/l tryptophan to 43 fold of that produced by untreated cells (2.8% dry weight. At the seventh week of culture, the production of quinine and quinidine started to grow whereas the production of cinchonine and cinchonidine tended to decrease. An addition of 5 mg/l PBZ to culture media yielded the highest level of total quinine/quinidine after seven weeks, e.g. quinine 11 times more abundant and quinidine 23 fold higher compared to the untreated cells. Particularly the level of quinine which is the most demanded for medical and industrial purposes still need to be improved to approach to or even higher than that of extracted from the conventional source.

  14. Toward stable genetic engineering of human o-glycosylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Bennett, Eric Paul; Jørgensen, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    an obvious choice for de novo engineering of this O-glycosylation pathway. We previously showed that transient implementation of O-glycosylation capacity in plants requires introduction of the synthesis of the donor substrate UDP-GalNAc and one or more polypeptide GalNAc-transferases for incorporating Gal......NAc residues into proteins. Here, we have stably engineered O-glycosylation capacity in two plant cell systems, soil-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension culture cells. Efficient GalNAc O-glycosylation of two stably coexpressed substrate O...... Yellow-2 cells. In summary, stably engineered mammalian type O-glycosylation was established in transgenic plants, demonstrating that plants may serve as host cells for the production of recombinant O-glycoproteins. However, the present stable implementation further strengthens the notion...

  15. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments...

  16. Methyl Jasmonate and Salicylic Acid Induced Oxidative Stress and Accumulation of Phenolics in Panax ginseng Bioreactor Root Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Yoeup Paek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the enzyme variations responsible for the synthesis of phenolics, 40 day-old adventitious roots of Panax ginseng were treated with 200 μM methyl jasmonate (MJ or salicylic acid (SA in a 5 L bioreactor suspension culture (working volume 4 L. Both treatments caused an increase in the carbonyl and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 contents, although the levels were lower in SA treated roots. Total phenolic, flavonoid, ascorbic acid, non-protein thiol (NPSH and cysteine contents and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical reducing activity were increased by MJ and SA. Fresh weight (FW and dry weight (DW decreased significantly after 9 days of exposure to SA and MJ. The highest total phenolics (62%, DPPH activity (40%, flavonoids (88%, ascorbic acid (55%, NPSH (33%, and cysteine (62% contents compared to control were obtained after 9 days in SA treated roots. The activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, substrate specific peroxidases (caffeic acid peroxidase, quercetin peroxidase and ferulic acid peroxidase were higher in MJ treated roots than the SA treated ones. Increased shikimate dehydrogenase, chlorogenic acid peroxidase and β-glucosidase activities and proline content were observed in SA treated roots than in MJ ones. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity remained unaffected by both MJ and SA. These results strongly indicate that MJ and SA induce the accumulation of phenolic compounds in ginseng root by altering the phenolic synthesis enzymes.

  17. Plant cell proliferation inside an inorganic host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perullini, Mercedes; Rivero, María Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Mentaberry, Alejandro; Bilmes, Sara A

    2007-01-10

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to plant cell culture as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites and the expression of recombinant proteins. Plant cell immobilization offers many advantages for biotechnological processes. However, the most extended matrices employed, such as calcium-alginate, cannot fully protect entrapped cells. Sol-gel chemistry of silicates has emerged as an outstanding strategy to obtain biomaterials in which living cells are truly protected. This field of research is rapidly developing and a large number of bacteria and yeast-entrapping ceramics have already been designed for different applications. But even mild thermal and chemical conditions employed in sol-gel synthesis may result harmful to cells of higher organisms. Here we present a method for the immobilization of plant cells that allows cell growth at cavities created inside a silica matrix. Plant cell proliferation was monitored for a 6-month period, at the end of which plant calli of more than 1 mm in diameter were observed inside the inorganic host. The resulting hybrid device had good mechanical stability and proved to be an effective barrier against biological contamination, suggesting that it could be employed for long-term plant cell entrapment applications.

  18. Plant-based vaccines for animals and humans: recent advances in technology and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-09-01

    It has been about 30 years since the first plant engineering technology was established. Although the concept of plant-based pharmaceuticals or vaccines motivates us to develop practicable commercial products using plant engineering, there are some difficulties in reaching the final goal: to manufacture an approved product. At present, the only plant-made vaccine approved by the United States Department of Agriculture is a Newcastle disease vaccine for poultry that is produced in suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progress toward commercialization of plant-based vaccines takes much effort and time, but several candidate vaccines for use in humans and animals are in clinical trials. This review discusses plant engineering technologies and regulations relevant to the development of plant-based vaccines and provides an overview of human and animal vaccines currently under clinical trials.

  19. Hydrolytic enzymes in the central vacuole of plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boller, T.; Kende, H.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrolase content of vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of suspension-cultured tobacco cells, of tulip petals, and pineapple leaves, and the sedimentation behavior of tobacco tonoplasts were studied. Three precautions were found to be important for the analysis of vacuolar hydrolases and of the tonoplast: (a) purification of protoplasts in a Ficoll gradient was necessary to remove cell debris which contained contaminating hydrolases adsorbed from the fungal cell-wall-degrading enzyme preparation; (b) hydrolase activities in the homogenates of the intact cells or the tissue used and of the purified protoplasts had to be compared to verify the absence of contaminating hydrolases in the protoplast preparation; and (c) vacuoles obtained from the protoplasts by an osmotic shock had to be purified from the lysate in a Ficoll gradient. Since the density of the central vacuole approximates that of the protoplasts, about a 10% contamination of the vacuolar preparation by surviving protoplasts could not be eliminated. The intracellular activities of the following acid hydrolases were primarily localized in the vacuole of tobacco cells: α-mannosidase, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, β-fructosidase, nuclease, phosphatase, phosphodiesterase. A similar composition of acid hydrolases was found in vacuoles obtained from protoplasts of tulip petals. Proteinase, a hydrolase with low activity in tobacco cells and tulip petals was found to be vacuolar in pineapple leaves, a tissue containing high levels of this enzyme. None of the vacuolar enzymes investigated ws found to be bound to the tonoplast. When vacuoles were isolated from cells labeled with radioactive choline, the vacuolar membrane was found to contain radioactivity. On sucrose gradients, the label incorporated into tonoplasts banded around a density of 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter

  20. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  1. Nontransgenic genome modification in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Ira; Zuker, Amir; Shklarman, Elena; Zeevi, Vardit; Tovkach, Andrey; Roffe, Suzy; Ovadis, Marianna; Tzfira, Tzvi; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a powerful tool for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. ZFNs have been used for targeted mutagenesis in model and crop species. In animal and human cells, transient ZFN expression is often achieved by direct gene transfer into the target cells. Stable transformation, however, is the preferred method for gene expression in plant species, and ZFN-expressing transgenic plants have been used for recovery of mutants that are likely to be classified as transgenic due to the use of direct gene-transfer methods into the target cells. Here we present an alternative, nontransgenic approach for ZFN delivery and production of mutant plants using a novel Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based expression system for indirect transient delivery of ZFNs into a variety of tissues and cells of intact plants. TRV systemically infected its hosts and virus ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis could be clearly observed in newly developed infected tissues as measured by activation of a mutated reporter transgene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants. The ability of TRV to move to developing buds and regenerating tissues enabled recovery of mutated tobacco and petunia plants. Sequence analysis and transmission of the mutations to the next generation confirmed the stability of the ZFN-induced genetic changes. Because TRV is an RNA virus that can infect a wide range of plant species, it provides a viable alternative to the production of ZFN-mediated mutants while avoiding the use of direct plant-transformation methods.

  2. Stress Response Monitoring of Photoautotrophic Higher Plant Suspension Cultures by Fluorescence Imaging for High-Throughput Toxic Compound Screening

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Segečová, Anna; Červený, Jan; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2017), s. 678-692 ISSN 2152-2197 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17367S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Toxins * Toxicants * Ecotoxicology * PAM Chlorophyll Fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  3. Synthesis of plant cell wall oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    Plant cell walls are structurally complex and contain a large number of diverse carbohydrate polymers. These plant fibers are a highly valuable bio-resource and the focus of food, energy and health research. We are interested in studying the interplay of plant cell wall carbohydrates with proteins...... for characterizing protein-carbohydrate binding. The presentation will highlight chemical syntheses of plant cell wall oligosaccharides from the group and provide examples from studies of their interactions with proteins....... such as enzymes, cell surface lectins, and antibodies. However, detailed molecular level investigations of such interactions are hampered by the heterogeneity and diversity of the polymers of interest. To circumvent this, we target well-defined oligosaccharides with representative structures that can be used...

  4. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-[1'-14C]hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-[1'- 14 C]hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-[1'- 14 C]hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-[1'- 14 C]hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-[1'-14C]Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity

  5. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  6. Proteomic characterization of golgi membranes enriched from Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The plant Golgi apparatus has a central role in the secretory pathway and is the principal site within the cell for the assembly and processing of macromolecules. The stacked membrane structure of the Golgi apparatus along with its interactions with the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum has...... from an Arabidopsis cell suspension culture that can be used to investigate the proteome of this organelle. We also provide a useful workflow for the examination of proteomic data as the result of multiple analyses. Finally, we highlight a simple technique to validate the subcellular localization...

  7. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  8. Quantitative Aspects of Cyclosis in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, K. F.; Fell, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exercise which is currently used in a course in cell physiology at Oxford Polytechnic in England. This exercise can give students some idea of the molecular events involved in bringing about movement of chloroplasts (and other organelles) in plant cells. (HM)

  9. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-19

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

  10. Redox regulation of plant stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jian; Dong, Zhicheng; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-10-02

    Despite the importance of stem cells in plant and animal development, the common mechanisms of stem cell maintenance in both systems have remained elusive. Recently, the importance of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) signaling in priming stem cell differentiation has been extensively studied in animals. Here, we show that different forms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have antagonistic roles in plant stem cell regulation, which were established by distinct spatiotemporal patterns of ROS-metabolizing enzymes. The superoxide anion (O2·-) is markedly enriched in stem cells to activate WUSCHEL and maintain stemness, whereas H 2 O 2 is more abundant in the differentiating peripheral zone to promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, H 2 O 2 negatively regulates O2·- biosynthesis in stem cells, and increasing H 2 O 2 levels or scavenging O2·- leads to the termination of stem cells. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for ROS-mediated control of plant stem cell fate and demonstrate that the balance between O2·- and H 2 O 2 is key to stem cell maintenance and differentiation. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Studies on plant cell toxicity of luminescent silica nanoparticles (Cs{sub 2}[Mo{sub 6}Br{sub 14}]@SiO{sub 2}) and its constitutive components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.cabello@univ-rennes1.fr; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores [University of Rennes 1, UMR UR1-CNRS 6553 ECOBIO, Mechanisms at the Origin of Biodiversity Team (France); Neaime, Chrystelle [University of Rennes 1, Solid State Chemistry and Materials Group, UMR UR1-CNRS 6226 Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (France); Burel, Agnès [University of Rennes 1, Electronic Microscopy Department (France); Jeanne, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal; Cordier, Stéphane; Grasset, Fabien [University of Rennes 1, Solid State Chemistry and Materials Group, UMR UR1-CNRS 6226 Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (France)

    2016-03-15

    As part of the risk evaluation before potential applications of nanomaterials, phytotoxicity of newly designed multifunctional silica nanoparticles (CMB@SiO{sub 2}, average diameter of 47 nm) and their components, i.e., molybdenum octahedral cluster bromide units (CMB, 1 nm) and SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nSiO{sub 2}, 29 nm), has been studied using photosynthetic Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures. CMB clusters presented toxic effects on plant cells, inhibiting cell growth and negatively affecting cell viability and photosynthetic efficiency. Nevertheless, we showed that neither nSiO{sub 2} nor CMB@SiO{sub 2} have any significant effect on cell growth and viability or photosynthetic efficiency. At least, part of the harmful impact of CMB clusters could be ascribed to their capacity to generate an oxidative stress since lipid peroxidation greatly increased after CMB exposure, which was not the case for nSiO{sub 2} or CMB@SiO{sub 2} treatments. Exposure of cells to CMB clusters also leads to the induction of several enzymatic antioxidant activities (i.e., superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase activities) compared to control and the other treatments. Finally, using electron microscopy, we showed that Arabidopsis cells internalize CMB clusters and both silica nanoparticles, the latter through, most likely, endocytosis-like pathway as nanoparticles were mainly found incorporated into vesicles.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2017-01-01

    Understanding plant cell wall cross-linking chemistry and polymeric architecture is key to the efficient utilization of biomass in all prospects from rational genetic modification to downstream chemical and biological conversion to produce fuels and value chemicals. In fact, the bulk properties of cell wall recalcitrance are collectively determined by its chemical features over a wide range of length scales from tissue, cellular to polymeric architectures. Microscopic visualization of cell wa...

  13. The phytotoxicity to tobacco plants of short-chain carboxylic acids at atmospheric concentration levels in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, M; Ozaki, T; Matsuo, M

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the influence of monocarboxylic acids (formic acid and acetic acid) and dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid and adipic acid), which are usually contained in aerosol particles and fog water, on the growth of tobacco plant. Their influence was examined by spraying the acid solutions on intact plants and by administering them in a culture medium for suspension-cultured cells. Their growth rates suggest that the influence of short-chain monocarboxylic acids was not significant in both the intact plant experiment and the cell culture experiment. In contrast, dicarboxylic acids exhibited significant influence on the growth of intact plants and no influence on culture cells, indicating that their toxicity is exerted mainly on the tissue of leaf surface. Phytotoxicity of dicarboxylic acids is higher than that of monocarboxylic acids.

  14. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280–320 nm) and UV-A (320–390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:23344059

  15. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  16. Osmosis in Poisoned Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatina, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Describes two simple laboratory exercises that allow students to test hypotheses concerning the requirement of cell energy for osmosis. The first exercise involves osmotically-caused changes in the length of potato tubers and requires detailed quantitative observations. The second exercise involves osmotically-caused changes in turgor of Elodea…

  17. Extracellular Synthesis of Luminescent CdS Quantum Dots Using Plant Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovaya, Mariya N; Burlaka, Olga M; Naumenko, Antonina P; Blume, Yaroslav B; Yemets, Alla I

    2016-12-01

    The present study describes a novel method for preparation of water-soluble CdS quantum dots, using bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cell suspension culture. Acting as a stabilizing and capping agent, the suspension cell culture mediates the formation of CdS nanoparticles. These semiconductor nanoparticles were determined by means of an UV-visible spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and XRD. Followed by the electron diffraction analysis of a selected area, transmission electron microscopy indicated the formation of spherical, crystalline CdS ranging in diameter from 3 to 7 nm and showed wurtzite CdS quantum dots. In the present work, the toxic effect of synthesized CdS quantum dots on Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts as a very sensitive model was under study. The results of this research revealed that biologically synthesized CdS nanoparticles in low concentrations did not induce any toxic effects.

  18. Programmed Cell Death in Plants: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locato, Vittoria; De Gara, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a controlled mechanism that eliminates specific cells under developmental or environmental stimuli. All organisms-from bacteria to multicellular eukaryotes-have the ability to induce PCD in selected cells. Although this process was first identified in plants, the interest in deciphering the signaling pathways leading to PCD strongly increased when evidence came to light that PCD may be involved in several human diseases. In plants, PCD activation ensures the correct occurrence of growth and developmental processes, among which embryogenesis and differentiation of tracheary elements. PCD is also part of the defense responses activated by plants against environmental stresses, both abiotic and biotic.This chapter gives an overview of the roles of PCD in plants as well as the problems arising in classifying different kinds of PCD according to defined biochemical and cellular markers, and in comparison with the various types of PCD occurring in mammal cells. The importance of understanding PCD signaling pathways, with their elicitors and effectors, in order to improve plant productivity and resistance to environmental stresses is also taken into consideration.

  19. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these pathways...

  20. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the

  1. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply

  2. Plant cells : immobilization and oxygen transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The study described in this thesis is part of the integrated project 'Biotechnological production of non-persistent bioinsecticides by means of plant cells invitro ' and was done in close cooperation with the research Institute Ital within the framework

  3. Plant microbial fuel cell applied in wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetser, Koen; Liu, Jia; Buisman, Cees; Strik, David

    2015-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) has to be applied in wetlands to be able to generate electricity on a large scale. The objective of this PMFC application research is to clarify the differences in electricity generation between a Spartina anglica salt marsh and Phragmites australis peat soil

  4. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    cell wall interface. Transport through plasmodesmata, the cell wall channels that directly connect plant cells, is regulated not only by a fixed size exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. The noninvasive approach described here offers the possibility of precisely...... by confocal microscopy, loaded tracer is activated by UV illumination in a target cell and its spread to neighboring cells monitored. When combined with high-speed acquisition by resonant scanning or spinning disc confocal microscopy, the high signal-to-noise ratio of photoactivation allows collection...

  5. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    this problem, we sought an expression system in which heterologous gene expression could be induced at high levels. We selected a rice amylase expression system in which the promoter Ramy3D is induced to express recombinant protein by sucrose starvation. This induction system was found to give good yield...

  6. An assay for secologanin in plant tissues based on enzymatic conversion into strictosidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallard, Didier; van der Heijden, Robert; Contin, Adriana

    1998-01-01

    strictosidine, a reaction catalysed by the enzyme strictosidine synthase (STR; E.C. 4.3.3.2). Subsequently, the formation of strictosidine is quantified by HPLC. STR was isolated from transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cells expressing a cDNA-derived gene coding for STR from Catharanthus roseus. The high specificity......The secoiridoid glucoside secologanin is the terpenoid building block in the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids. A method for its determination in plant tissues and cell suspension cultures has been developed. This assay is based on the condensation of secologanin with tryptamine, yielding...... of STR for secologanin, in combination with a sensitive and selective HPLC system, allows a simple extraction of secologanin from plant tissue. The detection limit of this methos is 15 ng secologanin. Using this assay, secologanin contents were determined in tissues of various plant species; Lonicera...

  7. Glycoprotein component of plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.B.; Chen, J.A.; Varner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary wall surrounding most dicotyledonous plant cells contains a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) component named extensin. A small group of glycopeptides solubilized from isolated cell walls by proteolysis contained a repeated pentapeptide glycosylated by tri- and tetraarabinosides linked to hydroxyproline and, by galactose, linked to serine. Recently, two complementary approaches to this problem have provided results which greatly increase the understanding of wall extensin. In this paper the authors describe what is known about the structure of soluble extensin secreted into the walls of the carrot root cells

  8. Improved method for HPLC analysis of polyamines, agmatine and aromatic monoamines in plant tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucas carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues.

  9. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Schmeitzl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON, 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON, and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G. This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives.

  11. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  12. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Sadat Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4 D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family.

  13. Plant cell technologies in space: Background, strategies and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkorian, A. D.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize work in plant cell technologies in space. The evolution of concepts and the general principles of plant tissue culture are discussed. The potential for production of high value secondary products by plant cells and differentiated tissue in automated, precisely controlled bioreactors is discussed. The general course of the development of the literature on plant tissue culture is highlighted.

  14. How do plant cell walls extend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  15. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from cultured cells of Manihot esculenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Yong; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) cDNA, mSOD2, encoding cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) cDNA was isolated from suspension-cultured cells of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by cDNA library screening, and its expression was investigated in relation to environmental stress. mSOD2 is 774 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 152 amino acids, corresponding to a protein of predicted molecular mass 15 kDa and a pI of 5.22. One copy of the mSOD2 gene was found to be present in the cassava genome by Southern analysis using an mSOD2 cDNA-specific probe. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed diverse expression patterns for the mSOD2 gene in various tissues of intact cassava plants, at various stages of the growth in suspension cultures, and in the leaf tissues exposed to different stresses. The mSOD2 gene was highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells and in the stems of intact plants. However, it was expressed at low levels in leaves and roots. During suspension cell growth, the mSOD2 transcript progressively increased during culture. Moreover, the mSOD2 gene in excised cassava leaves responded to various stresses in different ways. In particular, it was highly induced in leaf tissue by several abiotic stresses, including high temperature (37 degrees C), chilling (4 degrees C), methyl viologen (MV) exposure, and wounding treatment. These results indicate that the mSOD2 gene is involved in the antioxidative process triggered by oxidative stress induced by environmental change.

  16. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  17. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  18. The potential of single-cell profiling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-04-05

    Single-cell transcriptomics has been employed in a growing number of animal studies, but the technique has yet to be widely used in plants. Nonetheless, early studies indicate that single-cell RNA-seq protocols developed for animal cells produce informative datasets in plants. We argue that single-cell transcriptomics has the potential to provide a new perspective on plant problems, such as the nature of the stem cells or initials, the plasticity of plant cells, and the extent of localized cellular responses to environmental inputs. Single-cell experimental outputs require different analytical approaches compared with pooled cell profiles and new tools tailored to single-cell assays are being developed. Here, we highlight promising new single-cell profiling approaches, their limitations as applied to plants, and their potential to address fundamental questions in plant biology.

  19. [Effect of vanadium compounds on the growth and production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2007-10-01

    Plant tissue cultures represent a promising source of substances of natural origin. The main problem of their use is a low production of the majority of secondary metabolites. One of the methods of increasing the production of these substances is elicitation, because the biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites in plant cells is part of the defensive reaction against biological or abiotic stress influences. The paper tested vanadium compounds as potential elicitors of the production of coumarins: sodium vanadate (0.2; 1; 10; 100 and 1000 microM/l of medium) and vanadyl sulfate (10; 20; 50; 100; 200 and 500 microM/l of medium). The toxicity of these substances for the culture was simultaneously monitored by means of the evaluation of the effects on growth (characterized by fresh and dry weights of biomass at the end of two-week cultivation). The cultures were grown both in the light and dark. The growth of the cultures was not influenced by sodium vanadate at concentrations of 0.2 to 100 microM. A vanadate concentration of 1000 microM acted already toxically (in comparison with the control culture, the fresh weight was decreased by 28 % and the dry weight by 41% when cultivated in the light; the fresh weight by 69% and the dry weight by 66% when cultivated in the dark). Vanadyl sulfate in concentrations of 10 to 50 microM did not affect the growth of the culture, at higher concentrations it decreased it gradually: a concentration of 500 microM acted already toxically, again more markedly when cultivated in the light (in comparison with the control culture, the fresh weight was decreased by 27% and dry weight by 38% when cultivated in the light; the fresh weight by 65% and the dry weight by 61% when cultivated in the dark). The production of coumarins was stimulated by sodium vanadate in a concentration of 0.2 and 1 microM when cultivated in the light. The content of coumarins increased in comparison with the control culture mainly in the medium by 46% and by 25

  20. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  1. Plant and animal stem cells: similar yet different

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, R.; Sabatini, S.

    2014-01-01

    The astonishingly long lives of plants and their regeneration capacity depend on the activity of plant stem cells. As in animals, stem cells reside in stem cell niches, which produce signals that regulate the balance between self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells that differentiate into

  2. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  3. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  4. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  5. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eEbine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall.

  6. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  7. An analysis of chick limb bud intercellular adhesion underlying the establishment of cartilage aggregates in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, J A; von der Mark, K

    1990-07-01

    To examine the mechanism of intercellular adhesion in the establishment of limb skeletal elements we have investigated the process of limb bud cell aggregation in vitro. Limb bud cells are aggregation-competent immediately after their trypsin:collagenase dissociation in the absence of calcium. This aggregation is largely Ca2(+)-independent (CI) and is completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, when limb bud cells are first allowed to recover from Ca2(+)-free trypsin:collagenase dissociation, aggregation of the surviving population is exclusively Ca2(+)-dependent (CD) and completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. The presence of exogenous calcium during initial cell dissociation retains a functional CD aggregation mechanism. However, incubation of such cells with EGTA releases the CD component and converts the cells to a predominantly CI aggregation. Rabbits were immunized with limb bud cells exhibiting the recovered CD aggregation mechanism and the resulting immune sera were screened for their effect on cell aggregation. Relative to pre-immune sera, intact immune IgG agglutinated dissociated limb bud cells whilst immune Fab fragments inhibited their aggregation. The aggregation-inhibiting antiserum recognizes five major limb bud cell surface components with apparent molecular weights of 72K, 50K, 23K, 14.5K and 8.5K (K = 10(3) Mr), respectively. Limb bud cell surface plasma membranes were isolated by sucrose gradient density centrifugation and detergent-solubilized proteins coupled to Sepharose 4B with cyanogen bromide. Equivalent cell surface plasma membrane proteins were 125I-iodinated and applied to the affinity column. Limb bud cell surface protein affinity chromatography in the presence of exogenous calcium yields a single protein with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 8.5 K. This protein molecule elutes at 0.6 M NaCl, indicating a high affinity, is recognized by the aggregation-inhibiting antiserum, and is

  8. Plant cortical microtubule dynamics and cell division plane orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakrabortty, Bandan

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work aimed at a better understanding of the molecular basis of oriented cell division in plant cell. As, the efficiency of plant morphogenesis depends on oriented cell division, this work should contribute  towards a fundamental understanding of the  molecular basis of

  9. Penium margaritaceum as a model organism for cell wall analysis of expanding plant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydahl, Maja Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard

    2015-01-01

    organization of the polymeric networks of the cell wall around the protoplast also contributes to the direction of growth, the shape of the cell, and the proper positioning of the cell in a tissue. In essence, plant cell expansion represents the foundation of development. Most studies of plant cell expansion......The growth of a plant cell encompasses a complex set of subcellular components interacting in a highly coordinated fashion. Ultimately, these activities create specific cell wall structural domains that regulate the prime force of expansion, internally generated turgor pressure. The precise...... mechanics of the cell wall in a single plant cell....

  10. Multidimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Plant Cell Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular st...

  11. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  12. Effects of aluminum on growth, polyamine metabolism, and inorganic ions in suspension cultures of red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Walter C. Shortle; Daniel J. Jr. Coughin; Subhash C. Minocha

    1996-01-01

    The influence of age of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cell suspensions on aluminum (Al) effects was studied by adding AICI3 (0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mM) to the media on each day of a 7-day culture period and analyzing for changes in total cell mass, polyamines, arginine decarboxylase activity, and inorganic ions after 24 h of...

  13. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...

  14. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  15. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation.

  16. Volatiles identified from five stages of embryo development separated from a heterogeneous suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A H; Chamberlain, D; Wilson, G; Ryan, M F

    1991-11-01

    Five stages of embryo development were fractionated from a mature culture of Daucus carota (Gelbe Rheinsche), using a series of metal sieves. The composition of the population of embryos in each fraction was determined quantitatively from microscopic investigations. Volatiles from samples of tissue from six stages of development were trapped on activated charcoal cartridges. These volatiles, some of which may play a significant role in the interaction of the plant with the carrot root fly (Psila rosae), were analysed using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The resulting chromatograms are arranged in order of embryo development. The progressive elaboration of the volatile profile reflects the increased biosynthetic capacity of the developing embryo.

  17. Agrobacterium -induced hypersensitive necrotic reaction in plant cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High necrosis and poor survival rate of target plant tissues are some of the major factors that affect the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transfer into plant cells. These factors may be the result of, or linked to, hypersensitive defense reaction in plants to Agrobacterium infection, which may involve the recognition ...

  18. Plant Microbial Fuel Cells; a new marine energy source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Helder, M.; Timmers, R.A.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide there is need for more clean, renewable, sustainable energy. Plant microbial fuel cells (Plant- MFCs) generate in-situ green electricity(Strik, Hamelers et al. 2008). How does this work? By photosynthesis the plant is capturing solar energy which is transformed into chemical energy as

  19. Many ways to excit? Cell death categories in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and defence. It occurs at all stages of the life cycle, from fertilization of the ovule to death of the whole plant. Without it, tall trees would probably not be possible and plants would more easily succumb to invading

  20. Latrunculin B-induced plant dwarfism: Plant cell elongation is F-actin-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, F; Jasik, J; Edelmann, H G; Salajová, T; Volkmann, D

    2001-03-01

    Marine macrolides latrunculins are highly specific toxins which effectively depolymerize actin filaments (generally F-actin) in all eukaryotic cells. We show that latrunculin B is effective on diverse cell types in higher plants and describe the use of this drug in probing F-actin-dependent growth and in plant development-related processes. In contrast to other eukaryotic organisms, cell divisions occurs in plant cells devoid of all actin filaments. However, the alignment of the division planes is often distorted. In addition to cell division, postembryonic development and morphogenesis also continue in the absence of F-actin. These experimental data suggest that F-actin is of little importance in the morphogenesis of higher plants, and that plants can develop more or less normally without F-actin. In contrast, F-actin turns out to be essential for cell elongation. When latrunculin B was added during germination, morphologically normal Arabidopsis and rye seedlings developed but, as a result of the absence of cell elongation, these were stunted, resembling either genetic dwarfs or environmental bonsai plants. In conclusion, F-actin is essential for the plant cell elongation, while this F-actin-dependent cell elongation is not an essential feature of plant-specific developmental programs.

  1. Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Mesnard, François; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Bienaimé, Christophe; Robins, Richard J; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2004-05-01

    De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.

  2. Progress and prospects for phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonville, L.J.; Scheffler, G.W.; Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has developed the fuel cell power plant as a new, on-site power generation source. IFC`s commercial fuel cell product is the 200-kW PC25{trademark} power plant. To date over 100 PC25 units have been manufactured. Fleet operating time is in excess of one million hours. Individual units of the initial power plant model, the PC25 A, have operated for more than 30,000 hours. The first model {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} power plant has over 10,000 hours of operation. The manufacturing, application and operation of this power plant fleet has established a firm base for design and technology development in terms of a clear understanding of the requirements for power plant reliability and durability. This fleet provides the benchmark against which power plant improvements must be measured.

  3. The first observation on plant cell fossils in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Cui, J.Z. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China)

    2007-02-15

    For a long time, paleontologists have been focusing on hard parts of organisms during different geological periods while soft parts are rarely reported. Well-preserved plant cells, if found in fossils, are treated only as a rarity. Recent progress in research on fossil cytoplasm indicates that plant cytoplasm not only has excellent ultrastructures preserved but also may be a quite commonly seen fossil in strata. However, up to now there is no report of plant cell fossils in China yet. Here plant cell fossils are reported from Huolinhe Coal Mine (the early Cretaceous), Inner Mongolia, China. The presence of plant cytoplasm fossils in two cones on the same specimen not only provides further support for the recently proposed hypothesis on plant cytoplasm fossilization but also marks the first record of plant cytoplasm fossils in China, which suggests a great research potential in this new area.

  4. New plant-growth medium for increased power output of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Kuijken, R.C.P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    In a Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell anode-conditions must be created that are favorable for plant growth and electricity production. One of the major aspects in this is the composition of the plant-growth medium. Hoagland medium has been used until now, with added phosphate buffer to reduce potential

  5. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  6. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development

  7. The study of accumulation of Sr 90 by plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusov, G.D.; Kudryashova, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the absorption and desorption of ions Sr 90 by plant cells and influence of different physical and chemical factors of environment on that processes were investigated. The kinetics of strontium accumulation have been obtained and the factors of accumulation of Sr 90 have been determined for a plant cell itself and its separate compartments

  8. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  9. Animal and plant stem cells concepts, propagation and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlović, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a multifaceted look into the world of stem cells and explains the similarities and differences between plant and human stem cells. It explores the intersection between animals and plants and explains their cooperative role in bioengineering studies. The book treats both theoretical and practical aspects of stem cell research. It covers the advantages and limitations of many common applications related to stem cells: their sources, categories, engineering of these cells, reprogramming of their functions, and their role as novel cellular therapeutic approach. Written by experts in the field, the book focuses on aspects of stem cells ranging from expansion-propagation to metabolic reprogramming. It introduces the emergence of cancer stem cells and different modalities in targeted cancer stem cell therapies. It is a valuable source of fresh information for academics and researchers, examining molecular mechanisms of animal and plant stem cell regulation and their usage for therapeutic applicati...

  10. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and their secretion in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2014-01-01

    Approximately a tenth of all described fungal species can cause diseases in plants. A common feature of this process is the necessity to pass through the plant cell wall, an important barrier against pathogen attack. To this end, fungi possess a diverse array of secreted enzymes to depolymerize the main structural polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. Recent advances in genomic and systems-level studies have begun to unravel this diversity and have pinpointed cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) families that are specifically present or enhanced in plant-pathogenic fungi. In this review, we discuss differences between the CWDE arsenal of plant-pathogenic and non-plant-pathogenic fungi, highlight the importance of individual enzyme families for pathogenesis, illustrate the secretory pathway that transports CWDEs out of the fungal cell, and report the transcriptional regulation of expression of CWDE genes in both saprophytic and phytopathogenic fungi.

  11. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......, an Arabidopsis mutant with increased lignin levels compared to wild type shows increased levels of ATP A2 mRNA and of a mRNA encoding an enzyme upstream in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. The substrate specificity of ATP A2 was analysed by X-ray crystallography and docking of lignin precursors. The structure...

  12. The development and evaluation of single cell suspension from wheat and barley as a model system; a first step towards functional genomics application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Jing; Bowra, Steve; Vincze, Éva

    2010-01-01

    Background The overall research objective was to develop single cell plant cultures as a model system to facilitate functional genomics of monocots, in particular wheat and barley. The essential first step towards achieving the stated objective was the development of a robust, viable single cell...... suspension culture from both species. Results We established growth conditions to allow routine culturing of somatic cells in 24 well microtiter plate format. Evaluation of the wheat and barley cell suspension as model cell system is a multi step process. As an initial step in the evaluation procedure we...... level of genes (P5CS, P5CR) under various treatments and we suggest that the cells can be used as a model host system to study gene expression and regulation in monocots....

  13. Super-resolution Microscopy in Plant Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy methods dates back to 1994, relevant applications in plant cell imaging only started to emerge in 2010. Since then, the principal super-resolution methods, including structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), have been implemented in plant cell research. However, progress has been limited due to the challenging properties of plant material. Here we summarize the basic principles of existing super-resolution methods and provide examples of applications in plant science. The limitations imposed by the nature of plant material are reviewed and the potential for future applications in plant cell imaging is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant cell tissue culture: A potential source of chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.D.; Dougall, D.K.

    1987-08-01

    Higher plants produce many industrially important products. Among these are drugs and medicinal chemicals, essential oils and flavors, vegetable oils and fats, fine and specialty chemicals, and even some commodity chemicals. Although, currently, whole-plant extraction is the primary means of harvesting these materials, the advent of plant cell tissue culture could be a much more effective method of producing many types of phytochemicals. The use of immobilized plant cells in an advanced bioreactor configuration with excretion of the product into the reactor medium may represent the most straightforward way of commercializing such techniques for lower-value chemicals. Important research and development opportunities in this area include screening for plant cultures for nonmedical, lower-value chemicals; understanding and controlling plant cell physiology and biochemistry; optimizing effective immobilization methods; developing more efficient bioreactor concepts; and perfecting product extraction and purification techniques. 62 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Mechanisms of developmentally controlled cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Matthias; Nowack, Moritz K

    2016-02-01

    During plant development various forms of programmed cell death (PCD) are implemented by a number of cell types as inherent part of their differentiation programmes. Differentiation-induced developmental PCD is gradually prepared in concert with the other cell differentiation processes. As precocious or delayed PCD can have detrimental consequences for plant development, the actual execution of PCD has to be tightly controlled. Once triggered, PCD is irrevocably and rapidly executed accompanied by the breakdown of cellular compartments. In most developmental PCD forms, cell death is followed by cell corpse clearance. Devoid of phagocytic mechanisms, dying plant cells have to prepare their own demise in a cell-autonomous fashion before their deaths, ensuring the completion of cell clearance post mortem. Depending on the cell type, cell clearance can be complete or rather selective, and persistent corpses of particular cells accomplish vital functions in the plant body. The present review attempts to give an update on the molecular mechanisms that coordinate differentiation-induced PCD as vital part of plant development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of cellular antioxidants (glutathione and ascorbic acid) in the growth and development of wild carrot suspension cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnshaw, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Determinations of endogenous glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) in proliferating and developing wild carrot cultures showed that lower levels of GSH and AA were associated with developing cultures. The GSSG and DHA levels did not account for the changes in the levels of antioxidants between proliferating and developing cultures. Studies were designed to test an observed auxin (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-D)-antioxidant association. Two fractions (embryo and less developed) were obtained by screening developed cultures which were previously grown in the presence of 14 C-2, 4-D. The embryo fraction had a lower concentration of 14 C than the less developed fraction, supporting the association, since the two fractions showed this relationship with respect to GSH and AA concentrations. Determinations of GSH and AA levels of cells grown in various concentrations of 2,4-D showed the association, decreases in the 2,4-D concentration correlated with decreases in the GSH and AA concentrations. The existence of a respiratory pathway involving GSSG reductase, DHA reductase, and AA oxidase was investigated to test whether inhibition of AA oxidase by 2,4-D could explain the auxin-antioxidant association; however, AA oxidase activity was not detected

  17. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  18. PECULIARITIES OF SECONDARY METABOLITES BIOSYNTHESIS IN PLANT CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. NOSOV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available metabolites formation in plant cell cultures of Panax spp., (ginsenosides; Dioscorea deltoidea (steroid glycosides; Ajuga reptans, Serratula coronata, Rhaponticum carthamoides (ecdisteroids; Polyscias spp., (triterpene glycosides, Taxus spp. (taxoids, Stevia rebaudiana (diterpene steviol-glycosides, Stephania glabra (alkaloids. They are some regular trends of secondary metabolites synthesis in the plant cell culture:It can be noted the stable synthesis of the compound promoting cell proliferation. Indeed, cell cultures of Dioscorea deltoidea were demonstrated to accumulate only furostanol glycosides, which promoted cell division. Furostanol glycoside content of Dioscorea strain DM-0.5 was up to 6 - 12% by dry biomass.Panax ginseng and P. japonicus plant cell cultures synthesize as minimum seven triterpene glycosides (ginsenosides, the productivity of these compounds was up to 6.0 - 8.0% on dry biomass.By contrast, the detectable synthesis of diterpene steviol-glycosides in cultivated cells of Stevia rebaudiana initiated in the mixotrophic cultures during chloroplast formation only.Despite these differences, or mainly due to them, plant cell cultures have become an attractive source of phytochemicals in alternative to collecting wild plants. It provides a guideline to bioreactor-based production of isoprenoids using undifferentiated plant cell cultures. 

  19. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reape, Theresa J; McCabe, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is now accepted as a fundamental cellular process in plants. It is involved in defence, development and response to stress, and our understanding of these processes would be greatly improved through a greater knowledge of the regulation of plant PCD. However, there may be several types of PCD that operate in plants, and PCD research findings can be confusing if they are not assigned to a specific type of PCD. The various cell-death mechanisms need therefore to be carefully described and defined. This review describes one of these plant cell death processes, namely the apoptotic-like PCD (AL-PCD). We begin by examining the hallmark 'apoptotic-like' features (protoplast condensation, DNA degradation) of the cell's destruction that are characteristic of AL-PCD, and include examples of AL-PCD during the plant life cycle. The review explores the possible cellular 'executioners' (caspase-like molecules; mitochondria; de novo protein synthesis) that are responsible for the hallmark features of the cellular destruction. Finally, senescence is used as a case study to show that a rigorous definition of cell-death processes in plant cells can help to resolve arguments that occur in the scientific literature regarding the timing and control of plant cell death.

  20. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  1. Lethal impacts of cigarette smoke in cultured tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawano Tomonori

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to understand and generalize the toxic mechanism of cigarette smoke in living cells, comparison of the data between animal systems and other biological system such as microbial and plant systems is highly beneficial. Objective By employing the tobacco cells as model materials for cigarette smoke toxicity assay, the impacts of the combustion by-products such as nitrogen oxides could be highlighted as the toxic impacts of the plant-derived endogenous chemicals could be excluded in the plant cells. Methods Cigarette smoke-induced cell death was assessed in tobacco cell suspension cultures in the presence and absence of pharmacological inhibitors. Results Cigarette smoke was effective in induction of cell death. The smoke-induced cell death could be partially prevented by addition of nitric oxide (NO scavenger, suggesting the role for NO as the cell death mediator. Addition of NO donor to tobacco cells also resulted in development of partial cell death further confirming the role of NO as cell death mediator. Members of reactive oxygen species and calcium ion were shown to be protecting the cells from the toxic action of smoke-derived NO.

  2. Synthesis and Application of Plant Cell Wall Oligogalactans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Christian Franch

    The plant cell walls represent almost 50% of the biomass found in plants and are therefore one of the main targets for biotechnological research. Major motivators are their potential as a renewable energy source for transport fuels, as functional foods, and as a source of raw materials to generate...... chemical building blocks for industrial processes. To achieve a sustainable development it is necessary to optimize plant production and utilization. This will require a better understanding of the cell wall structure and function at the molecular level. The cell wall is composed by an intricate network...

  3. Gateway binary vectors with the bialaphos resistance gene, bar, as a selection marker for plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinya; Mano, Shoji; Tanaka, Yuji; Ohnishi, Masato; Nakamori, Chihiro; Araki, Masami; Niwa, Tomoko; Nishimura, Mikio; Kaminaka, Hironori; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yutaka; Ishiguro, Sumie

    2010-01-01

    We constructed two series of Gateway binary vectors, pGWBs and R4pGWBs, possessing the bialaphos resistance gene (bar) as a selection marker for plant transformation. The reporters and tags employed in this system are sGFP, GUS, LUC, EYFP, ECFP, G3GFP, mRFP, TagRFP, 6xHis, FLAG, 3xHA, 4xMyc, 10xMyc, GST, T7 and TAP. Selection of Arabidopsis transformants with BASTA was successfully carried out using both plate-grown and soil-grown seedlings. Transformed rice calli and suspension-cultured tobacco cells were selected on plates containing BASTA or glufosinate-ammonium. These vectors are compatible with existing pGWB and R4pGWB vectors carrying kanamycin and hygromycin B resistance.

  4. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  5. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  6. Plant and algal cell walls: diversity and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Zoë A; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Domozych, David S

    2014-10-01

    Although plants and many algae (e.g. the Phaeophyceae, brown, and Rhodophyceae, red) are only very distantly related they are united in their possession of carbohydrate-rich cell walls, which are of integral importance being involved in many physiological processes. Furthermore,wall components have applications within food, fuel, pharmaceuticals, fibres (e.g. for textiles and paper) and building materials and have long been an active topic of research. As shown in the 27 papers in this Special Issue, as the major deposit of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and therefore energy investment, cell walls are of undisputed importance to the organisms that possess them, the photosynthetic eukaryotes ( plants and algae). The complexities of cell wall components along with their interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment are becoming increasingly revealed. The importance of plant and algal cell walls and their individual components to the function and survival of the organism, and for a number of industrial applications, are illustrated by the breadth of topics covered in this issue, which includes papers concentrating on various plants and algae, developmental stages, organs, cell wall components, and techniques. Although we acknowledge that there are many alternative ways in which the papers could be categorized (and many would fit within several topics), we have organized them as follows: (1) cell wall biosynthesis and remodelling, (2) cell wall diversity, and (3) application of new technologies to cell walls. Finally, we will consider future directions within plant cell wall research. Expansion of the industrial uses of cell walls and potentially novel uses of cell wall components are both avenues likely to direct future research activities. Fundamentally, it is the continued progression from characterization (structure, metabolism, properties and localization) of individual cell wall components through to defining their roles in almost every aspect of plant

  7. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  8. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  9. An introduction to plant cell culture: the future ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola-Vargas, Víctor M; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell, tissue, and organ culture (PTC) techniques were developed and established as an experimental necessity for solving important fundamental questions in plant biology, but they currently represent very useful biotechnological tools for a series of important applications such as commercial micropropagation of different plant species, generation of disease-free plant materials, production of haploid and doublehaploid plants, induction of epigenetic or genetic variation for the isolation of variant plants, obtention of novel hybrid plants through the rescue of hybrid embryos or somatic cell fusion from intra- or intergeneric sources, conservation of valuable plant germplasm, and is the keystone for genetic engineering of plants to produce disease and pest resistant varieties, to engineer metabolic pathways with the aim of producing specific secondary metabolites or as an alternative for biopharming. Some other miscellaneous applications involve the utilization of in vitro cultures to test toxic compounds and the possibilities of removing them (bioremediation), interaction of root cultures with nematodes or mycorrhiza, or the use of shoot cultures to maintain plant viruses. With the increased worldwide demand for biofuels, it seems that PTC will certainly be fundamental for engineering different plants species in order to increase the diversity of biofuel options, lower the price marketing, and enhance the production efficiency. Several aspects and applications of PTC such as those mentioned above are the focus of this edition.

  10. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotide...... angiosperms. This analysis has enabled cell wall diversity to be placed in a phylogenetic context, and, when integrated with transcriptomic and genomic analysis has contributed to our understanding of important aspects of plant evolution....... produced has provided new insight into cell wall evolution and biosynthesis and has contributed to the commercial development of cell wall materials. A major focus of the work has been the wide scale sampling of cell wall diversity across the plant kingdom, from unicellular algae to highly evolved...

  11. Asymmetric cell division in plants: mechanisms of symmetry breaking and cell fate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Guo, Xiaoyu; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental mechanism that generates cell diversity while maintaining self-renewing stem cell populations in multicellular organisms. Both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms underpin symmetry breaking and differential daughter cell fate determination in animals and plants. The emerging picture suggests that plants deal with the problem of symmetry breaking using unique cell polarity proteins, mobile transcription factors, and cell wall components to influence asymmetric divisions and cell fate. There is a clear role for altered auxin distribution and signaling in distinguishing two daughter cells and an emerging role for epigenetic modifications through chromatin remodelers and DNA methylation in plant cell differentiation. The importance of asymmetric cell division in determining final plant form provides the impetus for its study in the areas of both basic and applied science.

  12. Investigating Wound Healing in Plant Cells: This Spud's for You!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Norm

    2000-01-01

    Presents classroom inquiry-based investigations to investigate wound healing in plant tissues and cells. Students create their own research problems and the investigations can be related to the National Science Standards. (SAH)

  13. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  14. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-26

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions.

  15. Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: from algae to flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Zoë A; Michel, Gurvan; Hervé, Cécile; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T; Tuohy, Maria G; Kloareg, Bernard; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-01-01

    All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall. The cell wall exerts considerable biological and biomechanical control over individual cells and organisms, thus playing a key role in their environmental interactions. This has resulted in compositional variation that is dependent on developmental stage, cell type, and season. Further variation is evident that has a phylogenetic basis. Plants and algae have a complex phylogenetic history, including acquisition of genes responsible for carbohydrate synthesis and modification through a series of primary (leading to red algae, green algae, and land plants) and secondary (generating brown algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) endosymbiotic events. Therefore, organisms that have the shared features of photosynthesis and possession of a cell wall do not form a monophyletic group. Yet they contain some common wall components that can be explained increasingly by genetic and biochemical evidence.

  16. Plant cell engineering: current research, application and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xunqing; Liu Luxiang

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the current status of basic research in plant cell engineering, highlighted the application of embryo culture, double haploid (DH) technology, protoplast culture and somatic hybridization, somaclonal variation, rapid propagation, and bio-products production of plant-origin, and t he prospects. (authors)

  17. Radiation-induced cell death in embryogenic cells of coniferous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Yukawa, Masae; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Sasamoto, Hamako; Takahagi, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive processes are particularly radiosensitive in plant development, which was clearly illustrated in reduction of seed formation in native coniferous plants around Chernobyl after the nuclear accident. For the purpose to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on embryonic formation in coniferous plants, we used an embryo-derived embryogenic cell culture of a Japanese native coniferous plant, Japanese cedar (Cryplomeria japonica). The embryogenic cells were so radiosensitive that most of the cells died by X-ray irradiation of 5 Gy. This indicated that the embryogenic cells are as radiosensitive as some mammalian cells including lymphocytes. We considered that this type of radiosensitive cell death in the embryogenic cells should be responsible for reproductive damages of coniferous plants by low dose of ionizing radiation. The cell death of the embryogenic cells was characteristic of nuclear DNA fragmentation, which is typically observed in radiation-induced programmed cell death, i.e. apoptosis, in mammalian cells. On the other hand, cell death with nuclear DNA fragmentation did not develop by X-ray irradiation in vegetative cells including meristematic cells of Japanese cedar. This suggests that an apoptosis-like programmed cell death should develop cell-specifically in embryogenic cells by ionizing radiation. The abortion of embryogenic cells may work to prevent transmission of radiation-induced genetic damages to the descendants. (author)

  18. Optimization of micropropagation and establishment of cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... those established conditions to produce useful essential oil. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Seed sterilization procedure. Viable seeds of M. officinalis ..... technology. UK: Butler and Tammer. Gopi C, Vatsala TM (2006) In vitro studies on effects of plant growth regulators on callus and suspension culture ...

  19. Plant response to heavy metals and organic pollutants in cell culture and at whole plant level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan-Goldhirsh, A.; Barazani, O. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of The Negev, The Jacob Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Albert Katz Dept. of Dryland Biotechnologies, Desert Plant Biotechnology Lab., Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Nepovim, A.; Soudek, P.; Vanek, T. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Czech Republic); Smrcek, S.; Dufkova, L.; Krenkova, S. [Faculty of Natural Sciences, Charles Univ. (Czech Republic); Yrjala, K. [Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Biosciences, Div. of General Microbiology, Helsinki (Finland); Schroeder, P. [Inst. for Soil Ecology, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background. Increasing awareness in the last decade concerning environmental quality had prompted research into 'green solutions' for soil and water remediation, progressing from laboratory in vitro experiments to pot and field trials. In vitro cell culture experiments provide a convenient system to study basic biological processes, by which biochemical pathways, enzymatic activity and metabolites can be specifically studied. However, it is difficult to relate cell cultures, calli or even hydroponic experiments to the whole plant response to pollutant stress. In the field, plants are exposed to additional a-biotic and biotic factors, which complicate further plant response. Hence, we often see that in vitro selected species perform poorly under soil and field conditions. Soil physical and chemical properties, plant-mycorrhizal association and soil-microbial activity affect the process of contaminant degradation by plants and/or microorganisms, pointing to the importance of pot and field experiments. Objective. This paper is a joint effort of a group of scientists in COST action 837. It represents experimental work and an overview on plant response to environmental stress from in vitro tissue culture to whole plant experiments in soil. Results. Results obtained from in vitro plant tissue cultures and whole plant hydroponic experiments indicate the phytoremediation potential of different plant species and the biochemical mechanisms involved in plant tolerance. In pot experiments, several selected desert plant species, which accumulated heavy metal in hydroponic systems, succeeded in accumulating the heavy metal in soil conditions as well. Conclusions and recommendations. In vitro plant tissue cultures provide a useful experimental system for the study of the mechanisms involved in the detoxification of organic and heavy metal pollutants. However, whole plant experimental systems, as well as hydroponics followed by pot and field trials, are essential when

  20. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. © 2017 Distéfano et al.

  1. The Life and Death of a Plant Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbage, Mehdi; Kessens, Ryan; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Williams, Brett

    2017-04-28

    Like all eukaryotic organisms, plants possess an innate program for controlled cellular demise termed programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the functional conservation of PCD across broad evolutionary distances, an understanding of the molecular machinery underpinning this fundamental program in plants remains largely elusive. As in mammalian PCD, the regulation of plant PCD is critical to development, homeostasis, and proper responses to stress. Evidence is emerging that autophagy is key to the regulation of PCD in plants and that it can dictate the outcomes of PCD execution under various scenarios. Here, we provide a broad and comparative overview of PCD processes in plants, with an emphasis on stress-induced PCD. We also discuss the implications of the paradox that is functional conservation of apoptotic hallmarks in plants in the absence of core mammalian apoptosis regulators, what that means, and whether an equivalent form of death occurs in plants.

  2. Complementation of a yeast cell cycle mutant by an alfalfa cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to p34cdc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, H; Páy, A; Györgyey, J; Bakó, L; Németh, K; Bögre, L; Schweyen, R J; Heberle-Bors, E; Dudits, D

    1991-03-01

    The cdc2 protein kinase plays a central role in control of the eukaryotic cell cycle of animals and yeasts. We have isolated a cDNA clone (cdc2Ms) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that is homologous to the yeast cdc2/CDC28 genes. The encoded protein is 64% identical to the yeast and mammalian counterparts and shows all the prominent structural features known from these organisms. Antibody raised against a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide with crossreactivity against p34 proteins recognized a 34-kilodalton protein in extracts of alfalfa cells. When transferred into a fission yeast, the plant cdc2 homolog can complement a temperature-sensitive cdc2 mutant. Northern analysis revealed higher transcript levels in shoots and suspension cultures than in roots. In addition to the dominant transcript of 1.4 kilobases detected in the poly(A)+fraction, 2.5- and 1.2-kilobase transcripts were detected in total RNA preparations from shoots or somatic embryos. Suspension cultures that were induced to form somatic embryos by an auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) showed fluctuations in transcription pattern during the induction period and embryogenesis.

  3. Biofunctionalized Plants as Diverse Biomaterials for Human Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Gianluca; Gershlak, Joshua; Adamski, Michal; Lee, Jae-Sung; Matsumoto, Shion; Le, Hau D; Binder, Bernard; Wirth, John; Gaudette, Glenn; Murphy, William L

    2017-04-01

    The commercial success of tissue engineering products requires efficacy, cost effectiveness, and the possibility of scaleup. Advances in tissue engineering require increased sophistication in the design of biomaterials, often challenging the current manufacturing techniques. Interestingly, several of the properties that are desirable for biomaterial design are embodied in the structure and function of plants. This study demonstrates that decellularized plant tissues can be used as adaptable scaffolds for culture of human cells. With simple biofunctionalization technique, it is possible to enable adhesion of human cells on a diverse set of plant tissues. The elevated hydrophilicity and excellent water transport abilities of plant tissues allow cell expansion over prolonged periods of culture. Moreover, cells are able to conform to the microstructure of the plant frameworks, resulting in cell alignment and pattern registration. In conclusion, the current study shows that it is feasible to use plant tissues as an alternative feedstock of scaffolds for mammalian cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Hahn, Michael G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); O' Neill, Malcolm A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); York, William S. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  5. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant's immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial...... features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined...

  6. Green light for quantitative live-cell imaging in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Krebs, Melanie; Maizel, Alexis; Stahl, Yvonne; Vermeer, Joop E M; Ott, Thomas

    2018-01-29

    Plants exhibit an intriguing morphological and physiological plasticity that enables them to thrive in a wide range of environments. To understand the cell biological basis of this unparalleled competence, a number of methodologies have been adapted or developed over the last decades that allow minimal or non-invasive live-cell imaging in the context of tissues. Combined with the ease to generate transgenic reporter lines in specific genetic backgrounds or accessions, we are witnessing a blooming in plant cell biology. However, the imaging of plant cells entails a number of specific challenges, such as high levels of autofluorescence, light scattering that is caused by cell walls and their sensitivity to environmental conditions. Quantitative live-cell imaging in plants therefore requires adapting or developing imaging techniques, as well as mounting and incubation systems, such as micro-fluidics. Here, we discuss some of these obstacles, and review a number of selected state-of-the-art techniques, such as two-photon imaging, light sheet microscopy and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy that allow high performance and minimal invasive live-cell imaging in plants. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Acid fuel cell technologies for vehicular power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, D. K.; McCormick, J. B.; Bobbett, R. E.; Huff, J. R.; Srinivasan, S.

    Three fuel cell technologies were assessed specifically for application as vehicular power plants. The considered cells include the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), the trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA) fuel cell, and the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell. The results of the assessments were used to calculate the performance of a consumer vehicle with a number of different fuel cell power plants. It was found that the near-term PAFC system can power the base-line vehicle with reasonable acceleration, a range of over 400 miles on 20 gallons of methanol, and a 92% improvement in energy efficiency over the gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) version. An SPE fuel cell system provides substantially improved performance and range with a 149% higher energy efficiency than the ICE-powered version. The advanced vehicle (ETV-1) with an SPE system provides performance competitive with today's gasoline ICE-powered vehicles and a gasoline energy equivalent of 66 mpg.

  8. Plant cell wall signalling and receptor-like kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-02-15

    Communication between the extracellular matrix and the cell interior is essential for all organisms as intrinsic and extrinsic cues have to be integrated to co-ordinate development, growth, and behaviour. This applies in particular to plants, the growth and shape of which is governed by deposition and remodelling of the cell wall, a rigid, yet dynamic, extracellular network. It is thus generally assumed that cell wall surveillance pathways exist to monitor the state of the wall and, if needed, elicit compensatory responses such as altered expression of cell wall remodelling and biosynthesis genes. Here, I highlight recent advances in the field of cell wall signalling in plants, with emphasis on the role of plasma membrane receptor-like kinase complexes. In addition, possible roles for cell wall-mediated signalling beyond the maintenance of cell wall integrity are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and cultured plant cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1989-01-01

    Plant development entails an orderly progression of cellular events both in terms of time and geometry. There is only circumstantial evidence that, in the controlled environment of the higher plant embryo sac, gravity may play a role in embryo development. It is still not known whether or not normal embryo development and differentiation in higher plants can be expected to take place reliably and efficiently in the micro g space environment. It seems essential that more attention be given to studying aspects of reproductive biology in order to be confident that plants will survive seed to seed to seed in a space environment. Until the time arrives when successive generations of plants can be grown, the best that can be done is utilize the most appropriate systems and begin, piece meal, to accumulate information on important aspects of plant reproduction. Cultured plant cells can play an important role in these activities since they can be grown so as to be morphogenetically competent, and thus can simulate those embryogenic events more usually identified with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary. Also, they can be manipulated with relative ease. The extreme plasticity of such demonstrably totipotent cell systems provides a means to test environmental effects such as micro g on a potentially free-running entity. The successful manipulation and management of plant cells and propagules in space also has significance for exploitation of biotechnologies in space since such systems, perforce, are an important vehicle whereby many genetic engineering manipulations are achieved.

  10. How filamentous plant pathogen effectors are translocated to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Libera; Kahmann, Regine

    2017-08-01

    The interaction of microbes with "signature" plants is largely governed by secreted effector proteins, which serve to dampen plant defense responses and modulate host cell processes. Secreted effectors can function either in the apoplast or within plant cell compartments. How oomycetes and fungi translocate their effectors to plant cells is still poorly understood and controversial. While most oomycete effectors share a common 'signature' that was proposed to mediate their uptake via endocytosis, fungal effectors display no conserved motifs at the primary amino acid sequence level. Here we summarize current knowledge in the field of oomycete and fungal effector uptake and highlight emerging themes that may unite rather than set apart these unrelated filamentous pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Programmed cell death in C. elegans, mammals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated removal of cells within an organism and plays a fundamental role in growth and development in nearly all eukaryotes. In animals, the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has aided in elucidating many of the pathways involved in the cell death process. Various analogous PCD processes can also be found within mammalian PCD systems, including vertebrate limb development. Plants and animals also appear to share hallmarks of PCD, both on the cellular and molecular level. Cellular events visualized during plant PCD resemble those seen in animals including: nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic condensation, and plasma membrane shrinkage. Recently the molecular mechanisms involved in plant PCD have begun to be elucidated. Although few regulatory proteins have been identified as conserved across all eukaryotes, molecular features such as the participation of caspase-like proteases, Bcl-2-like family members and mitochondrial proteins appear to be conserved between plant and animal systems. Transgenic expression of mammalian and C. elegans pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in plants has been observed to dramatically influence the regulatory pathways of plant PCD. Although these genes often show little to no sequence similarity they can frequently act as functional substitutes for one another, thus suggesting that action may be more important than sequence resemblance. Here we present a summary of these findings, focusing on the similarities, between mammals, C. elegans, and plants. An emphasis will be placed on the mitochondria and its role in the cell death pathway within each organism. Through the comparison of these systems on both a cellular and molecular level we can begin to better understand PCD in plant systems, and perhaps shed light on the pathways, which are controlling the process. This manuscript adds to the field of PCD in plant systems by profiling apoptotic factors, to scale on a protein

  12. Chromosomes and plant cell division in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives were: examination of chromosomal aberrations; development of an experimental system; and engineering design units (EDUs) evaluation. Evaluation criteria are presented. Procedures were developed for shuttle-based investigations which result in the procurement of plant root tips for subsequent cytological examination.

  13. Actin-mediated cytoplasmic organization of plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I present results that give insight in the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the production of an organized cytoplasm in plant cells, which is, for instance, required for proper cell morphogenesis.

    Chapter 1 is a review in which we discuss the possible role of actin-based

  14. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage

  15. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. New plant-growth medium for increased power output of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, M; Strik, D P B T B; Hamelers, H V M; Kuijken, R C P; Buisman, C J N

    2012-01-01

    In a Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell anode-conditions must be created that are favorable for plant growth and electricity production. One of the major aspects in this is the composition of the plant-growth medium. Hoagland medium has been used until now, with added phosphate buffer to reduce potential losses over the membrane because of differences in pH between anode and cathode. We developed a new, improved plant-growth medium that improves current production, while the plant keeps growing. This medium is a nitrate-less, ammonium-rich medium that contains all macro- and micro-nutrients necessary for plant growth, with a balanced amount of bicarbonate buffer. Sulphate presence in the plant-growth medium helps to keep a low anode-potential. With the new plant-growth medium the maximum current production of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell increased from 186 mA/m(2) to 469 mA/m(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant Micrometabolomics: The Analysis of Endogenous Metabolites Present in a Plant Cell or Tissue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moco, S.I.A.; Schneider, B.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Identification and quantification of metabolites occurring within specific cell types or single cells of plants and other organisms is of particular interest for natural product chemistry, chemical ecology, and biochemistry in general. The integration of studies at the gene, transcript, protein and

  18. Emission spectra profiling of fluorescent proteins in living plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylle, Evelien; Codreanu, Mirela-Corina; Boruc, Joanna; Russinova, Eugenia

    2013-04-03

    Fluorescence imaging at high spectral resolution allows the simultaneous recording of multiple fluorophores without switching optical filters, which is especially useful for time-lapse analysis of living cells. The collected emission spectra can be used to distinguish fluorophores by a computation analysis called linear unmixing. The availability of accurate reference spectra for different fluorophores is crucial for this type of analysis. The reference spectra used by plant cell biologists are in most cases derived from the analysis of fluorescent proteins in solution or produced in animal cells, although these spectra are influenced by both the cellular environment and the components of the optical system. For instance, plant cells contain various autofluorescent compounds, such as cell wall polymers and chlorophyll, that affect the spectral detection of some fluorophores. Therefore, it is important to acquire both reference and experimental spectra under the same biological conditions and through the same imaging systems. Entry clones (pENTR) of fluorescent proteins (FPs) were constructed in order to create C- or N-terminal protein fusions with the MultiSite Gateway recombination technology. The emission spectra for eight FPs, fused C-terminally to the A- or B-type cyclin dependent kinases (CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1) and transiently expressed in epidermal cells of tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), were determined by using the Olympus FluoView™ FV1000 Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope. These experimental spectra were then used in unmixing experiments in order to separate the emission of fluorophores with overlapping spectral properties in living plant cells. Spectral imaging and linear unmixing have a great potential for efficient multicolor detection in living plant cells. The emission spectra for eight of the most commonly used FPs were obtained in epidermal cells of tobacco leaves and used in unmixing experiments. The generated set of FP Gateway entry vectors

  19. Advanced coal gasifier-fuel cell power plant systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Two advanced, high efficiency coal-fired power plants were designed, one utilizing a phosphoric acid fuel cell and one utilizing a molten carbonate fuel cell. Both incorporate a TRW Catalytic Hydrogen Process gasifier and regenerator. Both plants operate without an oxygen plant and without requiring water feed; they, instead, require makeup dolomite. Neither plant requires a shift converter; neither plant has heat exchangers operating above 1250 F. Both plants have attractive efficiencies and costs. While the molten carbonate version has a higher (52%) efficiency than the phosphoric acid version (48%), it also has a higher ($0.078/kWh versus $0.072/kWh) ten-year levelized cost of electricity. The phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant is probably feasible to build in the near term: questions about the TRW process need to be answered experimentally, such as weather it can operate on caking coals, and how effective the catalyzed carbon-dioxide acceptor will be at pilot scale, both in removing carbon dioxide and in removing sulfur from the gasifier.

  20. Prospects for advanced coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, D.; Laag, P.C. van der; Oudhuis, A.B.J.; Ribberink, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    As part of ECN's in-house R and D programmes on clean energy conversion systems with high efficiencies and low emissions, system assessment studies have been carried out on coal gasification power plants integrated with high-temperature fuel cells (IGFC). The studies also included the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions, and to find possible ways for CO 2 extraction and sequestration. The development of this new type of clean coal technology for large-scale power generation is still far off. A significant market share is not envisaged before the year 2015. To assess the future market potential of coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants, the promise of this fuel cell technology was assessed against the performance and the development of current state-of-the-art large-scale power generation systems, namely the pulverized coal-fired power plants and the integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. With the anticipated progress in gas turbine and gas clean-up technology, coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants will have to face severe competition from advanced IGCC power plants, despite their higher efficiency. (orig.)

  1. Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Junichiro; Furukawa, Hiroka; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-03-01

    The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.

  2. Detection of programmed cell death in plant embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonova, Lada H; Suárez, María F; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of embryogenesis. In plant embryos, PCD functions during terminal differentiation and elimination of the temporary organ, suspensor, as well as during establishment of provascular system. Embryo abortion is another example of embryonic PCD activated at pathological situations and in polyembryonic seeds. Recent studies identified the sequence of cytological events leading to cellular self-destruction in plant embryos. As in most if not all the developmental cell deaths in plants, embryonic PCD is hallmarked by autophagic degradation of the cytoplasm and nuclear disassembly that includes breakdown of the nuclear envelope and DNA fragmentation. The optimized setup of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) allows the routine in situ analysis of nuclear DNA fragmentation in plant embryos. This chapter provides step-by-step procedure of how to process embryos for TUNEL and how to combine TUNEL with immunolocalization of the protein of interest.

  3. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  4. Gravity, chromosomes, and organized development in aseptically cultured plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the PCR experiment are: to test the hypothesis that microgravity will in fact affect the pattern and developmental progression of embryogenically competent plant cells from one well-defined, critical stage to another; to determine the effects of microgravity in growth and differentiation of embryogenic carrot cells grown in cell culture; to determine whether microgravity or the space environment fosters an instability of the differentiated state; and to determine whether mitosis and chromosome behavior are adversely affected by microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: special embryogenically competent carrot cell cultures will be grown in cell culture chambers provided by NASDA; four cell culture chambers will be used to grow cells in liquid medium; two dishes (plant cell culture dishes) will be used to grow cells on a semi-solid agar support; progression to later embryonic stages will be induced in space via crew intervention and by media manipulation in the case of liquid grown cell cultures; progression to later stages in case of semi-solid cultures will not need crew intervention; embryo stages will be fixed at a specific interval (day 6) in flight only in the case of liquid-grown cultures; and some living cells and somatic embryos will be returned for continued post-flight development and 'grown-out.' These will derive from the semi-solid grown cultures.

  5. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  6. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood-brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery.

  7. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obel, N.; Erben, V.; Schwarz, T.; Kühnel, S.; Fodor, A.; Pauly, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the

  8. Puzzling Out the Cell's Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    The biological research, of Gottfried Schatz at the University of Basel and Gunter Blobel at Rockefeller University, which explains a mechanism by which mitochondrial proteins are transported across membranes is described. Results indicate that the construction and heredity of mitochondria have surprising differences from other cell processes. (BT)

  9. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial VDAC and hexokinase together modulate plant programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Ashwini; Dubey, Ashvini Kumar; Reddy, Palakolanu S; Udayakumar, M; Mathew, Mathew K

    2013-08-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and mitochondrially located hexokinase have been implicated both in pathways leading to cell death on the one hand, and immortalization in tumor formation on the other. While both proteins have also been implicated in death processes in plants, their interaction has not been explored. We have examined cell death following heterologous expression of a rice VDAC in the tobacco cell line BY2 and in leaves of tobacco plants and show that it is ameliorated by co-expression of hexokinase. Hexokinase also abrogates death induced by H2O2. We conclude that the ratio of expression of the two proteins and their interaction play a major role in modulating death pathways in plants.

  11. Intracellular salicylic acid is involved in signal cascade regulating low ammonium-induced taxoid biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2011-05-01

    It was previously reported that low initial ammonium (2 mM) in medium had significant stimulating effects on the biosynthesis of taxuyunnanine C (Tc) by Taxus chinensis cells. However, the secondary metabolism induction mechanism of the low initial ammonium is yet unknown in plant cells. To provide an insight into the defense signals response to the low initial ammonium, oxidative burst and intracellular salicylic acid (SA) were detected, and their influences on the expression of important genes in taxoid biosynthetic pathway were examined in the cell cultures of T. chinensis. Induced H(2)O(2) production, elevated phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, and enhanced SA biosynthesis were observed. Interestingly, inhibition of SA biosynthesis by paclobutrazol and (BOC-aminooxy) acetic acid significantly depressed the Tc stimulation and up-regulation of Tc biosynthetic genes of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase and taxadiene synthase. The role of intracellular SA in regulating Tc biosynthesis was further confirmed by applying exogenous SA in normal ammonium (20 mM) medium. The results indicated that SA acted as a signal in low initial ammonium-induced Tc biosynthesis. A signal transduction cascade from defense signal response to activated transcription of taxoid biosynthetic genes and enhanced Tc production is proposed.

  12. A Hydroponic Co-cultivation System for Simultaneous and Systematic Analysis of Plant/Microbe Molecular Interactions and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathoo, Naeem; Bernards, Mark A; MacDonald, Jacqueline; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2017-07-22

    An experimental design mimicking natural plant-microbe interactions is very important to delineate the complex plant-microbe signaling processes. Arabidopsis thaliana-Agrobacterium tumefaciens provides an excellent model system to study bacterial pathogenesis and plant interactions. Previous studies of plant-Agrobacterium interactions have largely relied on plant cell suspension cultures, the artificial wounding of plants, or the artificial induction of microbial virulence factors or plant defenses by synthetic chemicals. However, these methods are distinct from the natural signaling in planta, where plants and microbes recognize and respond in spatial and temporal manners. This work presents a hydroponic cocultivation system where intact plants are supported by metal mesh screens and cocultivated with Agrobacterium. In this cocultivation system, no synthetic phytohormone or chemical that induces microbial virulence or plant defense is supplemented. The hydroponic cocultivation system closely resembles natural plant-microbe interactions and signaling homeostasis in planta. Plant roots can be separated from the medium containing Agrobacterium, and the signaling and responses of both the plant hosts and the interacting microbes can be investigated simultaneously and systematically. At any given timepoint/interval, plant tissues or bacteria can be harvested separately for various "omics" analyses, demonstrating the power and efficacy of this system. The hydroponic cocultivation system can be easily adapted to study: 1) the reciprocal signaling of diverse plant-microbe systems, 2) signaling between a plant host and multiple microbial species (i.e. microbial consortia or microbiomes), 3) how nutrients and chemicals are implicated in plant-microbe signaling, and 4) how microbes interact with plant hosts and contribute to plant tolerance to biotic or abiotic stresses.

  13. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqsud, M A; Yoshitake, J; Bushra, Q S; Hyodo, M; Omine, K; Strik, David

    2015-02-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) in soil mixed with compost. A total of six buckets filled with the same soil were used with carbon fiber as the electrodes for the test. Rice plants were planted in five of the buckets, with the sixth bucket containing only soil and an external resistance of 100 ohm was used for all cases. It was observed that the cells with rice plants and compost showed higher values of voltage and power density with time. The highest value of voltage showed around 700 mV when a rice plant with 1% compost mixed soil was used, however it was more than 95% less in the case of no rice plant and without compost. Comparing cases with and without compost but with the same number of rice plants, cases with compost depicted higher voltage to as much as 2 times. The power density was also 3 times higher when the compost was used in the paddy PMFCs which indicated the influence of compost on bio-electricity generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy from plants and microorganisms: progress in plant-microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huan; Chen, Zheng; Zhao, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Plant-microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) are newly emerging devices, in which electricity can be generated by microorganisms that use root exudates as fuel. This review presents the development of PMFCs, with a summary of their power generation, configurations, plant types, anode and cathode materials, biofilm communities, potential applications, and future directions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The cell biology of lignification in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Jaime; Serk, Henrik; Granlund, Irene; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-06-01

    Lignin is a polyphenolic polymer that strengthens and waterproofs the cell wall of specialized plant cell types. Lignification is part of the normal differentiation programme and functioning of specific cell types, but can also be triggered as a response to various biotic and abiotic stresses in cells that would not otherwise be lignifying. Cell wall lignification exhibits specific characteristics depending on the cell type being considered. These characteristics include the timing of lignification during cell differentiation, the palette of associated enzymes and substrates, the sub-cellular deposition sites, the monomeric composition and the cellular autonomy for lignin monomer production. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of lignin biosynthesis and polymerization at the cell biology level. The lignification process ranges from full autonomy to complete co-operation depending on the cell type. The different roles of lignin for the function of each specific plant cell type are clearly illustrated by the multiple phenotypic defects exhibited by knock-out mutants in lignin synthesis, which may explain why no general mechanism for lignification has yet been defined. The range of phenotypic effects observed include altered xylem sap transport, loss of mechanical support, reduced seed protection and dispersion, and/or increased pest and disease susceptibility. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Applications of large cell remote handling techniques in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issel, W.; Leister, P.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive demonstration project in a special remote handling test facility was performed in parallel to the design of, and the basic engineering work for, the planned reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf. The aim of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a completely remote maintenance of the components of the PUREX process. These components were to be arranged as modules in large cells. Remote handling transporters, manipulators and tools (FEMO) for preplanned and unscheduled repair work were constructed and tested. The results of the successful demonstration project are summarized, and potential applications of the remote handling tools in hot cells and other nuclear plants are outlined. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Gravity research on plants: use of single cell experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eChebli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions and implementation of permanent bases on Moon and Mars will greatly depend on the availability of ambient air and sustainable food supply. Therefore, understanding the effects of altered gravity conditions on plant metabolism and growth is vital for space missions and extra-terrestrial human existence. In this mini-review we summarize how plant cells are thought to perceive changes in magnitude and orientation of the gravity vector. The particular advantages of several single celled model systems for gravity research are explored and an overview over recent advancements and potential use of these systems is provided.

  18. Plastids: dynamic components of plant cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, J. A.; Gallegos, G. L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of maize roots, as a response to reorientation of the root within a gravitational field, was examined for sensitivity to exogenous applications of the cytoskeletal inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Agar blocks were impregnated with this inhibitor, and were applied either to the root cap or to the zone of root cell elongation. Root growth was normal with either treatment, if the roots were not repositioned with respect to the gravitational vector. When untreated roots were placed in a horizontal position with respect to gravity, a 40 degree bending response was observed within one hour. This bending also occurred when cytochalasin D was applied at high concentrations to the zone of root cell elongation. However, when cytochalasin D above 40 micrograms/ml was applied to the root cap, roots lost the ability of directional reorientation within the gravitational field, causing a random bending.

  19. Nicotinamide; antioxidative and DNA hypomethylation effects in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Torkel; Wallström, Anders; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Laurell, Cecilia; Ohlsson, Anna B

    2017-09-01

    The effects of nicotinamide (NIC) and its natural plant metabolites nicotinic acid (NIA) and trigonelline (TRIG) were studied with respect to defense in plant cell cultures. NIC and NIA could protect against oxidative stress damage caused by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), which generates free radicals. Damage was analyzed as DNA strand breaks in cell cultures of Pisum sativum (garden pea), Daucus carota (carrot), Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides (hybrid aspen) and Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), monitored by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay), and assays of cell leakage in C. roseus. The activities of aconitase and fumarase enzymes, which have key roles in energy metabolism, were analyzed in P. sativum cultures after treatment with NIC or NIA. Aconitase activity was increased by NIA, and fumarase activity was increased by both compounds. These compounds were shown to promote glutathione metabolism in P. sativum cultures, and NIC was shown to have a global DNA hypomethylating effect. Neither TRIG nor poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide offered any protection against DNA damage or cell leakage, nor did they promote aconitase or fumarase activities, or glutathione metabolism. By this broad approach addressing multiple biochemical factors and different plant species, we demonstrate that NIC and NIA protect plant cells from oxidative stress, and that NIC clearly exerts an epigenetic effect; decreased DNA methylation. This indicates that these compounds have important roles in the regulation of metabolism in plant cells, especially in connection to stress. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. "Fungal elicitors combined with a sucrose feed significantly enhance triterpene production of a Salvia fruticosa cell suspension".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmritz, Sibylle; Louis, Marilena; Haas, Christiane; Oehmichen, Franz; Gantz, Stephanie; Delenk, Hubertus; Steudler, Susanne; Bley, Thomas; Steingroewer, Juliane

    2016-08-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) are plant secondary metabolites with diverse pharmacological properties. To reach reasonable productivities with plant cell suspension cultures, elicitation is a widely used strategy. Within the presented work, the effects of different elicitors on growth and production of OA and UA in a Salvia fruticosa cell suspension culture were examined. Beside commonly used elicitors like jasmonic acid (JA) and yeast extract, the influence of medium filtrates of the endophytic fungi Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma virens was investigated. The best eliciting effects were achieved with JA and fungal medium filtrates. Both increased the triterpene content by approximately 70 %. Since JA showed significant growth inhibition, the volumetric triterpene yield did not increase. But, adding fungal filtrates increased the volumetric triterpene yield by approximately 70 % to 32.6 mgOA l(-1) and 65.9 mgUA l(-1) for T. virens compared to the control with 19.4 mgOA l(-1) and 33.3 mgUA l(-1). An elicitation strategy combining fungal medium filtrate of T. virens with sucrose feeding significantly enhanced cell dry weight concentration to 22.2 g l(-1) as well as triterpene content by approximately 140 %. In total, this led to an approximately 500 % increase of volumetric triterpene yield referring to the control with final values of 112.9 mgOA l(-1) and 210.4 mgUA l(-1). Despite the doubled cultivation duration, productivities of 6.7 mgOA l(-1) day(-1) and 12.4 mgUA l(-1) day(-1) were reached. These results demonstrate methods by which increased productivities of triterpenes can be achieved to attain yields competing with intact plants.

  1. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field.

  2. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederikke Gro eMalinovsky

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant’s immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle processes underlying cell wall modification poses special challenges for plant glycobiology. In this review we describe the major molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the roles of cell walls in plant defense against pathogen attack. In so doing, we also highlight some of the challenges inherent in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology.

  3. Mevastatin-induced inhibition of cell growth in avocado suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell suspension cultures were established using soft, friable callus derived from nucellar tissue of 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana Mill.) seed from fruit harvested 190 days after full bloom. Cell cultures were maintained in liquid medium supplemented with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), isopentenyl adenine (iP) and ...

  4. Effects of aluminum in red spruce (Picea rubens) cell cultures: Cell growth and viability, mitochondrial activity, ultrastructure and potential sites of intracellular aluminum accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Carolyn McQuattie; Wayne Fagerberg; Stephanie Long; Eun Woon Noh

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Al on red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cell suspension cultures were examined using biochemical, stereo-logical and microscopic methods. Exposure to Al for 24-48 h resulted in a loss of cell viability, inhibition of growth and a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity. Soluble protein content increased in cells treated with Al....

  5. The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III counteracts the necrotic activity of a Fusarium graminearum xylanase in vitro and in durum wheat transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Faoro, Franco; Moro, Stefano; Sabbadin, Davide; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-08-01

    The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III has been proven to delay Fusarium head blight (FHB) symptoms caused by Fusarium graminearum in transgenic durum wheat plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the capacity of the TAXI-III transgenic plants to limit FHB symptoms, we treated wheat tissues with the xylanase FGSG_03624, hitherto shown to induce cell death and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Experiments performed on lemmas of flowering wheat spikes and wheat cell suspension cultures demonstrated that pre-incubation of xylanase FGSG_03624 with TAXI-III significantly decreased cell death. Most interestingly, a reduced cell death relative to control non-transgenic plants was also obtained by treating, with the same xylanase, lemmas of TAXI-III transgenic plants. Molecular modelling studies predicted an interaction between the TAXI-III residue H395 and residues E122 and E214 belonging to the active site of xylanase FGSG_03624. These results provide, for the first time, clear indications in vitro and in planta that a xylanase inhibitor can prevent the necrotic activity of a xylanase, and suggest that the reduced FHB symptoms on transgenic TAXI-III plants may be a result not only of the direct inhibition of xylanase activity secreted by the pathogen, but also of the capacity of TAXI-III to avoid host cell death. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered.

  7. Plant cell, tissue and organ culture: the most flexible foundations for plant metabolic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Shinjiro

    2015-05-01

    Significant advances in plant cell, tissue and organ culture (PCTOC) have been made in the last five decades. PCTOC is now thought to be the underlying technique for understanding general or specific biological functions of the plant kingdom, and it is one of the most flexible foundations for morphological, physiological and molecular biological applications of plants. Furthermore, the recent advances in the field of information technology (IT) have enabled access to a large amount of information regarding all aspects of plant biology. For example, sequencing information is stored in mega repositories such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which can be easily accessed by researchers worldwide. To date, the PCTOC and IT combination strategy for regulation of target plant metabolism and the utilization of bioactive plant metabolites for commercial purposes is essential. In this review, the advantages and the limitations of these methodologies, especially regarding the production of bioactive plant secondary metabolites and metabolic engineering in target plants are discussed mainly from the phenotypic view point.

  8. Introducing the Cell Concept with Both Animal and Plant Cells: A Historical and Didactic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    In France, as well as in several other countries, the cell concept is introduced at school by two juxtaposed drawings, a plant cell and an animal cell. After indicating the didactic obstacles associated with this presentation, this paper focuses on the reasons underlying the persistence of these two prototypes, through three complementary…

  9. Programmed cell death in plants: lessons from bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhui; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2013-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has well-established roles in the development and physiology of animals, plants, and fungi. Although aspects of PCD control appear evolutionarily conserved between these organisms, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Recently, a putative bacterial PCD protein homolog in plants was found to play a significant role in cell death control, indicating a conservation of function between these highly divergent organisms. Interestingly, these bacterial proteins are thought to be evolutionarily linked to the Bcl-2 family of proteins. In this opinion article, we propose a new unifying model to describe the relationship between bacterial and plant PCD systems and propose that the underlying control of PCD is conserved across at least three Kingdoms of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  11. Teaching about Water Relations in Plant Cells: An Uneasy Struggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Lilianna; Rybska, Eliza; Sobieszczuk-Nowicka, Ewa; Adamiec, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    University students often struggle to understand the role of water in plant cells. In particular, osmosis and plasmolysis appear to be challenging topics. This study attempted to identify student difficulties (including misconceptions) concerning osmosis and plasmolysis and examined to what extent the difficulties could be revised during a plant…

  12. Thin Cell Layer technology in ornamental plant micropropagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thin cell layer (TCL) technology originated almost 30 years ago with the controlled development of flowers, roots, shoots and somatic embryos on tobacco pedicel longitudinal TCLs. Since then TCLs have been successfully used in the micropropagation of many ornamental plant species whose previous in vitro ...

  13. Plant Physiology: FERONIA Defends the Cell Walls against Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Stéphane; Hamant, Olivier

    2018-03-05

    A new study uncovers the role of wall sensing and remodeling in the plant response to salt stress, identifying the FERONIA receptor kinase as a key player in that process, likely through direct sensing of cell wall pectins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moqsud, M.A.; Yoshitake, J.; Bushra, Q.S.; Hyodo, M.; Omine, K.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells

  15. Interactions between Plant Extracts and Cell Viability Indicators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interactions between Plant Extracts and Cell Viability. Indicators during Cytotoxicity Testing: Implications for. Ethnopharmacological Studies. Sze Mun Chan1, Kong Soo Khoo2 and Nam Weng Sit1*. 1Department of Biomedical Science, 2Department of Chemical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman,.

  16. Green light for quantitative live-cell imaging in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, Guido; Krebs, Melanie; Maizel, Alexis; Stahl, Yvonne; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Ott, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Plants exhibit an intriguing morphological and physiological plasticity that enables them to thrive in a wide range of environments. To understand the cell biological basis of this unparalleled competence, a number ofmethodologies have been adapted or developed over the last decades that allow

  17. The plant cell nucleus: a true arena for the fight between plants and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Laurent; Rivas, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is a fundamental feature shared by both plant and animal cells. Cellular factors involved in the transport of macromolecules through the nuclear envelope, including nucleoporins, importins and Ran-GTP related components, are conserved among a variety of eukaryotic systems. Interestingly, mutations in these nuclear components compromise resistance signalling, illustrating the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in plant innate immunity. Indeed, spatial restriction of defence regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus-induced nuclear translocation constitute an important level of defence-associated gene regulation in plants. A significant number of effectors from different microbial pathogens are targeted to the plant cell nucleus. In addition, key host factors, including resistance proteins, immunity components, transcription factors and transcriptional regulators shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and their level of nuclear accumulation determines the output of the defence response, further confirming the crucial role played by the nucleus during the interaction between plants and pathogens. Here, we discuss recent findings that situate the nucleus at the frontline of the mutual recognition between plants and invading microbes.

  18. Hypersensitive cell death in plants : its mechanisms and role in plant defense against pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Michalczuk, L.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review is a recent update in the understanding of the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants with special consideration to the physiological and biochemical determinants in different model systems. Hypersensitive response is reviewed as a form of programmed cell death (PCD) representing one of

  19. Allelopathy in a leguminous mangrove plant, Derris indica: protoplast co-culture bioassay and rotenone effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Aya; Mori, Daisuke; Minagawa, Reiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2015-05-01

    To investigate allelopathic activity of a leguminous mangrove plant, Derris indica, the 'Protoplasts Co-culture Method' for bioassay of allelopathy was developed using suspension culture. A suspension culture was induced from immature seed and sub-cultured in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium containing 10 μM each of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzyladenine (BA). The protoplasts were isolated using the separate wells method with 2% each of Cellulase RS, Driselase 20 and Macerozyme R10 in 0.4 M mannitol solution. Protoplast cultures of D. indica revealed that high concentrations of cytokinins, BA and thidiazuron, were effective for cell divisions. The co-cultures of D. indica protoplasts with recipient lettuce protoplasts using 96 multi-well culture plates were performed in MS basal medium containing 0.4 M mannitol solution and 1 μM 2,4-D and 0.1 μM BA. The protoplast density of D. indica used in co-culturing varied from 6 x 10(3) - 10(5) / mL. Very strong inhibitory allelopathic effects of D. indica protoplasts on lettuce protoplast growth were found. A similar strong inhibitory allelopathic activity of dried young leaves on lettuce seedling growth was also observed by using the sandwich method. Rotenone, which is a component of Derris root, dissolved in DMSO, was highly inhibitory on the growth of lettuce protoplasts in culture and this could be one of the causes of the strong allelopathic activity of D. indica.

  20. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  1. Excretion of polyamines in alfalfa and tobacco suspension-cultured cells and its possible role in maintenance of intracellular polyamine contents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Eder, Josef; Zažímalová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2008), s. 1147-1156 ISSN 0721-7714 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arginine decarboxylase * Diamine oxidase * Ornithine decarboxylase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.946, year: 2008

  2. Protective Effects of Tormentic Acid, a Major Component of Suspension Cultures of Eriobotrya japonica Cells, on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ping Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An acetaminophen (APAP overdose can cause hepatotoxicity and lead to fatal liver damage. The hepatoprotective effects of tormentic acid (TA on acetaminophen (APAP-induced liver damage were investigated in mice. TA was intraperitoneally (i.p. administered for six days prior to APAP administration. Pretreatment with TA prevented the elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (T-Bil, total cholesterol (TC, triacylglycerol (TG, and liver lipid peroxide levels in APAP-treated mice and markedly reduced APAP-induced histological alterations in liver tissues. Additionally, TA attenuated the APAP-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β, and IL-6. Furthermore, the Western blot analysis showed that TA blocked the protein expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, as well as the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs activation in APAP-injured liver tissues. TA also retained the superoxidase dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT in the liver. These results suggest that the hepatoprotective effects of TA may be related to its anti-inflammatory effect by decreasing thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activation. Antioxidative properties were also observed, as shown by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction in the liver, and decreases in lipid peroxides and ROS. Therefore, TA may be a potential therapeutic candidate for the prevention of APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation.

  3. Establecimiento de un cultivo de celulas en suspensión de Eucalyptus cinérea Establishment of cell suspension culture of Eucalyptus cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Zabala Mario; Orozco Sáncnez Fernando; Hoyos Sáncnez Rodrigo

    2002-01-01

    Se desarrolla un protocolo para la obtención y establecimiento de suspensiones celulares de E. cinerea. La concentración de las hormonas 2,4 D Y BAP tienen un efecto significativo en la formación de callos friables de E. cinerea, obteniendo una respuesta periódica en la formación de callos friables con respecto a la concentración de las hormonas. Puede obtenerse hasta un 90% de formación de callos friables con varias combinaciones hormonales; primero, con concentraciones alrededor de 3,0 mg/L...

  4. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  5. Micrasterias as a model system in plant cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Luetz-Meindl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular freshwater alga Micrasterias denticulata is an exceptional organism due to its extraordinary star-shaped, highly symmetric morphology and has thus attracted the interest of researchers for many decades. As a member of the Streptophyta, Micrasterias is not only genetically closely related to higher land plants but shares common features with them in many physiological and cell biological aspects. These facts, together with its considerable cell size of about 200 µm, its modest cultivation conditions and the uncomplicated accessibility particularly to any microscopic techniques, make Micrasterias a very well suited cell biological plant model system. The review focuses particularly on cell wall formation and composition, dictyosomal structure and function, cytoskeleton control of growth and morphogenesis as well as on ionic regulation and signal transduction. It has been also shown in the recent years that Micrasterias is a highly sensitive indicator for environmental stress impact such as heavy metals, high salinity, oxidative stress or starvation. Stress induced organelle degradation, autophagy, adaption and detoxification mechanisms have moved in the center of interest and have been investigated with modern microscopic techniques such as 3-D- and analytical electron microscopy as well as with biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. This review is intended to summarize and discuss the most important results obtained in Micrasterias in the last 20 years and to compare the results to similar processes in higher plant cells.

  6. The development and evaluation of single cell suspension from wheat and barley as a model system; a first step towards functional genomics application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Bowra, Steve; Vincze, Eva

    2010-11-05

    The overall research objective was to develop single cell plant cultures as a model system to facilitate functional genomics of monocots, in particular wheat and barley. The essential first step towards achieving the stated objective was the development of a robust, viable single cell suspension culture from both species. We established growth conditions to allow routine culturing of somatic cells in 24 well microtiter plate format. Evaluation of the wheat and barley cell suspension as model cell system is a multi step process. As an initial step in the evaluation procedure we chose to study the impact of selected abiotic stress elicitors at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level. We report the results of osmotic stress imposed by NaCl and PEG. As proline is an important osmoprotectant of the cereal cells, colorimetric assay for proline detection was developed for small volumes (200 μl). We performed RT-PCR experiments to study the change in the expression of the genes encoding Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PC5R) in response to abiotic stress. We found differences between the wheat and barley suspension cultures, barley being more tolerant to the applied osmotic stresses. We suggested a model to explain the obtained differences in stress tolerance between the two species. The suspension cell cultures have proven useful for determining changes in proline concentration and expression level of genes (P5CS, P5CR) under various treatments and we suggest that the cells can be used as a model host system to study gene expression and regulation in monocots.

  7. Aggregations of organelles in meiotic cells of higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Rodkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During early prophase I in microsporocytes and sporocytes of various plants all mitochondria and plastids aggregate in a group, where some plastids seem to undergo division. This group desintegrates by middle prophase I. Further aggregations of plastids and mitochondria occur in microsporogenesis and sporogenesis is of a simultaneous type. Organelles aggregate the second time at the end of prophase 1 and during or after telophase I they form a dense equatorial plate which lasts until telophase IL Since the phragmoplast is dismantled after telophase I and there is no cytokinesis, organelles aggregated in the plate apparently prevent merging of the nuclei and spindles of meiosis II, thus taking over a role of a phragmoplast and cell wall. In some plants after telophase II organelle aggregation changes shape and occupies the planes where cell walls will be built in simultaneous cytokinesis. Positioning of plastids and mitochondria along these planes may facilitate their equal apportionment among the postmeiotic cells.

  8. Using Apple Peel Sections To Study Plant Cells and Water Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvius, John E.; Eckart, Christopher P.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests the cells of an apple peel as a plant species that can further enhance the plant cell laboratory. Describes the structure of apple peel cells and the benefits of including them in studies of plant cells. Suggests questions to stimulate further investigations for open-ended laboratories or independent studies. (PVD)

  9. Plant programmed cell death from a chromatin point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrasse, D; Benhamed, M; Bergounioux, C; Raynaud, C; Delarue, M

    2016-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting of the activation of finely controlled signalling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. PCD can be part of a developmental programme (dPCD) or be triggered by environmental conditions (ePCD). In plant cells, as in animal cells, extensive chromatin condensation and degradation of the nuclear DNA are among the most conspicuous features of cells undergoing PCD. Changes in chromatin condensation could either reflect the structural changes required for internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA or relate to large-scale chromatin rearrangements associated with a major transcriptional switch occurring during cell death. The aim of this review is to give an update on plant PCD processes from a chromatin point of view. The first part will be dedicated to chromatin conformational changes associated with cell death observed in various developmental and physiological conditions, whereas the second part will be devoted to histone dynamics and DNA modifications associated with critical changes in genome expression during the cell death process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Evolution of plant conducting cells: perspectives from key regulators of vascular cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Misato; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Takenaka, Yuto; Sano, Ryosuke; Demura, Taku

    2017-01-01

    One crucial problem that plants faced during their evolution, particularly during the transition to growth on land, was how to transport water, nutrients, metabolites, and small signaling molecules within a large, multicellular body. As a solution to this problem, land plants developed specific tissues for conducting molecules, called water-conducting cells (WCCs) and food-conducting cells (FCCs). The well-developed WCCs and FCCs in extant plants are the tracheary elements and sieve elements, respectively, which are found in vascular plants. Recent molecular genetic studies revealed that transcriptional networks regulate the differentiation of tracheary and sieve elements, and that the networks governing WCC differentiation are largely conserved among land plant species. In this review, we discuss the molecular evolution of plant conducting cells. By focusing on the evolution of the key transcription factors that regulate vascular cell differentiation, the NAC transcription factor VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN for WCCs and the MYB-coiled-coil (CC)-type transcription factor ALTERED PHLOEM DEVELOPMENT for sieve elements, we describe how land plants evolved molecular systems to produce the specialized cells that function as WCCs and FCCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Characterization and developmental patterns of telomerase expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Matthew S.; McKnight, Thomas D.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Telomerase activity is developmentally regulated in mammals. Here we examine telomerase activity in plants, whose development differs in fundamental ways from that of animals. Using a modified version of the telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, we detected an activity in extracts from carrots, cauliflower, soybean, Arabidopsis, and rice with all the characteristics expected for a telomerase synthesizing the plant telomere repeat sequence TTTAGGG. The activity was dependent on RNA and protein components, required dGTP, dATP, and dTTP, but not dCTP, and generated products with a seven nucleotide periodicity. Telomerase activity was abundant in cauliflower meristematic tissue and undifferentiated cells from Arabidopsis, soybean, and carrot suspension cultures, but was low or not detectable in a sampling of differentiated tissues from mature plants. Telomerase from cauliflower meristematic tissues exhibited relaxed DNA sequence requirements, which might reflect the capacity to form telomeres on broken chromosomes in vivo. The dramatic differences in telomerase expression and their correlation with cellular proliferation capacity mirror changes in human telomerase levels during differentiation and immortalization. Hence, telomerase activation appears to be a conserved mechanism involved in conferring long-term proliferation capacity. PMID:8962067

  12. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitop...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....... is restricted to loosely attached inner parenchyma cells at the inner face of the pea testa and does not occur in other cells of the testa. Elsewhere in the pea seedling, the LM8 epitope was found only in association with root cap cell development at the root apex. Furthermore, the LM8 epitope is specifically...... associated with root cap cells in a range of angiosperm species. In embryogenic carrot suspension cell cultures the epitope is abundant at the surface of cell walls of loosely attached cells in both induced and non-induced cultures. The LM8 epitope is the first cell wall epitope to be identified...

  13. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2004-01-01

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems

  14. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey F. Harper, Ph.D.

    2004-06-30

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems.

  15. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  16. Genetic and epigenetic control of transfer cell development in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Bateman, Perry; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2016-09-20

    The inter-cellular translocation of nutrients in plant is mediated by highly specialized transfer cells (TCs). TCs share similar functional and structural features across a wide range of plant species, including location at plant exchange surfaces, rich in secondary wall ingrowths, facilitation of nutrient flow, and passage of select molecules. The fate of endosperm TCs is determined in the TC fate acquisition stage (TCF), before the structure features are formed in the TC differentiation stage (TCD). At present, the molecular basis of TC development in plants remains largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the important roles of the signaling molecules in different development phases, such as sugars in TCF and phytohormones in TCD, and discuss the genetic and epigenetic factors, including TC-specific genes and endogenous plant peptides, and their crosstalk with these signaling molecules as a complex regulatory network in regulation of TC development in plants. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 1000kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. Outline of the plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinobe, Kenji; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kaneko, Hideo

    1988-02-10

    The outline of the 1000KW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant, developed as part of the Moonlight plan, was described. The plant was composed of 4 stacks of 260KW DC output. They were devided into two train with 680V and 765A. The generation efficiency of the plant was 40% and more. Steam reforming of natural gas was used. As the fuel, fuel cell exhaust gas was used in composition with the natural gas. The DC-AC inverter had an efficiency of 96%. The capacity of hot water generator and demineralized water plant for cell cooling were 2t/h and 1.6t/h, respectively, and air-system was incorporated. In September of 1987, the plant has succeeded in 1000KW power generation, and put in operation now. Under the 100% loaded condition, each cell had a voltage of 0.7V with little variation, and the current was 200mA/cm/sup 2/. No problems were found in cooling conditions and in the control of interpole differential pressure. The reformer has been operated for 1200h scince its commisioning, and had experiences of 100 times on start up-shut down operations, the reformer also indicated good performances in the gas compositions. The starting time of 8h and the load follow-up rate 10%/min remain as the subjects for shortening. DC-AC conversion was good. The concentration of NOx and the noise level satisfied the target values. (12 figs, 1 tab)

  18. Metabolism of fluoranthene in different plant cell cultures and intact plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, M.; Harms, H.

    2000-05-01

    The metabolism of fluoranthene was investigated in 11 cell cultures of different plant species using a [{sup 14}C]-labeled standard. Most species metabolized less than 5% of fluoranthene to soluble metabolites and formed less than 5% nonextractable residues during the standardized 48-h test procedure. Higher metabolic rates were observed in lettuce (Lactuca sativa, 6%), wheat (Tricitum aestivum, 9%), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, 15%). A special high metabolic rate of nearly 50% was determined for the rose species Paul's Scarlet. Chromatographic analysis of metabolites extracted from aseptically grown tomato plants proved that the metabolites detected in the cell cultures were also formed in the intact plants. Metabolites produced in tomato and rose cells from [{sup 14}C]-fluoranthene were conjugated with glucose, glucuronic acid, and other cell components. After acid hydrolyses, the main metabolite of both species was 1-hydroxyfluoranthene as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The second metabolite formed by both species was 8-hydroxyfluoranthene. A third metabolite in tomatoes was 3-hydroxyfluoranthene.

  19. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ. © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Redefining plant systems biology: from cell to ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keurentjes, Joost J B; Angenent, Gerco C; Dicke, Marcel; Dos Santos, Vítor A P Martins; Molenaar, Jaap; van der Putten, Wim H; de Ruiter, Peter C; Struik, Paul C; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2011-04-01

    Molecular biologists typically restrict systems biology to cellular levels. By contrast, ecologists define biological systems as communities of interacting individuals at different trophic levels that process energy, nutrient and information flows. Modern plant breeding needs to increase agricultural productivity while decreasing the ecological footprint. This requires a holistic systems biology approach that couples different aggregation levels while considering the variables that affect these biological systems from cell to community. The challenge is to generate accurate experimental data that can be used together with modelling concepts and techniques that allow experimentally verifying in silico predictions. The coupling of aggregation levels in plant sciences, termed Integral Quantification of Biological Organization (IQ(BiO)), might enhance our abilities to generate new desired plant phenotypes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Space stress and genome shock in developing plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In the present paper I review symptoms of stress at the level of the nucleus in cells of plants grown in space under nonoptimized conditions. It remains to be disclosed to what extent gravity "unloading" in the space environment directly contributes to the low mitotic index and the chromosomal anomalies and damage that is frequently, but not invariably, demonstrable in space-grown plants. Evaluation of the available facts indicates that indirect effects play a major role and that there is a significant biological component to the susceptibility to stress damage equation as well. Much remains to be learned on how to provide strictly controlled, optimal environments for plant growth in space. Only after optimized controls become possible will one be able to attribute any observed space effects to lowered gravity or to other significant but more indirect effects of the space environment.

  2. Secondary Metabolite Localization by Autofluorescence in Living Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Talamond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autofluorescent molecules are abundant in plant cells and spectral images offer means for analyzing their spectra, yielding information on their accumulation and function. Based on their fluorescence characteristics, an imaging approach using multiphoton microscopy was designed to assess localization of the endogenous fluorophores in living plant cells. This method, which requires no previous treatment, provides an effective experimental tool for discriminating between multiple naturally-occurring fluorophores in living-tissues. Combined with advanced Linear Unmixing, the spectral analysis extends the possibilities and enables the simultaneous detection of fluorescent molecules reliably separating overlapping emission spectra. However, as with any technology, the possibility for artifactual results does exist. This methodological article presents an overview of the applications of tissular and intra-cellular localization of these intrinsic fluorophores in leaves and fruits (here for coffee and vanilla. This method will provide new opportunities for studying cellular environments and the behavior of endogenous fluorophores in the intracellular environment.

  3. Integrating fuel cell power systems into building physical plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, J. [KCI Technologies, Inc., Hunt Valley, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the integration of fuel cell power plants and absorption chillers to cogenerate chilled water or hot water/steam for all weather air conditioning as one possible approach to building system applications. Absorption chillers utilize thermal energy in an absorption based cycle to chill water. It is feasible to use waste heat from fuel cells to provide hydronic heating and cooling. Performance regimes will vary as a function of the supply and quality of waste heat. Respective performance characteristics of fuel cells, absorption chillers and air conditioning systems will define relationships between thermal and electrical load capacities for the combined systems. Specifically, this paper develops thermodynamic relationships between bulk electrical power and cooling/heating capacities for combined fuel cell and absorption chiller system in building applications.

  4. Integrating cell biology and proteomic approaches in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-10-03

    Significant improvements of protein extraction, separation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics nurtured advancements of proteomics during the past years. The usefulness of proteomics in the investigation of biological problems can be enhanced by integration with other experimental methods from cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and other omics approaches including transcriptomics and metabolomics. This review aims to summarize current trends integrating cell biology and proteomics in plant science. Cell biology approaches are most frequently used in proteomic studies investigating subcellular and developmental proteomes, however, they were also employed in proteomic studies exploring abiotic and biotic stress responses, vesicular transport, cytoskeleton and protein posttranslational modifications. They are used either for detailed cellular or ultrastructural characterization of the object subjected to proteomic study, validation of proteomic results or to expand proteomic data. In this respect, a broad spectrum of methods is employed to support proteomic studies including ultrastructural electron microscopy studies, histochemical staining, immunochemical localization, in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins and visualization of protein-protein interactions. Thus, cell biological observations on fixed or living cell compartments, cells, tissues and organs are feasible, and in some cases fundamental for the validation and complementation of proteomic data. Validation of proteomic data by independent experimental methods requires development of new complementary approaches. Benefits of cell biology methods and techniques are not sufficiently highlighted in current proteomic studies. This encouraged us to review most popular cell biology methods used in proteomic studies and to evaluate their relevance and potential for proteomic data validation and enrichment of purely proteomic analyses. We also provide examples of

  5. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas eBou Daher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbours, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell’s life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells’ ability to hang on, and how it lets go.

  6. A population balance equation model of aggregation dynamics in Taxus suspension cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolewe, Martin E; Roberts, Susan C; Henson, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    The nature of plant cells to grow as multicellular aggregates in suspension culture has profound effects on bioprocess performance. Recent advances in the measurement of plant cell aggregate size allow for routine process monitoring of this property. We have exploited this capability to develop a conceptual model to describe changes in the aggregate size distribution that are observed over the course of a Taxus cell suspension batch culture. We utilized the population balance equation framework to describe plant cell aggregates as a particulate system, accounting for the relevant phenomenological processes underlying aggregation, such as growth and breakage. We compared model predictions to experimental data to select appropriate kernel functions, and found that larger aggregates had a higher breakage rate, biomass was partitioned asymmetrically following a breakage event, and aggregates grew exponentially. Our model was then validated against several datasets with different initial aggregate size distributions and was able to quantitatively predict changes in total biomass and mean aggregate size, as well as actual size distributions. We proposed a breakage mechanism where a fraction of biomass was lost upon each breakage event, and demonstrated that even though smaller aggregates have been shown to produce more paclitaxel, an optimum breakage rate was predicted for maximum paclitaxel accumulation. We believe this is the first model to use a segregated, corpuscular approach to describe changes in the size distribution of plant cell aggregates, and represents an important first step in the design of rational strategies to control aggregation and optimize process performance. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cell physiology of plants growing in cold environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütz, Cornelius

    2010-08-01

    The life of plants growing in cold extreme environments has been well investigated in terms of morphological, anatomical, and ecophysiological adaptations. In contrast, long-term cellular or metabolic studies have been performed by only a few groups. Moreover, a number of single reports exist, which often represent just a glimpse of plant behavior. The review draws together the literature which has focused on tissue and cellular adaptations mainly to low temperatures and high light. Most studies have been done with European alpine plants; comparably well studied are only two phanerogams found in the coastal Antarctic. Plant adaptation in northern polar regions has always been of interest in terms of ecophysiology and plant propagation, but nowadays, this interest extends to the effects of global warming. More recently, metabolic and cellular investigations have included cold and UV resistance mechanisms. Low-temperature stress resistance in plants from cold environments reflects the climate conditions at the growth sites. It is now a matter of molecular analyses to find the induced genes and their products such as chaperones or dehydrins responsible for this resistance. Development of plants under snow or pollen tube growth at 0 degrees C shows that cell biology is needed to explain the stability and function of the cytoskeleton. Many results in this field are based on laboratory studies, but several publications show that it is not difficult to study cellular mechanisms with the plants adapted to a natural stress. Studies on high light and UV loads may be split in two parts. Many reports describe natural UV as harmful for the plants, but these studies were mainly conducted by shielding off natural UV (as controls). Other experiments apply additional UV in the field and have had practically no negative impact on metabolism. The latter group is supported by the observations that green overwintering plants increase their flavonoids under snow even in the absence of

  8. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki eHatsugai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an orthologue of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain. VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1.

  9. Plant hormones increase efficiency of reprogramming mouse somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells and reduce tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Palomo, Ana Belén; McLenachan, Samuel; Requena Osete, Jordi; Menchón, Cristina; Barrot, Carme; Chen, Fred; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Edel, Michael J

    2014-03-15

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined pluripotency and self-renewal factors has taken stem cell technology to the forefront of regenerative medicine. However, a number of challenges remain in the field including efficient protocols and the threat of cancer. Reprogramming of plant somatic cells to plant embryonic stem cells using a combination of two plant hormones was discovered in 1957 and has been a routine university laboratory practical for over 30 years. The plant hormones responsible for cell reprogramming to pluripotency, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and isopentenyl adenosine (IPA), are present in human cells, leading to the exciting possibility that plant hormones might reprogram mammalian cells without genetic factors. We found that plant hormones on their own could not reprogram mammalian cells but increase the efficiency of the early formation of iPS cells combined with three defined genetic factors during the first 3 weeks of reprogramming by accelerating the cell cycle and regulating pluripotency genes. Moreover, the cytokinin IPA, a known human anticancer agent, reduced the threat of cancer of iPS cell in vitro by regulating key cancer and stem cell-related genes, most notably c-Myc and Igf-1. In conclusion, the plant hormones, auxin and cytokinin, are new small chemicals useful for enhancing early reprogramming efficiency of mammalian cells and reducing the threat of cancer from iPS cells. These findings suggest a novel role for plant hormones in the biology of mammalian cell plasticity.

  10. Proline and its metabolism enzymes in cucumber cell cultures during acclimation to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naliwajski, Marcin R; Skłodowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Proline is an important osmolyte appearing as the result of salt stress response of plants. In the present study, we measured the proline concentration, activities of pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR), and proline dehydrogenase (PDH) key regulatory enzymes in the biosynthesis and degradation of proline in the acclimated (AC20) and the non-acclimated (NAC) cucumber cell suspension cultures subjected to moderate (150 mM NaCl; AC20-150, NAC-150, respectively) and severe (200 mM NaCl; AC20-200, NAC-200, respectively) salt stress. The data showed that salt stress brought about a linear increase in proline content in both types of cultures. However, in the acclimated culture proline accumulation was observed earlier, in third hour after stress. Only in the acclimated culture moderate and severe stresses up-regulated P5CS activity throughout the experiment, whereas the activity of P5CR grew in response to both NaCl concentrations only in 24th and 48th hour. The severe salt stress resulted in decrease in P5CR in NAC-200 cultures. In response to salt stress, both types of cell suspension cultures reacted with decline in PDH activity below the spectrophotometrically detected level. Cell cultures vigor correlated with salt concentration and time of exposure to the stress factor. Both NaCl concentrations caused linear decline in vigor of the non-acclimated culture up to 80-90 % at the end of the experiment, whereas in the acclimated culture significant decrease by about 30-40 % was reached in 24th hour after stress. The presented data suggest that acclimation to salt stress up-regulated proline synthesis enzyme activity and caused intensive accumulations of proline by inhibiting its oxidation.

  11. Nitric oxide is required for, and promotes auxin-mediated activation of, cell division and embryogenic cell formation but does not influence cell cycle progression in alfalfa cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvös, Krisztina; Pasternak, Taras P; Miskolczi, Pál; Domoki, Mónika; Dorjgotov, Dulguun; Szucs, Attila; Bottka, Sándor; Dudits, Dénes; Fehér, Attila

    2005-09-01

    It is now well established that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a signaling molecule in plant cells. In this paper experimental data are presented which indicate that NO can stimulate the activation of cell division and embryogenic cell formation in leaf protoplast-derived cells of alfalfa in the presence of auxin. It was found that various NO-releasing compounds promoted auxin-dependent division (as shown by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine) of leaf protoplast-derived alfalfa cells. In contrast, application of NO scavenger or NO synthesis inhibitor inhibited the same process. Both the promotion and the inhibition of cell cycle activation correlated with the amount and activity of the cognate alfalfa p34cdc2 protein Medsa;CDKA;1,2. The effect of l-NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was transient, and protoplast-derived cells spending more than 3 days in culture become insensitive to the inhibitor as far as cell cycle progression was concerned. L-NMMA had no effect on the cell cycle parameters of cycling suspension-cultured cells, but had a moderate transient inhibitory effect on cells re-entering the cell cycle following phosphate starvation. Cycling cultured cells, however, could respond to NO, as indicated by the sodium nitroprusside (SNP)- and 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO)-dependent accumulation of the ferritin protein. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that L-NMMA-sensitive generation of NO is involved in the activation, but not the progression of the plant cell division cycle. In addition, SNP promoted and L-NMMA delayed the exogenous auxin [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)] concentration-dependent formation of embryogenic cell clusters expressing the MsSERK1 gene; this further supports a link between auxin- and NO-dependent signaling pathways in plant cells.

  12. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  13. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  14. Physical methods for the transformation of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oard, J H

    1991-01-01

    Transfer and expression of foreign genes in adult plants and their progeny has been achieved by acceleration of DNA-coated particles or microinjection techniques. Cultured cells or embryoids served as targets for the introduction of marker genes that were stably expressed in the nucleus or the chloroplast. Cloned genes from the maize anthocyanin pathway were regulated in a tissue-specific manner when transferred into maize by particle acceleration. In spite of these successes, stable transformation efficiency was low due to uneven particle distribution and cell death after bombardment. Transferred genes did not always segregate in a Mendelian fashion in the succeeding generation, and additional efforts of embryo rescue or shoot grafts were needed to obtain viable progeny from original transformants. New technical advances such as the helium-driven particle gun may improve transformation rates in the future, but some problems of cell manipulation remain.

  15. [Effect of manganese (II), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions on the growth and production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M; Sklenárová, H; Solich, P

    2005-01-01

    The plant cell reacts to an increased concentration of metals in the environment by various mechanisms. They include an increase in the formation of heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, phytochelatins, amino acids (cysteine, histidine), organic acids (citric, malic), or secondary metabolites. The latter mechanism is being investigated for its possible use in explant cultures for the stimulation of secondary metabolism, which is the source of substances of pharmaceutical importance. The study tested manganese (II) (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mM in the medium), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 200, and 500 microM in the medium) as potential elicitors of coumarin production. At the same time, toxicity of these metals for the culture was examined by evaluating their effect on growth (characterized by fresh and dry weight of biomass at the end of a two-week cultivation). Cultures were cultivated in the dark and in the light. It has been found that the growth of cultures is not influenced by manganese in concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 mM, then it slightly decreases, at a concentration of 50 mM it is lower by 20 % when cultivated in the dark and by 30 % when cultivated in the light in comparison with the control. Cobalt in concentrations of 0 to 50 microM does not significantly influence the growth of the culture, higher concentrations decrease the biomass yields, more markedly when cultivated in the light (at 500 microM Co by 60 %, in the dark only by 30 % in comparison with the controls). Nickel in concentrations of 0.1 to 200 microM does not influence growth, and in a concentration of 500 microM decreases it by approximately 30 % in comparison with the control both in the light and dark. Production of coumarins was not stimulated by any metal in comparison with the control cultures, only the removal of manganese from the medium in the culture cultivated in the dark increased production by about 15 % versus the

  16. Cell wall assembly and intracellular trafficking in plant cells are directly affected by changes in the magnitude of gravitational acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chebli, Y.; Pujol, L.; Shojaeifard, A.; Brouwer, I.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Geitmann, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in

  17. Cell Wall Assembly and Intracellular Trafficking in Plant Cells Are Directly Affected by Changes in the Magnitude of Gravitational Acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chebli, Y.; Pujol, L.; Shojaeifard, A.; Brouwer, I.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Geitmann, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in

  18. Estimation of turgor pressure through comparison between single plant cell and pressurized shell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Smet, P.; Gauquelin, E.; Chastrette, N.; Boudaoud, A.; Asnacios, A.

    2017-10-01

    While plant growth is well known to rely on turgor pressure, it is challenging to quantify the contribution of turgor pressure to plant cell rheology. Here we used a custom-made micro-rheometer to quantify the viscoelastic behavior of isolated plant cells while varying their internal turgor pressure. To get insight into how plant cells adapt their internal pressure to the osmolarity of their medium, we compared the mechanical behavior of single plant cells to that of a simple, passive, pressurized shell: a soccer ball. While both systems exhibited the same qualitative behavior, a simple mechanical model allowed us to quantify turgor pressure regulation at the single cell scale.

  19. O-acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eGille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation.From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of e.g. lignocellulosic based biofuel production.

  20. Fuel Cell Balance-of-Plant Reliability Testbed Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sproat, Vern [Stark State College of Technology, North Canton, OH (United States); LaHurd, Debbie [Lockheed Martin Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-29

    Reliability of the fuel cell system balance-of-plant (BoP) components is a critical factor that needs to be addressed prior to fuel cells becoming fully commercialized. Failure or performance degradation of BoP components has been identified as a life-limiting factor in fuel cell systems.1 The goal of this project is to develop a series of test beds that will test system components such as pumps, valves, sensors, fittings, etc., under operating conditions anticipated in real Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Results will be made generally available to begin removing reliability as a roadblock to the growth of the PEM fuel cell industry. Stark State College students participating in the project, in conjunction with their coursework, have been exposed to technical knowledge and training in the handling and maintenance of hydrogen, fuel cells and system components as well as component failure modes and mechanisms. Three test beds were constructed. Testing was completed on gas flow pumps, tubing, and pressure and temperature sensors and valves.

  1. A comparative mechanical analysis of plant and animal cells reveals convergence across kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Smet, Pauline; Chastrette, Nicolas; Guiroy, Axel; Richert, Alain; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Szecsi, Judit; Boudaoud, Arezki; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Bendhamane, Mohammed; Hamant, Oliver; Asnacios, Atef

    2014-11-18

    Plant and animals have evolved different strategies for their development. Whether this is linked to major differences in their cell mechanics remains unclear, mainly because measurements on plant and animal cells relied on independent experiments and setups, thus hindering any direct comparison. In this study we used the same micro-rheometer to compare animal and plant single cell rheology. We found that wall-less plant cells exhibit the same weak power law rheology as animal cells, with comparable values of elastic and loss moduli. Remarkably, microtubules primarily contributed to the rheological behavior of wall-less plant cells whereas rheology of animal cells was mainly dependent on the actin network. Thus, plant and animal cells evolved different molecular strategies to reach a comparable cytoplasmic mechanical core, suggesting that evolutionary convergence could include the internal biophysical properties of cells.

  2. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells

  3. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A {beta}-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 {eta}g/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. {sup 125}I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO{sub 2} delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed.

  4. Effect of Agrobacterium rhizogenes and elicitation on the asiaticoside production in cell cultures of Centella asiatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Komar; Selfitri, Anggrahaeni Dewi; Bulan, Shella A.; Rukayadi, Yaya; Elfahmi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Centella asiatica (L.) Urb. (Apiaceae) is an important medicinal plant, and it has been using to prepare herbal medicines. The compounds responsible for the biological activity of C. asiatica are triterpenoids such as asiaticoside. Asiaticoside is also important as a marker for standardization of C. asiatica. Due to the low content, there is a need to enhance the production of asiaticoside of C. asiatica. The biotechnological approach is one of the methods that can be used to enhance its production. Objectives: This study was designed to enhance the production of asiaticoside from C. asiatica using A. rhizogenes and elicitation experiments. Materials and Methods: Callus cultures were initiated using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/L indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1.0 mg/L 6-benzylaminopurin (BAP). All media were supplemented with 4% (w/w) sucrose and solidified with 0.9% agar. Elicitations were done using pectin, methyl jasmonate, and Cu2+ ions. Transformed hairy root cultures were performed using A. rhizogenes. Results: Callus culture of C. asiatica was successfully initiated. Enhancement of the production of asiaticoside in the callus culture by elicitors pectin was up to 31%; methyl jasmonate (50 μM) in cell suspension cultures at day 14 was up to 171% compared to explant and 494% compared to control callus; copper ion (25 μM) at day 21 was up to 144% compared to explant, and 676% compared to control cell suspension cultures. While enhancement by genetic transformation using A. rhizogenes was 166-172% compare to untransformed roots Conclusion: Elicitation and genetically transformed hairy root cultures of C. asiatica produced asiaticoside up to 172% higher than untreated callus. PMID:22701283

  5. Transcription factor-mediated cell-to-cell signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Kumar, Dhinesh; Chen, Huan; Wu, Shuwei; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-04-01

    Plant cells utilize mobile transcription factors to transmit intercellular signals when they perceive environmental stimuli or initiate developmental programmes. Studies on these novel cell-to-cell signals have accumulated multiple pieces of evidence showing that non-cell-autonomous transcription factors play pivotal roles in most processes related to the formation and development of plant organs. Recent studies have explored the evolution of mobile transcription factors and proposed mechanisms for their trafficking through plasmodesmata, where a selective system exists to facilitate this process. Mobile transcription factors contribute to the diversity of the intercellular signalling network, which is also established by peptides, hormones, and RNAs. Crosstalk between mobile transcription factors and other intercellular molecules leads to the development of complex biological signalling networks in plants. The regulation of plasmodesmata appears to have been another major step in controlling the intercellular trafficking of transcription factors based on studies of many plasmodesmal components. Furthermore, diverse omics approaches are being successfully applied to explore a large number of candidate transcription factors as mobile signals in plants. Here, we review these fascinating discoveries to integrate current knowledge of non-cell-autonomous transcription factors.

  6. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  7. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  8. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; E. Thybring, Emil; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood....... Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry...

  9. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-11-25

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the ‘Young's modulus’ of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics.

  10. Long-term performance of a plant microbial fuel cell with Spartina anglica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell is a sustainable and renewable way of electricity production. The plant is integrated in the anode of the microbial fuel cell which consists of a bed of graphite granules. In the anode, organic compounds deposited by plant roots are oxidized by electrochemically active

  11. Parallel adaptations and common host cell responses enabling feeding of obligate and facultative plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smant, Geert; Helder, Johannes; Goverse, Aska

    2018-01-01

    Parallel adaptations enabling the use of plant cells as the primary food source have occurred multiple times in distinct nematode clades. The hallmark of all extant obligate and facultative plant-feeding nematodes is the presence of an oral stylet, which is required for penetration of plant cell

  12. Esau's Plant anatomy: meristems, cells, and tissues of the plant body : their structure, function, and development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evert, Ray Franklin; Esau, Katherine; Eichhorn, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Chapter 1 Structure and Development of the Plant Body- An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Internal Organization of the Plant Body...

  13. Green electricity production with living plants and bacteria in a fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Snel, J.F.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    The world needs sustainable, efficient, and renewable energy production. We present the plant microbial fuel cell (plant-MFC), a concept that exploits a bioenergy source in situ. In the plant-MFC, plants and bacteria were present to convert solar energy into green electricity. The principal idea is

  14. Exocytosis and polarity in plant cells: insights by studying cellulose synthase complexes and the exocyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ying Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers aspects of exocytosis, plant cell growth and cell wall formation. These processes are strongly linked as cell growth and cell wall formation occur simultaneously and exocytosis is the process that delivers cell wall components to the existing cell wall

  15. Time course of programmed cell death, which included autophagic features, in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Naoya; Nihei, Saori; Miyakawa, Naoto; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Marubashi, Wataru; van Doorn, Wouter G; Yamada, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    PCD with features of vacuolar cell death including autophagy-related features were detected in hybrid tobacco cells, and detailed time course of features of vacuolar cell death were established. A type of interspecific Nicotiana hybrid, Nicotiana suaveolens × N. tabacum exhibits temperature-sensitive lethality. This lethality results from programmed cell death (PCD) in hybrid seedlings, but this PCD occurs only in seedlings and suspension-cultured cells grown at 28 °C, not those grown at 36 °C. Plant PCD can be classified as vacuolar cell death or necrotic cell death. Induction of autophagy, vacuolar membrane collapse and actin disorganization are each known features of vacuolar cell death, but observed cases of PCD showing all these features simultaneously are rare. In this study, these features of vacuolar cell death were evident in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality. Ion leakage, plasma membrane disruption, increased activity of vacuolar processing enzyme, vacuolar membrane collapse, and formation of punctate F-actin foci were each evident in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that macroautophagic structures formed and tonoplasts ruptured in these cells. The number of cells that contained monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-stained structures and the abundance of nine autophagy-related gene transcripts increased just before cell death at 28 °C; these features were not evident at 36 °C. We assessed whether an autophagic inhibitor, wortmannin (WM), influenced lethality in hybrid cells. After the hybrid cell began to die, WM suppressed increases in ion leakage and cell deaths, and it decreased the number of cells containing MDC-stained structures. These results showed that several features indicative of autophagy and vacuolar cell death were evident in the hybrid tobacco cells subject to lethality. In addition, we documented a detailed time course of these vacuolar cell death features.

  16. Plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnatska, Veresa; Gladun, Hanna; Padalko, Svetlana

    To investigate simulated microgravity (clinorotation) effect on plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall formation, the culture of primary explants of potato and Jerusalem artichoke tubers was used. It is found that the efficiency of tumor formation and development in clinorotated explants are considerably reduced. When using the explants isolated from potato tubers clinorotated for 3, 5 and 19 days, drastic reduction of formation and development of crown gall tumors was observed. Conversely, the tumor number and their development increased when potato tubers were clinorotated for one day. As was estimated by us previously, cells of Jerusalem artichoke explants are the most sensitive to agrobacteria on 4-5 h of in vitro culturing and this time corresponds to the certain period of G1-stage of the cell cycle. We have also estimated that this period is characterized by the increase of binding of acridine orange by nuclear chromatin and increase in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II. Inoculation of explants with agrobacteria in this period was the most optimal for transformation and crown gall induction. We estimated that at four - hour clinorotation of explants the intensity of acridine orange binding to nuclei was considerably lower than on 4h in the control. At one-day clinorotation of potato tubers, a considerable increase in template accessibility of chromatin and in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II occurred. These results may serve as an evidence for the ability of plant dormant tissues to respond to microgravity. Another demonstration of dormant tissue response to changed gravity we obtained when investigating pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-proteins). PR-proteins were subjected to nondenaturing PAGE.and we have not found any effect of microgravity on PR-proteins of potato explants with normal or tumorous growth. We may suggest that such response derives from the common effects of two stress factors - wounding and changed

  17. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  18. Development of Gravity Sensitive Plant Cells (Ceratodon) in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Protonemata of the moss Ceratodon are tip-growing cells that grow up in the dark. This cell type is unique compared to cells in almost any other organism, since the growth of the plant cell itself is completely oriented by gravity. Thus, both the processes of gravity sensing and the gravity response occur in the same cell. Gravity sensing appears to rely upon amyloplasts (starch-filled plastids) that sediment. This sedimentation occurs in specific zones and plastid zonation is complex with respect to plastid morphology, distribution, and gravity. Microtubules restrict the extent of plastid sedimentation (i.e., they are load-bearing). Light also is important since apical cells have a phytochrome-based positive phototropism, light quality influences plastid zonation and sedimentation (photomorphogenesis), and red light suppresses gravitropism at higher but not lower light intensities. Many of these processes were examined in a 16 day spaceflight experiment, "SPM-A" space moss" or "SPAM)) on STS-87 that landed in December, 1997. The work described here involves the definition of a second flight experiment that builds upon the data and questions arising from STS-87. Effort was directed towards further definition of an experiment for the Shuttle (dubbed "SOS" for "Son of SPAM"). Our current target is STS 107 that is scheduled to fly in January 2001. This definition addressed two goals of the STS107 experiment. The goals of the current experiment were to determine whether the cytoskeleton plays a role in maintaining and generating an apical (non-random) plastid distribution in microgravity and to determine the development and extent of clockwise spiral tip-growth in microgravity.

  19. A Highly Specific O-Methyltransferase for Nororientaline Synthesis Isolated from Argemone platyceras Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueffer, M; Nagakura, N; Zenk, M H

    1983-12-01

    A highly specific new enzyme, S-adenosyl-L-methionine: (6-O-methyl-norlaudanosoline)-5'-O-methyltransferase which catalyses the formation of nor-orientaline from 6-O-methyl-norlaudanosoline and SAM was discovered, partially purified, and characterized. ARGEMONE PLATYCERAS cell suspension cultures served as enzyme source.

  20. Nanobiotechnology meets plant cell biology: Carbon nanotubes as organelle targeting nanocarriers

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2013-01-01

    For years, nanotechnology has shown great promise in the fields of biomedical and biotechnological sciences and medical research. In this review, we demonstrate its versatility and applicability in plant cell biology studies. Specifically, we discuss the ability of functionalized carbon nanotubes to penetrate the plant cell wall, target specific organelles, probe protein-carrier activity and induce organelle recycling in plant cells. We also, shed light on prospective applications of carbon nanomaterials in cell biology and plant cell transformation. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labeling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

  2. Exploring plant tissue culture in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal: in vitro propagation and secondary metabolite production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasmita; Rai, Manoj K; Naik, Soumendra K

    2017-12-26

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (family: Solanaceae), commonly known as "Indian Ginseng", is a medicinally and industrially important plant of the Indian subcontinent and other warmer parts of the world. The plant has multi-use medicinal potential and has been listed among 36 important cultivated medicinal plants of India that are in high demand for trade due to its pharmaceutical uses. The medicinal importance of this plant is mainly due to the presence of different types of steroidal lactones- withanolides in the roots and leaves. Owing to low seed viability and poor germination, the conventional propagation of W. somnifera falls short to cater its commercial demands particularly for secondary metabolite production. Therefore, there is a great need to develop different biotechnological approaches through tissue and organ culture for seasonal independent production of plants in large scale which will provide sufficient raw materials of uniform quality for pharmaceutical purposes. During past years, a number of in vitro plant regeneration protocols via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis and in vitro conservation through synthetic seed based encapsulation technology have been developed for W. somnifera. Several attempts have also been made to standardize the protocol of secondary metabolite production via tissue/organ cultures, cell suspension cultures, and Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformed hairy root cultures. Employment of plant tissue culture based techniques would provide means for rapid propagation and conservation of this plant species and also provide scope for enhanced production of different bioactive secondary metabolites. The present review provides a comprehensive report on research activities conducted in the area of tissue culture and secondary metabolite production in W. somnifera during the past years. It also discusses the unexplored areas which might be taken into consideration for future research so that the medicinal properties and

  3. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton : lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes.

  4. Generation of functionally competent single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells from cell aggregates using the neutral protease dispase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, Gale L

    2004-08-30

    A simple and efficient procedure has been developed to enzymatically dissociate aggregates of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in suspension culture into viable, responsive single cells. For dissociation, the neutral protease dispase is added directly to the culture medium for a minimum of 3 h, followed by incubation of the cells in Hank's calcium-magnesium-free balanced salt solution at 37 degrees C with intermittent trituration to facilitate dispersion. This procedure generates a population of phase-bright single cells that are round in morphology, take up the dye neutral red, exclude the dye trypan blue and readily attach to tissue culture dishes coated with collagen, fibronectin or polylysine, thereby permitting applications that require plated-down conditions. When transferred to culture medium, the cells begin to reaggregate. By altering the length of time the cells are incubated in culture medium prior to attachment, the degree of reaggregation can be controlled to obtain plate-down profiles that consist of both isolated cells and cells in aggregates of varying sizes. Returning dissociated cells to suspension culture results in the reformation of large cell aggregates. Several measures of chromaffin cell function were indistinguishable for dissociated cells placed either in monolayer culture or suspension culture versus non-dissociated cells, implying that the dissociation procedure does not alter cellular responses or cause cellular damage.

  5. Regulation of plant cells, cell walls and development by mechanical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  6. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  7. [Ultrastructural study of TNT effect on the callus cells and the cells of intact plants of Yucca gloriosa L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, M; Zaalishvili, G; Ramishvili, M; Gogava, M; Chelidze, N

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular distribution of assimilated 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in callus cells, flower buds and leaves of intact Yucca gloriosa L. plants using electron microscope radioautography. The radiotracer was detected in vacuoles, plastids, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. It was found that in dedifferentiated callus cells TNT was incorporated in the vacuoles in greater quantities in comparison with the cells of intact plant. Correspondingly the ultrastructural integrity of the dedifferentiated cells is less damaged.

  8. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  9. Methods of expressing and detecting activity of expansin in plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Elizabeth E.; Yoon, Sangwoong

    2017-10-10

    A method of expressing heterologous expansin in a plant cell is provided where a nucleic acid molecule encoding expansin is introduced into the plant cell and in an embodiment is operably linked to a promoter preferentially expressing in the seed tissue of the plant, and in another embodiment is linked to a promoter preferentially expressing in the embryo tissue of the seed. An embodiment provides the nucleic acid molecule is operably linked to a second nucleic acid molecule that directs expression to the endoplasmic reticulum, vacuole or cell wall. Plants and plant parts expressing expansin are provided. An assay for detection of expansin activity is also provided.

  10. A Survey of Databases for Analysis of Plant Cell Wall-Related Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Ronald, Pamela C

    2010-01-01

    Biofuels derived from plant cell wall lignocellulose have the potential to serve as an alternative source of energy, relieving dependence on finite petroleum reserves and reducing production of climate-changing greenhouse gases. To better elucidate cell wall structure, the plant research community has developed databases to host the accumulated information on plant cell wall-related enzymes. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive catalog of these databases, as well as to descri...

  11. A phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of phosphate uptake and storage in cultured Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, P; Vogel, H J

    1985-03-25

    High resolution 31P NMR spectra (103.2 MHz) of oxygenated Catharanthus roseus and Daucus carota cells grown in suspension cultures were obtained using a solenoidal perfusion probe. The spectra showed resonances for various phosphorylated metabolites such as ATP, ADP, NAD(P)(H), nucleoside diphosphoglucose, and sugar phosphates. The relative levels of the phosphorylated metabolites remained constant throughout the growth curve. No resonances for storage compounds such as polyphosphates, pyrophosphate, or phytates were observed. Two resolved resonances for Pi indicated an intracellular pH of 7.3 and 5.7 (or below) for the cytoplasm and vacuoles, respectively. The time course of Pi uptake and storage during growth in fresh culture medium was followed by studying the level of vacuolar Pi with 31P NMR (145.7 MHz). Simultaneously, the level of Pi in the culture medium was followed with radioactive 32P. C. roseus quickly takes up all the Pi from the culture medium (maximum rate 1.7 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells]. The Pi is first stored in the vacuoles; subsequently, one part of this pool is used to keep a constant cytoplasmic Pi level while another part is apparently accumulated as an NMR invisible Pi store, probably in another cell organelle. In contrast, D. carota does not accumulate Pi in the vacuoles and consequently it takes up Pi from the medium at a much slower rate (0.05 mumol min-1 g-1 (dry weight of cells].

  12. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant-microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eLeborgne-Castel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e. the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters.

  13. Phytomedicines (medicines derived from plants) for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniyangi, Oluseyi; Cohall, Damian H

    2018-02-15

    Sickle cell disease, a common recessively inherited haemoglobin disorder, affects people from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Mediterranean basin, Indian subcontinent, Caribbean and South America. It is associated with complications and a reduced life expectancy. Phytomedicines (medicine derived from plants in their original state) encompass many of the plant remedies from traditional healers which the populations most affected would encounter. Laboratory research and limited clinical trials have suggested positive effects of phytomedicines both in vivo and in vitro. However, there has been little systematic appraisal of their benefits. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2004, and updated in 2010, 2013, and 2015. To assess the benefits and risks of phytomedicines in people with sickle cell disease of all types, of any age, in any setting. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (ISRCTN), the Allied and Complimentary Medicine Database (AMED), ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).Dates of most recent searches: Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 10 April 2017; ISRCTN: 26 July 2017; AMED: 24 August 2017; ClinicalTrials.gov: 02 August 2017; and the WHO ICTRP: 27 July 2017. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials with participants of all ages with sickle cell disease, in all settings, comparing the administration of phytomedicines, by any mode to placebo or conventional treatment, including blood transfusion and hydroxyurea. Both authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Two trials (182 participants) and two phytomedicines Niprisan ® (also known as Nicosan ® ) and Ciklavit ® were included. The Phase IIB (pivotal) trial suggests that Niprisan ® was effective

  14. The excitability of plant cells: with a special emphasis on characean internodal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.

    1994-01-01

    This review describes the basic principles of electrophysiology using the generation of an action potential in characean internodal cells as a pedagogical tool. Electrophysiology has proven to be a powerful tool in understanding animal physiology and development, yet it has been virtually neglected in the study of plant physiology and development. This review is, in essence, a written account of my personal journey over the past five years to understand the basic principles of electrophysiology so that I can apply them to the study of plant physiology and development. My formal background is in classical botany and cell biology. I have learned electrophysiology by reading many books on physics written for the lay person and by talking informally with many patient biophysicists. I have written this review for the botanist who is unfamiliar with the basics of membrane biology but would like to know that she or he can become familiar with the latest information without much effort. I also wrote it for the neurophysiologist who is proficient in membrane biology but knows little about plant biology (but may want to teach one lecture on "plant action potentials"). And lastly, I wrote this for people interested in the history of science and how the studies of electrical and chemical communication in physiology and development progressed in the botanical and zoological disciplines.

  15. Immunological approaches to plant cell wall and biomass characterization: Glycome Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Miller, Jeffrey S; Hahn, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    The native complexity of plant cell walls makes research on them challenging. Hence, it is advantageous to have a diversity of tools that can be used to analyze and characterize plant cell walls. In this chapter, we describe one of two immunological approaches that can be employed for screening of plant cell wall/biomass materials from diverse plants and tissues. This approach, Glycome Profiling, lends itself well to moderate to high-throughput screening of plant cell wall/biomass samples. Glycome Profiling is being further optimized to reduce the amount of sample required for the analysis, and to improve the sensitivity and throughput of the assay. We are optimistic that Glycome Profiling will prove to be a broadly applicable experimental approach that will find increasing application to a wide variety of studies on plant cell wall/biomass samples.

  16. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. No Stress! Relax! Mechanisms Governing Growth and Shape in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which plant cells control growth and shape are the result of the coordinated action of many events, notably cell wall stress relaxation and turgor-driven expansion. The scalar nature of turgor pressure would drive plant cells to assume spherical shapes; however, this is not the case, as plant cells show an amazing variety of morphologies. Plant cell walls are dynamic structures that can display alterations in matrix polysaccharide composition and concentration, which ultimately affect the wall deformation rate. The wide varieties of plant cell shapes, spanning from elongated cylinders (as pollen tubes and jigsaw puzzle-like epidermal cells, to very long fibres and branched stellate leaf trichomes, can be understood if the underlying mechanisms regulating wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal dynamics are addressed. This review aims at gathering the available knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regulating expansion, growth and shape in plant cells by putting a special emphasis on the cell wall-cytoskeleton system continuum. In particular, we discuss from a molecular point of view the growth mechanisms characterizing cell types with strikingly different geometries and describe their relationship with primary walls. The purpose, here, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the multitude of events through which plant cells manage to expand and control their final shapes.

  18. Intact plant MRI for the study of cell water relations, membrane permeability, cell-to-cell and long distance water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    2007-01-01

    Water content and hydraulic conductivity, including transport within cells, over membranes, cell-to-cell, and long-distance xylem and phloem transport, are strongly affected by plant water stress. By being able to measure these transport processes non-invasely in the intact plant situation in

  19. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Svensson, Birte

    or optically detectable events during PCD in barley aleurone layer, a cell model for living plant tissues, for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic cell culture enables in vitro experiments to approach in vivo conditions. The major advantage of electrochemical......Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants can influence the outcome of yield and quality of crops through its important role in seed germination and the defence process against pathogens. The main scope of the project is to apply microfluidic cell culture for the measurement of electrochemically......, since it is known that reactive oxygen species, which are affected by changes in the redox activity of the cells3, are involved in PCD in plants, but the relationship between and mechanisms behind ROS and PCD is only poorly understood in plant cells4. Recently, it has been shown, using optical detection...

  20. Increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity enhances Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene delivery into plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Nonaka, Satoko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a useful tool for the genetic modification in plants, although its efficiency is low for several plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has three major steps in laboratory-controlled experiments: the delivery of T-DNA into plant cells, the selection of transformed plant cells, and the regeneration of whole plants from the selected cells. Each of these steps must be optimized to improve the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated plant transf...

  1. Pectic homogalacturonan masks abundant sets of xyloglucan epitopes in plant cell walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcus, Susan E; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Hervé, Cécile

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular probes are required to detect cell wall polymers in-situ to aid understanding of their cell biology and several studies have shown that cell wall epitopes have restricted occurrences across sections of plant organs indicating that cell wall structure is highly developmentally...... is associated with pectin in plant cell walls. They also indicate that documented patterns of cell wall epitopes in relation to cell development and cell differentiation may need to be re-considered in relation to the potential masking of cell wall epitopes by other cell wall components....... regulated. Xyloglucan is the major hemicellulose or cross-linking glycan of the primary cell walls of dicotyledons although little is known of its occurrence or functions in relation to cell development and cell wall microstructure. RESULTS: Using a neoglycoprotein approach, in which a XXXG heptasaccharide...

  2. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  3. Cell wall mechanics and growth control in plants: the role of pectins revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman eHöfte

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How is the extensibility of growing plant cell walls regulated ? In the past, most studies have focused on the role of the cellulose/xyloglucan network and the enigmatic wall-loosening agents expansins. Here we review first how in the closest relatives of the land plants, the Charophycean algae, cell wall synthesis is coupled to cell wall extensibility by a chemical Ca2+-exchange mechanism between Ca2+-pectate complexes. We next discuss evidence for the existence in terrestrial plants of a similar primitive Ca2+-pectate-based growth control mechanism in parallel to the more recent, land plant-specific, expansin-dependent process.

  4. Long-term performance of a plant microbial fuel cell with Spartina anglica

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, Ruud A.; Strik, David P. B. T. B.; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2010-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell is a sustainable and renewable way of electricity production. The plant is integrated in the anode of the microbial fuel cell which consists of a bed of graphite granules. In the anode, organic compounds deposited by plant roots are oxidized by electrochemically active bacteria. In this research, salt marsh species Spartina anglica generated current for up to 119?days in a plant microbial fuel cell. Maximum power production was 100?mW?m?2 geometric anode area, hi...

  5. Long-term performance of a plant microbial fuel cell with Spartina anglica

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, R.A.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell is a sustainable and renewable way of electricity production. The plant is integrated in the anode of the microbial fuel cell which consists of a bed of graphite granules. In the anode, organic compounds deposited by plant roots are oxidized by electrochemically active bacteria. In this research, salt marsh species Spartina anglica generated current for up to 119 days in a plant microbial fuel cell. Maximum power production was 100 mW m-2 geometric anode area, hi...

  6. Plant development: cell movement relative to each other is both common and very important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    The common view that "plant cells cannot move relative to each other" is incorrect. Relative movement of plant cells relative to each other is expressed during fiber elongation, growth of arms of branched sclereids, intrusive growth of the tips of fusiform initials in the cambium, the increase in diameter of vessel members, growth in length of vessel-member elements in the secondary xylem of the few monocotyledons that express secondary growth, growth of laticifers, formation of tylosis, dilatation in the bark via parenchyma cell expansion, and growth of pollen tubes in the style. In all these cases, part of the plant cell remains in its original position, while other parts of the cell grow to the new locations, moving significantly relative to other cells. Not considering these movements will cause a delay in studying and understanding many aspects of differentiation of plant cells and tissues.

  7. Cell wall integrity signaling in plants: "To grow or not to grow that's the question".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voxeur, Aline; Höfte, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Plants, like yeast, have the ability to monitor alterations in the cell wall architecture that occur during normal growth or in changing environments and to trigger compensatory changes in the cell wall. We discuss how recent advances in our understanding of the cell wall architecture provide new insights into the role of cell wall integrity sensing in growth control. Next we review the properties of membrane receptor-like kinases that have roles in pH control, mechano-sensing and reactive oxygen species accumulation in growing cells and which may be the plant equivalents of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) sensors. Finally, we discuss recent findings showing an increasing role for CWI signaling in plant immunity and the adaptation to changes in the ionic environment of plant cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A synthetic glycan microarray enables epitope mapping of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruprecht, Colin; Bartetzko, Max P; Senf, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    In the last three decades, more than 200 monoclonal antibodies have been raised against most classes of plant cell wall polysaccharides by different laboratories world-wide. These antibodies are widely used to identify differences in plant cell wall components in mutants, organ and tissue types, ...

  9. Antiproliferative activity of Thai medicinal plant extracts on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moongkarndi, Primchanien; Kosem, Nuttavut; Luanratana, Omboon; Jongsomboonkusol, Suna; Pongpan, Narongchai

    2004-06-01

    Ethanolic extracts of selected nine Thai medicinal plants were tested for antiproliferative activity against SKBR3 human breast adenocarcinoma cell line using MTT assay. Garcinia mangostana showed the most potent activity. However, all plant extracts showed activity in potential range for further investigation on cancer cells. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Dismantling of an alpha contaminated hot cell at the Marcoule Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, M.

    1988-01-01

    For the remodeling of Marcoule Pilot Plant, the cell 82: old unit for plutonium solution purification by extraction, was dismantled. About 42 tons of wastes were evacuated. Some wastes wen decontaminated by mechanical means other wastes with higher residual activity were stored for subsequent processing. The operation shows that dismantling of a hot cell is possible even if incorporated in an operating plant [fr

  11. Microbial community structure elucidates performance of Glyceria maxima plant microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.; Rothballer, M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Engel, M.; Schulz, M.; Hartmann, A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) is a technology in which living plant roots provide electron donor, via rhizodeposition, to a mixed microbial community to generate electricity in a microbial fuel cell. Analysis and localisation of the microbial community is necessary for gaining insight into

  12. High-resolution solution-state NMR of unfractionated plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Dino Ress; Daniel J. Yelle; Kenneth E. Hammel; Sally A. Ralph; Bernadette Nanayakkara; Armin Wagner; Takuya Akiyama; Paul F. Schatz; Shawn D. Mansfield; Noritsugu Terashima; Wout Boerjan; Bjorn Sundberg; Mattias Hedenstrom

    2009-01-01

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With recent methods for dissolution of, admittedly, finely divided plant cell wall material, the wall can...

  13. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  14. Cyanobacteria as Cell Factories to Produce Plant Secondary Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yong; He, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria represent a promising platform for the production of plant secondary metabolites. Their capacity to express plant P450 proteins, which have essential functions in the biosynthesis of many plant secondary metabolites, makes cyanobacteria ideal for this purpose, and their photosynthetic capability allows cyanobacteria to grow with simple nutrient inputs. This review summarizes the advantages of using cyanobacteria to transgenically produce plant secondary metabolites. Some techniq...

  15. Eduard Strasburger (1844-1912): founder of modern plant cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Dieter; Baluška, František; Menzel, Diedrik

    2012-10-01

    Eduard Strasburger, director of the Botany Institute and the Botanical Garden at the University of Bonn from 1881 to 1912, was one of the most admirable scientists in the field of plant biology, not just as the founder of modern plant cell biology but in addition as an excellent teacher who strongly believed in "education through science." He contributed to plant cell biology by discovering the discrete stages of karyokinesis and cytokinesis in algae and higher plants, describing cytoplasmic streaming in different systems, and reporting on the growth of the pollen tube into the embryo sac and guidance of the tube by synergides. Strasburger raised many problems which are hot spots in recent plant cell biology, e.g., structure and function of the plasmodesmata in relation to phloem loading (Strasburger cells) and signaling, mechanisms of cell plate formation, vesicle trafficking as a basis for most important developmental processes, and signaling related to fertilization.

  16. Escherichia coli common pilus (ECP) targets arabinosyl residues in plant cell walls to mediate adhesion to fresh produce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-12-05

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR-GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  18. Cytotoxicity of Selected Medicinal and Nonmedicinal Plant Extracts to Microbial and Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary M. Booth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the cytotoxicity of 55 species of plants. Each plant was rated as medicinal, or nonmedicinal based on the existing literature. About 79% of the medicinal plants showed some cytotoxicity, while 75% of the nonmedicinal plants showed bioactivity. It appears that Asteraceae, Labiatae, Pinaceae, and Chenopodiaceae were particularly active against human cervical cancer cells. Based on the literature, only three of the 55 plants have been significantly investigated for cytotoxicity. It is clear that there is much toxicological work yet to be done with both medicinal and nonmedicinal plants.

  19. Traits, properties, and performance: how woody plants combine hydraulic and mechanical functions in a cell, tissue, or whole plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenbruch, Barbara; McCulloh, Katherine A

    2014-12-01

    This review presents a framework for evaluating how cells, tissues, organs, and whole plants perform both hydraulic and mechanical functions. The morphological alterations that affect dual functionality are varied: individual cells can have altered morphology; tissues can have altered partitioning to functions or altered cell alignment; and organs and whole plants can differ in their allocation to different tissues, or in the geometric distribution of the tissues they have. A hierarchical model emphasizes that morphological traits influence the hydraulic or mechanical properties; the properties, combined with the plant unit's environment, then influence the performance of that plant unit. As a special case, we discuss the mechanisms by which the proxy property wood density has strong correlations to performance but without direct causality. Traits and properties influence multiple aspects of performance, and there can be mutual compensations such that similar performance occurs. This compensation emphasizes that natural selection acts on, and a plant's viability is determined by, its performance, rather than its contributing traits and properties. Continued research on the relationships among traits, and on their effects on multiple aspects of performance, will help us better predict, manage, and select plant material for success under multiple stresses in the future. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Esau's Plant anatomy: meristems, cells, and tissues of the plant body : their structure, function, and development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evert, Ray Franklin; Esau, Katherine; Eichhorn, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Body of a Vascular Plant Is Composed of Three Tissue Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structurally Stem, Leaf, and Root Differ Primarily...