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Sample records for suspension-cultured cells electronic

  1. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    of growth regulators were observed to be 3 × 10−6M indoleacetic acid (JAA) combined with 3 × 10−6M benzylaminopurin (BAP) or 10−6M 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) alone. IAA + BAP caused a 100 fold increase in fresh weight over 4 weeks at 25°C. Addition of casein hydrolysate increased growth further....... Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  2. Phosphatidylinositol species of suspension cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, S.; Wagner, K.G.

    Suspension cultured Nicotiana tabacum and Catharanthus roseus cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, the phospholipid fraction extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography. Three different solvent systems and reference compounds were used to assign the different /sup 3/H-labeled species by autoradiography. The ratio of (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into PI, PIP and PIP/sub 2/ was found to be 95:4:1; with some preparations a lyso-PI band was obtained which incorporated about a tenth of the label of the PIP band. With Catharanthus roseus cells a very faint band between PI and lyso-PI was detected which could not be assigned to a reference compound.

  3. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... This study describes the establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for use in proteomics studies. ... Key words: Sorghum, proteomics, callus, cell suspension cultures, total soluble protein, secretome. INTRODUCTION ..... system, are dynamic and heterogeneous, being com- posed of a ...

  4. Establishment and characterization of American elm cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven M. Eshita; Joseph C. Kamalay; Vicki M. Gingas; Daniel A. Yaussy

    2000-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Dutch elm disease (DED)-tolerant and DED-susceptible American elms clones have been established and characterized as prerequisites for contrasts of cellular responses to pathogen-derived elicitors. Characteristics of cultured elm cell growth were monitored by A700 and media conductivity. Combined cell growth data for all experiments within a...

  5. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Datura innoxia Mill, were successfully grown on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium with 2,4–D, NAA or BAP as growth substances, provided the micronutrient levels were reduced to 1/10. Normal amounts of micronutrients were toxic. Attempts to identify the toxic elements did...... malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities above 500...

  6. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... plant growth regulators on the callus induction and accumulation of condensed tannins, and (iii) determine the optimum medium and the hormone combination for cell suspension culture of E. angustifolia. This paper presents the feasibility of condensed tannins production in callus and cell culture of E.

  7. Biotransformation of Dydrogesterone by Cell Suspension Cultures of Azadirachta indica

    OpenAIRE

    KHAN, Saifullah; CHOUDHARY, Muhammad Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    Biotransformation of dydrogesterone (1) by using cell suspension cultures of Azadirachta indica yielded a metabolite 20R-hydroxy-9b ,10a-pregna-4,6-diene-3-one (2). The structure of this compound was deduced on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Establishment of the callus and cell suspension culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was the optimization of the conditions of callus and cell suspension culture of Elaeagnus angustifolia for the production of condensed tannins. The effects of different conditions on the callus growth and the production of condensed tannins were researched. The leaf tissue part of E. angustifolia was ...

  9. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of Azadirachta indica. 113. J. Biosci. 33(1), March 2008. 1. Introduction. Chemical pesticides, once considered a boon for increasing the yield of food crops, have now become a bane owing to the numerous cases of pesticide poisoning. Alternative pesticides ...

  10. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... In vitro plant regeneration was achieved from embryogenic cell suspension culture of Astragalus chrysochlorus. When 30-day-old aseptically ... previous study, cytotoxic activities of stem and root ex-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: ... For callus induction, 30-day-old mesocotyl parts of seedlings were used.

  11. Study on enzymatic browning in suspension cultures of licorice cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic browning is one of the main obstacles encountered in the establishment of suspension systems of licorice cells. Browning of cells may result in decreased viability, poor growth and even death. The present study investigated the mechanism of browning reactions and the effective controlling methods. The results showed that the cell viability and membrane permeabilization obviously changed when the cells were transferred to liquid medium. The transformation caused rapid increase in the levels of polyphenol oxidase activity and in the production of polyphenols. Osmotic and hydrodynamic stresses arising from liquid culture were regarded as the major causes of enzymatic browning. Ascorbic acid and L-cysteine were found to be the most significant anti-browning agents that could decrease the degree of browning with 55.8% and 52.2%, respectively, at the end of the suspension culture's lag phase. When cultured with a cycle of 21 days, the maximum biomass of the cells cultured with ascorbic acid and L-cysteine increased with 31.1% and 26.5%, respectively, when compared to the control. These findings may be essential for the development of licorice cell cultures devoted to browning prevention and cell viability maintaining.

  12. Metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Williams, Daniel A; Xiong, Quanbo; Thornburgh, Scott

    2013-01-09

    Strobilurin fungicides are a leading class of antifungal chemicals used today in agricultural applications. Although degradation of some strobilurin fungicides has been assessed in plant residues, little information has appeared in the literature concerning the rates of metabolism of these fungicides in plants. In this study, we explored plant metabolism of three strobilurin fungicides, azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl, and trifloxystrobin, using wheat cell suspension cultures. Trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl were completely metabolized within 24 h, whereas the metabolism of azoxystrobin was relatively slow with half-lives up to 48 h depending on specific experimental conditions. Metabolic rates of these fungicides were affected by the amounts of compound and cells added to the media. Structural analysis of metabolites of trifloxystrobin and kresoxim-methyl by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) indicated that trifloxystrobin was first demethylated followed by subsequent hydroxylation, whereas kresoxim-methyl was largely demethylated. In contrast, a number of minor metabolites of azoxystrobin were present suggesting a differential metabolism of strobilurins by wheat cells.

  13. Diacylglycerol Kinase from Suspension Cultured Plant Cells 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Josef B.; Wagner, Karl G.

    1992-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (adenosine 5′-triphosphate:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.107), purified from suspension cultured Catharanthus roseus cells (J Wissing, S Heim, KG Wagner [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 1546-1551), was further characterized and its subcellular location was investigated. The enzyme revealed a complex dependency on lipids and surfactants; its activity was stimulated by certain phospholipids, with phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol as the most effective species, and by deoxycholate. In the presence of Triton X-100, used for its purification, a biphasic dependency upon diacylglycerol was observed and the apparent Michaelis constant values for diacylglycerol decreased with decreasing Triton concentration. The enzyme accepted both adenosine 5′-triphosphate and guanosine 5′-triphosphate as substrate and showed rather low apparent inhibition constant values for all nucleoside diphosphates tested. Diacylglycerol kinase is an intrinsic membrane protein and no activity was found in the cytosol. An investigation of different cellular membrane fractions confirmed its location in the plasma membrane. PMID:16668739

  14. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  15. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles, electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases or imaging (contrast agents. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis — total protein content, thiols — reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension

  16. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis—total protein content, thiols—reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  17. Nitration of plant apoplastic proteins from cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Wojtaszek, Przemysław

    2015-04-29

    Nitric oxide causes numerous protein modifications including nitration of tyrosine residues. This modification, though one of the greatest biological importance, is poorly recognized in plants and is usually associated with stress conditions. In this study we analyzed nitrotyrosines from suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, treated with NO modulators and exposed to osmotic stress, as well as of BY2 cells long-term adapted to osmotic stress conditions. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that the cell wall area is one of the compartments most enriched in nitrotyrosines within a plant cell. Subsequently, we analyzed nitration of ionically-bound cell-wall proteins and identified selected proteins with MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Proteomic analysis indicated that there was no significant increase in the amount of nitrated proteins under the influence of NO modulators, among them 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), considered a donor of nitrating agent, peroxynitrite. Moreover, osmotic stress conditions did not increase the level of nitration in cell wall proteins isolated from suspension cells, and in cultures long-term adapted to stress conditions; that level was even reduced in comparison with control samples. Among identified nitrotyrosine-containing proteins dominated the ones associated with carbon circulation as well as the numerous proteins responding to stress conditions, mainly peroxidases. High concentrations of nitric oxide found in the cell wall and the ability to produce large amounts of ROS make the apoplast a site highly enriched in nitrotyrosines, as presented in this paper. Analysis of ionically bound fraction of the cell wall proteins indicating generally unchanged amounts of nitrotyrosines under influence of NO modulators and osmotic stress, is noticeably different from literature data concerning, however, the total plant proteins analysis. This observation is supplemented by further nitroproteome analysis, for cells long

  18. A phytochemical study of lignans in whole plants and cell suspension cultures of Anthriscus sylvestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulman, A; Kubbinga, M.E.; Batterman, S; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Pras, N.; Woolley, J.G.; Quax, Wim

    2003-01-01

    In the roots of Anthriscus sylvestris 12 different lignans were detected. Arctigenin, dimethylmatairesinol, dimethylthujaplicatin, podophyllotoxin, 7-hydroxyyatein and 7-hydroxyanhydropodorhizol have not been previously reported to be present in A. sylvestris. In the cell suspension cultures, which

  19. Cytological changes associated with induction of anthraquinone synthesis in photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Tabata, M; Leistner, E

    1987-06-01

    Differences in subcellular structures between anthraquinone-producing and non-producing cells were investigated using photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida. Irregular or distorted plastids containing starch grains were observed in the anthraquinone-producing cells, together with a highly elongated rough endoplasmic reticulum. The possible participation of plastids and rough endoplasmic reticulum in the anthraquinone biosynthesis is discussed.

  20. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  1. Ultrastructure of paraquat-treated pine cells (Pinus elliottii Engelm. ) in suspension culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchem, R.; Henk, W.G.; Brown, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructure of liquid suspension cultures of Pinus elliottii was studied, noting characteristics of dividing and senescent cells. The cultures were treated with 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg 1/sup -1/ paraquat, an herbicide which stimulates oleoresin synthesis and resinosis in the xylem of treated pine trees. The ultrastructural effects of the toxin were studied at each paraquat concentration over a period of 24 days. The ultrastructural observations are correlated with physiological studies in suspension culture and in living trees.

  2. Extraction and Estimation of Secondary Metabolites from Date Palm Cell Suspension Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2017-01-01

    The health benefits of dates arise from their content of phytochemicals, known for having pharmacological properties, including flavonoids, carotenoids, phenolic acids, sterols, procyanidins, and anthocyanins. In vitro cell culture technology has become an attractive means for the production of biomass and bioactive compounds. This chapter describes step-by-step procedures for the induction and proliferation of callus from date palm offshoots on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with plant growth regulators. Subsequently cell suspension cultures are established for optimum biomass accumulation, based on the growth curve developed by packed cell volume as well as fresh and dry weights. The highest production of biomass occurs at the 11th week after culturing. Moreover, this chapter describes methodologies for the extraction and analysis of secondary metabolites of date palm cell suspension cultures using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum level of catechin, caffeic acid, apigenin, and kaempferol from the cell suspension cultures establishes after the 11th and 12th weeks of culture. This protocol is useful for scale-up production of secondary metabolites from date palm cell suspension cultures.

  3. Regulation of DNA synthesis and cell division by polyamines in Catharanthus roseus suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Minocha; S.C. Minocha; A. Komamine; W.C. Shortle

    1991-01-01

    Various inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis were used to study the role of polyamines in DNA synthesis and cell division in suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus (L) G. Don. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) was the major enzyme responsible for putrescine production. DL α-difluoromethylarginine inhibited ADC activity, cellular...

  4. Fetal calf serum-free suspension culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells employing fish serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masashi; Aizu, Yu; Shioya, Itaru; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2010-03-01

    The effects of heat treatment and concentration of fish serum (FS) on cell growth in a suspension culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) 1-15(500) (ATCC CRL-9606) cells were investigated. An increase in FS concentration from 1% to 4% markedly increased cell density. On the other hand, heat treatment of FS showed nearly no effect on cell density. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Suspension culture of pluripotent stem cells: effect of shear on stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin C; Rodrigues, Beatriz; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant promise, the routine usage of suspension cell culture to manufacture stem cell-derived differentiated cells has progressed slowly. Suspension culture is an innovative way of either expanding or differentiating cells and sometimes both are combined into a single bioprocess. Its advantages over static 2D culturing include a homogeneous and controllable culture environment and producing a large quantity of cells in a fraction of time. This feature makes suspension cell culture ideal for use in stem cell research and eventually ideal in the large-scale production of differentiated cells for regenerative medicine. Because of their tremendous differentiation capacities and unlimited growth properties, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in particular are considered potential sources for future cell-replacement therapies. Currently, expansion of PSCs is accomplished in 2D, which only permits a limited amount of cell growth per culture flask before cells need to be passaged. However, before stem cells can be applied clinically, several aspects of their expansion, such as directed growth, but also differentiation, need to be better controlled. This review will summarize recent advantages in suspension culture of PSCs, while at the same time highlighting current challenges.

  6. [Effects of fungal elicitor on inophyllums production in suspension cultured cells of Calophyllum inophyllum L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huan-liang; Guo, Yong; Cui, Tang-bing; Dai, Jian-guo; Zhang, Jun-song; Xu, Bai-qiu

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the effects of fungal elicitors on inophyllums production in suspension cultured cell of Calophyllum inophyllum Linn. The pathogen of leaf spot disease of C. inophyllum L. was isolated and prepared as fungal elicitor. The fungal elicitor was added to the medium with different concentrations and culture period. Their effects on biomass and inophyllums content of the suspension of cultured cells were studied. The optimum effects of S-I fungal elicitor concentrations on inophyllums content was 60 mg GE x L(-1). Adding the fungi elicitor into the cell suspension culture system at stationary phase (being cultured for 18 days) resulted in a highest inophyllum content of 59.174 mg x L(-1) at the 3rd day with 27% higher than control. Fungal elicitor treatment promoted the inophyllums accumulation in medium. Adding the Stagonospora curtisii (Berk.) Sacc. to the medium was effective approaches to enhance inophyllums yield in the suspension of C. inophyllum L culture cell.

  7. Effects of Selected Physicochemical Parameters on Zerumbone Production of Zingiber zerumbet Smith Cell Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanom Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber zerumbet Smith is an important herb that contains bioactive phytomedicinal compound, zerumbone. To enhance cell growth and production of this useful compound, we investigated the growth conditions of cell suspension culture. Embryogenic callus generated from shoot bud was used to initiate cell suspension culture. The highest specific growth rate of cells was recorded when it was cultured in liquid Murashige and Skoog basal medium containing 3% sucrose with pH 5.7 and incubated under continuous shaking condition of 70 rpm for 16 h light and 8 h dark cycle at 24°C. Our results also revealed that the type of carbohydrate substrate, light regime, agitation speed, and incubation temperature could affect the production of zerumbone. Although the zerumbone produced in this study was not abundant compared to rhizome of Z. zerumbet, the possibility of producing zerumbone during early stage could serve as a model for subsequent improvement.

  8. Study on enzymatic browning in suspension cultures of licorice cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yali Li; Tingting Meng; Yuxi Wang; Xiaoli Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic browning is one of the main obstacles encountered in the establishment of suspension systems of licorice cells. Browning of cells may result in decreased viability, poor growth and even death. The present study investigated the mechanism of browning reactions and the effective controlling methods. The results showed that the cell viability and membrane permeabilization obviously changed when the cells were transferred to liquid medium. The transformation caused rapid increase in the...

  9. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Emine Sema; Babalik, Zehra; Hallac-Turk, Filiz; Gokturk-Baydar, Nilgun

    2014-09-23

    Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM) to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols) production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols) and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g), total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g), total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g) and trans-resveratrol (490.76 μg/100 g) were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 μg/100 g) were detected in the cell cultures collected at day 6

  10. The effects of cadmium chloride on secondary metabolite production in Vitis vinifera cv. cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Sema Cetin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant secondary metabolites are possess several biological activities such as anti-mutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-aging, etc. Cell suspension culture is one of the most effective systems to produce secondary metabolites. It is possible to increase the phenolic compounds and tocopherols by using cell suspensions. Studies on tocopherols production by cell suspension cultures are seldom and generally focused on seed oil plants. Although fresh grape, grape seed, pomace and grape seed oil had tocopherols, with our best knowledge, there is no research on tocopherol accumulation in the grape cell suspension cultures. In this study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cadmium chloride treatments on secondary metabolite production in cell suspension cultures of grapevine. Cell suspensions initiated from callus belonging to petiole tissue was used as a plant material. Cadmium chloride was applied to cell suspension cultures in different concentration (1.0 mM and 1.5 mM to enhance secondary metabolite (total phenolics, total flavanols, total flavonols, trans-resveratrol, and α-, β-, γ- δ-tocopherols production. Cells were harvested at two days intervals until the 6th day of cultures. Amounts of total phenolics, total flavanols and total flavonols; trans-resveratrol and tocopherols (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherols and dry cell weights were determined in the harvested cells. RESULTS: Phenolic contents were significantly affected by the sampling time and cadmium concentrations. The highest values of total phenolic (168.82 mg/100 g, total flavanol (15.94 mg/100 g, total flavonol (14.73 mg/100 g and trans-resveratrol (490.76 µg/100 g were found in cells treated with 1.0 mM CdCl2 and harvested at day 2. Contents of tocopherols in the cells cultured in the presence of 1.0 mM CdCl2 gradually increased during the culture period and the highest values of α, β and γ tocopherols (145.61, 25.52 and 18.56 µg/100 g were detected in the cell

  11. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of nutritional alteration on biomass content and azadirachtin production in cell suspensions of the elite neem variety crida-8. Variations in total nitrogen availability in the medium in terms of different ratios of nitrate:ammonium showed that the ratio 4:1 revealed a profound effect, ...

  12. Establishment of sorghum cell suspension culture system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total soluble proteins (TSP) and culture filtrate (CF) proteins were extracted from the cell culture system and solubilised in urea buffer (9 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 4% CHAPS). Both onedimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gel analysis of these two proteomes show that the TSP and CF proteomes have different ...

  13. Characterization of transmembrane auxin transport in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifertová, Daniela; Skůpa, Petr; Rychtář, Jan; Laňková, Martina; Pařezová, Markéta; Dobrev, Petre I; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Polar auxin transport is a crucial process for control and coordination of plant development. Studies of auxin transport through plant tissues and organs showed that auxin is transported by a combination of phloem flow and the active, carrier-mediated cell-to-cell transport. Since plant organs and even tissues are too complex for determination of the kinetics of carrier-mediated auxin uptake and efflux on the cellular level, simplified models of cell suspension cultures are often used, and several tobacco cell lines have been established for auxin transport assays. However, there are very few data available on the specificity and kinetics of auxin transport across the plasma membrane for Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells. In this report, the characteristics of carrier-mediated uptake (influx) and efflux for the native auxin indole-3-acetic acid and synthetic auxins, naphthalene-1-acetic and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acids (NAA and 2,4-D, respectively) in A. thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta suspension-cultured cells (LE line) are provided. By auxin competition assays and inhibitor treatments, we show that, similarly to tobacco cells, uptake carriers have high affinity towards 2,4-D and that NAA is a good tool for studies of auxin efflux in LE cells. In contrast to tobacco cells, metabolic profiling showed that only a small proportion of NAA is metabolized in LE cells. These results show that the LE cell line is a useful experimental system for measurements of kinetics of auxin carriers on the cellular level that is complementary to tobacco cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  15. Establishment of cell suspension cultures of two Costa Rican Jatropha species (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yesenia Solís-Ramos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available J. curcas has been studied in different countries and some interesting agronomic, pharmacological and industrial properties have been reported. More recently, it has been considered an important alternative source for biofuel production. The objective of this study was to establish a long-term method for the maintenance of calli and cell suspension cultures of the local species J. curcas and J. gossypifolia, in order to allow future studies for novel compounds with pharmaceutical or industrial applications. For this, friable calli were successfully induced from hypocotyl segments of J. curcas and J. gossypifolia that were cultured in semisolid MS media supplemented with 1.5mg/L, and 0.5mg/L of 2,4-D, respectively. Cell suspension cultures of J. curcas were established using 1g of 35 and 60-day calli, in 50mL of liquid MS media supplied with 1.5mg/L of 2,4-D; sucrose and maltose were additionally evaluated as carbon sources. After 35 days, cell suspension cultures initiated with 35-day calli, showed greater cell growth with a maximum biomass of 194.9g/L fresh weight, 6.59g/L dry weight and 17.3% packed volume. The exponential phase ended at day 35 for cultures initiated with 35-day calli, and at day 21 for cultures initiated with 60-day calli. Higher biomass production was obtained with sucrose. Cell cultures were established with 35-day calli in MS media with the same 2,4-D concentration used for calli induction and 30g/L sucrose. This medium was considered optimum for the maintenance and growth of cell suspensions for both species, with sub-cultures every 20 days. The biotechnological potential for the production of bioactive compounds in these species for pharmacological, agricultural and industrial applications is being evaluated.

  16. Comparison of Cuminaldehyde Contents from Cell Suspension Cultures and Seeds of [Bunium persicum (Boiss. B. Fedtsch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara KHOSRAVINIA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The cell suspension culture and seed samples of Bunium persicum were extracted by supercritical fluid, hydrodistillation and solvent methods and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. In this study to compare the different methods of extractions, cuminaldehyde was targeted as one of the Black zira essential oil constitute. For callus induction the germinated seeds were cultured as explants on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l kinetin (treatment A as well as 2 mg/l ?-naphthalene acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l 6-benzyl aminopurine (treatment B and followed by cells suspension cultures establishment for the first time. The results of cell culture showed that cells from treatment B have a growth rate higher than A. All extracts were dissolved in 1 ml hexane and analyzed by Gas Chromatography. According to the Gas Chromatography analysis, cuminaldehyde was not detected in the supercritical fluid samples, while it was present in hydrodistillation and solvent extract. Cuminaldehyde percentage in cell and seed solvent extracts was 4.65% and 18.61% respectively. Gas Chromatography results also showed that no cuminaldehyde is present in media extracts, means no cuminaldehyde has been secreted into the medium.

  17. Five 2-(2-Phenylethylchromones from Sodium Chloride-Elicited Aquilaria sinensis Cell Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiu Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Five 2-(2-phenylethylchromones including a new one, (5S,6R,7S,8R-5,8-dichloro-6,7-dihydroxy-2-phenylethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-chromen-4-one (1, and four known ones (2–5, were isolated from 150 mM NaCl-elicited Aquilaria sinensis cell suspension cultures. In addition, three feruloyl amides (6–8, six nucleosides (9–14, (+-syringaresinol (15, indole-3-carboxaldehyde (16, and two glycosides (17–18 were also obtained. The structures were unambiguously identified by analysis of their UV, IR, NMR, and HRESIMS data. The absolute configuration of the new 2-(2-phenylethylchromone (1 was established by a dimolybdenum tetraacetate-induced circular dichroism experiment. Compared to un-elicited cell lines, the appearance of 2-(2-phenylethylchromones in NaCl-treated cells occurred on the 3rd and 5th days of their treatment. 2-(2-Phenylethylchromones, feruloyl amides, nucleosides, and lignins have been reported to be closely related to plant defense; therefore, the identification of these compounds from NaCl-elicited A. sinensis cell suspension cultures would be useful for further exploring the mechanism of agarwood formation.

  18. Improvement of catechin productivity in suspension cultures of tea callus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Takeishi, Junna; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2003-01-01

    In the suspension cultures of tea callus cells, C.sinensis cv. Yabukita, the effects of the culture conditions, such as culture period and light irradiation, on cell growth and catechin production were investigated. The production of flavonoids (catechins + proanthocyanidins) was promoted by inoculating the cells into the fresh medium at the culture period giving the maximum flavonoid content in the cells. The cultivation under light irradiation was repeated several times by inoculating the cells with the maximum flavonoid content. The flavonoid production was significantly increased without inhibiting the cell growth. We obtained the maximum flavonoid production, 1.5 g/dm(3) medium, and the maximum content, 150 mg/(g of dry cell weight (DCW)). The latter value was larger than that in the leaves of the tea plant.

  19. [The production of gastrodin through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension culture of Datura stramonium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jia-Shun; Ma, Wei-Peng; Pu, Jun-Xue; Xu, Shu-Guan; Zheng, Shuang-Qing; Xiao, Chun-Jie

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the production of p-hydroxymethylphenol-beta-D-glucoside (gastrodin) through biotransformation by plant cell suspension cultures. Using cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium to convert the exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin was conducted and the converted compounds were separated with a combination of multi-chromatography. Their chemical structures were determined on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical evidence. The conversion procedure of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into gastrodin by Datura stramonium cell suspension cultures was established. The synthesized gastrodin (II) was isolated from the fermental liquor and identified by spectral analysis. At the same time, the p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (I) converted through biotransformation of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde by cell suspension cultures of Datura stramonium was also isolated and identified. Two compounds were also isolated from the cell cultures and they were identified as beta-D-furanoallulose (III) and n-butyloxystyryl-beta-D-pyranoallulose (IV). Datura stramonium grown in suspension cultures can convert exogenous p-hydroxybenzaldehyde into the corresponding gastrodin.

  20. CALLUS INDUCTION AND PHYTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF Cannabis sativa CELL SUSPENSION CULTURES

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    Tri Joko Raharjo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Callus of Cannabis sativa has been successfully induced from C. sativa explants and seedings. It seems that flowers are the best explant for callus induction and induction under light also give better results than induction in dark. Four cell culture lines were established from flower induced callus. Phytochemical profiles of C. sativa suspension cell cultures were investigated using HPLC and 1H-NMR. Cannabinoids and phenolic compounds related to cannabinoids such as flavonoids could not be found in the cell suspension cultures and there is no major chemical difference between the cell lines though they can visually be distinguished by their colors. Only in one cell line some aromatic compounds in the water/methanol extract could be observed in the 1H-NMR. Further investigations showed that none of these compounds are flavonoids. It seems that lack of cannabinoids in the cell cultures is related to lack of polyketide synthase activity.   Keywords: Callus, Cannabis, phytochemical

  1. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45......% at the start of the phase of rapid cell division. If the culture is continued beyond 7 days, the vacuole volume reaches 90% of cell volume by day 12.Attempts to measure relative cytoplasmic volumes by compartmental analysis of nonelectrolyte efflux were unsuccessful. The proportion of cell volume occupied...... by cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  2. Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured catharanthus roseus cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Sagishima, Kyoko; Kubota, Kaoru (Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    The Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were investigated. Substantially all the sucrose in the culture medium was hydrolyzed to glucose and fructose before being taken up by the cells. The activity of invertase bound to cell walls, determined in situ, was high at the early stage of culture. Glucose was more easily taken up by the cells than was fructose. Tracer experiments using (U-{sup 14}C)glucose and (U-{sup 14}C)fructose indicated that glucose is a better precursor for respiration than fructose, while fructose is preferentially utilized for the synthesis of sucrose, especially in the early phase of cell growth. These results suggest that fructose is utilized for the synthesis of sucrose via the reaction catalyzed by sucrose synthase, prior to the phosphorylation by hexokinase or fructokinase.

  3. Impact of fluidic agitation on human pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampe, Daniel; Joshi, Ronak; Keller, Kevin; Zur Nieden, Nicole I; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    The success of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of future cell therapies hinges, in part, on the availability of a robust and scalable culture system that can readily produce a clinically relevant number of cells and their derivatives. Stirred suspension culture has been identified as one such promising platform due to its ease of use, scalability, and widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry (e.g., CHO cell-based production of therapeutic proteins) among others. However, culture of undifferentiated hPSCs in stirred suspension is a relatively new development within the past several years, and little is known beyond empirically optimized culture parameters. In particular, detailed characterizations of different agitation rates and their influence on the propagation of hPSCs are often not reported in the literature. In the current study, we systematically investigated various agitation rates to characterize their impact on cell yield, viability, and the maintenance of pluripotency. Additionally, we closely examined the distribution of cell aggregates and how the observed culture outcomes are attributed to their size distribution. Overall, our results showed that moderate agitation maximized the propagation of hPSCs to approximately 38-fold over 7 days by keeping the cell aggregates below the critical size, beyond which the cells are impacted by the diffusion limit, while limiting cell death caused by excessive fluidic forces. Furthermore, we observed that fluidic agitation could regulate not only cell aggregation, but also expression of some key signaling proteins in hPSCs. This indicates a new possibility to guide stem cell fate determination by fluidic agitation in stirred suspension cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2109-2120. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Thiruvengadam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones (AQs and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs, media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA, and salicylic acid (SA for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM; 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  5. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-11-16

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum . We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum . The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum . This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  6. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities. PMID:27854330

  7. Jasmonic and salicylic acids enhanced phytochemical production and biological activities in cell suspension cultures of spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Thiruvengadam, Muthu

    2017-03-01

    In vitro cell suspension culture was established for the production of commercially valuable phytochemicals in Momordica dioica. The influence of elicitors in jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) increased their effect on phytochemical production and biomass accumulation in M. dioica. The results indicate that compared with non-elicited cultures, JA- and SA-elicited cell suspension cultures had significantly enhanced phenolic, flavonoid, and carotenoid production, as well as antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative activities. Furthermore, elicited cultures produced 22 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids, and hydroxybenzoic acids. Greater biomass production, phytochemical accumulation, and biological activity occurred in JA- than in SA-elicited cell cultures. This study is the first to successfully establish M. dioica cell suspension cultures for the production of phenolic compounds and carotenoids, as well as for biomass accumulation.

  8. Optimizing Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Expansion in Stirred Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shiying; Poon, Anna; Rancourt, Derrick Emile

    2017-10-10

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great hopes for application in regenerative medicine due to their inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells from the three embryonic germ layers. For clinical applications, a large quantity of hiPSCs produced in standardized and scalable culture processes is required. Several groups including ours have developed methodologies for scaled-up hiPSC production in stirred bioreactors in chemically defined medium. Here, we optimized the critical steps and factors that affect hiPSC expansion and yield in stirred suspension cultures including inoculation conditions, seeding density, aggregate size, agitation rate, and cell passaging method. After multiple passages in stirred suspension bioreactors, hiPSCs remained pluripotent, karyotypically normal, and capable of differentiating into all three germ layers.

  9. Histology of embryoid development in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songrat Tinnongjig

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryos of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. variety tenera were cultured on Eeuwens or Y3 (1976; 1978 medium supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-D. Calluses were initiated from these embryos. The eight-weekold calluses derived from embryos were transferred to modified Y3 liquid medium devoid of 2,4-D and supplemented with NAA, BA and coconut water to establish cell suspension culture. After a period of culture,these cells were then subcultured to the same medium without plant growth regulators to induce embryoid formation. The calluses and embryoids were harvested at various times, fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically. Histological study revealed that embryoid occurred from meristematic cells with dense cytoplasm along the callus clumps.

  10. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  11. Production and elicitation of benzalacetone and the raspberry ketone in cell suspension cultures of Rubus idaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedapudi, S; Chin, C K; Pedersen, H

    2000-01-01

    Production levels of p-coumaric acid (p-CA), p-hydroxyphenylbut-3-ene-2-one (benzalacetone), and p-hydroxyphenyl-2-butanone (raspberry ketone) were measured in raspberry cell suspension cultures to investigate metabolite dynamics in a short (two-step) pathway. Intracellular concentrations of benzalacetone and the raspberry ketone fluctuated during the time course of a normal batch culture cycle but showed higher levels during periods of rapid growth. Cells elicited with the signal coupler methyl jasmonate yielded a 2- to 3-fold increase in metabolite concentrations after 24 h. The results suggest that raspberry ketone production is rapidly inducible during periods of high carbohydrate utilization. It is not an end product, however, and undergoes conversion to subsequent metabolites.

  12. Up-scaling single cell-inoculated suspension culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harmeet; Mok, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Rahmat, Siti Norfiza Binte; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We have systematically developed single cell-inoculated suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in defined media. Cell survival was dependent on hESC re-aggregation. In the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (Ri) only approximately 44% of the seeded cells were rescued, but an optimized heat shock treatment combined with Ri significantly increased cell survival to approximately 60%. Mechanistically, our data suggest that E-cadherin plays a role in hESC aggregation and that dissociation and re-aggregation upon passaging functions as a purification step towards a pluripotency markers-enriched population. Mass expansion of hESC was readily achieved by up-scaling 2 ml cultures to serial passaging in 50 ml spinner flasks. A media comparison revealed that mTeSR was superior to KnockOut-SR in supporting cell proliferation and pluripotency. Persistent expression of pluripotency markers was achieved for two lines (hES2, hES3) that were used at higher passages (>86). In contrast, rapid down regulation of Oct4, Tra-1-60, and SSEA4 was observed for ESI049, a clinically compliant line, used at passages 20-36. The up-scaling strategy has significant potential to provide pluripotent cells on a clinical scale. Nevertheless, our data also highlights a significant line-to-line variability and the need for a critical assessment of novel methods with numerous relevant cell lines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of boron deficiency in cell suspension cultures of Populus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakegawa, Koichi; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Toshiro

    2005-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Populus alba L. (original cells) require at least 10 microM boron for appropriate growth. Using original cells we established a cell line, T-5B, which can grow in a medium containing low levels of boron (5 microM). The level of boron localized in the cell walls of T-5B cells was one-half that found in the cell walls of original cells maintained in medium containing 100 microM boron, and the level of the rhamnogalacturonan II dimer, cross-linked by a borate ester, also decreased in the former. The sugar composition of whole cell walls of the T-5B cell line was similar that of the original cells, however pectic polysaccharides composed of arabinose or galacturonic acid were easily extracted from T-5B cell walls with 50 mM trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Our results suggest that boron deficiency causes a weakening of the interaction among pectic polysaccharides due to a decrease in boron-rhamnogalacturonanII cross-linkage.

  14. Induction of linalool as a pharmaceutical and medicinal metabolite via cell suspension culture of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N; Kahrizi, D; Mansouri, M; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Khanahmadi, M; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-05-30

    Cumin is an important medicinal plant in Iran. Plant cell suspension culture is a method for the production of medicinal and secondary metabolites. The linalool is a plant secondary metabolite that has been recognized as a neuroprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salicylic acid elicitor on induction of linalool in cell suspension culture of cumin. For this purpose, the cumin seeds were prepared, to obtain sterile seedling, were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and alcohol, and were cultured on MS basal medium. This research was conducted in two separate experiments including callus induction and suspension cultures. Leaf explants were prepared from sterile seedlings and used to produce callus on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA and 0.5 mg/l BAP. In order to establish suspension culture, the appropriate calli were transferred to liquid medium. Then cell cultures were treated with elicitors. The effects of elicitor on the production of linalool secondary metabolite and cell viability were assessed by GC-Mass and tetrazolium test respectively. For this purpose, the salicylic acid (at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/l) was used. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications. The results of cell culture and GC-Mass analysis showed that salicylic acid had significant effects on the linalool production (cumin. It is necessary to determine the best combination of medium and elicitor.

  15. Guggulsterone production in cell suspension cultures of the guggul tree, Commiphora wightii, grown in shake-flasks and bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Meeta; Ramawat, K G

    2007-06-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Commiphora wightii, grown in modified MS medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (0.5 mg l(-1)) and kinetin (0.25 mg l(-1)), produced approximately 5 microg guggulsterone g(-1) dry wt. In a 2 l stirred tank bioreactor, the biomass was 5.5 g l(-1) and total guggulsterone was 36 microg l(-1).

  16. Increased podophyllotoxin production in Podophyllum hexandrum cell suspension cultures after feeding coniferyl alcohol as a β-cyclodextrin complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdenbag, H J; van Uden, W; Frijlink, H W; Lerk, C F; Pras, N; Malingré, T M

    Cell suspension cultures, derived from roots of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle (Berberidaceae), accumulate podophyllotoxin. In this study the use of β-cyclodextrin in feeding the poorly water-soluble precursor coniferyl alcohol to these cultures is described. By complexation with β-cyclodextrin, a

  17. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Flow cytometry and phytochemical analysis of a sunflower cell suspension culture in a 5-L bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Christiane; Weber, Jost; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Deponte, Sandra; Bley, Thomas; Georgiev, Milen

    2008-01-01

    A cell suspension culture of sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a producer of immunologically active polysaccharides, was cultivated in a 5-L stirred tank bioreactor, operated in batch mode. After some changes in the internal bioreactor design a stable growth of Helianthus cells was achieved and the accumulated biomass reached 15.2 g/L (only approximately 5% lower compared to the accumulated biomass in shake-flasks). Flow cytometry used for measuring the cell cycle parameters of suspended Helianthus cells did not reveal significant differences between shake-flasks and bioreactor cultivation modes. For both cultivation methods significant enhancement of the percentage of S-phase cells was observed at the beginning of the cultivation process. Concerning the metabolite production the maximum in exopolysaccharides was reached at day 9 of the cultivation period (1.9 g/L), while the highest amounts of alpha-tocopherol were accumulated at the beginning of the cultivation process (day 2 of the cultivation). These finding were related to the respective stress levels caused by the inoculation procedure. The kinetic parameters of growth and polysaccharide production as well as the time course of carbon source utilization were monitored and discussed.

  19. [Adherent and single-cell suspension culture of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in serum-free medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Zhao, Liang; Tan, Wensong

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, there are tremendous economic and social losses across the world because of virus-related diseases. It is well known that Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are easily handled, quickly amplified and efficiently infected with influenza virus. Therefore, they are considered as one of the most important cell lines for the production of influenza vaccine. In this work, we first developed a serum-free adherent culture process for MDCK cells with an in-house prepared serum-free medium MDCK-SFM. Next, we derived a cell line named ssf-MDCK, which was amenable for single-cell suspension culture in the serum-free medium. We found that during serum-free batch culture of MDCK cells, the peak viable cell density and maximum specific growth rate were 3.81 x 10(6) cells/mL and 0.056 h(-1), respectively; 3.6- and 1.6-fold increase compared with those in serum-containing adherent batch culture. In addition, we compared growth and metabolic characteristics of MDCK cells in serum-containing adherent culture, serum-free adherent culture and serum-free single-cell suspension culture. We found that less metabolic by-products were produced in both serum-free cultures. In serum-free single-cell suspension batch culture, the viable cell density was highest. These results are critical for establishing large-scale suspension culture of MDCK cells as subsequent well as large-scale influenza vaccine production.

  20. Growth arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in suspension culture using low-acyl gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Tomomi; Fujiyoshi, Masachika; Uchida, Masashi; Abe, Natsuki; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishii, Itsuko

    2017-03-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes restenosis in biomaterial vascular grafts. The purposes of this study were to establish a suspension culture system for SMCs by using a novel substrate, low-acyl gellan gum (GG) and to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition. When SMCs were cultured in suspension with GG, their proliferation was inhibited. Their viability was 70% at day 2, which was maintained at more than 50% until day 5. In contrast, the viability of cells cultured in suspension without GG was 5.6% at day 2. By cell cycle analysis, the ratio of SMCs in the S phase when cultured in suspension with GG was lower than when cultured on plastic plates. In SMCs cultured in suspension with GG, the ratio of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein to Rb protein was decreased and p27Kip1 expression was unchanged in comparison with SMCs cultured on plastic plates. In addition, SMCs could be induced to proliferate again by changing the culture condition from suspension with GG to plastic plates. These results suggest that our established culturing method for SMCs is useful to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition with high viability.

  1. Controlling Expansion and Cardiomyogenic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Scalable Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Kempf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To harness the potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, an abundant supply of their progenies is required. Here, hPSC expansion as matrix-independent aggregates in suspension culture was combined with cardiomyogenic differentiation using chemical Wnt pathway modulators. A multiwell screen was scaled up to stirred Erlenmeyer flasks and subsequently to tank bioreactors, applying controlled feeding strategies (batch and cyclic perfusion. Cardiomyogenesis was sensitive to the GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021 concentration, whereas the aggregate size was no prevailing factor across culture platforms. However, in bioreactors, the pattern of aggregate formation in the expansion phase dominated subsequent differentiation. Global profiling revealed a culture-dependent expression of BMP agonists/antagonists, suggesting their decisive role in cell-fate determination. Furthermore, metallothionein was discovered as a potentially stress-related marker in hPSCs. In 100 ml bioreactors, the production of 40 million predominantly ventricular-like cardiomyocytes (up to 85% purity was enabled that were directly applicable to bioartificial cardiac tissue formation.

  2. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelliah Jayabaskaran

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc and strictosidine synthase (Str. In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated. Results Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3–4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s, Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed.

  3. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Shilpa; Chelliah, Jayabaskaran

    2007-01-01

    Background Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) and strictosidine synthase (Str). In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated. Results Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3–4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s), Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed. PMID:17988378

  4. Treatment strategies for high resveratrol induction in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu V. Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioprocesses capable of producing large scales of resveratrol at nutraceutical grade are in demand. This study herein investigated treatment strategies to induce the production of resveratrol in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures. Among seven investigated elicitors, jasmonic acid (JA, salicylic acid, β-glucan (GLU, and chitosan enhanced the production of intracellular resveratrol manyfold. The combined treatment of JA and GLU increased extracellular resveratrol production by up to tenfold. The application of Amberlite XAD-7 resin for in situ removal and artificial storage of secreted resveratrol further increased resveratrol production by up to four orders of magnitude. The level of resveratrol produced in response to the combined treatment with 200 g/L XAD-7, 10 μM JA and 1 mg/mL GLU was approximately 2400 mg/L, allowing the production of resveratrol at an industrial scale. The high yield of resveratrol is due to the involvement of a number of mechanisms working in concert.

  5. Design of serum-free medium for suspension culture of CHO cells on the basis of general commercial media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Hideo; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2015-08-01

    The design of serum-free media for suspension culture of genetically engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using general commercial media as a basis was investigated. Subcultivation using a commercial serum-free medium containing insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 with or without FCS necessitated additives other than IGF-1 to compensate for the lack of FCS and improve cell growth. Suspension culture with media containing several combinations of growth factors suggested the effectiveness of addition of both IGF-1 and the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) for promoting cell growth. Subcultivation of CHO cells in suspension culture using the commercial serum-free medium EX-CELL™302, which contained an IGF-1 analog, supplemented with LPA resulted in gradually increasing specific growth rate comparable to the serum-containing medium and in almost the same high antibody production regardless of the number of generations. The culture with EX-CELL™302 supplemented with LPA in a jar fermentor with pH control at 6.9 showed an apparently higher cell growth rate than the cultures without pH control and with pH control at 6.8. The cell growth in the medium supplemented with aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), which was much cheaper than IGF-1, in combination with LPA was synergistically promoted similarly to that in the medium supplemented with IGF-1 and LPA. In conclusion, the serum-free medium designed on the basis of general commercial media could support the growth of CHO cells and antibody production comparable to serum-containing medium in suspension culture. Moreover, the possibility of cost reduction by the substitution of IGF-1 with ATA was also shown.

  6. Abscisic acid is involved in brassinosteroids-induced chilling tolerance in the suspension cultured cells from Chorispora bungeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajie; Jiang, Haifeng; Zhao, Zhiguang; An, Lizhe

    2011-06-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether abscisic acid (ABA), a second messenger in chilling stress responses, is involved in brassinosteroids (BRs)-induced chilling tolerance in suspension cultured cells from Chorispora bungeana. The suspension cells were treated with 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), ABA, ABA biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone (Flu) and EBR in combination with Flu. Their effects on chilling tolerance, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense system were analyzed. The results showed that EBR treatment markedly alleviated the decrease of cell viability and the increases of ion leakage and lipid peroxidation induced by chilling stress, suggesting that application of EBR could improve the chilling tolerance of C. bungeana suspension cultures. In addition, similar results were observed when exogenous ABA was applied. Treatment with Flu alone and in combination with EBR significantly suppressed cell viability and increased ion leakage and lipid peroxidation under low temperature conditions, indicating that the inhibition of ABA biosynthesis could decrease the chilling tolerance of C. bungeana suspension cultures and the EBR-enhanced chilling tolerance. Further analyses showed that EBR and ABA enhanced antioxidant defense and slowed down the accumulation of ROS caused by chilling. However, Flu application differentially blocked these protective effects of EBR. Moreover, EBR was able to mimic the effect of ABA by markedly increasing ABA content in the suspension cells under chilling conditions, whereas the EBR-induced ABA accumulation was inhibited by the addition of Flu. Taken together, these results demonstrate that EBR may confer chilling tolerance to C. bungeana suspension cultured cells by enhancing the antioxidant defense system, which is partially mediated by ABA, resulting in preventing the overproduction of ROS to alleviate oxidative injury induced by chilling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Affinity Purification and Characterization of Functional Tubulin from Cell Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis and Tobacco1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Seiichi; Noguchi, Masahiro; Demura, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules assemble into several distinct arrays that play important roles in cell division and cell morphogenesis. To decipher the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics and organization of this versatile cytoskeletal component, it is essential to establish in vitro assays that use functional tubulin. Although plant tubulin has been purified previously from protoplasts by reversible taxol-induced polymerization, a simple and efficient purification method has yet to be developed. Here, we used a Tumor Overexpressed Gene (TOG) column, in which the tubulin-binding domains of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) TOG homolog are immobilized on resin, to isolate functional plant tubulin. We found that several hundred micrograms of pure tubulin can readily be purified from cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The tubulin purified by the TOG column showed high assembly competence, partly because of low levels of polymerization-inhibitory phosphorylation of α-tubulin. Compared with porcine brain tubulin, Arabidopsis tubulin is highly dynamic in vitro at both the plus and minus ends, exhibiting faster shrinkage rates and more frequent catastrophe events, and exhibits frequent spontaneous nucleation. Furthermore, our study shows that an internal histidine tag in α-tubulin can be used to prepare particular isotypes and specifically engineered versions of α-tubulin. In contrast to previous studies of plant tubulin, our mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses failed to detect posttranslational modification of the isolated Arabidopsis tubulin or detected only low levels of posttranslational modification. This novel technology can be used to prepare assembly-competent, highly dynamic pure tubulin from plant cell cultures. PMID:26747285

  8. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Dipto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX, the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level.

  9. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    this problem, we sought an expression system in which heterologous gene expression could be induced at high levels. We selected a rice amylase expression system in which the promoter Ramy3D is induced to express recombinant protein by sucrose starvation. This induction system was found to give good yield......Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  10. A novel terpenoid indole alkaloid derived from catharanthine via biotransformation by suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuijie; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Zhou, Pengfei; Liang, Jincai; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    Although catharanthine (1) is well known as a biosynthetic precursor of the anticancer alkaloid, vinblastine, its alternative metabolic pathways are unclear. Biotransformation of 1 by suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus gave a new oxidative-cleavage product (2). The structure of 2 was determined as 3-hydroxy-4-imino-catharanthine by spectroscopic methods. Maximum conversion (9.75 %) of 2 was observed after 120 h adding 6 mg of 1/100 ml to 12-day-old suspension-cultured cells of C. roseus. Furthermore, qRT-PCR experiment was performed to reveal the effect of 1 on the expression of the genes in the biosynthetic pathway of TIA 1 up-regulated the transcript level of D4H whilst down-regulating the transcript levels of G10H, LAMT, GES, and IRS. A new metabolite of catharanthine, 3-hydroxy-4-imino-catharanthine, is reported.

  11. Culture medium refinement by dialysis for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman Chandra; Nagamori, Eiji; Horie, Masanobu; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) secrete essential autocrine factors that are removed along with toxic metabolites when the growth medium is exchanged daily. In this study, after determining the minimum inhibitory level of lactic acid for hiPSCs, a medium refining system was constructed by which toxic metabolites were removed from used culture medium and autocrine factors as well as other growth factors were recycled. Specifically, about 87 % of the basic fibroblast growth factor and 80 % of transforming growth factor beta 1 were retained in the refined medium after dialysis. The refined medium efficiently potentiated the proliferation of hiPS cells in adherent culture. When the refining system was used to refresh medium in suspension culture, a final cell density of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 106 cells mL-1 was obtained, with 99.5 ± 0.2 % OCT 3/4 and 78.3 ± 1.1 % TRA-1-60 expression, on day 4 of culture. These levels of expression were similar to those observed in the conventional suspension culture. With this method, culture medium refinement by dialysis was established to remove toxic metabolites, recycle autocrine factors as well as other growth factors, and reduce the use of macromolecules for the expansion of hiPSCs in suspension culture.

  12. Isolation and culture of protoplasts of Ma-phut (Garcinia dulcis derived from cell suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Te-chato

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Friable callus induced from young leaves of Ma-phut on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 3% sucrose,1 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, 0.5 mg/l benzyladenine (BA and 500 mg/l polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, was cultured in liquid medium with the same components. Various ages of cell suspension at weekly intervals were then incubated in various kinds and concentrations of cell wall digestion enzymes combined with 1% macerozyme R-10 on a rotary shaker at 100 rpm under 1500 lux illumination at 26±4oC. Purified protoplasts were cultured at various densities in MS medium (adjusted osmoticum to 0.4 M by mannitol supplemented with 3% sucrose and two types of auxin, 2,4-D and NAA at four concentrations (1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/l together with 1 mg/l BA. The results revealed that a four-day old cell suspension culture incubated in 2% cellulase Onozuka R-10 (CR10 in combination with 1% macerozyme R-10 gave an optimum result in both yield and viability of protoplasts at 5.7x106/1 ml PCV and 80%, respectively. Embedding protoplasts at a density of 2.5x105/ml in 0.2% phytagel containing MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/l NAA and 1 mg/l BA promoted the most effective division of the protoplasts (20%. The first division of the protoplasts was obtained after 2 days of culture and further divisions to form micro- and macro-colonies could be observed after 7-10 days of culture. However, callusformation and plantlet regeneration was not obtained.

  13. Alternative formation of anthraquinones and lipoquinones in heterotrophic and photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures of Morinda lucida Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbavboa, U; Sieweke, H J; Leistner, E; Röwer, I; Hüsemann, W; Barz, W

    1985-12-01

    Photoheterotrophic and photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures were raised from a callus tissue derived from a Morinda lucida Benth. plant (Rubiaceae). The cultures were characterized with regard to fresh weight, dry weight, cell number, pH, chlorophyll and quinoid natural products. The amount of lipoquinones (phylloquinone, α-tocopherol, plastoquinone, ubiquinone) isolated from the photoautotrophic cultures matched the amount detected in an intact leaf. Anthraquinone glycosides which are found in the roots of Morinda plants were not present in the photoautotrophic culture. The photoheterotrophic culture contained only trace amounts of these pigments. Abundant anthraquinone synthesis was observed when photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic suspension cultures were transferred into darkness, provided sucrose was present in the medium. Induction of synthesis of anthraquinone pigments coincided with a rapid disappearance of lipoquinones from the culture. Thus, in the suspension culture, photoautotrophy correlates with lipoquinone synthesis and heterotrophy correlates with anthraquinone synthesis. This reflects the situation in the intact plants where lipoquinones are chloroplast-associated whereas anthraquinones occur in the roots.

  14. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. (Hangzhou Univ. (China)); Cullen, W.R. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls.

  16. Changes of Respiration Activities in Cells of Winter Wheat and Sugar Cane Suspension Cultures During Programmed Cell Death Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Process of cell death in suspension cultures of winter wheat and sugar cane under high (50 °С and negative (-8 °С temperature treatment has been studied. It has been shown, that programmed cell death (PCD process caused by the negative temperature in the culture of winter wheat was noted for slow rate of realization and it was carried out for 10 days. It has been state that rate of cell respiration was significantly higher than in the control culture. At the same time PCD processes induced by the high temperature in the culture of sugar cane and winter wheat and by the negative temperature in the culture of sugar cane realized for 24-48 h and was accompanied by graduate decrease of respiration activities. We can conclude that the main reason of PCD processes realization differences was a different level of respiration metabolism resistance to high and negative temperatures action.

  17. Immune suppression of human lymphoid tissues and cells in rotating suspension culture and onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Chen, Silvia; Walz, Carl; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses of human lymphoid tissue explants or cells isolated from this tissue were studied quantitatively under normal gravity and microgravity. Microgravity was either modeled by solid body suspension in a rotating, oxygenated culture vessel or was actually achieved on the International Space Station (ISS). Our experiments demonstrate that tissues or cells challenged by recall antigen or by polyclonal activator in modeled microgravity lose all their ability to produce antibodies and cytokines and to increase their metabolic activity. In contrast, if the cells were challenged before being exposed to modeled microgravity suspension culture, they maintained their responses. Similarly, in microgravity in the ISS, lymphoid cells did not respond to antigenic or polyclonal challenge, whereas cells challenged prior to the space flight maintained their antibody and cytokine responses in space. Thus, immune activation of cells of lymphoid tissue is severely blunted both in modeled and true microgravity. This suggests that suspension culture via solid body rotation is sufficient to induce the changes in cellular physiology seen in true microgravity. This phenomenon may reflect immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space flights. If so, the ex vivo system described above can be used to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction. PMID:19609626

  18. A Novel Hydroxyproline-Deficient Arabinogalactan Protein Secreted by Suspension-Cultured Cells of Daucus carota (Purification and Partial Characterization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, T. C.; McCann, M. C.; Roberts, K.

    1993-09-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are secreted or membrane-associated glycoproteins that have been operationally defined as binding to [beta]-glucosyl Yariv artificial antigen, being rich in arabinose and galactose, and containing high levels of alanine, serine, and hydroxyproline. Using an anti-AGP monoclonal antibody (MAC 207) bound to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B, we have purified by immunoaffinity chromatography an extracellular AGP from the culture medium of suspension-cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota). The apparent molecular mass of this highly glycosylated proteoglycan is 70 to 100 kD as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Although its sugar analysis, [beta]-glucosyl Yariv binding, and high alanine, serine, and proline content are consistent with it being an AGP, the amino acid composition unexpectedly revealed this molecule to have no detectable hydroxyproline. This suggests that this glycoprotein is not a "classical" AGP, but represents the first example of a new class of hydroxyproline-poor AGPs. Deglycosylation of the AGP with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride revealed that the purified proteoglycan contains probably a single core protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kD. Direct visualization of the native AGP in the electron microscope showed ellipsoidal putative AGP monomers, approximately 25 nm by 15 nm, that showed a strong tendency to self assemble into higher-order structures. Upon desiccation, the glycosylated AGP formed paracrystalline arrays visible in the light microscope. Polarized Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy of these arrays demonstrated a high degree of polarization of the sugar moieties under these conditions. These results put possible constraints on current models of AGP structure; a putative role for these novel AGPs as pectin-binding proteins is discussed.

  19. Effect of heavy metal treatments on metallothionein expression profiles in white poplar (Populus alba L. cell suspension cultures

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    Anca MACOVEI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Populus species and hybrids are intensively cultivated as sources of woody biomass and are good candidates for phytoremediation because of their rapid growth rate, extensive root system and ease of propagation and transformation. To date, the molecular mechanisms that regulate heavy metal tolerance have not been fully investigated. In the present work, white poplar (Populus alba L. cell suspension cultures were used as model system to investigate the response to heavy metal treatments. The VFMT2 cDNA, encoding a type 2 metallothionein from P. alba, was isolated by RT-PCR approach. The expression profiles of the VFMT2 gene were then investigated by Quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR under oxidative stress conditions. The latter were induced by exposing the cell suspension cultures to different doses of cadmium (75 and 150 μM CdSO4, copper (50 and 100 μM CuCl2 and zinc (1 and 2 mM ZnSO4. Cell death was evidenced by Evans blue staining. The VFMT2 gene was up-regulated in response to heavy metal treatments and the highest mRNA level (up to 5-fold was observed 4 h following exposure to 100 μM CuCl2.

  20. Partially acetylated chitosan oligo- and polymers induce an oxidative burst in suspension cultured cells of the gymnosperm Araucaria angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, André Luis Wendt; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Trombotto, Stéphane; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria

    2008-12-01

    Suspension-cultured cells were used to analyze the activation of defense responses in the conifer A. angustifolia , using as an elicitor purified chitosan polymers of different degrees of acetylation (DA 1-69%), chitin oligomers of different degrees of polymerization (DP 3-6), and chitosan oligomer of different DA (0-91%). Suspension cultured cells elicited with chitosan polymers reacted with a rapid and transient generation of H2O2, with chitosans of high DA (60 and 69%) being the most active ones. Chitosan oligomers of high DA (78 and 91%) induced substantial levels of H2O2, but fully acetylated chitin oligomers did not. When cultivated for 24-72 h in the presence of 1-10 microg mL(-1) chitosan (DA 69%), cell cultures did not show alterations in the levels of enzymes related to defense responses, suggesting that, in A. angustifolia , the induction of an oxidative burst is not directly coupled to the induction of other defense reactions.

  1. Changes in cell wall properties coincide with overexpression of extensin fusion proteins in suspension cultured tobacco cells.

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    Li Tan

    Full Text Available Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. These data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  2. Serum-Free Suspension Culture of MDCK Cells for Production of Influenza H1N1 Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Peng, Wen-Juan; Ye, Qian; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Xia-Hou, Kang; Jia, Han-Jing; Luo, Jian; Zhou, Lin-Ting; Li, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shi-Lei; Xu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Ze; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Development of serum-free suspension cell culture processes is very important for influenza vaccine production. Previously, we developed a MDCK suspension cell line in a serum-free medium. In the present study, the growth kinetics of suspension MDCK cells and influenza virus production in the serum-free medium were investigated, in comparison with those of adherent MDCK cells in both serum-containing and serum-free medium. It was found that the serum-free medium supported the stable subculture and growth of both adherent and suspension cells. In batch culture, for both cell lines, the growth kinetics in the serum-free medium was comparable with those in the serum-containing medium and a commercialized serum-free medium. In the serum-free medium, peak viable cell density (VCD), haemagglutinin (HA) and median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) titers of the two cell lines reached 4.51×106 cells/mL, 2.94Log10(HAU/50 μL) and 8.49Log10(virions/mL), and 5.97×106 cells/mL, 3.88Log10(HAU/50 μL), and 10.34Log10(virions/mL), respectively. While virus yield of adherent cells in the serum-free medium was similar to that in the serum-containing medium, suspension culture in the serum-free medium showed a higher virus yield than adherent cells in the serum-containing medium and suspension cells in the commercialized serum-free medium. However, the percentage of infectious viruses was lower for suspension culture in the serum-free medium. These results demonstrate the great potential of this suspension MDCK cell line in serum-free medium for influenza vaccine production and further improvements are warranted.

  3. Relationships between hydroxyproline-containing proteins secreted into the cell wall and medium by suspension-cultured Acer psedoplatanus cells

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    Pope, D.G.

    1977-05-01

    The pathway of hydroxyproline-containing proteins to the cell wall and to the growth medium in suspension-cultured Acer pseudoplatanus cells is traced by following the kinetics of the transfer of protein-bound /sup 14/C-hydroxyproline into various fractions, and by comparing the hydroxyproline-arabinoside profiles of these fractions after alkaline hydrolysis. Hydroxyproline-rich protein passes directly from a membrane-bound compartment in the cytoplasm to the cell wall, not via an intermediate salt-soluble pool in the wall. There are at least three hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins in the cell wall. One which possesses mono-, tri-, and tetraarabinoside side chains accounts for over 90% of the total hydroxyproline. This glycoprotein is ''extensin.'' The hydroxyproline-containing proteins secreted into the medium have a glycosylation pattern markedly different from that of the major cell wall glycoprotein. It appears that there is little or no wall-like extensin in the medium. Approximately half of the protein-bound hydroxyproline secreted into the medium is linked to an arabinogalactan. This linkage is also found in a particulate wall protein precursor fraction from the cytoplasm, but only trace amounts can be detected in the cell wall.

  4. Detection of Changes in the Medicago sativa Retinoblastoma-Related Protein (MsRBR1) Phosphorylation During Cell Cycle Progression in Synchronized Cell Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kotogány, Edit; Ábrahám, Edit; Horváth, Gábor V

    2017-01-01

    Deepening our knowledge on the regulation of the plant cell division cycle depends on techniques that allow for the enrichment of cell populations in defined cell cycle phases. Synchronization of cell division can be achieved using different plant tissues; however, well-established cell suspension cultures provide large amount of biological sample for further analyses. Here, we describe the methodology of the establishment, propagation, and analysis of a Medicago sativa suspension culture that can be used for efficient synchronization of the cell division. A novel 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based method is used for the estimation of cell fraction that enters DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle and we also demonstrate the changes in the phosphorylation level of Medicago sativa retinoblastoma-related protein (MsRBR1) during cell cycle progression.

  5. Simple suspension culture system of human iPS cells maintaining their pluripotency for cardiac cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a simple three-dimensional (3D) suspension culture method for the expansion and cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is reported. The culture methods were easily adapted from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D culture without any additional manipulations. When hiPSCs were directly applied to 3D culture from 2D in a single-cell suspension, only a few aggregated cells were observed. However, after 3 days, culture of the small hiPSC aggregates in a spinner flask at the optimal agitation rate created aggregates which were capable of cell passages from the single-cell suspension. Cell numbers increased to approximately 10-fold after 12 days of culture. The undifferentiated state of expanded hiPSCs was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, and the hiPSCs differentiated into three germ layers. When the hiPSCs were subsequently cultured in a flask using cardiac differentiation medium, expression of cardiac cell-specific genes and beating cardiomyocytes were observed. Furthermore, the culture of hiPSCs on Matrigel-coated dishes with serum-free medium containing activin A, BMP4 and FGF-2 enabled it to generate robust spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes and these cells expressed several cardiac cell-related genes, including HCN4, MLC-2a and MLC-2v. This suggests that the expanded hiPSCs might maintain the potential to differentiate into several types of cardiomyocytes, including pacemakers. Moreover, when cardiac cell sheets were fabricated using differentiated cardiomyocytes, they beat spontaneously and synchronously, indicating electrically communicative tissue. This simple culture system might enable the generation of sufficient amounts of beating cardiomyocytes for use in cardiac regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Recombinant human IGF-1 produced by transgenic plant cell suspension culture enhances new bone formation in calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Sher Bahadur; Bhattarai, Govinda; Kook, Sung-Ho; Shin, Yun-Ji; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Lee, Seung-Youp; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2017-10-01

    Transgenic plant cell suspension culture systems have been utilized extensively as convenient and efficient expression systems for the production of recombinant human growth factors. We produced insulin-like growth factor-1 using a plant suspension culture system (p-IGF-1) and explored its effect on new bone formation in calvarial defects. We also compared the bone regenerating potential of p-IGF-1 with commercial IGF-1 derived from Escherichia coli (e-IGF-1). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent calvarial defect surgery, and the defects were loaded with absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) only (ACS group) or ACS impregnated with 13μg of p-IGF-1 (p-IGF-1 group) or e-IGF-1 (e-IGF-1 group). The sham group did not receive any treatment with ACS or IGFs after surgery. Live μCT and histological analyses showed critical-sized bone defects in the sham group, whereas greater bone formation was observed in the p-IGF-1 and e-IGF-1 groups than the ACS group both 5 and 10weeks after surgery. Bone mineral density, bone volume, and bone surface values were also higher in the IGF groups than in the ACS group. Local delivery of p-IGF-1 or e-IGF-1 more greatly enhanced the expression of osteoblast-specific markers, but inhibited osteoclast formation, in newly formed bone compared with ACS control group. Specifically, p-IGF-1 treatment induced higher expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in the defect site than did e-IGF-1. Furthermore, treatment with p-IGF-1, but not e-IGF-1, increased mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells, with the attendant upregulation of osteogenic marker genes. Collectively, our findings suggest the potential of p-IGF-1 in promoting the processes required for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie L. Long; Walter C. Shortle

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminum (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic...

  8. Cell death induction and nitric oxide biosynthesis in white poplar (Populus alba) suspension cultures exposed to alfalfa saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrazzi, Alma; Agoni, Valentina; Tava, Aldo; Avato, Pinarosa; Biazzi, Elisa; Raimondi, Elena; Macovei, Anca; Carbonera, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    The present work reports on the biological activity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) saponins on white poplar (Populus alba, cultivar 'Villafranca') cell suspension cultures. The extracts from alfalfa roots, aerial parts and seeds were characterized for their saponin content by means of thin layer chromatography (TLC) and electrospray ionisation coupled to mass spectrometry. The quantitative saponin composition from the different plant extracts was determined considering the aglycone moieties and determined by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses. Only soyasapogenin I was detected in the seed extract while several other saponins were found in the root and leaf extracts. Actively proliferating white poplar cell cultures were challenged with the different saponin extracts. Only alfalfa root saponins, at 50 µg ml⁻¹, induced significant cell death rates (75.00 ± 4.90%). Different cell subpopulations with peculiar cell death morphologies were observed and the programmed cell death (PCD)/necrosis ratio was reduced at increasing saponin concentrations. Enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) production was observed in white poplar cells treated with root saponins (RSs) at 50 µg ml⁻¹ and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the culture medium was also demonstrated. Saponin-induced NO production was sensitive to sodium azide and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, two specific inhibitors of distinct pathways for NO biosynthesis in plant cells. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  9. Comparison of the Production of Recombinant Protein in Suspension Culture of CHO Cells in Spinner Flask and Shake Flask System

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    S.N.Z Zainul Abidin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells have been most widely used as the production host for the commercial production of biopharmaceuticals product. They have been extensively studied and developed, and today provide a stable platform for producing monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. This study was focusing on comparison of suspension culture system by using spinner flask and shake flask for the growth and production of recombinant protein in CHO cell line. The CHO cells were transfected with an expression of DNA plasmid containing lac Z gene which codes for β-galactosidase. The recombinant genes in these CHO cells and the β-galactosidase expressing cells were adapted to suspension culture. The agitation speed for both spinner and shake flask were adjusted accordingly. The experiments were carried out in duplicate and samples were taken for cell count, determination of glucose consumption, lactate production and protein level by using biochemical assay. The result showed that, the cell growth in spinner flask is more favorable then in shake flask. The cell concentration in spinner flask is 58% higher than in shake flask. On the other hand, specific activity of β-galactosidase is 25% higher in spinner flask compared to shake flask, at the same agitation speed.ABSTRAK: Sel ovari hamster China (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO digunakan secara meluas dalam hos pembiakan untuk tujuan komersil produk biofarmaseutikal. Ia telah dikaji dan dibangunkan secara ekstensif, dan kini ia menyediakan landasan yang stabil untuk penghasilan antibodi monoklon dan protein rekombinan. Kajian ini memfokuskan tentang penghasilan protein rekombinan menggunakan kultur ampaian sel CHO di dalam kelalang putar dan kelalang goncang. Sel CHO dimasukkan dengan plasmid DNA yang mengandungi gen lac Z yang juga memberikan kod untuk β-galaktosidase. Sel CHO β-galaktosidase-terungkap dimasukkan ke dalam kultur ampaian. Kelajuan agitasi untuk kedua-dua kelalang putar

  10. Interaction between abscisic acid and nitric oxide in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Lu, Li; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Yu, Qin; Xu, Hongke; Yang, Fengxia; Fu, Mengna; Li, Shengchao; Wang, Huizhong; Xu, Maojun

    2013-01-01

    Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy to improve production of secondary metabolites of plant cell cultures. However, mechanisms responsible for the elicitor-induced production of secondary metabolites of plant cells have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we report that treatment of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures with PB90, a protein elicitor from Phytophthora boehmeriae, induced rapid increases of abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO), subsequently followed by the enhancement of catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc, two important genes in catharanthine biosynthesis. PB90-induced catharanthine production and the gene expression were suppressed by the ABA inhibitor and NO scavenger respectively, showing that ABA and NO are essential for the elicitor-induced catharanthine biosynthesis. The relationship between ABA and NO in mediating catharanthine biosynthesis was further investigated. Treatment of the cells with ABA triggered NO accumulation and induced catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc. ABA-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions were suppressed by the NO scavenger. Conversely, exogenous application of NO did not stimulate ABA generation and treatment with ABA inhibitor did not suppress NO-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions. Together, the results showed that both NO and ABA were involved in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that ABA acted upstream of NO in the signaling cascade leading to PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Elicitation of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) cell suspension culture for enhancement of inulin production and altered degree of polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunquan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Haitao; Han, Dongming; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures have emerged as a potential source of secondary metabolites for food additives and pharmaceuticals. In this study inulin accumulation and its degree of polymerisation (DP) in the treated cells in the same medium were investigated after treatment with six types of elicitors. An in vitro cell suspension culture of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) was optimised by adding an extra nitrogen source. According to the growth kinetics, a maximum biomass of 5.48 g L -1 was obtained from the optimal cell suspension medium consisted of Murashige and Skoog basic medium (MS) + 1.0 mg L -1 α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) + 1.0 mg L -1 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) + 0.5 mg L -1 proline + 1.0 mg L -1 glutamine. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA, 250 µmol L -1 ) treatment for 15 days led to the highest levels of inulin (2955.27 ± 9.81 mg L -1 compared to control of 1217.46 ± 0.26 mg L -1 ). The elicited effect of five elicitors to the suspension cells of Jerusalem artichoke is as follows: AgNO 3 (Ag, 10 µmol L -1 ), salicylic acid (SA, 75 µmol L -1 ), chitosan (KJT, 40 mg L -1 ), Trichoderma viride (Tv, 90 mg L -1 ), yeast extract (YE, 0.25 mg L -1 ), and the corresponding content of inulin is increased by 2.05-, 1.93-, 1.76-, 1.44- and 1.18-fold compared to control, respectively. The obvious effect on the percentage of lower DP in inulin was observed in cells treated with 40 mg L -1 KJT, 0.25 mg L -1 YE and 10 µmol L -1 Ag. Among the six types of elicitors, the descending order of inulin content is MeJA > Ag > SA > KJT > Tv > YE. For the purpose inulin with lower DP and its application to prebiotic food, three elicitors, including KJT, YE and Ag, can be used for the elicitation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accumulation of ixerin F and activities of some terpenoid bisynthetic enzymes in a cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L.

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    Anna Stojakowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cell suspension culture of Lactuca virosa L. (Asteraceae, tribe Lactuceae is capable of synthesizing sesquiterpene lactones of which ixerin F is the main compound. The culture was characterized on growth (by dissimilation rates, on ixerin F accumulation (by RP-HPLC and on some enzyme activities involved in early steps of terpenoid biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (AACT, E.C. 2.3.1.9 and 3S-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS, E.C. 4.13.5 activities of the cells were assayed spectrophotometrically. HMGS activity increased during the culture period and reached a maximum during the stationary phase (190 pkat/mg protein, while AACT showed relatively high level of activity throughout the growth cycle, with transient decrease at the logarithmic growth phase and the beginning of stationary phase. Ixerin F accumulated inside the cells and the maximum concentration of 0.08% (on dry weight basis was found in the early stationary phase of the growth cycle of the culture.

  14. Role of Changes in Cell Fatty Acids Composition in the Increasing of Frost Resistance of Winter Wheat Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Influences of low temperatures (4 and 8 ° С on the frost tolerance and fatty acid compositions of cells in a winter wheat suspension culture have been studied. It has been found that treatment of the culture with 4 °C (7 days did not protect cells from subsequent freezing temperature action (-8 °С, 6 h and was not accompanied significant changes in the fatty acid composition. On the contrary, the treatment of the culture with the temperature 8 °C (7 days prevented the death caused by freezing temperature and the content of saturated fatty acids decreased: pentadecanoic acid (by 35,0%, palmitic acid (by 19,9% and stearic acid (by 65,4%, and the content of α-linolenic acid increased by 94%. That was the cause of the double bond index (DBI increase by 16%. The role of fatty acids composition changes in the process of increasing frost tolerance in plants are discussed.

  15. Enhanced extracellular production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells by using cyclodextrins and coronatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Lorena; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, María A

    2015-12-01

    In the present work the effect of cyclodextrin and coronatine on both trans-resveratrol production and the expression of stilbene biosynthetic genes in Vitis vinifera L. cv Monastrell suspension cultured cells were evaluated. The results showed the maximum level of trans-resveratrol produced by cells and secreted to the culture medium with 50 mM cyclodextrins and 1 μM coronatine. Since the levels of trans-resveratrol produced in the combined treatment were higher than the sum of the individual treatments, a synergistic effect between both elicitors was assumed. In addition, all the analysed genes were induced by cyclodextrins and/or coronatine. The expression of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase and stilbene synthase genes was greatly enhanced by coronatine although an increase in the amount of trans-resveratrol in the spent medium was not detected. Therefore, despite the fact that trans-resveratrol production is related with the expression of genes involved in the biosynthetic process, other factors may be involved, such as post-transcriptional and post-traductional regulation. The expression maximal levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase genes were found with cyclodextrins alone or in combination with coronatine suggesting that the activity of these enzymes could be not only important for the formation of intermediates of trans-R biosynthesis but also for those intermediates involved in the biosynthesis of lignins and/or flavonoids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of use of Vero cell line and suspension culture of murine macrophage to attenuation of virulence of Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadmehr, Monireh; Namavari, Mehdi; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Mansourian, Maryam; Rahimian, Abdollah; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2013-10-01

    In this study the tachyzoite yields of Neospora caninum were compared in two cell lines: Vero (African Green Monkey Kidney) and suspension culture of murine macrophage (J774) cell lines. Then, N. caninum were continuously passaged in these cell lines for 3 months and the effect of host cells on virulence of tachyzoites was assessed by broiler chicken embryonated eggs. Inoculation was performed in the chorioallantoic (CA) liquid of the embryonated eggs with different dilutions (0.5 × 10(4), 1.0 × 10(4), 1.5 × 10(4)) of tachtzoites isolated from these cell cultures. The mortality pattern and pathological changes of the dead embryos and hatched chickens were noted. Tissue samples of brain, liver and heart were examined by histopathological and detection of DNA of parasite by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also, consecutive sections of the tissues examined histologically were used for immunohistochemical (IHC) examination. Embryos inoculated with tachyzoites derived from Vero cell line (group V) showed a higher mortality rate (100%) than the embryos that received tachyzoites derived from J774 cell line (group J) (10% mortality rate). The results of this study indicated that the culture of N. caninum in J774 cell led to a marked increase in the number of tachyzoite yields and rapid attenuation in comparison to Vero, so the results were confirmed by IHC and PCR. This study is the first report of the significant effect of host cell on the attenuation of virulence of N. caninum tachyzoites. These findings could potentially provide a practical approach in the mass production of N. caninum tachyzoites, and also in producing live attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment and characterization of a Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) cell suspension culture: a new in vitro source of rosmarinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraroo, Amir; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein; Corchete, Purificación; Babalar, Mesbah; Fattahi Moghadam, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    An in vitro approach to the production of rosmarinic acid (RA), a medicinally important caffeic acid ester, in a cell suspension culture (CSC) of Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Lamiaceae) has been investigated for the first time. The CSC was established from friable calli derived from shoot tip explants in Gamborg's B5 liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/L sucrose, 20 mg/L L-glutamine, 200 mg/L casein hydrolysate, 5 mg/L benzyladenine (BA) and 1 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The effect of nitrogen source (KNO3 and (NH4)2SO4) and their different concentrations on the fresh and dry weight (g/L), as well as RA content (mg/g dry weight) were measured. CSC growth measurements indicated a maximum specific cell growth rate of 1.5/day, a doubling time of 7.6 days and a high percentage of cell viability (96.4 %) throughout the growth cycle. Maximum cell fresh weight (353.5 g/L), dry weight (19.7 g/L) and RA production (180.0 mg/g) were attained at day 21 of culture. Cell growth and RA content were affected by nitrogen deficiency. Media containing 8.3 mM of total nitrogen (¼ of B5 standard medium) led to a minimum cell fresh weight (243.0 g/L), dry weight (17.4 g/L) and RA content (38.0 mg/g) after 21 days. The established CSC provided useful material for further optimization experiments aimed at a large-scale production of RA.

  18. Adaption of FMDV Asia-1 to Suspension Culture: Cell Resistance Is Overcome by Virus Capsid Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Veronika; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease with catastrophic economic impact for affected countries. BHK21 suspension cells are preferred for the industrial production of FMDV vaccine antigen, but not all virus strains can be successfully propagated in these cells. Serotype Asia-1 is often affected by this phenomenon. In this study, the Asia-1 strain Shamir was used to examine viral, cellular and environmental factors that contribute to resistance to cell culture infection. Cell media composition, pH and ammonium chloride concentration did not affect Asia-1 differently than other serotypes. Virus replication after transfection of viral genome was not impaired, but the adhesion to the cells was markedly reduced for Asia-1 in comparison to serotype A. The Asia-1 Shamir virus was successfully adapted to grow in the resistant cells by using a closely related but susceptible cell line. Sequence analysis of the adapted virus revealed two distinct mutations in the capsid protein VP1 that might mediate cell attachment and entry. PMID:28820470

  19. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  20. Role of polyamines in DNA synthesis of Catharanthus roseus cells grown in suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha; Atsushi Komamine; Walter C. Shortle

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for polyamines in the proliferation of cells was first demonstrated in bacteria (3). While significant progress has been made in this field using animal cell cultures, only preliminary studies have been reported with plant tissues. Serafini-Fracassini et al. (9) showed a marked increase in polyamine synthesis early during the G 1 phase, concomitant with...

  1. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Manivannan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 3.0 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA in a combination with 2 mg·L−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa, salicylic acid (SA, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  2. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-03-18

    Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 3.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) in a combination with 2 mg·L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa), salicylic acid (SA), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures.

  3. Propagation of Brazilian Zika virus strains in static and suspension cultures using Vero and BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Alexander; Castilho, Leda R; Reichl, Udo; Genzel, Yvonne

    2017-03-23

    The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and the Pacific has reached alarming levels in more than 60 countries. However, relatively little is known about the disease on a virological and epidemiological level and its consequences for humans. Accordingly, a large demand for in vitro derived Brazilian ZIKV material to support in vitro and in vivo studies has arisen. However, a prompt supply of ZIKV and ZIKV antigens cannot be guaranteed as the production of this virus typically using Vero or C6/36 cell lines remains challenging. Here we present a production platform based on BHK-21 suspension (BHK-21 SUS ) cells to propagate Brazilian ZIKV at larger quantities in perfusion bioreactors. Scouting experiments performed in tissue culture flasks using adherent BHK-21 and Vero cells have demonstrated similar permissivity and virus yields for four different Brazilian ZIKV isolates. The cell-specific yield of infectious virus particles varied between respective virus strains (1-48PFU/cell), and the ZIKV isolate from the Brazilian state Pernambuco (ZIKV PE ) showed to be a best performing isolate for both cell lines. However, infection studies of BHK-21 SUS cells with ZIKV PE in shake flasks resulted in poor virus replication, with a maximum titer of 8.9×10 3 PFU/mL. Additional RT-qPCR measurements of intracellular and extracellular viral RNA levels revealed high viral copy numbers within the cell, but poor virus release. Subsequent cultivation in a perfusion bioreactor using an alternating tangential flow filtration system (ATF) under controlled process conditions enabled cell concentrations of about 1.2×10 7 cells/mL, and virus titers of 3.9×10 7 PFU/mL. However, while the total number of infectious virus particles was increased, the cell-specific yield (3.3PFU/cell) remained lower than determined in adherent cell lines. Nevertheless, the established perfusion process allows to provide large amounts of ZIKV material for research and is a first step towards

  4. Innovative, non-stirred bioreactors in scales from milliliters up to 1000 liters for suspension cultures of cells using disposable bags and containers--a Swiss contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Sören; Eibl, Regine; Lettenbauer, Christine; Röll, Marcel; Eibl, Dieter; De Jesus, Maria; Zhang, Xiaowei; Stettler, Matthieu; Tissot, Stephanie; Bürki, Cedric; Broccard, Gilles; Kühner, Markus; Tanner, Rolf; Baldi, Lucia; Hacker, David; Wurm, Florian M

    2010-01-01

    Innovative mixing principles in bioreactors, for example using the rocking of a platform to induce a backwards and forwards 'wave', or using orbital shaking to generate a 'wave' that runs round in a cylindrical container, have proved to be successful for the suspension cultures of cells, especially when combined with disposable materials. This article presents an overview of the engineering characteristics when these new principles are applied in bioreactors, and case studies covering scales of operation from milliliters to 1000 liters.

  5. Characterization of lentiviral vector production using microwell suspension cultures of HEK293T-derived producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Heather M; McCloskey, Laura; Lye, Gary J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit K

    2013-04-01

    ProSavin(®) is a lentiviral vector (LV)-based gene therapy for Parkinson's disease. ProSavin(®) is currently in a Phase I/II clinical trial using material that was generated by transient transfection of adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK)293T cells. For future large-scale productions of ProSavin(®), we have previously reported the development and characterization of two inducible producer cell lines, termed PS5.8 and PS46.2. PS46.2 has been successfully adapted to grow in suspension cultures. The present study describes the creation of a small-scale (combined with statistical design of experiments (DoE) techniques to enable rapid characterization of the process conditions that impact cell growth and LV production. The effects of postinduction period, microwell liquid fill volume, and concentration of inducer (doxycycline) on ProSavin(®) titer and the particle:infectivity (P:I) ratio was investigated using three rounds of DoE, in order to identify appropriate factor ranges and optimize production conditions. We identified an optimal "harvest window" between approximately 26-46 hr within which maximal titers of around 6×10(4) transducing units (TU)/ml were obtained (an approximately 30-fold improvement compared to starting microwell conditions), providing that the fill volume was maintained at or below 1 ml and the doxycycline concentration was at least 1.0 μg/ml. Insights from the microwell studies were subsequently used to rapidly establish operating conditions for ProSavin(®) production in a 0.5-L wave bioreactor culture. The information presented herein thus aids the design and evaluation of scalable production processes for LVs.

  6. Establishment of cell suspension culture in Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. for the optimum production of flavonoids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnan, Remya; Anil Kumar, V S; Murugan, K

    .... Chlorophyll-containing callus cells of Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. is able to grow under low light in the presence of organic carbon source and retain the ability to produce flavonoids...

  7. Establishment of Cell Suspension Culture and Plant Regeneration in Abrus precatorius L., a Rare Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Serajur RAHMAN

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new protocol has been developed for cell culture and in vitro regeneration of Abrus precatorius that holds enormous potentiality for preparation of medicines. In vitro grown calli were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS liquid media in agitated condition fortified with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine. Growth curve of cells revealed that the cells continued to grow until 12 days of culture and got the highest peak from day 6-8. Isolated cell was found to produce highest 8.2% calli when suspended on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. Callus derived from single cell produced highest number of embryo (25-28% cultured on MS medium fortified with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.2 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The bipolar embryos were selected and optimum shoot formation was recorded on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 6-Benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid. The optimum root induction was noticed in MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l 3-Indolebutyric acid. Rooted plantlets were successfully transferred to potting soil and acclimatized to outdoor conditions.

  8. Evaluation of simulated microgravity environments induced by diamagnetic levitation of plant cell suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamal, K.Y.; Herranz, R.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Medina, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Ground-Based Facilities (GBF) are essetial tools to understand the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity and they are necessary to prepare and complement space experiments. It has been shown previously that a real microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell

  9. Serum-free spheroid suspension culture maintains mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimperti, Stella; Lei, Pedro; Wen, Yuan; Tian, Jun; Campbell, Andrew M; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2014-01-01

    There have been many clinical trials recently using ex vivo-expanded human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat several disease states such as graft-versus-host disease, acute myocardial infarction, Crohn's disease, and multiple sclerosis. The use of MSCs for therapy is expected to become more prevalent as clinical progress is demonstrated. However, the conventional 2-dimensional (2D) culture of MSCs is laborious and limited in scale potential. The large dosage requirement for many of the MSC-based indications further exacerbates this manufacturing challenge. In contrast, expanding MSCs as spheroids does not require a cell attachment surface and is amenable to large-scale suspension cell culture techniques, such as stirred-tank bioreactors. In the present study, we developed and optimized serum-free media for culturing MSC spheroids. We used Design of Experiment (DoE)-based strategies to systematically evaluate media mixtures and a panel of different components for effects on cell proliferation. The optimization yielded two prototype serum-free media that enabled MSCs to form aggregates and proliferate in both static and dynamic cultures. MSCs from spheroid cultures exhibited the expected immunophenotype (CD73, CD90, and CD105) and demonstrated similar or enhanced differentiation potential toward all three lineages (osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic) as compared with serum-containing adherent MSC cultures. Our results suggest that serum-free media for MSC spheroids may pave the way for scale-up production of MSCs in clinically relevant manufacturing platforms such as stirred tank bioreactors. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Establishment of cell suspension culture in Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. for the optimum production of flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Remya; Anil Kumar, V S; Murugan, K

    2014-02-01

    Bryophytes are the second largest group in the plant kingdom, but studies conducted to better understand their chemical composition are limited and scattered. Axenically grown bryophytes expressed potential in biotechnological processes. The present study was designed to investigate the in vitro cell growth, culture parameters and their effect on flavonoid synthesis. Chlorophyll-containing callus cells of Marchantia linearis Lehm & Lindenb. is able to grow under low light in the presence of organic carbon source and retain the ability to produce flavonoids. Highest flavonoid production was achieved using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as growth hormone. Inoculum size, light intensity, organic carbon source and cations are the culture parameters affecting flavonoid productivity. Maximum flavonoid productivity is observed under low light intensity, with a photon flux density ca. 20 μmol/m2/s. Optimal inoculum size and glucose concentration for flavonoid production are 10-14 and 2-3 %, respectively. Cations like ferrous trigger flavonoid synthesis by increasing its intracellular concentrations. Flavonoid production in the cell culture is shown to be significantly growth related. Osmotic stress is ineffective in triggering flavonoid synthesis. Methyl jasmonate and 2-(2-fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanyl) pyridine-4-carbothioamide elicitors showed positive effect on intracellular flavonoid content in cultured cells. Using the standard plot of quercetin (y = 0.0148x, R2 = 0.975), the flavonoid contents of in vitro samples were found ranging from 4.0 to 17.7 mg quercetin equivalent/g tissue. Flavonoids are fractionated by HPLC-PAD revealed the presence of quercetin (182.5 μg/g), luteolin (464.5 μg/g) and apigenin (297.5 μg/g). Further studies are warranted to analyze the therapeutic potentiality of the flavonoids in the liverwort.

  11. Metabolism of ibuprofen in higher plants: A model Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Šíša, Miroslav; Lacina, O.; Moťková, Kateřina; Langhansová, Lenka; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN (2017), s. 383-392 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Grant - others:European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Ibuprofen * Metabolism * Plant cells * Sequestration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  12. Bioreactor-Based Production of Glycoproteins in Plant Cell Suspension Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Tanja; Buyel, Johannes Felix

    2018-01-01

    Recombinant glycoproteins such as monoclonal antibodies have a major impact on modern healthcare systems, e.g., as the active pharmaceutical ingredients in anticancer drugs. A specific glycan profile is often necessary to achieve certain desirable activities, such as the effector functions of an antibody, receptor binding or a sufficient serum half-life. However, many expression systems produce glycan profiles that differ substantially from the preferred form (usually the form found in humans) or produce a diverse array of glycans with a range of in vivo activities, thus necessitating laborious and costly separation and purification processes. In contrast, protein glycosylation in plant cells is much more homogeneous than other systems, with only one or two dominant forms. Additionally, these glycan profiles tend to remain stable when the process and cultivation conditions are changed, making plant cells an ideal expression system to produce recombinant glycoproteins with uniform glycan profiles in a consistent manner. This chapter describes a protocol that uses fermentations using plant cell cultures to produce glycosylated proteins using two different types of bioreactors, a classical autoclavable STR 3-L and a wave reactor.

  13. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Liping; Liu, RuiE; Chu, Bijue; Yu, Xiushuang; Sun, Jie; Jones, Brian; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Huizhong; Zhu, Shuijin; Sun, Yuqiang

    2012-01-01

    Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel). In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L) and bentazon (4.2 µmol). A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon) tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  14. Cell suspension culture-mediated incorporation of the rice bel gene into transgenic cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Ke

    Full Text Available Cotton plants engineered for resistance to the herbicides, glyphosate or glufosinate have made a considerable impact on the production of the crop worldwide. In this work, embryogenic cell cultures derived from Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Coker 312 hypocotyl callus were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with the rice cytochrome P450 gene, CYP81A6 (bel. In rice, bel has been shown to confer resistance to both bentazon and sulfanylurea herbicides. Transformed cells were selected on a liquid medium supplemented alternately or simultaneously with kanamycin (50mg/L and bentazon (4.2 µmol. A total of 17 transgenic cotton lines were recovered, based on the initial resistance to bentazon and on PCR detection of the bel transgene. Bel integration into the cotton genome was confirmed by Southern blot and expression of the transgene was verified by RT-PCR. In greenhouse and experimental plot trials, herbicide (bentazon tolerance of up to 1250 mg/L was demonstrated in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines with a single copy of the bel gene showed normal Mendelian inheritance of the characteristic. Importantly, resistance to bentazon was shown to be stably incorporated in the T1, T2 and T3 generations of self-fertilised descendents and in plants outcrossed to another upland cotton cultivar. Engineering resistance to bentazon in cotton through the heterologous expression of bel opens the possibility of incorporating this trait into elite cultivars, a strategy that would give growers a more flexible alternative to weed management in cotton crops.

  15. Jasmonic Acid Effect on the Fatty Acid and Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitele Dalia Goldhaber-Pasillas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The stress response after jasmonic acid (JA treatment was studied in cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus. The effect of JA on the primary and secondary metabolism was based on changes in profiles of fatty acids (FA and terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA. According to multivariate data analyses (MVDA, three major time events were observed and characterized according to the variations of specific FA and TIA: after 0–30 min of induction FA such as C18:1, C20:0, C22:0 and C24:0 were highly induced by JA; 90–360 min after treatment was characterized by variations of C14:0 and C15:0; and 1440 min after induction JA had the largest effect on both group of metabolites were C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C16:0, C20:0, C22:0, C24:0, catharanthine, tabersonine-like 1, serpentine, tabersonine and ajmalicine-like had the most significant variations. These results unambiguously demonstrate the profound effect of JA particularly on the accumulation of its own precursor, C18:3 and the accumulation of TIA, which can be considered as late stress response events to JA since they occurred only after 1440 min. These observations show that the early events in the JA response do not involve the de novo biosynthesis of neither its own precursor nor TIA, but is due to an already present biochemical system.

  16. Growth and production optimization of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranbakhsh, A R; Oshagi, M A; Ebadi, M

    2007-04-15

    Abstract: A number of physicochemical conditions such different concentration of glucose, sucrose, potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, calcium chloride and temperatures were tested to optimize growth and production of tropane alkaloids from Datura stramonium (Solanaceae) plants. Cell suspension from semi-clear calli of leave explants developed in MS medium containing kinetin (0.5 mg L(-1)) and NAA (2 mg L(-1)) hormones was used to measure biomass and total alkaloids and comparison of treatments. The results showed that 30 and 40 g L(-1) glucose led to the highest level of alkaloids and biomass productions, respectively. 20 and 40 g L(-1) sucrose concentrations resulted in order the most rates of alkaloids and biomass productions. The results showed that increasing of nitrate concentration led to the reduction of the alkaloids. The best concentration of potassium nitrate for the production of tropane alkaloids and biomass were in order 9.4 and 3.76 mM. Also it was evinced that the optimized concentration of ammonium nitrate for alkaloids production was 10.3 mM and for the biomass was 41.22 mM. The best concentration of calcium chloride for growth and production of the alkaloids was 7.92 mM. Testing different temperature specified that the best condition for production of the alkaloids was 20 degrees C whereas it was 25 degrees C for biomass production. The results of this study could be recommended to farmers involved in production of D. stramonium for tropain alkaloids at industrial and semi-industrial scales.

  17. Light-induced fluctuations in biomass accumulation, secondary metabolites production and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-11-01

    Light is an important factor influencing plant morphogenesis and biochemical pathways, including biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites. In the present study, we investigated the differential effect of light on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolites production in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L. A prolonged log phase of 21 days was followed by light-grown cultures. Light-grown cultures displayed 3.9-fold maximum increase (8.88 g/l) in dry biomass on day 30 of culture which was comparable to 3.7-fold maximum increase (9.2 g/l) on day 27 in dark-grown cultures. Compared to dark grown-cultures, enhanced levels of total phenolic content (5.32 mg/g DW), total phenolic production (42.96 mg/l) and total secondary metabolites (6.79 mg/g) were found in light-grown suspension cultures during the log phase of growth. Further, a positive correlation among maximum levels of antioxidant activity (63.8%), total phenolic production (42.96 mg/l) and total secondary metabolites (6.79 mg/g DW) was displayed by light-grown suspension cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Purification to homogeneity and properties of glucosidase II from mung bean seedlings and suspension-cultured soybean cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Hatanaka, K; Elbein, A D

    1990-09-25

    Glucosidase II was purified approximately 1700-fold to homogeneity from Triton X-100 extracts of mung bean microsomes. A single band with a molecular mass of 110 kDa was seen on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This band was susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H or peptide glycosidase F, and the change in mobility of the treated protein indicated the loss of one or two oligosaccharide chains. By gel filtration, the native enzyme was estimated to have a molecular mass of about 220 kDa, suggesting it was composed of two identical subunits. Glucosidase II showed a broad pH optima between 6.8 and 7.5 with reasonable activity even at 8.5, but there was almost no activity below pH 6.0. The purified enzyme could use p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside as a substrate but was also active with a number of glucose-containing high-mannose oligosaccharides. Glc2Man9GlcNAc was the best substrate while activity was significantly reduced when several mannose residues were removed, i.e. Glc2Man7-GlcNAc. The rate of activity was lowest with Glc1Man9GlcNAc, demonstrating that the innermost glucose is released the slowest. Evidence that the enzyme is specific for alpha 1,3-glucosidic linkages is shown by the fact that its activity on Glc2Man9GlcNAc was inhibited by nigerose, an alpha 1,3-linked glucose disaccharide, but not by alpha 1,2 (kojibiose)-, alpha 1,4(maltose)-, or alpha 1,6 (isomaltose)-linked glucose disaccharides. Glucosidase II was strongly inhibited by the glucosidase processing inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and 2,6-dideoxy-2,6-imino-7-O-(beta-D- glucopyranosyl)-D-glycero-L-guloheptitol, but less strongly by castanospermine and not at all by australine. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the mung bean glucosidase II reacted with a 95-kDa protein from suspension-cultured soybean cells that also showed glucosidase II activity. Soybean cells were labeled with either [2-3H]mannose or [6-3H]galactose, and the glucosidase II was isolated by immunoprecipitation

  19. Diadenosine triphosphate is a novel factor which in combination with cyclodextrins synergistically enhances the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell suspension cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Czekała, Łukasz; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Pedreño, María Angeles; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Dinucleoside polyphosphates are considered as signal molecules that may evoke response of plant cells to stress. Other compounds whose biological effects have been recognized are cyclodextrins. They are cyclic oligosaccharides that chemically resemble the alkyl-derived pectic oligosaccharides naturally released from the cell walls during fungal attack, and they act as true elicitors, since, when added to plant cell culture, they induce the expression of genes involved in some secondary metabolism pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that some dinucleoside polyphosphates triggered the biosynthesis of enzymes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells, cyclodextrins were shown to enhance the accumulation of trans-resveratrol, one of the basic units of the stilbenes derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here, we show that diadenosine triphosphate, applied alone or in combination with cyclodextrins to the grapevine suspension-cultured cells, increased the transcript level of genes encoding key phenylpropanoid-pathway enzymes as well as the trans-resveratrol production inside cells and its secretion into the extracellular medium. In the latter case, these two compounds acted synergistically. However, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside trans-piceid inside cells were stimulated much better by diadenosine triphosphate than by cyclodextrins. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. [Establishment of embryogenic cell suspension culture and plant regeneration of edible banana Musa acuminata cv. Mas (AA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yue-Rong; Huang, Xue-Lin; Li, Jia; Huang, Xia; Li, Zhe; Li, Xiao-Ju

    2005-01-01

    Conventional breeding for dual resistance of disease and pest of Musa cultivars remains a difficult endeavor, as the plant is polyploidic and high in sterility. Biotechnological techniques, eg., genetic engineering, in vitro mutation breeding, or protoplast fusion, may overcome the difficulties and improve the germplasm. Establishment of a stable embryogenic cell suspension (ECS) is a prerequisite for any of the biotechnological breeding methods. In this study an embryogenic cell suspension was established from immature male flower of Musa acuminata cv. Mas (AA), a popular commercial variety of banana in the South-East Asian region. After culture for 5-6 months on callus induction media, which consisted of MS salts, different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4.1 micromol/L biotin, 5.7 micromol/L indoleacetic acid (IAA), 5.4 micromol/L naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), other vitamins, 87 mmol/L sucrose, and solidified with 7 g/L agarose, meristematic globules and yellow, friable embryogenic cultures were induced from the explants of 1-15th row young floral hands of immature male flowers. Of the four treatments of 2,4-D, 9 micromol/L was the most effective on the callus induction, it transformed 40.96% and 7.45% of the cultivated male floral hands into callus and embryogenic callus respectively. The explants to produce highest frequency of the embryogenic calli were floral hands of 6 to 12th rows, which generated 5.79% of the embryogenic calli. Suspension cultures were initiated from these embryogenic calli in liquid medium supplemented with 4.5 micromol/L 2, 4-D. After sieving selection of the cultures using a stainless steel metallic strainer with pore sizes of 154 microm at 15 day intervals for 3 months, homogeneous and yellow embryogenic cell suspensions, composed of single cells and small cell aggregates, were established. Based upon the growth quantity and growth rate of ECS, it was determined that the appropriate inoculum was 2.0 mL PCV

  1. Serum replacement with albumin-associated lipids prevents excess aggregation and enhances growth of induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ikki; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-08

    Suspension culture systems are currently under investigation for the mass production of pluripotent stem (PS) cells for tissue engineering; however, the control of cell aggregation in suspension culture remains challenging. Existing methods to control aggregation such as microwell culture are difficult to scale up. To address this issue, in this study a novel method that incorporates the addition of KnockOut Serum Replacement (KSR) to the PS cell culture medium was described. The method regulated cellular aggregation and significantly improved cell growth (a 2- to 10-fold increase) without any influence on pluripotency. In addition, albumin-associated lipids as the major working ingredient of KSR responsible for this inhibition of aggregation were identified. This is one of the simplest methods described to date to control aggregation and requires only chemically synthesizable reagents. Thus, this method has the potential to simplify the mass production process of PS cells and thus lower their cost. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1009-1016, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Induction of trans-resveratrol and extracellular pathogenesis-related proteins in elicited suspension cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Almagro, Lorena; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, Maria Angeles

    2013-02-15

    Suspension-cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell were used to investigate the effects of methyljasmonate, ethylene and salicylic acid separately or in combination with cyclodextrins on both trans-resveratrol production and the induction of defense responses. The results showed that the addition of methyljasmonate or ethylene to suspension-cultured cells jointly treated with cyclodextrins and salicylic acid provoked a decrease of trans-resveratrol levels suggesting that salicylic acid has a negative and antagonistic effect with methyljasmonate or ethylene on trans-resveratrol production. Likewise, the exogenous application of these compounds induced the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. Analysis of the extracellular proteome showed the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to an specific β-1,3-glucanase, class III peroxidases and a β-1,4-mannanase, which suggests that these signal molecules could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in V. vinifera cv Monastrell. Apart from these inducible proteins, other proteins were found in both the control and elicited cell cultures of V. vinifera. These included class IV chitinase, polygalacturonase inhibitor protein and reticuline oxidase-like protein, suggesting that their expression is constitutive being involved in the modification of the cell wall architecture during cell culture growth and in the prevention of pathogen attack. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced production of vanillin flavour metabolites by precursor feeding in cell suspension cultures of Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn., in shake flask culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, Pradeep; Parvatam, Giridhar; Shetty, Nandini P

    2017-12-01

    The flavour rich tuberous roots of Decalepis hamiltonii are known for its edible and medicinal use and have become endangered due to commercial over-exploitation. Besides 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxy benzaldehyde (2H4MB), other flavour metabolites in tuberous roots include vanillin, 4-Methoxy Cinnamic acid derivatives, aromatic alcohols etc. So far, there are no reports on the pathway of 2H4MB biosynthesis nor there is an organized work on biotransformation using normal and cell suspension cultures for obtaining these metabolites using precursors. The main aim of the study is to develop a method for enhanced production of flavour attributing metabolites through ferulic acid (FA) feeding to the D. hamiltonii callus culture medium. Biomass of D. hamiltonii cell suspension cultures was maximum (200.38 ± 1.56 g/l) by 4th week. Maximum production of 2H4MB was recorded on 4th week (0.08 ± 0.01 mg/100 g dry weight) as quantified by HPLC. Addition of 0.1-1.5 mM ferulic acid as precursor in the culture medium showed significant (p < 0.001) effect on suspension cultures biomass and respective phenylpropanoid metabolites content and 2H4MB accumulation. The maximum accumulation of vanillin, 2H4MB, vanillic acid, ferulic acid were of 0.1 ± 0.02 mg/100 g, 0.44 ± 0.01 mg/100 g, 0.52 ± 0.04 mg/100 g, 0.18 ± 0.02 mg/100 g DW respectively in 4 weeks of cultured cells supplemented with 1 mM ferulic acid as a precursor. The results indicate that, substantial increase in the levels of flavour metabolites in D. hamiltonii callus suspension culture was achieved. This would be having implications in biosynthesis of respective vanilla flavour attributing metabolites at very high levels for their large scale production.

  4. Production of Limonoids with Insect Antifeedant Activity in a Two-Stage Bioreactor Process with Cell Suspension Culture of Azadirachta indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Rivera, Andrés; Chicaiza-Finley, Diego; Hoyos, Rodrigo A; Orozco-Sánchez, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) cell suspension culture is an alternative for the production of limonoids for insect control that overcomes limitations related to the supply of neem seeds. To establish conditions for cell growth and azadiracthin-related limonoid production, the effect of different sucrose concentrations, nitrate and phosphate in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, and the addition of one precursor and three elicitors was evaluated in shake flasks. The process was scaled up to a 3-l stirred tank bioreactor in one- and two-stage batch cultivation. In shake flasks, more than fivefold increase in the production of limonoids with the modified MS medium was observed (increase from 0.77 to 4.52 mg limonoids/g dry cell weight, DCW), while an increase of more than fourfold was achieved by adding the elicitors chitosan, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid together (increase from 1.03 to 4.32 mg limonoids/g DCW). In the bioreactor, the volumetric production of limonoids was increased more than threefold with a two-stage culture in day 18 (13.82 mg limonoids/l in control single-stage process and 41.44 mg/l in two-stage process). The cultivation and operating mode of the bioreactor reported in this study may be adapted and used in optimization and process plant development for production of insect antifeedant limonoids with A. indica cell suspension cultures.

  5. The mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria induces chitinase activity in roots and in suspension-cultured cells of its host Picea abies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, M; Hager, A

    1989-08-01

    A cell-wall fraction of the mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria increased the chitinase activity in suspension-cultured cells of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) which is a frequent host of Amanita muscaria in nature. Chitinase activity was also increased in roots of spruce trees upon incubation with the fungal elicitor. Non-induced levels of chitinase activity in spruce were higher in suspension cells than in roots whereas the elicitorinduced increase of chitinase activity was higher in roots. Treatment of cells with hormones (auxins and cytokinin) resulted in a severalfold depression of enzyme activity. However, the chitinase activity of hormone-treated as well as hormone-free cells showed an elicitor-induced increase. Suspension cells of spruce secreted a large amount of enzyme into the medium. It is postulated that chitinases released from the host cells in an ectomycorrhizal system partly degrade the fungal cell walls, thus possibly facilitating the exchange of metabolites between the symbionts.

  6. Increasing anthraquinone production by overexpression of 1-deoxy-D: -xylulose-5-phosphate synthase in transgenic cell suspension cultures of Morinda citrifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Carla; Perassolo, María; Alechine, Eugenia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana María; Talou, Julián Rodriguez

    2010-07-01

    A Morinda citrifolia cell line was obtained by overexpresion of 1-deoxy-D: -xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) from Catharanthus roseus, a key enzyme of the metabolic pathway of anthraquinones (AQs). This cell line increased AQs production by about 24% compared to the control cell line. This transgenic cell line which carries dxs cDNA isolated from Catharanthus roseus, was achieved by direct transformation of cell suspension cultures of M. citrifolia using a hypervirulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain. The effects of the overexpression of the dxs gene also resulted in increased levels of dxs mRNA transcripts and DXS activity compared to the control cell line. In addition, total phenolics and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity were evaluated and were significantly higher in the transgenic line than in controls.

  7. Botulinum hemagglutinin-mediated in situ break-up of human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates for high-density suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Suman C; Tokura, Tomohiro; Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    Large numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are required for making stable cell bank. Although suspension culture yields high cell numbers, there remain unresolved challenges for obtaining high-density of hiPSCs because large size aggregates exhibit low growth rates. Here, we established a simple method for hiPSC aggregate break-up using botulinum hemagglutinin (HA), which specifically bound with E-cadherin and disrupted cell-cell connections in hiPSC aggregates. HA showed temporary activity for disrupting the E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connections to facilitate the break-up of aggregates into small sizes only 9 hr after HA addition. The transportation of HA into the aggregates was mediated by transcellular and paracellular way after HA addition to the culture medium. hiPSC aggregates broken up by HA showed a higher number of live cells, higher cell density, and higher expansion fold compared to those of aggregates dissociated with enzymatic digestion. Moreover, a maximum cell density of 4.5 ± 0.2 × 10 6 cells ml -1 was obtained by aggregate break-up into small ones, which was three times higher than that with the conventional culture without aggregate break-up. Therefore, the temporary activity of HA for disrupting E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell connection was key to establishing a simple in situ method for hiPSC aggregate break-up in bioreactors, leading to high cell density in suspension culture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor treatment to dissociate human iPS cells for suspension culture to form embryoid body-like cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Ayumi; Yazaki, Koyuki; Aoyagi, Mami; Ohnuki, Yoshitsugu; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Treatment conditions using Y-27632 in the preparation of cell suspension of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were investigated in the context of embryoid body (EB)-like cell aggregates. The effectiveness of a pretreatment with Y-27632 before cell dissociation and that of a Y-27632 treatment during cell dissociation were investigated from the viewpoint of simplicity and robustness. The duration of Y-27632 treatment in the preparation process affected the circularity and agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs. A single application of pretreatment failed to prevent the onset of blebbing. However, a pretreatment promoted the agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs when combined with the addition of Y-27632 to cell suspension. Our results indicate that pretreatment enhances the agglomeration potential of dissociated hiPSCs. When cell dissociation was performed in the presence of Y-27632, dissociated hiPSCs possessed the highest circularity and significant agglomerating property. It was shown that treatment with Y-27632 during cell dissociation is a simple and robust method to prepare dissociated hiPSCs for suspension culture to form EB-like cell aggregates. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced Biosynthesis of Withanolides by Elicitation and Precursor Feeding in Cell Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in Shake-Flask Culture and Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period. PMID:25089711

  10. Enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides by elicitation and precursor feeding in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal in shake-flask culture and bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganeshan Sivanandhan

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg, withanolide B (4826.05 mg, withaferin A (3732.81 mg, withanone (6538.65 mg, 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg, withanoside IV (2623.21 mg and withanoside V (2861.18 mg] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l and squalene (6 mM along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period.

  11. Establishment and validation of new complementing cells for production of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors in serum-free suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rénald; Guilbault, Claire; Gagnon, David; Bernier, Alice; Bourget, Lucie; Elahi, Seyyed Mehdy; Kamen, Amine; Massie, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    E1-deleted adenovirus vectors (AdV) are important gene transfer vehicles for gene therapy and vaccination. Amplification of AdV must take place in cells that express the adenovirus E1A and E1B genes. Sequence homology between AdV and the E1 genes integrated within the complementing cells should be minimal to reduce the odds of generating replication-competent adenovirus (RCA). The present study describes the establishment of AdV complementing cells constructed by stable transfection of the minimal E1A and E1B genes into human lung carcinoma (A549). Because some transgene products can be cytotoxic, the cells were engineered to stably express the repressor of the cumate-switch (CymR) to silence transgene transcription during vector growth. For regulatory compliance and to facilitate the scale-up, the resulting complementing cells (SF-BMAdR) were adapted to serum-free suspension culture. The best clone of SF-BMAdR produced AdV carrying an innocuous transgene to the same level as 293 cells, but titers were better for AdV carrying transgene for a cytotoxic product. Elevated titers were maintained for at least two months in suspension culture in the absence of selective agent and the cells did not produce RCA. Because of their advantageous properties, SF-BMAdR cells should become an important tool for developing large-scale production processes of AdV for research and clinical applications. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Targeted Gene Deletion Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Nuclease Accelerates Adaptation of CHO Cells to Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namil; Shin, JongOh; Park, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Gyun Min; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-11-18

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred host for the production of a wide array of biopharmaceuticals. Thus, efficient and rational CHO cell line engineering methods have been in high demand to improve quality and productivity. Here, we provide a novel genome engineering platform for increasing desirable phenotypes of CHO cells based upon the integrative protocol of high-throughput RNA sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein9) nuclease-based genome editing. For commercial production of therapeutic proteins, CHO cells have been adapted for suspension culture in serum-free media, which is highly beneficial with respect to productivity and economics. To engineer CHO cells for rapid adaptation to a suspension culture, we exploited strand-specific RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed according to their adaptation trajectory in serum-free media. More than 180 million sequencing reads were generated and mapped to the currently available 109,152 scaffolds of the CHO-K1 genome. We identified significantly downregulated genes according to the adaptation trajectory and then verified their effects using the genome editing method. Growth-based screening and targeted amplicon sequencing revealed that the functional deletions of Igfbp4 and AqpI gene accelerate suspension adaptation of CHO-K1 cells. The availability of this strand-specific transcriptome sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease mediated genome editing facilitates the rational design of the CHO cell genome for efficient production of high quality therapeutic proteins.

  13. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Different Explants on the Response of Tissue Culture and Cell Suspension Cultures of German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Koohi,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. is one of the most important medicinal plants that its essential oils used in different medicinal industries. In this study which was carried out in 2013 growing season at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, the in vitro response of leaf and hypocotyl explants of German Chamomile in B5 medium supplemented with different levels of plant growth regulators including 2,4-D, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP were investigated in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD.In addition, cell suspension cultures were established and characterized. Hypocotyl and leaf explants exhibited cell proliferation and produced callus within 1-2 weeks. The highest fresh weight of the callus (264.1 mg was produced by leaf explants in the medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l BAP. However, the leaf explants cultured on medium containing 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D showed the lowest cell proliferation and callus yield (40.42 mg. The highest percentage of root induction from leaf explants (58.73% was observed on the medium containing 4 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l Kin, and from hypocotyl explants (48.61% was observed on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l NAA. The 42.22% of calli derived from hypocotyl explants on B5 medium supplemented with 4 mg/l NAA and 3 mg/l BAP, were friable. Cell suspension cultures of German chamomile were established by transferring of hypocotyl-derived friable calli into the MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/l 2,4-D and 1 mg/l kinetin. The growth curve of cell proliferations started 4 days after culture and continued to grow until day 13th, where the cells entered stationary phase.

  14. Comparative study of withanolide production and the related transcriptional responses of biosynthetic genes in fungi elicited cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera in shake flask and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Seema; Saxena, Parul; Ali, Athar; Khan, Shazia; Abdin, Malik Z

    2017-05-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is one of the most reputed medicinal plants in the traditional medicinal system. In this study, cell suspension culture of W. somnifera was elicited with cell homogenates of fungi (A. alternata, F. solani, V. dahliae and P. indica) in shake flask and the major withanolides like withanolide A, withaferin A and withanone were analysed. Simultaneously expression levels of key pathway genes from withanolides biosynthetic pathways were also checked via quantitative PCR in shake flask as well as in bioreactor. The results show that highest gene expression of 10.8, 5.8, 4.9, and 3.3 folds were observed with HMGR among all the expressed genes in cell suspension cultures with cell homogenates of 3% P. indica, 5% V. dahliae, 3% A. alternata and 3% F. solani, respectively, in comparison to the control in shake flask. Optimized concentration of cell homogenate of P. indica (3% v/v) was added to the growing culture in 5.0-l bioreactor under optimized up-scaling conditions and harvested after 22 days. The genes of MVA, MEP and withanolides biosynthetic pathways like HMGR, SS, SE, CAS, FPPS, DXR and DXS were up-regulated by 12.5, 4.9, 2.18, 4.65, 2.34, 1.89 and 1.4 folds, respectively in bioreactor. The enhancement of biomass (1.13 fold) and withanolides [withanolide A (1.7), withaferin A (1.5), and withanone (1.5) folds] in bioreactor in comparison to shake flask was also found to be in line with the up-regulation of genes of withanolide biosynthetic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. An established Arabidopsis thaliana var. Landsberg erecta cell suspension culture accumulates chlorophyll and exhibits a stay-green phenotype in response to high external sucrose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avery; Chung, Michelle; Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Inman, Michael; Maxwell, Denis P; Hüner, Norman P A

    2016-07-20

    An established cell suspension culture of Arabidopsis thaliana var. Landsberg erecta was grown in liquid media containing 0-15%(w/v) sucrose. Exponential growth rates of about 0.40d-1 were maintained between 1.5-6%(w/v) sucrose, which decreased to about 0.30d-1 between 6 and 15%(w/v) sucrose. Despite the presence of external sucrose, cells maintained a stay-green phenotype at 0-15% (w/v) sucrose. Sucrose stimulated transcript levels of genes involved in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway (ChlH, ChlI2, DVR). Although most of the genes associated with photosystem II and photosystem I reaction centers and light harvesting complexes as well as genes associated with the cytochrome b6f and the ATP synthase complexes were downregulated or remained unaffected by high sucrose, immunoblotting indicated that protein levels of PsaA, Lhcb2 and Rubisco per gram fresh weight changed minimallyon a Chl basis as a function of external sucrose concentration. The green cell culture was photosynthetically competent based on light-dependent, CO2-saturated rates of O2 evolution as well as Fv/Fm and P700 oxidation. Similar to Arabidopsis WT seedlings, the suspension cells etiolated in the dark and but remained green in the light. However, the exponential growth rate of the cell suspension cultures in the dark (0.45±0.07d-1) was comparable to that in the light (0.42±0.02d-1). High external sucrose levels induced feedback inhibition of photosynthesis as indicated by the increase in excitation pressure measured as a function of external sucrose concentration. Regardless, the cell suspension culture still maintained a stay-green phenotype in the light at sucrose concentrations from 0 to 15%(w/v) due, in part, to a stimulation of photoprotection through nonphotochemical quenching. The stay-green, sugar-insensitive phenotype of the cell suspension contrasted with the sugar-dependent, non-green phenotype of Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta WT seedlings grown at comparable external sucrose

  16. Suramin inhibits initiation of defense signaling by systemin, chitosan, and a β-glucan elicitor in suspension-cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, Johannes; Scheer, Justin; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2000-01-01

    Systemin-mediated defense signaling in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants is analogous to the cytokine-mediated inflammatory response in animals. Herein, we report that the initiation of defense signaling in suspension-cultured cells of Lycopersicon peruvianum by the peptide systemin, as well as by chitosan and β-glucan elicitor from Phytophtora megasperma, is inhibited by the polysulfonated naphtylurea compound suramin, a known inhibitor of cytokine and growth factor receptor interactions in animal cells. Using a radioreceptor assay, we show that suramin interfered with the binding of the systemin analog 125I-Tyr-2,Ala-15-systemin to the systemin receptor with an IC50 of 160 μM. Additionally, labeling of the systemin receptor with a photoaffinity analog of systemin was inhibited in the presence of suramin. Receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 48-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase and alkalinization of the medium of suspension-cultured cells in response to systemin and carbohydrate elicitors were also inhibited by suramin. The inhibition of medium alkalinization by suramin was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of systemin and carbohydrate elicitors. Calyculin A and erythrosin B, intracellular inhibitors of phosphatases and plasma membrane proton ATPases, respectively, both induce medium alkalinization, but neither response was inhibited by suramin. The polysulfonated compound heparin did not inhibit systemin-induced medium alkalinization. NF 007, a suramin derivative, induced medium alkalinization, indicating that neither NF 007 nor heparin interact with elicitor receptors like suramin. The data indicate that cell-surface receptors in plants show some common structural features with animal cytokine and growth factor receptors that can interact with suramin to interfere with ligand binding. PMID:10922047

  17. Suramin inhibits initiation of defense signaling by systemin, chitosan, and a beta-glucan elicitor in suspension-cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, J; Scheer, J; Ryan, C A

    2000-08-01

    Systemin-mediated defense signaling in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants is analogous to the cytokine-mediated inflammatory response in animals. Herein, we report that the initiation of defense signaling in suspension-cultured cells of Lycopersicon peruvianum by the peptide systemin, as well as by chitosan and beta-glucan elicitor from Phytophtora megasperma, is inhibited by the polysulfonated naphtylurea compound suramin, a known inhibitor of cytokine and growth factor receptor interactions in animal cells. Using a radioreceptor assay, we show that suramin interfered with the binding of the systemin analog (125)I-Tyr-2, Ala-15-systemin to the systemin receptor with an IC(50) of 160 microM. Additionally, labeling of the systemin receptor with a photoaffinity analog of systemin was inhibited in the presence of suramin. Receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 48-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase and alkalinization of the medium of suspension-cultured cells in response to systemin and carbohydrate elicitors were also inhibited by suramin. The inhibition of medium alkalinization by suramin was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of systemin and carbohydrate elicitors. Calyculin A and erythrosin B, intracellular inhibitors of phosphatases and plasma membrane proton ATPases, respectively, both induce medium alkalinization, but neither response was inhibited by suramin. The polysulfonated compound heparin did not inhibit systemin-induced medium alkalinization. NF 007, a suramin derivative, induced medium alkalinization, indicating that neither NF 007 nor heparin interact with elicitor receptors like suramin. The data indicate that cell-surface receptors in plants show some common structural features with animal cytokine and growth factor receptors that can interact with suramin to interfere with ligand binding.

  18. Sucrose-enhanced biosynthesis of medicinally important antioxidant secondary metabolites in cell suspension cultures of Artemisia absinthium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Ahmad, Nisar; Ali, Syed Shujait; Ali, Shahid; Ali, Gul Shad

    2016-12-01

    Natural products are gaining tremendous importance in pharmaceutical industry and attention has been focused on the applications of in vitro technologies to enhance yield and productivity of such products. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of biomass and antioxidant secondary metabolites in response to different carbohydrate sources (sucrose, maltose, fructose and glucose) and sucrose concentrations (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 %). Moreover, the effects of 3 % repeated sucrose feeding (day-12, -18 and -24) were also investigated. The results showed the superiority of disaccharides over monosaccharides for maximum biomass and secondary metabolites accumulation. Comparable profiles for maximum biomass were observed in response to sucrose and maltose and initial sucrose concentrations of 3 and 5 %. Maximum total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were displayed by cultures treated with sucrose and maltose; however, initial sucrose concentrations of 5 and 7 % were optimum for both classes of metabolites, respectively. Following 3 % extra sucrose feeding, cultures fed on day-24 (late-log phase) showed higher biomass, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents as compared to control cultures. Highest antioxidant activity was exhibited by maltose-treated cultures. Moreover, sucrose-treated cultures displayed positive correlation of antioxidant activity with total phenolics and total flavonoids production. This work describes the stimulatory role of disaccharides and sucrose feeding strategy for higher accumulation of phenolics and flavonoids, which could be potentially scaled up to bioreactor level for the bulk production of these metabolites in suspension cultures of A. absinthium.

  19. Enhancement of anthraquinone production in Morinda citrifolia cell suspension cultures after stimulation of the proline cycle with two proline analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Carla V; Perassolo, María; Giulietti, Ana M; Rodríguez Talou, Julián

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of anthraquinones (AQs) involves the shikimate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways. The proline cycle is linked to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to generate NADPH needed in the first steps of this pathway. The effect of two proline analogs, azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (A2C) and thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C), were evaluated in Morinda citrifolia suspension cultures. Both analogs gave higher proline accumulation after 6 and 10 days (68 and 179% after 6 days with A2C at 25 and 50 μM, respectively, and 111% with T4C added at 100 μM). Induction of the proline cycle increased the AQ content after 6 days (~40% for 50 μM A2C and 100 μM T4C). Whereas A2C (50 μM) increased only AQ production, T4C also enhanced total phenolics. However, no induction of the PPP was observed with any of the treatments. This pathway therefore does not limit the supply of carbon skeletons to secondary metabolic pathways.

  20. Influence of a specific xyloglucan-nonasaccharide derived from cell walls of suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota L. on regenerating carrot protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerling, M; Seitz, H U

    1990-09-01

    A xyloglucan oligosaccharide was isolated from cell walls of Daucus carota L. suspension-cultured cells. From analytical data (gel-permeation chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis) it can be concluded that this oligosaccharide preparation consists mainly of a nonasaccharide known as XG9 (Glc4Xyl3GalFuc). This nonasaccharide showed excellent "anti-auxin" properties in the pea-stem bioassay, with 80% inhibition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-induced longitudinal growth of etiolated pea stem segments at concentrations of 1-0.1 nM. Applied in nanomolar concentrations to protoplasts regenerating in a medium containing 4.52 μM 2,4-D, the nonasaccharide influenced the viability of the protoplasts and the activities of glycan synthases in vitro. The effects were similar to those achieved by the omission of 2,4-D from the regeneration medium. The composition of the regenerated cell wall was not changed significantly by the use of 2,4-D-depleted medium or the addition of XG9 to 2,4-D-containing medium.

  1. Identification of the human Lewis(a) carbohydrate motif in a secretory peroxidase from a plant cell suspension culture (Vaccinium myrtillus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, N S; Nimtz, M; Conradt, H S; Fevereiro, P S; Costa, J

    1997-09-29

    This paper reports for the first time the presence of the human Lewis(a) type determinant in glycoproteins secreted by plant cells. A single glycopeptide was identified in the tryptic hydrolysis of the peroxidase VMPxC1 from Vaccinium myrtillus L. by HPLC/ESI-MS. The oligosaccharide structures were elucidated by ESI-MS-MS and by methylation analysis before and after removal of fucose by mild acid hydrolysis. The major structure determined is of the biantennary plant complex type containing the outer chain motif Lewis(a) [structure in text]. A corresponding fucosyltransferase activity catalyzing the formation of Lewis(a) type structures in vitro was identified in cellular extracts of the suspension cultures.

  2. Enrichment in Specific Soluble Sugars of Two Eucalyptus Cell-Suspension Cultures by Various Treatments Enhances Their Frost Tolerance via a Noncolligative Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travert, S.; Valerio, L.; Fouraste, I.; Boudet, A. M.; Teulieres, C.

    1997-08-01

    A cell-suspension culture obtained from the hybrid Eucalyptus gunnii/Eucalyptus globulus was hardened by exposure to lower temperatures, whereas in the same conditions cells from a hybrid with a more frost-sensitive genotype, Eucalyptus cypellocarpa/Eucalyptus globulus, were not able to acclimate. During the cold exposure the resistant cells accumulated soluble sugars, in particular fructose and sucrose, with a limited increase in cell osmolality. In contrast, the cell suspension that was unable to acclimate did not accumulate soluble sugars in response to the same cold treatment. To an extent similar to that induced after a cold acclimation, frost-hardiness of the cells increased after a 14-h incubation with specific soluble sugars such as sucrose, raffinose, fructose, and mannitol. Such hardening was also observed for long-term cultures in mannitol-enriched medium. This cryoprotective effect of sugars without exposure to lower temperatures was observed in both the resistant and the sensitive genotypes. Mannitol was one of the most efficient carbohydrates for the cryoprotection of eucalyptus. The best hardiness (a 2.7-fold increase in relative freezing tolerance) was obtained for the resistant cells by the cumulative effect of cold-induced acclimation and mannitol treatment. This positive effect of certain sugars on eucalyptus freezing tolerance was not colligative, since it was independent of osmolality and total sugar content.

  3. Optimization of BY-2 cell suspension culture medium for the production of a human antibody using a combination of fractional factorial designs and the response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Grömping, Ulrike; Lipperts, Anja; Raven, Nicole; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a strategy for the optimization of plant cell suspension culture media using a combination of fractional factorial designs (FFDs) and response surface methodology (RSM). This sequential approach was applied to transformed tobacco BY-2 cells secreting a human antibody (M12) into the culture medium, in an effort to maximize yields. We found that the nutrients KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂ and the hormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) had the most significant impact on antibody accumulation. The factorial screening revealed strong interactions within the nutrients group (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂) and also individually between 2,4-D and three other components (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and BAP). The RSM design resulted in a fivefold increase in the antibody concentration after 5 days and a twofold reduction in the packed cell volume (PCV). Longer cultivation in the optimized medium led to the further accumulation of antibody M12 in the culture medium (up to 107 μg/mL, day 10). Because the packed cell volume was reduced in the optimized medium, this enhanced the overall yield by 20-fold (day 7) and 31-fold (day 10) compared to the conventional MS medium. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of light wavelength on cell growth, content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Thevetia peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, J P; Zapata, K; Rojano, B; Arias, M

    2016-10-01

    Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana) has been considered as a potentially important plant for industrial and pharmacological application. Among the number of compounds which are produced by T. peruviana, antioxidants and polyphenols are of particular interest due to their benefits on human health. Cell suspension cultures of T. peruviana were established under different conditions: 1) constant illumination (24h/day) at different light wavelengths (red, green, blue, yellow and white), 2) darkness and 3) control (12h/12h: day light/dark) to investigate their biomass, substrate uptake, polyphenols production and oxidizing activity. The results showed biomass concentrations between 17.1g dry weight (DW)/l (green light) and 18.2g DW/l (control) after 13days. The cultures that grew under green light conditions consumed completely all substrates after 10days, while other cultures required at least 13days or more. The total phenolic content was between 7.21 and 9.46mg gallic acid (GA)/g DW for all light conditions. In addition the ferric reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid antioxidant activity ranged from 5.41-6.58mg ascorbic acid (AA)/g DW and 82.93-110.39μmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. Interestingly, the samples which grew under the darkness presented a higher phenolic content and antioxidant capacity when compared to the light conditions. All together, these results demonstrate the extraordinary effect of different lighting conditions on polyphenols production and antioxidant compounds by T. peruviana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra, E-mail: A.Kwiatkows@gmail.com [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Zebrowski, Jacek [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Oklejewicz, Bernadetta [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Czarnik, Justyna [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Halibart-Puzio, Joanna [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wnuk, Maciej [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  6. Rice callus suspension culture inhibits growth of cell lines of multiple cancer types and induces apoptosis in lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nafeesa; Dhadi, Surendar Reddy; Deshpande, Aparna; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2016-11-02

    Cancer is one of the leading cause of mortality. Even though efficient drugs are being produced to treat cancer, conventional medicines are costly and have adverse effects. As a result, alternative treatments are being tried due to their low cost and little or no adverse effects. Our previous study identified one such alternative in rice callus suspension culture (RCSC) which was more efficient than Taxol® and Etoposide, in reducing the viability of human colon and renal cancer cells in culture with minimal or no effect on a normal cell line. In this study, we tested the effect of RCSC by studying the dynamics of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H460 and A549), breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and colorectal cancer cell lines (SW620 and Caco-2) as well as their normal-prototypes. Complementary analysis for evaluating membrane integrity was performed by estimating LDH release in non-lysed cells and cell viability with WST-1 assay. Fluorescence microscopy with stains targeting nucleus and cell membrane as well as caspase 3/7 and Annexin V assays were performed. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was performed to evaluate expression of 92 genes associated with molecular mechanisms of cancer in RCSC treated ling cancer cell line, NCI-H460 and its normal prototype, MRC-5. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to collect RCSC fractions, which were evaluated on NCI-H460 for their anti-cancer activity. Lower dilutions of RCSC showed maximum reduction in total LDH indicating reduced viability in majority of the cancer cell lines tested with minimal or no effect on normal cell lines compared to the control. Complementary analysis based on LDH release in non-lysed cells and WST-1 assay mostly supported total LDH results. RCSC showed the best effect on the lung non-small carcinoma cell line, NCI-H460. Fluorescence microscopy analyses suggested apoptosis as the most likely event in NCI-H460 treated with RCSC. Gene expression

  7. Highly efficient in vitro regeneration, establishment of callus and cell suspension cultures and RAPD analysis of regenerants of Swertia lawii Burkill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthraj R. Kshirsagar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly efficient in vitro regeneration system has been developed for Swertia lawii Burkill, an important herb used as substitute for Swertia chirayita. Shoot tips explants were cultured on MS medium with various phytohormones for multiple shoot production. The best shoot production frequency (100% and maximum shoots (10.4 ± 0.8 were obtained on MS media containing TDZ (3.0 mg l−1 in combination with IBA (0.3 mg l−1. Maximum callus induction (95 ± 4.8% and callus growth (1.7 ± 0.4 gm was achieved on MS medium with 2, 4-D (3.0 mg l−1. Cell suspension cultures were established and studied for their growth kinetics. Shoots were rooted best (22.1 ± 2.5 in 1/2 MS medium with IAA (3.0 mg l−1. The genetic uniformity of the micropropagated clones was assessed using RAPD markers. Out of 405 bands, 400 (98.76% were monomorphic and rest 5 (1.24% were polymorphic. High multiplication frequency and low risk of genetic instability ensures the efficacy of this protocol.

  8. Effects of aluminum on DNA synthesis, cellular polyamines, polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and inorganic ions in cell suspension cultures of a woody plant, Catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, R.; Shortle, W.C. (USDA Forest Service, Durham (US)); Minocha, S.C.; Long, S.L. (Dept. of Plant Biology, Univ. of New Hamshire, Durham (US))

    1992-01-01

    Increased aluminium (Al) solubility in soil waters due to acid precipitation has aroused considerable interest in the problem of Al toxicity in plants. In the present study, an in vitro suspension culture system of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don was used to analyze the effects of aluminum on several biochemical processes in these cells. The aliphatic polyamines, spermine and spermidine, and their precusor, putrescine, have been implicated in a number of stress responses of plants. Addition of 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0 mM AlCl{sub 3} to cells cultured for 3 days caused a small but significant increase in cellular levels of putrescine at 4 h followed by a sharp decline by 16 h. There was no further decline in levels of putrescine during the next 32 h. Spermidine levels did not change appreciably compared to those in the control cultures. However, spermine levels increased by 2-3-fold at 24 and 48 h. Cellular activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC; EC 4.1.1.50) were both inhibited by 20-25% at 4 and 7 h. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17) was less than 10% of ADC activity at all times. Whereas all concentrations of Al caused a slight decrease in total cell number, cell viability was affected only by 1.0 mM Al. There was a decrease in the cellular levels of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn, P and Fe in the cells treated with Al at 4 h, but a significant increase by 16 and 24 h. The results presented here suggest that both the absolute amounts of Al and the length of exposure to it are important for cell toxicity. (au).

  9. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  10. Scaling up a chemically-defined aggregate-based suspension culture system for neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, M Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-12-01

    The demand of high cell numbers for applications in cellular therapies and drug screening requires the development of scalable platforms capable to generating highly pure populations of tissue-specific cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In this work, we describe the scaling-up of an aggregate-based culture system for neural induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under chemically-defined conditions. A combination of non-enzymatic dissociation and rotary agitation was successfully used to produce homogeneous populations of hiPSC aggregates with an optimal (140 μm) and narrow distribution of diameters (coefficient of variation of 21.6%). Scalable neural commitment of hiPSCs as 3D aggregates was performed in 50 mL spinner flasks, and the process was optimized using a factorial design approach, involving parameters such as agitation rate and seeding density. We were able to produce neural progenitor cell cultures, that at the end of a 6-day neural induction process contained less than 3% of Oct4-positive cells and that, after replating, retained more than 60% of Pax6-positive neural cells. The results here presented should set the stage for the future generation of a clinically relevant number of human neural progenitors for transplantation and other biomedical applications using controlled, automated and reproducible large-scale bioreactor culture systems. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Formation of a series of myo-inositol phosphates during growth of rice plant cells in suspension culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuo, Igaue; Masatoshi, Shimizu; Satoshi, Miyauchi; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University

    1980-01-01

    A series of myo-inositol phosphates including myo-inositol mono- to hexa-phosphates was observed during growth of cultured rice plant cells. We also found that ^Pi and myo-[2-^3H] inositol were incorporated into all these myo-inositol phosphates. myo-inositol phosphorylating activity, which depended on ATP and Mg^ was detected in the soluble fraction from the cells, and the reaction product was identified as myo-inositol-2-phosphate.

  12. Production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes by transient transfection of HEK293 cell suspension cultures for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Parminder Singh; Schulze, Erica; Tran, Rosa; Montes, Johnny; Kamen, Amine A

    2014-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is being used successfully in gene therapy. Different serotypes of AAV target specific organs and tissues with high efficiency. There exists an increasing demand to manufacture various AAV serotypes in large quantities for pre-clinical and clinical trials. A generic and scalable method has been described in this study to efficiently produce AAV serotypes (AAV1-9) by transfection of a fully characterized cGMP HEK293SF cell line grown in suspension and serum-free medium. First, the production parameters were evaluated using AAV2 as a model serotype. Second, all nine AAV serotypes were produced successfully with yields of 10(13)Vg/L cell culture. Subsequently, AAV2 and AAV6 serotypes were produced in 3-L controlled bioreactors where productions yielded up to 10(13)Vg/L similar to the yields obtained in shake-flasks. For example, for AAV2 10(13)Vg/L cell culture (6.8×10(11)IVP/L) were measured between 48 and 64h post transfection (hpt). During this period, the average cell specific AAV2 yields of 6800Vg per cell and 460IVP per cell were obtained with a Vg to IVP ratio of less than 20. Successful operations in bioreactors demonstrated the potential for scale-up and industrialization of this generic process for manufacturing AAV serotypes efficiently. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Positive selection of Wharton's jelly-derived CD105(+) cells by MACS technique and their subsequent cultivation under suspension culture condition: A simple, versatile culturing method to enhance the multipotentiality of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Halabian, Raheleh; Dehgan Harati, Mozhgan; Bahadori, Marzie; Mehdipour, Ahmad; Mohammadi Roushandeh, Amaneh; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2015-05-01

    Wharton's jelly (WJ), an appropriate source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has been shown to have a wide array of therapeutic applications. However, the WJ-derived MSCs are very heterogeneous and have limited expression of pluripotency markers. Hence, improvement of their culture condition would promote the efficiency of WJ-MSCs. This study aims to employ a simple method of cultivation to obtain WJ-MSCs which express more pluripotency markers. CD105(+) cells were separated by magnetic-associated (activated) cell sorting from umbilical cord mucous tissue. CD105(+) cells were added to Methocult medium diluted in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) and seeded in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA)-coated plates for suspension culture preparation. Differentiation capacity of isolated cells was evaluated in the presence of differentiation-inducing media. The expression of pluripotency markers such as Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 was also analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot techniques. Moreover, immunocytochemistry was performed to detect alpha-smooth muscle actin (antigene) (α-SMA) protein. WJ-MSCs grew homogeneously and formed colonies when cultured under suspension culture conditions (Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs). They maintained their growth ability in both adherent and suspension cultures for several passages. Non-adhesive WJ-MSCs expressed Oct3/4, Nanog, and Sox2 both at transcriptional and translational levels in comparison to those cultured in conventional adherent cultures. They also expressed α-SMA protein. In this study, we isolated WJ-MSCs using a slightly modified culture condition. Our simple non-genetic method resulted in a homogeneous population of WJ-MSCs, which highly expressed pluripotency markers. In the future, more multipotent WJ-MSCs can be harnessed as a non-embryonic source of MSCs in MSC-based cell therapy.

  14. Catalase and alternative oxidase cooperatively regulate programmed cell death induced by beta-glucan elicitor in potato suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masashi; Tada, Yasuomi; Uchii, Kimitaka; Kawakami, Sachiko; Mayama, Shigeyuki

    2005-04-01

    In potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) suspension cells, the expression of the gene encoding alternative oxidase (AOX) and H2O2 accumulation were induced by treatment with beta-glucan elicitor. The inhibition of catalase activity enhanced both AOX mRNA expression and the production of H2O2, whereas the ascorbate peroxidase inhibitor did not have any effect on these responses. Simultaneous inhibition of catalase and AOX activities in elicited cells dramatically increased H2O2 accumulation, leading to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and programmed cell death (PCD). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that not only AOX but also catalase plays a central role in the suppression of mitochondrial deltapsi(m) breakdown and PCD induced by beta-glucan elicitor.

  15. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Taxol® (paclitaxel) promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ) elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day) to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation. PMID:22530557

  16. Influence of rare earth elements on metabolism and related enzyme activity and isozyme expression in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Peng; Shuang-Lin, Zhou; Jun-Yao, He; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rare earth elements (REEs) not only on cell growth and flavonoid accumulation of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum suspension cells but also on the isoenzyme patterns and activities of related enzymes were studied in this paper. There were no significant differences in enhancement of flavonoid accumulation in T. hemsleyanum suspension cells among La(3+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+). Whereas their inductive effects on cell proliferation varied greatly. The most significant effects were achieved with 100 μM Ce(3+)and Nd(3+). Under treatment over a 25-day culture period, the maximal biomass levels reached 1.92- and 1.74-fold and the total flavonoid contents are 1.45- and 1.49-fold, than that of control, respectively. Catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activity was activated significantly when the REE concentration range from 0 to 300 μM, whereas no significant changes were found in superoxide dismutase activity. Differences of esterase isozymes under REE treatment only laid in expression level, and there were no specific bands. The expression level of some POD isozymes strengthened with increasing concentration of REEs within the range of 50-200 μM. When REE concentration was higher than 300 μM, the expression of some POD isozymes was inhibited; meanwhile, some other new POD isozymes were induced. Our results also showed REEs did not directly influence PAL activity. So, we speculated that 50-200 μM REEs could activate some of antioxidant enzymes, adjust some isozymes expression, trigger the defense responses of T. hemsleyanum suspension cells, and stimulate flavonoid accumulation by inducing PAL activity.

  17. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sangram K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol® (paclitaxel promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation.

  18. The effect of methyl jasmonate and light irradiation treatments on the stilbenoid biosynthetic pathway in Vitis vinifera cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andi, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Mansour; Ford, Christopher M

    2017-08-29

    Grape stilbenes are a well-known family of plant polyphenolics that have been confirmed to have many biological activities in relation to health benefits. In the present study, we investigated the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitor at four different concentrations (25, 50, 100 and 200 μM) in combination or not with high-level light irradiation (10,000 LUX) on a cell line obtained from the pulp of Vitis vinifera cv. Shahani. Our results showed that the stilbene synthesis pathway is inhibited by high-light conditions. A concentration of 50 μM MeJA was optimum for efficient production and high accumulation of total phenolics and total flavonoids as well as total stilbenoids. Furthermore, we showed that there is a significant negative correlation between the production of these metabolites and cell growth. These data provide valuable information for the future scale-up of cell cultures for the production of these very high value compounds in bioreactor system.

  19. Effect of NaCl on ionic content and distribution in suspension-cultured cells of the halophyte Sonneratia alba versus the glycophyte Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Suechika; Hasegawa, Ai; Tsuchiya, Shinpei; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-09-15

    The effect of a high concentration of NaCl on the intra- (cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole) and extracellular (cell wall) distribution of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca, S, and P was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the mangrove halophyte Sonneratia alba and compared to cultured cells of glycophytic rice (Oryza sativa). No significant differences were observed in ultrastructural features of cluster cells of both species cultured with and without 50mM NaCl. Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of the cells cultured in the presence of 50mM NaCl showed that the Na concentration ([Na]) and Cl concentration ([Cl]) significantly increased in all three cell components measured. In S. alba, the [Na] was highest in the vacuole and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix, while the [Cl] was highest in the cell wall and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. In O. sativa, however, the [Na] and [Cl] were highest in the cell wall, and the [Na] was lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. Thus, the possible activities for Na and Cl transport from the cytoplasmic matrix into the vacuole were greater in S. alba than in O. sativa, suggesting that halophilic mangrove cells gain salt tolerance by transporting Na and Cl into their vacuoles. In O. sativa, the addition of NaCl to the culture medium caused no significant changes to the intracellular concentrations of various elements, such as K, P, S, Ca, and Mg, which suggests the absence of a direct relationship with the transport Na and Cl. In contrast, a marked decrease in the Ca concentration ([Ca]) in the cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole and an approximately two-fold increase in the P concentration ([P]) in the cytoplasmic matrix were found in S. alba, suggesting that the decrease in the [Ca] is related to the halophilic nature of S. alba (as indicated by the inward movement of Na(+) and Cl(-)). The possible roles of a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange mechanism in halophilism and the effect of the [P] on the metabolic activity under saline conditions are

  20. SUSPENSION CULTURE AND PLANT REGENERATION OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study is the first reported attempt to generate a growth curve from Typha latifolia L. (broadleaf cattail) callus cells in suspension culture. Several media and hormone combinations were tested for their capacity to induce callus cell formation from T. latifolia leaf section...

  1. Physiological responses of suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus to aluminum: changes in polyamines and inorganic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhua Zhou; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    1995-01-01

    The effects of aluminum (Al) treatment on polyamines were studied using suspension cultures of Madagascar periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don]. The addition of A1 (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 mM) to the suspension cultures caused a significant increase in putrescine within 24h only in freshly transferred cells. By contrast, Al treatment reduced putrescine...

  2. Stimulation of taxane production in suspension cultures of Taxus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... biosynthesis in transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium. Phytochemistry 50: 53-56. Zhang CH, Fevereiro PS, He G, Chen Z (2007). Enhanced paclitaxel productivity and release capacity of Taxus chinensis cell suspension cultures adapted to chitosan. Plant Sci. 172: 158-163. Zhang CH, Wu JY, He ...

  3. Microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses of gene expression in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cell suspension cultures after exposure to NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2012-09-01

    The gene expression profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cells in suspension culture after exposure to salinity (NaCl) induced stress were examined by constructing two suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries. cDNA from non-treated cells was used as a driver and cDNA samples from cell suspension cultures exposed to 150 mM NaCl for 2 or 10 h were used as testers. Randomly selected clones from each SSH library were sequenced and 727 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained and analyzed. Four novel ESTs were identified. Between the two libraries, 542 unique SSH clones were selected for placement on a cDNA microarray. In total, 18 differentially expressed genes were identified with 4 and 12 genes being significantly differentially expressed 2 and 10 h after the treatment, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and protein synthesis and several genes whose protein products are implicated in salt or other abiotic stress-related responses were expressed in the salt-stressed cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence that generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate are rapid responses following addition of fungal elicitor which induces phytoalexin synthesis in lucerne (Medicago sativa) suspension culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, T J; Cooke, C J; Newton, R P; Smith, C J

    1993-05-01

    Treatment of lucerne suspension culture cells with glycoprotein elicitor from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium albo-atrum R & B triggers Ca(2+)-mediated induction of antimicrobial secondary metabolites termed phytoalexins. The present study investigated the possible role of polyphosphoinositide signal transduction in phytoalexin elicitation. Within 1 min of addition of elicitor to lucerne suspension culture cells we found a 100-160% (15-25 pmol/g fresh wt) increase in the level of compound with chromatographic and electrophoretic properties expected for an inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) and which was strongly bound by an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3)-specific binding protein; after 3 min the level of this compound had fallen below that observed prior to elicitor challenge. In 32P-prelabelled cells, the relative proportion of radioactivity which cochromatographed with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) was found to have decreased by 48% 1 min after elicitor addition and that rapid depletion of membrane lipid radioactivity was specific to this lipid fraction. The rapid, transient increase in level of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and concomitant fall in PtdIns(4,5)P2 suggests that Ins(1,4,5)P3 generated by hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 may provide a Ca(2+)-mobilizing signal in phytoalexin elicitation in lucerne.

  5. Putting the spotlight back on plant suspension cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell suspension cultures have several advantages that make them suitable for the production of recombinant proteins. They can be cultivated under aseptic conditions using classical fermentation technology, they are easy to scale-up for manufacturing, and the regulatory requirements are similar to those established for well-characterized production systems based on microbial and mammalian cells. It is therefore no surprise that taliglucerase alfa (Elelyso® – the first licensed recombinant pharmaceutical protein derived from plants – is produced in plant cell suspension cultures. But despite this breakthrough, plant cells are still largely neglected compared to transgenic plants and the more recent plant-based transient expression systems. Here, we revisit plant cell suspension cultures and highlight recent developments in the field that show how the rise of plants cells parallels that of Chinese hamster ovary cells, currently the most widespread and successful manufacturing platform for biologics. These developments include medium optimization, process engineering, statistical experimental designs, scale-up/scale-down models and process analytical technologies. Significant yield increases for diverse target proteins will encourage a gold rush to adopt plant cells as a platform technology, and the first indications of this breakthrough are already on the horizon.

  6. Regeneration of soybean via embryogenic suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droste Annette

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to establish an alternative plant regeneration system for soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] cultivars used in Brazilian breeding programs, ten genotypes were tested for their embryogenic potential. Cotyledons were removed as explants from immature seeds harvested from field-grown plants. After 45 days on induction medium, the number of responding cotyledons and the number of somatic embryos per immature cotyledon were evaluated. The percentage of explants that produced somatic embryos varied from 1 to 70% among cultivars. The average number of somatic embryos produced per cotyledon pair ranged from 0.01 to 10.3 with a mean of 3.4. Suspension cultures were initiated with three Agrobacterium tumefaciens susceptible cultivars. Suspensions were successfully developed from Bragg and IAS5 cultivars. The packed cell volume, in one-month growth, increased 8.1 fold for Bragg and 3.5 fold for IAS5 and the fresh weight increased 6.6 and 2.8 fold, respectively. The cultivars differed for the analysed parameters. All tissue from each cultivar was transferred to the maturation medium and subsequently to the germination medium. The germination frequency was 45.7 and 54.9% for Bragg and IAS5, respectively. Plants were gradually exposed to ambient humidity over one week and then planted in soil. All plants yielded seeds in the greenhouse.

  7. Rotary orbital suspension culture of embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells: impact of hydrodynamic culture on aggregate yield, morphology and cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundos, Tiago L; Silva, Joana; Assunção, Marisa; Quelhas, Pedro; Monteiro, Cátia; Oliveira, Carla; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2017-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES)-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (ES-NSPCs) constitute a promising cell source for application in cell therapies for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In this study, a rotary orbital hydrodynamic culture system was applied to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, to obtain homogeneously-sized ES-NSPC cellular aggregates (neurospheres). Hydrodynamic culture allowed the formation of ES-NSPC neurospheres with a narrower size distribution than statically cultured neurospheres, increasing orbital speeds leading to smaller-sized neurospheres and higher neurosphere yield. Neurospheres formed under hydrodynamic conditions (72 h at 55 rpm) showed higher cell compaction and comparable percentages of viable, dead, apoptotic and proliferative cells. Further characterization of cellular aggregates provided new insights into the effect of hydrodynamic shear on ES-NSPC behaviour. Rotary neurospheres exhibited reduced protein levels of N-cadherin and β-catenin, and higher deposition of laminin (without impacting fibronectin deposition), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity and percentage of neuronal cells. In line with the increased MMP-2 activity levels found, hydrodynamically-cultured neurospheres showed higher outward migration on laminin. Moreover, when cultured in a 3D fibrin hydrogel, rotary neurospheres generated an increased percentage of neuronal cells. In conclusion, the application of a constant orbital speed to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, besides allowing the formation of homogeneously-sized neurospheres, promoted ES-NSPC differentiation and outward migration, possibly by influencing the expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of proteases/extracellular matrix proteins. These findings are important when establishing the culture conditions needed to obtain uniformly-sized ES-NSPC aggregates, either for use in regenerative therapies or in in vitro platforms for biomaterial development or

  8. Independent pathways leading to apoptotic cell death, oxidative burst and defence gene expression in response to elicitin in tobacco cell suspension culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasabe, M.; Takeuchi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ichinose, Y.; Govers, F.; Toyoda, K.; Shiraishi, T.; Yamada, T.

    2000-01-01

    We characterized pharmacologically the hypersensitive cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells that followed treatments with Escherichia coli preparations of INF1, the major secreted elicitin of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. INF1 elicitin treatments resulted in fragmentation and 180 bp

  9. Changes in auxin level in the course of growth of a sunflower crown-gall suspension culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    The auxin level in the cell mass and culture medium was determined by means of the Avena straight caleoptile test in various periods of the suspension culture cycle of the sunflower crown-gall tumour...

  10. Sucrose metabolizing enzymes in cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris Enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em cultura celular de Bauhinia forficata, Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ometto de Mello

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the activity of sucrose metabolizing enzymes in extracts of cell suspension cultures of Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Invertase pathway was identified in the three studied species. Sucrose synthase pathway was also responsible for sucrose metabolism in Curcuma zedoaria and Phaseolus vulgaris cells. Activity values higher than 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein were found for acid and neutral invertases, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase in the cell extract of the three plant species. Sucrose synthase showed low activity in Bauhinia forficata cells. As sucrose concentration in the culture medium decreased, sucrose synthase activity increased in C. zedoaria and P. vulgaris cells. The glycolytic enzymes activity gradually reduced at the end of the culture period, when carbohydrate was limited.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar as enzimas do metabolismo da sacarose em culturas de célula em suspensão de Bauhinia forficata Link, Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe e Phaseolus vulgaris L. A via da invertase foi identificada nas três espécies estudadas. A via da sacarose sintase também foi responsável pelo metabolismo da sacarose em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Foram encontradas atividades maiores que 300 nmol min-1 mg-1 de proteína das enzimas invertase ácida e alcalina, UDPglicose pirofosforilase e fosfoglicomutase no extrato celular das três espécies de plantas. A sacarose sintase mostrou atividade baixa nas células de Bauhinia forficata. À medida que a concentração de sacarose no meio de cultura diminuiu, a atividade da sacarose sintase aumentou em células de Curcuma zedoaria e Phaseolus vulgaris. Ao final do período de cultura, quando os carboidratos se tornaram limitantes, as atividades das enzimas glicolíticas reduziram-se gradualmente.

  11. Gas phase composition effects on suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjalili, N.; Linden, J.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Bioresources Engineering

    1995-10-20

    The effect of different concentrations and combinations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ethylene on cell growth and taxol production in suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata was investigated using several factorial design experiments. Low head space oxygen concentration (10% v/v) promoted early production of taxol. High carbon dioxide concentration (10% v/v) inhibited taxol production.The most effective gas mixture composition in terms of taxol production was 10% (v/v) oxygen, 0.5% (v/v) carbon dioxide, and 5 ppm ethylene. Cultures grown under ambient concentration of oxygen had a delayed uptake of glucose and fructose compared to cultures grown under 10% (v/v) oxygen. Average calcium uptake rates into the cultured cells decreased and average phosphate uptake rates increased as ethylene was increased from 0 to 10 ppm. These results may indicate that gas composition alters partitioning of nutrients, which in turn affects secondary metabolite production.

  12. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots trigger DNA repair and antioxidant enzyme systems in Medicago sativa cells in suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles appear to be promising devices for application in the agriculture and food industries, but information regarding the response of plants to contact with nano-devices is scarce. Toxic effects may be imposed depending on the type and concentration of nanoparticle as well as time of exposure. A number of mechanisms may underlie the ability of nanoparticles to cause genotoxicity, besides the activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. In a previous study, we showed that plant cells accumulate 3-Mercaptopropanoic acid-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD) in their cytosol and nucleus and increased production of ROS in a dose dependent manner when exposed to QD and that a concentration of 10 nM should be cyto-compatible. Results When Medicago sativa cells were exposed to 10, 50 and 100 nM MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD a correspondent increase in the activity of Superoxide dismutase, Catalase and Glutathione reductase was registered. Different versions of the COMET assay were used to assess the genotoxicity of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. The number of DNA single and double strand breaks increased with increasing concentrations of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. At the highest concentrations, tested purine bases were more oxidized than the pyrimidine ones. The transcription of the DNA repair enzymes Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase, Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I and DNA Topoisomerase I was up-regulated in the presence of increasing concentrations of MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD. Conclusions Concentrations as low as 10 nM MPA-CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots are cytotoxic and genotoxic to plant cells, although not lethal. This sets a limit for the concentrations to be used when practical applications using nanodevices of this type on plants are being considered. This work describes for the first time the genotoxic effect of Quantum Dots in plant cells and demonstrates that both the DNA repair genes (Tdp1β, Top1β and Fpg) and the ROS scavenging mechanisms are activated when MPA-CdSe/ZnS QD contact M. sativa

  13. Reaction of detoxification mechanisms in suspension cultured spruce cells (Picea abies L. Karst.) to heavy metals in pure mixture and in soil eluates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Peter; Fischer, Claudia; Debus, Reinhard; Wenzel, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    INTENTION, GOAL, BACKGROUND: The widespread and unconcerned use of chemicals in the past has led to an accumulation of pollutants in our environment. Numerous sites are polluted with a mixture of organic chemicals and heavy metals. The future use of these sites and the safe consumption of groundwater from these areas depends on our ability to assess risk by determining the bioavailability of trace levels of pollutants in the respective soil solutions. Soil eluates containing heavy metals in mixture as well as pure heavy metals in aqueous solution were added to a spruce cell culture to set up such a test system. The present study aims at evaluating the response of cultured spruce cells to heavy metals in aqueous solution, and at characterizing these basic cellular responses as potential biomarkers. In order to characterize cell reactions toward heavy metals, spruce cell cultures were incubated with CdSO4 (50 to 500 microM), Na2HAsO4 (1.5 to 80 microM) or PbCl2 (10 to 150 microM). Alternatively, the cells were incubated with a standard heavy metal mixture containing 80 microM Na2HAsO4, 150 microM CdSO4 and 150 microM PbCl2 in medium and with aqueous original soil eluates. Measurement of oxidative stress, antioxidants and basic detoxification enzymes involved in plant defence reactions were performed with the treated cells. After 5 hrs of incubation, the onset of a strong oxidative burst was observed. H2O2 concentrations exceeded 40 microM in the culture media after 20 hrs. Concomitantly, glutathione levels showed drastic changes indicating the influence of the metals and/or the H2O2 on antioxidative systems. Following cadmium treatment, GSH and GSSG were elevated by 50 and 200% above controls. Whereas arsenic doubled GSSG levels, treatment with lead did not cause significant changes. However, a mixture of the metals decreased both metabolites by 50%. The effect of the metals was concentration-dependent and disappeared at high concentrations. Furthermore, strong

  14. In vitro morphogenesis and cell suspension culture establishment in Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae Morfogênese in vitro e estabelecimento de culturas de suspensão celular em Piper solmsianum C. DC. (Piperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santana Balbuena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Piper solmsianum is a shrub from Southeast Brazil in which many biologically active compounds were identified. The aim of this work was to establish a cell suspension culture system for this species. With this in mind, petiole and leaf explants obtained from in vitro plantlets were cultured in the presence of different plant growth regulator combinations (IAA, NAA, 2,4-D and BA. Root and indirect shoot adventitious formation, detected by histological analysis, was observed. Besides the different combinations of plant growth regulators, light regime and the supplement of activated charcoal (1.5 mg.l-1 were tested for callus induction and growth. Cultures maintained in light, on a 0.2 mg.l-1 2,4-D and 2 mg.l-1 BA supplemented medium, and in the absence of activated charcoal, showed the highest calli fresh matter increment. From a callus culture, cell suspension cultures were established and their growth and metabolite accumulation studied. The achieved results may be useful for further characterization of the activated secondary metabolites pathways in in vitro systems of P. solmsianum.Piper solmsianum é uma espécie herbácea do sudeste brasileiro onde vários compostos biologicamente ativos já foram identificados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer suspensões celulares nesta espécie. Para tanto, foram utilizados explantes de pecíolos e folhas, retirados de plântulas cultivadas in vitro, os quais foram submetidos a diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento (AIA, ANA, 2,4-D e BAP. Foi obtida a neo-formação de raízes e brotos, estes últimos através do processo de organogênese indireta evidenciada por estudos histológicos. Para a indução e crescimento dos calos, foram avaliados, além das diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento, a suplementação ao meio de cultura de carvão ativado (1,5 mg.l-1 e o regime de luz. Culturas mantidas na luz, em meio de cultura suplementado com 0,2 mg.l-1 2,4-D e 2 mg

  15. Purification and characterization of three chitinases and one beta-1,3-glucanase accumulating in the medium of cell suspension cultures of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, K.M.; Jacobsen, S.; Dalgaard Mikkelsen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Three basic chitinases and one basic beta-1,3-glucanase were secreted into the medium when embryogenic cell suspensions of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cv. 'Igri' were cultured as undifferentiated aggregates in the presence of 2,4-D. The enzymes were purified by affinity and ion exchange chromatog......Three basic chitinases and one basic beta-1,3-glucanase were secreted into the medium when embryogenic cell suspensions of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cv. 'Igri' were cultured as undifferentiated aggregates in the presence of 2,4-D. The enzymes were purified by affinity and ion exchange...... chromatography. Two of the chitinases were identified as the previously described endochitinases T and C from barley grain. The third and novel chitinase, designated K, was the major basic chitinase in the medium constituting 4% of the soluble protein. Chitinase K was found to be a 33-kDa endochitinase with p......I at 8.7. Further analysis showed that this enzyme is also expressed in barley grain. The amino acid composition and five partial amino acid sequences covering 93 residues of chitinase K were determined. A high similarity was found between chitinase K and barley chitinase T and C as well as basic...

  16. Production of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in rice cell suspension culture with a human-like N-glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Chong, Yun-Jo; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2011-12-01

    The rice α-amylase 3D promoter system, which is activated under sucrose-starved conditions, has emerged as a useful system for producing recombinant proteins. However, using rice as the production system for therapeutic proteins requires modifications of the N-glycosylation pattern because of the potential immunogenicity of plant-specific sugar residues. In this study, glyco-engineered rice were generated as a production host for therapeutic glycoproteins, using RNA interference (RNAi) technology to down-regulate the endogenous α-1,3-fucosyltransferase (α-1,3-FucT) and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (β-1,2-XylT) genes. N-linked glycans from the RNAi lines were identified, and their structures were compared with those isolated from a wild-type cell suspension. The inverted-repeat chimeric RNA silencing construct of α-1,3-fucosyltransferase and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (Δ3FT/XT)-9 glyco-engineered line with significantly reduced core α-1,3-fucosylated and/or β-1,2-xylosylated glycan structures was established. Moreover, levels of plant-specific α-1,3-fucose and/or β-1,2-xylose residues incorporated into recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced from the N44 + Δ3FT/XT-4 glyco-engineered line co-expressing ihpRNA of Δ3FT/XT and hGM-CSF were significantly decreased compared with those in the previously reported N44-08 transgenic line expressing hGM-CSF. None of the glyco-engineered lines differed from the wild type with respect to cell division, proliferation or ability to secrete proteins into the culture medium. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Surfactant-induced non-lethal release of anthraquinones from suspension culture of Morinda citrifolia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassetti, L.; Hagendoorn, M.J.M.; Tramper, J.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach based on the use of the surfactant Pluronic F-68 to obtain non-lethal release of plant cell intracellular products was investigated. Suspension cultures of Morinda citrifolia (Rubiaceae), producing anthraquinones as secondary metabolites, were selected as model system. By

  18. Spontaneous pepsin C-catalyzed activation of human pepsinogen C in transgenic rice cell suspension culture: Production and characterization of human pepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Reyazul; Kim, Nan-Sun; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kim, Hyo-Boon; Han, So-Chon; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2018-01-01

    A human pepsinogen C (hPGC) gene was synthesized with rice-optimized codon usage and cloned into a rice expression vector containing the promoter, signal peptide, and terminator derived from the rice α-amylase 3D (Ramy3D) gene. In addition, a 6-His tag was added to the 3' end of the synthetic hPGC gene for easy purification. The plant expression vector was introduced into rice calli (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The integration of the hPGC gene into the chromosome of the transgenic rice callus and hPGC expression in transgenic rice cell suspensions was verified via genomic DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification and Northern blot analysis. Western blot analysis indicated both hPGC and its mature form, human pepsin C, with masses of 42- and 36-kDa in the culture medium under sugar starvation conditions. Human pepsin C was purified from the culture medium using a Ni-NTA agarose column and the NH2-terminal 5-residue sequences were verified by amino acid sequencing. The hydrolyzing activity of human pepsin C was confirmed using bovine hemoglobin as a substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for pepsin activity were 2.0 and 40°C, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Estabelecimento de cultura de células em suspensão e identificação de flavonóides em Cordia verbenacea DC. Establishment of cell suspension cultures and flavonoid identification in Cordia verbenacea DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Lameira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivos o estabelecimento de culturas de células em suspensão, extração, separação e identificação de flavonóides em extratos de folhas e de células em suspensão de Cordia verbenacea. Células dessa espécie, após terem sido subcultivadas três vezes no meio MS suplementado com 2,32 µM de cinetina + 10,74 µM de ANA a intervalos de 28 dias, apresentaram cinco estágios de crescimento: as fases lag, exponencial, linear, desaceleração e estacionária. O maior percentual de crescimento (37% ocorreu no período exponencial entre o quarto e o décimo segundo dia e o menor (3% na fase lag até o quarto dia. Para identificação de flavonóides, foram usados extratos submetidos à separação e purificação por CCD e CCL e os componentes obtidos submetidos à Espectroscopia de Ultravioleta, Espectrometria de Infravermelho e Massa e Ressonância Magnética Nuclear de Hidrogênio. Após as frações das amostras de folhas e células terem sido separadas pelo eluente ácido acético, foram identificados os componentes 7,4'-diidróxi-5'-carboximetóxi isoflavona e 7,4'-diidróxi-5'-metil isoflavona. Foi detectado maior concentração dessas substâncias nas células cultivadas in vitro.The aims of this study were to establish cell suspension cultures, as well as to extract, separate and identify flavonoids in Cordia verbenacea leaf extracts and cell suspensions. Cells of this species were subcultivated three times in MS culture medium supplemented with 2.32 µM kinetin + 10.74 µM NAA at 28-day intervals, showing five growth stages: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration and stationary phases. The highest growth rate (37% occurred in the exponential phase between the fourth and the twelfth day and the lowest growth rate (3%, in the lag phase until the fourth day. For flavonoid identification, extracts were separated and purified by TLC and LC and the obtained compounds were subjected to Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

  20. Regeneration from embryogenic callus and suspension cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from both callus and suspension cultures of the wild medicinal plant Cymbopogon schoenanthus subsp. proximus has been achieved. The species is rare and confined in its distribution to Africa. A range (0.5 to 8 mg/l) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for the induction ...

  1. Changes in cellulase and polygalacturonase activity in Rosa glauca suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseleau, J.P.; Chambat, G.

    The levels of cellulase and polygalacturonase activities in Rosa glauca suspension cultures were measured at 6, 10, 14 and 28 days of growth. Cellulase and polygalacturonase showed the highest activity in the 14-day-old cells. The changes in the activities followed closely the changes in the corresponding levels of cellulose and galacturonic acid-containing polysaccharides in the cell wall. The maximum in both activities coincided with the end of the exponential growth of the cells. These hydrolases are believed to play a role in the cell expansion and the polysaccharides synthesis.

  2. Production of Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Recombinant Factor VIII Expression in Serum-Free Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Luis Caron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer offers several advantages over other gene delivery vectors when considering gene and cell therapy applications. However, using these therapies in clinical applications involves large-scale vector production in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Here we describe a high yield production of a lentivirus encoding recombinant factor VIII in a scalable and GMP-compliant culture system, based on serum free suspension cultures and transient transfection with an inexpensive reagent, polyethylenimine (PEI, reaching a total viral yield of 2.48x108 particles.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  4. Influence of NaCl on Growth, Proline, and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Levels in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; De Armond, Richard L.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    The facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum responds to salt stress by increasing the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and other enzymes associated with Crassulacean acid metabolism. A more common response to salt stress in sensitive and tolerant species, including M. crystallinum, is the accumulation of proline. We have established M. crystallinum suspension cultures to investigate whether both these salt-induced responses occur at the cellular level. Leaf-and root-derived cultures maintain 5% of the total soluble amino acids as proline. Cell culture growth slows upon addition of 400 millimolar NaCl, and proline levels increase to 40% of the total soluble amino acids. These results suggest a functional salt-stress and response program in Mesembryanthemum cells. Suspension cultures grown with or without 400 millimolar NaCl have PEPCase levels that compare with those from roots and unstressed leaves. The predominant protein cross-reacting with an anti-PEPCase antibody corresponds to 105 kilodaltons (apparent molecular mass), whereas a second species of approximately 110 kilodaltons is present at low levels. In salt-stressed leaves, the 110 kilodalton protein is more prevalent. Levels of mRNA for both ppc1 (salt stress induced in leaves) and ppc2 (constitutive) genes in salt-treated suspensions cultures are equal to unstressed leaves, and only twice the levels found in untreated suspension cultures. Whereas cells accumulate proline in response to NaCl, PEPCase protein amounts remain similar in salt-treated and untreated cultures. The induction upon salt stress of the 110 kilodalton PEPCase protein and other Crassulacean acid metabolism enzymes in organized tissues is not observed in cell culture and may depend on tissue-dependent or photoautotrophy-dependent programs. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668687

  5. Synchronization of Somatic Embryogenesis in Date Palm Suspension Culture Using Abscisic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwael, Hussain A; Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2017-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is considered the most effective method for commercial propagation of date palm. However, the limitation of obtaining synchronized development of somatic embryos remains an impediment. The synchronization of somatic embryo development is ideal for the applications to produce artificial seeds. Abscisic acid (ABA) is associated with stress response and influences in vitro growth and development. This chapter describes an effective method to achieve synchronized development of somatic embryos in date palm cell suspension culture. Among the ABA concentrations tested (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 μM), the best synchronized growth was obtained in response to 50-100 μM. Here we provide a comprehensive protocol for in vitro plant regeneration of date palm starting with shoot-tip explant, callus initiation and growth, cell suspension establishment, embryogenesis synchronization with ABA treatment, somatic embryo germination, and rooting as well as acclimatized plantlet establishment.

  6. Effects of aluminum on organic acid metabolism and secretion by red spruce cell suspension cultures and the reversal of Al effects on growth and polyamine metabolism by exogenous organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of added Al, the concentration of succinate in cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells was 15-20 times higher (> 600 nmol g-1FW) than that of citrate or oxalate and 4-6 times higher than that of malate. Addition of AICIJ (effective monomeric Al concentrations of 0.23 and 0.48...

  7. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After two weeks, induction of somatic embryos up to the torpedo stage occured at all tested concentrations of 2,4-D, IAA or NAA. Somatic embryos developed only in MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l IAA within two weeks and 2% of globular embryos were developed into the cotyledonary stage embryos. Eighty one percent of ...

  8. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of indole-3-acetic acid oxidase activity in suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IAA oxidase activity was determined in several growth phases of a suspension culture of sunflower crown-gall. During the short phase of intensive growth (zero passage - PO a negative correlation was noted between enzymatic activity and the rate of growth. IAA oxidase activity increased to a certain level is not a factor limiting cell division. For protraction of the phase of intensive growth (first passage - P1, however, a decrease in the activity of this enzyme seems indispensable. IAA oxidase activity in the tested culture is under the control of inhibitors present in the cells and medium. High enzyme inhibition was observed in PO cells during the phase, of intensive growth and in P1 at the beginning and in the middle part of this phase. These results suggest' that the -auxin level determined in earlier studies in sunflower crown-gall culture is controlled by the IAA oxidase set. During the long phase of intensive growth (P1 this control is of negative feedback type.

  10. Factors influencing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) somatic embryogenesis. I. The crucial role of pH and nitrogen in suspension culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeusz Wróblewski; Marcin K. Filipecki; Stefan Malepszy

    2014-01-01

    A method of obtaining and the characteristics of an embryogenic stabilised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) suspension culture which has many similarities to the carrot model are presented. The Specific Type I cells and proembryogenic mass were present in such a suspension. The maintenance of the proembryogenic stage took place in medium containing 2,4-D as the sole growth regulator, subsequent stages of embryogenesis occurred in hormone-free medium. Embryonic structures were also observed in me...

  11. Development of friable embryogenic callus and embryogenic suspension culture systems in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N J; Edwards, M; Kiernan, R J; Davey, C D; Blakesley, D; Henshaw, G G

    1996-06-01

    Procedures for the production of a new and highly prolific embryogenic culture system have been developed in cassava. The importance of the basal salts and type of auxin in controlling the development of cassava embryogenic tissues has been demonstrated, with culture on Gresshoff and Doy basal medium in the presence of 4-amino-3,5,6,trichloro-picolinic acid (picloram) inducing the formation of friable embryogenic callus from which highly totipotent embryogenic suspension cultures could be established. Plants have been regenerated from these cultures. The availability of embryogenic suspension cultures is considered to have important implications for the application of genetic transformation and other biotechnologies in the agronomic improvement of cassava.

  12. Effect of ultrasonic waves on crocin and safranal content and expression of their controlling genes in suspension culture of saffron (Crocus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Tofigh; Asghari Zakaria, Rasool; Omidi, Mansoor; Zare, Naser

    2017-11-10

    The expression of biosynthesis controlling genes of crocin and safranal in saffron (Crocus sativus) can be influenced by ultrasonic waves. Sterilized saffron corms were cultured in a ½-MS medium supplemented by 2-4-D and BAP.  Saffron callus cells were treated with ultrasonic waves in a cellular suspension culture under optimal growth conditions. The samples were collected at 24 and 72 hours after treatment in three replications. The secondary metabolites were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and the gene expression was analysed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results indicate that this elicitor can influence the expressions of genes CsBCH, CsLYC and CsGT-2; the ultrasonic waves acted as an effective mechanical stimulus to the suspension cultures. The analysis of variance of the ultrasonically produced amounts of safranal and crocin indicates that there is a significant difference between once- and twice-treated samples in that the amount of safranal was the highest within the samples taken from the twice-treated suspension culture at 72 h after the ultrasound treatment, and the crocin was maximised after 24 h passed the twice-applied ultrasound treatment.

  13. The use of morphogenic suspension cultures for the development of a protoplast regeneration system in lily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Famelaer, L.; Bordas, M.; Baliu', E.; Ennik, E.; Meijer, H.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Creemers-Molenaar, J.

    1997-01-01

    The present study reports data on the development of a protoplast regeneration procedure in lily. Established morphogenic suspension cultures were obtained from callus cultures induced on mature embryos from crosses between cultivars of L. longiflorum. The effect on the frequency of protoplast

  14. Growth characteristics and nutrient depletion of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' suspension cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted

    1998-01-01

    The growth characteristics and nutrient depletion in suspension cultures of Miscanthus ogiformis Honda ‘Giganteus' grown in media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal nutrient salts were studied during a culture period of 15 days. Proline was added to both media in concentrations from...

  15. Production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina by Camellia sinensis L suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutini, Sodiq, Mochamad; Muslihatin, Wirdhatul; Indra, Mochamad Rasjad

    2017-06-01

    Bioactive trimethyl xanthina can be obtained from the plant Camellia sinensis L. To obtain bioactive plant of which there are several hurdles for instance to wait up to five years to be harvested, also it needs land at a certain height from the sea level. Therefore, the production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina need to be developed with suspense culture techniques. The purpose of this study obtained the production of bioactive trimethyl xanthina way culturally suspense in large scale with a relatively short time, potentially as anti-oxidants. Research methods include: (1) initiation of callus from pieces of leaves, shoots the youngest of the plant Camellia sinensis L in the media MS with the optimization of the addition of growth regulators, (2) the subculture of callus on media and plant growth regulator that is equal to the stage of initiation, (3) initiation of suspension culture using explants of callus Camellia sinensis L, (4) Analysis of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina growth in suspension culture, (5) the isolation and identification of trimethyl xanthina qualitatively and quantitatively using thin layer chromatography/high performance chromatography column. The results of the study suspension cultures containing bioactive trimethyl xanthina candidates that can be used as an antioxidant.

  16. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Nahazima Mohamad Zuldin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D, kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%. Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47±0.4667 mL. The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275±0.082 mg L−1 that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226±1.98 mg L−1.

  17. Optimization of callus and cell suspension cultures of Barringtonia racemosa (Lecythidaceae family for lycopene production Otimização de culturas de suspensões de calos e células de Barringtonia racemosa (família Lecythidaceae para produção de licopeno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Behbahani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is present in a range of fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in the leaves of Barringtonia racemosa. The traditional lycopene extraction from the plant is being employed instead of an easy propagation technique like cell culture process from the leaf explants. We intend to assess how lycopene could be extracted via tissue culture under light (illuminance: 8,200 lux under white fluorescent lamps, photoperiod 16 h per day at 25ºC and dark. Leaf explants of Barringtonia racemosa were cultured on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS, Woody Plant Medium (WPM and B5 media, supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. Optimal conditions for callus induction and maintenance under both dark and light were investigated, and growth and lycopene accumulation were evaluated. Among media with different concentrations of 2,4-D, fast growing, friable callus initiated within three weeks after culturing on WPM basal medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 (weight per volume of 2,4-D, whereas callus induction in explants cultured on all other media started only after five weeks. Calli were subcultured once every fortnight. Pale yellow and green calli developed under conditions of dark and light respectively were then selected for evaluation of their lycopene contents. An improved reversed phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was used for a selective chemical determination of the lycopene content. Light induced lycopene production; and likewise maximum lycopene level incubated in light was higher than those incubated in darkness. The best growth rates of callus and cell suspension were achieved in WPM and B5 media respectively. The production of lycopene was growth-dependent through analysis of growth and lycopene content of both callus and cell suspension cultures.O licopeno está presente numa série de frutas frescas e hortaliças principalmente na folhas de Barringtonia racemosa. A extra

  18. The characterisation of foaming in suspension cultures of morinda citrifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Cusack, Winifred (Úna)

    1998-01-01

    The characterisation of foaming in plant cell cultures was investigated using Monnda citnfoha, as a test organism Suspensions were cultivated in 250 ml shake flasks, over the course of 21 day batch growth cycles, and were characterised in terms of biomass concentration, conductivity, morphology, pH and metabolite production (extracellular proteins and extracellular polysaccharides (ECP)). The Theological and surface tension profiles of the cell-free broths were assessed, with a view to unders...

  19. High yield derivation of enriched glutamatergic neurons from suspension-cultured mouse ESCs for neurotoxicology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Kyle S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, there has been a strong emphasis on identifying an in vitro model for neurotoxicity research that combines the biological relevance of primary neurons with the scalability, reproducibility and genetic tractability of continuous cell lines. Derived neurons should be homotypic, exhibit neuron-specific gene expression and morphology, form functioning synapses and consistently respond to neurotoxins in a fashion indistinguishable from primary neurons. However, efficient methods to produce neuronal populations that are suitable alternatives to primary neurons have not been available. Methods With the objective of developing a more facile, robust and efficient method to generate enriched glutamatergic neuronal cultures, we evaluated the neurogenic capacity of three mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC lines (R1, C57BL/6 and D3 adapted to feeder-independent suspension culture. Neurogenesis and neuronal maturation were characterized as a function of time in culture using immunological, genomic, morphological and functional metrics. The functional responses of ESNs to neurotropic toxins with distinctly different targets and mechanisms of toxicity, such as glutamate, α-latrotoxin (LTX, and botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, were also evaluated. Results Suspension-adapted ESCs expressed markers of pluripotency through at least 30 passages, and differentiation produced 97×106 neural progenitor cells (NPCs per 10-cm dish. Greater than 99% of embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs expressed neuron-specific markers by 96 h after plating and rapidly developed complex axodendritic arbors and appropriate compartmentalization of neurotypic proteins. Expression profiling demonstrated the presence of transcripts necessary for neuronal function and confirmed that ESN populations were predominantly glutamatergic. Furthermore, ESNs were functionally receptive to all toxins with sensitivities and responses consistent with primary neurons

  20. Establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures of Pinus radiata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of embryonal suspensor mass (ESM) from immature embryos of Pinus radiata on a solidified growth medium containing 0, 5 mgl -1 benzyladenine, 3, 0 mgl -1 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 500 mgl -1 casein hydrolysate and 250 mgl -1 L-glutamine was used as inoculum to establish cell suspension ...

  1. Impact of UV-B radiation on some biochemical changes and growth parameters in Echinacea purpurea callus and suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam H. Manaf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of UV-B light force, exposure time and incubation period on producing caffeic acid derivatives and growth parameters in Echinacea purpurea callus and suspension culture were assessed. UV-B led to an increment of all growth parameters and antioxidant activity in callus and cell suspension and caffeic acid derivatives in cell suspension by increasing incubation period. The reverse was true for G-POD activity in cell suspension and PAL activity in both types of cultures. Incubation period 2 weeks was more effective in caffeic acid, total phenols and G-POD activity in callus cells and incubation period one week only for total phenols in cell suspension. The two exposure times 2 and 4 h increased antioxidant activity in the two types of cultures. Exposure time 2 h led to increase caffeic acid and total phenols in callus cells. The maximum increase in caffeic acid, total phenols and PAL activity in cell suspension was achieved by 4 h exposure time. Likewise, using 2 UV-B lamps for 2 h was the most effective in creating more biochemical components than the other treatments.

  2. Caffeine formation by suspension cultures of Coffea dewevrei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Mary Sartor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The low caffeine content in leaves of C. dewevrei (~ 0.5 mg/g is due to a low biosynthesis associated with a fast degradation. On the other hand, high biosynthesis and low degradation confer a higher content (~ 8 mg/g in leaves of C. arabica. In this work it was observed that cell cultures of C. dewevrei recovered the ability to synthesize caffeine almost in similar levels of C. arabica cultures. Tracer experiments with labelled carbon dioxide showed a significant accumulation of radioactivity in caffeine and metabolites, indicating an active biosynthesis. When the cultures were fed with labelled caffeine most of the radioactivity was recovered in caffeine, indicating that although active, degradation was not so efficient as in leaves, and therefore, contributing for the alkaloid accumulation in the cell cultures.O baixo conteúdo de cafeína em folhas de C. dewevrei (~ 0.5 mg/g é devido a uma menor biossíntese associada a uma rápida degradação. Por outro lado, alta taxa de biossíntese e baixa degradação confere o maior conteúdo (~ 8 mg/g em folhas de C. arabica. Neste trabalho estudou-se a produção de cafeína em culturas de células em suspensão de C. dewevrei. Observou-se que culturas desta espécie de café recuperaram a habilidade em sintetizar cafeína, em níveis semelhantes aos de culturas de C. arabica. Em experimento em que carbonato de bário contendo carbono marcado foi adicionado ao meio de cultura observou-se expressivo acúmulo de radioatividade em cafeína e seus metabólitos, indicando ativa biossíntese. Quando culturas receberam cafeína marcada, a maior parte da radioatividade recuperada estava neste alcalóide, indicando que a via de degradação não era tão ativa como em tecidos intactos (folhas para reduzir o teor de cafeína, levando portanto ao seu acúmulo.

  3. Changes in auxin level in the course of growth of a sunflower crown-gall suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Chirek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The auxin level in the cell mass and culture medium was determined by means of the Avena straight caleoptile test in various periods of the suspension culture cycle of the sunflower crown-gall tumour. The investigations were performed in the course of the zero passage (PO and first one (Pl, differing in their time of duration of maximum growth and its intensity. In both passages the intra- and extra-cellular auxin levels reach values of the same order. At the beginning of the maximal growth phase the activity corresponding to IAA in the cells prevails over that of the other auxin-like compounds. This disproportion diminishes with further development of the culture, and with the beginning of the stationary phase the cellular IAA level is lower than that of the remaining auxin-like compounds. The short phase of maximal growth (PO occurs with an auxin level decreasing in the cell mass and increasing in the medium, and towards the end of the cycle these levels become equal. During the long phase of maximal growth (Pl the total amount of auxins in the cells increases and is 2-3 times higher than in the medium, whereas IAA in the cells remains at a constant level. These results suggest that the participation of IAA in the intracellular pool of auxin-like substances is decisive for the mitotic activity of the cells and maintenance of growth in the culture.

  4. White poplar (Populus alba L.) suspension cultures as a model system to study apoptosis induced by alfalfa saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrazzi, Alma; Carbonera, Daniela; Avato, Pinarosa; Tava, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    In animal cells, the anticancer function played by plant saponins involves a complex network of molecular processes that still deserves investigation and apoptosis seems to be the outstanding pathway. An intriguing aspect of the biological activity of saponins is related to their effects on genome integrity. As demonstrated by the studies carried out in white poplar (Populus alba L., cv Villafranca) cell suspension cultures, plant cells can as well be used as a model system to unravel the molecular mechanisms activated by plant saponins. These recent studies have evidenced that animal and plant cells share common features in their response to saponins, paving the way for novel opportunities for both basic and applied research. Indeed, there is a certain interest in replacing the animal models for pharmacological research, at least when preliminary large-scale cytotoxicity tests are performed on wide collections of natural extracts and/or purified compounds. The review provides an up-date of the molecular pathways (signal transduction, antioxidant response, DNA repair) associated with plant saponin bioactivity, with an emphasis on apoptosis induced by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) saponins. The comparison between animal and plant cells as tools for the study of saponin bioactivity is also discussed in view of the most recent literature and innovative future applications.

  5. Nitric Oxide Functions as a Signal in Ultraviolet-B-Induced Baicalin Accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jie Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, Nω-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA, and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation.

  6. Pretreatment of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cultures with Methyl Jasmonate Enhances Elicitation of Activated Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauss, H.; Jeblick, W.; Ziegler, J.; Krabler, W.

    1994-05-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) were used to demonstrate an influence of jasmonic acid methyl ester (JAME) on the elicitation of activated oxygen species. Preincubation of the cell cultures for 1 d with JAME greatly enhanced the subsequent induction by an elicitor preparation from cell walls of Phytophtora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg elicitor) and by the polycation chitosan. Shorter preincubation times with JAME were less efficient, and the effect was saturated at about 5 [mu]M JAME. Treatment of the crude Pmg elicitor with trypsin abolished induction of activated oxygen species, an effect similar to that seen with elicitation of coumarin secretion. These results suggest that JAME conditioned the parsley suspension cells in a time-dependent manner to become more responsive to elicitation, reminiscent of developmental effects caused by JAME in whole plants. It is interesting that pretreatment of the parsley cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic and 5-chlorosalicylic acid only slightly enhanced the elicitation of activated oxygen species, whereas these substances greatly enhanced the elicitation of coumarin secretion. Therefore, these presumed inducers of systemic acquired resistance exhibit a specificity different from JAME.

  7. Growth and accumulation of flavan-3-ol in Camellia sinensis through callus culture and suspension culture method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutini Sutini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to assess flavan-3-ol biomass in C. sinensis through callus cultures and suspension cultures derived from leaf explants. Callus initiation of both cultures were using Murashige and Skoog medium were enriched with plant growth regulators Naphtha-lene Acetic Acid 3.0 mg/L and kinetin 2.0 mg/L. The procedures in this study were: (1 callus initiation by cutting the leaves of C. sinen-sis shoots then planted on Murashige and Skoog medium that were enriched with plant growth regulators, (2 sub callus culture on fresh medium that enriched with the same growth regulators, (3 suspension culture initiation of liquid callus, (4 growth examination of callus and suspension cultures in week 12, (5 examination of qualitative-quantitative content of flavan-3-olin suspension cultures at week 4. The results show that suspension cultures contain biomass flavan-3-ol that increase in the same manner of the increase of callus age and weight

  8. Enhanced camptothecin production by ethanol addition in the suspension culture of the endophyte, Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of a non-camptothecin producing plant, Catharanthus roseus when added in the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani known to produce camptothecin, resulted in enhanced production of camptothecin by 10.6-fold in comparison to that in control (2.8 μg/L). Interestingly, addition of pure ethanol (up to 5% v/v) in the suspension culture of F. solani resulted in maximum enhancement in camptothecin production (up to 15.5-fold) from that obtained in control. In the presence of ethanol, a reduced glucose uptake (by ∼ 40%) and simultaneous ethanol consumption (up to 9.43 g/L) was observed during the cultivation period (14 days). Also, the total NAD level and the protein content in the biomass increased by 3.7- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in comparison to that in control. The study indicates a dual role of ethanol, presumably as an elicitor and also as a carbon/energy source, leading to enhanced biomass and camptothecin production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Suicidal tomato cells: programmed cell death in suspension-cultured tomato cells and ripening fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening involves a series of highly organised biochemical, physiological and structural changes that are under strict genetic control. The plant hormone ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), in synergy

  10. Fuel cell electronics packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuang, Ken; Easler, Keith

    2007-01-01

    ... more energy independent. Despite the fact that the primary focus of the new initiative revolved around automotive technologies, the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative was crafted into a balanced program that benefited a wide range of technologies and applications, including micro, portable, stationary fuel cells. This massive effort was given an addition...

  11. Evaluation of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Biochemical Characterization from Static and Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajit Kanungo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal, is an erect evergreen shrub commonly known as Ashwagandha. It is widely used in Ayurvedic and in the traditional pharmacopeia system of India. It is one of the major ingredients in many formulations prescribed for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and rheumatism. In the present study the variation in quality and quantity of protein and antioxidant enzymes were evaluated biochemically and enzymatically from the static and suspension cultures. The nodal segments had provided maximum callusing of 90.25±0.06 % with (1mg/l of BAP and Kn with (2mg/l of 2, 4-D. The static and suspension cultures were taken for the analysis of total soluble protein and screened for antioxidant enzyme activity [catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX]. The protein content (1.2016 µg/µl was found to be higher in static culture samples (0.870 µg/µl than the protein obtained from the suspension culture. The antioxidant enzyme activity (CAT, SOD and GPX was higher in static culture samples (301.01± 0.42, 198.92 ± 0.29, 103.75 ± 0.11 nkat/ mg of protein than that of suspension culture. Specific activity staining of isozyme pattern exhibited three isoforms (CAT 1, CAT 2 and CAT 3 in static culture samples but CAT 1 was absent in the sample extracted from suspension cultures.  In case of SOD, four bands (SOD 1, SOD 2, SOD 3 and SOD 4 were found in both the samples whereas intensity of GPX activity was found to be more in static culture but both the samples exhibited three isoforms such as  (GPX 1, GPX 2 and GPX 3. The supplementation of required nutrients along with the phytohormones under in vitro condition might be an enhancing factor to yield antioxidant enzymes in the static culture samples. 

  12. Factors influencing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. somatic embryogenesis. I. The crucial role of pH and nitrogen in suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Wróblewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of obtaining and the characteristics of an embryogenic stabilised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. suspension culture which has many similarities to the carrot model are presented. The Specific Type I cells and proembryogenic mass were present in such a suspension. The maintenance of the proembryogenic stage took place in medium containing 2,4-D as the sole growth regulator, subsequent stages of embryogenesis occurred in hormone-free medium. Embryonic structures were also observed in medium with auxin in the late stages of growth, probably due to the depletion of 2,4-D in the medium during subculture. The choice of the proper inorganic nitrogen sources and the maintenance of correct proportions between them had a significant effect on the formation of these structures. We have shown that the pH of the medium with an embryogenic culture became stabilized regardless of the initial pH value and depended on the medium composition. The inoculum used for the initiation of subsequent subcultures of the stable suspension culture was 1 part tissue to 300 parts medium and was small in comparison to the systems described for the cucumber so far. From 1 ml of basic suspension 7 embryos were obtained on medium without growth regulators 10 days after inoculation, and this amount increased to 21 after 3 weeks. From 3.2% of the somatic embryos it was posible to regenerate plants. The high yield and synchronisation of the process and the development of embryos without passing through callus tissue create the possibility of using this system for molecular investigations and in the technology of somatic seed production.

  13. Biomass Yield and Steviol Glycoside Production in Callus and Suspension Culture of Stevia rebaudiana Treated with Proline and Polyethylene Glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced production of steviol glycosides (SGs) was observed in callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana treated with proline and polyethylene glycol (PEG). To study their effect, yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of proline (2.5-10 mM) and PEG (2.5-10 %) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension culture biomass (i.e. both fresh and dry weight content) was increased with 5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, while at further higher concentrations, they got reduced. Further, quantification of SGs content in callus (collected at 15th day) and suspension culture (collected at 10th and 15th day) treated with and without elicitors was analysed by HPLC. It was observed that chemical stress enhanced the production of SGs significantly. In callus, the content of SGs increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.09 and 1.83 % with 7.5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, respectively, which was about 4.0 and 7.0 times higher than control. However, in the case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of proline and polyethylene glycol enhanced the SG content from 1.36 (control) to 5.03 and 6.38 %, respectively, on 10th day which were 3.7 times and 4.7 times higher than control.

  14. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Potentials of Nigella sativa L. Suspension Cultures under Elicitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Chaudhry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae is an annual herb of immense medicinal properties because of its major active components (i.e., thymoquinone (TQ, thymohydroquinone (THQ, and thymol (THY. Plant tissue culture techniques like elicitation, Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hairy root culture, and so on, are applied for substantial metabolite production. This study enumerates the antibacterial and antioxidant potentials of N. sativa epicotyl suspension cultures under biotic and abiotic elicitation along with concentration optimization of the elicitors for enhanced TQ and THY production. Cultures under different concentrations of pectin and manganese chloride (MnCl2 elicitation (i.e., 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L showed that the control, MnCl2 10 mg/L, and pectin 15 mg/L suspension extracts greatly inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and S. aureus (MIC against E. coli, i.e., 2.35±0.8, 2.4±0.2, and 2.46±0.5, resp.. Elicitation decreased SOD enzyme activity whereas CAT enzyme activity increased remarkably under MnCl2 elicitation. MnCl2 10 mg/L and pectin 15 mg/L elicitation enhanced the DPPH radical inhibition ability, but ferric scavenging activity was comparable to the control. TQ and THY were quantified by LC-MS/MS in the cultures with high bioactive properties revealing maximum content under MnCl2 10 mg/L elicitation. Therefore, MnCl2 elicitation can be undertaken on large scale for sustainable metabolite production.

  15. Retrobiosynthetic study of salicylic acid in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustafa, Natali Rianika

    2007-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signal compound in systemic acquired resistance in plants. The level of this C6C1 compound in plants increases after a pathogenic attack. There are two biosynthetic pathways of SA, the phenylalanine pathway, which is thought to occur in plants, and the

  16. Inhibition of Src family kinases overcomes anoikis resistance induced by spheroid formation and facilitates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Fujita, Yumiko; Tabata, Chiharu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Nakano, Takashi; Fujimori, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells of serous membranes, and forms spheroid-like cell aggregates in pleural and peritoneal effusions. We examined the levels of anoikis, apoptosis induced by the detachment of cells from the extracellur matrix, in suspension culture in the human mesothelioma cell line NCI-H2052. NCI-H2052 cells were adherent in conventional monolayer cultures, but were found to form spheroids in suspension cultures using dishes with ultra-low cell binding capacity. NCI-H2052 cells proliferated in both cultures, but the proliferation rate was markedly lower in suspension cultures than in monolayer cultures. In addition, NCI-H2052 cells in suspension cultures showed little apoptosis, suggesting that the suspension culture induces anoikis resistance. Western blot analysis revealed that suspension cultures induced activation of Src family kinases (SFK) after spheroid formation. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multi-tyrosine kinases including SFK, abolished anoikis resistance in suspension cultures, indicating that SFK activated by spheroid formation are responsible for anoikis resistance. Cisplatin induced apoptosis in NCI-H2052 cells, but the apoptotic rate was significantly lower in suspension cultures than in monolayer cultures, suggesting that spheroid formation is involved in cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, a combination of dasatinib and cisplatin induced apoptosis more significantly than either alone in suspension cultures. These results suggest that spheroid formation induces resistance to anoikis and to cisplatin through SFK activation and that dasatinib facilitates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human mesothelioma cells.

  17. Embryogenic callus formation, growth and regeneration in callus and suspension cultures of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' as affected by proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted; Krogstrup, Peter; Hansen, Jürgen

    1997-01-01

    The effects of proline additions to culture systems of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda Giganteus' were investigated. Proline was added in concentrations of 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 or 300 mM to the callus induction and suspension culture media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal salts and ...

  18. Abscisic acid induced freezing tolerance in chilling-sensitive suspension cultures and seedlings of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of abscisic acid (ABA) as a possible activator of cold acclimation process was postulated since endogenous levels of ABA increase temporarily or constitutively during cold-hardening. Exogenous application of ABA has been known to induce freezing tolerance at ambient temperatures in in vitro systems derived from cold hardy plants. Yet, some cell cultures acquired much greater freezing tolerance by ABA than by cold whilst maintaining active growth. This raises questions about the relationships among ABA, cold acclimation and growth cessation. To address this question, we attempted to 1) determine whether exogenous ABA can confer freezing tolerance in chilling-sensitive rice suspension cells and seedlings, which obviously lack the mechanisms to acquire freezing tolerance in response to cold; 2) characterize this phenomenon by optimizing the conditions and compare with the case of cold hardy bromegrass cells. Results Non-embryogenic suspension cells of rice suffered serious chilling injury when exposed to 4°C. When incubated with ABA at the optimal conditions (0.5-1 g cell inoculum, 75 μM ABA, 25-30°C, 7–10 days), they survived slow freezing (2°C/h) to −9.0 ~ −9.3°C (LT50: 50% killing temperature) while control cells were mostly injured at −3°C (LT50: -0.5 ~ −1.5°C). Ice-inoculation of the cell suspension at −3°C and survival determination by regrowth confirmed that ABA-treated rice cells survived extracellular freezing at −9°C. ABA-induced freezing tolerance did not require any exposure to cold and was best achieved at 25-30°C where the rice cells maintained high growth even in the presence of ABA. ABA treatment also increased tolerance to heat (43°C) as determined by regrowth. ABA-treated cells tended to have more augmented cytoplasm and/or reduced vacuole sizes compared to control cultures with a concomitant increase in osmolarity and a decrease in water content. ABA-treated (2–7 days) in vitro grown

  19. Methyl Jasmonate and Salicylic Acid Induced Oxidative Stress and Accumulation of Phenolics in Panax ginseng Bioreactor Root Suspension Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Yoeup Paek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the enzyme variations responsible for the synthesis of phenolics, 40 day-old adventitious roots of Panax ginseng were treated with 200 μM methyl jasmonate (MJ or salicylic acid (SA in a 5 L bioreactor suspension culture (working volume 4 L. Both treatments caused an increase in the carbonyl and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 contents, although the levels were lower in SA treated roots. Total phenolic, flavonoid, ascorbic acid, non-protein thiol (NPSH and cysteine contents and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical reducing activity were increased by MJ and SA. Fresh weight (FW and dry weight (DW decreased significantly after 9 days of exposure to SA and MJ. The highest total phenolics (62%, DPPH activity (40%, flavonoids (88%, ascorbic acid (55%, NPSH (33%, and cysteine (62% contents compared to control were obtained after 9 days in SA treated roots. The activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, substrate specific peroxidases (caffeic acid peroxidase, quercetin peroxidase and ferulic acid peroxidase were higher in MJ treated roots than the SA treated ones. Increased shikimate dehydrogenase, chlorogenic acid peroxidase and β-glucosidase activities and proline content were observed in SA treated roots than in MJ ones. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity remained unaffected by both MJ and SA. These results strongly indicate that MJ and SA induce the accumulation of phenolic compounds in ginseng root by altering the phenolic synthesis enzymes.

  20. New Synthetic Pyridine Derivate as Potential Elicitor in Production of Isoflavonoids and Flavonoids in Trifolium pratense L. Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kašparová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of secondary metabolites in Trifolium pratense L. suspension culture of the family of legume plants (Fabaceae is low, and therefore there was an attempt to increase it by elicitation. New synthetic substance, 2-(2-fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanylpyridine-4-carbothioamide, was tested as elicitor—a substance that showed the best elicitation effect after 48-hour application of 1 μmol L−1 concentration. Maximum contents of genistin (11.60 mg g−1 DW, daidzein (8.31 mg g−1 DW, and genistein (1.50 mg g−1 DW were recorded, and the production of these isoflavonoids thus significantly increased, when compared with the control, by 152%, 151%, and 400%. The maximum content of flavonoids (5.78 mg g−1 DW and the increase in the production by 142%, when compared with the control, were induced by 6-hour application of 100 μmol L−1 concentration. The tested substance showed to be an effective elicitor of phenylpropane metabolism.

  1. Regeneration of transgenic cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) from microbombarded embryogenic suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpke, C; Taylor, N; Cárcamo, R; Konan, N K; Marmey, P; Henshaw, G G; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C

    1996-06-01

    A protocol was established for the introduction of DNA into embryogenic suspension-derived tissues of cassava via microparticle bombardment, for the selection of genetically transformed cells, and for the regeneration of fully transgenic plants from these cells. The plasmid DNA used for bombardment contained a gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and a gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (uidA). Selection of bombarded tissue with paromomycin resulted in the establishment of putative transgenic embryogenic calli. In most of these calli, beta-glucuronidase was detected histochemically. Molecular analysis of paromomycin-resistant embryogenic calli and of plants regenerated from these calli, confirmed the stable integration of bombarded DNA into the cassava genome.

  2. Enhancement of 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    hydroxyecdysone production of. Vitex glabrata suspension .... hydroxyecdysone production in V. glabrata cell suspension cultures. Determination of dry cell ... residue was dissolved in 3 ml methanol and vortexed with 2 ml hexane twice.

  3. Effect of culture conditions on synthesis of triterpenoids in suspension cultures of Lantana camara L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Sisodia, Vikash; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-01-01

    Present report is aimed to study the batch kinetics of Lantana camara. Dynamic changes of parameters, such as pH, conductivity, wet and dry cell concentrations, consumption of major nutrients, carbon source and agitation speeds were investigated to understand the culture characteristics of suspended cells grown on MS + BAP + 2,4-D + NAA in shake flasks. Results indicated that the consumption of phosphate resulted in the onset of stationary phase in cultures. Maltose as carbon source resulted in production of maximum triterpenoid content (31.08 mg/L) while the least was found on glucose (10.69 mg/L). Notably, both did not support accumulation of betulinic acid. Sucrose, although stood second in terms of quantity (21.6 mg/L), supported the production of all the three triterpenoids-oleanolic, ursolic and betulinic acids. Maximum viable cultures were obtained at a rotation speed of 120 rpm. The present finding will form a background for further scale-up related studies.

  4. Electron Cryomicroscopy: From Molecules to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, W.

    2014-06-01

    Today's biomolecular electron microscopy uses essentially three different imaging modalities: (i) electron crystallography, (ii) single particle analysis and (iii) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimum preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Electron crystallography requires the existence of two-dimensional crystals. In principle, electron crystallography is a high-resolution technique and it has indeed been demonstrated in a number of cases that near-atomic resolution can be attained. Single-particle analysis is particularly suited for structural studies of large macromolecular complexes. The amount of material needed is minute and some degree of heterogeneity is tolerable since image classification can be used for further 'purification in silico'. In principle, single particle analysis can attain high-resolution but, in practice, this often remains an elusive goal. However, since medium resolution structures can be obtained relatively easily, it often provides an excellent basis for hybrid approaches in which high-resolution structures of components are integrated into the medium resolution structures of the holocomplexes. Electron tomography can be applied to non-repetitive structures. Most supramolecuar structures inside cells fall into this category. In order to obtain three-dimensional structures of objects with unique topologies it is necessary to obtain different views by physical tilting. The challenge is to obtain large numbers of projection images covering as wide a tilt range as possible and, at the same time, to minimize the cumulative electron dose. Cryoelectron tomography provides medium resolution three-dimensional images of a wide range of biological structures from isolated supramolecular assemblies to organelles and cells. It allows the visualization of molecular machines in their functional environment (in situ) and the mapping of entire molecular landscapes.

  5. Effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana for Steviol glycoside production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycosides are natural non-caloric sweeteners which are extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana plant. Present study deals the effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia plant for steviol glycoside (SGs) production. Yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of NaCl (0.05-0.20%) and Na2CO3 (0.0125-0.10%) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension biomass cultured on salts showed less growth as well as browning of medium when compared with control. Quantification of SGs content in callus culture (collected on 15th day) and suspension cultures (collected at 10th and 15th days) treated with and without salts were analyzed by HPLC. It was found that abiotic stress induced by the salts increased the concentration of SGs significantly. In callus, the quantity of SGs got increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.43 and 1.57% with 0.10% NaCl, and 0.025% Na2CO3, respectively. However, in case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of NaCl and Na2CO3 enhanced the SGs content from 1.36 (control) to 2.61 and 5.14%, respectively, on the 10th day.

  6. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Schmeitzl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON, 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON, and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G. This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives.

  7. Influence of growth regulators and sucrose concentrations on growth and rosmarinic acid production in calli and suspension cultures of Coleus blumei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ju; Guiping, Liu; Xiujun, Liu; Xincai, Han; Hongmei, Liu

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid, which is reported to have adstringent, antibacterial, antiviral and antioxidant activities, is one of the most prominent secondary compounds in Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae). Rosmarinic acid (RA) production in different hybrids of C. blumei was estimated by HPLC. Conditions for HPLC were as follows: column, 150 x 4.6 mm; solvent system, methanol -0.1% phosphate (45 : 55); flow rate, 0.9 mL/min; detection: 325 nm. Two out of four hybrids of C. blumei (hy1; hy2) contain better rosmarinic acid production (0.9 and 1.0% dry weight, respectively) and the leaves have the highest rosmarinic acid production, followed by stems and roots. The hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (HPPR) gene expression levels were analysed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Hy3 shows highest level of HPPR gene expression out of four hybrids on genotype-specific patterns, and stems represent the highest level of HPPR gene expression among leaves, roots and stems. This was probably a result of the fact that the RA biosynthetic pathway was regulated by interactions of several enzymes necessary for biosynthesis. The explants from the hy1 leaves were used in subsequent studies on the effect of different growth regulators (2.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl-aminopurine (6-BA), different 2,4-dichlorophenxyaretic acid (2,4-D) and alpha-naphthaleneacetic (NAA) concentrations) and sucrose contents (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6%) on culture growth and rosmarinic acid accumulation. On the effect of different growth regulators, the best result is obtained when the B5-medium supplemented is with 2.0 mg L(-1) 6-BA, 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA, 0.8 mg L(-1) 2,4-D and 2% sugar, and solidified with 0.8% agar. In this case, both growth index and rosmarinic acid accumulation reach a maximum, which is 49.7 and 25.3% (dry weight), respectively. The optimal medium for suspension culture growth contains 2.0 mg L(-1) 6-BA, 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA, 0.8 mg L(-1) 2,4-D, 600 mg L(-1) inositel and 2% sugar, and the rosmarinic acid production is 1.7% (dry weight

  8. Solar electron source and thermionic solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Yaghoobi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Common solar technologies are either photovoltaic/thermophotovoltaic, or use indirect methods of electricity generation such as boiling water for a steam turbine. Thermionic energy conversion based on the emission of electrons from a hot cathode into vacuum and their collection by an anode is also a promising route. However, thermionic solar conversion is extremely challenging as the sunlight intensity is too low for heating a conventional cathode to thermionic emission temperatures in a practical manner. Therefore, compared to other technologies, little has been done in this area, and the devices have been mainly limited to large experimental apparatus investigated for space power applications. Based on a recently observed “Heat Trap” effect in carbon nanotube arrays, allowing their efficient heating with low-power light, we report the first compact thermionic solar cell. Even using a simple off-the-shelf focusing lens, the device delivered over 1 V across a load. The device also shows intrinsic storage capacity.

  9. An analysis of chick limb bud intercellular adhesion underlying the establishment of cartilage aggregates in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, J A; von der Mark, K

    1990-07-01

    To examine the mechanism of intercellular adhesion in the establishment of limb skeletal elements we have investigated the process of limb bud cell aggregation in vitro. Limb bud cells are aggregation-competent immediately after their trypsin:collagenase dissociation in the absence of calcium. This aggregation is largely Ca2(+)-independent (CI) and is completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, when limb bud cells are first allowed to recover from Ca2(+)-free trypsin:collagenase dissociation, aggregation of the surviving population is exclusively Ca2(+)-dependent (CD) and completely and reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide. The presence of exogenous calcium during initial cell dissociation retains a functional CD aggregation mechanism. However, incubation of such cells with EGTA releases the CD component and converts the cells to a predominantly CI aggregation. Rabbits were immunized with limb bud cells exhibiting the recovered CD aggregation mechanism and the resulting immune sera were screened for their effect on cell aggregation. Relative to pre-immune sera, intact immune IgG agglutinated dissociated limb bud cells whilst immune Fab fragments inhibited their aggregation. The aggregation-inhibiting antiserum recognizes five major limb bud cell surface components with apparent molecular weights of 72K, 50K, 23K, 14.5K and 8.5K (K = 10(3) Mr), respectively. Limb bud cell surface plasma membranes were isolated by sucrose gradient density centrifugation and detergent-solubilized proteins coupled to Sepharose 4B with cyanogen bromide. Equivalent cell surface plasma membrane proteins were 125I-iodinated and applied to the affinity column. Limb bud cell surface protein affinity chromatography in the presence of exogenous calcium yields a single protein with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 8.5 K. This protein molecule elutes at 0.6 M NaCl, indicating a high affinity, is recognized by the aggregation-inhibiting antiserum, and is

  10. Preparation of single-celled marine dinoflagellates for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truby, E W

    1997-02-15

    Electron microscopy has been used successfully to study and identify single-celled marine dinoflagellates including parasitic ones and others, such as those that cause red tide. Delicate cells can be preserved for scanning electron microscopy with a combined glutaraldehydeosmium tetroxide mixture that is adjusted for the osmolality of the medium. The protocol allows resolution of fine morphological features. Preservation for transmission electron microscopy can be accomplished with a standard glutaraldehyde fixation and osmium-tetroxide post-fixation in a suitable buffer, but again, the osmolality of the mixture must be adjusted. The protocol allows ultrastructural resolution of vesiculated cells and has been modified for small sample sizes.

  11. Application of rice (Oryza sativa L.) suspension culture in studying senescence in vitro (II).: Changes in DNA integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin,Hosseini; Mulligan,Bernard J.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the DNA content and organisation of senescing rice cell cultures (Taipei 309) were studied, using PCR and Southern blot analyses. A mitochondrial gene (coxII), a plastid gene (psaA) and a nuclear DNA maker (RG64) were analysed. The amplification of mitochondrial (mt), plastid and nuclear DNA produced the expected fragments, indicating that there were still some intact organelles and nuclei in the senescing rice cells. However, in plastid and nuclear DNA, changes in the number and s...

  12. ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF WHITE CELL REDUCTION BY 4 WHITE CELL-REDUCTION FILTERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STENEKER, [No Value; VANLUYN, MJA; VANWACHEM, PB; BIEWENGA, J

    The mechanisms of white cell (WBC) reduction in 16-hour-old CPDA-1 red cell (RBC) concentrates by filtration on a column filter and on three different flatbed filters were studied by electron microscopy, with special emphasis on cell-to-cell interaction, cell damage, and interaction of blood cells

  13. Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Mesnard, François; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Bienaimé, Christophe; Robins, Richard J; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2004-05-01

    De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.

  14. Cadmium-induced programmed cell death signaling in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a summary of our study on cadmium-induced cell death signaling in a model system of suspension-cultured tomato cells. Exposure of the cells to CdSO4 induced typical for PCD (cytoplasm shrinkage and nuclear condensation) morphological changes of the dead cells. Ethylene and hydrogen

  15. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    in brain-machine interfaces, for drug delivery and for interfacing with cells. The potential health risks associated with nanostructures are also becoming a more pressing issue with the increased production and use of nanostructures. Developing and testing tools for visualising nanostructures interacting...

  16. Do cell phones affect establishing electronic working length?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurstel, Justine; Guivarc'h, Maud; Pommel, Ludovic; Camps, Jean; Tassery, Hervé; Cohen, Stephen; Bukiet, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Patients often keep their cell phones on and nearby during root canal therapy. Cell phones release electromagnetic interference, which might disturb electronic working length measurements. The purpose of this ex vivo study was to determine the effect of a cell phone (Apple iPhone 5 [Apple, Cupertino, CA] or KP100 [LG, Seoul, Korea]) placed into direct contact with an electronic apex locator (EAL) (Dentaport Root ZX module [J Morita Corp, Tokyo, Japan] or Propex II [Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland]) on working length determination. Twenty-six human premolars without fractures or carious lesions were used; previously cleaned; and observed under magnification (×15) in order to check for the presence of only 1 apical foramen, the absence of apical resorption, an "open" apex, and accessory canals. The working length measurement was performed with a #15 K-file in the presence of 2.6% sodium hypochlorite under 4 conditions: (1) visually, under the microscope until the file tip reached the canal terminus; (2) electronically, without the cell phone in proximity; (3) electronically, with the cell phone in standby mode placed in physical contact with the EAL; and (4) electronically, with the cell phone activated by a call in the same position. The experimental model for electronic working length determination was a screw top plastic container filled with a saline solution. The measurements were repeated 3 times per canal under each condition. Scores of 1 to 3 categorized the stability of the readings as follows: (1) good stability; (2) unstable reading with minor difficulties determining the working length; and (3) major difficulties or impossible to determine the working length. A 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance (way 1: cell phone type and way 2: EAL model) was performed, and a second repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to seek a difference among the 4 working length determination conditions. Neither the cell phone type nor the EAL

  17. A Single-Cell Electronic Sensor of Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupin, D. D.

    2017-11-01

    Here we propose a simple label-free bio-electronic toxin detector based on nondestructive impedance spectroscopy (IS) method with a single living cell as a sensing element. The toxins distort cell membrane, which significantly affects on the impedance level of an electrode, which covered by a cell. This effect could be used for toxin detection. We believe that our bio-sensor will open a new roadmap in water purity purposes and will save many a one lives.

  18. Bioprocess development for mass production of size-controlled human pluripotent stem cell aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Larijani, Mehran Rezaei; Samadian, Azam; Baharvand, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Current protocols for the scalable suspension culture of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are limited by multiple biological and technical challenges that need to be addressed before their use in clinical trials. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a novel bioprocess platform for large-scale expansion of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines as three-dimensional size-controlled aggregates. This novel bioprocess utilizes the stepwise optimization of both static and dynamic suspension culture conditions. After screening eight xeno-free media in static suspension culture and optimizing single-cell passaging in dynamic conditions, the scale-up from a static to a dynamic suspension culture in the stirred bioreactor resulted in a two- to threefold improvement in expansion rates, as measured by cell counts and metabolic activity. We successfully produced size-specific aggregates through optimization of bioreactor hydrodynamic conditions by using combinations of different agitation rates and shear protectant concentrations. The expansion rates were further improved by controlling oxygen concentration at normoxic conditions, and reached a maximum eightfold increase for both types of hPSCs. Subsequently, we demonstrated a simple and rapid scale-up strategy that produced clinically relevant numbers of hPSCs (∼2×10(9) cells) over a 1-month period by the direct transfer of "suspension-adapted frozen cells" to a stirred suspension bioreactor. We omitted the required preadaptation passages in the static suspension culture. The cells underwent proliferation over multiple passages in the demonstrated xeno-free dynamic suspension culture while maintaining their self-renewal capabilities, as determined by marker expressions and in vitro spontaneous differentiation. In conclusion, suspension culture protocols of hPSCs could be used to mass produce homogenous and pluripotent undifferentiated cells by identification and optimization of key bioprocess

  19. Electron tomography of whole cultured cells using novel transmission electron imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Taiga; Shoji, Minami; Hisada, Akiko; Ominami, Yusuke; Ito, Sukehiro; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Nakajima, Masato; Ohshima, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Since a three-dimensional (3D) cellular ultrastructure is significant for biological functions, it has been investigated using various electron microscopic techniques. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques are traditionally used, cells must be embedded in resin and sliced into ultrathin sections in sample preparation processes. Block-face observation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has also been recently applied to 3D observation of cellular components, but this is a destructive inspection and does not allow re-examination. Therefore, we developed electron tomography using a transmission electron imaging technique called Plate-TEM. With Plate-TEM, the cells cultured directly on a scintillator plate are inserted into a conventional SEM equipped with a Plate-TEM observation system, and their internal structures are observed by detecting scintillation light produced by electrons passing through the cells. This technology has the following four advantages. First, the cells cultured on the plate can be observed at electron-microscopic resolution since they remain on the plate. Second, both surface and internal information can be obtained simultaneously by using electron- and photo-detectors, respectively, because a Plate-TEM detector is installed in an SEM. Third, the cells on the scintillator plate can also be inspected using light microscopy because the plate has transparent features. Finally, correlative observation with other techniques, such as conventional TEM, is possible after Plate-TEM observation because Plate-TEM is a non-destructive analysis technique. We also designed a sample stage to tilt the samples for tomography with Plate-TEM, by which 3D organization of cellular structures can be visualized as a whole cell. In the present study, Mm2T cells were investigated using our tomography system, resulting in 3D visualization of cell organelles such as mitochondria, lipid droplets, and microvilli. Correlative observations

  20. Effects of several physiochemical factors on cell growth and gallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... physiochemical factors and chemical substances effect on the cell growth and the production of gallic acid were .... Effect of different combination of 2, 4-D and KT on cell growth and gallic acid production in cell suspension culture. 0.008 mg. ..... a bottleneck in the commercialization of plant cell cultures,.

  1. Digital imaging of stem cells by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathananthan, A Henry; Nottola, Stefania A

    2007-01-01

    This chapter deals with basic techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy applicable to stem cell imaging. It is sometimes desirable to characterize the fine structure of embryonic and adult stem cells to supplement the images obtained by phase-contrast and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy to compare with the microstructure of cells and tissues reported in the literature. This would help confirm their true identity whilst defining their surface and internal morphology. The intention is to put a face on stem cells during their differentiation.

  2. Electron Acceptor Materials Engineering in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huan

    2011-07-15

    Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells with a solar power conversion efficiency of 5.6% are reported. The result is achieved through careful optimization of the titanium dioxide electrode that serves as the electron acceptor. Metal-ion-doped sol-gel-derived titanium dioxide electrodes produce a tunable-bandedge, well-passivated materials platform for CQD solar cell optimization. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. "Sticky electrons" transport and interfacial transfer of electrons in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Laurence

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, also known as Gratzel cells) mimic the photosynthetic process by using a sensitizer dye to harvest light energy to generate electrical power. Several functional features of these photochemical devices are unusual, and DSC research offers a rewarding arena in which to test new ideas, new materials, and new methodologies. Indeed, one of the most attractive chemical features of the DSC is that the basic concept can be used to construct a range of devices, replacing individual components with alternative materials. Despite two decades of increasing research activity, however, many aspects of the behavior of electrons in the DSC remain puzzling. In this Account, we highlight current understanding of the processes involved in the functioning of the DSC, with particular emphasis on what happens to the electrons in the mesoporous film following the injection step. The collection of photoinjected electrons appears to involve a random walk process in which electrons move through the network of interconnected titanium dioxide nanoparticles while undergoing frequent trapping and detrapping. During their passage to the cell contact, electrons may be lost by transfer to tri-iodide species in the redox electrolyte that permeates the mesoporous film. Competition between electron collection and back electron transfer determines the performance of a DSC: ideally, all injected electrons should be collected without loss. This Account then goes on to survey recent experimental and theoretical progress in the field, placing particular emphasis on issues that need to be resolved before we can gain a clear picture of how the DSC works. Several important questions about the behavior of "sticky" electrons, those that undergo multiple trapping and detrapping, in the DSC remain unanswered. The most fundamental of these concerns is the nature of the electron traps that appear to dominate the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage response of DSCs. The

  4. Transmission electron microscopy for thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininghaus, Nies; Schmidt, Vitalij; Hachmann, Wiebke; Heinzmann, Ulrich [Molecular and Surface Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Gruss, Stefan; Stiebig, Helmut [Malibu GmbH and Co. KG, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Thin-film amorphous and microcrystalline silicon are promising materials for photovoltaics as they have the potential to reduce the solar cell costs. In case of microcrystalline silicon the crystalline volume fraction is related to the efficiency factor of solar cells because it provides information about the microstructure of the material and the defect density. With Transmission Electron Microscopy of cross-sections it is possible to show the microstructure of the cells. However to determine the structure of the bulk it is necessary to analyse the diffraction of the electron beam. For the purpose of imaging diffraction patterns and displaying dark fields a new camera system has been installed in the Phillips CM200. With much higher sensitivity and a larger photoactive area it is possible to take images of the low-intensity diffraction and the dark field patterns.

  5. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  6. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  7. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  8. Electron Microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, R.; González, C.; Muñoz, Nubia; Mendoza, Silvia

    1966-01-01

    Virgilio, Rafael (Escuela de Química y Farmacia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), C. González, Nubia Muñoz, and Silvia Mendoza. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis. J. Bacteriol. 91:2018–2024. 1966.—A crude suspension of Staphylococcus aureus cell walls (strain Cowan III) in buffer solution was shown by electron microscopy to lyse slightly after 16 hr, probably owing to the action of autolysin. The lysis was considerably faster and more intense after the addition of lysozyme. A remarkable reduction in thickness and rigidity of the cell walls, together with the appearance of many irregular protrusions in their outlines, was observed after 2 hr; after 16 hr, there remained only a few recognizable cell wall fragments but many residual particulate remnants. When autolysin was previously inactivated by trypsin, there was a complete inhibition of the lytic action of lysozyme; on the other hand, when autolysin was inactivated by heat and lysozyme was added, a distinct decrease in the thickness of the cell walls was observed, but there was no destruction of the walls. The lytic action of lysozyme, after treatment with hot 5% trichloroacetic acid, gave rise to a marked dissolution of the structure of the cell walls, which became lost against the background, without, however, showing ostensible alteration of wall outlines. From a morphological point of view, the lytic action of autolysin plus lysozyme was quite different from that of trichloroacetic acid plus lysozyme, as shown by electron micrographs, but in both cases it was very intense. This would suggest different mechanisms of action for these agents. Images PMID:5939482

  9. A new view into prokaryotic cell biology from electron cryotomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Catherine M; Jensen, Grant J; Chang, Yi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) enables intact cells to be visualized in 3D in an essentially native state to 'macromolecular' (∼4 nm) resolution, revealing the basic architectures of complete nanomachines and their arrangements in situ. Since its inception, ECT has advanced our understanding of many aspects of prokaryotic cell biology, from morphogenesis to subcellular compartmentalization and from metabolism to complex interspecies interactions. In this Review, we highlight how ECT has provided structural and mechanistic insights into the physiology of bacteria and archaea and discuss prospects for the future.

  10. Simple characterization of electronic processes in perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyano, Kenjiro, E-mail: MIYANO.Kenjiro@nims.go.jp; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-03-02

    Electronic properties of perovskite lead-halide photovoltaic cells have been studied. The dc current/voltage characteristics were found to be well fitted by a standard diode equation under optical excitation and in the dark, while the impedance spectroscopy revealed a pronounced slow process under light illumination, which is absent in the dark. A simple model is proposed, which can explain all aspects of the observed behavior quantitatively and consistently.

  11. Efficient electron open boundaries for simulating electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauchner, Mario G.; Horsfield, Andrew P.; Todorov, Tchavdar N.

    2018-01-01

    Nonequilibrium electrochemistry raises new challenges for atomistic simulation: we need to perform molecular dynamics for the nuclear degrees of freedom with an explicit description of the electrons, which in turn must be free to enter and leave the computational cell. Here we present a limiting form for electron open boundaries that we expect to apply when the magnitude of the electric current is determined by the drift and diffusion of ions in a solution and which is sufficiently computationally efficient to be used with molecular dynamics. We present tight-binding simulations of a parallel-plate capacitor with nothing, a dimer, or an atomic wire situated in the space between the plates. These simulations demonstrate that this scheme can be used to perform molecular dynamics simulations when there is an applied bias between two metal plates with, at most, weak electronic coupling between them. This simple system captures some of the essential features of an electrochemical cell, suggesting this approach might be suitable for simulations of electrochemical cells out of equilibrium.

  12. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider

    2017-08-15

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21.6% obtained on n-type cells, featuring SiO2/TiO2/Al rear contacts and after forming gas annealing (FGA) at 350°C, is due to strong surface passivation of SiO2/TiO2 stack as well as low contact resistivity at the Si/SiO2/TiO2 heterojunction. This can be attributed to the transformation of amorphous TiO2 to a conducting TiO2-x phase. Conversely, the low efficiency (9.8%) obtained on cells featuring an a-Si:H/TiO2/Al rear contact is due to severe degradation of passivation of the a-Si:H upon FGA.

  14. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  15. Morphological aspects of giant cells in giant cell arteritis: an electron-microscopic and immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, E; Bengtsson, B A; Petursdottir, V; Nordborg, C

    1997-01-01

    To compare the morphology of foreign body and Langhans giant cells in the two different inflammatory phases of giant cell arteritis (GCA). Electron microscopy was performed on 6 positive temporal arterial biopsies. Light microscopy and immunocytochemistry for macrophage-associated antigen (KP1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) were performed on 16 positive biopsies. A focal granulomatous reaction with foreign body giant cells was found only in association with the internal elastic membrane (IEM) in atrophic arterial segments, which often displayed calcification of the IEM. Diffuse invasion of lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages affected non-atrophic as well as atrophic arterial segments. Within such segments Langhans giant cells were found in all layers of the wall. Electron microscopy of biopsies displaying the focal foreign body reaction revealed that large cells devoid of lysosomes but with cytoplasmic densities, tightly packed cytoplasmic filaments and numerous micropinocytotic vesicles formed clusters close to calcified parts of the internal elastic membrane. Furthermore, foreign body giant cells were surrounded by large cells devoid of lysosomes. Lysosomes tended to concentrate in central parts of the foreign body giant cells. In the diffusely inflamed arteries, the Langhans giant cells were surrounded by mononuclear cells rich in lysosomes. The lysosomes in the Langhans giant cells were more evenly distributed than in foreign body giant cells. Immunocytochemistry of biopsies displaying the focal granulomatous reaction revealed an uneven, often central immunoreactivity for the macrophage marker (KP1) in the foreign body giant cells, and immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle antigen (alpha-SMA) showed their poor delineation from the surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. The Langhans giant cells in the diffusely inflamed arteries displayed a strong even cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for KP1 and a distinct delineation from the smooth muscle cells

  16. Reelin expression in brain endothelial cells: an electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Fenton, Erin Y; Caruncho, Hector J

    2015-03-24

    Reelin expression and function have been extensively studied in the brain, although its expression has been also reported in other tissues including blood. This raises the possibility that reelin might be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could be functionally relevant. Up-to-date no studies have been conducted to assess if reelin is present in the blood-brain barrier, which is mainly constituted by tightly packed endothelial cells. In this report we assessed the expression of reelin in brain capillaries using immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. At the light microscope, reelin immunolabeling appeared in specific endothelial cells in brain areas that presented abundant diffuse labeling for this protein (e.g., layer I of the cortex, or the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus), while it was mostly absent from capillaries in other brain areas (e.g., deeper cortical layers, or the CA1 layer of the hippocampus). As expected, at the electron microscope reelin labeling was observed in neurons of the cortex, where most of the labeling was associated with the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, reelin was also observed in some endothelial cells located in small capillaries, which confirmed the findings obtained at the light microscope. In these cells, reelin labeling was located primarily in caveolae (i.e., vesicles of transcytosis), and associated with the plasma membrane of the luminal side of endothelial cells. In addition, some scarce labeling was observed in the nuclear membrane. The presence of reelin immunolabeling in brain endothelial cells, and particularly in caveolar vesicles within these cells, suggests that reelin and/or reelin peptides may be able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which could have important physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications.

  17. Induced accumulation of 20-hydroxyecdysone in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the effects of culture medium, culture temperature, sucrose concentration and cholesterol feeding on cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production in suspension cultures of Vitex glabrata, an important medicinal plant in Thailand. Cell growth and 20-hydroxyecdysone production were not significantly ...

  18. Mevastatin-induced inhibition of cell growth in avocado suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell suspension cultures were established using soft, friable callus derived from nucellar tissue of 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana Mill.) seed from fruit harvested 190 days after full bloom. Cell cultures were maintained in liquid medium supplemented with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), isopentenyl adenine (iP) and ...

  19. Immunogenicity of an adeno-vector vaccine expressing the F protein of a respiratory syncytial virus manufactured from serum-free suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Huai-Sheng; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Hu, Kai-Chieh; Chang, Ching-Kun; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an efficient cell culture process to scale up the production of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses the membrane-trunked fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; Ad-F0ΔTM). Adherent cells of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293-derived cell, 293A, which supports the production of E1/E3-deleted Ad-F0ΔTM when cultured in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), were adapted to suspension growth under serum-free medium. In doing so, we studied the immunogenicity of Ad-F0ΔTMsus, which propagated in a bioreactor that was cultured with serum-free suspension of 293A, in comparison with Ad-F0ΔTMadh, which was produced from parental 293A cells that were adherently cultured in medium containing FBS. The size and morphology of Ad-F0ΔTMsus and Ad-F0ΔTMadh virions were identical upon inspection with electron microscopy. The results showed that anti-F IgG and RSV-neutralizing titer were raised in the serum of both mice that were intranasally immunized twice with Ad-F0ΔTMsus or Ad-F0ΔTMadh at two-week injection intervals. Furthermore, the immune responses persisted for six months after vaccination. Activation of F protein-specific CD8(+) T cell's epitope associated IFN-ɣ and IL-4 was induced in both Ad-F0ΔTMsus- and Ad-F0ΔTMadh, but not in Ad-LacZsus, -immunized mouse splenocytes. No vaccine-enhanced lung inflammation, airway mucus occlusion or eosinophils infiltration were observed in Ad-immunized mice followed by RSV challenge; however, these symptoms were observed following immunization with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. These results indicate that the safety and potency of Ad-F0ΔTM produced from either adherent cells or suspension and serum-free cells are the same. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    with animage corrector and a differential pumping system.A symmetric cell was prepared by depositing a cell consisting of three thin films on a strontium titanate (STO)single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Lanthanum strontium cobaltite La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC)was chosen as electrode....... Comparing the two figures, the cell exposed tooxygen showed structural changes in the LSC thin film in comparison with the sample heated in vacuum. Thesechanges refer to the formation of grains as is confirmed by electron diffraction patterns....... have been often used for ex-situpost mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of themicrostructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in-situ studies are necessary [4]. Thedevelopment of advanced TEM chips and holders makes...

  1. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  2. Establishment of callus, cell suspension and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. and diterpene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, W

    1995-10-01

    Callus cultures, cell suspension cultures and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. (Motherwort) were established and growth conditions optimized. Shoot cultures showed constant growth whether in the dark or under continuous light, accumulating varying amounts of the furanic labdane diterpenes leosibiricin, preleosibirin, leosibirin and isoballotenol acetate, which are also present in the soil-grown plants. Only traces of leosibiricin were detected in callus cultures, while cell suspension cultures did not produce any furanic diterpenes. A small amount of furanic labdane diterpenes was found in the medium of shoot cultures. Callus and shoot culture induction of several other Lamiaceae species is also described.

  3. Growth of Suspension Cultured Cell of Populus euphratica, Populus alba cv. Pyramidalis and Populus maximowiczii×Populus plantierensis in NaCl Containing Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hailong; Watanabe, Shin; IDE, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    Populus euphratica, Populus alba cv. Pyramidalis, Populus maximowiczii×Populus plantierensisの3種のポプラの培養細胞について,培地へのNaClの添加量を徐々に増加させた場合の耐性を評価した。NaClを添加した最初の培養では,P. euphratica, P. maximowiczii×P. plantierensisの細胞は,200mMのNaCl添加では成長が著しく抑制された。また,P. alba cv. Pyramidalisの細胞では150mMのNaCl添加で成長が抑制された。しかし,培養を繰り返すうちに細胞はNaClに対する適応性を発達させ,6回目の継代培養終了時には,P. euphraticaの細胞は200mM, P. alba cv. Pyramidalisの細胞は150mMのNaCl添加培地でも良好な成長が可能になった。しかし,P. maximowiczii×P. plantierensisの細胞は,100mMまででしか良好な成長を示さなくなった。高NaCl条件下において種ごと...

  4. Protective Effects of Tormentic Acid, a Major Component of Suspension Cultures of Eriobotrya japonica Cells, on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ping Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An acetaminophen (APAP overdose can cause hepatotoxicity and lead to fatal liver damage. The hepatoprotective effects of tormentic acid (TA on acetaminophen (APAP-induced liver damage were investigated in mice. TA was intraperitoneally (i.p. administered for six days prior to APAP administration. Pretreatment with TA prevented the elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (T-Bil, total cholesterol (TC, triacylglycerol (TG, and liver lipid peroxide levels in APAP-treated mice and markedly reduced APAP-induced histological alterations in liver tissues. Additionally, TA attenuated the APAP-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β, and IL-6. Furthermore, the Western blot analysis showed that TA blocked the protein expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, as well as the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs activation in APAP-injured liver tissues. TA also retained the superoxidase dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT in the liver. These results suggest that the hepatoprotective effects of TA may be related to its anti-inflammatory effect by decreasing thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activation. Antioxidative properties were also observed, as shown by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction in the liver, and decreases in lipid peroxides and ROS. Therefore, TA may be a potential therapeutic candidate for the prevention of APAP-induced liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation.

  5. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  6. Sensing lymphoma cells based on a cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu, E-mail: kzsuga@maebashi-it.ac.jp [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Shinohara, Hiroki; Kadoya, Toshihiko [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Kuramitz, Hideki [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-14

    To electrochemically sense lymphoma cells (U937), we fabricated a multifunctional peptide probe that consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. Electron-transfer peptides derive from cysteine residue combined with the C-terminals of four tyrosine residues (Y{sub 4}). A peptide whereby Y{sub 4}C is bound to the C-terminals of protegrin 1 (RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH{sub 2}) is known to be an apoptosis-inducing agent against U937 cells, and is referred to as a peptide-1 probe. An oxidation response of the peptide-1 probe has been observed due to a phenolic hydroxyl group, and this response is decreased by the uptake of the peptide probe into the cells. To improve the cell membrane permeability against U937 cells, the RGGR at the N-terminals of the peptide-1 probe was replaced by RRRR (peptide-2 probe). In contrast, RNRCKGTDVQAWY{sub 4}C (peptide-3 probe), which recognizes ovalbumin, was constructed as a control. Compared with the other probes, the change in the peak current of the peptide-2 probe was the greatest at low concentrations and occurred in a short amount of time. Therefore, the cell membrane permeability of the peptide-2 probe was increased based on the arginine residues and the apoptosis-inducing peptides. The peak current was linear and ranged from 100 to 1000 cells/ml. The relative standard deviation of 600 cells/ml was 5.0% (n = 5). Furthermore, the membrane permeability of the peptide probes was confirmed using fluorescent dye. - Highlights: • We constructed a multifunctional peptide probe for the electrochemical sensing of lymphoma cells. • The peptide probe consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. • The electrode response of the peptide probe changes due to selective uptake into the cells.

  7. Electron injection and scaffold effects in perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Miguel; Zhang, Wei; Hames, Bruno Clasen; Li, Yuelong; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Calvo, Mauricio E; Snaith, Henry J; Míguez, Hernán; Mora-Seró, Iván

    2017-01-21

    In spite of the impressive efficiencies reported for perovskite solar cells (PSCs), key aspects of their working principles, such as electron injection at the contacts or the suitability of the utilization of a specific scaffold layer, are not yet fully understood. Increasingly complex scaffolds attained by the sequential deposition of TiO2 and SiO2 mesoporous layers onto transparent conducting substrates are used to perform a systematic characterization of both the injection process at the electron selective contact and the scaffold effect in PSCs. By forcing multiple electron injection processes at a controlled sequence of perovskite-TiO2 interfaces before extraction, interfacial injection effects are magnified and hence characterized in detail. An anomalous injection behavior is observed, the fingerprint of which is the presence of significant inductive loops in the impedance spectra with a magnitude that correlates with the number of interfaces in the scaffold. Analysis of the resistive and capacitive behavior of the impedance spectra indicates that the scaffolds could hinder ion migration, with positive consequences such as lowering the recombination rate and implications for the current-potential curve hysteresis. Our results suggest that an appropriate balance between these advantageous effects and the unavoidable charge transport resistive losses introduced by the scaffolds will help in the optimization of PSC performance.

  8. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  9. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  10. Enhancement of 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell suspension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most effective. The maximum 20-hydroxyecdysone productivity of about 1.31 mg/L/day was observed in culture with 10 mg/L 7-dehydrocholesterol. This data is the first indication that 7-dehydrocholesterol and ergosterol feeding are effective precursors for 20-hydroxyecdysone formation in plant cell suspension culture.

  11. Biofuel cell as a power source for electronic contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Magnus; Andoralov, Viktor; Blum, Zoltan; Sotres, Javier; Suyatin, Dmitry B; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Arnebrant, Thomas; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Here we present unequivocal experimental proof that microscale cofactor- and membrane-less, direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells do produce significant amounts of electrical energy in human lachrymal liquid (tears). 100 μm diameter gold wires, covered with 17 nm gold nanoparticles, were used to fashion three-dimensional nanostructured microelectrodes, which were biomodified with Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of miniature glucose/oxygen biodevices operating in human tears were registered: 0.57 V open-circuit voltage, about 1 μW cm(-2) maximum power density at a cell voltage of 0.5 V, and more than 20 h operational half-life. Theoretical calculations regarding the maximum recoverable electrical energy can be extracted from the biofuel and the biooxidant, glucose and molecular oxygen, each readily available in human lachrymal liquid, fully support our belief that biofuel cells can be used as electrical power sources for so called smart contact lenses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlative cryo-electron tomography and optical microscopy of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peijun

    2013-10-01

    The biological processes occurring in a cell are complex and dynamic, and to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, both temporal and spatial information is required. While cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) provides three-dimensional (3D) still pictures of near-native state cells and organelles at molecular resolution, fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) offers movies of dynamic cellular processes in living cells. Combining and integrating these two commonly used imaging modalities (termed correlative microscopy) provides a powerful means to not only expand the imaging scale and resolution but also to complement the dynamic information available from optical microscopy with the molecular-level, 3D ultrastructure detail provided by cryoET. As such, a correlative approach performed on a given specimen can provide high resolution snapshots of dynamic cellular events. In this article, I review recent advances in correlative light microscopy and cryoET and discuss major findings made available by applying this method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION ON THE GROWTH OF CATTAIL CALLUS CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation examined the growth of Typha latifolia (cattail) callus cells grown in 5 different (0, 11, 22, 33, 44, jg/L(-1) phosphosur concentrations. The cells were grown for two successive subcultures on semi-solid media, and subsequently in suspension culture with the s...

  14. A holder assembly for cooperating with an environmental cell and an electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, H.W.; Pleun, D.; Van Veen, G.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a holder assembly for cooperating with an environmental cell ( 101 ) and an electron microscope, the environmental cell showing a fluid inlet (103), the electron microscope showing a vacuum wall (110) for separating an evacuable part of the electron microscope from the

  15. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  16. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäcke, Olof, E-mail: obacke@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kristiansen, Per Magnus [Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology (INKA), FHNW University of Applied Science and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Olsson, Eva, E-mail: eva.olsson@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV–vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000 kGy. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of a polymer: fullerne blend is increased using electron irradiation. • Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy the nanostructure is studied. • Electron irradiation stops phase separation between the polymer and fullerene. • Electron irradiation quenches the formation and nucleation of fullerene crystals.

  18. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two years results of electronic brachytherapy for basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Ballester-Sánchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The use of radiation therapy (RT for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC has been changing throughout the last century. Over the last decades, the use of radiotherapy has surged with the development of new techniques, applicators, and devices. In recent years, electronic brachytherapy (eBT devices that use small x-ray sources have been introduced as alternative to radionuclide dependence. Nowadays, several devices have been incorporated, with a few series reported, and with a short follow-up, due to the recent introduction of these systems. The purpose of this work is to describe the clinical results of our series after two years follow-up with a specific eBT system. Material and methods: This is a prospective single-center, non-randomized pilot study, to assess clinical results of electronic brachytherapy in basal cell carcinoma using the Esteya® system. In 2014, 40 patients with 60 lesions were treated. Patient follow-up on a regular basis was performed for a period of two years. Results: Twenty-six patients with 44 lesions achieved two years follow-up. A complete response was documented in 95.5% of cases. Toxicity was mild (G1 or G2 in all cases, caused by erythema, erosion, or alopecia. Cosmesis was excellent in 88.6% of cases, and good in the rest. Change in pigmentation was the most frequent cosmetic alteration. Conclusions : This work is special, since the equipment’s treatment voltage was 69.5 kV, and this is the first prospective study with long term follow-up with Esteya®. These preliminary report show excellent results with less toxicity and excellent cosmesis. While surgery has been the treatment of choice, certain patients might benefit from eBT treatment. These are elderly patients with comorbidities or undergoing anticoagulant treatment as well as those who simply refuse surgery or might have other contraindications.

  20. AN IMPROVED WHITE CELL DILUENT FOR USE WITH THE EEL ELECTRONIC BLOOD CELL COUNTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F.; Rickards, A. G.

    1960-01-01

    An improved white cell diluent for use with the Eel electronic counter is described. It possesses advantages over previously described diluents in the rapidity of its action as a red cell stromalysin and in its ability to conserve surviving leucocytes for long periods of time. These properties enable counts to be made either immediately after preparation of the suspension or several hours later. The diluent is equally suitable for use with capillary or venous blood samples. When used for counting leucocytes it has been found necessary to effect a minor modification to the machine whereby the light intensity is reduced by approximately one-half. PMID:13837137

  1. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  2. Ultrastructural Evidence of Exosome Secretion by Progenitor Cells in Adult Mouse Myocardium and Adult Human Cardiospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Barile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The demonstration of beneficial effects of cell therapy despite the persistence of only few transplanted cells in vivo suggests secreted factors may be the active component of this treatment. This so-called paracrine hypothesis is supported by observations that culture media conditioned by progenitor cells contain growth factors that mediate proangiogenic and cytoprotective effects. Cardiac progenitor cells in semi-suspension culture form spherical clusters (cardiospheres that deliver paracrine signals to neighboring cells. A key component of paracrine secretion is exosomes, membrane vesicles that are stored intracellularly in endosomal compartments and are secreted when these structures fuse with the cell plasma membrane. Exosomes have been identified as the active component of proangiogenic effects of bone marrow CD34+ stem cells in mice and the regenerative effects of embryonic mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts in pigs and mice. Here, we provide electron microscopic evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in mouse myocardium and human cardiospheres. Exosomes are emerging as an attractive vector of paracrine signals delivered by progenitor cells. They can be stored as an “off-the-shelf” product. As such, exosomes have the potential for circumventing many of the limitations of viable cells for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

  3. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  4. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2017-01-17

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication 'bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  5. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication `bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  6. Enhanced Electronic Properties of SnO2 via Electron Transfer from Graphene Quantum Dots for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangsheng; Huang, Kun; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Zhengrui; Xiao, Ke; Qiang, Yaping; Zhu, Xiaodong; Xu, Lingbo; Wang, Peng; Cui, Can; Yang, Deren

    2017-09-26

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) has been demonstrated as an effective electron-transporting layer (ETL) for attaining high-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs). However, the numerous trap states in low-temperature solution processed SnO2 will reduce the PSCs performance and result in serious hysteresis. Here, we report a strategy to improve the electronic properties in SnO2 through a facile treatment of the films with adding a small amount of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). We demonstrate that the photogenerated electrons in GQDs can transfer to the conduction band of SnO2. The transferred electrons from the GQDs will effectively fill the electron traps as well as improve the conductivity of SnO2, which is beneficial for improving the electron extraction efficiency and reducing the recombination at the ETLs/perovskite interface. The device fabricated with SnO2:GQDs could reach an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 19.2 ± 1.0% and a highest steady-state PCE of 20.23% with very little hysteresis. Our study provides an effective way to enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells through improving the electronic properties of SnO2.

  7. Culturing immobilized plant cells for the TUBUL space experiments on the DELTA and 12S Missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Emons, A.M.C.; Vos, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract For the TUBUL experiments during the DELTA mission in April 2004 and 12S mission in March/April 2006 on board the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station we developed a method to culture and chemically fix plant suspension culture cells. The aim of the ten day experiment was to

  8. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm.

  9. 75 FR 64248 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority Foreign-Trade Zone 196 ATC Logistics & Electronics (Cell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... & Electronics (Cell Phone Kitting) Fort Worth, TX Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of... following Order: Whereas, ATC Logistics & Electronics (ATCLE), an operator of Foreign-Trade Zone 196, has... procedures within FTZ 196 on behalf of ATC Logistics & Electronics, as described in the application and...

  10. A new strategy to enhance the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol by overexpressing stilbene synthase gene in elicited Vitis vinifera cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Mingyu; Pedreño, M A; Alburquerque, Nuria; Faize, Lydia; Burgos, Lorenzo; Almagro, Lorena

    2017-04-01

    In this work, transgenic lines of suspension cultured cells of Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell containing the plasmid pMOG800-sts have been obtained. The cell growth of these transgenic cell lines decreased slightly as compared to non-transgenic suspension cultured cells, while cell viability was not affected. In addition, the elicitation with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate enhanced the production of trans-resveratrol, observing the highest levels of this compound in sts-expressing transgenic Vitis suspension cultured cells with the sts expression cassette in the forwards orientation. Moreover, the forwards 2 (F2) transgenic cell line produced the greater levels of trans-resveratrol in comparison with the non-transgenic cell line. In fact, when suspension cultured cells were treated with both elicitors, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol outside the cells in the F2 transgenic suspension cultured cells increased twice (1458 mg.L-1) as compared to non-transgenic cell lines (724 mg.L-1). In both cases, the levels of trans-resveratrol detected in the treatment with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate were greater than the sum of the individual treatments, and therefore we observed a synergistic effect in the presence of both elicitors. Moreover, the expression profile of sts gene in transgenic V. vinifera cell lines was similar to the expression profile detected for the endogenous sts gene in non-transgenic V. vinifera cell lines, being the expression levels greater in the treatment with methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, which was related to the high levels of trans-resveratrol found in the presence of both elicitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labeling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

  12. Chapter 14: Electron Microscopy on Thin Films for Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Manuel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Abou-Ras, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB); Nichterwitz, Melanie [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB); Schmidt, Sebastian S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB)

    2016-07-22

    This chapter overviews the various techniques applied in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and highlights their possibilities and also limitations. It gives the various imaging and analysis techniques applied on a scanning electron microscope. The chapter shows that imaging is divided into that making use of secondary electrons (SEs) and of backscattered electrons (BSEs), resulting in different contrasts in the images and thus providing information on compositions, microstructures, and surface potentials. Whenever aiming for imaging and analyses at scales of down to the angstroms range, TEM and its related techniques are appropriate tools. In many cases, also SEM techniques provide the access to various material properties of the individual layers, not requiring specimen preparation as time consuming as TEM techniques. Finally, the chapter dedicates to cross-sectional specimen preparation for electron microscopy. The preparation decides indeed on the quality of imaging and analyses.

  13. Generation of functionally competent single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells from cell aggregates using the neutral protease dispase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, Gale L

    2004-08-30

    A simple and efficient procedure has been developed to enzymatically dissociate aggregates of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in suspension culture into viable, responsive single cells. For dissociation, the neutral protease dispase is added directly to the culture medium for a minimum of 3 h, followed by incubation of the cells in Hank's calcium-magnesium-free balanced salt solution at 37 degrees C with intermittent trituration to facilitate dispersion. This procedure generates a population of phase-bright single cells that are round in morphology, take up the dye neutral red, exclude the dye trypan blue and readily attach to tissue culture dishes coated with collagen, fibronectin or polylysine, thereby permitting applications that require plated-down conditions. When transferred to culture medium, the cells begin to reaggregate. By altering the length of time the cells are incubated in culture medium prior to attachment, the degree of reaggregation can be controlled to obtain plate-down profiles that consist of both isolated cells and cells in aggregates of varying sizes. Returning dissociated cells to suspension culture results in the reformation of large cell aggregates. Several measures of chromaffin cell function were indistinguishable for dissociated cells placed either in monolayer culture or suspension culture versus non-dissociated cells, implying that the dissociation procedure does not alter cellular responses or cause cellular damage.

  14. Intracellular salicylic acid is involved in signal cascade regulating low ammonium-induced taxoid biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2011-05-01

    It was previously reported that low initial ammonium (2 mM) in medium had significant stimulating effects on the biosynthesis of taxuyunnanine C (Tc) by Taxus chinensis cells. However, the secondary metabolism induction mechanism of the low initial ammonium is yet unknown in plant cells. To provide an insight into the defense signals response to the low initial ammonium, oxidative burst and intracellular salicylic acid (SA) were detected, and their influences on the expression of important genes in taxoid biosynthetic pathway were examined in the cell cultures of T. chinensis. Induced H(2)O(2) production, elevated phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, and enhanced SA biosynthesis were observed. Interestingly, inhibition of SA biosynthesis by paclobutrazol and (BOC-aminooxy) acetic acid significantly depressed the Tc stimulation and up-regulation of Tc biosynthetic genes of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase and taxadiene synthase. The role of intracellular SA in regulating Tc biosynthesis was further confirmed by applying exogenous SA in normal ammonium (20 mM) medium. The results indicated that SA acted as a signal in low initial ammonium-induced Tc biosynthesis. A signal transduction cascade from defense signal response to activated transcription of taxoid biosynthetic genes and enhanced Tc production is proposed.

  15. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Carmona, Mercè; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Bañó, M Carmen; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2017-06-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  16. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Boronat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR. RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  17. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  18. Electronic circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dachuan; Yuvarajan, S.

    The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is being investigated as an alternate power source for various applications like transportation and emergency power supplies. The paper presents a novel circuit model for a PEM fuel cell that can be used to design and analyze fuel cell power systems. The PSPICE-based model uses bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and LC elements available in the PSPICE library with some modification. The model includes the phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The static and dynamic characteristics obtained through simulation are compared with experimental results obtained on a commercial fuel cell module.

  19. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  1. Radiobiological Effectiveness of Ultrashort Laser-Driven Electron Bunches: Micronucleus Frequency, Telomere Shortening and Cell Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Borghini, Andrea; Pulignani, Silvia; Baffigi, Federica; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Koester, Petra; Cresci, Monica; Vecoli, Cecilia; Lamia, Debora; Russo, Giorgio; Panetta, Daniele; Tripodi, Maria; Gizzi, Leonida A; Labate, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven electron accelerators are capable of producing high-energy electron bunches in shorter distances than conventional radiofrequency accelerators. To date, our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells exposed to electrons using a laser-plasma accelerator is still very limited. In this study, we compared the dose-response curves for micronucleus (MN) frequency and telomere length in peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to laser-driven electron pulse and X-ray radiations. Additionally, we evaluated the effects on cell survival of in vitro tumor cells after exposure to laser-driven electron pulse compared to electron beams produced by a conventional radiofrequency accelerator used for intraoperative radiation therapy. Blood samples from two different donors were exposed to six radiation doses ranging from 0 to 2 Gy. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for micronucleus induction was calculated from the alpha coefficients for electrons compared to X rays (RBE = alpha laser/alpha X rays). Cell viability was monitored in the OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell line using trypan blue exclusion assay at day 3, 5 and 7 postirradiation (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy). The RBE values obtained by comparing the alpha values were 1.3 and 1.2 for the two donors. Mean telomere length was also found to be reduced in a significant dose-dependent manner after irradiation with both electrons and X rays in both donors studied. Our findings showed a radiobiological response as mirrored by the induction of micronuclei and shortening of telomere as well as by the reduction of cell survival in blood samples and cancer cells exposed in vitro to laser-generated electron bunches. Additional studies are needed to improve preclinical validation of the radiobiological characteristics and efficacy of laser-driven electron accelerators in the future.

  2. Detection of smell print differences between nonmalignant and malignant prostate cells with an electronic nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roine, Antti; Tolvanen, Mikko; Sipiläinen, Miki; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Helenius, Merja A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Keinänen, Tuomo A; Häkkinen, Merja R; Koskimäki, Juha; Veskimäe, Erik; Tuokko, Antti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Tammela, Teuvo L; Sioris, Thanos; Paavonen, Timo; Lekkala, Jukka; Helle, Hannu; Oksala, Niku K J

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether an electronic nose can differentiate cultured nonmalignant and malignant prostatic cells from each other and whether the smell print is secreted to the surrounding medium. Prostatic nonmalignant (EP-156T and controls) and malignant (LNCaP) cell lines, as well as conditioned and unconditioned media, were collected. The smell prints of the samples were analyzed by a ChemPro(®) 100 electronic nose device. The data were normalized and dimension reduction was conducted. The samples were classified and misclassification rates were calculated. The electronic nose differentiated the nonmalignant and malignant cell lines from each other, achieving misclassification rates of 2.9-3.6%. Cells did not differ from the conditioned medium but differed from the unconditioned medium (misclassification rates: 0.0-25.6%). Malignant and nonmalignant prostatic cell lines have distinct smell prints. Prostatic cancer cells seem to modify the smell print of their medium.

  3. Efficient and Environmentally Stable Perovskite Solar Cells Based on ZnO Electron Collection Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Jiaxing; Bian, Ji; Zheng, Enqiang; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Wenjing; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    ZnO thin films prepared by spin-coating of nanoparticles at low temperature were utilized as the electron collection layer in CH3NH3PbI3-based perovskite solar cells having a planar heterojunction structure...

  4. A genetically encoded tag for correlated light and electron microscopy of intact cells, tissues, and organisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu, Xiaokun; Lev-Ram, Varda; Deerinck, Thomas J; Qi, Yingchuan; Ramko, Ericka B; Davidson, Michael W; Jin, Yishi; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y

    2011-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) achieves the highest spatial resolution in protein localization, but specific protein EM labeling has lacked generally applicable genetically encoded tags for in situ visualization in cells and tissues...

  5. Realization of an Electronic Load for Testing Low Power PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordje Šaponjić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A realized electronic load system intended for testing and characterization of hydrogen fuel sells is described. The system is based on microcontroller PIC16F877 by applying the concept of virtual instrumentation. The accomplished accuracy of the developed electronic system allows performing efficiently investigations of the electro-chemical phenomena involved in the process of designing hydrogen fuel cells.

  6. Electron transport in acceptor-sensitized polymer-oxide solar cells: the importance of surface dipoles and electron cascade effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhe, Seare A; Zhou, Joy Y; Haynes, Keith M; Rodriguez, Marco T; Youngblood, W Justin

    2012-06-27

    Fullerene and acenequinone compounds have been examined as electron mediators between a p-type semiconductive polymer and two n-type oxide semiconductors. Composite interlayer materials and photovoltaic test cells were assembled and studied for their fluorescence quenching, current-voltage, and quantum efficiency behavior to characterize the efficacy of the acceptor-sensitizers as electron-selective interlayers. The sensitizers are generally more effective with titanium dioxide than with zinc oxide, due to the difference in magnitude of dipole-induced vacuum level shifts at the respective oxide interfaces. In titanium dioxide-based solar cells, where dipole effects are weak, photovoltage and fill factor increase in a trend that matches the increase in the first reduction potential of the acceptor-sensitizers. Photosensitization of the oxide semiconductor by the acceptor-sensitizers is observed to operate either in parallel with the polymer as an alternate photosensitizer or in series with the polymer in a two-photon process, according to an acceptor-sensitizer's first reduction potential. In zinc oxide-based solar cells, where dipole effects are stronger, the acceptor-sensitizers impaired most devices, which is attributed to an upward shift of the oxide's conduction band edge caused by dipole-induced vacuum level shifts. These results have broad implications for designing electron-selective interlayers and solid-state photocells using sensitized oxide semiconductors.

  7. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  8. Distribution of Epithelial Cells and Their Relationship to Immunocompetent Cells in Rat Molars: A Confocal and Transmission Electron Microscope Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Osamu; Kawahara, Ichiro; Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska; Inoue, Katsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the distribution of cytokeratin (CK)-immunopositive cells and their relationship to immunocompetent ED1- and OX6-immunopositive cells in rat periodontium by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. CK-immunopositive cells were generally distributed along the surface of the tooth root. They could also be found between root dentin and cementum, in the perivascular space, and close to or in the alveolar bone lacunae. ED1-immunopositive cells exhibited a compact shape with small processes and were widely distributed in the periodontium. Few sections demonstrated an intimate relationship between the CK- and ED1-immunopositive cells close to the cementum, in the perivascular space, and close to or in the alveolar bone. Numerous OX6-immunopositive cells with long branching processes were widely distributed in the periodontal ligament, surrounding and holding CK-immunopositive cells in the cell clusters, close to the cementum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed OX6-immunopositive cells that extended their cytoplasmic processes, which contained vesicles and occasionally lysosomes in between the epithelial cells. This study demonstrates the close relationship between the epithelial cells and the immunocompetent cells in a rat periodontium, indicating a functional interrelationship. It is possible that in a non-inflammatory periodontium, the epithelial cells act not independently, but through interaction with immunocompetent cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:315–325, 2009) PMID:19029402

  9. Electron-phonon energy transfer in hot-carrier solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luque López, Antonio; Martí Vega, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Hot-carrier solar cells may yield very high efficiency if the heat transfer from electrons to phonons is low enough. In this paper we calculate this heat transfer for the two inelastic mechanisms known to limit the electric conductivity: the multi-valley scattering in non-polar semiconductors and the coupling of electrons to longitudinal optical phonons in polar semiconductors. Heat transfer is ruled by matrix elements deduced from electric conductivity measurements. The cell power extracted ...

  10. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  11. Correlated fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Cheri M; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hammonds, Jason E; Alonas, Eric; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Storms, Rachel E; Leon, Fredrick; Melikyan, Gregory B; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) combines spatiotemporal information from fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) with high-resolution structural data from cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). These technologies provide opportunities to bridge knowledge gaps between cell and structural biology. Here we describe our protocol for correlated cryo-fLM, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-ET (i.e., cryo-CLEM) of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells. Mammalian-derived cells are cultured on EM substrates, using optimized conditions that ensure that the cells are spread thinly across the substrate and are not physically disrupted. The cells are then screened by fLM and vitrified before acquisition of cryo-fLM and cryo-ET images, which is followed by data processing. A complete session from grid preparation through data collection and processing takes 5-15 d for an individual experienced in cryo-EM.

  12. Electron migration and stability of dye solar cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Lukas J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitised photoelectrochemical solar cells with four different electrolyte combinations were assembled and characterised using current voltage measurements. The effects that the solvents (acetonitrile - ACN and propionitrile - PN) have...

  13. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  14. Electron-transfer kinetics in cyanobacterial cells: methyl viologen is a poor inhibitor of linear electron flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sétif, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor methyl viologen (MV) has been widely used in photosynthesis to study oxidative stress. Its effects on electron transfer kinetics in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells were studied to characterize its electron-accepting properties. For the first hundreds of flashes following MV addition at submillimolar concentrations, the kinetics of NADPH formation were hardly modified (less than 15% decrease in signal amplitude) with a significant signal decrease only observed after more flashes or continuous illumination. The dependence of the P700 photooxidation kinetics on the MV concentration exhibited a saturation effect at 0.3 mM MV, a concentration which inhibits the recombination reactions in photosystem I. The kinetics of NADPH formation and decay under continuous light with MV at 0.3 mM showed that MV induces the oxidation of the NADP pool in darkness and that the yield of linear electron transfer decreased by only 50% after 1.5-2 photosystem-I turnovers. The unexpectedly poor efficiency of MV in inhibiting NADPH formation was corroborated by in vitro flash-induced absorption experiments with purified photosystem-I, ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. These experiments showed that the second-order rate constants of MV reduction are 20 to 40-fold smaller than the competing rate constants involved in reduction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP(+)-oxidoreductase. The present study shows that MV, which accepts electrons in vivo both at the level of photosystem-I and ferredoxin, can be used at submillimolar concentrations to inhibit recombination reactions in photosystem-I with only a moderate decrease in the efficiency of fast reactions involved in linear electron transfer and possibly cyclic electron transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methods of Monte Carlo electron transport in particle-in-cell codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been implemented in CCUBE and ISIS to treat electron transport in materials using a Monte Carlo method in addition to the electron dynamics determined by the self-consistent electromagnetic, relativistic, particle-in-cell simulation codes that have been used extensively to model generation of electron beams and intense microwave production. Incorporation of a Monte Carlo method to model the transport of electrons in materials (conductors and dielectrics) in a particle-in-cell code represents a giant step toward realistic simulation of the physics of charged-particle beams. The basic Monte Carlo method used in the implementation includes both scattering of electrons by background atoms and energy degradation.

  16. Nano particles play with electrons : Fundamental research into electron transport inside dye-sensitised solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.; Schoonman, J.; Van Den Berg, R.

    2000-01-01

    Were stuck with a chicken-and-egg-problem: solar cells are expensive, so they dont get sold, which keeps the production volume low, so the price remains high.However, within a decade the price of electricity from a solar panel will be comparable to that of conventional mains power, says Dr. Albert

  17. In SITU Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOC) have the potential of playing a significant role in the future efficient energy system scenario. In order to become widely commercially available, an improved performance and durability of the cells has to be achieved [1]. Conventional scanning and transmission SEM and TEM...... have been often used for ex-situ post mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of the microstructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in situ studies are necessary [4]....

  18. Cell wall integrity, genotoxic injury and PCD dynamics in alfalfa saponin-treated white poplar cells highlight a complex link between molecule structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Stefania; Tava, Aldo; Avato, Pinarosa; Biazzi, Elisa; Macovei, Anca; Biggiogera, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, eleven saponins and three sapogenins purified from Medicago sativa were tested for their cytotoxicity against highly proliferating white poplar (Populus alba L.) cell suspension cultures. After preliminary screening, four saponins with different structural features in terms of aglycone moieties and sugar chains (saponin 3, a bidesmoside of hederagenin; saponins 4 and 5, monodesmoside and bidesmoside of medicagenic acid respectively, and saponin 10, a bidesmoside of zanhic acid) and different cytotoxicity were selected and used for further investigation on their structure-activity relationship. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses provided for the first time evidence of the effects exerted by saponins on plant cell wall integrity. Exposure to saponin 3 and saponin 10 resulted into disorganization of the outer wall layer and the effect was even more pronounced in white poplar cells treated with the two medicagenic acid derivatives, saponins 4 and 5. Oxidative burst and nitric oxide accumulation were common hallmarks of the response of white poplar cells to saponins. When DNA damage accumulation and DNA repair profiles were evaluated by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, induction of single and double strand breaks followed by effective repair was observed within 24h. The reported data are discussed in view of the current issues dealing with saponin structure-activity relationship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An electronic apparatus for early detection of changes in red cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electronic apparatus was developed for anaesthetists to use to detect changes in red cell concentration during surgery. The mechanism is based on the relationship between the red cell content and the electrical conductivity of blood. In a pilot study of 170 blood samples, a correlation coefficient of 0,9806 was obtained ...

  20. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  1. Electron trapping in higher adduct fullerene-based solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenes, Martijn; Shelton, Steven; Sieval, Alexander; Kronholm, David F.; Hummelen, Jan C. (Kees); Blom, Paul W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Here, the performance of bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on a series of bisadduct analogues of commonly used derivatives of C(60) and C(70), such PCBMs and their thienyl versions, is investigated. Due to their highest lowest unoccupied molecular orbital an increase in open-circuit voltage and

  2. Micro-Fuel Cells{sup TM} for portable electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockaday, R.G.; DeJohn, M.; Navas, C.; Turner, P.S.; Vaz, H.L.; Vazul, L.L. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The Micro-Fuel Cell{sup TM} is a new power supply which provides a superior alternative compared to rechargeable batteries. A prototype has been developed by Manhattan Scientifics Inc. in collaboration with Energy Related Devices Inc. This mass-producible high-energy power supply can be used for cellular telephones, portable computers and other portable devices. Instead of being recharged, it can be easily refueled with methanol. The approach taken in designing this product was to develop a competitive product with definite advantages over existing products. The Micro-Fuel Cell{sup TM} is based on the idea that a fuel cell can be built onto an engineered microplastic substrate. In this case, the integrated design makes use of thin film vacuum deposition techniques to coat patterned, etched-nuclear-particle-track plastic membranes. This process forms catalytically active surface area electrodes on either side of a single structured proton-exchange-membrane electrolyte. Methanol was the choice fuel for this system because compared to hydrogen and metal hydrides, it was considered to be safer and more compact. In addition, the theoretical specific energy of methanol is significantly higher than for lithium-ion batteries. The problem of crossover, whereby methanol fuel diffuses across the fuel cell from the anode to the cathode, has also been solved by using a selectively permeable membrane. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Electronic integration of fuel cell and battery system in novel hybrid vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Peter; Jostins, John; Hilmansen, Stuart; Kendall, Kevin

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to integrate a lithium ion battery pack, together with its management system, into a hydrogen fuel cell drive train contained in a lightweight city car. Electronic units were designed to link the drive train components using conventional circuitry. These were built, tested and shown to perform according to the design. These circuits allowed start-up of battery management system, motor controller, fuel cell warm-up and torque monitoring. After assembling the fuel cell and battery in the vehicle, full system tests were performed. Analysis of results from vehicle demonstrations showed operation was satisfactory. The conclusion was that the electronic integration was successful, but the design needed optimisation and fine tuning. Eight vehicles were then fitted with the electronically integrated fuel cell-battery power pack. Trials were then started to test the integration more fully, with a duration of 12 months from 2011 to 2012 in the CABLED project.

  4. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    This thesis concerns the deposition of thin films for solar cells using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and pulsed electron deposition (PED). The aim was to deposit copper tin sulfide (CTS) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by pulsed laser deposition to learn about these materials in relation to copper zinc tin......, which make them promising alternatives to the commercially successful solar cell material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Complementing our group's work on pulsed laser deposition of CZTS, we collaborated with IMEM-CNR in Parma, Italy, to deposit CZTS by pulsed electron deposition for the first...... of using pulsed electron deposition was to make CZTS at a low processing temperature, avoiding the 570 °C annealing step used for our pulsed laser deposited solar cells. Preliminary solar cells had an efficiency of 0.2 % with a 300 °C deposition step without annealing. Further process control is needed...

  5. Revealing 3D Ultrastructure and Morphology of Stem Cell Spheroids by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaros, Josef; Petrov, Michal; Tesarova, Marketa; Hampl, Ales

    2017-01-01

    Cell culture methods have been developed in efforts to produce biologically relevant systems for developmental and disease modeling, and appropriate analytical tools are essential. Knowledge of ultrastructural characteristics represents the basis to reveal in situ the cellular morphology, cell-cell interactions, organelle distribution, niches in which cells reside, and many more. The traditional method for 3D visualization of ultrastructural components, serial sectioning using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), is very labor-intensive due to contentious TEM slice preparation and subsequent image processing of the whole collection. In this chapter, we present serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, together with complex methodology for spheroid formation, contrasting of cellular compartments, image processing, and 3D visualization. The described technique is effective for detailed morphological analysis of stem cell spheroids, organoids, as well as organotypic cell cultures.

  6. Electronic Interfacing Between a Living Cell and a Nanodevice: A Bio-Nano Hybrid System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraf, Ravi F. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2013-12-31

    The primary goal of this program was to couple physical electronics with live cells to leverage the highly sophisticated functions of a biological system to ultimately create advanced functionality. The study was built on a unique self-assembled architecture of nanoparticles that exhibits transport properties that are sensitive to single-electron charge modulation. At room temperature, the energy of switching due to single-electron charge modulation was in the range of 4 to 100 kT. The structure invented in the principal investigator’s lab is a two-dimensional (2D) network of one-dimensional (1D) necklaces of 10 nm Au nanoparticles. The electron transport through the necklace network is regulated by quantum mechanical single-electron traps. As a result of the single electron traps, the all metal nanoparticle network array displays a conduction band gap. Fundamental studies on the transport properties of the network in air and water were studied to regulate the band gap by tailoring the network structure to demonstrate the first electrochemical single electron transistor operating in water. Cells were interfaced with the network to observe electrochemical activity in a cell during photosynthesis and single viral infection.

  7. Exploring the human mesenchymal stem cell tubule communication network through electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sabrina; Rossi, Roberta; Resta, Leonardo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2015-04-01

    Cells use several mechanisms to transfer information to other cells. In this study, we describe micro/nanotubular connections and exosome-like tubule fragments in multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human arteries. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed characterization of sinusoidal microtubular projections (700 nm average size, 200 µm average length, with bulging mitochondria and actin microfilaments); short, uniform, variously shaped nanotubular projections (100 nm, bidirectional communication); and tubule fragments (50 nm). This is the first study demonstrating that MSCs from human arteries constitutively interact through an articulate and dynamic tubule network allowing long-range cell to cell communication.

  8. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ke [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ward, William [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Farnum, Byron H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Taheri, Atefeh [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Johansson, Patrik [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Meyer, Gerald John [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  9. All-polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of chemically doped electron-donating and electron-accepting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungho; Shin, Minjung; Park, Soohyeong; Lee, Sooyong; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2012-11-21

    We report the improved performance of all-polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of an electron-donating polymer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)) and an electron-accepting polymer (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT)), which were both doped with 4-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid (EBSA). To choose the doping ratio of P3HT for all-polymer solar cells, various EBSA doping ratios (0, 1, 3, 5, 10, 20 wt%) were tested by employing optical absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and space-charge-limited current (SCLC) mobility measurement. The doping reaction of P3HT with EBSA was followed by observing the colour change in solutions. The final doping ratio for P3HT was chosen as 1 wt% from the best hole mobility measured in the thickness direction, while that for F8BT was fixed as 10 wt% (F8BT-EBSA). The polymer:polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of P3HT-EBSA (EBSA-doped P3HT) and F8BT-EBSA (EBSA-doped F8BT) showed greatly improved short circuit current density (J(SC)) and open circuit voltage (V(OC)), compared to the undoped solar cells. As a result, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was enhanced by ca. 300% for the 6 : 4 (P3HT-EBSA : F8BT-EBSA) composition and ca. 400% for the 8 : 2 composition. The synchrotron-radiation grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIXD) measurement revealed that the crystallinity of the doped nanolayers significantly increased by EBSA doping owing to the formation of advanced phase segregation morphology, as supported by the surface morphology change measured by atomic force microscopy. Thus the improved PCE can be attributed to the enhanced charge transport by the formation of permanent charges and better charge percolation paths by EBSA doping.

  10. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Electron probe microanalysis of red blood cells. I. Methods and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R G; Bronner, C; Barba, W; Tosteson, D C

    1978-11-01

    The concentrations of potassium, sodium, and iron in human and sheep red blood cells were measured with an electron probe. Cells were prepared for analysis by spraying them on pyrolytic graphite supports. The results obtained with this spray technique agreed well with values measured on similar cells that were prepared for analysis by freezing, sectioning, and freeze-drying. Higher Na concentrations and lower K concentrations were found to be associated with lower cell volumes in human and high-potassium sheep cells. In low-potassium sheep cells the reverse was found, lower Na and higher K concentrations were associated with lower cell volumes. However, the amounts of iron were found to remain relatively constant in all human cells.

  12. Isolation and characterization of spheroid cells from the HT29 colon cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinlan; Ouyang, Nengyong; Teng, Hong; Yao, Herui

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Cr-CSCs) are involved in the growth of colon cancer, but their specific role in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still unclear. Currently, methods for sorting Cr-CSCs are based on the expression of surface markers (e.g., CD133(+), CD44(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1(+))); however, the specificity of these markers for Cr-CSCs is uncertain. This study aimed to develop more effective ways of isolating and purifying Cr-CSCs. Suspension culture was used for isolation of Cr-CSCs. And spheroid cells were performed by side population technology, and the putative molecular marker analysis of colorectal cancer stem cell. Migration assay and chemoresistance experiment were conducted between the adherent cells and spheroid cells. HT29 colon cancer cells grew well in suspension culture. The percentage of CD44(+) cancer cell of spheroid cells was 68 times higher than that of adherent cells (89.5% vs. 1.3%), but there was no obvious difference in the percentage of CD133(+) cells (6.25% vs. 5.6%). Moreover, it is worth noting that the percent of CD133 (+)/CD44(+) cells remarkably rose (from 0.6% to 5.4%). The expression of ALDH1 was markedly increased (7.5% vs. 20.5%) for the spheroid cells than the adherent cells. The side population within the spheroid population dramatically increased from 0.2% to 6.3%. The resistance of spheroid cells to 5-FU was higher than that of adherent cells, as was their ability to migrate in the presence of SDF-1α. Suspension culture is an effective approach for enriching Cr-CSCs and can provide an inexhaustible supply of genetically stable colon cancer stem cells for targeted Cr-CSC studies. Spheroid cell models also enable the study of colon cancer chemoresistance and metastasis and may help to elucidate the role of cancer stem cells in colon cancer.

  13. Conventional and 360 degree electron tomography of a micro-crystalline silicon solar cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchamp, Martial; Ramar, Amuthan; Kovács, András

    2011-01-01

    Bright-field (BF) and annular dark-field (ADF) electron tomography in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to characterize elongated porous regions or cracks (simply referred to as cracks thereafter) in micro-crystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cell. The limitations of inferring th...... tomography are used to acquire 360° tilt series of images from a FIB-prepared needle-shaped μc-Si:H specimen....

  14. Nanostructured Electron-Selective Interlayer for Efficient Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyun; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Thambidurai, M; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Myeongjin; Song, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Seonghoon; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee

    2015-08-26

    We report a unique nanostructured electron-selective interlayer comprising of In-doped ZnO (ZnO:In) and vertically aligned CdSe tetrapods (TPs) for inverted polymer:fullerene bulkheterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. With dimension-controlled CdSe TPs, the direct inorganic electron transport pathway is provided, resulting in the improvement of the short circuit current and fill factor of devices. We demonstrate that the enhancement is attributed to the roles of CdSe TPs that reduce the recombination losses between the active layer and buffer layer, improve the hole-blocking as well as electron-transporting properties, and simultaneously improve charge collection characteristics. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC70BM based solar cell with nanostructured CdSe TPs increases to 7.55%. We expect this approach can be extended to a general platform for improving charge extraction in organic solar cells.

  15. Direct extraction of photosynthetic electrons from single algal cells by nanoprobing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Bai, Seoung-Jai; Park, Joong Sun; Huang, Zubin; Moseley, Jeffrey; Fabian, Tibor; Fasching, Rainer J; Grossman, Arthur R; Prinz, Fritz B

    2010-04-14

    There are numerous sources of bioenergy that are generated by photosynthetic processes, for example, lipids, alcohols, hydrogen, and polysaccharides. However, generally only a small fraction of solar energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms is converted to a form of energy that can be readily exploited. To more efficiently use the solar energy harvested by photosynthetic organisms, we evaluated the feasibility of generating bioelectricity by directly extracting electrons from the photosynthetic electron transport chain before they are used to fix CO(2) into sugars and polysaccharides. From a living algal cell, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, photosynthetic electrons (1.2 pA at 6000 mA/m(2)) were directly extracted without a mediator electron carrier by inserting a nanoelectrode into the algal chloroplast and applying an overvoltage. This result may represent an initial step in generating "high efficiency" bioelectricity by directly harvesting high energy photosynthetic electrons.

  16. The future is cold: cryo-preparation methods for transmission electron microscopy of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbain, Ilse; Sachse, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Our knowledge of the organization of the cell is linked, to a great extent, to light and electron microscopy. Choosing either photons or electrons for imaging has many consequences on the image obtained, as well as on the experiment required in order to generate the image. One apparent effect on the experimental side is in the sample preparation, which can be quite elaborate for electron microscopy. In recent years, rapid freezing, cryo-preparation and cryo-electron microscopy have been more widely used because they introduce fewer artefacts during preparation when compared with chemical fixation and room temperature processing. In addition, cryo-electron microscopy allows the visualization of the hydrated specimens. In the present review, we give an introduction to the rapid freezing of biological samples and describe the preparation steps. We focus on bulk samples that are too big to be directly viewed under the electron microscope. Furthermore, we discuss the advantages and limitations of freeze substitution and cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections and compare their application to the study of bacteria and mammalian cells and to tomography.

  17. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  18. Very-Low-Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging of Nitroxide-Loaded Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Barth, Eugene D.; Burks, Scott R.; Smithback, Philip; Mailer, Colin; Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Halpern, Howard J.; Rosen, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging have made it possible to image, in real time in vivo, cells that have been labeled with nitroxide spin probes. We previously reported that cells can be loaded to high (millimolar) intracellular concentrations with (2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl-3-ylmethyl)amine-N,N-diacetic acid by incubation with the corresponding acetoxymethyl (AM) ester. Furthermore, the intracellular lifetime (t1/e) of this nitroxide is 114 min—suffic...

  19. Ionic and electronic transport across interfaces in thin electrolyte film, anode supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Tae

    In transport studies in oxygen ion conductors, oxygen chemical potential (muO2) has been usually assumed to be equilibrated across gas/solid electrolyte interfaces. However, since the interfaces exhibit different properties from the bulk, they must have their own ionic and electronic properties. In this study, Pt reference electrodes were embedded within the electrolyte (gadolinia-doped ceria; GDC) in an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell to measure the electrochemical potential of electrons (ϕ) through the bulk electrolyte and its interfaces under fuel cell operating condition. Based on local equilibrium assumption, which leads to relations between electrochemical potentials of charged species and chemical potential of neutral species, the corresponding mu O2 was estimated. When the GDC is protected by a thin layer of a predominantly ionic conductor from reducing atmosphere, the muO2 varied monotonically through the GDC layer, exhibiting a relatively small change across the cathode interface region. By contrast, when the GDC was exposed to hydrogen, it was significantly reduced, resulting in higher electron concentration. The corresponding mu O2 was small through the GDC layer, exhibiting an abrupt change across the cathode interface region. This difference in the muO2 variation depending upon the relative electronic conduction in the electrolyte resulted in a large difference in the cathode overpotential. The direction of ionic/electronic current and the corresponding internal muO2 through the electrolyte can have a profound effect on its stability. If cell imbalance exists in a series-connected fuel cell stack, a "bad" cell characterized by a higher resistance can be operated under a negative voltage. To investigate the SOFC stack failure by simulating abnormal behavior in a single cell test, yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte cells were tested with an applied DC bias. When operating under a negative voltage, rapid degradation occurred

  20. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  1. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  2. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B Peckys

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7 were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM laboratory.

  3. Photoinduced Interfacial Electron Injection Dynamics in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells under Photovoltaic Operating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuscher, Joël; Décoppet, Jean-David; Punzi, Angela; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Moser, Jacques-E; Grätzel, Michael

    2012-12-20

    We report a pump-probe spectroscopy study of electron injection rates in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices. We examine the case of working devices employing an N719 ruthenium sensitizer and an iodide electrolyte. Electron injection is found to occur mainly on a sub-100 fs time scale, followed by a slower component with a lifetime of 26.9 ps, in accordance with previous reports on model samples. The amplitude of this latter component varies with electrolyte composition from 25 to 9%. The appearance of slower components in the electron injection dynamics may be attributed to an aggregated or weakly bound state of the surface-adsorbed N719 sensitizer. Further measurements are reported varying the cell light bias and load conditions, revealing no influence on electron injection dynamics. No other electron injection event is found to occur up to 1 ns. These results show no evidence for a slowdown of electron injection under working conditions compared to model systems for the electrolytes examined in this study.

  4. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaña, Fabián [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Faini, Francesca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kemmerling, Ulrike [Anatomy and Developmental Biology Program, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Parra, Eduardo [Laboratory of Experimental Biomedicine, University of Tarapaca, Campus Esmeralda, Iquique (Chile); Ferreira, Jorge, E-mail: jferreir@med.uchile.cl [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  5. Sputter Deposited TiOx Thin-Films as Electron Transport Layers in Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina; Bomholt Jensen, Pia; Lakhotiya, Harish

    transparency and favorable energy-level alignment with many commonly used electron-acceptor materials. There are several methods available for fabricating compact TiOx thin-films for use in organic solar cells, including sol-gel solution processing, spray pyrolysis and atomic-layer deposition; however...... of around 7%, by incorporating sputter deposited TiOx thin-films as electron-transport and exciton-blocking layers. In the work, we report on the effect of different TiOx deposition temperatures and thicknesses on the organic-solar-cell device performance. Besides optical characterization, AFM and XRD...... analyses are performed to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the films, and external quantum efficiency measurements are employed to shed further light on the device performance. Our study presents a novel method for implementation of TiOx thin-films as electron-transport layer in organic...

  6. Volume organization of polymer and hybrid solar cells as revealed by electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavel, Svetlana S. van [Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Loos, Joachim [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-08

    Polymer and hybrid solar cells have the potential to become the leading technology of the 21{sup st} century in conversion of sun light to electrical energy because their ease processing from solution producing printable devices in a roll-to-roll fashion with high speed and low cost. The performance of such devices critically depends on the nanoscale organization of the photoactive layer, which is composed of at least two functional materials: the electron donor and the electron acceptor forming a so-called bulk heterojunction; however, control of its volume morphology still is a challenge. In this context, advanced analytical tools are required that are able to provide information on the local volume morphology of the photoactive layer with nanometer resolution. In this report electron tomography is introduced as the technique able to explore the 3D morphology of polymer and hybrid solar cells and the first results achieved are critically discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Mapping boron in silicon solar cells using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchamp, Martial; Boothroyd, Chris; Kovács, András

    2011-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to study the B distribution in a p-i-n layered solar cell structure. The boron concentration in the p-doped Si layer is expected to be ~1021 cm−3 and should not exceed 1017 cm−3 in the neighbouring intrinsic layer. We show that B concentrations...

  8. Improving the Osteoblast Cell Adhesion on Electron Beam Controlled TiO2 Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the osteogenesis and synostosis processes on the surface-modified TiO2 nanotubes via electron beam irradiation. The TiO2 nanotubes studied were synthesized by anodization process under different anodizing voltage. For the anodization voltage of 15, 20, and 25 V, TiO2 nanotubes with diameters of 59, 82, and 105 nm and length of 115, 276, and 310 nm were obtained, respectively. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line was incubated on the TiO2 nanotubes to monitor the change in the cell adhesion before and after the electron beam irradiation. We observe that the electron beam irradiation affects the number of surviving osteoblast cells as well as the cultivation time. In particular, the high adhesion rate of 155% was obtained when the osteoblast cells were cultivated for 2 hours on the TiO2 nanotube, anodized under 20 V, and irradiated with 5,000 kGy of electron beam.

  9. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell systems in portable electronics - a metrics-based conceptualization approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, S.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is impossible to imagine life without portable electronics like the laptop computer and cell phone. All these products are powered by a battery, granting them grid independence and all-round protability. Connectivity to the internet and an increase of functionality demands for a better battery.

  10. Increased electron photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles and photoemission enhanced solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Uskov, Alexander; Gritti, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation shows possibility to enhance substantially (by one-two orders) the electron photoemission through surface of metal nanoparticles embedded into photovoltaic structures. This, in turn, can lead to increase of the solar cells efficiency due to efficient light-to-electricity...

  11. A review and design of power electronics converters for fuel cell hybrid system applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of most promising power electronics topologies for a fuel cell hybrid power conversion system which can be utilized in many applications such as hybrid electrical vehicles (HEV), distributed generations (DG) and uninterruptible-power-supply (UPS) systems. Then...

  12. A method of correlative light and electron microscopy for yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2014-06-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a method of imaging in which the same specimen is observed by both light microscopy and electron microscopy. Specifically, CLEM compares images obtained by light and electron microscopy and makes a correlation between them. After the advent of fluorescent proteins, CLEM was extended by combining electron microscopy with fluorescence microscopy to enable molecular-specific imaging of subcellular structures with a resolution at the nanometer level. This method is a powerful tool that is used to determine the localization of specific molecules of interest in the context of subcellular structures. Knowledge of the localization of target proteins coupled with the functions of the structures to which they are localized yields valuable information about the molecular functions of these proteins. However, this method has been mostly applied to adherent cells due to technical difficulties in immobilizing non-adherent target cells, such as yeasts, during sample preparation. We have developed a method of CLEM applicable to yeast cells. In this report, we detail this method and present its extension to Live CLEM. The Live CLEM method enabled us to link the dynamic properties of molecules of interest to cellular ultrastructures in the yeast cell. Since yeasts are premier organisms in molecular genetics, combining CLEM with yeast genetics promises to provide important new findings for understanding the molecular basis of the function of cellular structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Light and electron microscopic observations of the reproductive swarmer cells of nassellarian and spumellarian polycystines (Radiolaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We observed reproductive swarmer cells of the nassellarian and spumellarian polycystine radiolarians Didymocyrtis ceratospyris, Pterocanium praetextum, Tetrapyle sp., and Triastrum aurivillii using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The swarmer cells had subspherical to ovoid or spindle shapes with two unequal flagella tapered to whip-like ends. The cell size was approximately 2.5-5.5μm long and 1.6-2.2μm wide, which is significantly smaller than that of the collodarian (colonial or naked) polycystine radiolarians. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the swarmer cells possessed a nucleus, mitochondria with tubular cristae, Golgi body, and small lipid droplets in the cytoplasm; they also had a large vacuole in which a single crystalline inclusion (approx. 1.0-1.5μm) that was probably celestite (SrSO4) was enclosed. The swarmer cells were released directly from the parent cells. At that time, morphological change such as encystment was not observed in the parent cells, and the axopodia remained extended in a period of swarmer reproduction for floating existence. This may have prevented the polycystine swarmers from rapidly sinking down to great depths. Thus, we concluded that the polycystine radiolarians release the swarmer cells into the photic layer in the same way as the symbiotic acantharians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Turkish experience with translational technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulutin, H Cüneyt; Beyan, Cengiz; Pak, Yücel

    2002-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In our department, between January 1995 to January 2001, we treated eleven patients with mycosis fungoides by total body skin electron irradiation to evaluate its influence. According to our knowledge, our department is the only center in Turkey capable of applying total skin electron beam therapy. Total skin electron beam therapy was applied by using the "translational technique". Daily doses (4 Gray) were given in a total of seven fractions according to the conventional fractionation scheme. There were 6 patients with stage I disease, 3 patients with stage II and 2 patients with stage IV disease. Except stage IV patients, we obtained good cutaneous results. According to our observation, in early stage mycosis fungoides total body skin electron irradiation can provide good cutaneous response, but for stage IV only moderate pallation can be obtained.

  15. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electron-Anode Interactions in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Applied-B Ion Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E.; Cuneo, M.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Pointon, T.D.; Renk, T.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Vesey, R.A.

    1998-11-12

    Particle-in-cell simulations of applied-B ion diodes using the QUICKSILVER code have been augmented with Monte Carlo calculations of electron-anode interactions (reflection and energy deposition). Extraction diode simulations demonstrate a link between the instability evolution and increased electron loss and anode heating. Simulations of radial and extraction ion diodes show spatial non-uniformity in the predicted electron loss profile leading to hot spots on the anode that rapidly exceed the 350-450 {degree}C range, known to be sufficient for plasma formation on electron-bombarded surfaces. Thermal resorption calculations indicate complete resorption of contaminants with 15-20 kcal/mole binding energies in high-dose regions of the anode during the power pulse. Comparisons of parasitic ion emission simulations and experiment show agreement in some aspects; but also highlight the need for better ion source, plasma, and neutral gas models.

  17. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  18. Studies on plant cell toxicity of luminescent silica nanoparticles (Cs{sub 2}[Mo{sub 6}Br{sub 14}]@SiO{sub 2}) and its constitutive components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.cabello@univ-rennes1.fr; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores [University of Rennes 1, UMR UR1-CNRS 6553 ECOBIO, Mechanisms at the Origin of Biodiversity Team (France); Neaime, Chrystelle [University of Rennes 1, Solid State Chemistry and Materials Group, UMR UR1-CNRS 6226 Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (France); Burel, Agnès [University of Rennes 1, Electronic Microscopy Department (France); Jeanne, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal; Cordier, Stéphane; Grasset, Fabien [University of Rennes 1, Solid State Chemistry and Materials Group, UMR UR1-CNRS 6226 Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (France)

    2016-03-15

    As part of the risk evaluation before potential applications of nanomaterials, phytotoxicity of newly designed multifunctional silica nanoparticles (CMB@SiO{sub 2}, average diameter of 47 nm) and their components, i.e., molybdenum octahedral cluster bromide units (CMB, 1 nm) and SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nSiO{sub 2}, 29 nm), has been studied using photosynthetic Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures. CMB clusters presented toxic effects on plant cells, inhibiting cell growth and negatively affecting cell viability and photosynthetic efficiency. Nevertheless, we showed that neither nSiO{sub 2} nor CMB@SiO{sub 2} have any significant effect on cell growth and viability or photosynthetic efficiency. At least, part of the harmful impact of CMB clusters could be ascribed to their capacity to generate an oxidative stress since lipid peroxidation greatly increased after CMB exposure, which was not the case for nSiO{sub 2} or CMB@SiO{sub 2} treatments. Exposure of cells to CMB clusters also leads to the induction of several enzymatic antioxidant activities (i.e., superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase activities) compared to control and the other treatments. Finally, using electron microscopy, we showed that Arabidopsis cells internalize CMB clusters and both silica nanoparticles, the latter through, most likely, endocytosis-like pathway as nanoparticles were mainly found incorporated into vesicles.Graphical Abstract.

  19. Serotonin-producing cells in human gastric mucosa--immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Nadya I; Baltadjiev, Georgi A; Koeva, Yvetta A; Atanassova, Pepa K; Andonov, Vladimir N; Trichkova, Valentina A

    2010-01-01

    The great many hormones released by the endocrine cells of the glands and lining epithelium of gastric mucosa determine its significance for the processes in the gastrointestinal tract. One of these hormones, serotonin, plays an important role in the regulation of the motility, secretion and sensation in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to conduct immunohistochemical and electron microscopic studies of serotonin-producing EC cell of gastric mucosa. Gastric mucosa biopsies were obtained and studied immunihistochemically for serotonin expression in the mucosa endocrine cells. Electron microscopic study was performed to specify the processes of synthesis, accumulation and release of secretory product by those cells. The immunohistochemical study revealed a considerable number of serotonin-containing EC cells scattered in the lining epithelium and between the glands in the corpus and pyloric region of the stomach. The electron microscopic study followed the stages of formation of the secretory granules from the initial accumulation of granular substance, its membrane packing and formation of mature granules to their disintegration in the secretory process. Serotonin as a neurotransmitter and gastrointestinal hormone appears to be a key to understanding a number of symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders like nausea, vomiting, pain, diarrhea and constipation. A detailed study of serotonin functions in the gastrointestinal tract realised through different types of receptors, and of the development of specific antagonists and agonists to these receptors would open up new opportunities for a more efficient treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

  20. Unified Electromagnetic-Electronic Design of Light Trapping Silicon Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Javaneh; Das, Sonali; Vázquez-Guardado, Abraham; Franklin, Daniel; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional unified electromagnetic-electronic model is developed in conjunction with a light trapping scheme in order to predict and maximize combined electron-photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells. The comparison between a bare and light trapping cell shows significant enhancement in photon absorption and electron collection. The model further demonstrates that in order to achieve high energy conversion efficiency, charge separation must be optimized through control of the doping profile and surface passivation. Despite having a larger number of surface defect states caused by the surface patterning in light trapping cells, we show that the higher charge carrier generation and collection in this design compensates the absorption and recombination losses and ultimately results in an increase in energy conversion efficiency. The fundamental physics behind this specific design approach is validated through its application to a 3 μm thick functional light trapping solar cell which shows 192% efficiency enhancement with respect to the bare cell of same thickness. Such a unified design approach will pave the path towards achieving the well-known Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit for c-Si in thin-film (<30 μm) geometries.

  1. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An overview of power electronics applications in fuel cell systems: DC and AC converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M S; Kamarudin, S K; Masdar, M S; Mohamed, A

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics and fuel cell technologies play an important role in the field of renewable energy. The demand for fuel cells will increase as fuel cells become the main power source for portable applications. In this application, a high-efficiency converter is an essential requirement and a key parameter of the overall system. This is because the size, cost, efficiency, and reliability of the overall system for portable applications primarily depend on the converter. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate converter topology is an important and fundamental aspect of designing a fuel cell system for portable applications as the converter alone plays a major role in determining the overall performance of the system. This paper presents a review of power electronics applications in fuel cell systems, which include various topology combinations of DC converters and AC inverters and which are primarily used in fuel cell systems for portable or stand-alone applications. This paper also reviews the switching techniques used in power conditioning for fuel cell systems. Finally, this paper addresses the current problem encountered with DC converters and AC inverter.

  3. Performance evaluation of aluminum/phosphate cell for powering small electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gymama Slaughter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an innovative membrane-free aluminum/phosphate cell based on the activation of aluminum (Al as anodic material using ZnO nanocrystal in phosphate rich electrolyte that is capable of generating sufficient power to power a light-emitting diode (LED, selected as a model of a small electronic device. The energy from the cell is periodically supplied in high power bursts due to the charge and discharge cycle of the capacitor. The entire process is controlled by a switched capacitor regulator. The Al/phosphate cell was studied in neutral 100 mM phosphate buffer solution (7.4 at a temperature of 25 °C. We demonstrate that two Al/phosphate cells connected in series can generate an open circuit voltage (Voc up to 1.66 V to continuously power a LED via a switched capacitor regulator circuit. The switched capacitor regulator circuit enabled the 1 μF capacitor to store the incoming power from the cell and discharge it in a large power burst to supply the necessary drive strength required by the LED. This new Al/phosphate cell configuration is a ‘green’ alternative to the use of glucose abiotic and biofuel cells for powering ultra-low power implantable electronic devices.

  4. Functional Genomic Investigation of the Molecular Biological Impact of Electron Beam Radiation in Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Ramani; Rani, Usha; Murugesan, Ram; Kumar, Kirushna; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-05-01

    The biological response of electron beam radiation (EBR) in tumors remains underexplored. This study describes the molecular biological and genomic impact of EBR on tumor cells. A mouse model bearing Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells was exposed to an 8-MeV pulsed electron beam, at a dose rate of 2 Gy/min using a microtron, a linear accelerator. The radiation-induced changes were assessed by histopathology, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, signaling pathway-focused reporter assays, and gene expression by microarray analysis. EBR was found to increase apoptosis and G2-M cell cycle arrest with concomitant tumor regression in vivo. The microarray data revealed that EBR induced tumor regression, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest mediated by p53, PPAR, and SMAD2/3/4 signaling pathways. Activation of interferon regulatory factor and NFkB signaling were also found upon EBR. Chemo-genomics exploration revealed the possibility of drugs that can be effectively used in combination with EBR. For the first time, an 8-MeV pulse EBR induced genomic changes, and their consequence in molecular and biological processes were identified in lymphoma cells. The comprehensive investigation of radiation-mediated responses in cancer cells also revealed the potential therapeutic features of EBR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Glyphosate on the Shikimate Pathway and Regulation of Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase in Cryptomeria and Perilla Cell Suspension Cultues

    OpenAIRE

    Nariyuki, Ishikura; Susumu, Teramoto; Yasunobu, Takeshima; Seiji, Mitsui; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University; Biological Laboratory, College of Medical Science, Kumamoto University

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Cryptomeria and Perilla cell suspension cultures with glyphosate resulted in a marked suppression of the formation of flavans and caffeic acid derivatives, respectively, while it caused only a slight decline in the cell growth. In contrast with 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate (DAHP) synthase-Mn isozyme, DAHP synthase-Co isozyme from Cryptomeria and Perilla cells was much more sensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. The addition of 1 to 2 mM glyphosate caused an accumulation of shi...

  6. Single-Cell Resolution of Uncultured Magnetotactic Bacteria via Fluorescence-Coupled Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Heng; Menguy, Nicolas; Benzerara, Karim; Wang, Fuxian; Lin, Xiaoting; Chen, Zhibao; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-06-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form intracellular chain-assembled nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite termed magnetosomes. The characterization of magnetosome crystals requires electron microscopy due to their nanoscopic sizes. However, electron microscopy does not provide phylogenetic information for MTB. We have developed a strategy for the simultaneous and rapid phylogenetic and biomineralogical characterization of uncultured MTB at the single-cell level. It consists of four steps: (i) enrichment of MTB cells from an environmental sample, (ii) 16S rRNA gene sequencing of MTB, and (iii) fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses coordinated with (iv) transmission or scanning electron microscopy of the probe-hybridized cells. The application of this strategy identified a magnetotactic Gammaproteobacteria strain, SHHR-1, from brackish sediments collected from the Shihe River estuary in Qinhuangdao City, China. SHHR-1 magnetosomes are elongated prismatic magnetites which can be idealized as hexagonal prisms. Taxonomic groups of uncultured MTB were also identified in freshwater sediments from Lake Miyun in northern Beijing via this novel coordinated fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy method based on four group-specific rRNA-targeted probes. Our analyses revealed that major magnetotactic taxonomic groups can be accurately determined only with coordinated scanning electron microscopy observations on fluorescently labeled single cells due to limited group coverage and specificity for existing group-specific MTB fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our reported strategy is simple and efficient, offers great promise toward investigating the diversity and biomineralization of MTB, and may also be applied to other functional groups of microorganisms.IMPORTANCE Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are phylogenetically diverse and biomineralize morphologically diverse magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite or greigite in intracellular structures termed

  7. Cell culture and electron microscopy for identifying viruses in diseases of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Rollin, Pierre E; Comer, James A; Nicholson, William L; Peret, Teresa C T; Erdman, Dean D; Bellini, William J; Harcourt, Brian H; Rota, Paul A; Bhatnagar, Julu; Bowen, Michael D; Erickson, Bobbie R; McMullan, Laura K; Nichol, Stuart T; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-06-01

    During outbreaks of infectious diseases or in cases of severely ill patients, it is imperative to identify the causative agent. This report describes several events in which virus isolation and identification by electron microscopy were critical to initial recognition of the etiologic agent, which was further analyzed by additional laboratory diagnostic assays. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Nipah, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, West Nile, Cache Valley, and Heartland viruses. These cases illustrate the importance of the techniques of cell culture and electron microscopy in pathogen identification and recognition of emerging diseases.

  8. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Petrenko, A.; Stein, M

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular e...

  9. DFT Studies on the electronic structures of indoline dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIE XU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of indoline dyes with promising efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs were studied using the density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31g (d level. The ground-state geometries, electronic structures and absorption spectra of these dyes are reported. The calculated results indicate that the energy levels of the HOMOs and LUMOs of these dyes are advantageous for electron injection. Their intense and broad absorption bands as well as favorable excited-state energy levels are key factor for their outstanding efficiencies in DSSCs.

  10. Membrane protein stoichiometry studied in intact mammalian cells using liquid-phase electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Jonge, N

    2017-05-04

    Receptor membrane proteins in the plasma membranes of cells respond to extracellular chemical signals by conformational changes, spatial redistribution, and (re-)assembly into protein complexes, for example, into homodimers (pairs of the same protein type). The functional state of the proteins can be determined from information about how subunits are assembled into protein complexes. Stoichiometric information about the protein complex subunits, however, is generally not obtained from intact cells but from pooled material extracted from many cells, resulting in a lack of fundamental knowledge about the functioning of membrane proteins. First, functional states may dramatically differ from cell to cell on account of cell heterogeneity. Second, extracting the membrane proteins from the plasma membrane may lead to many artefacts. Liquid-phase scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), in short liquid STEM, is a new technique capable of determining the locations of individual membrane proteins within the intact plasma membranes of cells in liquid. Many tens of whole cells can readily be imaged. It is possible to analyse the stoichiometry of membrane proteins in single cells while accounting for heterogenic cell populations. Liquid STEM was used to image epidermal growth factor receptors in whole COS7 cells. A study of the dimerisation of the HER2 protein in breast cancer cells revealed the presence of rare cancer cells in which HER2 was in a different functional state than in the bulk cells. Stoichiometric information about receptors is essential not only for basic science but also for biomedical application because they present many important pharmaceutical targets. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Monitoring cell growth, viability, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael; Spearman, Maureen; Braasch, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    The accurate determination of cell growth and viability is pivotal to monitoring a bioprocess. Direct methods to determine the cell growth and/or viability in a bioprocess include microscopic counting, electronic particle counting, image analysis, in situ biomass monitoring, and dieletrophoretic cytometry. These methods work most simply when a fixed volume sample can be taken from a suspension culture. Manual microscopic counting is laborious but affords the advantage of allowing cell viability to be determined if a suitable dye is included. Electronic particle counting is a rapid total cell count method for replicate samples, but some data distortion may occur if the sample has significant cell debris or cell aggregates. Image analysis based on the use of digital camera images acquired through a microscope has advanced rapidly with the availability of several commercially available software packages replacing manual microscopic counting and viability determination. Biomass probes detect cells by their dielectric properties or their internal concentration of NADH and can be used as a continuous monitor of the progress of a culture. While the monitoring of cell growth and viability is an integral part of a bioprocess, the monitoring of apoptosis induction is also becoming more and more important in bioprocess control to increase volumetric productivity by extending bioprocess duration. Different fluorescent assays allow for the detection of apoptotic characteristics in a cell sample.Indirect methods of cell determination involve the chemical analysis of a culture component or a measure of metabolic activity. These methods are most useful when it is difficult to obtain intact cell samples. However, the relationship between these parameters and the cell number may not be linear through the phases of a cell culture. The determination of nucleic acid (DNA) or total protein can be used as an estimate of biomass, while the depletion of glucose from the media can be used

  12. Direct methanol biocatalytic fuel cell--considerations of restraints on electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia-Chang; Ranta, Anja; Halme, Aarne

    2006-05-15

    In this paper structure and operational principles of a novel type direct methanol biocatalytic fuel cell (DMBFC) system is introduced. In addition observed restraints in the energy generation are discussed. The operational principle of the biofuel cell is enzymatic breakdown of methanol by methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) from Methylobacterium extorquens at the anode. The terminal electron acceptor at the cathode is potassium permanganate. Performance characteristics of the system are the following: open circuit voltage 1.4 V, power density 0.25 mW/cm2 and current density 0.38 mA/cm2 at the operating voltage of 0.67 V, and a continuous operation time of 2 weeks. A biofuel cell usually requires an electrochemically active reagent, a mediator, to ensure effective transfer of the electrons from the activity centre of the enzyme to the electrode. Inactivation of the mediator was found to restrict the electron transfer. Moreover, the rate of inactivation was found to increase in fuel cell conditions. The half-life of TMPD was observed to be maximum 5 days compared to 10 days in normal conditions. Experiments showed that addition of 0.2% w/w of aluminium dioxide into the anodic graphite paste stabilized the mediator.

  13. Controlling Side Chain Density of Electron Donating Polymers for Improving VOC in Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Cho, C. H.; Kang, H.; Yoon, S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to tune the LUMO/HOMO levels of electroactive materials in active layer of polymer solar cells is critical in controlling their optical and electrochemical properties because the HOMO and LUMO offsets between the polymer donor and the electron acceptor strongly affect charge separation and the open circuit voltage (VOC) of a solar cell. Here, we developed two series of electroactive materials for improving VOC in polymer solar cells. First, we enable facile control over the number of solubilizing groups ultimately tethered to the fullerene by tuning the molar ratio between reactants from 1:1 to 1:3, thus producing o-xylenyl C60 mono-, bis-, and tris-adducts (OXCMA, OXCBA, and OXCTA) as electron acceptors with different LUMO levels. As the number of solubilizing groups increased, VOC values of the P3HT-based BHJ solar cells increased from 0.63, 0.83, to 0.98 V. Second, we present a series of novel poly[3-(4-n-octyl)phenylthiophene] (POPT) derivatives (POPT, POPTT, and POTQT) as electron donors with different side-chain density. As a result of lower HOMO levels by decrease in the side-chain density of the polymers, the devices consisting of POPT, POPTT, and POPQT with PCBM showed increased VOC values of 0.58, 0.63, and 0.75 V, respectively.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy artifacts in characterization of the nanomaterial-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yu Hang; Guo, Mu Yao; Ma, Angel P Y; Ng, Alan M C; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Degger, Natalie; Leung, Frederick C C

    2017-07-01

    We investigated transmission electron microscopy artifacts obtained using standard sample preparation protocols applied to the investigation of Escherichia coli cells exposed to common nanomaterials, such as TiO 2 , Ag, ZnO, and MgO. While the common protocols for some nanomaterials result only in known issues of nanomaterial-independent generation of anomalous deposits due to fixation and staining, for others, there are reactions between the nanomaterial and chemicals used for post-fixation or staining. Only in the case of TiO 2 do we observe only the known issues of nanomaterial-independent generation of anomalous deposits due to exceptional chemical stability of this material. For the other three nanomaterials, different artifacts are observed. For each of those, we identify causes of the observed problems and suggest alternative sample preparation protocols to avoid artifacts arising from the sample preparation, which is essential for correct interpretation of the obtained images and drawing correct conclusions on cell-nanomaterial interactions. Finally, we propose modified sample preparation and characterization protocols for comprehensive and conclusive investigations of nanomaterial-cell interactions using electron microscopy and for obtaining clear and unambiguous revelation whether the nanomaterials studied penetrate the cells or accumulate at the cell membranes. In only the case of MgO and ZnO, the unambiguous presence of Zn and Mg could be observed inside the cells.

  15. Versatility of the green microalga cell vacuole function as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebanova, Anastasia; Ismagulova, Tatiana; Solovchenko, Alexei; Baulina, Olga; Lobakova, Elena; Ivanova, Alexandra; Moiseenko, Andrey; Shaitan, Konstantin; Polshakov, Vladimir; Nedbal, Ladislav; Gorelova, Olga

    2017-05-01

    Vacuole is a multifunctional compartment central to a large number of functions (storage, catabolism, maintenance of the cell homeostasis) in oxygenic phototrophs including microalgae. Still, microalgal cell vacuole is much less studied than that of higher plants although knowledge of the vacuolar structure and function is essential for understanding physiology of nutrition and stress tolerance of microalgae. Here, we combined the advanced analytical and conventional transmission electron microscopy methods to obtain semi-quantitative, spatially resolved at the subcellular level information on elemental composition of the cell vacuoles in several free-living and symbiotic chlorophytes. We obtained a detailed record of the changes in cell and vacuolar ultrastructure in response to environmental stimuli under diverse conditions. We suggested that the vacuolar inclusions could be divided into responsible for storage of phosphorus (mainly in form of polyphosphate) and those accommodating non-protein nitrogen (presumably polyamine) reserves, respectively.The ultrastructural findings, together with the data on elemental composition of different cell compartments, allowed us to speculate on the role of the vacuolar membrane in the biosynthesis and sequestration of polyphosphate. We also describe the ultrastructural evidence of possible involvement of the tonoplast in the membrane lipid turnover and exchange of energy and metabolites between chloroplasts and mitochondria. These processes might play a significant role in acclimation in different stresses including nitrogen starvation and extremely high level of CO2 and might also be of importance for microalgal biotechnology. Advantages and limitations of application of analytical electron microscopy to biosamples such as microalgal cells are discussed.

  16. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Investigating Ceria Nanocrystals Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells and its Related Effects: An Electron Microscopy Study

    KAUST Repository

    Aloufi, Bader

    2017-01-22

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been utilized widely nowadays in cancer research. It has been suggested by many studies that these nanoparticles are capable of having dual antioxidant behavior in healthy and cancer microenvironment; where in physiological condition, they act as antioxidant and do not affect the healthy cells, while in tumor-like condition; they act as an oxidase, and result in a selective killing for the cancer cells. In this experiment, the interaction of nanoceria with glioblastoma and healthy astrocyte cells was examined, and further correlated with the in vitro cytotoxic effects of various nanoceria concentrations (100 and 300 µg/ml) and exposure times (12, 24, and 48 hours). Electron microscopes were used to investigate the cellular-NPs interactions, and to examine the related cytotoxic effects in combination with trypan blue and propidium iodide viability assays. Our data suggest the following results. First, the two cell lines demonstrated capability of taken up the ceria through endocytosis pathway, where the NPs were recognized engulfed by double membrane vesicles at various regions over the cellular cytoplasm. Secondly, cerium oxide nanoparticles were found to affect the glioblastoma cells, but not so severely the corresponding healthy astrocytes at the various concentrations and incubation times, as revealed by the viability assays and the electron microscopy analysis. Thirdly, the viability of the glioblastoma cells after the treatment displayed a declined trend when increasing the ceria concentrations, but did not show such dependency with regard to the different time points. In all cases, the healthy astrocyte cells showed slight alterations in mitochondrial shape which did not influence their viability. Among the various nanoceria concentrations and exposure times, the most efficient dose of treatment was found to be with a concentration of 300 µg/ml at a time point of 24-hour, where higher reduction on the viability of

  19. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, N A; El Fiki, S A; Nouh, S A; El Disoki, T M; Ragheb, M S; Zakhary, S G

    2013-08-01

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ = 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10-100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ~0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N2 revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10(13)∕cm(3). The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N2 gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration to a preferred

  20. Tailored Electron Transfer Pathways in Aucore /Ptshell -Graphene Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Ding, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Aucore/Ptshell–graphene catalysts (G-Cys-Au@Pt) are prepared through chemical and surface chemical reactions. Au–Pt core–shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) covalently immobilized on graphene (G) are efficient electrocatalysts in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The 9.5 ± 2 nm......–Pt. Functional tests in direct fomic acid, methanol and ethanol fuel cells exhibit 95%, 53%, and 107% increased power densities for G-Cys-Au@Pt over C–Pt, respectively.......-chemically immobilized G-Au@Pt and commercial platinum NPs catalyst (C-Pt), is a result of (1) the tailored electron transfer pathways of covalent bonds integrating Au@Pt NPs into the graphene framework, and (2) synergetic electronic effects of atomically thin Pt shells on Au cores. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation...

  1. Cryo-electron tomography-the cell biology that came in from the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonathan; Schaffer, Miroslava; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2017-09-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) provides high-resolution 3D views into cells pristinely preserved by vitrification. Recent technical advances such as direct electron detectors, the Volta phase plate and cryo-focused ion beam milling have dramatically pushed image quality and expanded the range of cryo-ET applications. Cryo-ET not only allows mapping the positions and interactions of macromolecules within their intact cellular context, but can also reveal their in situ structure at increasing resolution. Here, we review how recent work using cutting-edge cryo-ET technologies is starting to provide fresh views into different aspects of cellular biology at an unprecedented level of detail. We anticipate that these developments will soon make cryo-ET a fundamental technique in cell biology. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bruhwiler

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available We present 2D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low \\(∼10^{16} W/cm^{2}\\ and high \\(∼10^{18} W/cm^{2}\\ peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. Beneficial Role of Reduced Graphene Oxide for Electron Extraction in Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Taek; Grancini, Giulia; Lee, Yonghui; Konios, Dimitrios; Paek, Sanghyun; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-11-09

    In this work we systematically investigated the role of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs). By mixing rGO within the mesoporous TiO2 (m-TiO2 ) matrix, highly efficient solar cells with power conversion efficiency values up to 19.54 % were realized. In addition, the boosted beneficial role of rGO with and without Li-treated m-TiO2 is highlighted, improving transport and injection of photoexcited electrons. This combined system may pave the way for further development and optimization of electron transport and collection in high efficiency PSCs. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  5. Picoliter Drop-On-Demand Dispensing for Multiplex Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Parent, Lucas R.; Cantlon, Joshua; Eickhoff, Holger; Bared, Guido; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2016-05-03

    Abstract

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) provides a unique insight into the dynamics of nanomaterials in solution. Controlling the addition of multiple solutions to the liquid cell remains a key hurdle in our ability to increase throughput and to study processes dependent on solution mixing including chemical reactions. Here, we report that a piezo dispensing technique allows for mixing of multiple solutions directly within the viewing area. This technique permits deposition of 50 pL droplets of various aqueous solutions onto the liquid cell window, before assembly of the cell in a fully controlled manner. This proof-of-concept study highlights the great potential of picoliter dispensing in combination with LCTEM for observing nanoparticle mixing in the solution phase and the creation of chemical gradients.

  6. One electron changes everything: a multispecies copper redox shuttle for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffeditz, William L.; Katz, Michael J.; Deria, Pravas; Cutsail, George E.; Pellin, Michael J.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2016-02-25

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are an established alternative photovoltaic technology that offers numerous potential advantages in solar energy applications. However, this technology has been limited by the availability of molecular redox couples that are both noncorrosive/nontoxic and do not diminish the performance of the device. In an effort to overcome these shortcomings, a copper-containing redox shuttle derived from 1,8-bis(2'-pyridyl)-3,6-dithiaoctane (PDTO) ligand and the common DSC additive 4-tert-butylpyridine (TBP) was investigated. Electrochemical measurements, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that, upon removal of one metal-centered electron, PDTO-enshrouded copper ions completely shed the tetradentate PDTO ligand and replace it with four or more TBP ligands. Thus, the Cu(I) and Cu(II) forms of the electron shuttle have completely different coordination spheres and are characterized by widely differing Cu(II/I) formal potentials and reactivities for forward versus reverse electron transfer. Notably, the coordination-sphere replacement process is fully reversed upon converting Cu(II) back to Cu(I). In cells featuring an adsorbed organic dye and a nano- and mesoparticulate, TiO2-based, photoelectrode, the dual species redox shuttle system engenders performance superior to that obtained with shuttles based on the (II/I) forms of either of the coordination complexes in isolation.

  7. Enhancement of radiosensitivity of melanoma cells by pegylated gold nanoparticles under irradiation of megavoltage electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Nedaei, Hassan Ali; Khoei, Samideh; Eynali, Samira; Khoshgard, Karim; Robatjazi, Mostafa; Iraji Rad, Rasoul

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNP) have significant potential as radiosensitizer agents due to their distinctive properties. Several studies have shown that the surface modification of nanoparticles with methyl polyethylene glycol (mPEG) can increase their biocompatibility. However, the present study investigated the radiosensitization effects of mPEG-coated GNP (mPEG-GNP) in B16F10 murine melanoma cells under irradiation of 6 MeV Electron beam. The synthesized GNP were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and zeta potential. Enhancement of radiosensitization was evaluated by the clonogenic assay at different radiation doses of megavoltage electron beams. It was observed that mPEG-GNP with a hydrodynamic size of approximately 50 nm are almost spherical and cellular uptake occurred at all concentrations. Both proliferation efficiency and survival fraction decreased with increasing mPEG-GNP concentration. Furthermore, significant GNP sensitization occurred with a maximum dose enhancement factor of 1.22 at a concentration of 30 μM. Pegylated-GNP are taken up by B16F10 cancer cells and cause radiosensitization in the presence of 6 MeV electrons. The radiosensitization effects of GNP may probably be due to biological processes. Therefore, the underlying biological mechanisms beyond the physical dose enhancement need to be further clarified.

  8. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of the attachment of Treponema pallidum to nerve cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repesh, L A; Fitzgerald, T J; Oakes, S G; Pozos, R S

    1982-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) was incubated with cultured nerve cells derived from rat embryos. Primary cultures were established from dorsal root ganglia, superior cervical ganglia, and spinal cord. Using phase contrast microscopy treponemes were seen to interact with the nerve cells in a similar manner to other cultured mammalian cells. Organisms began to attach within minutes after inoculation, actively motile organisms attached at the tip of one end, higher numbers of organisms attached with continued incubation, and attached organisms survived longer than unattached organisms. T pallidum attached both to nerve cell bodies and to neuronal processes of each of the three nerve cell cultures. As shown by scanning electron microscopy the mechanism of attachment was identical to that of cultured cells derived from rabbits testis, rat skeletal muscle, and human cervical carcinoma. There was no indentation or swelling of the cultured cell surface at the point of attachment, just a close physical proximity of organisms and cells. These techniques provide a biological means of studying the in-vitro detrimental influences of micro-organisms on nerve tissue. Images PMID:7049315

  10. 3-D ultrastructure of O. tauri: electron cryotomography of an entire eukaryotic cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P Henderson

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The hallmark of eukaryotic cells is their segregation of key biological functions into discrete, membrane-bound organelles. Creating accurate models of their ultrastructural complexity has been difficult in part because of the limited resolution of light microscopy and the artifact-prone nature of conventional electron microscopy. Here we explored the potential of the emerging technology electron cryotomography to produce three-dimensional images of an entire eukaryotic cell in a near-native state. Ostreococcus tauri was chosen as the specimen because as a unicellular picoplankton with just one copy of each organelle, it is the smallest known eukaryote and was therefore likely to yield the highest resolution images. Whole cells were imaged at various stages of the cell cycle, yielding 3-D reconstructions of complete chloroplasts, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticula, Golgi bodies, peroxisomes, microtubules, and putative ribosome distributions in-situ. Surprisingly, the nucleus was seen to open long before mitosis, and while one microtubule (or two in some predivisional cells was consistently present, no mitotic spindle was ever observed, prompting speculation that a single microtubule might be sufficient to segregate multiple chromosomes.

  11. Visualization of adherent cell monolayers by cryo-electron microscopy: A snapshot of endothelial adherens junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Decossas, Marion; Gontier, Etienne; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie-Christine; Lambert, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows the visualization of the cell architecture in its native state. We developed a robust solution to adapt cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to a monolayer of adherent cells using a functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogel growing substrate. We applied this method to reconstitute an endothelial cell monolayer to visualize the morphology of adherens junctions (AJs) which regulate permeability and integrity of the vascular barrier. The fine morphology and ultrastructure of AJs from cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed in their native state by using CEMOVIS. Doxycycline and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are known as efficient regulators of endothelial permeability. Doxycycline and S1P treatments both led to a drastic morphological switch from very uneven to standardized 14-17 nm wide AJs over several microns indicative of a better membrane tethering. Repetitive structures were occasionally noticed within the AJ cleft reflecting a local improved structural organization of VE-cadherin molecules. The ultrastructural stabilization of AJs observed upon treatment likely indicates a better adhesion and thus provides structural clues on the mechanism by which these treatments improve the endothelial barrier function. This method was also successfully extended to a thick epithelial barrier model. We expect our strategy to extend the reliable application of CEMOVIS to virtually any adherent cultured cell systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transport limitation in P3HT:CdSe nanorods hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek, Jun Yan; Xing, Guichuan; Sum, Tze Chien; Lam, Yeng Ming

    2014-01-22

    Hybrid solar cells have the potential to be efficient solar-energy-harvesting devices that can combine the benefits of solution-processable organic materials and the extended absorption offered by inorganic materials. In this work, an understanding of the factors limiting the performance of hybrid solar cells is explored. Through photovoltaic-device characterization correlated with transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, it was found that the interfacial charge transfer between the organic (P3HT) and inorganic (CdSe nanorods) components is not the factor limiting the performance of these solar cells. The insulating original ligands retard the charge recombination between the charge-transfer states across the CdSe-P3HT interface, and this is actually beneficial for charge collection. These cells are, in fact, limited by the subsequent electron collection via CdSe nanoparticles to the electrodes. Hence, the design of a more continuous electron-transport pathway should greatly improve the performance of hybrid solar cells in the future.

  13. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  14. Full 3D opto-electronic simulation tool for nanotextured solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michallon, Jérôme; Collin, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Increasing efforts on the photovoltaics research have recently been devoted to material savings, leading to the emergence of new designs based on nanotextured and nanowire-based solar cells. The use of small absorber volumes, light-trapping nanostructures and unconventional carrier collection schemes (radial nanowire junctions, point contacts in planar structures,…) increases the impact of surfaces recombination and induces homogeneity in the photogenerated carrier concentrations. The investigation of their impacts on the device performances need to be addressed using full 3D coupled opto-electrical modeling. In this context, we have developed a new tool for full 3D opto-electrical simulation using the most advanced optical and electrical simulation techniques. We will present an overview of its simulation capabilities and the key issues that have been solved to make it fully operational and reliable. We will provide various examples of opto-electronic simulation of (i) nanostructured solar cells with localized contacts and (ii) nanowire solar cells. We will also show how opto-electronic simulation can be used to simulate light- and electron-beam induced current (LBIC/EBIC) experiments, targeting quantitative analysis of the passivation properties of surfaces.

  15. Electrochemical performance and microbial community profiles in microbial fuel cells in relation to electron transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uria, Naroa; Ferrera, Isabel; Mas, Jordi

    2017-10-18

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with complex microbial communities have been extensively reported in the past, and are commonly used in applications such as wastewater treatment, bioremediation or in-situ powering of environmental sensors. However, our knowledge on how the composition of the microbial community and the different types of electron transfer to the anode affect the performance of these bioelectrochemical systems is far from complete. To fill this gap of knowledge, we designed a set of three MFCs with different constrains limiting direct and mediated electron transfer to the anode. The results obtained indicate that MFCs with a naked anode on which a biofilm was allowed unrestricted development (MFC-A) had the most diverse archaeal and bacterial community, and offered the best performance. In this MFC both, direct and mediated electron transfer, occurred simultaneously, but direct electron transfer was the predominant mechanism. Microbial fuel cells in which the anode was enclosed in a dialysis membrane and biofilm was not allowed to develop (MFC-D), had a much lower power output (about 60% lower), and a prevalence of dissolved redox species that acted as putative electron shuttles. In the anolyte of this MFC, Arcobacter and Methanosaeta were the prevalent bacteria and archaea respectively. In the third MFC, in which the anode had been covered by a cation selective nafion membrane (MFC-N), power output decreased a further 5% (95% less than MFC-A). In this MFC, conventional organic electron shuttles could not operate and the low power output obtained was presumably attributed to fermentation end-products produced by some of the organisms present in the anolyte, probably Pseudomonas or Methanosaeta. Electron transfer mechanisms have an impact on the development of different microbial communities and in turn on MFC performance. Although a stable current was achieved in all cases, direct electron transfer MFC showed the best performance concluding

  16. Insight into cell-entry mechanisms of CPPs by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padari, Kärt; Lorents, Annely; Jokitalo, Eija; Pooga, Margus

    2011-01-01

    Despite the quickly widening application of cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for the cellular delivery of various macromolecules, the cell entry mechanisms of these peptides have remained elusive so far. The basic features of the translocation of CPPs into cells have been mapped by fluorescence microscopy and activity-based assays revealing that endocytotic mechanisms are mainly responsible for the uptake at physiological temperature. However, the high concentration of CPP or the lowering of the incubation temperature below 10°C (re)activates a nonvesicular cell entry mode. The fluorescence microscopy can hardly provide detailed information about the interaction of CPP molecules with the extracellular structures, the induced changes in the morphology of the plasma membrane, etc. Therefore, application of electron microscopy could help to shed light on the nature of nonvesicular uptake mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been a valuable tool for the morphological characterization of biological material at high resolution. It can provide useful information at the ultrastructural level about the interaction and arrangement of CPPs on the cell surface, the entrapment in cellular organelles and the translocation to the cytoplasm. In this chapter, we present a method for the tagging of CPPs covalently with a 1.4 nm gold cluster and provide a flat-embedding protocol for the mapping of Nanogold™-labeled CPPs in cultured cells by TEM. This method enables to retain the cell monolayers in their in situ orientation. The Nanogold™ tag is putatively not interfering with the uptake of CPPs and enables the production of specimens with excellent morphology and good contrast.

  17. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Heiner

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. To achieve this, we consider a highly selective energy filter such as a quantum dot embedded into a one-dimensional conductor. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. In addition this theoretical analysis, I will also report on first experimental results in a nanowire-based energy filter device. Ref: S Limpert, S Bremner, and H Linke, New J. Phys 17, 095004 (2015)

  18. Electronic cigarettes induce DNA strand breaks and cell death independently of nicotine in cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vicky; Rahimy, Mehran; Korrapati, Avinaash; Xuan, Yinan; Zou, Angela E; Krishnan, Aswini R; Tsui, Tzuhan; Aguilera, Joseph A; Advani, Sunil; Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Brumund, Kevin T; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of short- and long-term e-cigarette vapor exposure on a panel of normal epithelial and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. HaCaT, UMSCC10B, and HN30 were treated with nicotine-containing and nicotine-free vapor extract from two popular e-cigarette brands for periods ranging from 48 h to 8 weeks. Cytotoxicity was assessed using Annexin V flow cytometric analysis, trypan blue exclusion, and clonogenic assays. Genotoxicity in the form of DNA strand breaks was quantified using the neutral comet assay and γ-H2AX immunostaining. E-cigarette-exposed cells showed significantly reduced cell viability and clonogenic survival, along with increased rates of apoptosis and necrosis, regardless of e-cigarette vapor nicotine content. They also exhibited significantly increased comet tail length and accumulation of γ-H2AX foci, demonstrating increased DNA strand breaks. E-cigarette vapor, both with and without nicotine, is cytotoxic to epithelial cell lines and is a DNA strand break-inducing agent. Further assessment of the potential carcinogenic effects of e-cigarette vapor is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Native immunogold labeling of cell surface proteins and viral glycoproteins for cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hong; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Alonas, Eric; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hampton, Cheri M; Lamb, Kristen M; Hammonds, Jason E; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2015-10-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for immunogold labeling of thick, cryo-preserved biological specimens. However, most of the methods are permutations of chemical fixation and sample sectioning, which select and isolate the immunolabeled region of interest. We describe a method for combining immunogold labeling with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) of the surface proteins of intact mammalian cells or the surface glycoproteins of assembling and budding viruses in the context of virus-infected mammalian cells cultured on EM grids. In this method, the cells were maintained in culture media at physiologically relevant temperatures while sequentially incubated with the primary and secondary antibodies. Subsequently, the immunogold-labeled specimens were vitrified and observed under cryo-conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Cryo-EM and cryo-ET examination of the immunogold-labeled cells revealed the association of immunogold particles with the target antigens. Additionally, the cellular structure was unaltered by pre-immunolabeling chemical fixation and retained well-preserved plasma membranes, cytoskeletal elements, and macromolecular complexes. We think this technique will be of interest to cell biologists for cryo-EM and conventional studies of native cells and pathogen-infected cells. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antioxidant defense in quiescent cells determines selectivity of electron transport chain inhibition-induced cell death

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blecha, Jan; Novais, Silvia Magalhaes; Rohlenová, Kateřina; Novotná, Eliška; Lettlová, Sandra; Schmitt, S.; Zischka, H.; Neužil, Jiří; Rohlena, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 112, NOV 2017 (2017), s. 253-266 ISSN 0891-5849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22823S; GA ČR GA17-20904S; GA ČR GA16-12719S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-31604A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Electron transport chain * Supercomplexes * Antioxidant defense * SOD2 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.606, year: 2016

  2. High-speed counting and sizing of cells in an impedance flow microcytometer with compact electronic instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Fernandez, Oscar; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Gomila, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a high-throughput impedance flow cytometer on a chip. This device was built using compact and inexpensive electronic instrumentation. The system was used to count and size a mixed cell sample containing red blood cells and white blood cells. It demonstrated a counting capacity of...

  3. Advantages of indium-tin oxide-coated glass slides in correlative scanning electron microscopy applications of uncoated cultured cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluk, H.; Stokes, D.J.; Lich, B.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A method of direct visualization by correlative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence light microscopy of cell structures of tissue cultured cells grown on conductive glass slides is described. We show that by growing cells on indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass slides, secondary

  4. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  5. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron-neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron-ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  6. Okadaic acid inhibits cell growth and photosynthetic electron transport in the alga Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perreault, Francois; Matias, Marcelo Seleme; Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, LABTOX, Depto. de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, CEP: 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan, E-mail: popovic.radovan@uqam.ca [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), which is produced by several dinoflagellate species, is a phycotoxin known to induce a decrease of biomass production in phytoplankton. However, the mechanisms of OA cytotoxicity are still unknown in microalgae. In this study, we exposed the green microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta to OA concentrations of 0.05 to 0.5 {mu}M in order to evaluate its effects on cell division, reactive oxygen species production and photosynthetic electron transport. After 72 h of treatment under continuous illumination, OA concentrations higher than 0.10 {mu}M decreased culture cell density, induced oxidative stress and inhibited photosystem II electron transport capacity. OA effect in D. tertiolecta was strongly light dependent since no oxidative stress was observed when D. tertiolecta was exposed to OA in the dark. In the absence of light, the effect of OA on culture cell density and photosystem II activity was also significantly reduced. Therefore, light appears to have a significant role in the toxicity of OA in microalgae. Our results indicate that the site of OA interaction on photosynthetic electron transport is likely to be at the level of the plastoquinone pool, which can lead to photo-oxidative stress when light absorbed by the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II cannot be dissipated via photochemical pathways. These findings allowed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of OA toxicity in microalgae. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposition of Dunaliella tertiolecta to okadaic acid in light conditions results in reactive oxygen species formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of photosystem II is dependent on oxidative stress and effects of okadaic acid on the plastoquinone pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis increase okadaic acid effect on cell density in light conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Okadaic acid induces toxicity in algae via both light-dependent and light

  7. Imaging heterostructured quantum dots in cultured cells with epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Erin M.; Trujillo Provencio, Casilda; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Rastogi, Pawan; Dennis, Allison; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Serrano, Elba

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with extensive imaging and diagnostic capabilities, including the potential for single molecule tracking. Commercially available QDs offer distinct advantages over organic fluorophores, such as increased photostability and tunable emission spectra, but their cadmium selenide (CdSe) core raises toxicity concerns. For this reason, replacements for CdSe-based QDs have been sought that can offer equivalent optical properties. The spectral range, brightness and stability of InP QDs may comprise such a solution. To this end, LANL/CINT personnel fabricated moderately thick-shell novel InP QDs that retain brightness and emission over time in an aqueous environment. We are interested in evaluating how the composition and surface properties of these novel QDs affect their entry and sequestration within the cell. Here we use epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to evaluate the structural properties of cultured Xenopus kidney cells (A6; ATCC) that were exposed either to commercially available CdSe QDs (Qtracker® 565, Invitrogen) or to heterostructured InP QDs (LANL). Epifluorescence imaging permitted assessment of the general morphology of cells labeled with fluorescent molecular probes (Alexa Fluor® ® phalloidin; Hoechst 33342), and the prevalence of QD association with cells. In contrast, TEM offered unique advantages for viewing electron dense QDs at higher resolution with regard to subcellular sequestration and compartmentalization. Preliminary results show that in the absence of targeting moieties, InP QDs (200 nM) can passively enter cells and sequester nonspecifically in cytosolic regions whereas commercially available targeted QDs principally associate with membranous structures within the cell. Supported by: NIH 5R01GM084702.

  8. Importance and Challenges of Electrochemical in Situ Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy for Energy Conversion Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodnik, Nejc; Dehm, Gerhard; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2016-09-20

    The foreseeable worldwide energy and environmental challenges demand renewable alternative sources, energy conversion, and storage technologies. Therefore, electrochemical energy conversion devices like fuel cells, electrolyzes, and supercapacitors along with photoelectrochemical devices and batteries have high potential to become increasingly important in the near future. Catalytic performance in electrochemical energy conversion results from the tailored properties of complex nanometer-sized metal and metal oxide particles, as well as support nanostructures. Exposed facets, surface defects, and other structural and compositional features of the catalyst nanoparticles affect the electrocatalytic performance to varying degrees. The characterization of the nanometer-size and atomic regime of electrocatalysts and its evolution over time are therefore paramount for an improved understanding and significant optimization of such important technologies like electrolyzers or fuel cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) are to a great extent nondestructive characterization tools that provide structural, morphological, and compositional information with nanoscale or even atomic resolution. Due to recent marked advancement in electron microscopy equipment such as aberration corrections and monochromators, such insightful information is now accessible in many institutions around the world and provides huge benefit to everyone using electron microscopy characterization in general. Classical ex situ TEM characterization of random catalyst locations however suffers from two limitations regarding catalysis. First, the necessary low operation pressures in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-9) mbar for TEM are not in line with typical reaction conditions, especially considering electrocatalytic solid-liquid interfaces, so that the active state cannot be assessed. Second, and somewhat related, is the lack of time resolution for the

  9. Nonconjugated Polymer Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as an Efficient Interlayer Promoting Electron Transport for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Fang, Zhimin; Zhou, Weiran; Qiao, Qiquan; Wang, Mingtai; Chen, Tao; Yang, Shangfeng

    2017-09-27

    The interfaces between perovskite layer and electrodes play a crucial role on efficient charge transport and extraction in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Herein, for the first time we applied a low-cost nonconjugated polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a new interlayer between PCBM electron transport layer (ETL) and Ag cathode for high-performance inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (iPSCs), leading to a dramatic efficiency enhancement. The CH3NH3PbI3-xClx-based iPSC device incorporating the PVP interlayer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.55%, which is enhanced by ∼15.9% relative to that of the control device without PVP interlayer (10.83%). The mechanistic investigations based on morphological, optical, and impedance spectroscopic characterizations reveal that incorporation of PVP interlayer promotes electron transport across the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite/Ag interface via PCBM ETL. Besides, PVP incorporation induces the formation of a dipole layer, which may enhance the built-in potential across the device, conjunctly promoting electron transport from PCBM to Ag cathode and consequently leading to significantly improved fill factor (FF) from 58.98 to 66.13%.

  10. Cells on biomaterials--some aspects of elemental analysis by means of electron probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylko, G

    2016-02-01

    Electron probe X-ray microanalysis enables concomitant observation of specimens and analysis of their elemental composition. The method is attractive for engineers developing tissue-compatible biomaterials. Either changes in element composition of cells or biomaterial can be defined according to well-established preparation and quantification procedures. However, the qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis appears more complicated when cells or thin tissue sections are deposited on biomaterials. X-ray spectra generated at the cell/tissue-biomaterial interface are modelled using a Monte Carlo simulation of a cell deposited on borosilicate glass. Enhanced electron backscattering from borosilicate glass was noted until the thickness of the biological layer deposited on the substrate reached 1.25 μm. It resulted in significant increase in X-ray intensities typical for the elements present in the cellular part. In this case, the mean atomic number value of the biomaterial determines the strength of this effect. When elements are present in the cells only, the positive linear relationship appears between X-ray intensities and cell thickness. Then, spatial dimensions of X-ray emission for the particular elements are exclusively in the range of the biological part and the intensities of X-rays become constant. When the elements are present in both the cell and the biomaterial, X-ray intensities are registered for the biological part and the substrate simultaneously leading to a negative linear relationship of X-ray intensities in the function of cell thickness. In the case of the analysis of an element typical for the biomaterial, strong decrease in X-ray emission is observed in the function of cell thickness as the effect of X-ray absorption and the limited excitation range to biological part rather than to the substrate. Correction procedures for calculations of element concentrations in thin films and coatings deposited on substrates are well established in

  11. Whole cell cryo-electron tomography reveals distinct disassembly intermediates of vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Cyrklaff

    Full Text Available At each round of infection, viruses fall apart to release their genome for replication, and then reassemble into stable particles within the same host cell. For most viruses, the structural details that underlie these disassembly and assembly reactions are poorly understood. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET, a unique method to investigate large and asymmetric structures at the near molecular resolution, was previously used to study the complex structure of vaccinia virus (VV. Here we study the disassembly of VV by cryo-ET on intact, rapidly frozen, mammalian cells, infected for up to 60 minutes. Binding to the cell surface induced distinct structural rearrangements of the core, such as a shape change, the rearrangement of its surface spikes and de-condensation of the viral DNA. We propose that the cell surface induced changes, in particular the decondensation of the viral genome, are a prerequisite for the subsequent release of the vaccinia DNA into the cytoplasm, which is followed by its cytoplasmic replication. Generally, this is the first study that employs whole cell cryo-ET to address structural details of pathogen-host cell interaction.

  12. Carbon quantum dots shuttle electrons to the anode of a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, A S; Aiyer, Kartik S; Chunduri, L A A; Venkataramaniah, K; Siva Sankara Sai, S; Rao, Govind

    2016-12-01

    Electrodes based on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanomaterials have been used in the anode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Carbon quantum dots (C-dots) are a class of versatile nanomaterials hitherto not reported in MFCs. C-dots previously synthesized from coconut husk were reported to possess hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups on their surface. The presence of these functional groups on a carbon matrix conferred on the C-dots the ability to conduct and transfer electrons. Formation of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate upon addition of C-dots confirmed their reducing ability. DREAM assay using a mixed microbial culture containing C-dots showed a 172% increase in electron transfer activity and thus confirmed the involvement of C-dots in supplementing redox activity of a microbial culture. Addition of C-dots as a suspension in the anode chamber of an MFC resulted in a 22.5% enhancement in maximum power density. C-dots showed better performance as electron shuttles than methylene blue, a conventional electron shuttle used in MFCs.

  13. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron and hole drift mobility measurements on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Brian; Long, Qi; Schiff, Eric A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Abbas, Hisham; Dalal, Vikram L. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-04-25

    We report nanosecond domain time-of-flight measurements of electron and hole photocarriers in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The mobilities ranged from 0.06 to 1.4 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature, but there is little systematic difference between the two carriers. We also find that the drift mobilities are dispersive (time-dependent). The dispersion parameters are in the range of 0.4–0.7, and they imply that terahertz domain mobilities will be much larger than nanosecond domain mobilities. The temperature-dependences of the dispersion parameters are consistent with confinement of electron and hole transport to fractal-like spatial networks within nanoseconds of their photogeneration.

  15. Efficient inverted polymer solar cells integrated with a compound electron extraction layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Qian-Kun; Li, Chi; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2015-12-01

    We constructed an effective electron extraction layer (EEL) used for polymer solar cells by integrating one new kind of organic material of 4,4‧-(1,4-phenylene) bis(2-phenyl-6-p-tolylnicotinonitrile) (p-PPtNT) and cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) used as a compound EEL (CEEL). The CEEL based device exhibits an ideal PCE of 4.15%, corresponding to an enhancement 220% in contrast to that of control device without EEL, which is also comparable to that of ZnO based device. Our analyses indicated that the remarkably improved PCE for CEEL based device is mainly ascribed to the Ohmic contact and the negligible electron extraction barrier at cathode/active layer by inserting CEEL.

  16. Performance of sodium bromate as cathodic electron acceptor in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongyan; Yang, Huimin; Liu, Xian; Zhao, Yu; Liang, Zhenhai

    2016-02-01

    The potential of using sodium bromate as a cathodic electron acceptor in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was determined in this study. The effects of sodium bromate concentration and initial catholyte pH on the electricity production of the MFC were investigated. The MFC performance improved with increasing sodium bromate concentration and decreasing catholyte pH. The maximum voltage output (0.538 V), power density (1.4908 W m(-3)), optimal open circuit potential (1.635 V), coulombic efficiency (11.1%), exchange current density (0.538 A m(-3)) and charge transfer resistance (4274.1 Ω) were obtained at pH 3.0 and 100 mM sodium bromate. This work is the first to confirm that sodium bromate could be used as an electron acceptor in MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In situ observation of water in a fuel cell catalyst using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Satoru; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Koizumi, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki

    2015-04-01

    To visualize water in the catalyst of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), backscattered electron (BSE) imaging by means of scanning electron microscopy was employed. To confine a wet specimen of catalyst, an environmental wet cell was manufactured with a silicon nitride thin film (∼100 nm) as the beam window. By supplying humidified gas into the cell, a change in BSE brightness was detected in the catalyst attached to the silicon nitride window. As humidification proceeded, the BSE image became darker and returned brighter by switching to a dry gas. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the energy and number of BSE obtained after passing through water with thickness d. Combining the results of the Monte Carlo simulation successfully converted the change in brightness to the change in thickness from d = 100 nm to d = 3 μm. This established method of evaluating water with a thickness resolution of the order of Δd = 100 nm can be applied to in situ observations of the catalyst in a PEFC during operation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Efficient Regular Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Pristine [70]Fullerene as Electron-Selective Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collavini, Silvia; Kosta, Ivet; Völker, Sebastian F; Cabanero, German; Grande, Hans J; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Delgado, Juan Luis

    2016-06-08

    [70]Fullerene is presented as an efficient alternative electron-selective contact (ESC) for regular-architecture perovskite solar cells (PSCs). A smart and simple, well-described solution processing protocol for the preparation of [70]- and [60]fullerene-based solar cells, namely the fullerene saturation approach (FSA), allowed us to obtain similar power conversion efficiencies for both fullerene materials (i.e., 10.4 and 11.4 % for [70]- and [60]fullerene-based devices, respectively). Importantly, despite the low electron mobility and significant visible-light absorption of [70]fullerene, the presented protocol allows the employment of [70]fullerene as an efficient ESC. The [70]fullerene film thickness and its solubility in the perovskite processing solutions are crucial parameters, which can be controlled by the use of this simple solution processing protocol. The damage to the [70]fullerene film through dissolution during the perovskite deposition is avoided through the saturation of the perovskite processing solution with [70]fullerene. Additionally, this fullerene-saturation strategy improves the performance of the perovskite film significantly and enhances the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on different ESCs (i.e., [60]fullerene, [70]fullerene, and TiO2 ). Therefore, this universal solution processing protocol widens the opportunities for the further development of PSCs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Universal Features of Electron Dynamics in Solar Cells with TiO2 Contact: From Dye Solar Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todinova, Anna; Idígoras, Jesús; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Anta, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    The electron dynamics of solar cells with mesoporous TiO2 contact is studied by electrochemical small-perturbation techniques. The study involved dye solar cells (DSC), solid-state perovskite solar cells (SSPSC), and devices where the perovskite acts as sensitizer in a liquid-junction device. Using a transport-recombination continuity equation we found that mid-frequency time constants are proper lifetimes that determine the current-voltage curve. This is not the case for the SSPSC, where a lifetime of ∼1 μs, 1 order of magnitude longer, is required to reproduce the current-voltage curve. This mismatch is attributed to the dielectric response on the mid-frequency component. Correcting for this effect, lifetimes lie on a common exponential trend with respect to open-circuit voltage. Electron transport times share a common trend line too. This universal behavior of lifetimes and transport times suggests that the main difference between the cells is the power to populate the mesoporous TiO2 contact with electrons.

  20. Visualising impregnated chitosan in Pinus radiata early wood cells using light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Adya P; Singh, Tripti; Rickard, Catherine L

    2010-04-01

    Chitosan, a deacetylated product of an abundant naturally occurring biopolymer chitin, has been used in a range of applications, particularly in food and health areas, as an antimicrobial agent. In the work reported here Pinus radiata wood was impregnated with chitosan as an environmentally compatible organic biocide (Eikenes et al., 2005a,b) to protect wood against wood deteriorating microorganisms and to thus prolong the service life of wooden products. We developed sample preparation techniques targeted to visualise impregnated chitosan within wood tissues using light microscope and field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Sections were viewed with the light microscope without staining with a dye as well as after staining with the dye toluidine blue. Light microscopy was also undertaken on sections that had been stained with 1% aqueous osmium tetroxide (OsO(4)). For SEM observations, the sections were treated with OsO(4) and then examined with the FE-SEM, first in the secondary electron imaging mode (SEI) and then in the backscattered electron imaging (BEI) mode, imaging the same areas of a section in both SEI and BEI modes. The preparation techniques employed and the combined use of light and scanning electron microscopy provided valuable complementary information, revealing that chitosan had penetrated into the cavities (cell lumens, intercellular spaces) of all sizes present within wood tissues and had also impregnated early wood cell walls. The information obtained is discussed in relation to its importance in further development of chitosan formulations and refinement of impregnation technologies to optimise chitosan impregnation into and distribution within wood tissues as well as in assessing chitosan efficacy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Underestimation of the Maximal Capacity of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport System in Oligomycin-Treated Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana S Ruas

    Full Text Available The maximal capacity of the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS in intact cells is frequently estimated by promoting protonophore-induced maximal oxygen consumption preceded by inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation by oligomycin. In the present study, human glioma (T98G and U-87MG and prostate cancer (PC-3 cells were titrated with different concentrations of the protonophore CCCP to induce maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR within respirometers in a conventional growth medium. The results demonstrate that the presence of oligomycin or its A-isomer leads to underestimation of maximal ETS capacity. In the presence of oligomycin, the spare respiratory capacity (SRC, i.e., the difference between the maximal and basal cellular OCR, was underestimated by 25 to 45%. The inhibitory effect of oligomycin on SRC was more pronounced in T98G cells and was observed in both suspended and attached cells. Underestimation of SRC also occurred when oxidative phosphorylation was fully inhibited by the ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin. Further experiments indicated that oligomycin cannot be replaced by the adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitors bongkrekic acid or carboxyatractyloside because, although these compounds have effects in permeabilized cells, they do not inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in intact cells. We replaced CCCP by FCCP, another potent protonophore and similar results were observed. Lower maximal OCR and SRC values were obtained with the weaker protonophore 2,4-dinitrophenol, and these parameters were not affected by the presence of oligomycin. In permeabilized cells or isolated brain mitochondria incubated with respiratory substrates, only a minor inhibitory effect of oligomycin on CCCP-induced maximal OCR was observed. We conclude that unless a previously validated protocol is employed, maximal ETS capacity in intact cells should be estimated without oligomycin. The inhibitory effect of an ATP synthase blocker on potent

  2. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddad El-Moznine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentationdeveloped in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell orbattery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. Thisinstrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electroniccards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout ofthe impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambienttemperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc..., were taken withseveral sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and theinfluence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a verynarrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation underPspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility ofobtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results ona 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedancemeasurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper.The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5Vand with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A. The Nyquist diagram resulting from theexperimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internalimpedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the valuesobtained (both theoretical and practical enables us to validate our electronic measurementinstrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  3. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglzim, El-Hassane; Rouane, Amar; El-Moznine, Reddad

    2007-10-17

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentationdeveloped in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell orbattery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. Thisinstrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electroniccards. Software under Hpvee(®) was developed for automatic measurements and the layout ofthe impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambienttemperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc..., were taken withseveral sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and theinfluence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a verynarrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation underPspice(®) of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility ofobtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results ona 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedancemeasurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper).The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5V)and with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A). The Nyquist diagram resulting from theexperimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internalimpedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the valuesobtained (both theoretical and practical) enables us to validate our electronic measurementinstrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  4. Probing electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a nanoelectrode platform and single-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Xie, Ping; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Lieber, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a promising approach for sustainable energy production as they generate electricity directly from metabolism of organic substrates without the need for catalysts. However, the mechanisms of electron transfer between microbes and electrodes, which could ultimately limit power extraction, remain controversial. Here we demonstrate optically transparent nanoelectrodes as a platform to investigate extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, ...

  5. An Essential Role of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Cell Proliferation Is to Enable Aspartate Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Freinkman, Elizaveta; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W.; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Sabatini, David; Birsoy, Kivanc

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enables many metabolic processes, but why its inhibition suppresses cell proliferation is unclear. It is also not well understood why pyruvate supplementation allows cells lacking ETC function to proliferate. We used a CRISPR-based genetic screen to identify genes whose loss sensitizes human cells to phenformin, a complex I inhibitor. The screen yielded GOT1, the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase, loss of which kills cells upon ETC inhibitio...

  6. Electron microscope detection of an endogenous infection of retrovirus-like particles in L20B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason A; Thorley, Bruce R; Bruggink, Leesa D; Marshall, John A

    2013-08-01

    L20B cells are a cell line commonly used for the isolation of poliovirus. The current study indicates that L20B cells are chronically infected with a retrovirus-like particle that replicates in the cytoplasm and buds through the plasma membrane. The findings indicate that care is needed in the use of L20B cells for certain virus isolation studies and emphasize the importance of electron microscope studies as an adjunct to the development of diagnostic virology protocols.

  7. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopy study regarding myofibroblasts in fibroinflammatory epulis and giant cell peripheral granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filioreanu, Ana Maria; Popescu, Eugenia; Cotrutz, C; Cotrutz, Carmen Elena

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblasts represent the main cellular population in the connective tissue; they have a central role in extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, degradation and remodeling. These cells may express a substantial heterogeneity regarding their morphology and functions in pathological conditions and during tissue remodeling. Myofibroblasts are a good example for heterogeneity and phenotypical changes. These cells can be morphologically and immunologically defined by the expression of specific cytoskeleton proteins. Myofibroblasts show cytoplasmic actin microfilaments organized as stress fibers and interconnected by gap or adherens junctions. These cells come also in contact with extracellular matrix by focal contacts. Myofibroblasts play fundamental roles in pathologic conditions, even by activation and proliferation or by deletion. Moreover, these cells seem to be involved in formation and repair of the ECM compounds, proliferation and differentiation of the epithelial, vascular or neurogenic elements. The purpose of the present study is to emphasize the presence and distribution of myofibroblasts in the reactive stromal tissue of granulation tumors in the oral area, fibroinflammatory epulis and giant cells peripheral granuloma, by means of immunocytochemical and transmission electron microscopy studies. Both tumor types shown a common characteristic of the presence of reactive inflammatory stromal tissue and myofibroblasts are a common issue.

  8. Evaluation of blood cell attachment on Er: YAG laser applied root surface using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekici, Ali; Maden, Ilay; Yildiz, Sercan; San, Tangul; Isik, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is dependent on the uninterrupted adhesion, maturation and absorption of fibrin clots to a periodontally compromised root surface. The modification of the root surface with different agents has been used for better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. It is known that Er:YAG laser application on dentin removes the smear layer succesfully. The aim of this study is to observe blood cell attachment and fibrin network formation following ER:YAG laser irradiation on periodontally compromised root surfaces in comparison to chemical root conditioning techniques in vitro. 40 dentin blocks prepared from freshly extracted periodontally compromised hopeless teeth. Specimens were divided in 5 groups; those applied with PBS, EDTA, Citric acid and Er:YAG. They were further divided into two groups: those which had received these applications, and the control group. The specimens were evaluated with scanning electron microscope and micrographs were taken. Smear layer and blood cell attachment scoring was performed. In the Er:YAG laser applied group, smear layer were totally removed. In the blood applied specimens, better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment were observed in the Er:YAG group. In the group that had been applied with citric acid, the smear layer was also removed. The smear layer could not be fully removed in the EDTA group. Er:YAG laser application on the root dentin seems to form a suitable surface for fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. Further clinical studies to support these results are necessitated.

  9. Incremental resistance programming of programmable metallization cells for use as electronic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalanabis, D.; Barnaby, H. J.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Kozicki, M. N.; Vrudhula, S.; Dandamudi, P.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the resistance switching behavior of Ag-Ge-Se based resistive memory (ReRAM) devices, otherwise known as programmable metallization cells (PMC). The devices studied are switched between high and low resistive states under externally applied electrical bias. The presence of multiple resistive states observed under both dc and pulse voltage application makes these devices promising candidates for use as electronic synapses in neuromorphic hardware implementations. Finally, the effect of varying pulse voltage magnitude and width on the change in resistance is observed through measurement.

  10. Two examples of organic opto-electronic devices: Light emitting diodes and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J. L.; Ramos-Ortíz, G.; Miranda, M. L.; Vázquez-Córdova, S.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; Ortíz-Gutiérrez, M.

    2008-12-01

    Organic and polymeric (plastic) opto-electronic devices have been developed over the past decade, and some of them have made the leap from the research laboratory to commercial use. We present a simple and inexpensive method of fabricating organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. The devices are fabricated by the deposition of solid films based on the fluorescent polymer MEH:PPV using the spin-coating technique. The films were sandwiched between electrodes, one of which was made of Bi-Pb-Cd-Sn alloy. An overview of these two devices is also provided.

  11. Assessment of TID Effect of FRAM Memory Cell Under Electron, X-Ray, and Co- 60 gamma Ray Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jingyu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yuanbin

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the total ionizing dose (TID) effect of the memory cell of the ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) under electron, X-ray, and Co-60 γ ray radiation sources. An electron accelerator and an X-ray microbeam from synchrotron, which are used to simulate the given radiation environments, offer local irradiation on the FRAM memory cell. In addition, the Co-60 γ ray source provides global irradiation on the full chip of FRAM. The FRAM memory cell is proved to have a lower failure threshold for TID effect than the ferroelectric thin-film capacitor due to the performance degradation of nMOS transistor in memory cell. The failure phenomenon is studied according to the experimental results of different radiation sources, and the failure mechanism is discussed based on the technology and the characteristics of FRAM memory cell in circuit-level. The difference of device performance is also analyzed for electron irradiation and X-ray irradiation.

  12. A direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell operating in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coman, V.; Gorton, L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry/Biochemistry, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Ludwig, R. [Research Centre Applied Biocatalysis, 8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Harreither, W.; Haltrich, D. [Department of Food Sciences and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Wien (Austria); Ruzgas, T. [Biomedical Laboratory Science, Health and Society, Malmoe University, 20506 Malmoe (Sweden); Laboratory of Chemical Enzymology, A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, 119071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shleev, S.

    2010-02-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterisation of the very first direct electron transfer-based glucose/oxygen biofuel cell (BFC) operating in neutral glucose-containing buffer and human serum. Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase were used as anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively. The following characteristics of the mediator-, separator- and membrane-less, a priori, non-toxic and simple miniature BFC, was obtained: an open-circuit voltage of 0.62 and 0.58 V, a maximum power density of ca. 3 and 4 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at 0.37 and 0.19 V of cell voltage, in phosphate buffer and human serum, respectively. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Magnetoresistance oscillations of two-dimensional electron systems in lateral superlattices with structured unit cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardts, Rolf R.

    2015-11-01

    Model calculations for commensurability oscillations of the low-field magnetoresistance of two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in lateral superlattices, consisting of unit cells with an internal structure, are compared with recent experiments. The relevant harmonics of the effective modulation potential depend not only on the geometrical structure of the modulated unit cell, but also strongly on the nature of the modulation. While higher harmonics of an electrostatically generated surface modulation are exponentially damped at the position of the 2DES about 90 nm below the surface, no such damping appears for strain-induced modulation generated, e.g., by the deposition of stripes of calixarene resist on the surface before cooling down the sample.

  14. Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell based on CdS electron transport layer

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2017-07-02

    We report on planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing a metal chalcogenide (CdS) electron transport layer with power conversion efficiency up to 10.8%. The CdS layer was deposited via solution-process chemical bath deposition at low-temperature (60°C). Pinhole-free and uniform thin films were obtained with good structural, optical and morphological properties. An optimal layer thickness of 60nm yielded an improved open-circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the standard TiO2-based solar cells. Devices showed a higher reproducibility of the results compared to TiO2-based ones. We also tested the effect of annealing temperature on the CdS film and the effect of CdCl2 treatment followed by high temperature annealing (410°C) that is expected to passivate the surface, thus eliminating eventual trap-states inducing recombination.

  15. Real-time observation of protein aggregates in pharmaceutical formulations using liquid cell electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMemmo, Lynn M; Cameron Varano, A; Haulenbeek, Jonathan; Liang, Yanping; Patel, Kaya; Dukes, Madeline J; Zheng, Songyan; Hubert, Mario; Piccoli, Steven P; Kelly, Deborah F

    2017-01-17

    Understanding the properties of protein-based therapeutics is a common goal of biologists and physicians. Technical barriers in the direct observation of small proteins or therapeutic agents can limit our knowledge of how they function in solution and in the body. Electron microscopy (EM) imaging performed in a liquid environment permits us to peer into the active world of cells and molecules at the nanoscale. Here, we employ liquid cell EM to directly visualize a protein-based therapeutic in its native conformation and aggregate state in a time-resolved manner. In combination with quantitative analyses, information from this work contributes new molecular insights toward understanding the behaviours of immunotherapies in a solution state that mimics the human body.

  16. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  17. Fluorinated copper phthalocyanine nanowires for enhancing interfacial electron transport in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok Min; Lou, Sylvia J; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Chen, Lin X; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Marks, Tobin

    2012-12-12

    Zinc oxide is a promising candidate as an interfacial layer (IFL) in inverted organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells due to the n-type semiconducting properties as well as chemical and environmental stability. Such ZnO layers collect electrons at the transparent electrode, typically indium tin oxide (ITO). However, the significant resistivity of ZnO IFLs and an energetic mismatch between the ZnO and the ITO layers hinder optimum charge collection. Here we report that inserting nanoscopic copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F(16)CuPc) layers, as thin films or nanowires, between the ITO anode and the ZnO IFL increases OPV performance by enhancing interfacial electron transport. In inverted P3HT:PC(61)BM cells, insertion of F(16)CuPc nanowires increases the short circuit current density (J(sc)) versus cells with only ZnO layers, yielding an enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ∼3.6% vs ∼3.0% for a control without the nanowire layer. Similar effects are observed for inverted PTB7:PC(71)BM cells where the PCE is increased from 8.1% to 8.6%. X-ray scattering, optical, and electrical measurements indicate that the performance enhancement is ascribable to both favorable alignment of the nanowire π-π stacking axes parallel to the photocurrent flow and to the increased interfacial layer-active layer contact area. These findings identify a promising strategy to enhance inverted OPV performance by inserting anisotropic nanostructures with π-π stacking aligned in the photocurrent flow direction.

  18. Different Cell Types In the Lower Respiratory Tract of the Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. - A Transmission Electron Microscopical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo A.m. Saari

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the trachea and distal airways of 12 healthy adult reindeer were studied with transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of the reindeer respiratory tract corresponded to the findings of previous investigators studying other mammalian species. The epithelium of the trachea and bronchi, down to the level of the distal bronchioli, was composed of three main types of cell: ciliated, goblet, and basal. In the distal brochioli, non-ciliated cells similar to those known as Clara cells were predominant. Numerous electron-dense granules and the cell organelle pattern resembled the Clara cell type observed in laboratory rodents, rabbit, sheep, pig, horse, and llama. Pneumocyte 1 and pneumocyte 2 cells were readily identified in the alveoli. The pneumocyte 2 cells possessed short microvilli and granules with lamellar content. Micropinocytotic vesicles were very numerous in the alveolar wall, and a small number of alveolar macrophages occasionally seen in the alveolar lumen.

  19. Probing the plasma membrane structure of immune cells through the analysis of membrane sheets by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemeier, Björn F; Davis, Mark M

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method to generate plasma membrane sheets that are large enough to visualize the membrane architecture and perform quantitative analyses of protein distributions. This procedure places the sheets on electron microscopy grids, parallel to the imaging plane of the microscope, where they can be characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The basic principle of the technique is that cells are broken open ("ripped") through mechanical forces applied by the separation of two opposing surfaces sandwiching the cell, with one of the surfaces coated onto an EM grid. The exposed inner membrane surfaces can then be visualized with electron dense stains and specific proteins can be detected with gold conjugated probes.

  20. A simple method for environmental cell depressurization for use with an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Naoki; Mizokawa, Ryo; Saito, Minoru; Ishikawa, Akira

    2017-08-09

    With the aid of the environmental cell (EC) in electron microscopy, hydrated specimens have been observed at high resolutions that optical microscopy cannot attain. Due to the ultra-high vacuum conditions of the inner column of the electron microscope, the EC requires sealing films that are sufficiently thin to allow electron transmission and that are sufficiently tough to withstand the pressure difference between the inside and outside of the EC. However, most hydrated specimens can be observed at low vacuum because the saturated vapor pressure of water is known to be 0.02 atm at room temperature. These concepts have been used in the differential pumping system, but it is complicated and relatively expensive. In this work, we propose a simple method for depressurization of the EC using a 'balloon structure' and demonstrate the theoretical benefits and practical improvement for specimen observations in low-vacuum conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Perovskite Solar Cells with ZnO Electron-Transporting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yafei; Liu, Detao; Chen, Hao; Ji, Long; Liu, Chunhua; Ahmad, Waseem; Chen, Zhi David; Li, Shibin

    2018-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have developed rapidly over the past few years, and the power conversion efficiency of PSCs has exceeded 20%. Such high performance can be attributed to the unique properties of perovskite materials, such as high absorption over the visible range and long diffusion length. Due to the different diffusion lengths of holes and electrons, electron transporting materials (ETMs) used in PSCs play a critical role in PSCs performance. As an alternative to TiO2 ETM, ZnO materials have similar physical properties to TiO2 but with much higher electron mobility. In addition, there are many simple and facile methods to fabricate ZnO nanomaterials with low cost and energy consumption. This review focuses on recent developments in the use of ZnO ETM for PSCs. The fabrication methods of ZnO materials are briefly introduced. The influence of different ZnO ETMs on performance of PSCs is then reviewed. The limitations of ZnO ETM-based PSCs and some solutions to these challenges are also discussed. The review provides a systematic and comprehensive understanding of the influence of different ZnO ETMs on PSCs performance and potentially motivates further development of PSCs by extending the knowledge of ZnO-based PSCs to TiO2 -based PSCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Secondary Electron Emission From Solar Cell Coverslides And Its Effect On Absolute Vehicle Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2011-10-01

    It has often been stated that earthed conductive solar cell coverslides are the best way to prevent electrostatic discharges on space solar arrays in GEO. While it is true that such coverslides will prevent differential charging on the solar arrays, it will be shown through NASCAP- 2k simulations that the secondary electron emission of such coverslides is very important for absolute vehicle charging. In particular, carbon nanotube coatings, due to the extremely low secondary electron emission from carbon, may exacerbate absolute vehicle charging. However, if they are earthed, because of their conductivity they may minimize differential charging and the possibility of arcing elsewhere on the spacecraft. Such results may also be true for insulative coverslides if spacecraft thermal blankets are made of materials with high secondary electron emission. Finally, photoemission from coverslides is investigated, with regard to anti-reflection coatings. Surfaces which reflect UV can have low photoemission, while those that absorb may have higher photoemission rates. Thus, anti-reflection coatings may lead to higher absolute spacecraft charging rates. NASCAP-2k simulations will be used to investigate these dependences for realistic spacecraft.

  3. Optimizing electronic standard cell libraries for variability tolerance through the nano-CMOS grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James Alfred; Sinnott, Richard; Stewart, Gordon; Hilder, James A; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2010-08-28

    The project Meeting the Design Challenges of nano-CMOS Electronics (http://www.nanocmos.ac.uk) was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to tackle the challenges facing the electronics industry caused by the decreasing scale of transistor devices, and the inherent variability that this exposes in devices and in the circuits and systems in which they are used. The project has developed a grid-based solution that supports the electronics design process, incorporating usage of large-scale high-performance computing (HPC) resources, data and metadata management and support for fine-grained security to protect commercially sensitive datasets. In this paper, we illustrate how the nano-CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) grid has been applied to optimize transistor dimensions within a standard cell library. The goal is to extract high-speed and low-power circuits which are more tolerant of the random fluctuations that will be prevalent in future technology nodes. Using statistically enhanced circuit simulation models based on three-dimensional atomistic device simulations, a genetic algorithm is presented that optimizes the device widths within a circuit using a multi-objective fitness function exploiting the nano-CMOS grid. The results show that the impact of threshold voltage variation can be reduced by optimizing transistor widths, and indicate that a similar method could be extended to the optimization of larger circuits.

  4. Solution-Processed Nb:SnO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Yang, Dong; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Jiangshan; Zhu, Xuejie; Niu, Jinzhi; Liu, Yucheng; Zhao, Wangen; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2017-01-25

    Electron transport layer (ETL), facilitating charge carrier separation and electron extraction, is a key component in planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We developed an effective ETL using low-temperature solution-processed Nb-doped SnO2 (Nb:SnO2). Compared to the pristine SnO2, the power conversion efficiency of PSCs based on Nb:SnO2 ETL is raised to 17.57% from 15.13%. The splendid performance is attributed to the excellent optical and electronic properties of the Nb:SnO2 material, such as smooth surface, high electron mobility, appropriate electrical conductivity, therefore making a better growth platform for a high quality perovskite absorber layer. Experimental analyses reveal that the Nb:SnO2 ETL significantly enhances the electron extraction and effectively suppresses charge recombination, leading to improved solar cell performance.

  5. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Lucas R; Bakalis, Evangelos; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K; Park, Chiwoo; de Pablo, Juan; Zerbetto, Francesco; Patterson, Joseph P; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2017-11-29

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  6. Reversible Cryopreservation of Living Cells Using an Electron Microscopy Cryo-Fixation Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Huebinger

    Full Text Available Rapid cooling of aqueous solutions is a useful approach for two important biological applications: (I cryopreservation of cells and tissues for long-term storage, and (II cryofixation for ultrastructural investigations by electron and cryo-electron microscopy. Usually, both approaches are very different in methodology. Here we show that a novel, fast and easy to use cryofixation technique called self-pressurized rapid freezing (SPRF is-after some adaptations-also a useful and versatile technique for cryopreservation. Sealed metal tubes with high thermal diffusivity containing the samples are plunged into liquid cryogen. Internal pressure builds up reducing ice crystal formation and therefore supporting reversible cryopreservation through vitrification of cells. After rapid rewarming of pressurized samples, viability rates of > 90% can be reached, comparable to best-performing of the established rapid cooling devices tested. In addition, the small SPRF tubes allow for space-saving sample storage and the sealed containers prevent contamination from or into the cryogen during freezing, storage, or thawing.

  7. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Lucas R. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Bakalis, Evangelos [Dipartimento; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo [Materials; Institute; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Park, Chiwoo [Department; de Pablo, Juan [Materials; Institute; Zerbetto, Francesco [Dipartimento; Patterson, Joseph P. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Laboratory; Gianneschi, Nathan C. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States

    2017-11-16

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  8. Mesoporous SnO₂ single crystals as an effective electron collector for perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zonglong; Zheng, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Zilong; Xiao, Shuang; Yang, Shihe

    2015-07-28

    Mesoporous single crystals are prized for their fast electron transport and high surface area. Here we report the first synthesis of mesoporous SnO2 single crystals (SnO2 MSCs) by a simple silica-templated hydrothermal method, and its application in solution-processed perovskite solar cells (PSCs). A relatively low efficiency (3.76%) was obtained due to the strong charge recombination at the SnO2/perovskite interface. However, by coating a thin TiO2 barrier layer on SnO2via TiCl4 treatment, we were able to achieve an 8.54% power conversion efficiency (PCE). A dynamics study using impedance spectroscopy revealed a much lower transport resistance for the SnO2 MSC-based solar cells than for the TiO2 nanocrystal PSCs, but a stronger recombination. Significantly, the thin TiO2 coating layer on SnO2 considerably reduced the recombination while largely maintaining the superior electron-transport properties.

  9. Cell organelles at uncoated cryofractured surfaces as viewed with the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, P S; Ledbetter, M C

    1976-06-01

    A method of direct visualization of cell organelles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is described. Plant and animal tissues fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide are treated with the ligand thiocarbohydrazide and a second osmium tetroxide solution, to increase their osmium content. Tissues are then dehydrated, infiltrated with an epoxy monomer, and together solidified with dry ice and fractured. The pieces are transferred to pure acetone, critical-point dried, attached to stubs with silver paint and viewed by SEM. The ligating procedure increases the osmium concentration at its original bonding site sufficiently to render the tissue electrically conductive, thus obviating the need for metallic coating. he organelles at the fractured surface are revaled in relation to their osmium incorporation rather than by surface irregularities as with coating methods. The image derived from the uncoated surface approaches in resolution that of transmission electron micrographs of thin sections. A protion of the image arising from a small distance below the surface, while at progressively lower resolution, provides some 3-dimensional information about cell fine structure.

  10. Preparation of electron buffer layer with crystalline ZnO nanoparticles in inverted organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghwan; Kang, Taeho; Choi, Yoon-Young; Oh, Seong-Geun

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles synthesized through sol-gel method were used to fabricate the electron buffer layer in inverted organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) after thermal treatment. To investigate the effect of thermal treatment on the formation of crystalline ZnO nanoparticles, the amorphous ZnO nanoparticles were treated via hydrothermal method. The crystalline phase of ZnO with well-ordered structure could be obtained when the amorphous phase of ZnO was processed under hydrothermal treatment at 170 °C. The crystalline structure of ZnO thin film in inverted organic solar cell could be obtained under relatively low annealing temperature by using thermally treated ZnO nanoparticles. The OPVs fabricated by using crystalline ZnO nanoparticles for electron buffer layer exhibited higher efficiency than the conventional ZnO nanoparticles. The best power conversion efficiency (PCE) was achieved for 7.16% through the ZnO film using the crystalline ZnO nanoparticles. The proposed method to prepared ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) could effectively reduce energy consumption during the fabrication of OPVs, which would greatly contribute to advantages such as lower manufacturing costs, higher productivity and application on flexible substrates.

  11. The development of the cnidoblasts of Hydra; an electron microscope study of cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLAUTTERBACK, D B; FAWCETT, D W

    1959-05-25

    The general histological organization of Hydra is reviewed and electron microscopic observations are presented which bear upon the nature of the mesoglea, the mode of attachment of the contractile processes of the musculo-epithelial cells, and the cytomorphosis of the cnidoblasts. Particular attention is devoted to the changes in form and distribution of the cytoplasmic organelles in the course of nematocyst formation. The undifferentiated interstitial cell is characterized by a small Golgi complex, few mitochondria, virtual absence of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a cytoplasmic matrix crowded with fine granules presumed to be ribonucleoprotein. These cytological characteristics persist through the early part of the period of interstitial cell proliferation which leads to formation of clusters of cnidoblasts. With the initiation of nematocyst formation in the cnidoblasts, numerous membrane-bounded vesicles appear in their cytoplasm. These later coalesce to form a typical endoplasmic reticulum with associated ribonucleoprotein granules. During the ensuing period of rapid growth of the nematocyst the reticulum becomes very extensive and highly organized. Finally, when the nematocyst has attained its full size, the reticulum breaks up again into isolated vesicles. The Golgi complex remains closely applied to the apical pole of the nematocyst throughout its development and apparently contributes to its enlargement by segregating formative material in vacuoles whose contents are subsequently incorporated in the nematocyst. The elaboration of this complex cell product appears to require the cooperative participation of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Their respective roles in the formative process are discussed.

  12. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  14. Interplay between protons and electrons in a firehose-unstable plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Maneva, Yana

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic plasma instabilities originating from unstable, non-Maxwellian shapes of the velocity distribution functions serve as internal degrees of freedom in plasma dynamics, and play an important role near solar current sheets and in solar wind plasmas. In the presence of strong temperature anisotropy (different thermal spreads in the velocity space with respect to the mean magnetic field), plasmas are unstable either to the firehose mode or to the mirror mode in the case of predominant parallel and perpendicular temperatures, respectively. The growth rates of these instabilities and their thresholds depend on plasma properties, such as the temperature anisotropy and the plasma beta. The physics of the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities becomes even more diverse for various shapes of velocity distribution functions and the particle species of interest. Recent studies based on a linear instability analysis show an interplay in the firehose instability between protons and electrons when the both types of particle species are prone to unstable velocity distribution functions and their instability thresholds. In this work we perform for the first time 3D nonlinear PIC (particle-in-cell) numerical simulations to test for the linear-theory prediction of the simultaneous proton-electron firehose instability. The simulation setup allows us not only to evaluate the growth rate of each firehose instability, but also to track its nonlinear evolution and the related wave-particle interactions such as the pitch-angle scattering or saturation effects. The specialty of our simulation is that the magnetic and electric fields have a low numerical noise level by setting a sufficiently large number of super-particles into the simulation box and enhancing the statistical significance of the velocity distribution functions. We use the iPIC3D code with fully periodic boundaries under various conditions of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, which gives insight into the

  15. Structural Integration of Silicon Solar Cells and Lithium-ion Batteries Using Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Sung

    Inkjet printing of electrode using copper nanoparticle ink is presented. Electrode was printed on a flexible glass epoxy composite substrate using drop on demand piezoelectric dispenser and was sintered at 200°C in N 2 gas condition. The printed electrodes were made with various widths and thicknesses. Surface morphology of electrode was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Reliable dimensions for printed electronics were found from this study. Single-crystalline silicon solar cells were tested under four-point bending to find the feasibility of directly integrating them onto a carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminate. These solar cells were not able to withstand 0.2% strain. On the other hand, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells were subjected to flexural fatigue loadings. The current density-voltage curves were analyzed at different cycles, and there was no noticeable degradation on its performance up to 100 cycles. A multifunctional composite laminate which can harvest and store solar energy was fabricated using printed electrodes. The integrated printed circuit board (PCB) was co-cured with a carbon/epoxy composite laminate by the vacuum bag molding process in an autoclave; an amorphous silicon solar cell and a thin-film solid state lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery were adhesively joined and electrically connected to a thin flexible PCB; and then the passive components such as resistors and diodes were electrically connected to the printed circuit board by silver pasting. Since a thin-film solid state Li-ion battery was not able to withstand tensile strain above 0.4%, thin Li-ion polymer batteries were tested under various mechanical loadings and environmental conditions to find the feasibility of using the polymer batteries for our multifunctional purpose. It was found that the Li-ion polymer batteries were stable under pressure and tensile loading without any noticeable degradation on its charge and discharge

  16. Investigation of the Electron Acceleration by a High-Power Laser and a Density-Tapered Mixed-Gas Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinju; Phung, Vanessa L. J.; Kim, Minseok; Hur, Min-Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can generate about 1000 times stronger acceleration field compared with RF-based conventional accelerators, which can be done by high power laser and plasma. There are many issues in this research and one of them is development of a good plasma source for higher electron beam energy. For this purpose, we are investigating a special type of plasma source, which is a density-tapered gas cell with a mixed-gas for easy injection. By this type of special gas cell, we expect higher electron beam energies with easy injection in the wakefield. In this poster, some experimental results for electron beam generation with the density-tapered mixed-gas cell are presented. In addition to the experimental results, CFD (Computational-Fluid-Dynamics) and PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation results are also presented for comparison studies.

  17. Visualization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in 2Dand 3D-Cultures by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Lanthanide Contrasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, I A; Vakhrushev, I V; Antonov, E N; Yarygin, K N; Subbot, A M

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells from deciduous teeth in 2D- and 3D-cultures on culture plastic, silicate glass, porous polystyrene, and experimental polylactoglycolide matrices were visualized by scanning electron microscopy with lanthanide contrasting. Supravital staining of cell cultures with a lanthanide-based dye (neodymium chloride) preserved normal cell morphology and allowed assessment of the matrix properties of the carriers. The developed approach can be used for the development of biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  18. An Efficient, "Burn in" Free Organic Solar Cell Employing a Nonfullerene Electron Acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyojung; Wu, Jiaying; Wadsworth, Andrew; Nagitta, Jade; Limbu, Saurav; Pont, Sebastian; Li, Zhe; Searle, Justin; Wyatt, Mark F; Baran, Derya; Kim, Ji-Seon; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R

    2017-09-01

    A comparison of the efficiency, stability, and photophysics of organic solar cells employing poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3'″-di(2-octyldodecyl)-2,2';5',2″;5″,2'″-quaterthiophen-5,5'″-diyl)] (PffBT4T-2OD) as a donor polymer blended with either the nonfullerene acceptor EH-IDTBR or the fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl C 71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71 BM) as electron acceptors is reported. Inverted PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR blend solar cell fabricated without any processing additive achieves power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 9.5 ± 0.2%. The devices exhibit a high open circuit voltage of 1.08 ± 0.01 V, attributed to the high lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of EH-IDTBR. Photoluminescence quenching and transient absorption data are employed to elucidate the ultrafast kinetics and efficiencies of charge separation in both blends, with PffBT4T-2OD exciton diffusion kinetics within polymer domains, and geminate recombination losses following exciton separation being identified as key factors determining the efficiency of photocurrent generation. Remarkably, while encapsulated PffBT4T-2OD:PC 71 BM solar cells show significant efficiency loss under simulated solar irradiation ("burn in" degradation) due to the trap-assisted recombination through increased photoinduced trap states, PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR solar cell shows negligible burn in efficiency loss. Furthermore, PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR solar cells are found to be substantially more stable under 85 °C thermal stress than PffBT4T-2OD:PC 71 BM devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An Efficient, “Burn in” Free Organic Solar Cell Employing a Nonfullerene Electron Acceptor

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Hyojung

    2017-06-28

    A comparison of the efficiency, stability, and photophysics of organic solar cells employing poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3\\'″-di(2-octyldodecyl)-2,2\\';5\\',2″;5″,2\\'″-quaterthiophen-5,5\\'″-diyl)] (PffBT4T-2OD) as a donor polymer blended with either the nonfullerene acceptor EH-IDTBR or the fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71 BM) as electron acceptors is reported. Inverted PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR blend solar cell fabricated without any processing additive achieves power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 9.5 ± 0.2%. The devices exhibit a high open circuit voltage of 1.08 ± 0.01 V, attributed to the high lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of EH-IDTBR. Photoluminescence quenching and transient absorption data are employed to elucidate the ultrafast kinetics and efficiencies of charge separation in both blends, with PffBT4T-2OD exciton diffusion kinetics within polymer domains, and geminate recombination losses following exciton separation being identified as key factors determining the efficiency of photocurrent generation. Remarkably, while encapsulated PffBT4T-2OD:PC71 BM solar cells show significant efficiency loss under simulated solar irradiation (“burn in” degradation) due to the trap-assisted recombination through increased photoinduced trap states, PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR solar cell shows negligible burn in efficiency loss. Furthermore, PffBT4T-2OD:EH-IDTBR solar cells are found to be substantially more stable under 85 °C thermal stress than PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM devices.

  20. Mapping boron in silicon solar cells using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amorphous silicon solar cells typically consist of stacked layers deposited on plastic or metallic substrates making sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) difficult. The amorphous silicon layer - the active part of the solar cell - is sandwiched between 10-nm-thick n- and p...... by focused ion beam milling in order to map the boron distribution across a 200-nm-thick n-p amorphous silicon junction using energy-filtered TEM and EELS spectrum acquisition. EELS line scans are used to detect boron concentrations as low as 10^20cm-3. We also use monochromated EELS to measure changes...... in the energies of plasmon peaks in the low loss region [5]. We use these approaches to characterize both a thick n-p junction and the 10-nm-thick p-doped layer of a working solar cell. [1] U. Kroll, C. Bucher, S. Benagli, I. Schönbächler, J. Meier, A. Shah, J. Ballutaud, A. Howling, Ch. Hollenstein, A. Büchel, M...

  1. Inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing polymer as the electron conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Yuan, Jianyu; Shi, Guozheng; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Shi, Shaohua; Liu, Zeke; Han, Lu; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Ma, Wanli

    2015-02-25

    Inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing different polymers, poly{[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)} (N2200), poly{[N,N'-bis(alkyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide-2,6-diyl-alt-5,5'-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,2'-(E)-2-(2-(thiophen-2-yl)vinyl)thiophene]} (PNVT-8), and PNDI2OD-TT as electron-transporting material (ETM) have been investigated for the first time. The best device performance was obtained when N2200 was applied as the ETM, with JSC of 14.70 mA/cm2, VOC of 0.84 V, and fill factor (FF) of 66%, corresponding to a decent power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ∼ 8.15%. Which is very competitive to the parameters (JSC 14.65 mA/cm2, VOC 0.83 V, FF 70%, and PCE 8.51%) of the reference device employing conventional PCBM as the ETM. The slightly lower FF could be mainly accounted for by the increased recombination in the polymer contained devices. This work demonstrated that polymeric materials can be used as efficient ETM in perovskite solar cells, and we believe this class of polymeric ETMs will further promote the performance of perovskite photovoltaic cells after extended investigation.

  2. Fine-tuning optical and electronic properties of graphene oxide for highly efficient perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongfa; Kim, Dongcheon; Han, Hongwei; Yusoff, Abd Rashid bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2015-06-28

    Simplifying the process of fine-tuning the electronic and optical properties of graphene oxide (GO) is of importance in order to fully utilize it as the hole interfacial layer (HIL). We introduced silver trifluoromethanesulfonate (AgOTf), an inorganic chemical dopant, that tunes and controls the properties of single-layered GO films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The morphology, work function, mobility, sheet resistance, and transmittance of the GO film were systematically tuned by various doping concentrations. We further developed a solution-processable low-temperature hole interfacial layer (HIL) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS):AgOTf-doped GO HIL in highly efficient perovskite solar cells. The PSS:AgOTf-doped GO HIL grants the desirable charge-collection in the HIL allowing the entire device to be prepared at temperatures less than 120 °C. The fabricated perovskite solar cells utilize a rigid substrate and demonstrate compelling photovoltaic performance with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 11.90%. Moreover, flexible devices prepared using a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)/ITO demonstrate a PCE of 9.67%, while ITO-free flexible devices adopting PET/aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO)/silver (Ag)/AZO demonstrate a PCE of 7.97%. This study shows that the PSS:AgOTf-doped GO HIL has significant potential to contribute to the development of low-cost solar cells.

  3. Power electronics for local fuel cell/-battery plants; Leistungselektronik fuer dezentrale Brennstoffzellen/-Batterieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krykunov, Oleksandr

    2009-10-13

    With their high efficiency and modular structure, fuel cells are an attractive option for decentral power supply. An important component of decentral power supply systems is the power-electronic control element for supply of electric power from the fuel cell to the three-phase electricity grid. Control elements can be constructed of a unidirectional DC/DC converter with a current inverter connnected in series. The investigation focused on the development of the DC/DC converter with minimum constructional and control requirements and optimum adaption of the DC/DC converter to the characteristics of the fuel cell. (orig.) [German] Die Brennstoffzelle stellt mit ihrem hohen Wirkungsgrad und ihrem modularen Aufbau eine attraktive Option fuer die Verwendung in einem dezentralen Energieversorgungssystem dar. Eine wichtige Komponente des dezentralen Energieversorgungssystems sind die leistungselektronischen Stellglieder fuer die Einspeisung der elektrischen Energie aus der Brennstoffzelle in das dreiphasige Netz. Die leistungselektronischen Stellglieder koennen aus einem undirektionalen DC/DC-Wandler und einem nachgeschalteten Wechselrichter realisiert werden. Die Entwicklung des DC/DC-Wandlers mit einem moeglichst geringeren Bauelemente- und Steuerungsaufwand fuer diese leistungselektronischen Stellglieder und die Anpassung des DC/DC-Wandlers an die Eigenschaften der Brennstoffzelle war das Ziel dieser Arbeit. (orig.)

  4. Power sources for portable electronics and hybrid cars: lithium batteries and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrosati, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The activities in progress in our laboratory for the development of batteries and fuel cells for portable electronics and hybrid car applications are reviewed and discussed. In the case of lithium batteries, the research has been mainly focused on the characterization of new electrode and electrolyte materials. Results related to disordered carbon anodes and improved, solvent-free, as well as gel-type, polymer electrolytes are particularly stressed. It is shown that the use of proper gel electrolytes, in combination with suitable electrode couples, allows the development of new types of safe, reliable, and low-cost lithium ion batteries which appear to be very promising power sources for hybrid vehicles. Some of the technologies proven to be successful in the lithium battery area are readapted for use in fuel cells. In particular, this approach has been followed for the preparation of low-cost and stable protonic membranes to be proposed as an alternative to the expensive, perfluorosulfonic membranes presently used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Copyright 2005 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  5. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material.

  6. Push–pull effect on the geometries, electronic and optical properties of thiophene based dye-sensitized solar cell materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Irfan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometries, electronic structure and electronic absorption spectra of thiophene based dye-sensitized solar cells were performed using Density Functional Theory (DFT and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT. Different electron donating and electron withdrawing groups have been substituted. Geometries and electronic properties have been computed at B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ and absorption spectra at TD-B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ level of theory. Major change in bond lengths and bond angles occurs in the system where there is electron withdrawing or electron donating groups have been substituted. In SYSTEM-2 and SYSTEM-3 intra charge transfer has been observed. HOMO of SYSTEM-2 and SYSTEM-3 is delocalized on left side while LUMO on right side of the molecule. In SYSTEM-1, HOMO is on left side while LUMO is in the center. The designed systems show two absorption peaks for each of the system. In short, choice of appropriate electron withdrawing and donating groups is very important for improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  7. Pristine fullerenes mixed by vacuum-free solution process: Efficient electron transport layer for planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Si-Min; Tian, Han-Rui; Zhang, Mei-Lin; Xing, Zhou; Wang, Lu-Yao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Tan; Deng, Lin-Long; Xie, Su-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites ignites the dream of next-generation solar cells fabricated by low-cost solution processing. To date, fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM), is the most prevalently used electron transport layer for high efficiency p-i-n planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Compared with PC61BM, pristine fullerenes, such as C60 and C70, have shown superiority of higher electron mobility and much lower costs. Due to the poor solubility and strong tendency to crystallize for pristine fullerenes in solution process, it is still a challenge to deposit compact and continuous film of pristine fullerenes for p-i-n type perovskite solar cells by solution processing. Herein, solution processed pristine fullerenes (C60 and C70) were used as electron transport layers to replace PC61BM in perovskite solar cells with high performance and enhanced stability. Power conversion efficiency of 14.04% was obtained by using mixture of C60 and C70 as electron transport layer, which is comparable to that of PC61BM based device (13.74%). We demonstrated that the strong tendency of pristine fullerenes to crystallize during solvent removal can be largely mitigated by mixing different kinds of pristine fullerenes. These findings implicate pristine fullerenes as promising electron transport layers for high performance perovskite solar cells.

  8. Investigation of solar cells fabricated on low-cost silicon sheet materials using 1 MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachare, A. H.; Hyland, S. L.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of high energy electron irradiation is investigated as a controlled means to study in more detail the junction depletion layer processes of solar cells made on various low-cost silicon sheet materials. Results show that solar cells made on Czochralski grown silicon exhibit enhancement of spectral response in the shorter wavelength region when irradiated with high energy electrons. The base region damage can be reduced by subsequent annealing at 450 C which restores the degraded longer wavelength response, although the shorter wavelength enhancement persists. The second diode component of the cell dark forward bias current is also reduced by electron irradiation, while thermal annealing at 450 C without electron irradiation can also produce these same effects. Electron irradiation produces small changes in the shorter wavelength spectral responses and junction improvements in solar cells made on WEB, EFG, and HEM silicon. It is concluded that these beneficial effects on cell characteristics are due to the reduction of oxygen associated deep level recombination centers in the N(+) diffused layer and in the junction.

  9. Effect of Energy Alignment, Electron Mobility, and Film Morphology of Perylene Diimide Based Polymers as Electron Transport Layer on the Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Xu, Yingxue; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Bing; Zhou, Erjun; Wang, Fuzhi; Bai, Yiming; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2017-03-29

    For organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells (PerSCs), the electron transport layer (ETL) plays a crucial role in efficient electron extraction and transport for high performance PerSCs. Fullerene and its derivatives are commonly used as ETL for p-i-n structured PerSCs. However, these spherical small molecules are easy to aggregate with high annealing temperature and thus induce morphology stability problems. N-type conjugated polymers are promising candidates to overcome these problems due to the tunable energy levels, controllable aggregation behaviors, and good film formation abilities. Herein, a series of perylene diimide (PDI) based polymers (PX-PDIs), which contain different copolymeried units (X), including vinylene (V), thiophene (T), selenophene (Se), dibenzosilole (DBS), and cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT), are introduced as ETL for p-i-n structured PerSCs. The effect of energy alignment, electron mobility, and film morphology of these ETLs on the photovoltaic performance of the PerSCs are fully investigated. Among the PX-PDIs, PV-PDI demonstrates the deeper LUMO energy level, the highly delocalized LUMO electron density, and a better planar structure, making it the best electron transport material for PerSCs. The planar heterojunction PerSC with PV-PDI as ETL achieves a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.14%, among the best values for non-fullerene based PerSCs.

  10. Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process driven by microbial fuel cells for triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Dong-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Dong [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Yan, Zhi-Ying [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhou, Jun; Wu, Xia-Yuan [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Wei, Ping [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jia, Hong-Hua [College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Bioenergy Research Institute, Nanjing TECH University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Zheng, Tao, E-mail: zhengtao@ms.giec.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Nengyuan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yong, Yang-Chun, E-mail: ycyong@ujs.edu.cn [Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the Bio-Electron-Fenton (BEF) process for TPTC degradation. - Highlights: • A Bio-Electro-Fenton process was performed for TPTC degradation. • TPTC removal efficiency achieved 78.32 ± 2.07% within 100 h. • The TPTC degradation rate (0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}) was much higher than previous reports. - Abstract: The intensive use of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) has caused serious environmental pollution. In this study, an effective method for TPTC degradation was proposed based on the Bio-Electron-Fenton process in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum voltage of the MFC with graphite felt as electrode was 278.47% higher than that of carbon cloth. The electricity generated by MFC can be used for in situ generation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to a maximum of 135.96 μmol L{sup −1} at the Fe@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3(*)}/graphite felt composite cathode, which further reacted with leached Fe{sup 2+} to produce hydroxyl radicals. While 100 μmol L{sup −1} TPTC was added to the cathodic chamber, the degradation efficiency of TPTC reached 78.32 ± 2.07%, with a rate of 0.775 ± 0.021 μmol L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This Bio-Electron-Fenton driving TPTC degradation might involve in Sn−C bonds breaking and the main process is probably a stepwise dephenylation until the formation of inorganic tin and CO{sub 2}. This study provides an energy saving and efficient approach for TPTC degradation.

  11. Application of solution processable squaraine dyes as electron donors for organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B Ananda; Yesudas, K; Kumar, G Siva; Bhanuprakash, K; Rao, V Jayathirtha; Sharma, G D; Singh, S P

    2013-09-01

    New low bandgap small molecules based on a squaraine (SQ) chromophore, bis[4-(2,6-di-tert-butyl)vinylpyrylium]squaraine (TBU-SQ), bis[2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)pyrylium]squaraine (MeTBU-SQ) and bis[4-(but-1-en-2-yl)-2,6-di-tert-butylpyrylium]squaraine (EtTBU-SQ), were synthesized and used as electron donors along with PC70BM for their application in solution processed organic bulk-heterojunction (OBHJ) solar cell (SC). The long wavelength of these SQ dyes are located in between 650-750 nm in thin films and the optical bandgaps are about 1.64, 1.52 and 1.48 eV, respectively. The electrochemical properties of these SQ dyes indicate that they are well suited for the fabrication of OBHJSCs as electron donors along with fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors. The OBHJ photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated with the blend of TBU-SQ:PC70BM, MeTBU-SQ:PC70BM and EtTBU-SQ:PC70BM cast from chloroform (CF) solvent exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.71%, 2.15%, and 1.89%, respectively. The PCE of the OBHJSCs based on MeTBU-SQ:PC70BM blends cast from DIO-THF (DIO = 1,8-diiodooctane) additive solvent and cast from DIO-THF with subsequent thermal annealing have been further improved up to 2.73% and 3.14%, respectively. This enhancement in the PCE is attributed to the improvement in the crystalline nature of the blend and more balanced charge transport resulting from the higher hole mobility. All these results have been supported by the quantum chemical calculations.

  12. Silicotungstate, a Potential Electron Transporting Layer for Low-Temperature Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ho; Kim, Hyun Bin; Yang, In Seok; Sung, Sang Do; Choi, Young Sik; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Wan In

    2017-08-02

    Thin films of a heteropolytungstate, lithium silicotungstate (Li 4 SiW 12 O 40 , termed Li-ST), prepared by a solution process at low temperature, were successfully applied as electron transporting layer (ETL) of planar-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Dense and uniform Li-ST films were prepared on FTO glass by depositing a thin Li-ST buffer layer, followed by coating of a main Li-ST layer. The film thickness was controlled by varying the number of coating cycles, consisting of spin-coating and thermal treatment at 150 °C. In particular, by employing 60 nm-thick Li-ST layer obtained by two cycles of coating, the fabricated CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 PSC device demonstrates the photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.26% with J SC of 22.16 mA cm -2 , V OC of 0.993 mV and FF of 64.81%. The obtained PCE is significantly higher than that of the PSC employing a TiO 2 layer processed at the same temperature (PCE = 12.27%). Spectroscopic analyses by time-resolved photoluminescence and pulsed light-induced transient measurement of photocurrent indicate that the Li-ST layer collects electrons from CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 more efficiently and also exhibits longer electron lifetime than the TiO 2 layer thermally treated at 150 °C. Thus, Li-ST is considered to be a promising ETL material that can be applied for the fabrication of flexible PSC devices.

  13. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)