WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspense horror poetry

  1. Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratta, Leslie, Ed.

    1966-01-01

    Thirteen articles on effective classroom teaching of poetry are collected in this bulletin. The relationships of poetry to emotion and to experience are discussed by Barbara Hardy and Donald Thomas. Effective techniques for the British Junior Schools are explored in three articles: Peter Searby and Geoffrey Summerfield create a hypothetical…

  2. Enactive Horror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    Threat simulations in the form of horror stories have existed for thousands of years because they satisfy an evolved appetite for vicarious experience with danger and negative emotion. Now, haunted attractions, or haunts, are becoming a multi-million dollar industry in North America and abroad...... to facilitate immersion and the elicitation of negative emotions ranging from disgust to fear in costumers. In contrast to observational horror (e.g. in literature and film), which situates audiences as passive observers, haunts position visitors as active participants in live-action horror scenarios. Haunts...... thus potentially fulfill the function of providing consumers with threat simulations more effectively than does observational horror....

  3. El horror antes del horror

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez-Varea, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    El autor de este ensayo precisa la definición y alcance del género del horror y establece qué elementos del mismo se trasfunden en las primeras historietas del siglo XX y cómo se deslizan y transforman en algunos personajes de los cómics americanos previos a la gran proliferación del género en los comic books.

  4. Horror films and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Forcen, Fernando Espi; Shand, John Preston

    2014-10-01

    Horror films have been popular for generations. The purpose of this article is to illustrate psychiatric conditions, themes and practice seen in horror films. Horror films often either include psychiatrists as characters or depict (Hollywood's dangerous version of) serious mental illness. Demonic possession, zombies, and 'slasher' killers are described, as well as the horror genre's characterizations of psychiatrists. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  5. Horror and evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Pišev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the relationship between the real and the unreal in horror literature. Its basic premise is that the concept of evil in horror stories stems from liminal content which is the product of the authors' subjective experiences of reality. The aim of the paper is to answer the question of whether such conceptualizations of evil can be put into a certain socio-cultural context, or are they arbitrary seeing as they are rooted in the imagination of individual writers. In order to understand this dilemma, this paper focuses on the analysis of instructions for writing horror stories in the form of books, essays and forewords formulated by leading contemporary horror authors, which, among other things, consider the thematization of evil in horror prose.

  6. The Humor in Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Cosette

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of horror fiction for teenagers focuses on the element of humor. Topics include parodies, plots, the element of mystery, cover art, end-of-chapter cliffhangers, and formula books. An annotated list of 10 pertinent titles is included. (LRW)

  7. Horror and evil

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Pišev

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the relationship between the real and the unreal in horror literature. Its basic premise is that the concept of evil in horror stories stems from liminal content which is the product of the authors' subjective experiences of reality. The aim of the paper is to answer the question of whether such conceptualizations of evil can be put into a certain socio-cultural context, or are they arbitrary seeing as they are rooted in the imagination of individual writers. In order to...

  8. Horror Vacui Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson used with children in the third grade to help them learn about symmetry, as well as encouraging them to draw larger than usual. Explains that students learn about the belief called "Horror Vacui" of the Northwest American Indian tribes and create their interpretation of this belief. (CMK)

  9. Three paradigms of horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Ognjanović

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the definition of horror as a literary genre the core story of which is based on a meeting with threatening Otherness whose influx into consensual reality and it’s tacit normality creates unrest and awakens fear in the protagonists and the audience, this paper defines the three key paradigms of the horror genre, based on the causes of fear, or rather the “monstrous” Otherness in them. Paradigm 1 concerns the “fear of one’s own self”: the root of the fear is inside, in the individual psyche, in the split, deceived, or in some other way unreliable self which is, consciously or unconsciously, harmful to others, and ultimately to itself. Paradigm 2 deals with the “Fear of others”: the root of fear is outside and is concerned with other people and other creatures which have an urge to occupy a certain human microcosm. Paradigm 3 is concerned with the “Fear of the numinous”: the root of the fear is mostly situated on the outside; however its shape is amorphous, ambivalent and unknowable. The “monster” is faceless; it touches on primary forces of the divine/demonic, and as such is situated on the very border between inside/outside. All three paradigms, with their main approaches and constitutive elements, are modulated through two basic possible treatments: the conservative and the progressive (liberal, which affords a total of six basic variations of horror. Starting from definitions given by John Carpenter, Robin Wood and his own, the author analyzes representative examples from horror literature and film for each paradigm and its variation, with a special accent on the image of Otherness and its connection to the norm, its intrusion into the status quo, anthropocentrism and the presence or absence of a happy ending. The paper demonstrates the richness of connotative potential within the horror genre and provides a basis for its taxonomy.

  10. on poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... ABSTRACT. This article investigates the uniqueness of poetry. Special attention is given to the ars poetica of the poetry of Cas Vos. Other poems are also discussed. The binding force of metaphors in poetry is considered. The essence and expressiveness of poetry are explained through several different.

  11. After the horror, the heroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    All of us will have felt shock and horror over the Manchester Arena bombing. That someone could descend into the barbarism required to target young concert goers is beyond belief. But after the horror came the heroes, as children's nurses stood shoulder to shoulder. The public was informed of the courage, dedication and commitment of the emergency services and NHS staff.

  12. Creating Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  13. Poetry Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  14. Rich and Strange: The Yuppie Horror Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Barry Keith

    1996-01-01

    States that many critics concerned with genre theory deny that the genres of horror and science fiction are flexible and adaptable. Discusses a group of recent American horror films that present a distinct variation of the horror film, including "Fatal Attraction,""Single White Female," and "After Hours." Concludes…

  15. Horror: To Gratify, Not Edify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Randi

    1998-01-01

    Examines R.L. Stine's "Goosebumps" series, and investigates why children (including the author's two daughters) like them. Explores the lures of the horror fiction genre. Suggests that the attractiveness of the genre can be found in books more rewarding in literary terms, such as those by John Bellairs. Offers suggestions about the…

  16. Poetry corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Lee, Shayna

    2017-05-01

    This section briefly presents poetry with a psychology theme. This submission was made by The Cummings Center for the History of Psychology's reference archivist Lizette Royer. Two transcribed poems by Knight Dunlap are presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Intra-Diegetic Cameras as Cinematic Actor Assemblages in Found Footage Horror Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødje, Kjetil

    2017-01-01

    that comprises what is commonly known as human actors as well as material entities that play an active part in motion picture images. The use of intra-diegetic cameras in contemporary found footage horror films constitutes a particular case of such cinematic actor assemblages. Through a dynamic relational...... performance, cameras here take on roles as active agents with the potential to affect other elements within the images as well as the films’ audiences. In found footage horror the assemblage mode of operation creates suspense, since the vulnerability of the camera threatens the viewer's access to the depicted...... events. While human characters and individual entities making up the camera assemblage are disposable, the recording is not. Found footage horror crucially hinges upon the survival of the footage. I will further suggest that these films allow filmmakers to experiment with the acting capabilities of intra...

  18. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the annual annotated list of the best science fiction, fantasy, and horror titles for teens that have been reviewed in this journal. Also includes a sidebar with four annotated titles of nonfiction resources related to science fiction, fantasy, and horror. (LRW)

  19. Monsters Evolve:A Biocultural Approach to Horror Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Clasen, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Horror fiction is a thriving industry. Many consumers pay hard-earned money to be scared witless by films, books, and computer games. The well-told horror story can affect even the most obstinate skeptic. How and why does horror fiction work? Why are people so fascinated with monsters? Why do horror stories generally travel well across cultural borders, if all they do is encode salient culturally contingent anxieties, as some horror scholars have claimed? I argue that an evolutionary perspect...

  20. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 81 science fiction, fantasy, and horror genre titles that were judged best-reads by reviewers in "Voice of Youth Advocates" from June 2001 through April 2002. (LRW)

  1. The unlearning: Horror and transformative theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Arnzen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Building on the foundational concepts of transformative learning theory, I argue that horror fiction strongly encourages perspective transformation by challenging student assumptions about both genre writing and educational experience. I informally describe a specific creative writing class period focusing on the motif of the scream in diverse horror texts, and I illustrate how students learn to transform what they already bring to the classroom by employing a variety of particular in-class writing exercises and literary discussions. Among these, transformative writing exercises—such as the revision of an existing text by Stephen King—are highlighted as instructional techniques. As cautionary literature, horror especially dramatizes strategies of fight versus flight. I reveal how students can learn by transforming their knowledge through disorientation that is particular to reading and writing in the horror genre.

  2. Can an Evolutionary Analysis Dissolve the Paradox of Horror?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, Jens; Clasen, Mathias; Johnson, John

    The paradox of horror” is the problem of why so many people are motivated to experience the negative emotions induced by horror media. In this talk, we argue that an evolutionary analysis may dissolve the paradox of horror. From an evolutionary perspective, horror may be analyzed as a simulation...... technology that allows users to attain adaptive experience with perceived threat and negative emotion in a safe environment. The argument is supported by results from a comprehensive MTurk survey of American users of horror media (n=1,071). Results include findings on the personal details (e.g., sex......), supernatural beliefs (e.g., paranormal beliefs), personality traits (e.g., Big Five), horror genre preferences (e.g., supernatural versus natural horror), and horror-induced emotional responses of users of horror media. The strongest individual predictors of horror media enjoyment are sex (male preference...

  3. The Point of Horror: The Relationship between Teenage Popular Horror Fiction and the Oral Repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Explores the relationship between teenage oral narrative folklore and popular fiction. Concentrates on the use of folklore in the "Point Horror" series occurring on two separate levels; as it is used by the writers and by the publishers. Concludes that there appears to be a strong relationship between "Point Horror" fiction and…

  4. Horror from the Soul--Gothic Style in Allan Poe's Horror Fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe made tremendous contribution to horror fiction. Poe's inheritance of gothic fiction and American literature tradition combined with his living experience forms the background of his horror fictions. He inherited the tradition of the gothic fictions and made innovations on it, so as to penetrate to subconsciousness. Poe's horror…

  5. History and Epic Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Thomas N.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the use of epic poetry in a combined English/history humanities class. Concludes that epic poetry, the combination of history and verse, helps students understand the continuity and meaning of the Western tradition. (CFR)

  6. Poetry is Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, Betty

    1974-01-01

    Relates poetry to journalism, as a kind, or several kinds, of reporting with several of the author's own poems illustrating the thesis. Suggestions for stimulating student poetry writing are given. (TO)

  7. The Opportunity of Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, Per; Grisoni, Louise

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on a radio broadcast about the use of poetry in research, management and organization. It describes the approaches in which poetry has influenced organization and management. The implications of the interrelations among poetry, organization, management and research are also...

  8. Why Is Poetry Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenstein, Barry

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the public's lack of appreciation for poetry. Gives examples of poems expressing irony and emotions. Argues that poetry's philosophy, mode, and tone of communication make it difficult. Considers poetry's subversive, exploratory, and entertaining aspects. Presents detailed analyses of four poems. (DMM)

  9. Angela Ndalianis: The Horror Sensorium: Media and the Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    review of Angela Ndalianis, The Horror Sensorium: Media and the Senses (Jefferson: McFarland, 2012)......review of Angela Ndalianis, The Horror Sensorium: Media and the Senses (Jefferson: McFarland, 2012)...

  10. EEEK! They Just Keep Coming! YA Horror Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Cosette

    1994-01-01

    Describes the increase in production of horror books for teen audiences and compares horror books from a decade ago and today, including subject matter, covers, audiences, fright factors, illustrations, and changing character stereotypes. A sidebar includes an annotated bibliography of horror/thriller series for teens and preteens. (SLW)

  11. Horror fusionis: a report of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutstein, R P; Bessant, B

    1996-12-01

    Horror fusionis is an uncommon anomaly and is rarely reported in the literature. Five adults with long-standing diplopia associated with horror fusionis were examined. All patients had strabismus since early childhood and had been treated at that time either with surgery, occlusion, and/or orthoptics/vision therapy. Prisms could not eliminate the diplopia. Graded occlusion was attempted with one patient but was not tolerated. Another patient with an asymmetrical dissociated vertical deviation could ignore the second image by fixating with the eye with the smaller deviation. Two patients reported the diplopia becoming less noticeable over the years. Because of its poor prognosis, the diplopia associated with horror fusionis must be differentiated from other types of diplopia occurring in adults with childhood onset strabismus.

  12. Pearls and pitfalls in the horror cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascuzzi, R M

    1998-01-01

    Observations on the neurologic signs and symptoms of Count Dracula, Wolfman, and Frankenstein's Monster are presented as viewed by a specialist in neuromuscular disease. Key clinical features of these horror movie figures illustrate a variety of pearls in the diagnosis of a variety of neurologic disorders, including porphyria, lead poisoning, osteosclerotic myeloma, and myasthenia gravis.

  13. Poetry Top 10: A Foolproof Formula for Teaching Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linaberger, Mara

    2004-01-01

    While a wealth of knowledge about the teaching of poetry exists, many teachers are still fearful about teaching it. Others have tried unsuccessfully to write poetry with students and have turned to merely reading poetry on occasion as a means to teach the genre. This article seeks to debunk the mystery surrounding the teaching of poetry through…

  14. Cunts, Dicks, and Postfeminist Politics: Torture-Porn, the Horror Heroine, and Hostel II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    about the new horror heroine in contemporary horror and the torture porn aesthetics, espcially in Hostel II......about the new horror heroine in contemporary horror and the torture porn aesthetics, espcially in Hostel II...

  15. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Hall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically support ableist assumptions, can be used to subvert ableism and open space for alternative social and political thinking about disability. I point to the work of Tim Burton and Stephen King to demonstrate these possibilities in horror.

  16. Performing poetry slam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweppenhäuser, Jakob; Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard

    2017-01-01

    The article addresses poetry slam as an example of an oral turn captured in contemporary poetry practices that seems to extend the landscape of literary arts (Gioia, 2003). We investigate poetry slam as a phenomenon that mediates between at least two quite different (audio) language cultures...... chosen to keep focus on the two mentioned). The article builds on a generalised perspective negotiating poetry slam as an aesthetic and cultural phenomenon in between hip hop culture and literary culture, but it also includes a close reading/listening aspect deriving from a specific example, namely...... – namely the contemporary Western literary poetry reading and a literary network, on the one side, and, on the other side, the rap battle connected to hip hop culture (other genres, such as e.g. stand-up comedy, could also have been drawn into the discussion, but in order to clarify our argument we have...

  17. "Wiki-Ed Poetry": Transforming Preservice Teachers' Preconceptions about Poetry and Poetry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Janette; Dymoke, Sue

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses specifically on teacher candidates' preconceptions about poetry and poetry teaching and how these preconceptions shift as they work through various tasks on a wiki. Through an analysis of their definitions of poetry and ideas about poetry pedagogy captured in online discussion, survey, and interview responses, the authors…

  18. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  19. Anglophone Music as Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lacmanović, Matea

    2015-01-01

    Literature as a whole is usually divided into poetry, prose and drama (Solar 2006: 154) with fairly clear boundaries between them. When it comes to their subdivision and definition of specific literature and art type, the boundaries become unclear and many questions arise. One of the most difficult questions to answer is what poetry is and which criteria must be met in order for some work to be classified as poetry. It is known that authors such as Shakespeare, Byron, Cummings or Angelou are ...

  20. Dialogues on Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book’s inquiry into contemporary poetry takes two directions. The first direction leads to several close examinations of digital, multi-modal and performative poetry, and how perspectives or perhaps just an awareness of a new media landscape recondition our understanding of an old literary...... genre. The second direction expands into considerations of contextual theories of affect and atmosphere, to materiality studies and towards the heterogenic field of politics, for example feminism, minority studies, digital and environmental humanities or cosmopolitanism. Hence, the question the articles......, discussing and describing how poetry responds to the substantial changes of our media-saturated circumstances and environments....

  1. Thinking/Feeling: Emotion, Spectatorship, and the Pedagogy of Horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Allison

    2014-01-01

    When teaching horror films, where the primary texts are created to frighten and disturb their audiences, instructors often find it challenging to find pedagogical strategies that are at once effective and responsible. For students not accustomed to horror, the shocking nature of the texts can sometimes be difficult to handle, while even the horror…

  2. En guide til gyset. Horror: The Film Reader

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Nielsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Der er gennem tiden skrevet og teoretiseret vidt og bredt om, hvad horrorgenren er for en størrelse – og det med skiftende held. Antologien Horror: The Film Reader forsøger at levere en både bred og dybdegående introduktion til det mudrede genrefelt, som horror er. Det lykkedes langt hen af vejen....

  3. Bricoleurs in Preschool: Girls Poaching Horror Media and Gendered Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henward, Allison S.; MacGillivray, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Children's experiences and understandings are often marginalised in discussions of their own television viewing. Moreover, rarely is attention paid to the meaning children make "from" and "with" the ideas and images in media, much less in horror movies. This inquiry examines the horror media talk of a preschool girl in a poor…

  4. Movie Smoking, Movie Horror, and Urge to Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARGENT, James D.; MARUSKA, Karin; MORGENSTERN, Matthis; ISENSEE, Barbara; HANEWINKEL, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    It is known that exposure to smoking cues increases urge to smoke (UTS), but little is known about other media factors that might also increase UTS. We hypothesized that horror/thriller movies might also increase UTS by increasing negative affect. We surveyed 536 movie patrons who were smokers aged 18 years or older. Subjects had exited 26 movies, of which 12 contained smoking and two were horror films, one with and one without smoking. We used random effects regression to assess the association between exposure to movie smoking, movie horror, both and UTS, controlling for confounding factors. Median age was 26 years and 52% were female. Mean UTS was 5.9, 6.6, 6.6, and 8.7 for smokers exiting movies without smoking, with smoking, horror without smoking and horror with smoking respectively. Smoking in movies was associated with a significantly higher UTS (0.63 [95% CI 0.31–0.94]). Horror with smoking increased UTS by 2.8 points (95% C.I. 2.3, 3.5); the horror without smoking estimate was 0.88, but not statistically significant. This short report offers preliminary evidence that movie horror as one factor besides visual smoking cues that could increase UTS in a community setting. PMID:20301876

  5. Poetry by Seduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostowin, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a way of getting students to write poetry through writing collaborative poems. Relates the step-by-step procedure used by a class in writing a collaborative poem, and presents their poem. (RL)

  6. Poetry and Poster Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Dina

    1993-01-01

    Describes a school library media project for teaching poetry in which fifth-grade students write and illustrate a poem and produce a poster using the PosterPrinter machine. Suggestions for additional activities are included. (EAM)

  7. The Poetry of Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholdt, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Describes how creating a poem that focuses on memory, understanding, and emotion can lead to the construction of a meditative poem. States that poetry of meditation can be modified for use in almost any writing or literature classroom environment. (PA)

  8. 6. Elegiac Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Finnegan, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    General and introductory. Akan funeral dirges: content and themes; structure, style, and delivery; occasions and functions; the dirge as literature. I Elegiac poetry is an exceedingly common form of expression in Africa. We hear of it from all areas and in many different forms. However it is usually less specialized and elaborate than panegyric poetry, and, perhaps for this reason, it has attracted less interest. More private and normally lacking the political relevance of panegyric poetry—to...

  9. Uncanny behaviour in survival horror games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinwell, Angela; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Williams, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the perceived strangeness of a virtual character and the perception of human likeness for some attributes of motion and sound. Participants (N=100) were asked to rate thirteen video clips of twelve different virtual characters and one human. The re...... facial rendering and vocalization in survival horror games that can be used by game designers seeking to increase the fear factor in the genre, and that will form the basis of further experiments, which, it is hoped, will lead to a conceptual framework for the uncanny....

  10. Comprehending, Composing, and Celebrating Graphic Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of graphic poetry in classrooms is encouraged as a way to engage students and motivate them to read and write poetry. This article discusses how graphic poetry can help students with their comprehension of poetry while tapping into popular culture. It is organized around three main sections--reading graphic poetry, writing graphic poetry,…

  11. Poetry and Dance for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, Peggy

    1982-01-01

    Poetry offers excellent possibilities for teaching creative dance. Curriculum development and lesson plan ideas in the area of poetry interpretation through dance and movement for elementary school students are described. (CJ)

  12. Movie smoking, movie horror, and urge to smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D; Maruska, Karin; Morgenstern, Matthis; Isensee, Barbara; Hanewinkel, Reiner

    2009-01-01

    It is known that exposure to smoking cues increases urge to smoke (UTS), but little is known about other media factors that might also increase UTS. We hypothesized that horror/ thriller movies might also increase UTS by increasing negative affect. We surveyed 536 movie patrons who were smokers aged 18 years or older. Subjects had exited 26 movies, of which 12 contained smoking and two were horrorfilms, one with and one without smoking. We used random effects regression to assess the association between exposure to movie smoking, movie horror, both and UTS, controlling for confounding factors. Median age was 26 years and 52% were female. Mean UTS was 5.9, 6.6, 6.6, and 8.7 for smokers exiting movies without smoking, with smoking, horror without smoking and horror with smoking respectively. Smoking in movies was associated with a significantly higher UTS (0.63 [95% CI 0.31-0.94]). Horror with smoking increased UTS by 2.8 points (95% C.I. 2.3, 3.5); the horror without smoking estimate was 0.88, but not statistically significant. This short report offers preliminary evidence that movie horror as one factor besides visual smoking cues that could increase UTS in a community setting.

  13. The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Vriezen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Five years after his suicide, Jeroen Mettes' collected poetry has been published. With this introductory essay are excerpts from Mettes' path-clearing N30. As Vriezen explains, Mettes read poetry for political reasons: to see whether poetry could offer a way to deal with a political world he detested. His poetry is an attempt to bridge the divide between critical theory and the practice of social life.

  14. Using Poetry throughout the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Polly

    2008-01-01

    In the content areas, poetry encourages interest, insight, and understanding. It is like no other form of written word in its ability to offer personal connections. Poetry reaches across all areas of life, and this universality invites teachers to embed it in instruction in all curricular areas. Poetry is an excellent tool for encouraging deep…

  15. Iconicity as the key to the poetry of Nelly Sachs (1891-1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ester

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In her poetry Nelly Sachs tried to overcome all obstaclesi in order to speak about the unspeakable. Words that could adequately embody the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps were lacking. Nevertheless, it was necessary to speak about the experience for the sake of both herself and other victims of the camps. Through her poetry Sachs tests the validity and strength of both traditional images and biblical stories about suffering and grace. Words and images enable her to touch the experiences of people. However, she questions the generally accepted meaning of words in German. Her use of language strives to be different and to draw the attention to both the difficulties and risks of writing authentic words with the necessary symbolic strength. Sachs’ mental fragility made her very vulnerable and caused her to walk on the edge of total silence. As a consequence of her vulnerability, she tried with her whole heart to gain Paul Celan’s sympathy for her way of writing and efforts to turn the events in the concentration camps into dignified and true poetry. The relationship between Celan and Sachs reveals that the true meaning of poetry in her life was a manner of survival. The differences between the two poets provide insight into the specific poetic laws at work in the poetry of Nelly Sachs.

  16. Poetry as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrice, J K

    1983-12-01

    In the practice of general psychiatry, art therapy in the form of painting is widely employed. Music and drama similarly provide regular treatment occasions. The use of poetry is less familiar and is little discussed in the literature. This paper reviews a therapeutic liaison, happening largely by chance, which depended almost exclusively upon an exchange of verse. The relationship between the processes of psychotherapy, on the one hand, and the writing and reading of poetry, on the other, is suggested and illustrated by the patient's writings. It may be that good poetry, like successful psychotherapy, arises from disturbed emotions only when they are given resolution and form. Exceptionally the two go hand-in-hand.

  17. Performing poetry slam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard; Schweppenhäuser, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    – namely the contemporary Western literary poetry reading and a literary network, on the one side, and, on the other side, the rap battle connected to hip hop culture (other genres, such as e.g. stand-up comedy, could also have been drawn into the discussion, but in order to clarify our argument we have...... chosen to keep focus on the two mentioned). The article builds on a generalised perspective negotiating poetry slam as an aesthetic and cultural phenomenon in between hip hop culture and literary culture, but it also includes a close reading/listening aspect deriving from a specific example, namely...

  18. Bringing poetry into staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie

    2002-01-01

    "Quello che mai fue detto d'alfcuna," words from Dante, "strive to say which was never said by anyone." This is the art of true verbal expression, the essence of poetry. Poet W. H. Auden once wrote that "poetry can open spaces of meaning for the human spirit that is more intimate to other human beings than it is to ourselves" (Auden, 1968). Poetry has many definitions. To some, it is the rhythmic verse they remember from grade school or from Mother Goose. To others, poetry is a verse of meter and measure, of balance and harmony. However, to most individuals, poetry is the ultimate expression of human emotion. Roy (1999) believed that nursing is in need of poetry, in order to evoke the deepest of images, fears, questions, and quests of the human spirit and the nursing profession. This article examines the use of poetry and how it might be incorporated into staff education.

  19. Poetry of the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2011-06-01

    From Homer to the Bible looking at the heavenly vault is an enchanted moment in human life. It produces that wonder which Aristotle maintains is the beginning of the love of wisdom, that is to say of philosophy, science, and philomythia-the love of myth: poetry.

  20. Psychoanalysis as poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Jeanine M

    2013-12-01

    Like psychoanalysis, poetry is possible because of the nature of verbal language, particularly its potentials to evoke the sensations of lived experience. These potentials are vestiges of the personal relational context in which language is learned, without which there would be no poetry and no psychoanalysis. Such a view of language infuses psychoanalytic writings on poetry, yet has not been fully elaborated. To further that elaboration, a poem by Billy Collins is presented to illustrate the sensorial and imagistic potentials of words, after which the interpersonal processes of language development are explored in an attempt to elucidate the original nature of words as imbued with personal meaning, embodied resonance, and emotion. This view of language and the verbal form allows a fuller understanding of the therapeutic processes of speech and conversation at the heart of psychoanalysis, including the relational potentials of speech between present individuals, which are beyond the reach of poetry. In one sense, the work of the analyst is to create language that mobilizes the experiential, memorial, and relational potentials of words, and in so doing to make a poet out of the patient so that she too can create such language.

  1. Poetry Experiment 1965

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2019-01-01

    POEX 65 was a transdisciplinary experiment and event which took place in Copenhagen December 10-20, 1965. Short for ’POetry EXperiment’, POEX 65 was an exhibition event curated and created by Danish artist Knud Hvidberg (1948-91). It aimed at breaking the boundaries of artgenres, the false devisi...

  2. The Poetry Wreck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Karl

    1970-01-01

    Adapted from a speech delivered to a pre-conference session of the California Library Association in San Francisco, December 8, 1969. The downhill speed of American poetry in the last decade has been breathtaking for those who watch the sport. One hopes librarians are guarding the standards of letters. (Editor/Author/JS)

  3. Developing Awareness through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeming, Robert F., Ed.

    This booklet contains the proceedings of a seminar in which poets demonstrated through readings and analysis of their works how poetry, combining appeals to both reason and emotion, can develop and refine individual awareness of the world and nature around us. The primary participants in the program were Bruce Cutler, Dolores Kendrick, and May…

  4. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  5. Experience, Poetry and Truth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gahrn-Andersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    of philosophical thinking. Specifically, I show that, beneath a highly poetic and obscure prose, Jünger posits how subjective experience and poetry allow individuals to realize truth. I relate parts of Jünger’s insights to contributions by Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, arguing that Jünger offers a unique...

  6. Rap Poetry and Postmodernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Molokov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article observes several most significant rap albums of this decade within postmodern literature. Today rap culture ceased to be a sort of “outsider” in academic opinion, because of its influences on the culture and art innovations. We study albums as literary objects according to literary aesthetic theories and principles, display the main postmodern features they have, and analyze the role of rap poetry within postmodernism in general. The results suggest that rap poetry is postmodern not only musically, but also lyrically, as an object of literature. The rap music embodies all the postmodern traits and synthesizes them within the syntheses of music and literature and high art and pop culture.

  7. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcreation, transconceptualization and poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gessner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcreation is widely used in discussions about translation theory. It was created in a particular cultural context, developed mainly from the Concrete Poetry in view of a specific application befitting to its proposals. This paper aims to define a conceptual hue for trancreation, based on theories of Haroldo de Campos, and apply it to an analysis of the translation of the poem “Blanco”, by Octavio Paz.

  9. Effects of Gender Roles and Self Perceptions on Affective Reactions to Horror Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundorf, Norbert; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines responses to graphic horror films based on gender and personality variables. Results indicate that responses to horror movies are largely determined by gender-specific rules for social conduct. (MW)

  10. Relationship of Terror Feelings and Physiological Response During Watching Horror Movie

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Tsukino, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Part 8: ICBAKE 2015 Workshop; International audience; Movie is one of the most popular media types. Horror movie is a kind of attractive movie contents which part of people want to watch very much. Although the users feel terror of the contents, the users want to watch the horror movies to have extraordinary feelings such as excitements. Therefore, terror feelings of the horror movies are considered as an important factor to establish more attractive movie contents, and the effect of horror m...

  11. Breaking the Poetry Barrier: Towards Understanding and Enjoying Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, D. J.

    Poetry presents serious difficulties to students. Many poems students are asked to study were written during eras with social mores, modes of thought and expression that are now unfamiliar. Often the sentiments expressed in poetry are discomforting or unfamiliar to students, though the greatest poets express universal ideas and emotions with which…

  12. Reacting to Graphic Horror: A Model of Empathy and Emotional Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies viewer response to graphic horror films. Reports that undergraduate mass communication students viewed clips from two horror films and a scientific television program. Concludes that people who score high on measures for wandering imagination, fictional involvement, humanistic orientation, and emotional contagion tend to find horror films…

  13. Keeping it Intimate: A Meditation on the Power of Horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Beardsworth

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a reading of Julia Kristeva, The Severed Head. It first interprets a dual historical element in Kristeva's text on "capital visions," her selection of exemplars of the artistic representation of severed heads. On the one hand, there are the aesthetic trajectories themselves, from skull art to artistic modernism. On the other hand, there is an implicit history of "horror" in psychoanalysis in this text, going from Freud through Lacan to Kristeva. The paper then indicates the tone of possibility and invitation that inhabits Kristeva’s treatment of horror in capital visions, which suggests that she does not divide aesthetics off from ethics. Finally, I underline the note of humor that enters into the psychoanalytic and aesthetic treatment of horror, once Kristeva has linked it to the feminine.

  14. Tapping the Power of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    "I have become increasingly convinced that poetry offers one of the best-and often most underused--resources for developing literacy foundations," writes Timothy Rasinski. Poetry and songs are typically short and easy to learn, provide opportunities for students to play with the sounds of language, and offer an engaging way to learn…

  15. The Poetry of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the poetry of John Dewey, 101 poems in total. Characteristic of the rhymed and metered poetry of the period, they show a very human side of Dewey. This analysis argues that many of his poems deal with existential themes--love, finitude, and God, for example. On a deeper level these poems are also show connections to Dewey's…

  16. Teaching Nursing Care through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treistman, Judith M.

    1986-01-01

    The author demonstrates through poetry samples how feminist poetry can help nursing students understand patient feelings and emotions while students take part in a clinical rotation in a women's health unit. Topics include aging, pregnancy, childbirth, and sense of "self." (CT)

  17. Poetry therapy, men and masculinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Rich; Dill, LeConté

    2012-04-01

    Therapists have long utilized poetry with various at risk male populations. Yet, in spite of its use, therapists have also been aware of the dilemmas associated with using poetry in a population whose behavior and identity may at times run counter to the core tenants of poetry therapy. However, the literature of poetry therapy does not fully explore what therapists need to know about men and masculinities in order to work with them. This article helps prepare therapists using poetry to become more sensitive to gender issues and utilize this understanding in their practice with men. It explores some of the key concepts from gender and masculinities studies and provides examples for how these concepts can be used in practice.

  18. Astronomy and Poetry (overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samvelyan, David

    2016-12-01

    Through this work we have tried to show how astronomy penetrates into the poetry of different periods in time and in various poets' works all over the world. The following work has significant cognitive value, demonstrates and reveals the general nature of certain poets' astronomical ideas and provides a brief analysis in some cases. As a result, we have come to the conclusion that astronomy with all its components such as the sky, our solar system and phenomena such as these have always been a source of inspiration for those who create works of art, moreover some of them have even gained actual astronomical knowledge.

  19. Poetry and Neuroscience:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, James; Scott, Sophie K

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dialogues and collaborations between scientists and non-scientists are now widely understood as important elements of scientific research and public engagement with science. In recognition of this, the authors, a neuroscientist and a poet, use a dialogical approach to extend questions and ideas first shared during a lab-based poetry residency. They recorded a conversation and then expanded it into an essayistic form, allowing divergent disciplinary understandings and uses of experiment, noise, voice and emotion to be articulated, shared and questioned. PMID:27885317

  20. The horror of stigma: psychosis and mental health care environments in twenty-first-century horror film (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John

    2014-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which modern horror films present stigmatizing depictions of psychosis and mental health care environments. Horror films will often include stigmatizing representations of psychosis and mental health care environments. Cinematic techniques can create stigmatizing depictions of psychosis and mental health care environments. Misinformation is often communicated. Due to these stigmatizing representations, people experiencing mental ill health may be rejected by the public. Stigma is a serious problem affecting the mental health services. It is important for practitioners to understand where stigma arises in order to challenge beliefs and attitudes.

  1. The Horror of Being Deaf and in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    2010-01-01

    Being deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant…

  2. Children Talk Horror Videos: Reading as a Social Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Gemma

    1993-01-01

    Children's discussion of television horror shows is the basis for examining television's effect on children and the relationship between television and reading. It is recommended that more attention be paid to the importance of social contexts in which both reading and responding to television occur. Implications for classroom instruction are…

  3. College Course File: Studies in Genre--Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott R.

    1996-01-01

    States that a Studies in Genre course essentially explores genre theory with the "hook" of a particular popular genre (in this case, horror) that serves as case study and exemplar for more general theories of genre. Describes the course's modular design so it can be expanded into other genres as time passes. Discusses each unit's…

  4. Mythology, poetry and theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonso Groenewald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have always been mythmakers. However, in view of the heavy negative connotations attached to the word “myth”, the aim of this article may, inter alia, be seen as an attempt to “rehabilitate” the word “myth” as a positive term in order to describe one of the most common genres within the Old Testament tradition. The author will indicate that the presence of myth is a common phenomenon in the Bible, and specifically in the Psalter (as poetry. The authors of the Psalms used (re-used myth, the “mythical” and/or mythical allusions in order to express some of their most profound theologising about Yahweh – the God of Israel – as well as their relationship to that God.

  5. Animal Poetry and Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Brüggemann

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses how our ideas of empathy are influenced by the dichotomy of mind versus body, also known as Cartesian dualism. Within the aesthetic field, this dichotomy is seen when researchers define narrative empathy as imaginatively reconstructing the fictional character’s thoughts and feelings. Conversely, the empathy aroused by a non-narrative work of art is seen as an unconscious bodily mirroring of movements, postures or moods. Thinking dualistically does not only have consequences for what we consider human nature; it also affects our view on animals. To show the untenability of dualistic thinking, this article focuses on the animal poetry genre. Using the ideas of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I analyze two animal poems: “Inventing a Horse” by Meghan O’Rourke and “Spermaceti” by Les Murray. The analysis of these two poems suggests that the presiding ideas about aesthetic empathy and empathy in general need re-evaluation.

  6. Science Poetry in Two Voices: Poetry and the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Wendy M.; Murray, Kristen B.

    2009-01-01

    Poetry can be used during science instruction to foster interest, excitement, and wonder among elementary-level students. Children can read poetry, or have poetry read to them, as a way of learning about their world. They can also create poems to share their own science learning with others. We introduce two formats of the Poetry in Two Voices…

  7. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition.

  8. Review of Japanese Horror Films and the Their American Remakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Harmes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Wee’s monograph on American remakes of Japanese supernatural horror films is a contribution to Routledge’s Advances in Film Studies series and examines a cluster of films made in the late 1990s and early 2000s. These are films which in their first incarnation were Japanese (such as Ringu which were then remade by Hollywood (for example Ringu became The Ring.

  9. Celebrating the Sound of Poetry (Bookalogues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Margaret H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents reviews of 22 poetry anthologies, collections of poems by 1 poet, and books that contain a single illustrated poem. Urges students and teachers to bring poetry alive by reading it aloud. (RS)

  10. The Medieval Swedish Horror Ballad in the Romantic Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhr, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    In the late 18th century the Horror Ballad became popular in Sweden. The rediscovery of medieval tales and ballads inspired the Romantic authors. Clas Livijn uses the medieval folksong of "Hafsfrun" in his dramatic play of the same title (1806). In Livijn’s own library we also find many Scandinav......In the late 18th century the Horror Ballad became popular in Sweden. The rediscovery of medieval tales and ballads inspired the Romantic authors. Clas Livijn uses the medieval folksong of "Hafsfrun" in his dramatic play of the same title (1806). In Livijn’s own library we also find many...... Scandinavian texts from the 17th century, by Saxo Gramaticus, Verelius and others as well as modern printings of old texts by for instance Afzelius. The Horror Ballad in Sweden was introduced by Johan Henrik Kellgren in “Fredrics vålnad” in 1793, although it’s in reality a translation of “Ludvigs Gjenfærd...

  11. Dreams, Nightmares and Haunted Houses: Televisual Horror as Domestic Imaginary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Griffin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely proclaimed that U.S.Television is currently experiencing a Golden Age with horror at its vanguard, in part enabled by technological innovations that have seen audiences engage with TV in ever more diverse ways, enabled by the advent of Smart T.V. Meanwhile, television has historically positioned itself as a humble and domesticated medium and yet its increasingly sophisticated channels penetrate into the very heart of the contemporary home. With this in mind, I view Suburban Gothic TV series such as American Horror Story (2011 and Hemlock Grove (2013 through the lens of psychoanalytic concepts such as The Uncanny, considering the extent to which such dramas invoke the dark side of the domestic imaginary which haunts that most cherished of spaces, the home. Why does Gothic Horror continue to engage the imaginations of the contemporary home’s technologically orientated inhabitants? And how has technology helped to drive the resurgence of a genre so firmly rooted in a historical-literary form? These are just some of the questions that this article explores.

  12. Significance of Iqbal’s Wisdom Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Suheyl Umar

    2002-01-01

    The distinguishing feature of Iqbal's poetry is his "conscious concerns" about issues vital to the Ummah. These concerns also provide the key to understand the psycho-dynamics of Iqbal's mind and help us to appreciate the reasons for which his poetry has become meaningful for the Ummah. Iqbal's poetry has to be considered as "contemplative or higher poetry" in that the response is born of his intellect. Iqbal is a poet of "intellectual conception" and "intuition expression" wherein the inner ...

  13. The horror of stigma: psychosis and mental health care environments in twenty-first-century horror film (part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights the specific manner in which twenty-first-century horror films stigmatize psychosis and mental health care environments (MHCEs) A search on various film forums using the terms "mental/psychiatric patient," "psychosis/psychoses," and "mental/psychiatric hospital" (limited from 2000 to 2012) revealed 55 films. A literature review revealed criteria for a checklist. Subsequent to viewings, salient recurring criteria were added to the checklist. Films were systematically analyzed under these criteria. Homicidal maniacs are the most common stereotypes. Misinformation is often communicated. Familiar horror tropes are used to stigmatize MHCEs. Practitioners should be aware of the specific manner in which clients are being stigmatized by the media. This paper highlights specific ways in which psychosis and MHCEs are stigmatized, and encourages practitioners to challenge these depictions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Poetry in motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2012-01-01

    . Originality/Value This paper presents a new conceptualization of context of use. The presented analysis of data opens a window to the transitions that users undergo, alone and together in order to make the iPhone their own. A particular focus is how the iPhone and its Apps support or hinder the artefact......Motivation This study was motivated by an interest in understanding the new opportunities brought to use by App technologies available on mobile devices. In our qualitative analysis of interview data we used the concept of 'appropriation', and in doing so we realized that we needed to address both...... and in collaboration with others, people make the iPhone and its App-world their own to the extent that they use the phone as a port to exercising personal interests like poetry, Italian novels, planning and cookbooks; hence the title of this paper. A closer look shows that in doing so, the interviewees have expanded...

  15. Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal! [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    The Bedouins of ancient Arabia and Persia made poetry a conversational art form, and several poetic forms developed from the participatory nature of tribal poetry. Today in most Arab cultures, people may still experience public storytelling and spontaneous poetry challenges in the streets. The art of turning a rhyme into sly verbal sparring is…

  16. Resolution of Sexual Identity through Poetry Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, D. Oliver

    The use of poetry as a valuable part of the psychotherapeutic experience has gained increasing acceptance and usage in recent years. Poetry provides a viable modality for releasing intense emotions and reducing anxieties and hostilities. Poetry therapy was used with an 18-year-old male who was experiencing sexual orientation disturbance to examine…

  17. Breakthroughs in Action Research through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how major breakthroughs in generating, analysing and disseminating action research about problem-based learning were made through the medium of poetry. I used poetry in three ways: as data, as an interpretive device and as a reflective medium. Poetry helped me to disseminate my research in provocative, memorable and…

  18. From Poetry & Autobiography to Poetry & “Autothanatography”

    OpenAIRE

    Hélène AJI

    2012-01-01

    The project for this issue started in a questioning about the possible bridges between poetry today and Romantic poetry. How to think beyond the now consensual but also constructed oppositions that helped the Modernists define themselves against their anxiety-inducing immediate predecessors? In the line of Marjorie Perloff’s 21st-Century Modernism, one is urged to this re-reading of the 19th and of the 20th and 21st centuries. Thus comes to be examined one of the major post-Romantic assessmen...

  19. From Poetry & Autobiography to Poetry & “Autothanatography”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène AJI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The project for this issue started in a questioning about the possible bridges between poetry today and Romantic poetry. How to think beyond the now consensual but also constructed oppositions that helped the Modernists define themselves against their anxiety-inducing immediate predecessors? In the line of Marjorie Perloff’s 21st-Century Modernism, one is urged to this re-reading of the 19th and of the 20th and 21st centuries. Thus comes to be examined one of the major post-Romantic assessmen...

  20. New Epic in Shamloo's Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    سوسن جبری

    2013-01-01

    New epic poetry is a modern version of the mainstream epic tradition whose features have changed to meet the requirements of modern taste. The most outstanding poet in employing this form is Ahmad Shamloo, one of the most renowned contemporary Iranian poets. To highlight the changes in the content and formal linguistic features of the traditional and new forms of epic, the present study compares the stylistic aspects of the Shāh-nāme with Shamloo’s poetry to reveal how the “passage of time” c...

  1. Significance of Iqbal’s Wisdom Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Suheyl Umar

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing feature of Iqbal's poetry is his "conscious concerns" about issues vital to the Ummah. These concerns also provide the key to understand the psycho-dynamics of Iqbal's mind and help us to appreciate the reasons for which his poetry has become meaningful for the Ummah. Iqbal's poetry has to be considered as "contemplative or higher poetry" in that the response is born of his intellect. Iqbal is a poet of "intellectual conception" and "intuition expression" wherein the inner meaning dominates totally over the form. The "vital operation" of which Iqbal's poetry is a manifestation is an intellectual conception born of the poet's wisdom.

  2. Deep digital poetry: Interrogating Tiv oral poetry within postmodernity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By reflecting the jeers, fears, aspirations, visions and general character of the society, they occupy a popular place and position in the social structure of Tiv society and their poetry is reinvigorated, in the usual popular way, in the new sensibilities of the digital technology being they dynamic in thematic exploration, traditional ...

  3. No One Here Gets out Alive: Educational Implications of Duomining as Aesthetic Ground in Psychological Horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, James

    2016-01-01

    Considering works of Horror artistic manifestations of cultural nightmares, the author takes up the charge that dreams deserve a place in the study of curriculum. Utilizing an object-oriented approach to aesthetic and educational inquiry, the author first develops a theory of Horror that divides the genre into the distinct categories of…

  4. Writing Poetry in the School Library (And Reading It Too!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelin, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Although April is National Poetry Month, poems are for any time... and all the time... and sharing poetry should be part of the library experience. Before we ask students to write poetry, however, we need to read poetry to and with them. We also need to provide opportunities for them to browse the poetry section and select poems to read to each…

  5. Modular Curriculum: English, Contemporary American Poetry: 1946 to the Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Richard

    In this university course for independent study of contemporary American poetry, the following points are brought out: (1) Poetry is essentially formal; (2) Poetry is the product of the conscious mind; (3) Poetry should appeal to the intellect; (4) Poetry is essentially apolitical. In the course of study presented, seven assignments are included:…

  6. Open to a Changing World: Concrete Poetry in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2010-01-01

    The essay describes the rise of concrete poetry in Denmark in the 1960s, the intermedial roots of concrete poetry, concrete poetry as open work (in Eco's sense), the main Danish poets, the development of concrete poetry into systemic writing and the longer cultural perspectives of concrete poetry...

  7. Polysemy and Association in Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John

    1976-01-01

    The language learner necessarily masters literal reading before literary reading. In order to learn the language of poetry, first-year university students of English as a second language must gain competence with polysemy and association which are fundamental to literary reading. (CFM)

  8. The poetry of (POP) science

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Only one person from CERN, Thomas Otto, was among the winners of the POPScience international poetry competition recently run in the framework of the EU-funded project of the same name. The TE Departmental Safety Officer won in the English category with three poems inspired by CERN and its people.   Thomas Otto in Building 180 with an LHC magnet, one of the sources of inspiration of his poetry.   After participating as a volunteer in the 2014 European Researchers’ Night – when the POPScience poetry competition was officially launched – Thomas Otto decided to take part in the contest with three poems inspired by CERN. “I’ve always been interested in poetry, but only as a reader,” says Thomas. “At that point I felt inspired and I began to think about all the associations and metaphors I could create to describe CERN and its life to a non-scientific audience.” The three poems pay homage to the LHC, the CM...

  9. Cernuda in Current Spanish Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Fajardo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The poet Luis Cernuda (Spain, 1902-Mexico, 1963 has left his mark on much of the poetry written in Spain since the sixties. First rediscovered in the Peninsula in the late fifties and early sixties by, among others, Francisco Brines, José Angel Valente, and Jaime Gil de Biedma, his influence became pervasive both through the work of these poets, and, through the reading of Cernuda’s poetry itself, available since 1975 in Harris and Maristany edition. Referring in particular to Biedma, whose impact on younger poets has been significant, this paper examines the presence of Cernuda in certain approaches to language and reality in the poetry of several “poetas de la experiencia” ‘poets of experience,’ such as Jesús García Montero, Felipe Benítez Reyes, and Álvaro García. Centering mainly on the simplification of language and the search for a non-rhetorical rhythm, developing in Cernuda from Invocaciones ‘Invocations,’ to Desolación de la Quimera ‘The Disconsolate Chimera,’ this article examines the same traits in Biedma. Thereafter it traces their incorporation in the poetry of García Montero, Benítez Reyes, and García. These readings offer an occasion to reflect on some of the strengths of the “poesía de la experiencia” that underlie its apparent straightforwardness and simplicity.

  10. Exploring Friendship Loss through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Losing friendships are significant events for people throughout their life span. In spite of the importance of friendships to psychosocial health, studies of friendships loss are not found in the literature. This article begins to address this gap through a qualitative study utilizing autobiographical poetry as data. This study exemplifies…

  11. Modifying Students' Tastes in Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John Edward

    To test whether student tastes in poetry could be modified by a particular method of teaching it, the poetic preferences of 751 eighth grade students were pretested and compared with the poetic choices made by a panel of English educators, 35 student teachers in English, and the students' own English teachers. Consistently, poems selected by any…

  12. Poetry Recitation for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoger, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Poetry recitation removes the distractions of creating and organizing original material so that business students can focus on presentation skills of delivery, confidence, and memory. Delivery includes articulation, emphasis, nonverbals, and presence. Confidence and memory development are complementary. Confidence comes from trusting the memory…

  13. Freud, Poetry and Serendipitous Parapraxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chumaceiro, Cora L. Diaz

    1996-01-01

    Discusses an overlooked example in everyday life of serendipitous parapraxes in the recall of poetry presented by Freud in 1907. Notes that its principles are applicable to clinical and educational research and practice, taking into account contemporary transference-countertransference dynamics. (SR)

  14. The monstrous metallic in medicine and horror cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Niall

    2014-01-01

    `This paper considers the monstrous nature of medical tools and devices through the lens of horror cinema and the art of Damien Hirst. In it I argue for a shift from the monster and the monstrous as organic to the threat of the monster as an inorganic object in tools such as the scalpel and syringe. However, the metaphorical significance of the monster is sustained in these tools where human technological creations continue the discourse of the monster as a product of human creativity.

  15. Integration: Understanding New Mediation via Innovations in Horror Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence A. Rickels

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available If television inherited the democratization tendencies of mass media, then digital media circumvented the impasse of politics and psychosis by a momentum that is more closely allied to integration. Beginning with the word “integration” it proves possible to go deeper than the term’s current associations in the headlines and revalorize the newly mediatized prospect of political change. It is an upgrade that becomes uniquely legible – as “alle-gory” – in recent alterations and alternations in media representation of occult and psycho horror.

  16. Updating Poetry Preferences: A Look at the Poetry Children Really Like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiper, Karen; Wilson, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    Examines poetry preferences of young children from a historical perspective and from a recent study conducted by the authors. Makes recommendations for building bridges to lasting poetry interest. (SR)

  17. Horror films: tales to master terror or shapers of trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballon, Bruce; Leszcz, Molyn

    2007-01-01

    The authors review the literature of cinematic-related psychiatric case reports and report the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with intrusive thoughts of demonic possession and flashbacks of the film The Exorcist. Cinematic neurosis may be considered a form of psychological crisis shaped by exposure to a film narrative that is emotionally and culturally significant to the individual. The structure of horror films are examined from the perspectives of trauma theory, narrative theory, and borderline personality organization theories, using the film The Exorcist as an example. Within this framework, the horror film can be seen as a cultural tale that provides a mechanism for attempting mastery over anxieties involving issues of separation, loss, autonomy, and identity. An individual will identify with narrative elements that resonate in personal life experiences and cultural factors embedded within the film, which carry levels of either stress that will be mastered, or act as a trauma to the viewer. The outcome of this exposure is related to how the individual's personality structure is organized in combination with the stresses they are experiencing.

  18. USELESS POETRY: BRIEF ANALYSIS OF LUÍS QUINTAIS’ POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyse dos Santos Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Marked in gray, pervaded by a vague presence of melancholy, Luís Quin­tais’ verses present us a world framed by fragmented images, opaque and quotidian, whose space and time are interrupted by voids. But what are these voids? These pages, which came from such a question, in their eager to seek answers, encounter another question: after all, why do many of the current poetics, including the poetry of which Luís Quintais is part, attract attention to the word, brushing on their verses a reflection of the poetic language and their (inutility and power of resistance against the society of their time? Thus, when we read Luis Quintais’ poetry, we see that the metalinguistic function is vital to understand the feeling of emptiness in his poems which, in their turn, take us to a reflection on language, memory and history.

  19. Sad Author of Funny Poetry: Edward Lear and Nonsense Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliona Matiychak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of Edward Lear’s art and literary works, in particular his nonsense poetry. The attention is drawn to E. Lear’s role in popularizing the limerick genre form in British and world poetry. The purpose of the article is to analyze humorous poems by Edward Lear in the aspect of genre study. The style of Lear’s versification (his short and silly poetic rhymes is analyzed. The research of the style and genre specific of his nonsense verses (comic rhymes, puns, paronomasia, creativity in spelling, creating neologisms according to the principles of homophony, his weird creatures and absurd stories, etc. is carried out. The influence of the poet’s personal features on his creativity is observed with reference to his drawings and illustrations. Psychological and biographical facts are considered in the research and allow understanding the poet’s world outlook.

  20. The Complexities of Translating Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bassnett

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers some of the long-standing debates about translating poetry, and explores the strategies used to bring about creative transposition through a series of examples, including translations from Persian, Korean and Welsh. The author drawsupon her own experiences both as a translator and translation scholar, also as one of the judges of the prestigious Stephen Spender poetry in translation prize for the last decade. The essay argues that the translator of a poem is both its rewriter and its recreator, and highlights the organic metaphor used by poets such as Percy Bysse Shelley proposing that the translation of poetry necessarily involves transplantation into new soil. The essay concludes by pointing out that the two crucial elements in translating poetry are joyfulness and playfulness, which gives the lie to the old negative idea of poetry being what is lost in translation.The translation of poetry is therefore a creative act, since it results in the blossoming of a new poem in a new language.Il saggio prende in esame una parte del dibatto di lunga data sulla traduzione della poesia e analizza le strategie utilizzate per trasporre la creatività attraverso una serie di esempi, tra i quali anche versioni dal persiano, coreano e gallese. L’autrice attinge allapropria esperienza di traduttrice e di studiosa della traduzione, anche in qualità di giudice nel corso dell’ultimo decennio del prestigioso premio per la traduzione poetica Stephen Spender. L’articolo sostiene che il traduttore di poesia è  contemporaneamente ri-scrittore e ri-creatore della stessa, e sottolinea la metafora biologica impiegata da poeti quali Percy Bysse Shelley secondo la quale la traduzione di poesia implica necessariamente il trapianto in un nuovo terreno. Il saggio si conclude mostrando come i due elementi cruciali nella traduzione di poesia siano la gioiosità e la giocosità, le quali sconfessano l’antica concezione della poesia come di

  1. Healing the healer: poetry in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulehan, Jack; Clary, Patrick

    2005-04-01

    Poetry plays an age-old role in the art of healing. Although medicine today seems distant from the world of poetic expression, there are surprising commonalities between the two. In this essay we reflect on three aspects of healing that are fostered by poetry. Practicing medicine with too many facts and not enough poetry leads to dissatisfaction, disappointment, and impaired healing, especially in the care of the terminally ill. Likewise, poetry deficiency cuts off an important avenue for physician self-awareness and reflectivity. Alternatively, three aspects of healing are fostered by poetry: the power of the word to heal (and also harm); the skill of "negative capability" that enhances physician effectiveness; and empathic connection, or compassionate presence, a relationship that heals without words. Reading and writing poetry can help physicians, especially those who care for dying patients, become more reflective, creative, and compassionate practitioners.

  2. Schools as "Poetry-Friendly Places": Michael Rosen on Poetry in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the views of children's poet Michael Rosen in relation to poetry in education. It is based on an interview in which Rosen not only discusses the significance of encouraging young people to engage with poetry at school but also analyzes a number of threats to poetry's place in the English curriculum. This article identifies…

  3. Poetry Education Research as an Anchorage of Thought: Using Poetry as Interview Stimulus Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Interviews in qualitative research may sometimes employ stimulus material as a means of eliciting richer data. However, scant consideration has been given to the use of poetry for this purpose, especially within the field of poetry education research. This article seeks to address the gap in the literature by illustrating how the use of poetry as…

  4. The Synergy of Poetry and Content Areas: Reading Poetry across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Laura Purdie; Wong, Janet; Bentley-Flannery, Paige; Hahn, Mary Lee; Jules, Jacqueline; Mordhorst, Heidi; Vardell, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Poetry can enhance all content areas. This article shares highlights from the 2014 CLA Master Class focused on using poetry in math, science, social studies, the arts, and physical education/movement. Presenters and participants read poems, asked questions, and engaged in lively discussions about using poetry to enhance all content areas. Chair…

  5. Aspect and narration applied to lyrical poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the linguistic category of aspect in relation to the genre of lyrical poetry. Lyrical poetry is characterized in a double mode: at the same time (in accordance with Jakobson) as quasi-quotation and at the same time (in accordance with Aristotle) as some kind of 'the author...... speaking in his own voice'. The main thesis of the paper is that lyrical poetry has a special connexion to imperfect aspect....

  6. Horror Image Recognition Based on Context-Aware Multi-Instance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Xiong, Weihua; Wu, Ou; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    Horror content sharing on the Web is a growing phenomenon that can interfere with our daily life and affect the mental health of those involved. As an important form of expression, horror images have their own characteristics that can evoke extreme emotions. In this paper, we present a novel context-aware multi-instance learning (CMIL) algorithm for horror image recognition. The CMIL algorithm identifies horror images and picks out the regions that cause the sensation of horror in these horror images. It obtains contextual cues among adjacent regions in an image using a random walk on a contextual graph. Borrowing the strength of the fuzzy support vector machine (FSVM), we define a heuristic optimization procedure based on the FSVM to search for the optimal classifier for the CMIL. To improve the initialization of the CMIL, we propose a novel visual saliency model based on the tensor analysis. The average saliency value of each segmented region is set as its initial fuzzy membership in the CMIL. The advantage of the tensor-based visual saliency model is that it not only adaptively selects features, but also dynamically determines fusion weights for saliency value combination from different feature subspaces. The effectiveness of the proposed CMIL model is demonstrated by its use in horror image recognition on two large-scale image sets collected from the Internet.

  7. TOWARD AUTOMATED GENERATION OF CHINESE CLASSIC POETRY

    OpenAIRE

    HONG LIN

    2013-01-01

    The forms of Chinese classic poetry have been developed through thousands of years of history and are still current in today's poetry society. A re-classification of the rhyming words, however, is necessary to keep the classic poetry up to date in the new settings of modern Chinese language. To ease the transition process, computing technology is used to help the readers as well as poetry writers to check the compliance of poems in accordance with the forms and to compose poems without the ef...

  8. Eastern Europe as the source of horror and humor: Examples films, "Hostel" and "Euro Trip"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Trifunović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the period from 2004. to 2007. three films belonging to two different genres were complete in the American production-a horror and a comedy. These being, Hostel (I and II and Euro Trip. The only similarity found in these films is the same stimulus that motivates the horror and the humor segment in them. That stimulus was identifies where all three films are placed, and that is Eastern Europe, more precisely Slovakia. This phenomenon was considered in Noel Carroll’s theory concerning the relationship of horror and humor in order to explain and understand their existence.

  9. The horror of being deaf and in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, Vernon

    2010-01-01

    Being Deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act by most jails and prisons in the United States. This includes the failure to provide interpreting services for necessary activities and facilities such as religious services, educational programs, vocational training, faith-based prisons, and mental health treatment for addiction. The author discusses other problems faced by inmates who are Deaf and offers suggestions for correcting injustices faced by those who are Deaf in American jails and prisons.

  10. Engaging Honors Students through Newspaper Blackout Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenheim, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the author's attempt to convince her students that poetry can be "their thing," and also show them how much it can shape the way they think about the world and their place in it. In this article Melissa Ladenheim describes the technique known as "newspaper blackout" poetry. The exciting thing about this…

  11. The Pragmatics of Color in Antara's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Btoosh, Mousa A.

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps rarely is there any piece of Pre-Islamic Arabic literature where color features more strongly and less naturally than in Antara's poetry. Therefore, the intended message of color in Antara's poetry is adequately understood inasmuch as the pragmatic implicatures of color are worked out. Evidence in literature explicitly attributes Antara's…

  12. Recording Students to Bring Poetry Alive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Poems are filled with musicality. Poetry and music are often described using similar terms: meter, cadence, phrase, form, and more. Poetry also has physical qualities recognized ever since the Greeks classified poetic meter in feet. In this article, the author presents a project that works well across the age spectrum: recording expressive poetry…

  13. Reconceptualising Poetry as a Multimodal Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfield, Denise; D'abdon, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual article theorises the role of poetry in English classrooms from a multimodal perspective. It discusses the gap between the practices of poetry inside and outside South African schools, particularly where English is taught as an additional language (EAL). The former is shown to be monomodal and prescriptive, while the latter is…

  14. The Poetry of Alessandro De Francesco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle Cushing

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available "Somewhere in between mathematics and theory, light and dark, physicality and projection, oscillates the poetry of Alessandro De Francesco." The cinematic poetry of De Francesco, some of it for the first time translated into English, is presented in its Italian original as well.

  15. Nigerian Poetry since 1990: History, Disillusionment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    independence disillusionment, the poetry of the 1970s reflected on the Nigerian civil war, while the 1980s produced poetry with ideological orientation. The 1990s was the decade that saw the maturation of emergent poets who were born in the ...

  16. Poetry Inside Out: Bridging Cultures through Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Marty

    2009-01-01

    This paper is about a writing and literary translation program called Poetry Inside Out (PIO). Students in the PIO program study poetic form and structure, figurative language, and the fundamentals of literary translation in an extended workshop format. During a typical Poetry Inside Out workshop, participants read, discuss, translate and recite…

  17. Stylistics and the Metaphysics of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the worth of aesthetic experience in encountering poetry, fresh perspectives are helpful. This paper introduces the reader to modern stylistics: that is linguistic examinations of "the speaker's meaning" in literature and notes such "scientific" approaches to poetry do find common metaphysical ground with leading…

  18. Poetry, Media, and Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ning Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe and analyze how the graduate course: "Writing, Reading and Teaching Poetry" influenced American and international students' writing, thinking, response to poetry, teaching beliefs and English learning through their participating in the class activities. In this study, I examine the…

  19. A journey through the stylistics of poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2015-01-01

    Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9.......Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9....

  20. PATTERNS OF DEVIATION IN NIYI OSUNDARE'S POETRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TAMMY

    This study does a holistic stylistic criticism of selected poems in order to project the artistic aesthetics in Niyi Osundare‟s poetry. The language of literature especially that of poetry is seen as a different register, marked by deviations from ordinary daily discourse. Deviation is an important aspect of literary style. The chief ...

  1. Affect is central to patient safety: the horror stories of young anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iedema, Rick; Jorm, Christine; Lum, Martin

    2009-12-01

    This paper analyses talk produced by twenty-four newly qualified anaesthetists. Data were collected from round table discussions at the Young Fellows Conference of the Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists 2006. The talk consisted to an important extent of narratives about experiences of horror. The paper isolates three themes: the normalization of horror, the functionalisation of horror for pedagogic purposes, and the problematization of horror. The last theme provides a springboard into our argument that confronting the affect invested in coping with medical-clinical failure is central to enabling young doctors, and clinicians generally, to address and resolve such adverse events. We conclude that the negotiation of affect through shared or 'dialogic' narrative is central to enabling doctors to deal with adverse events on a personal level, and to enabling them at a collective level to become attentive to threats to patients' safety.

  2. Douglas E. Cowan: Sacred Terror. Religion and Horror on the Silver Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybil A. Thornton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution offers a review of: Douglas E. Cowan: Sacred Terror. Religion and Horror on the Silver Screen. Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press, 2016. 325 pages, $29,95, ISBN (paperback: 978-1-4813-0490-0.

  3. Animal crossing: New leaf and the diversity of horror in video games

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, AML; Björn, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the diverse ways horror can be conveyed in games by investigating how games that are not associated with the horror genre can produce unsettling or scary experiences. To conduct this exploration, this study uses interaction mapping, as outlined by Consalvo and Dutton (2006), to examine a game that has thoroughly pleasant and cutesy trappings: Animal Crossing: New Leaf (Nintendo 2013). The interactions were analysed according to three themes prevalent within literature on h...

  4. Diving into the Letters in Poems: Creating Poetry Banners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godston, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Fifth grade students explore the public and private dimensions of poetry through the medium of poetry banners. The author maintains that poetry belongs in public spaces and serves as a counter to the "junk text" that surrounds us. A poetry banner is a nice addition to other banners and messages that students, teachers, school…

  5. Mandela in/and Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Guarducci

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1994, in his first speech to the parliament of South Africa, Nelson Mandela quoted the Afrikaner poet Ingrid Jonker and read The child who was shot dead by soldiers at Nyanga. This unorthodox choice was in fact politically fine-tuned and had an emotional impact both on the new-born Rainbow Nation and on Mandela’s stature as a 20th century-icon. A passionate reader of poetry, Mandela is one of the contemporary figures to whom the highest number of lines has ever been dedicated. Poets have celebrated him in in the forms of elegy, song, ballad, epistle, epic, ode, tribute, sonnet, rap, dub poetry, haiku and so forth. Poets started fashioning his public persona as early as the mid-Sixties when, banned and sentenced to life imprisonment, he became the world’s most famous invisible prisoner. Transformed into metaphors, blended with virtues, identified with private and collective historical events, associated with specific spaces, Mandela is above all identified with the prison where he spent eighteen years: Robben Island. In poetry, the osmotic intercourse between Mandela and Robben Island is a persistent topic with a strong symbolic function as the island catalyses issues which makes it a synecdoche of South Africa itself: a segregated place where brutality and injustice ruled but also a laboratory where resistance and hope developed. This article will examine a series of poems on Mandela and Robben Island starting from Dennis Brutus’ compositions on the subject, the first of which dates from 1963, up to post-apartheid lyrics.

  6. Poetry by Stephanos Stephanides in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanos Stephanides

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephanos Stephanides visited the Australian Studies Centre and gave a lecture and poetry reading to poetry undergraduate classes. The students were so impressed by his poetry that the idea of translating some of his work for this edition of Coolabah. For both the students and the journal this has been a great priviledge. Stephanos Stephanides, himself a Spanish speaker, worked with the students as they translated. A rare chance indeed to work with a poet while translating his work. We are grateful to Stephanos Stephanides for providing this wonderful opportunity for the students.

  7. Discovering Patterns in Mathematics and Poetry

    CERN Document Server

    Birken, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    You are invited to join a fascinating journey of discovery, as Marcia Birken and Anne C. Coon explore the intersecting patterns of mathematics and poetry — bringing the two fields together in a new way.Setting the tone with humor and illustrating each chapter with countless examples, Birken and Coon begin with patterns we can see, hear, and feel and then move to more complex patterns. Number systems and nursery rhymes lead to the Golden Mean and sestinas. Simple patterns of shape introduce tessellations and concrete poetry. Fractal geometry makes fractal poetry possible. Ultimately, patterns f

  8. Neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia is caused by horror autotoxicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljis, R O; Aguila, M C

    1999-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic, multi-system disorder with manifestations that include immune deficiency, sensitivity to ionizing radiation and neoplasms. Many of these manifestations are understood in principle since the identification in A-T patients of mutations in a gene encoding a protein kinase that plays a key role in signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, the cause of the neurodegeneration that afflicts patients with A-T for at least a decade before they succumb to overwhelming infections or malignancy remains mysterious. Based on our work in a mouse model of A-T and previous evidence of extra-neural autoimmune disorders in A-T, we postulate that the neurodegenerative process in A-T is not due to a function for A-T mutated (ATM) essential for the postnatal brain, but to an autoimmune process (hence 'horror autotoxicus', Paul Ehrlich's term for autoimmune disorder). This hypothetical mechanism may be analogous to that in the so-called 'paraneoplastic' neurodegenerative syndromes in patients with various malignancies. Thus, alterations in the balance between cellular and humoral immunity in A-T probably result in autoantibodies to cerebral epitopes shared with cells of the immune system. This hypothesis has important implications for the understanding and development of effective palliative and even preventative strategies for A-T, and probably for other so far relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Horror, humor e sexo no cinema de bordas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardette Lyra

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Por suas características, modos, técnicas e procedimentos, certos filmes de ficção se enquadram naquilo que chamo de cinema de bordas. O cinema de bordas se faz sobre fragmentos reciclados de gêneros, subgêneros e espécies, sem que, no entanto, nenhum dentre os modelos usados se apresente determinante. Tal reciclagem genérica tem por conseqüência a ausência da novidade e da originalidade, em favor da continuidade e da repetição daquilo já anteriormente conhecido. Nesse sentido, o cinema de bordas comumente recorre a formas que materializam a ação e o sentimento, utilizados tanto por alguns gêneros cinematográficos como pela literatura popular ou literatura de massa. Este trabalho enfoca, em especial, a produção com as formas do horror, do humor e do sexo, quase sempre excluídas do discurso das instituições que consagram uma centralidade canônica. O resultado específico é uma mistura que se alimenta das bordas compostas por diferentes instâncias culturais que vai do estrato mais erudito ao mais popular e vice-versa.

  10. Horror, humor e sexo no cinema de bordas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardette Lyra

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2006n51p131 Por suas características, modos, técnicas e procedimentos, certos filmes de ficção se enquadram naquilo que chamo de cinema de bordas. O cinema de bordas se faz sobre fragmentos reciclados de gêneros, subgêneros e espécies, sem que, no entanto, nenhum dentre os modelos usados se apresente determinante. Tal reciclagem genérica tem por conseqüência a ausência da novidade e da originalidade, em favor da continuidade e da repetição daquilo já anteriormente conhecido. Nesse sentido, o cinema de bordas comumente recorre a formas que materializam a ação e o sentimento, utilizados tanto por alguns gêneros cinematográficos como pela literatura popular ou literatura de massa. Este trabalho enfoca, em especial, a produção com as formas do horror, do humor e do sexo, quase sempre excluídas do discurso das instituições que consagram uma centralidade canônica. O resultado específico é uma mistura que se alimenta das bordas compostas por diferentes instâncias culturais que vai do estrato mais erudito ao mais popular e vice-versa.

  11. Agony, a Womb of Poetry. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, J. Bardarah

    1989-01-01

    Argues that the creative process of formulating poetic imagery during therapy may control, integrate, and communicate emotional distress. Illustrates these ideas using the poetry and reflections of a middle-aged woman in analytically oriented therapy. (SR)

  12. The psychological benefits of bad poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Donald

    2010-12-01

    The author was the founder and secretary pro-tem of the Bad Poets Society at Princeton Theological Seminary. This distinction does not appear on his official resume. The Society did not have meetings but it had a newsletter that came out several times a year comprised of bad poetry written by members of the faculty and staff. These poetic works included reflections on institutional matters. This article contains bad poetry by the author relating to such matters. This poetry illustrates Sigmund Freud's (Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious. Norton, New York, 1960) view of humor as saving in the expenditure of painful emotions, costly inhibitions, and difficult thinking. The parasitical nature of bad poetry is also noted and illustrated with the author's own poems.

  13. semantic representation and the translation of poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the actual process of the translation of poetry largely neglected. ... interpretation present in any literary .text - indeed it is claimed that it ensures such infinite ..... enough sample were used, and the method of describing the representation.

  14. Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Skiadopoulos; Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei

    2011-01-01

    The poetry of the Greek contemporary poet, Nikos Karouzos presents the opportunity to, "speak about a half-dead language that still utters in life what is seemingly excluded from it and thus forbidden to be talked about: death. Death as anything that is out of this world, as something that will never return." As we see, "it is also the waste of life that poetry itself presupposes."

  15. Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Skiadopoulos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The poetry of the Greek contemporary poet, Nikos Karouzos presents the opportunity to, "speak about a half-dead language that still utters in life what is seemingly excluded from it and thus forbidden to be talked about: death. Death as anything that is out of this world, as something that will never return." As we see, "it is also the waste of life that poetry itself presupposes."

  16. Interperformative Relationships in Ingrian Oral Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Kallio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Kalevala-metric oral poetry comprises various genres, from epic and lyric to ritual poetry, dancing songs, and lullabies. These poems were performed in diverse ways and applied to various social situations. The present article highlights the complexity of performance, referentiality, and local genres in Ingria. This complexity makes it crucial to take into account various analytical levels of the poem, from the content and meter to the melodies, refrains, and vocal style.

  17. Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    1999-05-01

    The January and April "From Past Issues" recalled some examples of cultural forms-plays, essays, picture contests-explored by chemical educators in the early years of the Journal. In the merry month of May, we turn to poetic works- lucky finds from a finger-walk through the first nine volumes (1924-1932).

  18. The Poetry Cafe Is Open! Teaching Literary Devices of Sound in Poetry Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalcik, Beth; Certo, Janine L.

    2007-01-01

    A six-week long intervention that introduced second graders to poetry writing is described in this article, ending in a classroom "poetry cafe" culminating event. This article details the established classroom "writing workshop" structure and environment and the perceptions and observations of how students responded to the instruction. Four poetry…

  19. Beyond McPoetry: Contemporary American Poetry in the Institutionalized Creative Writing Program Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julie LaRue

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the rise of the creative writing program in American higher education and considers its influence on contemporary American poetry. I investigate how the patronage of the university has impacted American poetry and reconfigured the contemporary literary landscape. Using Mark McGurl's (2009) groundbreaking research on…

  20. Poetry in the Classroom: Finding New Roads. Poetry and Children Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This 20-minute videotape program presents poet and Columbia University professor Kenneth Koch conducting a poetry workshop with a small group of fourth and fifth graders. The program's notes explain that Koch believes that students should be allowed to write poetry in the same way that they are allowed to dance and sing--with freedom,…

  1. Teaching Poetry: Reading and Responding to Poetry in the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Amanda; Wood, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching Poetry" is an indispensable source of guidance, confidence and ideas for all those new to the secondary English classroom. Written by experienced teachers who have worked with the many secondary pupils who "don't get" poetry, this friendly guide will help you support pupils as they access, understand, discuss and enjoy classic and…

  2. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  3. Diction in Poetry Anthology Surat Kopi by Joko Pinurbo as A Poetry Writing Teaching Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Andyan Anindita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research shows the diction of Joko Pinurbo in ten letter-themed poetries in poetry anthology of Surat Kopi using a stylistic approach. The poetries included “Surat Cukur”, “Surat Kopi”, “Surat Kau”, “Surat Batu”, “Surat Pulang”, “Surat Libur”, “Surat Sarung”, “Surat Malam”, “Surat Senyap”, “Surat Kabar”. The stylistic approach was chosen because stylistics is one of the linguistic disciplines that studies the uniqueness or the isiosyncrasy of the use of language in literary works, especially poetry that can bring certain effects. This study used descriptive qualitative method. This type of qualitative descriptive research was used to describe the aspects to be described. The results of this study indicated that in ten poetries with the theme of the letter there were 4 types of diction used: denotative, connotative, concrete and abstract diction. The denotative and concrete dictions were widely used dictions in the ten poetries. The effect was it was not confusing for the reader because it is very minimal use of figurative language. The poetries were explicit and did not generate many interpretations but still promising the depth of meaning. Thus, the ten poetries of Joko Pinurbo in this anthology could be used as a material for teaching Indonesian literature for students. The simplicity of the poetries could ease the students to learn and to try writing their own poetries with uncomplicated dictions, such as denotative diction and concrete diction that did not employ many figurative languages.

  4. Sobre o som no cinema de horror: padrões recorrentes de estilo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Carreiro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artigo procura listar alguns recursos estilísticos recorrentes no som do cinema de horror, examinando e discutindo algumas razões pelas quais essas ferramentas narrativas se tornaram populares entre cineastas, compositores e sound designers. Assim, partimos de uma definição estável do horror como gênero e analisamos a recorrência de certas técnicas narrativas em cada componente do som no cinema – voz, música e efeitos sonoros – em filmes que encaixam nessa definição.

  5. Lessons from the Anhinga Trail: Poetry and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Anne McCrary

    2005-01-01

    The potential of poetry for expanding possibilities in teaching, learning, and research is explored through specific examples from a poet/teacher's practice of poetry as a way of knowing and a medium for sharing knowledge.

  6. Ut pictura poesis: Intermediality between Traditional Visual Poetry and Contemporary Digital Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Širca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of intermediality, comparing traditional visual poetry and contemporary digital poetry. It shows that today’s somewhat fashionable concept of intermediality can actually be traced in the transposition of the classic concept of intertextuality from philosophical discourse, especially as developed by Barthes and Kristeva, to the domain of mediological discourse. The article briefly summarizes the tradition of visual poetry from antiquity to modernism, emphasizing its structure as basically concrete; that is, it implies a material and medial component of language or writing (écriture. This structure calls attention to its self-referential and referential aspect. The digital poetry that continues the line of development of concrete poetry, as it appeared in the 1950s and 1960s, belongs to a broader area of new media poetry that includes any experimental poetry that uses the “new” media. The problematic concept of intermediality can best be explored in a digital environment such as the holographic poetry (or holopoetry of the noted and versatile contemporary Brazilian artist Eduardo Kac. Kac’s holopoetry is a special space-time event in the context of the holographic projection of the text in order to display its multilinearity, which primarily means breaking with the linearity of classic poetry printed in a book. Based on an examination of Kac’s holopoem “Havoc” from 1992 (in this example, the poem’s graphic integrity is temporarily lost, the paper challenges the simplistic deconstructivist interpretation that is applied to Kac’s poems and often to digital poetry in general: namely, that these poetic events can most persuasively be seen as figures for the unattainability of “pure” presence/absence, materiality/immateriality, reality/virtuality, and so on. The author argues that the “polluted” reading as a reading against metaphysics and tradition in the case of new-media poetry is

  7. César vallejo's poetry: the paradigm of the rebellion

    OpenAIRE

    Lipnevičiūtė, Rolanda

    2016-01-01

    "César Vallejo's Poetry: the Paradigm of the Rebellion". The object of bachelor work „ César Vallejo' Poetry: the Paradigm of the Rebellion “ is the poetry of Peruvian poet Cesar Vallejo. The study aims to reveal the paradigm of the rebellion that was observed in three following aspects: the social rebellion, internal oppositions and arguments with the Bible. In order to conduct a survey the hermeneutic poetry analysis and sociocultural perspectives were used. According to the hypothesis form...

  8. A quantum physics poetry competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Susanna Wong

    2014-01-01

    What do you think happened when six world-renowned poets from six European countries met eight famous CERN scientists to talk about the Universe and the Higgs boson? Six poems about new quantum physics discoveries were born from this exciting collision of literature and science in an intimate and spontaneous setting!   Express yourself through poetry: this is the call from POPScience, a European Researchers' Night 2014-15 project supported by CERN. The general public can discover the mysteries of particle physics using a series of texts and thematic videos as well as clips of the meetings of the poets and CERN scientists available on the POPScience website. The Big Bang, an expanding Universe, dark energy, matter, antimatter and supersymmetry: what are they and do they exist?  The general public is welcome to give an answer in a poem by signing up to the competition. Poems can be submitted in English, French, Italian, Danish and Spanish; the selected entries will be translated ...

  9. We Speak in Streetlights: A Workshop in Spoken Word Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Scott; Weiss, Jen

    2001-01-01

    Describes a workshop in spoken word poetry. Presents a brief history of spoken word poetry. Describes ways of building the community and using hip-hop and rhythm in spoken word poetry. Lists and discusses nine exercises in rhythm and tone. Discusses the final week and the process of revision of the workshop. Concludes with a checklist of logistics…

  10. Style and the New Poetic Revolution in Niyi Osundare's Poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Style and the New Poetic Revolution in Niyi Osundare's. Poetry. Alu, Nesther Nachafiya. Abstract. The emergence of Niyi Osundare along with a new poetic revolution is perhaps the high point of the contingencies of the transition of. Modern African/Nigerian poetry from the loins of Euro-Modernist. Poetry. The transformative ...

  11. Pragmatic approaches to the selection and teaching of poetry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How many people really like poetry enough to read some regularly through adulthood? The unsatisfactory teaching of poetry in schools may be the main cause why poetry is not read and enjoyed by many more adults than it is at present (1995). C.W. Valentine (465-66). Valentine's (465-66) observations concerning the ...

  12. Poetry Preference Research: What Young Adults Tell Us They Enjoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Richard F.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that if adolescents are going to get hooked on poetry and read and write more than an occasional sample, they need to have teachers share with them poetry they will enjoy. Considers a study by Karen Kutiper of middle school student poetry preference. Presents conclusions from this study along with a list of the 25 most popular poems. (SG)

  13. The Kaleidoscope of Visual Poetry: New Approaches to Visual Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tamryn

    2011-01-01

    What are the possibilities for poetry? This paper introduces approaches to creating and teaching poetry through a critical survey of contemporary practitioners within the field. Analysis of ekphrastic traditions, comics and concrete poetry, artists books, graffiti poems, film, performance and interdisciplinary collaborations reveal new…

  14. Poetry and the "Me" Generation: Democratizing the "Ars Poetica".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Paul

    The art of poetry is being worn away by democracy, the rule of the average, and by an attitude of narcissism which equates sincere endeavor with significant endeavor. The opening lines of several poems taken from a poetry journal reveal a distinct lack of significant emotion. While poetry is the most significant expression of the Self, the…

  15. "Old Poems Have Heart": Teenage Students Reading Early Modern Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The proposals for the revised National Curriculum in English suggest limiting the pre-twentieth century poetry that GCSE pupils read to "representative Romantic poetry" (Department for Education [DFE], 2013, p. 4). This paper argues that poetry of the early modern period is challenging and enriching study for adolescent pupils and that…

  16. Aesthetics in Geography: Ideas for Teaching Geography Using Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how poetry can be used for teaching geography. The rational for using and writing poetry, its relationship to the National Standards for Geography, grade levels, pedagogical concerns associated with poetry writing, and subject integration are discussed. There are also classroom activities, sample discussion questions, lesson…

  17. Poetry and Narrative as Qualitative Data: Explorations into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of poetry and narrative as tools in qualitative research is explored. Poetry and narratives are shown to be valuable tools for presenting people's lived experiences of complex existential principles and processes. The use of poetry and narrative in this research is positioned within the traditions of expressive arts and ...

  18. Poetry and Narrative as Qualitative Data: Explorations into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    This article explores existential principles through autoethnographic poetry and narrative reflections. The use of poetry and narrative as tools in qualitative research is explored. Poetry and narratives are shown to be valuable tools for presenting people's lived experiences of complex existential principles and processes.

  19. Independent suspension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaikin, Don

    1992-01-01

    ... independent suspension. INDEPENDENCE! An independent system is simply one in which each of the vehicle's wheels is free to react totally separate from any of the other wheels. If the right rear wheel hits a bump, the left rear wheel is undisturbed. Since the whole car does not bounce and shake every time one of the wheels hits a potho...

  20. Living the Poet's Life: Using an Aesthetic Approach to Poetry to Enhance Preservice Teachers' Poetry Experiences and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Janine L.; Apol, Laura; Wibbens, Erin; Hawkins, Lisa K.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we argue that preservice teachers have limited experience reading and writing poetry, and that if they are to teach poetry in meaningful ways to their future students, they need to have compelling experiences with poetry in teacher education--ones that take into account their former experiences and incoming dispositions and that…

  1. 'The verses of madness': schizophrenia and poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-12-20

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of 'madness' and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the 'product' of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: "My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the 'ultimate psychiatrist', and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration."

  2. Christian thought in Momcilo Nastasijevic's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić-Tmušić Aleksandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poetry of Momcilo Nastasijevic gives us undoubted motive to talk about him as a consistent religious poet, a poet of orthodox religious inspiration. He approached towards words as sanctity, he endeavoured to measure each word, reach it, and clean it from accumulated dust of everyday’s blather. His attitude towards poetical locution, his personal law of poetical perfection, represents, brought up to the last consequences, principles of symbolist poetics. He thought of words as magic of sound and rhythm and examines all the effects we can get from it. To him, poetry was identical to crucial and the purest flickering of what he called human soul. The thought of our poet come down to essence of his poetry: who has understood his poems, can be sure that will understand Nastasijevic as a poet.

  3. Ebn Farez and Characteristics of his Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سردار اصلانی

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract     Abou Hafs Omar Ebn Ali known as Ebn Farez is one of the poets of the 6th century. He was famous in the field of poetry. Many great critics like Ebn Khallekan, the writer of Vafiyatolayan also praised him and even regarded him higher than his contemporary poets in position. In this article, we present some features of Soltan Alasheghin Ebn Farez. Ghazal and Khamriyyat are two main types of his poetry. However, his point of view in Khamriyeh is different from Abonavas and others. The reason is that Ebn Farez’s Khamriyyat is full of mystic elements. In addition, in his poetry one can find many uses of literary devices especially pun.

  4. Innovation and in Baraddooni’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at introducing the contemporary poet and writer of Yemen, Abodllah ibn Saleh, known as Baraddooni. He was a great poet and writer as well as a critic and historian. He studied in ‘Aljameol-Kabir’ in Sana. To continue his education, he then attended ‘Darololum’ from which he graduated in Arabic Literature. He was a Romantic poet with old and new style poetry. He established ‘The Yemen Association for Poets and Writers’. He received several international prizes including the UNESCO prize. He has 12 books of poetry and eight pieces of research. The theme of his poetry is the love for the country and in this line is his criticism of some politicians such as Ahmad Hamidoddin. Also important in his poems are: the issue of Palestine, Arab Nationalism and Arab unity.

  5. Gothic/Giallo/Genre: hybrid images in Italian horror cinema, 1956-82

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Brown

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n62p173   Italian horror cinema is commonly divided into two periods and genres. An initial classical Gothic period spanned the years from 1956 to 1966 and was followed by a modern giallo (thriller period from 1970 to 1982. Whilst accepting this broad distinction, this paper seeks to add nuance by considering the hybrid elements of three key films by three of the most important directors working in the giallo and horror area, namely Riccardo Freda with I Vampiri (1956, Mario Bava with The Girl Who Knew too Much (1963 and Dario Argento with Deep Red (1975. Drawing in particular upon Nöel Carroll’s idea of “fearing fictions”, I contend that Freda’s film, the first Italian horror movie since the silent era, is notable for being a distinctively modern vampire film; that Bava’s film, a foundational giallo, may be seen as having a palimpsest in Jane Austen’s Gothic parody Northanger Abbey; and that Argento’s film, while often taken as the paradigmatic giallo, has supernatural horror elements that push it in the direction of the Gothic.

  6. The Brood of Frankenstein: Great Literature? Maybe Not, but Teens Love Horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Amy; Wentling, Sarajo; Wurl, Jody

    2006-01-01

    Young adults have an insatiable thirst for blood, violence, and the supernatural. They love to be scared, and if something grosses them out, so much the better. That is why horror stories--tales that spark powerful feelings of dread, aversion, guilt, anger, and other deliciously dark emotions--are such a hit at libraries. In this article, the…

  7. The Horror of Education: Dark pedagogy and Education for Sustainable developement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jonas Greve

    into words and thoughts, drawn into the-world-for-us to make sense. Thacker argues, drawing on inspiration from the horror genre that it might be possible to introduce a third notion: the traumatic idea of the world-without-us. This world-without-us can be understood through the emerging notions of post...

  8. Teaching and Writing Popular Fiction: Horror, Adventure, Mystery and Romance in the American Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Karen M.

    This book, intended for teachers who want to expand their secondary-level writing curricula, examines the possibilities for using popular fiction in the classroom to encourage reading and to teach writing skills. Chapters include discussions of the genre approach, the horror story, the adventure story, the mystery story, the popular love story,…

  9. Rock 'n' Roll and Horror Stories: Students, Teachers, and Popular Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a teacher's informed response to popular culture in the classroom requires consideration of how students use it in light of the economics of its production. Illustrates this through the classroom talk of 11- and 12-year-old boys discussing a horror series book. Discusses social uses of popular culture and the role of teachers regarding…

  10. "Tõeline horror peidab end reality-televisioonis" / Xavier Mendik ; interv. Maria Ulfsak-Sheripova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mendik, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Lääne-Londoni Bruneli ülikooli õppejõud ja kultusfilmide arhiivi juht räägib kultusfilmi olemusest, kultusfilmi ja tavalise filmi erinevustest, õudusfilmidest, filmide publikust. Ka reality-televisioonist. X. Mendik viibis Eestis ja pidas loengu Haapsalu HÖFFil uuest briti horror'ist

  11. Poetry in the clinch of understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kozicka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents polemic discussions of poetry referred to as hermetic or obscure; the discussion has been ongoing for the past twenty five years. In more general terms, the dispute is over the issue of the incomprehensible nature of poetry. The most heated stages of the discussion reveal the basic and repeated arguments put forward by both parties, as well as  the differences in the perspectives and points of reference, indicating the changes which occurred in literature in the meantime.

  12. Poetry Writing in General Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, William L.

    2013-02-01

    Poetry writing in the context of physics is a student-centered activity that enables students to view the world through the window of physics and make connections to everyday life scenarios. Poetry assignments provide a creative and atypical challenge to students, creating more student-centered class discussions and a fun, light-hearted approach to learning what is often perceived as a purely logical subject. In order to write poetry in the context of a physics concept, students actively unify their worldview with an expression of physical concepts, personalizing their connection to the topic. Physics and poetry are two of the great human intellectual endeavors, each producing deep insights on self-created models of the universe. Each attempts to get beneath the surface of events and actions through different domains. Just as poets create a perspective of the world, scientists and researchers use their creativity to come up with new ideas, tests, and explanations. Creative thinking is one of the most important skills scientists have, whether that creativity is used to develop an alternative hypothesis, to devise a new way of testing an idea, or to look at old data in a new light. Scientific analysis often involves alternating among different modes of reasoning and creative brainstorming. Creative thinking is becoming an increasingly valuable skill for students. A 2006 comprehensive study done by job placement professionals concluded that creative thinking has become one of the most important skill sets for recent college graduates.

  13. Poetry and Therapeutic Factors in Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marion

    1989-01-01

    Describes the ways in which the use of poetry in group therapy facilitates therapeutic goals consistent with interpersonal theory. Discusses the relationship between poetic interventions and I. D. Yalom's therapeutic factors, and offers a case example of an in-patient therapy group. (SR)

  14. Cervantes and the Lirical Poetry: Don Quixote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Romo Feito

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the lyrical poems included in the first and the second part of Don Quixote. The different classes of poems are studied attending to its narrative context. But the poetry is also studied by relating it with metrical and aesthetical categories: Realism, Parody, Manierism…

  15. Visions or hallucinations? Brazil in romantic poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Knispel da Costa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay has as primary objective to present some of Brazil’s different representations in our Literature during the period in which Romanticism prevailed in our poetry. It also theorizes on the causes of changes in the different ways of representing the motherland by the poets of that period.

  16. Don't Call it Poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    The IPJP is a joint project of Rhodes University in South Africa and Edith Cowan University in Australia. This document is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or in part via any medium (print, electronic or otherwise) without the express permission of the publishers. Invited Paper. Don't Call it Poetry.

  17. god of love in early Greek poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    god of love in early Greek poetry. Edward Jenner. The paradox. The novelist Vladimir Nabokov once remarked that the word Eros makes a wonderful palindrome, Eros:Sore. Greek poets, ancient and modern, have constantly exploited the paradox of the god who brings as much pain as pleasure. The immortal oxymoron ...

  18. Astro Poetry: Students Working as Poets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakauskas, William

    1982-01-01

    An approach to teaching the writing of poetry is presented in this brief article. AUTHOR'S COMMENT (excerpt): A poet's purpose is to amuse, to instruct, to embellish truth, or to vitalize dull reality. Poets compress, using the minimum number of words to gain the maximum effect, yoking seemingly disparate ideas into metaphors, creating poetic…

  19. Emotional Self-Repair and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Terry, Rina

    1994-01-01

    Notes that some scholars have argued that writing poetry was harmful for psychological health of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. Contends that their writing probably provided cathartic benefit for them and helped them gain cognitive distance from their inner conflicts. Argues that writing may have helped both poets survive longer than they might…

  20. Pen- Name in Persian and Arabic Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Khodayar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Pen-name (Takhalloss is one of the main features of Persian poetry. It has been a matter of concern among many of Persian language geography poets in the orient at least up to the Mashrouteh era. Pen-name has been promoted among the other Muslim nations throuph Persian poetry. Although it is not as famous in the Arab nations as in the Persian speaking nations, it is known as “Alqab-o-shoara” among the Arab nations and, through this way, it has affected the poetrical wealth of the Arabic poets.   The Present paper, using description-analystic approach, compares the pen-names of Persian and Arabic poets under the title of “pen-names” and investigates their features in both cultures. The main research question is: What are the similarities and differences of poetic-names, in Persian and Arabic poets in terms of the type of name, position and importance? The results showed that Pseudonym by its amazing expansion in Persian poetry has also influenced Arabic poetry. In addition to the factors affecting in the choice of pen-names (like pseudonym, pen-name, nickname..., sometimes such external factors as events, commends, community benefactors and climate, as well as internal factors including the poets’ inner beliefs are associated too. .

  1. Pen- Name in Persian and Arabic Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Khodayar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pen-name (Takhalloss is one of the main features of Persian poetry. It has been a matter of concern among many of Persian language geography poets in the orient at least up to the Mashrouteh era. Pen-name has been promoted among the other Muslim nations throuph Persian poetry. Although it is not as famous in the Arab nations as in the Persian speaking nations, it is known as “Alqab-o-shoara” among the Arab nations and, through this way, it has affected the poetrical wealth of the Arabic poets.   The Present paper, using description-analystic approach, compares the pen-names of Persian and Arabic poets under the title of “pen-names” and investigates their features in both cultures. The main research question is: What are the similarities and differences of poetic-names, in Persian and Arabic poets in terms of the type of name, position and importance? The results showed that Pseudonym by its amazing expansion in Persian poetry has also influenced Arabic poetry. In addition to the factors affecting in the choice of pen-names (like pseudonym, pen-name, nickname..., sometimes such external factors as events, commends, community benefactors and climate, as well as internal factors including the poets’ inner beliefs are associated too. .

  2. From Poetry to Music: "Northern Lullaby"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Nancy White Carlstrom's children's book, "Northern Lullaby," conjures through poetry the beauty of the Alaskan landscape in the evening. The book provides an opportunity for music teachers to help their students transform text and visual images to music. The author describes connections for reading comprehension in the general music…

  3. SLAM POETRY: A SIMPLE WAY TO GET CLOSER WITH LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murti Ayu Wijayanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching literature in teacher training faculty in which the students are prepared for being English teachers is always challenging as the students think that they have nothing to do with any kinds of literary work. It takes times to prepare them learn literature. Most students think that they have no talent in literature. Thus, it will certainly affect the teaching and learning process. While the lecturer is teaching, the students tend to listen and think of another else but literature. It therefore needs the lecturer‘s effort to deal with this challenge. One part of literary works taught which creates problem for most of students is poetry. One way to encourage students in learning poetry is slam poetry. Slam poetry is a kind of poetry competition which was firstly popularized in America in 1990s. A rumor that only beautiful and rhythmic poetry which is highly appreciated vanishes since the poet will only write what he or she understands. In slam poetry, the students themselves create their own poetry and present it in front of their classmates whereas other students will be the judges and decide who the winner of this slam poetry is. This method will encourage the students to learn poetry as well as appreciate it.

  4. Digital Landscapes: Rethinking Poetry Interpretation in Multimodal Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessa A. Alghadeer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the fact that a great deal of scholarly studies in the field of digital humanities have emphasized implementing various modes of digital literacy, critical perspectives considering the use of multimodal texts in literature, namely poetry, have received scant attention. Beyond the boundaries of printed texts and verbal means, the present study aims to cast some light on how meaning making in poetry into multimodal contexts becomes crucial to poetry interpretation in multimodal contexts. In particular, the study tackles the theory of multimodality in regard to the poetry genre and briefly reviews its significance in relevant studies. The paper then shifts to show how the multimodalities in question enhance the transformation of print-based poetic texts into creative multimodal poetry experiences. Ultimately, the study provides insight into how digital media have altered our perspectives on definitions, interpretations, and appreciation of poetry.

  5. The return of the projected: some thoughts on paranoia and a recent trend in horror films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, R J

    1995-12-01

    I have focused on two interrelated changes in horror films of the last twenty-five years: a tendency for the "horror" to become internalized; and the use of what I call "bubbling flesh" to signify the internalized horror. Taking two films--the 1958 Fly and its 1986 remake--and treating them as (paranoid) fantasies, I have explored what I take to be the unconscious meanings of these changes. Although both films present oedipal as well as pre-oedipal conflicts, and although both employ paranoid mechanisms of negation and projection of an unacceptable wish, the earlier film also makes greater use of repression to keep the preoedipal wishes farther from consciousness. The earlier film is also more successful in its projection: In the later film the projective mechanisms fail and the projected returns to its original locus. The particular unacceptable wish that I see as being fundamental to these two films (and perhaps to all horror films) is a radically passive wish for merger with the mother--a merger wish so radical that it can be seen in terms of Gun-trip's "return to the womb" wishes, and so passive that it can be seen as a nearly pure form o Freud's death drive--the drive toward total quiescence and dissolution. I have associated the differences between the two films with changes in society in the past decades, and especially with changes in traditionally conceived gender roles and their associated senses of gender identity. Finally, I have suggested that we view these historical changes not as signs of societal regression but as the beginnings of the failure of one set of defense mechanisms that can possibly allow an opening to try out new strategies.

  6. Der Gewalt ihre Freiheit - Der Horror-Film als jugendliches Wertekonstrukt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Marci-Boehncke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jugendliche Gewaltbereitschaft wird in der medienkritischen Diskussion nicht selten auf mediale Vorbilder zurück geführt. Anhand qualitativer Daten wird zum einen gezeigt, dass das Erkennen medialer Gewalt in Sprache und Handlung bildungsabhängig ist, zum anderen, dass Jugendliche nach eigenen Angaben aus sehr unterschiedlichen Gründen zur Gewalt bereit wären – etwa, um Freunde zu verteidigen. Besonders betrachtet werden dann Jugendliche, die gern Horrorfilme anschauen. Die Untersuchung zeigt, dass die Fans von Horrorfilmen eine Rezeptionshaltung einnehmen, die zwischen Angst-Lust und Distanz oszilliert. Es interessieren hier keine identifikatorischen Aspekte, sondern Jugendliche haben Spaß an den medialen Inszenierungen des Gruseligen. Jenseits medienmoralischer Warnungen plädiert der Beitrag – unter Verweis auch auf Rezeptionstheorien der Literaturwissenschaft – dafür, distanzierten Horror-Genuss als Spielform nicht zu überbewerten und ihn auch als Ausdruck elaborierter Lese- und Medienkompetenz zu verstehen. Whereas within media-critical discussions violence of teens is sometimes said to be produced by referent power of media, this paper presents empirical data which show that and how teens are able to assume a distance when viewing media violence in horror-films. What they feel is not empathy, but fun. Young people enjoy a kind of delightful horror for themselves and are able to step into distance while talking to peers about their impressions during reception. This way of “delightful horror” is not only a phenomenon of modern media reception but can be found in recent and established horror literature. In so far this article encourages a more relaxed way of judging young people’s media habits.

  7. On the evolution of word usage of classical Chinese poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchy of classical Chinese poetry has been broadly acknowledged by a number of studies in Chinese literature. However, quantitative investigations about the evolution of classical Chinese poetry are limited. The primary goal of this study is to provide quantitative evidence of the evolutionary linkages, with emphasis on word usage, among different period genres for classical Chinese poetry. Specifically, various statistical analyses were performed to find and compare the patterns of w...

  8. 'Craziness' and creativity: Psychopathology and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed; Zaman, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    Not all poets have experienced psychopathology. Conversely, not all those who have experienced psychopathology become poets. The notion, nonetheless, of there being an association between 'craziness' and creativity, contentious though it may be, remains a seductive one. Poetry is both beneficial for the person who is composing or reciting it as well as the person who may be reading or listening to it. Poetry Therapy, which falls under the remit of Art Therapy, is increasingly being recognised as an effective form of adjunctive therapy for the treatment of mental health problems. The main aims of this paper are to explore (and to attempt to elucidate) if there is indeed a relationship between the artistic temperament and mental illness and to comment on the rise and recognition of Art Therapy.

  9. Orphism in the Poetry of Blaise Cendrars

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    Howard Nitzberg

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The story of Orpheus has undergone numerous changes in religion and poetry throughout the ages. My essay on Blaise Cendrars is the first study of him in an orphie context. He does not transpose the Orpheus myth directly. Rather, Cendrars contributes to the story of modern orphie poetry by the personal expression he gives to certain orphie concepts and themes. His poetic vision consists of the exploration of his being, the primacy of subjectivity, and the autonomy of the thought processes. Although Cendrars is usually considered an avant-garde poet of the early twentieth century, this article demonstrates that he can be placed in the heritage of Symbolism by the particular use he makes of autonomous thought as a creative means. In this regard, references are made to poems of Mallarmé.

  10. Aldo Oliva: a ghost in Argentine poetry

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    Bruno Crisorio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aldo Oliva (1927-2000 presents several problems to the researcher: acknowledged as an indispensable voice in Argentinian poetry (to quote David Viñas, his work, however, still waits for academic reception, and has circulated for many years in a marginal and reduced way. His reluctance to publish, his distance from any poetic movement of the second half of the XXth century, the complexity of his work explains, in part, this situation. In this context, the present article tries to locate Oliva in the history of Argentinian poetry; to that end, and considering that his work as well as his creative project prevent any linear and chronological approach, I have used the concepts of “anachronism” (Didi-Huberman, “contemporary” (Agamben o “constellation” (Benjamin, that revealed themselves useful to think this spectral figure that is at the same time unavoidable and invisible.

  11. The Poetry Asks for Passing... at School

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    Esméria de Lourdes Saveli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a research about the space that the poetry occupies in the school context. It was verified the frequency that the poetical texts are worked, their receptivity among the pupils, the type of activities teachers propose, the difficulties found by them and the conditions offered by the school for the development of these activities. It searched, still, to identify the students’ preference in relation to the authors which are presented by the teachers in their classes. The data was gotten by a questionnaire, with half-structuralized questions related to the teachers practicing with the poetical text. This questionnaire was applied, in 2005, in six State schools, in Ponta Grossa, PR. It evidenced that the poetry occupies a shy place in the didactic books that have been the pedagogical support in the Portuguese Language classes and, as a result, it is not much present in the classroom.

  12. Face to Face: Place and Poetry

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    Martin Harrison

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses specifically on three poems: ‘The Driver’, ‘The Slope’ and ‘Incident at Galore Hill’ and the relationship between poetry and place. In trying to prepare the ground for a philosophy which can deal with what he terms the ‘phenomenal field’, Merleau- Ponty spends a number of pages early in The Phenomenology of Perception clarifying what he sees as the limits and traps of several narrowly psychological approaches to perception. Such psychologies set up the observed world as a transcendent domain which maps consciousness as if it were somehow separated out from the world, as if, to employ his phrase, there are two different ‘modes’ of being. In this paper I explore the relations between inside and outside and the perceiver and the perceived as well sensory experience in relation to poetry, in conjuction with discussions of Merleau-Ponty's philosophies.

  13. Translating Culture: Contemporary African American Poetry

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    Kristina Kočan Šalamon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper interrogates cultural specifics of contemporary African American poetry and exhibits translation problems when translating this poetic work. African American writers have always included much of their cultural heritage in their writing and this is immediately noticed by a translator. The cultural elements, such as African American cuisine, attire and style in general, as well as spiritual and religious practices, often play a significant role for African American poets who are proclaiming their identity. Moreover, the paper presents the translation problems that emerge when attempting to transfer such a specific, even exotic, source culture into a target culture, like Slovene. The goal is to show to what extent contemporary African American poetry can successfully be translated into the Slovene language and to highlight the parts that inevitably remain lost in the translation process.

  14. Poetry and Neuroscience: : An Interdisciplinary Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, James; Scott, Sophie K

    2016-01-01

    Dialogues and collaborations between scientists and non-scientists are now widely understood as important elements of scientific research and public engagement with science. In recognition of this, the authors, a neuroscientist and a poet, use a dialogical approach to extend questions and ideas first shared during a lab-based poetry residency. They recorded a conversation and then expanded it into an essayistic form, allowing divergent disciplinary understandings and uses of experiment, noise, voice and emotion to be articulated, shared and questioned.

  15. Parole in Jeans: poetry and telematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Barisone

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of project "Parole in Jeans" focuses on poetry and telematics under more 'general education reading in a multimedia context. The theme concerns "the culture of the various Italian regions" created through a collaborative implemented electronically between Genoa Middle School, Udine and Padua. The main aim 'to promote reading, comprehension and production of poetic texts in an interdisciplinary context and key media.

  16. Poetry and Family Photographs [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tosheva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Evdokia Tosheva was born in 1942 in Lom, NW Bulgaria. She is retired as a hospital nurse. Her mother belonged to a rich Lom family. Her father was a cavalry officer from Belogradchik. The family was put under repression in the communist era. Now Evdokia is fond of writing poems, she loves Bulgarian landscapes, Belogradchik, and Bulgarian customs and folk traditions. The paper presents some of her poetry attempts for children and for adults. Beloved family photos illustrate her poems.

  17. The Poetry Asks for Passing... at School

    OpenAIRE

    Esméria de Lourdes Saveli; Regina Janiaki Copes; Solange Salles de Brito

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the results of a research about the space that the poetry occupies in the school context. It was verified the frequency that the poetical texts are worked, their receptivity among the pupils, the type of activities teachers propose, the difficulties found by them and the conditions offered by the school for the development of these activities. It searched, still, to identify the students’ preference in relation to the authors which are presented by the teachers in their c...

  18. Living Transcription: The Poetry of Jean Tortel

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    Suzanne Nash

    1989-11-01

    Full Text Available With the publication of six new books of poetry since 1979, Jean Tortel has joined his contemporaries, Francis Ponge and Guillevic, as one of France's leading materialist poets. His writing, recounting the process of its own unfolding with voluptuous precision, is meant to bear witness through its figurations to the forces of chance and mutability governing the natural order. As such it constitutes a place of passage or verbal garden, both sumptuous and ordinary, where reading and formulation merge.

  19. Living Transcription: The Poetry of Jean Tortel

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Nash

    1989-01-01

    With the publication of six new books of poetry since 1979, Jean Tortel has joined his contemporaries, Francis Ponge and Guillevic, as one of France's leading materialist poets. His writing, recounting the process of its own unfolding with voluptuous precision, is meant to bear witness through its figurations to the forces of chance and mutability governing the natural order. As such it constitutes a place of passage or verbal garden, both sumptuous and ordinary, where reading and formulation...

  20. Poetry in teaching pharmacology: Exploring the possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Juhi; Singh, Satendra; Badyal, Dinesh; Barua, Purnima; Sharma, Taruna; Dhasmana, Dinesh Chandra; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-10-01

    To explore poetry as a tool for active learning in linking knowledge and affective domains and to find if correlating learning with imagination can be used in "assessment for learning." After taking a conventional lecture on Asthma, a creative writing assignment in the form of poetry writing was given to the students. Different triggers were given to the students to channelize their thought pattern in a given direction that was linked to specific areas of academic relevance. Students were asked to reflect on this learning experience and the faculty was asked to evaluate the student assignment on a 5-point Likert scale. Most student groups scored well in the "overall assessment" of creative assignments and were rated as good or fair by the faculty. Students reflections were very informative and revealed that more than 90% of the students liked the exercise and many were too exuberant and liberal with emotional reactions that breathed positive. Around 5% students found the exercise average and another 5% found it very childish. Poetry writing turned out to be like a simulation exercise that linked academic knowledge, creativity, and the affective domain in an assumed scenario, rehearsed in free locales of mind. The metaphorical transition embedded in its subtle creation helped assess deeper understanding of the subject and the logical sequence of thought pattern.

  1. THE PESSIMISM IN POETRY AUGUSTO DOS ANJOS

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    Wellington Lima Amorim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Augusto dos Anjos is part of a select group of writers who, having dived deep into human existence, created in Brazilian literature works fleeing the commonplaces of his time and carnivalization condition attributed to the cultural diversity of Brazilian land, a view that is both distorted and obscured the true power of our artists. Pessimism takes thus an essential function: to question what you're doing and how you are doing, since all major pessimists are, deep down, great realistic. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pessimism of Augustan poetry of the Angels and identify innovative reflections that his verses present. For this, read to your unique work, "I", and poems published in youth and some of his critics and leading scholars, as Raimundo Magalhaes Junior and poet Gullar. The methodology used was the literature review, assessing the poetry of the author and his work in identifying, compared to the thought of his time, the genesis of their uniqueness in our literature. Keywords: Poetry. Pessimism. Reflection.

  2. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2014-03-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger—one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native German. It discusses existing perceptions of his poetry and challenges the assumptions that his poetic work was a mere hobby unrelated to his other achievements by focusing on the interplay between poetic images and scientific ideas in his German-language poems. It emphasizes that more research is needed on the understated role of bilingualism and of—often marginalized—writing in an adopted language in science and in poetry, with the premise that this feature of Schrödinger's life deserves more study. It argues that Schrödinger's literary imagination and his bilingualism are an integral part of his approach to reality and considers Schrödinger's literary work to be an important aspect of his intellectual heritage.

  3. Justification of Poetry Comics: A Multimodal Theory of an Improbable Genre

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    Derik Robertson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With an ever-increasing variety of comics being produced, it was inevitable that someone try to create poetry comics. However, most attempts at merging comics with poetry have ended in texts that fail to engage the hybrid nature of comics in a satisfactory manner. One of the main problems in creating true poetry comics is the veneration that language has in poetry. The strict language constructions of poetry, if explicitly maintained, will at best result in an illustrated poem. This paper argues that there is a way to create true poetry comics by realizing the segmentivity of poetry and merging that with the comic’s modes of panel and frames. Analyzing two examples of problematic poetry comics, the paper shows how too much reliance on the language and structure of poetry can undermine the poetry comic. A third example illustrates the principles needed in order to create an effective poetry comic.

  4. Teaching Vocabulary through Poetry in an EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Baki; Mohammadzadeh, Behbood

    2012-01-01

    This study has been conducted to investigate the effectiveness of using poetry to teach vocabulary in a foreign language classroom. It aims to find answers to two research questions (1) "Do the learners enhance more extensive vocabulary knowledge by means of poetry-based vocabulary teaching activities than the traditional coursebook…

  5. Becoming Poetry Teachers: Studying Poems through Choral Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff Hodges, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    The poet, Seamus Heaney, argues that transformations for both teachers and students may be engendered through recognising the connections and distinctions between the language of poetry and the language of everyday life. This article explores some of the ways in which choral reading of poetry, using multiple voices like musical instruments, may…

  6. Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandre, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    "Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry" was the title of the 2011 Master Class in Children's Literature. Woven into this session were the insights of poets Joyce Sidman and Pat Mora who shared their creative processes and the voices that inspire their poetry. In addition, Barbara Kiefer provided advice regarding how to connect…

  7. "Poems Look Like a Mathematical Equation": Assessment in Poetry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the influence that assessment exerts on poetry education. By means of research conducted in a post-16 educational context in Malta, it shows that teachers' and students' practices in the poetry lesson are determined by the kind of examinations that candidates sit for. When the mode of assessment is constituted solely by the…

  8. Pathology of external music in Nimayi`s poetry

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    Mahdi Firouzian

    2016-09-01

    In classic poems, long and short of hemistiches are not permitted and we can recognize prosodic false by counting syllables, but in Nimayian poetry hemistiches are unequal and sometimes detecting prosodic false is difficult and for this reason, even great poets in Nimayian poetry made mistakes in prosody. We have given some examples in this regard.

  9. Scaffolding Oral Language Development Through Poetry for Students Learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, Nancy L.; Vardell, Sylvia M.; Young, Terrell A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of providing opportunities for ongoing oral language development for all students, the particular needs of children learning English as a second language, and the unique appropriateness of poetry as a vehicle for providing practice and pleasure in oral language skill development. Notes that poetry provides a relaxed and…

  10. Religion and the Development of Swahili Political Poetry | Simala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is not simply an exercise in practical criticism, rather it has an underlying polemical purpose: to show that Swahili poetry has always been engaged with African history. With the burden of humanizing society, Swahili poetry has the proper and essential role of giving its audience a sense of community.

  11. Coyote Poems: Navajo Poetry, Intertextuality, and Language Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Anthony K.

    2004-01-01

    Many literary critics describe Native American written poetry as inspired by oral tradition (namely storytelling). This seems a vacuous claim unless one can set out the features of the oral genre (tradition) and the written form, and establish a baseline for comparative purposes. It is not enough to claim that poetry is storytelling based on oral…

  12. The place of Urhobo folklore in Tanure Ojaide's poetry | Ojaruega ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The place of Urhobo folklore in Tanure Ojaide's poetry. While some notable studies have been done on Tanure Ojaide and his coevals on their “Alter/Native” tradition of modern African poetry that gained inspiration from indigenous African oral literature and folklore, there has been no focused study on the place of folklore in ...

  13. The Relevance of Poetry in School Leadership Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lystra M.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that poetry, especially in times of crisis, serves society by offering a form of reflection. Suggests that by combining poetry with reflective practice, school leaders can use aspects of the poet's craft to enhance their ability to interpret their environment and improve communication. (Contains 31 references.) (AUTH/NB)

  14. Divination expressed through poetry: The divinatory poems of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to explore the divinatory poems of Johannes Mokgwadi with special reference to their structure, role and tools of performance in the art of divination as practised still today by the Bapedi in some rural areas of South Africa. Cultural verse forms in 'the poetry of divinatory bones', as this form of poetry may be ...

  15. In Spring Hearts Turn to Poetry and Love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Intended for use by junior or senior high school English teachers, the articles and features in this theme issue focus on romantic fiction and poetry for young adults. The articles and their authors are as follows (1) "The Gift of Poetry" (L. B. Hopkins); (2) "Maybe the Gallows, But Not a Tin Ear" (A. K. Helbig); (3) "A…

  16. Using Digital Media to Interpret Poetry: Spiderman Meets Walt Whitman

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVee, Mary B.; Bailey, Nancy M.; Shanahan, Lynn E.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers and students often express an aversion to poetry based on their experiences with printbased poetry texts that typically dominate school curricula. Given this challenge and the potential affordances of new and multimodal technologies, we investigate how preservice and inservice teachers enrolled in a new literacies master's course began to…

  17. How To Plan a Movable Feast of Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Describes how the Seattle (Washington) Public Library celebrated National Poetry Month in 1997 with readings, workshops, lectures, and poem-a-day display boards in libraries and community centers. Suggests ways libraries can organize programs, activities, exhibits, and displays for National Poetry Month (April) at minimal cost and staff effort.…

  18. Making Connections to Reading and Writing through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael P.

    The three critical components of effective poetry instruction are: (1) the poems; (2) the methodology; and (3) the teacher. Extensive poetry preference research has been done with elementary students which provides guidelines for assisting teachers in choosing poems that will appeal to their students. A review of the descriptive literature related…

  19. Poetry in South African Sign Language: What is different? | Baker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poetry in a sign language can make use of literary devices just as poetry in a spoken language can. The study of literary expression in sign languages has increased over the last twenty years and for South African Sign Language (SASL) such literary texts have also become more available. This article gives a brief overview ...

  20. On the Use of Poetry in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    Poetry can be a powerful tool in teaching students and residents interpersonal and scientific aspects of clinical medicine. Advantages of using poetry include emotional intensity, succinct, portable formulations and communication of encompassing, "existential" truths. Limitations include learners' lack of familiarity with the medium of…

  1. Poesie et representations culturelles (Poetry and Cultural Representation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    The ways in which poetry can offer the French second-language learner insights into French daily "culture" are examined. Aspects of poetry discussed include the creation of atmosphere in physical context, the power of words to evoke emotion, and the use of rhythm. Two poems are presented for illustration, and reading and writing exercises are…

  2. From Art to Poetry: "Prance as They Dance."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, Marilyn J.

    1989-01-01

    Recounts one teacher's use of art in the poetry-writing classroom, and suggests that its success stems from the following elements: schemata for seeing, experience with poetry, individual choice of art and poetic form, an encouraging environment, time to look and think and feel, and a powerful subject. (SR)

  3. Rumi's Poetry: The Journey toward Meaning and Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteshari, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    This research examined how Rumi's poetry impacts the lives of individuals who study his teachings, written 800 years ago in his masterpiece, "Mathnawi." After teaching Rumi for the last 15 years, I was aware of positive changes in my students' lives but wanted a more in-depth understanding of what drew the students to Rumi's poetry and…

  4. Untempered Tongues: Teaching Performance Poetry for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camangian, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Despite high levels of disengagement in urban literacy classrooms, few teachers have seen fit to explore spoken word--the performance of poetry--as a tool to engage students in literacy. Spoken word poetry serves as a powerful means of self-representation for youth that are traditionally portrayed as threatening, menaces to society that do not…

  5. What Is Not Said on Hearing Poetry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John

    2010-01-01

    This article considers an exchange between pupils in response to heard poetry, approaching it through a "conversation analytic mentality" informed by the theories of Basil Bernstein. Using his terms, it describes an existing "pedagogic device" of poetry study for schools, to which responses under discussion do not easily…

  6. Practicing Poetry: Teaching To Learn and Learning To Teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John Noell

    2002-01-01

    Describes a successful approach to teaching poetry--teaching poems in pairs or other small groupings, putting them in conversation with one another so that their ideas resonate and illuminate the experience of being in the poem. Demonstrates how poetry can be woven into the the classroom and into the lives of the students. (RS)

  7. Conceptualization and Linguistic Expression: Using Religious Poetry in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Religious poetry is, a heightened and impregnated form of expression. There is a marriage of form and sense. Linguistically speaking, religious poetry has a conceptual interface between syntax and semantics; a strong relationship between language and thought; universality and cultural specificity; the discourse context and the psychological…

  8. Poetics and Subjectivity in Contemporary Nigerian Poetry: Afam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the features of contemporary Nigerian poetry in English is the clear thematic space it maps out for itself, namely a concern with the travails and triumphs of the ordinary people in the society. This amounts to displacing poetry and poetics from a certain level of esotericism. Since the 1970s Nigerian poets writing in ...

  9. “Labyrinth of loneliness”: Breyten Breytenbach's prison poetry (1976 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... for its specificities: the singular prison conditions under which he wrote, the nature of the poetry, specific leitmotifs in each of the five volumes published between 1976 and 1985. A psychoanalytic approach is indicated to this strong middle phase in his extensive poetical oeuvre, comprising seventeen collections of poetry.

  10. A Poetry Coffee House: Creating a Cool Community of Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the sharing of writing through a coffee house--style poetry reading. Although this article focuses on a workshop and share activity used in a preservice teacher language arts and literacy course, it contains tips and ideas for implementing poetry coffee houses with elementary and secondary school students and preservice and…

  11. Echoing Hylas : metapoetics in Hellenistic and Roman poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, Mark Antonius Johannes

    2010-01-01

    I have argued in my thesis that poets throughout classical antiquity used this myth to reflect allegorically on their own poetry. Certain elements of the myth as well as Hylas himself function as metaphors of the art of poetry as such. In the Hellenistic age, for example, Theocritus employs the

  12. Multicultural Moments in Poetry: The Importance of the Unique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David Ian

    2003-01-01

    Argues for the importance of poetry for the field of applied linguistics. Focus is on the idea that poetry is a discourse constructed around the epistemological principle of the unique that provides its readers with specific insights into individualized, personal human experience and linguistic expression. (Author/VWL)

  13. "The Joy of Mere Words": Poetry and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelden, Michael

    As a man who took great delight in "the joy of mere words," George Orwell would understandably be appalled by the growing insensitivity to language in today's world. Poetry in composition classes can keep students aware of the music of the English language. There is no guarantee that students will respond to poetry with the same…

  14. Concrete Poetry as Sign of Technological Changes in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry......This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry...

  15. Poetry as a Veritable Tool for Social Criticism and Reformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ). “Words as Bullets”, Poetry as a Veritable Tool for Social. Criticism and Reformation: A Study of Akachi .... Poetry delights the mind and also serves the purpose of ..... with the new killer squad all in the name of religion and fair cause. She.

  16. Survey of Poetry Reading Strategy as the Modern Tool to Identify Poetry Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shirin Shafiei; Zainal, Zaidah

    2016-01-01

    This study examines common strategies that English as a Foreign language (EFL) students employ when reading English poetry. To identify the strategies, a survey was designed for data collection from TESL students. The result shows that students significantly tend to use the strategies that require their creativity to construct new ideas in the…

  17. Politics in poetry: epic poetry as a critique of Dutch culture

    OpenAIRE

    O.M. Heynders

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a Dutch volume of epic poetry, using a disciplinary strategy (concepts and devices from narrative studies) and a cultural analytical and rhetorical approach. The volume “Roeshoofd hemelt” by Joost Zwagerman (2005) is a political poetic text that raises fundamental questions on issues of mental illness and on consumerism in contemporary Dutch society.

  18. Politics in poetry: epic poetry as a critique of Dutch culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Heynders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a Dutch volume of epic poetry, using a disciplinary strategy (concepts and devices from narrative studies and a cultural analytical and rhetorical approach. The volume “Roeshoofd hemelt” by Joost Zwagerman (2005 is a political poetic text that raises fundamental questions on issues of mental illness and on consumerism in contemporary Dutch society.

  19. Morbid and Insight Poetry: A Glimpse at Schizophrenia through the Window of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakare, Muideen Owolabi

    2009-01-01

    Creativity, language, and psychotic disorders may share a common neurological and evolutionary background. These processes are uniquely human and may converge in poetic expression that illuminates the inner world of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Two types of poetry that may be written by patients with schizophrenia are identified as…

  20. Bleeding Mud: The Testimonial Poetry of Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua

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    Erin S Finzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with Rubén Darío, Nicaragua has long prided itself in being a country of poets. During the Sandinista Revolution, popular poetry workshops dispatched by Minister of Culture Ernesto Cardenal taught peasants and soldiers to write poetry about everyday life and to use poetry as a way to work through trauma from the civil war. When Hurricane Mitch--one of the first superstorms that heralded climate change--brought extreme flooding to Nicaragua in 1998, poetry again served as a way for victims to process the devastation. Examining testimonial poetry from Hurricane Mitch, this article shows how the mud and despair of this environmental disaster function as palimpsests of conquest and imperial oppression.

  1. Poetry and its Essential Constituents According to Feijoo

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    Rodrigo OLAY VALDÉS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout his essays, Feijoo makes numerous references to his own definition of poetry. He argues that the essential constituents of poetry must be «enthusiasm» (intensity and «versification» (rhythm. Feijoo considers that non-fiction should be regarded as another relevant constitutive of poetry, because non-fiction facilitates the teaching ability and usefulness of poetry. On account of his defense of non-fiction as a way to emphasize the docere, Feijoo came to prefer Lucan’s Pharsalia above Virgil’s Aeneid. Finally, Feijoo also maintained that naturalness was the last requisite of poetry, so he criticized the excesses of Baroque and he defended the literary models and the classical composition strategies that Neoclassicism would soon recover.

  2. Darwin vs. Wallace: When Poetry Dies and When Poetry Survives in the Not-so-Natural Selection of Memetic Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    The theory of memetic evolution--explaining the reproduction of cultural units called "memes"--illuminates the decline of poetry as a cultural presence by clarifying the contrasting attitudes towards poetry manifested by the co-discoverers of natural selection: Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace. Darwin's eventual indifference to poetry…

  3. Beyond Silverstein and Prelutsky: Enhancing and Promoting the Elementary and Middle School Poetry Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patricia J.; Kutiper, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Provides elementary and middle school library media specialists with criteria for evaluating poetry collections, including balancing contemporary and traditional poetry and responding to children's preferences; discusses ways to promote poetry with both students and teachers; and includes a selected bibliography of 60 recommended poetry books.…

  4. A morfologia do horror : construção e percepção na obra lovecraftiana

    OpenAIRE

    Alcebiades Diniz Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Resumo: O horror ficcional é uma das constantes na produção cultural do século XX, como um reflexo que acompanha o horror político. Esse horror culturalmente produzido, que é estético, podemos vislumbrar em vasta produção da indústria cultural ? que cobre as mais diversas mídias e formas de representação ?, tendo seu momento inicial na ficção fantástica dos séculos XVIII-XIX. Na década de 1920-30, o escritor norte-americano Howard Phillips Lovecraft retomaria essa tradição do fantástico, acre...

  5. Music and Poetry: a Call for Interpretation

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    Roberto Gigliucci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay concerns the relationship between Music and Poetry, to arrive to a personal conception of the artwork as an interpretative object. The musico-literature matter is a complex starting point to build an idea according to which the pleasure of understanding is the final purpose of the arts; aim of art is the position of a meaning, but in a realm of ambivalence-ambiguity, or better complexity: the two main examples – very distant but both basic – of Euripides and Mozart constitute the hearth of this contribute.http://dx.doi.org/10.14195/2183-1718_66_21

  6. Belogradchik Visions: A Poetry [In Bulgarian

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    V. Borisov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently Veselin Borisov, a professor of social medicine in the Medical University in Sofia, who is born in the village of Skomlya, near Belogradchik, has written a new and still unpublished book: “The chef d’oevure of God: Belogradchik visions.” An excerpt from the poetry section of the book is presented. All of the rhymes chosen are inspired from the poet’s memory from his schooling in Belogradchik and for his work as a physician in the Belogradchik hospital.

  7. Poetry magazines: description of an object

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    Carlos Battilana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to examine different mechanisms of poetry magazines as objects of reflections per se. Literary magazines have a cartographical quality in the sense that they organize the map of a group of works and authors. A magazine produces a critical system of selection. Far from suggesting a stable nature of literary magazines, each of their interventions influences a concrete community and temporality in different ways, which turns each historical moment into a stimulus whose effects are not known beforehand.

  8. Shirley Jackson's "The Tooth": Dentistry as Horror, the Imagination as a Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    On her way to a dreaded dental appointment to have an aching tooth pulled, Clara Spencer meets a solicitous stranger, Jim, and by the end of the story runs off with him, in many interpretations to perdition. But since 1) Shirley Jackson (who herself had much dental work and hated it) has suffered from typecasting as a horror writer, 2) dental gas anesthesia protocols of the time as Clara is anticipating could lead to sexual hallucinations, and 3) contemporary literature celebrated escapist fantasy (e.g., the invisible giant rabbit in Harvey), this article proposes instead that Jim is Clara's own imaginative, comforting, therapeutic creation.

  9. The diegetic camera: narrative legibility and documental verisimilitude in found footage horror films

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    Rodrigo Carreiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ake found footage horror films have been massively made in the last two decades. To shoot a fictional script and give to it the texture of a documentary, a filmmaker has to deal with a number of creative restrictions in order to impose to images and sounds an effect of reality present in amateur footage. This essay examines recurring patterns of style, in this subgenre of movies, which have been used to combine narrative clarity and documental verisimilitude – a combination imposed by the presence of recording devices on the diegesis. 

  10. On poetry – entering heaven through the ear of a raindrop: An ars poetical reading

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    Cas J.A. Vos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the uniqueness of poetry. Special attention is given to the ars poetica of the poetry of Cas Vos. Other poems are also discussed. The binding force of metaphors in poetry is considered. The essence and expressiveness of poetry are explained through several different poems. The end of the journey of poetry is concluded with a sonnet by Robert Pinsky.

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  12. Obscurity of poetry in Paul Celan

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    Mauricio Mendonça Cardozo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tensioned between variations of the said and the unsaid, and between figures of light and shadow, Paul Celan's work performs a certain confrontation with the condition of silence and obscurity, breaking all at once with a certain way of making poetry and of relating to reality. In this sense, Celan's work can hardly be reduced to a kind of hermeticism, a category too vague to account for its singularity. In his work saying and silencing together articulate the tension that creates the poetic space in which the poem is inscribed. The poet himself tried to refuse the insistence of some critics on labeling his work as obscure. Despite of its fragmentary nature, the recently published manuscripts of his speech project Von der Dunkelheit des Dichterischen constitutes one of Celan’s most extensive discussions of the matter of obscurity in poetry. This paper aims at presenting the fragments of his speech project and pointing out its importance to the discussion of the notion of obscurity in Paul Celan's work.

  13. Intertextuality shapes the poetry of Xhosa poets

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    M.M. Somniso

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Praises among the amaXhosa today are not only performed at traditional gatherings. These praises are also performed in many places such as schools, churches and funerals. The question is whether the praises performed in other places rather than traditional gatherings still possess the characteristics of traditional praises. In many praises Xhosa poets draw terminology from Biblical texts. This strategy can be seen as an attempt to break the boundaries between Christianity and Xhosa poetry. Having said that, the aim of this article is to uncover the interplay between Xhosa traditional poems and Christianity. To do that, this article discusses the interplay between Christianity, elegy, health and social issues. It also discusses new trends of intertextuality in Xhosa poetry. The intertextual theory insists that a text cannot exist as a hermetic or self-sufficient whole and does not function as a closed system. Still and Worton (1991:1 believe that the writer is a reader of the text before she/he is a creator of texts and therefore the work of art is inevitably alive with references, quotations and influences of every kind.

  14. Parallelism in Arandic Song-Poetry

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    Myfany Tuprin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ceremonial song-poetry performed by Arandic people of central Australia is characterized by parallelism of sound, form and meaning in both auditory and visual modalities. Parallelism, in all its manifestations, operates at multiple levels of the hierarchically structured poetic form. In the period Arandic people call the Altyerre, “Dreaming,” ancestral spirit-beings created the land and laid the lore through actions and song. This included the creation of women’s song-poetry called awelye. Awelye is sung in group unison as a series of many short verses that relate to each group’s inherited estate lands, their ancestors, and to the ceremonial performance itself. Actions that mirror the meaning of the verses accompany the singing, such as painting designs on the body, placing a ritual object in the ground, and dancing. This paper considers the role of parallelism in the poetic function of language (Jakobson 1987, and facilitates the merging of the everyday realm with that of the performer’s ancestors, which Stanner so aptly translates as the “everywhen.”

  15. GENRE IN RELATION TO SACRUM. CRISIS OF FAITH, HORROR AND POP CULTURE

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    Anna Taszycka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the text “Genre in relation to sacrum. Crisis of faith, horror and pop culture” Samuel Nowak and Anna Taszycka ponder over the phenomenon of modern horror raising the subject of sacrum, especially in relation to the motive of possession and exorcism. The authors attempt to prove that the phenomenon is symptomatic for the transition from religiousness, understood in institutional and collective terms, to individual and contemplative spirituality. After analysing selected films from the perspective of “spirituality” (in the meaning given to it by Zbigniew Pasek the authors conclude that today the pop cultural narrations which depict the new function of sacrum and shift the load from institution to an individual may become successful and accepted by viewers.According to the authors the traditional narration – which associates sacrum with a religious experience – is supplanted today by stories which treat sacrum rather in terms of a spiritual experience. This transformation leads to many possible alternative interpretations of selected films which in this text were described in categories of pensiveness or meta-interpretation.

  16. Suspension as an Emergency Power

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amanda L. Tyler

    2009-01-01

    ... Legislation B. Suspension During Reconstruction: Putting Down the Klan in South Carolina IV. UNDERSTANDING SUSPENSION AS AN EMERGENCY POWER A. Reading the Suspension Clause in Context B. Giving Meaning to the Suspension Power C. Mapping the Suspension Clause Within the Constitution V. SUSPENSION AND THE SEPARATION OF POWERS CONCLUSION [A] suspensio...

  17. Blood, Monstrosity and Violent Imagery: Grand-Guignol, the French Theatre of Horror as a Form of Violent Entertainment

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    Tanja Jurković

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the sixty-year period of its existence, Grand-Guignol, the French theatre of horror, gained a status of a legendary theatre which dealt with horrors and terrors of human mind, successfully connecting faits divers (common, everyday facts with the erotic and titillating scenes of violence on stage. The performance style, the writing, the special effects, and the directorship over the course of years, made this theatre a legendary place where blood flowed in streams and people fainted during performances, in this way making its indelible mark in horror genre today. In this paper, the author is trying to focus the attention on the theatre of Grand-Guignol as a form of violent entertainment and the way the representations of violence and horror enacted on its stage affected the audience, through Goldstein’s theory of the importance of visual imagery in different media today. Furthermore, through comparison of violent acts presented on the stage of the Grand-Guignol and the atmosphere they create in the viewer’s mind with some of the aspects of Artaud’s vision of his theatre of cruelty, the author attempts to show how this form of violent entertainment in the theatrical media influences the vision of that same violence within the audience, with the sense of security as the main idea in which the viewers feel safe to enjoy, envision and in a way become the participants in the performances enacted on the small stage of the Grand-Guignol.

  18. "Poetry Is Happening but I Don't Exactly Know How": Literacy Subject Leaders' Perceptions of Poetry in Their Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambirth, Andrew; Smith, Sarah; Steele, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests (Ofsted, 2007) that the role of the Subject Leader is crucial in how well poetry is taught in schools. This paper attempts to provide some insights on "what it is like" to coordinate poetry teaching in a primary school. Some of the data confirm elements of the findings from earlier research on the state of poetry in…

  19. Conceptualization and Linguistic Expression: Using Religious Poetry in ELT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amrita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    ...; the discourse context and the psychological environment of linguistic performance. This papers, tries to investigate how this unique genre of religious poetry be used to teach and understand the mode of conceptualization...

  20. Phobias in Poetry: Coleridge's Ancient Mariner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satendra; Khetarpal, Abha

    2012-04-01

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner was written by Coleridge and is a classic poetry about retribution, punishment, guilt, and curse. Religious beliefs and delusions can arise from neurologic lesions and anomalous experiences, suggesting that at least some religious beliefs can be pathological. Looking at the poem through the psychiatric and psychological domain, the symbolism, the narration and the entire setting of the poem represents Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Mariner's reactions are beautifully portrayed from the psychoanalytic point of view and the literary piece shows claustrophobia, stygiophobia, dikephobia, and poinephobia. The mental stress of a person under a crisis situation has remarkably been evoked in this poem. This incredible piece of art expresses how the realization of divine love within oneself has the power to heal pain and suffer.

  1. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  2. Nursing reality as reflected in nurses' poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiler, C

    1983-01-01

    In this discussion, the author has described a technique used in a pilot study where the research aim was to enhance understanding of nurses and their experiences--an understanding achieved from attention to nurses' expressions in poetry. There is a growing interest in qualitative approaches to the study of nursing phenomena and the development of nursing theory (Simms, 1981; Munhall, 1982; Oiler, 1982; Omery, 1983; Swanson and Chenitz, 1982). In fact, many of the techniques and strategies used by helping professionals to know their clients can be adapted in qualitative research procedures. For persons in the helping professions, a qualitative approach is consistent with the therapeutic process of coming to know a client. Human behavior is understood to be an expression of how individuals interpret their worlds. The task of the qualitative researcher is to capture this very process of interpretation in the subject's words, gestures, expressions, acts, and creations.

  3. Behavioral science, engineering, and poetry revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, George F

    2010-08-01

    Forty years ago, Lehrman (1971) identified 2 orientations to the study of animal behavior. The natural history orientation conducted field and lab research designed to reveal how animals cope with the circumstances of their natural environment. Such research reveals the diversity among different types of animals and differences between the world of animals and the world of humans (i.e., "poetry"). In contrast, the anthropocentric orientation studies animals either to generate animal-derived general laws applicable to humans or to provide experimental information that, for ethical and practical reasons, cannot be acquired from human research. The primary motivation for the anthropocentric orientation is to provide workable models for investigating specifically human problems (i.e., "engineering"). Evidence is presented from the study of bird song that demonstrates the contribution that the "poetic" approach can make to anthropocentric ("engineering") concerns. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  4. Physics or Poetry? - POPSCIENCE poets at CERN, July 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    From July 15 to July 17, six poets from 6 European countries, selected by the World Academy of Poetry, came to CERN for a full immersion into particle physics and cosmology. Their mission; writing poetry about physics and astrophysics, is part of POPSCIENCE, CERN`s project for European Researchers` Night 2014. The poems they produce will be unveiled at the POPSCIENCE Researchers` Night event, on Friday September 26, 2014, at FNAC Rove, Geneva.

  5. The Image of Women in Shoghi’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    جعفر دلشاد

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Image of Women in Shoghi’s Poetry     Zahra Soleymanpour *   Jafar Delshad **       Abstract     From a long time ago, describing the woman as well as love and mania has allocated a large part of poets’ poetry to itself. It could be said that there is almost no poet some of whose poems are not related to women. Moreover, love and affection are in fact common senses among human beings. In the period of Arabic poetry movement, this issue found a different color and the poets noticed the social status of women and attempted to restore the lost rights. In Shoghi’s poetry, the woman was pictured in two ways. The first was related to social problems with which the women were facing at that time and in fact they were the main factor of the movements which were seeking the women freedom. The second was the woman image as a matter of lyricism. In Shoghi’s poetry, two tendencies could be observed. The first is the classical tendency in the introduction of his eulogy poems as well as those which were purely in the field lyricism. The second is the romantic tendency shown in his presentation poetry. In these poems, the poet writes the poetry through his feeling and emotion and because he speaks by the heroes of the story, he has more freedom of speech. Our aim in this article is to have an analytical investigation of Shoghi’s viewpoints concerning social issues related to women and his lyricism (material or spiritual.     Key words: Shoghi’s poetry, women, social issues, lyric  * Ph.D Candidate in Arabic Language and Literature, University of Isfahan.   E-mail: soleymanpoorza@yahoo.com.  ** Assistant Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, University of Isfahan .

  6. Teaching compassion: multiple sclerosis and the poetry of Molly Holden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Teaching students about the experiences of those suffering from chronic illnesses like multiple sclerosis is important to the development of compassion. Because information on the psychosocial impact of chronic illness is scarce; however, new learning sources must be investigated. The author explores the use of poetry as a valuable supplement to conventional learning sources and teaching tools. Suggestions for integrating poetry into the nursing curriculum and evaluating its effectiveness are included.

  7. Nationalism, racism and propaganda in early Weimar Germany: contradictions in the campaign against the "black horror on the Rhine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Julia

    2012-01-01

    During the early 1920s, an average of 25,000 colonial soldiers from North Africa, Senegal and Madagascar formed part of the French army of occupation in the Rhineland. The campaign against these troops, which used the racist epithet ‘black horror on the Rhine’ (schwarze Schmach am Rhein), was one of the most important propaganda efforts of the Weimar period. In black horror propaganda, images of alleged sexual violence against Rhenish women and children by African French soldiers served as metaphors for Germany’s ‘victimization’ through the Versailles Treaty. Because the campaign initially gained broad popular and official support, historians have tended to consider the black horror a successful nationalist movement bridging political divides and strengthening the German nation state. In contrast, this essay points to some of the contradictions within the campaign, which often crystallized around conflicts over the nature of effective propaganda. Extreme racist claims about the Rhineland’s alleged ‘mulattoization’ (Mulattisierung) increasingly alienated Rhinelanders and threatened to exacerbate traditional tensions between the predominantly Catholic Rhineland and the central state at a time when Germany’s western borders seemed rather precarious in the light of recent territorial losses and separatist agitation. There was a growing concern that radical strands within the black horror movement were detrimental to the cohesion of the German nation state and to Germany’s positive image abroad, and this was a major reason behind the campaign’s decline after 1921/22. The conflicts within the campaign also point to some hitherto neglected affinities between the black horror and subsequent Nazi propaganda.

  8. Transforming the findings of narrative research into poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sharon Lorraine

    2015-05-01

    To offer dramatic poetry as representing findings from narrative research that is more accessible. This article is drawn from the author's doctorate work on how students' stories about their 'clinical' experiences can aid learning. Nursing students' stories of clinical practice experiences when engaged in the care of patients represented as dramatic poetry. Qualitative analytical approaches in narrative data analysis to provide a review of student stories from a variety of perspectives. This article illustrates a method for converting story data to poetry. It suggests that a range of audiences can learn from nursing students' stories of clinical practice when translated into dramatic poetry. Audiences can come close to understanding what students are experiencing in practice when engaged in the care of patients and learning from their practice experiences, when these experiences are expressed as dramatic poetry. Representing findings from narrative research as dramatic poetry can help audiences engage with nursing students' experiences at an emotional level. Enabling researchers and readers to become immersed in the poem transforming their understanding of what the students have learned.

  9. Holding emotional and linguistic rulers up to the poetry of Robert Frost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, C

    1999-12-01

    The words in a large and representative sample of Robert Frost's poetry were compared with information in several data bases which provided estimates of the poetry's pleasantness, arousal, emotionality, imagery, and linguistic complexity. Findings confirmed that Frost's poetry was linguistically simple and emotionally restrained in comparison to that of his cohort. They also highlighted the increasing variability in Frost's poetry across time and its decreasing imagery. Frost's poetry was more restrained than that of his male cohort but similar to the poetry of his female cohort in its linguistic simplicity. Frost's acknowledged death poems were in fact quite pleasant and passive in emotional tone.

  10. An unexpected version of horror autotoxicus: anaphylactic shock to a self-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedotti, R; Mitchell, D; Wedemeyer, J; Karpuj, M; Chabas, D; Hattab, E M; Tsai, M; Galli, S J; Steinman, L

    2001-03-01

    EAE can refer either to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Although EAE is classically a prototypic T helper 1 (TH1) cell-mediated autoimmune disease, it can also be induced by TH2 cells. Characteristically, the most severe manifestation of allergy, anaphylaxis, is associated with exposure to a foreign antigen that is often derived from medication, insect venom or food. We report here that, after self-tolerance to myelin is destroyed, anaphylaxis may be triggered by a self-antigen, in this case a myelin peptide. "Horror autotoxicus", which was initially described by Ehrlich, may not only include autoimmunity to self, it may also encompass immediate hypersensitivity to self, which leads to shock and rapid death.

  11. Freud en sus cartas durante la Gran Guerra: entre el horror y la condescendencia*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Clemencia Castro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available La correspondencia de Freud enlos tiempos de la Primera GuerraMundial, conocida también comola Gran Guerra, permite discernirlos efectos que esta le produjo, asícomo sus apuestas, inconsistenciasy contradicciones, pues allí Freud seexpone como sujeto dividido entreel horror y la condescendencia.Su encuentro con la conflagraciónaporta elementos para dilucidar laslógicas de la guerra y sus implicacionessubjetivas, a propósito de suentusiasmo bélico, la confrontacióncon el espectáculo de destrozo, lainhibición de la actividad, la vergüenza,la separación de los máscercanos, el final anticipado de laguerra y la abstención de juicio anteel retorno de “sus” combatientes.

  12. European do-it-yourself (DIY) biology: Beyond the hope, hype and horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Günter; Pei, Lei; Schmidt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The encounter of amateur science with synthetic biology has led to the formation of several amateur/do-it-yourself biology (DIYBio) groups worldwide. Although media outlets covered DIYBio events, most seemed only to highlight the hope, hype, and horror of what DIYBio would do in the future. Here, we analyze the European amateur biology movement to find out who they are, what they aim for and how they differ from US groups. We found that all groups are driven by a core leadership of (semi-)professional people who struggle with finding lab space and equipment. Regulations on genetic modification limit what groups can do. Differences between Europe and the US are found in the distinct regulatory environments and the European emphasis on bio-art. We conclude that DIYBio Europe has so far been a responsible and transparent citizen science movement with a solid user base that will continue to grow irrespective of media attention. PMID:24782329

  13. The Dark Side of British Horror Fiction: Politics, Taboos and Censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lázaro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly two and a half centuries have passed since the first British Gothic novels began to attract attention with their pages full of monstrous characters, excessive violence, explicit sexual content and all kinds of horrific scenes. For the most part, the reception of this type of literature has been very positive, though not exempt from controversies. This paper seeks to show how, beyond the alluring mystery, inventive plots and attraction of the dark side, British horror fiction appeals to the reader’s inner desires and imagination by means of transgressive political, religious or sexual contents that often defy taboos and social decorum. To illustrate this argument, three well-known authors and texts from three different periods will be discussed: Matthew Gregory Lewis’s The Monk (1796, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (1872 and Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange (1962.

  14. Shake, Rattle and Roll Horror Franchise and the Specter of Nation-Formation in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando B. Tolentino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks into the most successful horror franchise in Philippine history. Shake, Rattle and Roll has had a successful 14-film run since its introduction in 1984, and is composed of a three-part segment, each tackling a horrific experience: ghosts and folk creatures in provincial and city settings. My paper maps out the narratives, and the social and political contexts of the series. Specif ically, the period beginning 1984 marks a series of national transition: the political crisis of the Marcoses, People Power 1, the rise of Corazon Aquino, the economic crises in 1997 and 2007, the ousting of Joseph Estrada, the rise of neoliberalism, the coming of Noynoy Aquino, and the incarceration of Gloria Arroyo. How might these films also be read as analog of the anxieties of the nation?

  15. Aspects of the teaching practice in the horror narratives's revision and rewriting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Moreira Gasparotto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on recension and rewriting in teacher’s practice with students of the 4th and 5th grades of an elementary school in the Northwest region of Paraná State, Brazil, considering the writing pieces made in class about the Horror Story discursive genre. Conceiving rewriting as work, and based on Bakhtin’s Circle of dialogic assumptions concerning dialogism, the responsiveness of the written discourse, genres, and in studies on Applied Linguistics about text revision and rewriting, we observed the guided practice of a teacher on the text revision and rewriting processes of students in this situation. The characterization of the Horror Story genre was our main focus, proving that the notes on rewriting should be observed from this assumption. The records collection was carried out during the second half of the year 2012, after a collaborative theoretical-methodological intervention with the teacher, providing theoretical subsidies and guided discussions in order to subsidize the work’s proposed comprehension, and evaluate the ongoing actions. The results proved that: a the internalization of the theoretical-methodological assumptions happens when a single discursive genre is into focus; b the guidance and the attendance by the teacher are necessary for the formation process; c an improvement was observed in the students’ writings; d there is a necessity of development and improvement of proper revision and rewriting strategies towards the analyzed genre; and e the work done with text revision and rewriting in this specific textual genre seemed to be more effective due to the necessities arising from this enunciation.

  16. Inner Otherness as a Source of Fear: Elements of Horror in Balkan Travelogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Lazarević-Radak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Travel fiction has created numerous Others, assigning them an ontologically unstable status, while the traditional travelogue spread a fear of the dark interior of Europe, presenting images of daily political strife, assassinations, wars and uprisings. Just like the Gothic novel, which entertained its readers with images of ruins and gloomy structures in Eastern Europe, the travelogue spread a fear of the Balkans through Europe, depicting the Balkans as a place that could pose a threat to the entire continent. While enjoying the mysterious terror of the Gothic novel, Europe also derived a kind of pleasure from the shocking images that were to be found in travelogues from the Balkans. The paper re-examines the elasticity of the boundaries of the travelogue genre, and identifies convenient transformations of certain parts of the travelogue into text aimed at inspiring terror, shocking and appalling its readers. The transformations show that it is impossible to draw a strict boundary between travel fiction and travelogues, and at the same time reveal the hidden discourse used by both genres. The parallel presence of awareness of the geographic identity of the Balkans as European, and of the aspiration to depict them as the strange inner Otherness of Europe, is accompanied by the production of terrifying images. Although these images cannot be viewed solely as a threat of "reverse colonization", the assumption that hybridity is the basis on which the terrifying nature of the Balkans is produced is re-examined. The travelogue chapters, sections and illustrations assume the features of horror, particularly body horror, revealing Europe’s fear of the possibility of the Orient infiltrating the "body of the Occident", or of the possibility of the latter being infected by elements of "alien" i.e. Oriental culture.

  17. Electrorheology of nanofiber suspensions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2011-01-01

    .... In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers...

  18. Gadow's romanticism: science, poetry and embodiment in postmodern nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2004-07-01

    Sally Gadow's work is a sophisticated version of a familiar line of thought in nursing. She creates a chain of distinctions which is intended to differentiate cultural narratives, and particularly the 'science narrative', from imaginative narratives, especially poetry. Cultural narratives regulate and restrict; imaginative narratives are creative, liberating and potentially transcendent. These ideological effects are (supposedly) achieved through different structures of language. Scientific language, for example, is abstract and literal, while poetry is sensuous and metaphorical. In this paper, I argue that Gadow's way of discriminating between science and poetry fails. In the first place, the ideological valence she assigns to each of them is unwarranted. Science and poetry can both be harnessed to the project of emancipation, just as both can be incorporated in a strategy of oppression. In the second place, the claim that poetry and science are distinguished by their respective linguistic features--specifically, that one is metaphorical and the other literal--cannot be sustained. I illustrate this argument, as Gadow illustrates hers, by reference to the concept of embodiment, and consider whether Gadow is correct in thinking that poetry, not science, makes it possible for individuals (especially women) to 'reclaim the body'. I also suggest that Gadow's brand of postmodernism echoes Romanticism, whose defining characteristic was an insistent contrast between poetry and science. This is 'flip side' postmodernism, which merely opposes modernist values, preferring subjectivity to objectivity, feeling to rationality, and multiple realities to truth. It is less radical, and far less interesting, than 'remix' postmodernism, whose objective is not to reverse the polarities, but to reconfigure the entire circuit.

  19. From within the Abyss of the Mind : Psychological Horror in H. P. Lovecraft’s “The Call of Cthulhu”

    OpenAIRE

    Joakim, Bengtsson

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT An attempt to put the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft on the map of psychoanalytical criticism, this analysis examines Lovecraft’s use of setting, characters, and narrative mode and structure in “The Call of Cthulhu” (1926) to show how his construction of horror has its ground in psychology, or, more specifically, in ideas of identity and violated boundaries of the self. In addition, brief reflections on Modernist art, its connections with psychoanalysis, and its analogies to Lovecraft...

  20. Writing poetry through the eyes of science a teacher's guide to scientific literacy and poetic response

    CERN Document Server

    Gorrell, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Writing Poetry Through the Eyes of Science: A Teacher's Guide to Scientific Literacy and Poetic Response presents a unique and effective interdisciplinary approach to teaching science poems and science poetry writing in secondary English and science classrooms.

  1. Review: Dickens' Novels as Poetry: Allegory and Literature of the City 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainsford, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Review of Jeremy Tamblin: Dickens' Novels as Poetry: Allegory and Literature of the City. Routledge, 2015.......Review of Jeremy Tamblin: Dickens' Novels as Poetry: Allegory and Literature of the City. Routledge, 2015....

  2. The Metaphor of the Jewish People in the English Poetry by Rose Ausländer on the Example of the Poems “The Forbidden Tree” and “The Clinic”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Vikyrchak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the image of the Jewish people in English poetry by Rosa Ausländer. Born in 1901 in Austrian Chernivtsi, a German-speaking poet changes the language of her writing after survuvung through the Holocaust and for almost ten years writes in English during the emigration in New York. The main motives of this period are the search for a new identity, the experience of having lost her mother and rethinking the horrors of the Second World War and its consequences for the Jewish people and for Europe in general English poetry written by Rosa Ausländer between 1947 and 1956 was published by Helmut Braun in 1995 in a collection tittles “The Forbidden Tree”. The program poem under the same title depicts a tree from the Garden of Eden maimed by the Nazis, the roots of which, in spite of everything, are strong and “vigorous”. In the poem “The Clinic” the surface motive is the rapid pace of life in the megalopolis, which also belongs to the leading motives of this period of writing and the life of the poetess. However, the images of “impersonal names”, a sense of distrust to state institutions, long waiting for the unknown and a reference to the typical image of the phoenix often used by Ausländer give the reader implicit indications of the Shoah's traumatic experience. In the poetry of Rosa Ausländer, the phoenix remains a symbol of hope and rebirth for the Jewish people.

  3. Cultural imperialism or dialogue on equal terms? International publications of innovative American poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the international reception of American Language Poetry. We analyze and document how special sections or issues of journals, poetry centers and conferences in Australia, France, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, Spain, and the United Kingdom have been definitive in the dissemination of this kind of poetry outside United States. Rather than an Americanization of other poetries, the collaboration on translations and sharing of editorial projects in diverse countries ass...

  4. Aesthetic and emotional effects of meter and rhyme in poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal.

  5. ATTILA ILHAN POETRY WOMEN in MOTHERHOOD FORMATS: ASYLUM, REPRODUCTIVE, VALENTINE...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Arslan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Turkey itself has a line in one of the poet and poetry, which completed its maturation in this area is Attila Ilhan. the battle before him, our ideology and poetry together with İlhan urban structure organized by social changes associated with them and noticed its different returns. Even personally it has been involved in these changes and transformations. a phenomenon known as social realism and serious in the sense that the first mention of a unique structure and format began with İlhan can say. Urban people as the hero of the language revealed a partial half rebellious types. their whole life "can say that rowdy" behavior affects the entire text. Long life and different values, Ilhan manner in which they live period, Turkey has revealed a retrospective of his works.Poetry is one of the personal values of women. the pursuit of a woman image without actually wrote and lived. Characters typical feminist women from the traditional women formed until the time women entered the effort to witness the world. The different categories and will be quite comprehensive Attila Ilhan women will just try to look at the context of motherhood. Although the essential qualities of motherhood denominator, though the move permanent asylum women, fertility, lover, attitude, such as home-space has important referent are feminine values in poetry. Unknown women converted to the known values of Ilhan poetry. Motherhood seems to just this one known value structuring holdings.

  6. POÉSIE ET ÊTRE (POETRY AND BEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HORIA BĂDESCU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay focuses on the value of poetry to fill up the infinite horizon of the Absolute by a positive halo, stressing that poetry is/means, among other things, an ontological memory: it is the memory of Being. Especially in nowadays – so « poor » in authentic life, in humanness and sacred – we experience an acute awareness of the need to return to Meaning. And the poem mostly offers a path of the man’s search for meaning. It unveils a profound necessity to being through and into the Meaning perspective. Poetry is to be considered as the Being of self – the human and the cosmic alike -, in the play of essence and existence. The poem is part in the enhancement of the endless world, seeing that it is able to create Reality. The very condition of the poem is to be concomitantly created and creative. Poetry reveals a proximity, but not a limitation. Ceaselessly the poem opens and no less it encloses the mystery of Being; so, it challenges to questioning upon the Meaning, eventually finding the great worth of poetry.

  7. Aesthetic and emotional effects of meter and rhyme in poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eObermeier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from 19th and 20th German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted in a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal.

  8. Compassionate solidarity: suffering, poetry, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulehan, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suffering is the experience of distress or disharmony caused by the loss, or threatened loss, of what we most cherish. Such losses may strip away the beliefs by which we construct a meaningful narrative of human life in general and our own in particular. The vocation of physicians and other health professionals is to relieve suffering caused by illness, trauma, and bodily degeneration. However, since suffering is an existential state that does not necessarily parallel physical or emotional states, physicians cannot rely solely on knowledge and skills that address physiological dysfunction. Rather, they must learn to engage the patient at an existential level. Unfortunately, however, medical pedagogy encourages "detached concern," which devalues subjectivity, emotion, relationship, and solidarity. The term "compassionate solidarity" summarizes an alternative model, which begins with empathic listening and responding, requires reflectivity and self-understanding, and is in itself a healing act. Poetry, along with other imaginative writing, may help physicians and other health professionals grow in self-awareness and gain deeper understanding of suffering, empathy, compassion, and symbolic healing.

  9. "Poetry Does Really Educate": An Interview with Spoken Word Poet Luka Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spoken word poetry is a means of engaging young people with a genre that has often been much maligned in classrooms all over the world. This interview with the Australian spoken word poet Luka Lesson explores issues that are of pressing concern to poetry education. These include the idea that engagement with poetry in schools can be enhanced by…

  10. Found Poetry: Creating Space for Imaginative Arts-Based Literacy Research Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    This theoretical position article inquires into poetic methodologies in literacy research and argues for the inclusion of poetry in social science research writing. The unconventional use of poetry in research writing challenges the traditionally accepted role prose plays in academic writing. Research poetry is written from and about research…

  11. Using Poetry Writing and Sharing to Promote Student Empathy and Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mitzi M; Kowalski, Sonya L

    2015-01-01

    A poetry writing activity revealed both empathy and caring among nursing students. Using course readings to identify a topic, students created and shared their poems in an online format. The poems and students' reactions concur with existing literature that poetry writing and sharing reveals empathy and caring. Suggestions for using a poetry writing activity in nursing education are included.

  12. Poetry and World War II: Creating Community through Content-Area Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Elizabeth E. G.; Nixon, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    Two educators and a classroom of fifth grade students integrated poetry writing into social studies curriculum focusing on World War II. Several strategies and approaches to writing poetry are highlighted including list poems, writing from photographs and artifacts, and two voice poems. The study culminated in a poetry reading and the creation of…

  13. Poems about Sandwich Cookies, Jelly, and Chocolate: Poetry in K-3 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2012-01-01

    The author had presented a session on poetry at a children's literature conference sponsored by The Ohio State University, and afterward two teachers invited her to come to their school and read poetry. The children emailed their responses to her shortly after she spent the entire day conducting poetry reading sessions at an elementary school in…

  14. The Meaning of Poetry Therapy as Art and Science: Its Essence, Religious Quality, and Spiritual Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Hirsch Lazaar

    1997-01-01

    Examines poetry therapy as a healing force for the individual. Discusses poetry therapy as a conduit to draw out inner emotions and feelings of spirit with an emphasis on spiritual and religious values. Argues that personal growth and development of a values system can be enhanced through poetry therapy. (SR)

  15. What One Activity Would You Recommend to Teachers Who are Nervous about Teaching Poetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Walter H.; Sottile, Joseph; Witting, Charlotte R.

    2006-01-01

    In this brief column, three teachers submit recommendations on strategies and activities for teaching poetry. Walter H. Johnson suggests that using sonnets as an introduction to poetry can be a rewarding way to combine poetry terminology, a bit of literary history, and the search for meaning in poems. Joseph Sottile describes a classroom activity…

  16. Between Me and the World: Teaching Poetry to English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Many people may question the value of teaching poetry in public schools, particularly when it yields no "marketable" skills, and standardized testing and the government funding connected to test scores increasingly determine classroom curriculum. While poetry may seem like "fluff" next to math and history, poetry actually serves as a very…

  17. Sound[']s Right: Pupils' Responses to Heard Poetry and the Revised National Curriculum for English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the design of poetry within the UK National Curriculum for English, where it is conceived of primarily as a print-based medium. With reference to curricular detail, the recent Ofsted survey of poetry teaching in schools, and to original research, it describes the role the existing curricular conception of poetry can play in…

  18. Effects of a Multimodal Approach on ESL/EFL University Students' Attitudes towards Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyn, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Poetry is a specific genre of literature that has been long argued as being too difficult for ESL/EFL learners. However, poetry is considered a valuable and authentic material for teaching language learners and teaching poetry in the language classroom can lead to a meaningful language learning experience. This study examined the implementation of…

  19. The Competency of the Post Graduate Teachers in Appreciating English Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    The Post Graduate Teachers who teach English as a second language to Higher Secondary Classes that is 11th and 12th grades need to cultivate a good sense of appreciation for poetry. They must have an inherent thirst for reading poetry aloud and competence to elucidate the essential characteristics of poetry. A study was launched to understand the…

  20. Poems by Computer: Introducing Poetry in a High-Tech Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styne, Marlys M.

    Poetry was used in a college English class to teach figurative language, connotation, denotation, and the need for close attention to vocabulary. However, students were often bored by traditional poetry. Using computer programs like "Compupoem,""Poetrywriter,""Lifesongs," and "Haikuku," students were introduced to computer poetry and created their…

  1. Teogonia e “Expressionismo Alemão” – I due volti della paura [As duas faces do horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto e Ana Zarco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo investiga como uma primeva apreensão horrorosa da existência constitui imanente percepção do Homem, bem como uma potência formadora de imagens. Para tanto ressalta as primordiais, incontornáveis e imortais imagens de horror dispostas num dos alicerces da reflexão e imaginário gregos de antanho: A Teogonia de Hesíodo. Compreendido o imagético e prístino apreender existencial dos hesiódicos versos, demonstra-se como as suas horripilantes e originárias imagens subjazem nos filmes de Horror/Terror, e, mais especificamente, naqueles do “Expressionismo Alemão”.

  2. HACIA UNA EXPERIENCIA DEL HORROR: FEMINICIDIO Y ALIENACIÓN SENSORIAL COMO NATURALIZACIÓN DE LA BARBARIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Gasquez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo nos proponemos pensar la problemática de la experiencia en torno al horror. Partimos de considerar que la barbarie actual, bajo sus múltiples formas (asesinatos, violaciones, genocidios, feminicidios, etc. abandonó su condición histórica sin dejar de ser histórica, se proclamó naturaleza sabiéndose contingencia e instaló los cuadros del horror como parte de una imagen que posee otros encuadres y matices posibles. En este marco consideramos que el hombre contempla el horror por fuera de sí mismo y se niega a asumir la experiencia de la destrucción dando lugar a la naturalización de la barbarie. Para dar cuenta del tópico propuesto nos detenemos especialmente en el caso de “las muertas de Juárez”, en tanto representa un caso paradigmático de muertes en América Latina.  Este caso permite dar cuenta de un sistema de disciplinamiento que conjuga feminicidio, perpetuidad y alienación sensorial. Estrategias estas que posibilitan la naturalización de la barbarie. 

  3. The Rocky Horror (Picture Show: a Camp Parody of the Gothic between Mary Shelley, J. B. Priestley and James Whale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rotondi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lo spettacolo teatrale The Rocky Horror Show (1973 di Richard O’Brien e, successivamente, l’adattamento cinematografico The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975 di Jim Sharman possono essere considerate due pietre miliari del musical. Per temi e struttura, essi rappresentano la massima espressione della rivoluzione sessuale che va a cavalli tra gli anni '60 e '70 ed emblema del movimento di libertà sessuale. Il successo del musical risiede nella presa in giro degli stereotipi del gotico sia letterario che cinematografico, creando una enorme, irriverente parodia. Se il riferimento più evidente è il Frankenstein di Mary Shelley e la versione cinematografica di James Whale, meno analizzato è il rapporto con Benighted (1927 by John B. Priestley e la pellicola The Old Dark House (1932 sempre di Whale e adattata dal romanzo di Priestley. Proprio questa risulta, infatti, vera fonte di ispirazione per il lavoro di O’Brien, piuttosto che il Frankestein. Il contributo analizzerà questo rapporto, focalizzando la sua attenzione sugli elementi della “liturgia del Rocky Horror Show”, sui riferimenti in parodia e proponendo una visione dell’opera di O’Brien come una meta-aprodia.

  4. American ecopoetry – a new subgenre of traditional nature poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Marszalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available American ecological poetry is a relatively recent literary phenomenon that has marked its existence within the tradition of nature poetry. It is represented by such poets as Robinson Jeffers, Gary Snyder, Archie R. Ammons, Denise Levertov, Mary Oliver and Wendell Berry. The major feature that distinguishes ecopoetry from traditional nature poetry is its distinct biocentrism that is manifested in the attitude of humility towards the world of nature and a critical approach to technological civilization posing danger to Earth’s eco-community. On the level of the ecological consciousness that it promotes, ecopoetry is inspired by such ecosophies as Benedict Spinoza’s monistic pantheism, Aldo Leopold’s earth ethics, Arne Naess’s deep ecology and James Lovelock’s concept of Gaia.

  5. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Thirusha; Shabangu, Sifiso

    2015-01-01

    This case study presents the use of poetry in psychotherapy with an adolescent girl, Buhle (a pseudonym), who needed surgery to correct a curvature of her spine due to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. She experienced anxiety which prevented surgeons from doing the procedure. Psychotherapists used narrative therapy to explore issues associated with and contributing to her anxiety and encouraged her to document her experiences through poetry, after learning that she was a keen poet. During psychotherapy Buhle's poems were used to track and narrate her experiences and as an empowering method allowing her to make personal sense of challenging experiences. Buhle's poems are presented within an account of the psychotherapy leading up to the surgery. Her poetry reveals a juxtaposition of regular adolescent identity issues in the face of coping with a demanding medical condition and the prospect of invasive surgery.

  6. ‘The verses of madness’: schizophrenia and poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of ‘madness’ and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the ‘product’ of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: “My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the ‘ultimate psychiatrist’, and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration.” PMID:23264155

  7. The Effectiveness of Teaching Creative Writing Using Cinquain Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryusmar Aryusmar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at describing the effectiveness of teaching creative writing using cinquain poetry. The research was conducted at Lia Stephanie Elementary School. The students were given a pre-test, three time meetings, and a post-test. To figure out the significant difference between students’ pre-test and post-test, research used ‘Descriptive Qualitative Analysis’ since this analysis could describe the facts found during the research and it could also explain whether the aim of this research was achieved or not. In addition, this research also observed the students during the process of learning in order to find out students’ response toward the Cinquain poetry technique. Finally, the teaching creative writing using cinquain poetry was proved to be an effective medium at Elementary School.  

  8. The first translations of Harlem renaissance poetry in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Petrič

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available From the present-day perspective Harlem Renaissance poetry represents an epoch-making contribution by America's black authors to the mainstream literature. However, in the post World War 1 era black authors struggled for recognition in their homeland. The publication of a German anthology Afrika singt in the late 1920s agitated Europe as well as the German-speaking authors in Slovenia. Mile Klopčič, a representative of the poetry of Social Realism, translated a handful of Har­ lem Renaissance poems into Slovene using, except in two cases, the German anthology as a source text. His translations are formally accomplished but fail to reproduce the cultural significance of the Harlem Renaissance poetry.

  9. Conceptualization and Linguistic Expression: Using Religious Poetry in ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Sharma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Religious poetry is, a heightened and impregnated form of expression. There is a marriage of form and sense. Linguistically speaking, religious poetry has a conceptual interface between syntax and semantics; a strong relationship between language and thought; universality and cultural specificity; the discourse context and the psychological environment of linguistic performance. This papers, tries to investigate how this unique genre of religious poetry be used to teach and understand the mode of conceptualization? Which language items can be taught? How does language synergize itself to open its door to create such innumerous possibilities? An attempt to answer these aforesaid questions is done by structuring this paper into three sections viz. Language and Conceptualization, The Domain of Conceptualization, Teaching English Language Items.

  10. Sweet silent thought: alliteration and resonance in poetry comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, R Brooke; Rapp, David N; Elfenbein, Andrew; Mitchel, Aaron D; Romine, Russell Swinburne

    2008-07-01

    Poetic devices like alliteration can heighten readers' aesthetic experiences and enhance poets' recall of their epic pieces. The effects of such devices on memory for and appreciation of poetry are well known; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not yet understood. We used current theories of language comprehension as a framework for understanding how alliteration affects comprehension processes. Across three experiments, alliterative cues reactivated readers' memories for previous information when it was phonologically similar to the cue. These effects were obtained when participants read aloud and when they read silently, and with poetry and prose. The results support everyday intuitions about the effects of poetry and aesthetics, and explain the nature of such effects. These findings extend the scope of general memory models by indicating their capacity to explain the influence of nonsemantic discourse features.

  11. Karen Resistance Poetry translated and introduced by Violet Cho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Cho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Karen Resistance Poetry translated and introduced by Violet Cho. Tee Noe was born as M. No Noe in a village called Thavorta, Karen State, Myanmar (Burma in 1952. After completing year 10 at a state high school in 1974, he worked as a junior clerk at a local government office in Karen State, eastern Myanmar. Later he joined the rebellion as a soldier for the Karen National Liberation Army and as a schoolteacher in Burmese refugee camps along Thai-Burma border. With no formal knowledge of the mechanics of poetry, Tee Noe has become a leading voice of the Karen diaspora. From a young age, Noe was drawn to poetry. He remembers singing a short hta (Karen oral poem to thank his cousin who gave him a woollen hat as a present when he turned six: 'To school I run when the bell rings, with a woollen hat today I went.' "

  12. Poetry in general practice education: perceptions of learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William; Freeman, Elaine

    2008-08-01

    There has been little research into poetry-based medical education. Few studies consider learners' perceptions in depth. To explore general practice registrars' (GPRs) perceptions of two poetry-based sessions. GPRs in one general practice vocational training scheme experienced two poetry sessions. In one, the facilitator selected poems; in the other, poems were chosen by registrars. Poems were read and discussed, with emphasis on personal response. Data were obtained through in-depth semi-structured interviews with six registrars. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Identification of individual ideas and shared themes enabled exploration of the registrars' experiences. Registrars described how poetry helped them explore emotional territory. They recognized a broadening of education, describing how poems helped them consider different points of view, increasing their understanding of others. Vicarious experience, development of empathy and self-discovery were also reported. Participants speculated on how this might impact on patient care and professional practice. Facilitator-selected poems provided variety and ambiguity, provoking discussions with clinical relevance. Learner-selected poems enabled involvement, self-revelation and understanding of peers and developed emotional expression. These registrars reported difficulties expressing feelings in the culture of science-based medical training. Poetry sessions may provide an environment for emotional exploration, which could broaden understanding of self and others. Poetry-based education may develop emotional competence. The participants recognized development of key skills including close reading, attentive listening and interpretation of meaning. These skills may help doctors to understand individual patient's unique experience of illness, encouraging personalized care that respects patients' perspectives.

  13. Review of Cervantes’ Poetry: Cervantes’ Metric and Stylistic Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Olay Valdés

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervantes has been considered as a technically clumsy poet. In three classic texts still very influential, Ricardo Rojas, Francisco Rodriguez Marin and Gerardo Diego referred to the poor versification of Cervantes and the metric limitations of his poetry: these accusations have become common places of criticism about Cervantes. Recent attempts to revalue the poetry of Cervantes have ignored those last series of statements. Today examined, many of the alleged technical defects that have traditionally been attributed to Cervantes did not deserve to be considered errors. It’s time to check if Cervantes was a little technically gifted poet.

  14. Tradition and reality in John Fowles’s poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdova Maria Sergeevna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on reception in John Fowles’s poetry of the 1950s and 60s. The paper deals with the form and stylistics of the poems and their intertextuality, i.e. allusions and reminiscences to his predecessors’ works. The basic methods are those of reception-aesthetics and literary hermeneutics. The present paper is based on E.V. Abramovskikh’s theory and typology of creative reception developed by the author of the paper. The author analyzes creative reception strategies in Fowles’s poetry and draws a conclusion on the interaction of tradition and reality in it.

  15. Intermediacy of the Poetry of Vasyl Holoborodko

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Kytcan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of intermedial analysis media of the interaction peculiarities of different art forms, namely: literal, musical, and plastic in the works of a famous Ukrainian poet Vasyl Holoborodko. This paper showed that intermedialization is not only not in the opposition to verse libre, but also is another facet of its freedom, as well as a free choice for the sake of attainment of the deepest esthetic impression. Intermedialization of the poetry of V. Holoborodko makes oneself evident not merely on a notional level, but also on a strucural one. The title is oftentimes a signal that orientates the reader on the musical beginning of a verse. To mark the genre names for his verse libres the author borrows a sufficient layer of terms from others kinds of art (e.g. a symphony, a song, a nocturne, a suite, a fugue etc. which enables us to characterize a verse libre as a special kind of a contact zone. Special attention has been paid to the verse libres that contain the name of traditional, sometimes even standard from the point of view of lyric verse versification: “Ballada” (The Ballad, “Pisenka”(“The song”, “Romans” (“The Romance” as a title or a sub-title. The key method that makes the effect of musicality in a non-rhymed work possible is a split-level repetition: anaphor, refrain, parallelism, and alliteration. It is demonstrated that the appeal to other art forms in the titles is available in the upper layer of intermedial parallels, whereas on the deepest layers musical realm is condensed in the area of lexical meanings, musical work depiction, usage of musical terminology, the names of composers and their works. Engagement into literatureof other kinds of art is caused by the questioning of the new opportunities for expression, as well as a creative experiment.

  16. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: The importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2002-01-01

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases. PMID:11773639

  17. European do-it-yourself (DIY) biology: beyond the hope, hype and horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Günter; Pei, Lei; Schmidt, Markus

    2014-06-01

    The encounter of amateur science with synthetic biology has led to the formation of several amateur/do-it-yourself biology (DIYBio) groups worldwide. Although media outlets covered DIYBio events, most seemed only to highlight the hope, hype, and horror of what DIYBio would do in the future. Here, we analyze the European amateur biology movement to find out who they are, what they aim for and how they differ from US groups. We found that all groups are driven by a core leadership of (semi-)professional people who struggle with finding lab space and equipment. Regulations on genetic modification limit what groups can do. Differences between Europe and the US are found in the distinct regulatory environments and the European emphasis on bio-art. We conclude that DIYBio Europe has so far been a responsible and transparent citizen science movement with a solid user base that will continue to grow irrespective of media attention. © 2014 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: the importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2002-01-08

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases.

  19. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emphasis Programs Directives Severe Violators TOPICS By Sector Construction Health Care Agriculture Maritime Oil and Gas Federal ... such fatalities often are referred to as "harnessinduced pathology" or "suspension trauma." Signs & symptoms that may be ...

  20. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor will have you try bladder retraining, Kegel exercises, medicines, or other options. If you tried ... retropubic colposuspension; Needle suspension; Burch colposuspension Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  1. Rheology of organoclay suspension

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hato, MJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors have studied the rheological properties of clay suspensions in silicone oil, where clay surfaces were modified with three different types of surfactants. Dynamic oscillation measurements showed a plateau-like behavior for all...

  2. Articulated suspension system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention provides a rough terrain vehicle which maintains a substantially constant weight, and therefore traction, on all wheels, despite one wheel moving considerably higher or lower than the others, while avoiding a very soft spring suspension. The vehicle includes a chassis or body to be supported and a pair of side suspensions at either side of the body. In a six wheel vehicle, each side suspension includes a middle wheel, and front and rear linkages respectively coupling the front and rear wheels to the middle wheel. A body link pivotally connects the front and rear linkages together, with the middle of the body link rising or falling by only a fraction of the rise or fall of any of the three wheels. The body link pivotally supports the middle of the length of the body. A transverse suspension for suspending the end of the body on the side suspensions includes a middle part pivotally connected to the body about a longitudinal axis and opposite ends each pivotally connected to one of the side suspensions along at least a longitudinal axis.

  3. Bilingual and Group Poetry in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, Evelyn F.

    1985-01-01

    This article suggests a variety of ancillary activities in which poetry may be introduced into the foreign language classroom to build confidence and have fun in the second language, while practicing and reinforcing important linguistic concepts. The use of topics and themes such as wishes, comparisons, dreams, colors, or metaphors, is…

  4. Italic Typography and Wordsworth's Later Sonnets as Visual Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Peter

    2007-01-01

      The later Wordsworth understood the sonnet as a form of visual poetry. The essay investigates this in relation to Wordsworth's sense of layout in his 1838 book of sonnets, his conceptualization of the sonnet as "picture," "frame," and "monument," and his use of italic typeface in printings...

  5. Expressive intent, ambiguity, and aesthetic experiences of music and poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth; Levine, William H; Simchy-Gross, Rhimmon; Kroger, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author's intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts-excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts). Moreover, the information modulated the aesthetic experience of the excerpts in different ways for the different excerpt types: positive intent information increased enjoyment and the degree to which people found the musical excerpts to be moving, but negative intent information increased these qualities for poetry. Additionally, positive intent information was judged to better match musical excerpts and negative intent information to better match poetic excerpts. These results suggest that empathy with a perceived human artist is indeed an important shared factor across experiences of music and poetry, but that other mechanisms distinguish the generation of aesthetic appreciation between these two media.

  6. A Hunt for Tennyson: Teaching Poetry through Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lask-Spinac, Sabina

    Tennyson's poem "The Lady of Shalott" and Holman Hunt's painting of the same subject are excellent examples of the value of exploring poetry through painting. One of the biggest questions raised in relation to the poem's theme is the problem of its ambiguity. By looking at the painting in class, one can sense the lack of definite…

  7. Using Parody to Read and Write Original Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, William P.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an instructional lesson the author developed to help students use parody to read and write original poetry. The author begins this article with an introduction to parody and a rationale for using it as an instructional strategy. Then, he describes materials and procedures he used and he shares samples of student writing. He…

  8. Women Poetry from Northern Nigeria: A Bibliographical Note | Bala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is more pronounced if not more acute in Northern Nigeria, where literature of English expression is slow in evolving, compared to other parts of the country. Poetry of English expression by women from Northern Nigeria is indeed young, and is written in a tradition that is not only new but developing. This paper is a ...

  9. RELIGIOUS MOTIFS OF P. P. YERSHOV'S LYRIC POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zverev V. P.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the lyrical beginning of P. P. Yershov's poetry and his religious feelings. The whole of his world outlook and creativity gives particular harmony to poetical works and allows the author to embrace the world in all its diverse divine beauty.

  10. Poetry for Social Consciousness, Criticism and Change: A Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For Ezenwa-Ohaeto, a poet and a critic of international repute, the idea of writing and reading literature (poetry) for its own sake, is, in the words of Chunualumogu Achebe, “a deodorized shit.” In consonance with Achebe's views on the utility of literature, Ezenwa-Ohaeto, in most of his anthologies of poems, reveals himself ...

  11. Representations of 'Economic Hit Men' in selected Malawian poetry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Bright Molande imagine the Bretton Woods Institutions in sub-Saharan Africa and simultaneously negotiate the relationship between 'the West and the rest of us' in their poetry. I also argue that a reading of the poems allows for an opening up of a discursive debate on the effects of neoliberal ideologies in the 'Third World.

  12. Intertextual resonance in Christopher Okigbo's poetry | Okune | Lwati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artistic creativity can be demonstrated in several ways, one of which is in the area of intertextuality as a literary endeavour. Intertextuality is the by-product of wide scholarship, which Christopher Okigbo exemplifies in his poetry. No work of art exists in a vacuum, as every writer is said to operate within a given literary tradition ...

  13. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery | Naidu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... her to make personal sense of challenging experiences. Buhle's poems are presented within an account of the psychotherapy leading up to the surgery. Her poetry reveals a juxtaposition of regular adolescent identity issues in the face of coping with a demanding medical condition and the prospect of invasive surgery.

  14. Narrative Medicine: Community Poetry Heals Young and Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Allison S.

    2016-01-01

    This is a snapshot of a service learning course founded on narrative medicine, a clinical practice designed to replace impersonal care with empathic listening. By utilizing poetry therapy techniques among nursing home populations, a program called "HPU LifeLines" promotes a community literacy of illness and provides psychological and…

  15. Chiasmus as a Stylistic Device in Donne's and Vaughan's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    I'jam, Dunya Muhammad Miqdad; Fadhil, Zahraa Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates chiasmus as a stylistic device in ten metaphysical poems (five for John Donne and five for Henry Vaughan). It aims at showing how both, Donne and Vaughan, utilize chiasmus at the different linguistic levels as a stylistic device in their poetry. Thus, to achieve this aim, it is hypothesized that chiasmus as used by Donne…

  16. Oguega Divination Poetry In Edo State, Nigeria | Aluede | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oguega is a divination apparatus which is in common use among Esan people of Edo State, Nigeria. Oguega diviners are consulted irrespective of religious leanings in this culture. The use of this divination apparatus is concomitant with exclamations, songs, narratives, chants and poetry. This study investigates a handful of ...

  17. Possibilities for Biblio/Poetry Therapy Services in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Arleen McCarty

    1990-01-01

    Describes interactive bibliotherapy and poetry therapy as services which use literature as a catalyst for personal growth and healing through a facilitator. Their use in schools, hospitals, nursing homes, adult education centers, prisons, and chemical dependency units is discussed; reading bibliotherapy is described; and use for spiritual growth…

  18. Viewing a Poem as Argument: Helping Students Understand Contemporary Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sara

    2008-01-01

    When high school honors students were put off by contemporary poetry, the author engaged them by analyzing the poem as an "argument." Using the Toulmin model to establish a warrant, advance a claim, and locate details to support that claim, students were able, by treating a poem as an argument, to increase their understanding of the…

  19. The development of exilic poetry in Anglophone West Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, this study shows that there is a wide range of forms emerging from exilic literary experience in Anglophone West Africa in the explication of personal feelings, nostalgia, alienation, political and socio-cultural disruptions. Keywords: alienation, Anglophone West Africa, exile, exilic poetry, migration.

  20. The Sound of Violets: The Ethnographic Potency of Poetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Saunders, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes the form of a dialogue between the two authors, and is in two halves, the first half discursive and propositional, and the second half exemplifying the rhetorical, epistemological and metaphysical affordances of poetry in critically scrutinising the rhetoric, epistemology and metaphysics of educational management discourse. The…

  1. Pedagogy for Liberation: Spoken Word Poetry in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Mia

    2015-01-01

    The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, hip hop of the 1980s and early 1990s, and spoken word poetry have each attempted to initiate the dialogical process outlined by Paulo Freire as necessary in overturning oppression. Each art form has done this by critically engaging with the world and questioning dominant systems of power. However,…

  2. Riddle Hero: Play and Poetry in the Exeter Book Riddles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higl, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The author discusses the Exeter Book riddles, some of the earliest poems in English, specifically Old English, as perfect examples of how play and poetry intersect. Their playfulness, he claims, is most apparent in the original manuscript, but notes that few modern readers read Old English. The orthography of the manuscript also helps to make the…

  3. Expressive intent, ambiguity, and aesthetic experiences of music and poetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author's intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts-excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts. Moreover, the information modulated the aesthetic experience of the excerpts in different ways for the different excerpt types: positive intent information increased enjoyment and the degree to which people found the musical excerpts to be moving, but negative intent information increased these qualities for poetry. Additionally, positive intent information was judged to better match musical excerpts and negative intent information to better match poetic excerpts. These results suggest that empathy with a perceived human artist is indeed an important shared factor across experiences of music and poetry, but that other mechanisms distinguish the generation of aesthetic appreciation between these two media.

  4. Poetry and Gender: the Changing Status of Dagaare Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the evolving roles of Dagaare women in Dagaare oral poetry, and with that transformation, their changing status in the society. The issues of women as they are reflected in the oral poems they sing are also examined. Resources from fifty women, including discussions with people knowledgeable in ...

  5. Runaway with Words: Teaching Poetry to At-Risk Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Joann

    1993-01-01

    Reports on "Runaway with Words," a poetry workshop for at-risk teens in Florida's runaway shelters. Describes how, through various exercises, oral recitations, and conversations, troubled teens learn basic writing skills that help them gain control over their emotions. (SR)

  6. Science and Poetry: Passion v. Prescription in School Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to answer the question, Can school science be both a scientific and a literary experience or--in particular-an aesthetic, poetic experience? Highlights the power of poetry to stimulate observation, imagination, and emotion in school science. Examples of poems from published sources are used to illustrate ways in which verse can be used…

  7. Using Poetry and the Visual Arts to Develop Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. Andrew; Urbanski, John; Fuller, Janice

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a series of experiential exercises designed to use visual arts and poetry in classroom settings to increase students' awareness and recognition of emotion--two key components of emotional intelligence. Drawing on the liberal arts in the manner described in the exercises provides the instructor with a context in which students…

  8. Poetry or Propaganda? Relating Reason to Emotion in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Daniel E.

    In the name of responsible argument, persuasive rhetoric need not eschew all the devices used by propaganda. Emotion is not only inevitable in discourse, it is the necessary base for action. Educators should not consider propaganda evil for the very reason they consider poetry good: its emotional power. This kind of thinking creates a specious…

  9. [Conception and embryonic development between poetry and medical science: Dracontius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Innocenzo

    2010-01-01

    The article examines on the ancient theme of conception and development of embryo such as presented in the narration of Christus' conception in the De laudibus dei by Dracontius. Dracontius' description is not the only one in ancient Christian poetry, but it is surely the most ancient and the richest in medical details.

  10. Promoting emotional health through haiku, a form of Japanese poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M S

    1998-02-01

    This teaching technique can be adapted to use with young children. The use of rhymes may be easier and more fun for younger students. Also, this teaching technique can be used to address numerous health issues, which makes it appropriate for all health content areas. In addition to using student selections that illustrate various emotions, other resources are available for this activity. Libraries and bookstores offer wide selections of books containing poetry and quotations. In addition to books about haiku, consider general poetry selections by Maya Angelou, e.e. cummings, Ogden Nash, and Shel Silverstein. Musical selections can represent different styles, such as the Beatles' "Yesterday"; Blind Melon's "Change"; Garth Brooks' "The Dance"; Eric Clapton's "Tears from Heaven"; Gloria Estefan's "Coming Out of the Dark"; Whitney Houston's "Emotional" and "I Will Always Love You"; and Elton John's "Circle of Life." Internet sites also can be accessed for poetry samples (see Internet Resources). An Internet resource for ordering discounted books, including selections about haiku and poetry, is Amazon.com--Earth's Largest Book store, at http:www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ subst/home/home.html/0184-8423170-571096.

  11. How We Value Contemporary Poetry: An Empirical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, Bob; Theune, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Although evaluation is at the core of many of the practices associated with poetry--including teaching, editing, selecting, judging, and even writing--and although there have been involved discussions of the assessment of verse, there has been no empirical investigation of the specific values which, one supposes, lie at the heart of such…

  12. Exploring the Options: Teaching Economic Decision-Making with Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    High-stakes standardized tests in reading and limited instructional time are two powerful disincentives for teaching economics in the elementary classroom. In this article, integrating instruction in poetry and economic decision-making is presented as one way to maximize the use of scarce instructional time. Following a brief introduction to the…

  13. ON PATTERNS OF INTERSUBJECTIVE COGNITION IN DIDACTIC POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gabor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical reception of didactic poetry has displayed two tendencies in the past few decades. Firstly, the emphasis has been on what is taught in the works of art instead of how the teaching process is structured. Therefore rhetorical and philological approaches dominate theory and interpretation. Secondly, the status of didactic poetry as a poetic genre is often questioned despite the fact that its ancient Aristotelian critique has been revised. The aim of the paper is to reconsider both aspects from the viewpoint of cognitive genre theory. I examine what kinds of cognitive patterns organise the teaching process in three texts: in De rerum natura (On Nature by Titus Lucretius Carus, in A méltóság keserve (The Lament of Dignity by the Hungarian poet György Bessenyei, and in Die Metamorphose der Pflanzen (The Metamorphosis of Plants by Johann Wolfgang Goethe. In the demonstration of how the teacher-pupil interaction serves as the basis of the complex didactic process I apply the evolutionary model of teaching behaviour. The main results of the investigation are (i drawing attention to the indirect adaptations of teaching behaviour (e.g. social tolerance, local enhancement, evaluative feedback represented in didactic poetry; (ii demonstrating the importance of poetic imagery in didactic poetry, emphasising the close relation between poetic and didactic configurations; (iii rethinking the notion of genre as a specific pattern of cognition mediating between particular sociocultural contexts.

  14. The use of poetry writing in nurse education: An evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Kirsten

    2015-09-01

    Arts based approaches have been used in health education in various ways e.g. to develop emotional awareness, reduce anxiety and stress and assess communication skills. This evaluation aimed to explore the use of poetry writing as a way for undergraduate nursing students to consider their feelings about important practice issues. 42 first year undergraduate nursing students were asked to write a poem which focussed on an important nursing issue e.g. compassion, communication or the therapeutic role of the nurse. They were then asked to read the poem aloud to a small group and discuss its meaning. 60% (n=24) of students reported that the exercise had increased understanding of their chosen subject, 75% (n=30) stated that they had learned something about themselves and 65% (n=26) of students stated that they had enjoyed the poetry writing exercise. Qualitative comments suggested that the use of poetry enabled greater understanding of others' experiences, promoted open and honest reflection on feelings and supported the development of confidence. There is a need for teaching methods which engage and develop students' imagination, if they are going to be adequately prepared for the demands of nursing practice. Poetry writing and discussion supports the development of confidence, therapeutic communication skills and the ability to think creatively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tuning the Self : George Herbert's poetry as cognitive behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Eelco

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a cognitive analysis of the poetry of George Herbert (1593- 1633). From Herbert’s own thinking, recorded in his prose treatises, can be deduced that his poems should serve a specific function: teaching self-knowledge to his readers. Self-knowledge is a necessary skill, to be

  16. Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

  17. Measuring Voice in Poetry Written by Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing usage of creative writing in the ESL/EFL classroom based on the argument that this pedagogy develops writer's voice, emotional engagement, and ownership. Within the context of teaching poetry writing to second language learners, the current article develops a scientific approach to ways in which voice can be measured and then…

  18. Poetry Writing in the Post-16 English Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the place of poetry writing in the post-16 English curriculum in Malta. In presenting the results of a small-scale study adopting a mixed methods approach, it explores the views of teachers, students and an influential examiner. The paper proposes that while there seems to be an appreciation of what creative writing can…

  19. DEATH AND DESPAIR IN THE POETRY OF TORU DUTT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Sigroha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the short time that she lived Toru Dutt's literary output as a poet was prodigious. Her yearning for the past and her deep sense of many faceted losses are apparent in her poetry. The evocative acceptance of approaching death in one so young presents a picture of a girl mature beyond her years. A study of her poetry reveals her close affinity with the Romantic poets. Referring to various poems of Toru Dutt, the paper studies the role that religion, and her interpretation of religion/s she was exposed to, has to play in this embracing of the inevitability of fate. This paper analyses the reasons for the presence of the elements of death, despair, nostalgia and a yearning for the past and the role that religion plays in her acceptance of the inevitability of death in the poetry of Toru Dutt. Through a critical examination of various poems, the paper tries to uncover the beautiful interplay of memories of past experiences, stories heard long ago and the moments in the present in Dutt's poetry. It traces the journey of the poet from her exposure to death, to a questioning of death, its nature and the forms it might take, to the final acceptance of death as something as inevitable and precious as love.

  20. Teaching poetry writing to the old and the ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K

    1978-01-01

    When people are separated from the activities and relationships that make life so passionately interesting, they are separated from real accomplishment. A poet's non-therapeutic approach to writing led a group of ill and handicapped nursing home residents, aged 59-93 years, to find new strengths of feeling and ideas. Above all, it gave them the real accomplishment of some beautiful poetry.

  1. The Formeaning Response Approach: Poetry in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellem, Harlan

    2009-01-01

    In English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms, where acquisition of English is the ultimate goal, one of the main tasks for the teacher is to provide students with language input and activities that best aid them in their learning process. As different researchers have reported, including poetry-based activities in the EFL classroom is…

  2. Becoming a Cultural Tourist: Explorations in Caribbean Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the writer's own experience as a reader, this article discusses poetry by Eric Roach, Derek Walcott, Linton Kwesi Johnson, John Agard, Edward Baugh, Michael Smith and Velma Pollard. It explores the sense of place felt by writer and reader, going on to analyse the poets' use of Nation Language, poetic metre and intertextuality in…

  3. Discourse techniques in African poetry | Ebede | OGIRISI: a New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of discourse techniques in African written literature not just limited to poetry is a crucial and important area of study in the fields of academic as literature is becoming more indigenized and localized to suit author's environment, language and culture and world view in multi-language society. The purpose of this ...

  4. Expressive intent, ambiguity, and aesthetic experiences of music and poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth; Levine, William H.; Simchy-Gross, Rhimmon; Kroger, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author’s intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts—excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts). Moreover, the information modulated the aesthetic experience of the excerpts in different ways for the different excerpt types: positive intent information increased enjoyment and the degree to which people found the musical excerpts to be moving, but negative intent information increased these qualities for poetry. Additionally, positive intent information was judged to better match musical excerpts and negative intent information to better match poetic excerpts. These results suggest that empathy with a perceived human artist is indeed an important shared factor across experiences of music and poetry, but that other mechanisms distinguish the generation of aesthetic appreciation between these two media. PMID:28746376

  5. An Audio-Visual Presentation of Black Francophone Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Charlotte H.

    1982-01-01

    A college class project to develop a videocassette presentation of African, Caribbean, and Afro-American French poetry is described from its inception through the processes of obtaining copyright and translation permissions, arranging scripts, presenting at various functions, and reception by Francophone and non-Francophone audiences. (MSE)

  6. Jasmine and Lagarto: Pearse Hutchinson s Poetry of Spain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    ...; at the heart of this work is his poetry of Spain. From his first visit there in 1950 to today Hutchinson has been inspired by the landscapes, people and languages of Spain, translating from Catalan, Castilian and Galician and writing memorable poems...

  7. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2014-01-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger--one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native…

  8. Reviewing common epic elements in poetry of Salman Harati and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peotry originates from characteristical and social aspects of poet and as personality of poet changes in changing process of space and time, poetry will change according to these changes. Qiasar Aminpoor and Salman Harati are of the first poets that were more successful than other Holy Defense poets in recording war ...

  9. Learning about Yeast through Science, Art and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lois; Brade, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cross-curricular project designed to enhance learning about micro-organisms. This project includes studies in art and poetry, not subjects that teachers would think of linking with science, however research notes that scientists and poets share the ability to pay close attention to things, a key skill also…

  10. Memory decreases for prose, but not for poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Dowling, W Jay

    2007-06-01

    Memory for details of text generally declines relatively rapidly, whereas memory for propositional and context-based meanings is generally more resilient over time. In the present study, we investigated short-term memory for two kinds of verbal material: prose and poetry. Participants heard or read prose stories or poems in which aphrase near the start of the passage served as a target. The text continued, and after various delays, memory was tested with a repetition of the target (old verbatim; O), a paraphrased lure (P), or a lure in which the meaning was changed. For prose, memory for surface details (as measured by O/P discrimination) declined over time (Experiments 2-4), as was expected. For poetry, memory for surface details (O/P discrimination) did not decline with increasing delay (Experiments 1, 3, and 4). This lack of decline in memory for the surface details of poetry is discussed in relation to similar results previously observed for musical excerpts (Dowling, Tillmann, & Ayers, 2001), suggesting that a particular role is played by the temporal organization and rhythmic structure of poetry andmusic.

  11. Infinity and Beyond: The Poetic List in Children's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullinger, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Amongst the wide variety of poetic forms found across children's poetry, the list is strikingly prevalent. Drawing on Umberto Eco's theory of lists, the article examines how the poetic list plays out in the work of a number of children's poets, distinguishing four sub-categories, each of which operates in a slightly different way. After a brief…

  12. [Poetry: Literature Curriculum, Grades Five and Six; Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Oregon Elementary English Project.

    This curriculum guide is intended to introduce fifth and sixth grade children to the study of poetry. Separate units include discussion of, suggested activities for, and questions about (1) metrics and scansion; (2) rhyme scheme and stanza; (3) diction, denotation and connotation, and onomatopoeia; (4) rhyme (end rhyme, masculine and feminine…

  13. The poetics of Francisco Pino, rare avis in Spanish poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Hub.

    Francisco Pino (1910-2002) can be considered as a "rara avis" in Spanish poetry. Having published dozens of books rather anonymously, and generally with small private presses, he began publishing through more renowned publishing companies in 1978. His various new editions, anthologies and editions

  14. Soil in Persian Poetry and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem AlaviPanah, Seyed; Taghavibayat, Aida; Behifar, Maedeh; Alavipanah, Sadroddin

    2017-04-01

    Almost everybody knows that soils are the foundation of food production and foodsecurity, supplying plants with nutrients, water and supports for their roots, but how many people or policy makes know that: Soil is a Complex, Dynamic, Open System and life also is the same! Increasing public awareness about soil-related outreach involves the dissemination and acceptance of information about soil to stakeholders who have not been aware of its importance. Public awareness can support efforts to involve private sector, indigenous and local communities and NGOs to engage on soil related activities. In this regard utilization of cultural and traditional understanding of soil issues (ethnopedology, art, literature, customs, and poems) is essential and vital to promote soil awareness among policy-makers, donors and the general public in order to find better understanding of soil's role in global issues such as climate change. In this paper we extensively analysis Persian and Iranian poems in order to get better understanding of cultural patterns of soils and its contribution to society. In ancient Cultures Classical elements (earth(Soil), water, air, fire,) explained the nature of all matters around the world, same as many other, in Persian. Each of these elements has their nature and personalities. Soil also refers to one part of human's life cycle. After death we join to soil. Therefore in Persian culture and poetry there is lots of poem which express these concepts such as poem below of Umar Khayyam Neyshabouri which noted the importance and the nature of soil and its relation to vegetation, and their cause-effect relationships about one thousand years ago. "Every unique herb vegetated next to a stream/ is as if grown from the lip of an angelical beauty/ don't stampede (degrade) that herb/ because it is vegetated from the soil of a beauty whose face is like a tulip". and Look how the morning breeze has helped the rosebud bloom/ And how at the sight of the rose the

  15. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-03-01

    of poet’s era more than any criteria. 1-The nature of images: In Persian “illustration” is a equivalent for “image” in European literature. It was 1st introduced to Persian poetry by Shafeei Kadkani in his salient book known as “Types of Imagery”. It goes: A manipulation of the concept of nature an man by the poet whereby he tries to make a relation between man and nature. It is the thing we call “imagination” or “illustration”. Admittedly others have proposed definitions of their own. 1-1- Different expressions of imagery: As Fotohi Rood Mojani has noted, illustrations are classified on the basis of their functions as positive (objective versus imaginative (subjective. He also attributes deep and surface values for images on the basis of their covert (internal and overt (external feature and for this very reason the article is founded on a description of different imagery levels. Furthermore an analysis of poetical illustrations based on their subjectivity and objectivity (deep & surface characteristics is proposed. For the purpose of better understanding these concepts and their related terms are discussed in detail. Internal and external perspective of imageries: poetic images are elaborated from superficial descriptions to more profound ones in accordance with their imagery functions. It is quite clear that such imagination is more of 2ndary kind. For this very reason the illustrations are known as superficial and substantial manifestations. Superficial descriptions: from artistic and literary point of view as well as their functionality, superficial descriptions are the simplest poetic representations through which the poet presents the simplest kind of imaginations –what Hawks describes them just appealing to the public and without any poetical emotion or “ description “ Profound (deep imageries: Core of these illustrations is figures of speech that encompass richness and profundity. These

  16. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-04-01

    s era more than any criteria. 1-The nature of images: In Persian “illustration” is a equivalent for “image” in European literature. It was 1st introduced to Persian poetry by Shafeei Kadkani in his salient book known as “Types of Imagery”. It goes: A manipulation of the concept of nature an man by the poet whereby he tries to make a relation between man and nature. It is the thing we call “imagination” or “illustration”. Admittedly others have proposed definitions of their own. 1-1- Different expressions of imagery: As Fotohi Rood Mojani has noted, illustrations are classified on the basis of their functions as positive (objective versus imaginative (subjective. He also attributes deep and surface values for images on the basis of their covert (internal and overt (external feature and for this very reason the article is founded on a description of different imagery levels. Furthermore an analysis of poetical illustrations based on their subjectivity and objectivity (deep & surface characteristics is proposed. For the purpose of better understanding these concepts and their related terms are discussed in detail. Internal and external perspective of imageries: poetic images are elaborated from superficial descriptions to more profound ones in accordance with their imagery functions. It is quite clear that such imagination is more of 2ndary kind. For this very reason the illustrations are known as superficial and substantial manifestations. Superficial descriptions: from artistic and literary point of view as well as their functionality, superficial descriptions are the simplest poetic representations through which the poet presents the simplest kind of imaginations –what Hawks describes them just appealing to the public and without any poetical emotion or “ description “ Profound (deep imageries: Core of these illustrations is figures of speech that encompass richness and profundity. These figures make the host of literary devices of any language

  17. MODERN POETRY THAT COULD/COULDN’T EXHAUST THR CLASSICAL POETICA AND SUFISM DOCTRINE FROM A MYSTIC CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Hasan AKTAS

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The poetry of classical age was pouring from twomain vessels as Divan and Mysticism. The poem of thesetwo channels were standing on two strongepistemic/basic source like Quran and Tradition. Divanand mystic poetry are in a way a secular/visible andmystic/esoteric evolution of these two rooted/epistemicsource. This evolution is being made confirm andclassical by sealing with secrets sometimes. In a way, thiscaused the Divan poetry turning into a hidden treasure.Turkish poetry which suddenly lost it’s treasure withmodernism, got contemporary and positivist with anagression of no borders. This marginality is stopped themodern poetry. This blockage entailed new developmentwhich was through the Divan and mystic poetry. Altoughthis tendency, modern poetry couldn’t exhaust Divan andmystic poetry/sufism doctrine as it produce them.Because, modern poetry hasn’t got enough power toexhaust the wonderful treasure of Divan and mysticpoetry.

  18. Poetry Writing as Expressive Pedagogy in an EFL Context: Identifying Possible Assessment Tools for Haiku Poetry in EFL Freshman College Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Japanese poetry, haiku, has been widely accepted in western countries. While previous studies have reported on the applicability of haiku poetry to teaching practices in a variety of contexts, few researchers have discussed assessment which is one of the most important factors in language teaching. The aim of this study is to produce assessment…

  19. [Apparently opposite postulates of Ehrlich (Horror autotoxicus) and Metchnikoff (physiological autoimmunization) are not irreconcilable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighiero, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1900, the group from Metchnikoff suggested the concept of autoimmunization by demonstrating the presence of autoantibodies in normal conditions; which was opposed to the concept of horror autotoxicus raised by Ehrlich. Landsteiner's description of the transfusion compatibility rules and 50 year-later work from Burnett's and Medawar's groups lead to the clonal deletion theory as a general explanation of tolerance and autoimmunity. However, more recent work succeeded demonstrating that autoreactive B cells constitute a substantial part of the B-cell repertoire and that this autoreactive repertoire secretes the so-called natural autoantibodies (NAA) characterized by their broad reactivity mainly directed against very well conserved public epitopes. They fulfill the definition of an autoantibody since they are self-reactive, but they are not self-specific. As yet, NAA directed against determinants of polymorphism have not been reported. The presence of this repertoire in normal conditions challenges the clonal deletion theory as a unique explanation for self-tolerance. However, if we take into account that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is not self-specific, this contradiction may not be a real one opposition. Indeed, the Lansteiner's rule that a subject belonging to group A will never produce anti-A antibodies and will always produce natural antibodies against the B-cell group, could never be challenged. Clonal deletion is probably accounting for this phenomenon. However, the serum of healthy adult individuals frequently exhibits low titers of anti-I antibodies, which is a precursor molecule of AB0 antigen system. The mechanism accounting for deletion of B cells directed against critical determinants like antigens A and B in the red blood cell system and allowing the production of autoantibodies against I remains elusive.

  20. La estética del horror en tres relatos fantásticos de Honoré de Balzac

    OpenAIRE

    María Teresa Lozano Sampedro

    2008-01-01

    This study wants to emphasize thetopic of horror in Honoré de Balzac s writings,mainly through the analysis of threefantastic stories: La Peau de chagrin, Melmothréconcilié and L Elixir de longue vie.These three stories are included in theÉtudes philosophiques, the part of LaComédie Humaine in which Balzac intendsto show the invisible mechanisms of mankindand society. So, it is in the Étudesphilosophiques where one of the most importantideas of Balsac s writings is expressed:the power of thou...

  1. El culpable de la imagen. Genealogía del acto de anteponer un culpable para testimoniar el horror en el cine

    OpenAIRE

    Fillol, S. (Santiago)

    2017-01-01

    En 1945 el batallón que integraba el futuro cineasta Samuel Fuller entró en el campo de concentración de Falkenau. Ante el descubrimiento del horror, el capitán americano ordenó a Fuller esconderse para rodar cómo los soldados aleccionaban a los pobladores civiles alemanes, enfrentándolos antes las montañas de cadáveres. El gesto de anteponer un culpable como figura del plano, para poder mirar el agujero de sentido que provoca el horror de fondo, es una marca definitoria de dos polémicos docu...

  2. The Poet Glorifies his Poetry: AL-Mutanabbi and Shakespeare as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid al-Essa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying the aspects of and the reasons behind the poet glorifying his poetry and, consequently, himself. The two examples chosen here are Al-Muttanabi, the famous Abbasid poet and Shakespeare, the Elizabethan poet. The researchers discuss the common features that distinguish the poetry of both poets especially in relation to the theme of glorification of poetry. This comparative study has chosen examples from Al-Mutanabbi's poetry (the Diwan; the collection of his poems and Shakespeare's sonnets (18-126. The researchers have found out that the two poets glorify their poetry while praising an outstanding powerful character in order to make profit or gain a social status or a governmental position. Ironically speaking, they end up hinting at the fact that their poetic lines are immortal and only through their panegyric poetry the concerned patron is immortalized.

  3. A personal exploration of the power of poetry in palliative care, loss and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ann

    2004-01-01

    This article is a personal reflection and exploration of the potential of poetry in palliative care. Poetry can help enable expression of individuals' deepest unspoken concerns and may provide a means of providing spiritual care. The author draws on her personal experience as a community nurse, together with the views of patients and colleagues, and discusses the literature. Some limitations to the use of poetry are considered, as are the skills needed to help patients use poetry. To illustrate the potential therapeutic value of poetry in palliative care, examples of poems by poets, patients and the author are included. The article concludes that poetry can bring about a sense of healing, and should be considered as a possible addition to other holistic therapies.

  4. Different Types of Fantastic Etiology in Hafez Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Ghasemipour

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Fantastic etiology in Persian poetry has such a high status that we can say that this figure of speech is one of the most interested figures between classic Persian poets. This figure is frequently used by Hafez in his poetries so that after equivocalness it is the second rhetorical figure in his poetries. The definition of fantastic etiology is that causality in poetry is based on similarity and it must be aesthetical and satisfactory, not scientific and discursive. By Fantastic etiology poets create imaginative connection between two phenomena; in the other hand, this figure rationally proves the possibility of the impossible and thus presents the lies disguised as truth. The poet’s goal in fantastic etiology is not to invent the cause, but rather to make the conventional descriptions sound unusual. For example, in the line “Because the cloud weeps without reason, tulips and roses laugh at it,” it is the groundless tears of the cloud which cause mockery on the part of the tulips and roses. In this example, two conventional expressions- “the cloud’s tears” (describing the spring rain and “the flowers’ laughter” (describing their blossoming - are connected by a causal relationship which does not exist in reality.   In classical Persian poetry Hafez, along with equivocalness, utilized of fantastic etiology in the best form . His uses of this literary device, like another figures of speech in his poetry, is very natural and unassuming. Understanding, interpreting and aesthetical purpose of some Hafez poetries is based on fantastic etiology.   Companionship, concomitancy and admixture of poetical figures are factors that must be discussed in stylistic analysis of poetry. Literary figures occasionally uses alone in poetry and some when uses together. Though fantastic etiology in rhetoric or figure of thought is an independent figure, but this devise occasionally uses with another

  5. The usage of adjectives in the contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kordbache

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deviation from the norm, deviation  from the  rules that  governing  on  the  syntagmatic relations  of  the words, adding  the  rules  on  the  standard language, displace  in  parts  of  sentence,  and  manipulating  in  accepted  structure  of  grammar,  are  collection  of  methods  that  most  poets  use,  for  arriving  to the language  of  poetry.  Principally,  use  of  methods  in  language  that  focuses  on  language  instead  of  message  creates  foregrounding  in  language  of  poetry.  Foregrounding  in  language  of  poetry,  takes  shape  in  two  kinds  of  deviation  and  extra-regularity,  and  deviation,  takes  shape  with  displace  and  manipulating  in  parts  of  different  areas  of  grammar.  Adjective  that  has  a  secondary  role  in  the  structure  of  sentence,  is  so  flexible,  and  has  suitable  context  for  deviation.  Different  deviations  in  this  area,  especially  in  contemporary poetry,  create  significant  variety  in  application  of  adjective. In this article, examining deviation of adjectives' structure rules in contemporary literature, we have discussed importance of adjective as unessential grammatical component in deviation. In addition, we have shown flexibility of adjective to acceptance of deviation, and reviewed its impact on richness of language in Persian poetry. On the other hand, we have shown that most of deviation types in adjective structure, had been available in past literature (poetry and prose, for this reason, past literature considered as a treasures of language structures.   Adjectives are groups of words, which describe nouns and determine one or more of their characteristics such as their state, number or amount, etc. In fact, adjectives are so important that some scholars believe that they are more important than simile, metonymy and metaphor

  6. The Effects of Information Technology on Contemporary Italian Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Milani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the different ways in which the contemporary italian poets approach the inevitable interference between poetry and Web in the age of global communication. The computer technology provides not only a specific vocabulary for new materials for metaphors, but also new methods of composition (such as hypertext, and also it accelerates the circulation of text on the Web. In this paper the author analyzes poems about computer technology and Internet written by poets who belong to generations “pre-computing” and by “computer-native” poets. The results of this analysis show that most of the italian poets has resisted to the contamination between new media and poetry: only in the last ten years the creative experimentation through Internet become real (as the technique of the “sought poems”.

  7. Jasmine and Lagarto: Pearse Hutchinson’s Poetry of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Woods

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In his life as a poet Pearse Hutchinson, now in his 84th year, has engaged with the poetry and the cultures of many countries in Europe; at the heart of this work is his poetry of Spain. From his first visit there in 1950 to today Hutchinson has been inspired by the landscapes, people and languages of Spain, translating from Catalan, Castilian and Galician and writing memorable poems based on his own experiences and the history and politics of a country which he loves. His work brought an awareness of Spanish culture, life and literature to a wide audience in Ireland. Hutchinson is recording a prose memoir based on his life and travels in Spain and Portugal.

  8. The singing of the Hellenes: poetry and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Brandão dos Santos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a brief reflection on the genesis of literary genres in Ancient Greece. It is intended here, in the first place, take us off this "comfort zone" when we talk about "Greek literature" in antiquity, at least from the period of Homer until the fifth century. B.C. , moment when, in fact, the writing has become stable not only in the continent but spreads out reaching the Italian peninsula and generating what we have today as the Roman alphabet. Therefore, we examine some terms that appear to be so clear for us which termed other doings, such as poetry, poem, among others. We also examine issues concerning the epic, lyrical and dramatic poetry

  9. A poetry program for the very elderly-Narrative perspective on one therapeutic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Marvin

    2014-03-01

    The focus of this report is a poetry program that the author has been conducting at a nursing home/short-stay rehabilitation facility for the past three and a half years. The program involves reading poetry to groups of very elderly residents who have significant mental and/or physical disabilities. This article includes a description of the program and the author's observations of its beneficial effects. Poetry readings were also given to individual seniors who have significant dementia. The therapeutic value of the program to the elders and to the person reading the poetry to the elders is discussed.

  10. Psychological effects of poetry workshops with people with early stage dementia: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Ioana; MacFarlane, Kit; Ranzijn, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of writing poetry on psychological functioning in people with early stage dementia. A series of poetry writing workshops was conducted with four women, at the end of which a one-on-one short structured interview was conducted. All of the women said that they benefited from the workshops, but their experiences differed greatly. Themes included competence and self-efficacy, personal growth, wanting to contribute and poetry writing as a way of coping with the progression of the condition. Creative activities such as writing poetry hold promise for enhancing the quality of life of people with dementia.

  11. Poetry and Participation: Scripting a Meaningful Research Text With Rape Crisis Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rath, Jean

    2012-01-01

    .... In moving between context and methods, research generated poetry, participants' responses and preferences, and discussion of textual presences, the layered text format invites the reader to develop...

  12. A poetry program for the very elderly—Narrative perspective on one therapeutic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Marvin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this report is a poetry program that the author has been conducting at a nursing home/short-stay rehabilitation facility for the past three and a half years. The program involves reading poetry to groups of very elderly residents who have significant mental and/or physical disabilities. This article includes a description of the program and the author's observations of its beneficial effects. Poetry readings were also given to individual seniors who have significant dementia. The therapeutic value of the program to the elders and to the person reading the poetry to the elders is discussed. PMID:24899783

  13. POETICS OF PATHOS: ACHEBE'S WAR POETRY Chike Okoye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Chike Okoye

    Notable war poetry include Alfred Lord Tennyson‟s „The Charge of the Light Brigade‟,. Thomas Hardy‟s „The Man He Killed‟, Wilfred Owen‟s „Dulce et Decorum Est‟, „Anthem for Doomed Youth‟, Siegfried Sassoon‟s „Suicide in the Trenches‟ and so on. It is important to note that apart from Tennyson‟s „The Charge ...

  14. Trading Culture: Practical Background for Azerbaijani-English Poetry Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Mandaville A.; Naghiyeva Sh.

    2011-01-01

    Where translation theory often argues the difficulties of translation—whether or not and under what conditions translation is possible—the authors take a more practical approach. Examining the translation of poetry from Azerbaijani to English, two very different languages and poetic traditions, the authors discuss key linguistic, political, cultural considerations and demonstrate some effective practical strategies. They approach translation as a fundamentally human endeavor and the work of a...

  15. The Effectiveness of Teaching Creative Writing Using Cinquain Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Aryusmar Aryusmar; Winda Putria

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at describing the effectiveness of teaching creative writing using cinquain poetry. The research was conducted at Lia Stephanie Elementary School. The students were given a pre-test, three time meetings, and a post-test. To figure out the significant difference between students’ pre-test and post-test, research used ‘Descriptive Qualitative Analysis’ since this analysis could describe the facts found during the research and it could also explain whether the aim of this resea...

  16. Contribution of the Ciciban magazine to Slovenian youth poetry development

    OpenAIRE

    Eržen, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    Slovenian children's and youth magazine Ciciban is coming out regularly since 1945 until today, in total 70 years. It had many publishers, many of which had literature for professional occupation. It promoted many non-literary and literary works which contributed to children's knowledge of world of literature and their reading development. This diploma researches contribution of Ciciban magazine to poetry and poets. Many different poets were publishing their works through decades and because ...

  17. Afrikaans literature, Breyten Breytenbach, prison poetry, the reader ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Breyten Breytenbach's poetry the “I” is complex. “I” and “you”, the writer and the reader, are not represented with constituted meanings but as signifiers and as part of language production. This article reflects on the development process of the writer as the textual “I”, the “I” narrator in the poetic text – the “I” of language that ...

  18. Concrete Research Poetry: A Visual Representation of Metaphor

    OpenAIRE

    Marcy Meyer

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the author employs concrete research poetry as a visual representation of a metaphor analysis. Using autoethnographic methods, she explores the experiences of eight single mothers of children and young adults with mental illness. She conducts a metaphor analysis of semi-structured interview data and generates concrete poetic structures from metaphors that emerged from the data. In the process, she transforms data into art.

  19. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  20. Flywheel Magnetic Suspension Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Sifford, Curtiss; Thomas, Erwin; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Provenza, Andrew; Kascak, Albert; Montague, Gerald; Lei, Shuliang; Kim, Yeonkyu; hide

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of many areas of the flywheel magnetic suspension (MS) R&D being performed at the Texas A&M Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab (TAMU-VCEL). This includes system response prediction, actuator optimization and redundancy, controller realizations and stages, sensor enhancements and backup bearing reliability.

  1. Cryonic Suspension and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George P.; Hall, Clare

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes three central problems which adversely affect use, development, and perfection of cryonic suspension of individuals: the extent to which a physician may be guilty of malpractice in assisting with a suspension; the need for a recognition of suspension; and the present effect of the law's anachronistic treatment of estate devolution upon a…

  2. Eghterab’ in Iraqi Emigrants\\' Poetry: The Case of Ahmad Matar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سید عدنان اشکوری

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Eghterab’ in Iraqi Emigrants' Poetry: The Case of Ahmad Matar    Jafar Delshad *  Seyyed Adnan Eshkewaree **    Abstract  The word ‘eghterab’ in human sciences has different concepts which could be classified into three groups: 1 Westernization and tending to western culture or being alien with eastern authenticity 2 nostalgia and homesickness caused by being away from his/her motherhood land and hometown. Most of this group of poets are emigrants or are in exile and 3 having the sense of nostalgia but being in home country. It means that this group of poets have very high ideals which no one in their homeland can take and bare these ideals. The poet perceives that ideals which are essential for him/her are higher than the society in which he/she lives can grasp. This essay makes an attempt to study the various concepts of ‘eghterab’ by focusing on Ahmad Matar as a prominent poet with regard to the third concept and deal with the third concept of Eghterab from three points of view: political, social and spiritual. This article examines some samples of these three parts in Ahmad Matar's poetry.    Key words: nostalgia, poetry, emigration, Ahmad Matar, Iraq   * Assistant Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, University of IsfahanE-mail: delshad@fgn.ui.ir  ** Assistant Professor, University for Teacher Training, E-mail: eshkewaree@yahoo.com.

  3. Cult of mother Jugović in Serbian epic poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baćović Vukašin K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The poetry about Kosovo is a poetry about the Fenix Bird and torture. Because of its esthetic worthiness it is included in the greatest poetry accomplishments of Serbian people and the human kind in general. The Death of the Mother of Jugović is the poem in which spirit trolds the central position. The nature of this mother is characterized by two most supreme human feelings: patriotism and maternity. The poem accumulates pain reaching enormous power of personal, family and collective misery. Love of the mother of Jugović is always fresh because it rises from the never ending spring of a mother's soul. Only great poets such as: Sofocles in Antigona, Aesylus in Prometheus Bound, Shakespeare in Hamlet, Njegoš in The Mountain Wreath and some particular poets of the Bible created similar poetic branches. The cult of the mother of Jugović needs to be breaded new generations may reach new cognitions and new worlds.

  4. Home Army in the Poetry of Jerzy Ficowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kandziora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evolution of the theme of Armia Krajowa (Home Army and the Warsaw Uprising, in Ficowski’s poetry. The theme, engaged by the poet in the late 1940s (Ołowiani żołnierze, 1948, was quickly abandoned as incompatible with the imaginary, magical direction in the development of young Ficowski’s poetry. Neither was the theme fostered by the general political background of the “dead season” of Communist Poland, by censorship, and by Ficowski’s fear of settling for the post-Romantic stereotype and patriotic myth-making. The theme returned in the 1970s (Gryps, 1979; Errata, 1981, which was related to Ficowski’s decision to liberate himself from self-censorship, and his readiness to express the once repressed content in his own, mature poetic idiom. The present study presents two aspects of historical narration in the Home-Army poems from the 1970s: the fabulous quality, which positions history in Ficowski’s private topics and intimate memory, and the scientific, naturalistic quality, which relates history to physical and cosmic categories. Both aspects redeem the poetry from the narrow specificity of Polish national myth, and make it possible to reconcile individual truth of the experience of death and suffering with the discourse of concepts and historiosophy, which also touches upon the cosmic order.

  5. Teaching Poetry: A Descriptive Case Study of a Poetry Unit in a Classroom of Urban Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenson, Rebecca; Kretschmer, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted that reflected an analysis of a 6-week poetry unit in a language arts classroom of 6th and 8th graders at a school for the deaf in a large city in the northeastern United States. The school served a large population of children of poverty who were of Latino and African American descent. The study was guided by 4…

  6. El horror al amor incestuoso: lo traumático en el nacimiento de la ética individual y colectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia León-López

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available El encuentro con el trauma se anudaal drama del amor incestuosotanto en la historia del psicoanálisiscomo en la travesía de la cura. Esteencuentro no solo se desdobla enel paso que da Freud de su teoríade la seducción sexual, comoacontecimiento en el origen de lasneurosis, a la necesidad del fantasmade seducción en la construcciónde la realidad edípica; sino quetambién revela su lógica internaen un desplazamiento del horror:atravesar el horror al incesto implicaaceptar el deseo de realizacióndel amor incestuoso, desvalorizarel goce de este amor y salir de larealidad religiosa para acceder aun más allá del fantasma en el cualhay lugar para otro horror, el de loreal. Atravesar este otro horror esel nódulo del deseo del analista, elcomienzo del verdadero viaje, eseque no mutila lo humano de surelación con la Cosa, con el enigmadel origen.

  7. Visual and Artistic Functions of Letters Khaghani’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. Zolfaghari

    Full Text Available The intensity of emotion and vibration of meaning in the poet's mind causes him to go beyond the ordinary language and through metaphors, similes and linguistic preparation he conveys intellectual and emotional meanings. He has a sharp eye and a sensitive spirit and creative temprement and by inventing new images shows the creativity and imagination in various arenas and attempts in the way of literary strength and creating personal style and this point more than anything else must be done by presenting images and newness. Perhaps in the sixth century, and especially in Azerbaijani school, more than other periods, poets have been looking for creating innovative style in eloquence. Their major attempts were mainly in imaging, it was a wide field that they have competed and it is natural that in this illustration the alphabet letters would be very helpful. Khaghani poetry as one of the greatest poets of this school has the perfect poetrical book of painting and meaning, and delicated pattern in new and different scientific, cultural and religious paintings and letters are a broad range of elements that put a new field in front of the poet and he is aware of the potential features of the letters and also the new images and the artistic creativity.This paper shows descriptive - analytical study of various aspects of Khaghani’s poetry and frequency of letters in the alphabet, authentic images based on alphabet, taken at different pseudo relevance of poetry in the context of multiple semantic and literal characters, making figures of speech based on literary characters, images and characters and the sense of connection . . . which has been shown in his poetry.Letter has double and even multiple uses in Khaghani poetic works (divan and more than the construction of words which is the real and common sense that is used as an artistic. There is a world in the heart of every letter, word and morpheme lies in the poet's point of view is the last and

  8. Stage fever and text anxiety: the staging of poeticity in Dutch performance poetry since the 1960s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, G.; Gräbner, C.; Casas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades, the poetry performance has developed into an increasingly popular, diverse, and complex art form. In theoretical and critical discourse, it is referred to as performance poetry, spoken word poetry, and polipoesía; some theorists argue that it is an independent poetic genre,

  9. A Comparative Study of Allusions in the Poetry of English Poet John Milton and Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Comparative literary studies characterize similarities and dissimilarities found in poetic works of two writers of different cultures. This study focuses on the use of allusions in poetry of John Milton particularly with reference to Paradise Lost and poetry of Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi. Using allusions in poetry has been a common style of poets…

  10. Heteropolar Magnetic Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misovec, Kathleen; Johnson, Bruce; Downer, James; Eisenhaure, David; Hockney, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Compact permanent-magnet/electromagnet actuator has six degrees of freedom. Heteropolar magnetic actuator conceived for use as actively controlled vibration-isolating suspension device. Exerts forces along, and torques about, all three principal coordinate axes to resist all three components of translational vibration and all three components of rotational vibration. Inner cylinder suspended magnetically within outer cylinder. Electro-magnet coils interact with fields of permanent magnets to provide active control of suspending force and torque.

  11. "I Am the Book"--Deaf Poets' Views on Signed Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-01-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when…

  12. British Women, Chemistry, and Poetry: Some Contextual Examples from the 1870s to the 1940s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner-Canham, Marelene F.; Rayner-Canham, Geoff W.

    2011-01-01

    In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, British women chemists used poetry as a way of describing their work and as a means of social commentary. As far as we are aware, the chemistry-poetry interface has not previously been explored in the context of women's experience.

  13. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  14. Tap and Text: Using Poetry to Develop Rhythmic Proficiency in Percussive Dance Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ryan P.

    2017-01-01

    As a longtime student and aficionado of both poetry and percussive dance, Ryan Casey presents ways in which poetry--both written and spoken word--can be used in a dance class to develop rhythmic proficiency in percussive dancers of varying ages and skill levels, and explains why he believes this practice is accessible and educational. Although the…

  15. The tradition of analogy in the poetry of Murilo Mendes and Jorge de Lima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO ASSUNÇÃO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at discussing the relevance of the poetry of Murilo Mendes and Jorge de Lima, from the tradition of analogy, beyond the surrealistic interference on the building of his poetics, within the context of modern Brazilian poetry in the twentieth century.

  16. 76 FR 12786 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Poetry in Clay: Korean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Poetry in Clay: Korean Buncheong... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Poetry in Clay: Korean Buncheong Ceramics from the Leeum...

  17. The Effort to Increase the Students' Achievement in Poetry Mastery through Semiotic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirgeyasa, I Wy.

    2017-01-01

    The obejectives of this research are to know the improvement of the students' achievement in poetry mastery and their perception regarding to the semiotic method in teaching and learning poetry in English Education Department, Languages and Art Faculty of State University of Medan. The research method used is the Classroom Action Research (CAR).…

  18. Challenging the Autonomous Realm of Literature: Nieuwe Zakelijkheid and Poetry in the Dutch Literary Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorleijn, G.J.; Grüttemeier, Ralf; Beekman, Klaus; Rebel, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The term Nieuwe Zakelijkheid has mainly been used to indicate prose not poetry during the 1930s in Dutch literary criticism and academic criticism; literary historiography followed this practice. This contribution shows that Nieuwe Zakelijkheid and poetry are nevertheless closely intertwined in

  19. Assigning poetry reading as a way of introducing students to qualitative data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raingruber, Bonnie

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the paper is to explain how poetry reading can be used to teach interpretive analysis of qualitative data. A number of studies were located in the nursing literature that focused on using poetry to help students develop empathy for patients, to teach students to reflect on their own practice, and to assist them in developing self-understanding. No studies were found that described the use of poetry reading as a way of teaching the skill of interpretive analysis. There are, however, a number of parallels between the principles of poetry reading and qualitative analysis that suggest that this method of teaching would be successful. International papers published on PubMed, Medline, and CINAHL were reviewed to identify challenges facing educators and ways of teaching the process of qualitative data analysis using poetry reading. Using poetry reading to teach skills of qualitative data analysis helps motivate students, cultivates a reflective mindset, and develops the skill of working as a member of an interpretive group. Framing interpretive work as being like reading poetry helps students pick up more quickly on the art that is a major component of the work. This approach also helps students learn the importance of cultural and contextual particulars as they begin analyzing qualitative data. Using poetry reading to introduce students to the complex skill of qualitative data analysis is an effective pedagogical strategy.

  20. A Stylistic Study on the Linguistic Deviations in E. E. Cummings' Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shi, Mengchen

    2015-01-01

    Regarded as the pioneer of experimental poetry, E. E. Cummings' unconventional treatment of poetic language has reached an unprecedented acme, which has intrigued and baffled numerous scholars, researchers and readers alike. Nevertheless, the very existence of poetry, like other types of literary texts, demonstrates the significance and value of…

  1. A Model for the Instruction of Poetry Designed for Attitude Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maase, Elda Ocea Apel

    This study is an attempt to develop a high school poetry-teaching model designed for attitude development. The study reviewed related research and literature on objectives for teaching English and surveyed a school to determine student preferences among the poetry-teaching methods currently recommended. The model proposed includes the general…

  2. Characteristics of Poetry Associated with Preferences of a Panel of Tenth Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Benny Frank

    To determine what characteristics of poetry are preferred by high school students, researchers asked 16 sophomores to use a semantic differential rating scale to evaluate 120 poems selected from high school textbooks and current publications. Seven sophisticated poetry readers numerically assessed 10 technical characteristics of the poems to…

  3. Teaching Poetry Reading in Secondary Education: Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvardsson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review research on poetry reading pedagogy in secondary education from 1990 to 2015. Today there is little research on poetry teaching in Sweden and thus little guidance for secondary teachers. Therefore, this study thematically analyses peer-reviewed articles from English language international journals. Articles were…

  4. Reassessing Pocho Poetics: Americo Paredes's Poetry and the (Trans) National Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguin, B.V.

    2005-01-01

    Americo Paredes's first collection of poetry, Cantos de Adolescencia in 1937, alongside his second poetry anthology, Between Two Worlds in 1991 is examined. Paredes's discourses of Mexican American identity demand a reassessment of the pocho as an icon for Chicanao literary and cultural studies.

  5. Poetry Generated by Stillbirth and Livebirth: Transgenerational Sharing of Grief and Joy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heninger, Owen E.

    1987-01-01

    Preserves, in poetry, emotional reactions of parents and grandparents to the dire event of a stillbirth and the subsequent joyous occasion of a livebirth. Discusses implications of the therapeutic benefits of writing poetry to help resolve grief and develop active mastery over traumatic events. (RS)

  6. Seeing History: Malaika Favorite's "Furious Flower Poetry Quilt" Painting and Pan-African Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Maureen G.

    2010-01-01

    Malaika Favorite's "Furious Flower Poetry Quilt" (2004) is an acrylic painting that depicts 24 portraits of leading poets of the African Diaspora. Commissioned by Dr Joanne Gabbin, English professor and director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University, the painting is part of a larger programme of poetry…

  7. Lyricist’s Lyrical Lyrics: Widening the Scope of Poetry Studies by Claiming the Obvious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelens, G.

    2011-01-01

    Poetry is all but absent from Cultural Studies. Most treatments of the genre tend to focus on canonized poets whose work is wilfully difficult and obscure. Alternative histories should be explored, opening up possibilities to view poetry again as a culturally relevant art form. The demotic and

  8. The Impact of Using Music on Teaching English Poetry in Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Dima; Al-natour, Amal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using music on teaching English Poetry in Jordanian universities on students' performance. The researchers followed the equivalent pre/post T test two group designs. To achieve the aim of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' performance in English poetry. The…

  9. In Living Memory: The Dying Art of Learning Poetry and a Case for Revival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullinger, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the practice of learning poems and the value of poetry in the memory, and emerges from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge. Drawing on the subset of findings in relation to learning and memory, the essay locates the…

  10. Poetry Performances and Academic Identity Negotiations in the Literacy Experiences of Seventh Grade Language Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    This case study explores seventh grade students' experiences with writing and performing poetry. Teacher and student interviews along with class observations provide insight into how the teacher and students viewed spoken word poetry and identity. The researcher recommends practices for the teaching of critical literacy using spoken word and…

  11. Sounding Sense: The Place, Problems and Potential of Performance in Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullinger, Debbie; Whitley, David

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a strand of findings from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge, this article examines contemporary understandings of poetry performance in teaching contexts. Positioning these understandings in relation to past practices, we…

  12. Teachers' Conceptualisations of the Intuitive and the Intentional in Poetry Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The status of poetry both in the writing curriculum and in wider popular culture is best described as mixed (Wilson, 2009). In spite of a strong post-war tradition of enthusiasm for the teaching of poetry writing, it is currently felt to be marginalised in the writing curriculum (Dymoke, 2007; Ofsted, 2007). This paper reports on the beliefs,…

  13. The Role of Teaching Poetry in Developing Literacy in Greek Primary School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravani, Evagelia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to examine the ways in which the systematic teaching of poetry reading at Greek primary school enhances children's interest in reading and helps develop their oral skills by enriching their vocabulary and creative thinking. The present poetry project was implemented at a Greek public kindergarten in Rethymno,…

  14. The Other Tradition: Populist Perspectives on Teaching Poetry, as Published in "English Journal", 1912-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Mark; Dressman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In 2005 we began a comprehensive review of every article published in "English Journal" on the topics of poetry and its teaching since its first issue in 1912. Did high school English teachers and college professors in 1914 or 1945 or 1963 see the teaching of poetry as we see it today? Did they have similar problems and concerns? Is the sense of…

  15. On the Teaching of Poetry in "English Journal," 1912-2005: Does History Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressman, Mark; Faust, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study reports two stages of research into the discourses of poetry education in the United States from the early 20th to the early 21st centuries. The first is an original study that traces the history of discourses about teaching poetry, and the second is a coda or concluding analysis that raises questions about how history functions as a…

  16. Beyond Broudy's Triad--Infusing University Students with the Love of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zid, Mounir

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the diverse schools of thought providing guidance for poetry teachers--such as the didactic, heuristic, or phyletic approaches--this myriad of teaching modes has failed to generate adequate student appreciation for poetry courses. The reason for this is teachers' tendency to cling to the idea that one must choose a particular approach…

  17. The Conveyor Belt Curriculum? Poetry Teaching in the Secondary School: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the effects of the British National Curriculum and the SATs on teaching and changes in how poetry is examined. States that some teachers view these changes as having a detrimental effect on student poetry experiences, while others see a positive advantage in the changes. (CMK)

  18. From the Epic to the Allegorical Sublime: A Multilingual Reading of Spanish Civil War Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto Asín, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This article examines poetry written during the Spanish Civil War that reflects on the modern character of the conflict: the novel tactic of aerial bombing civilian populations as it was disseminated through the mass media. A comparative reading of this body of poetry written by Spanish, British, and American authors allows for the examination of…

  19. The Use of Line Poetry as a Therapeutic Technique in Sexual Assault Survivors Support Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiney, Teresa J.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the use of line poetry as a therapeutic technique in a support group for survivors of sexual assault. Finds line poetry, a group activity in which members contribute lines to a collective poem, to be helpful in developing a bond among members, validating feelings, and offering a powerful outlet for self-expression. (SG)

  20. Powerful Students, Powerful Words: Writing and Learning in a Poetry Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Angela

    2011-01-01

    A poetry workshop can present opportunities to integrate students' knowledge and perspectives in classroom contexts, encouraging the use of language for expression, communication, learning and even empowerment. This paper describes how adolescent students respond to a poetry workshop in an English classroom centred on teaching writing that is…

  1. The effect of medical students' gender, ethnicity and attitude towards poetry-reading on the evaluation of a required, clinically-integrated poetry-based educational intervention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muszkat, Mordechai; Barak, Orly; Lalazar, Gadi; Mazal, Bracha; Schneider, Ronen; Levi, Irit Mor-Yosef; Cohen, Matan J; Canetti, Laura; Ben Yehuda, Arie; Naparstek, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    ... their findings may be difficult to generalize. The goal of this study is to examine, in an unselected students' population, the effect of students' gender, ethnicity and attitude towards poetry on their evaluation of a clinically-integrated...

  2. A “DECADENT” POET ON THE AESTHETIC “PLANTATIONS” OF THE NEW POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin IVAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Lost Generation marks a major moment in the development of contemporary Romanian poetry. The process they start and develop in a rebellious manner in the fifth decade is not limited to theoretical o r ideological positions. Advocating the change in poetry, they propose something in return: their own poetry. Another kind of poetry, in the spirit of a new vision and of a new aesthetic, based, paradoxically, on the refusal of aesthetics. The young authors‘ literary offer is remarkable and shows the way to a new kind of poetry, to a new aesthetic canon. Constant Tonegaru is one of the most important poetic voices of this movement, who crystallizes a particular poetic aesthetics. Escapism, fantasy, ir ony and self - irony, bohemian attitudes, intelligence, in an aesthetic context that brings together post - avant - garde, surrealist, neo - modernist and textualist elements, is what defines his aesthetic identity.

  3. It's Something That I Feel Like Writing, Instead of Writing Because I'm Being Told To: Elementary Boys' Experiences Writing and Performing Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lisa K.; Certo, Janine L.

    2014-01-01

    Poetry is one of the most feared and least understood literary genres in our public schools. Boys, in particular, are frequently perceived to be resistant to poetry instruction; a view that often stems from a limited vision of what poetry is and a misread of masculinity. Nevertheless, the study of poetry provides many benefits in the journey to…

  4. Fear, helplessness, and horror in posttraumatic stress disorder: investigating DSM-IV criterion A2 in victims of violent crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, C R; Andrews, B; Rose, S

    2000-07-01

    A DSM-IV diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) required for the first time that individuals must report experiencing intense fear, helplessness, or horror at the time of the trauma. In a longitudinal study of 138 victims of violent crime, we investigated whether reports of intense trauma-related emotions characterized individuals who, after 6 months, met criteria for PTSD according to the DSM-III-R. We found that intense levels of all 3 emotions strongly predicted later PTSD. However, a small number of those who later met DSM-III-R or ICD criteria for PTSD did not report intense emotions at the time of the trauma. They did, however, report high levels of either anger with others or shame.

  5. La estética del horror en tres relatos fantásticos de Honoré de Balzac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Lozano Sampedro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study wants to emphasize the topic of horror in Honoré de Balzac’s writings, mainly through the analysis of three fantastic stories: La Peau de chagrin, Mel-moth réconcilié and L’Elixir de longue vie. These three stories are included in the Études philosophiques, the part of La Comédie Humaine in which Balzac intends to show the invisible mechanisms of man-kind and society. So, it is in the Études philosophiques where one of the most im-portant ideas of Balsac’s writings is ex-pressed: the power of thought which, in Balzac’s fantastic stories, reveals itself to be destructive.

  6. Hands of beauty, hands of horror: fear and Egyptian art at the Fin de Siècle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefel, Aviva

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines the gothicization of Egyptian manual productions in late-Victorian mummy narratives. These narratives often isolate the mummy's hand as a signifier of craftsmanship, a troubling object for a culture that was mourning the figurative loss of its artisans' hands to mechanized production. Focusing on Bram Stoker's 1903 novel, The Jewel of Seven Stars, I contend that the horror of the mummy's hand emanates from its ambiguous position as an artifact that is itself a means of production. It displaces Friedrich Engels's conception of the Western hand as a self-creating appendage into the atavistic domain of a long-lost Egyptian tradition, and in doing so, it forces the English observer to recognize the irrecoverable nature of aesthetic craftsmanship. Brought into violent contact with the creative potential of the mummy's hand, the characters in Stoker's novel try to disassociate the mummy from manual production but only succeed in confirming their own status as products of a mechanized age.

  7. MUSICAL IMAGES AND MOTIVES IN THE POETRY OF A. PLATONOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V. Khramykh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Th e fi rst literary experiments of  A. Platonov, like among many novelists of the twenties, are connected with poems, which occupy a signifi cant place in his early works. Poems are the texts where was formed a unique style of  the writer. Th is article analyzes the musical images and motifs from Platonov`s two books of poetry: “Blue Depth” (1922 and “Th e Singing Th oughts” (1926—1927. Th e leitmotif of the fi rst part of the book of poems “Blue depth” is music of machines. Th e presence of this motive is caused by the infl uence of Proletkult poetry. In a number of poems in this section the music of machines is a part of the characteristics of the utopian New Town, which is being built by the proletarians. At the end of the fi rst part of “Blue depth” appears the image of unsung songs. Th is image indicates to the ways of knowing of the world, which are rational-technocratic alternative ways. In the plot of the second part of this book of poetry the motif of music machines is transformed into the image of music of thought. Analysis of the cycle of poems “Th e Singing Th oughts” has shown that in comparison with the “Blue depth” this book has a  plot where a new interaction between musical motifs and themes takes place. Th e development of this plot is based on the principle of a counterpoint.

  8. TO SEE AND TO WRITE: INTERSEMIOTIC TRANSIT IN POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Gedra Ruiz Alvarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the question of visuality in Portuguese Literature of Modernity and concentrates its focus on the branch of compositions created from the transposition of the pictorial language into a verbal one. Taking “Un coup de dés” by Mallarmé, as a seminal text of poetic experiment, it reflects on the process of translation from the Dutch painter’s canvas to poetry, throughout the analysis of the poem “The yellow chair, by Van Gogh”, written by Jorge de Sena.

  9. The Influence of the Andalusi Muashah on the Troubadour Poetry

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    Khaled S. Khalafat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between the Andalusi Muashah and the Troubadour that appeared in the eleventh century in southern France with the coexistence of the Arab Islamic presence in Andalusia where the Andalusi Muashah appeared in the fourth century AH. The study also examined the different perspectives about the origins of the Troubadour, and how the Andalusi Muashah reached this type of poetry. Besides, the present study further shed light on the structure of the Andalusi Muashah and the Troubadourian poems, thus presenting the overlapping between these two literary genres in terms of form, structure and divisions.

  10. "Reflections of the Loss of Rumeli on the Turkish Poetry"

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNEŞ, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Losing the land of Rumeli has had significant reflections on the Turkish poetry. Poets such as Rıza Tevfik, Mehmet kif, Aka Gündüz, Arif Nihat, etc. wrote poems on how much the sudden loss of Rumeli, which had long been under the Turkish rule, influenced the feelings of the Turkish people quite negatively. They harshly criticized the negligence and the incompetence of the rulers which accelerated the loss of the land during the Balkan War. One can easily observe the dramatic style in such po...

  11. Reflections of the Loss of Rumeli on the Turkish Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNEŞ, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Losing the land of Rumeli has had significant reflections on the Turkish poetry. Poets such as Rıza Tevfik, Mehmet Âkif, Aka Gündüz, Arif Nihat, etc. wrote poems on how much the sudden loss of Rumeli, which had long been under the Turkish rule, influenced the feelings of the Turkish people quite negatively. They harshly criticized the negligence and the incompetence of the rulers which accelerated the loss of the land during the Balkan War. One can easily observe the dramatic style in such p...

  12. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Astronomy: Cosmic Fiction, Drama and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-09-01

    I have spent four decades teaching introductory astronomy to university students whose primary subject of study is not astronomy, as well as developing activities to help the public appreciate astronomical ideas and developments. One of the more effective tools that I have found for capturing the interest of non-scientists has been approaching astronomy through its influence on the humanities. In this article I examine some examples of astronomical inspiration in the humanities, looking at plays, poetry and fiction. A second paper, devoted to music inspired by astronomy, will appear in a future issue of the CAPjournal.

  13. Analysing Old Testament poetry: Basic issues in contemporary exegesis

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    G. T. M. Prinsloo

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available The wealth of publications on matters relating to Old Testament poetry is witness to the fact that this subject has become a focal point in Old Testament studies. In this paper, an overview of contemporary publications is given. The basic issues, both on the level of poetic theory and practical application, are pointed out. A tendency towards a comprehensive literary approach is definitely present and should be encouraged. Only when a poem is analysed on all levels and by all means, will the richness of its meaning be appreciated.

  14. Contemporary American poetry in Slovenian criticism and translation : 1945 - 2005

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    Igor Divjak

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the Slovenian reception of five major groups in American post-war poetry -the Formalists, the Confessionals, the Beats, the Black Mountain poets, and the New York School poets - as well as the reception of those prominent authors who cannot be classified in any of these groups. The analysis reveals which groups have attracted  most interest of the Slovenian critics and translators, when was the peak of their reception, which methods of interpretation have been used by the Slovenian critics, and to what extent has their judgement about certain contemporary American authors gradually changed.

  15. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited suspension. 10.82 Section... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a... suspension. A suspension under this section will commence on the date that written notice of the suspension...

  16. Mythical Elements in Lucian Blaga’s Poetry

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    Mioara Lavinia Farcaşiu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper work approaches the issue of mythical, as it is reflected in the poetic creation of Lucian Blaga. The poet does not conceive poetry outside mythical thinking because only a mythical thinking penetrates the essence of things, beyond their logical appearances. Blaga’s poetry is consistent with the Romanian folkloric tradition and draws its sap from myth. His lyric illustrates very well what the poet himself called monumentalization of folk culture (minor culture in a major culture. In search for a creative formula, Blaga will discover expressionism. Mythical motives invented by the poet or not, can be found throughout his entire lyrical creation. Many of the mythical or folkloric motives used by Eminescu: the lake, the linden tree, the spring, the forest, the sea, Blaga has borrowed them directly from the folklore or from Eminsecu’s lyrical universe. We can also see that Blaga’s work contains a great deal of elements with a rather stable symbolic value; elements that have become literary motives known in the universal imaginary and have been rebuilt by Blaga using his own vision of the world. Thus, from the telluric register of the imaginary, we discover elements like: the mountain, the cave, the wood; from the aquatic register: the mountain lake, the spring, the fountain, the lake, the tear; then others linked to the air register: the wind, the bird.

  17. A Survey of Contemporary African American Poetry, Drama, & Fiction

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    Lilly Fernandes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of literature indicates that varying viewpoints about different elements which define contemporary African American Literature has been identified. Majority of the scholarly works on African American writing are built on foundation of culture, political oppression and the need to express their true needs. This paper explores the current trends in contemporary African American Literature by examining tenets in poetry, fiction and drama.  Through the ages African American poetry, novels and drama can be considered to a chronicle documenting the struggles of a race which has been debated, debased and their humanity violated to the fight against oppression, social and political empowerment. From the views of this paper it can be concluded that the African American writing is not simply a reflection of the chain of events that took place but was a factor in change. Most of the writers and the works which have been highlighted in this essay have shown one primary theme: the use of literature as the means to voice their anger about social and economic repression. Keywords: s

  18. Le coeur imputrescible: The Poetry for the End of Times

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    Boštjan Marko Turk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This interpretation of The Still beating heart claims that France Prešeren deliberately used the apparatus of the Christian religion in order to point out – using the doomsday analogy – what should be the most acclaimed value at the absolute end of times, i.e. – the universe of poetry. The poem, a masterpiece in every respect, blends philosophical and poetical inspirations. The text is articulated in a romantic perspective, but the philosophy of the poem’s romanticism is in turn a framework for conveying an extra-temporal message. We may assume that at the end of his creative period, France Prešeren wrote this poem in order to reveal a broader sense of his endeavour: it was the message to be delivered to future generations. The Still beating heart can be resumed as follows: at the absolute end of times a group of idealized individuals commemorates the burial of the dead, the last in the genus of homo sapiens sapiens. The last who died must seek reconciliation with the cosmic entities by offering them their heart together with the poetic activity that was symbolically concealed within it. The wheel has come full circle and the author of The Still beating heart has opined that the poetry to which he has dedicated his life was the thing of supreme value of all that was comparable in human civilization.

  19. Charity, good deeds and the poor in Serbian epic poetry

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    Petrović Sonja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of relation between the poor and the concept of charity in Serbian epic poetry is initiated as part of the research project "Ethnic and social stratification of the Balkans", which includes study of social margins and subcultures in oral literature. Charitable activities directed toward the poor are discussed as social models, but also as a complex way of social interaction between the elites and the poor, which left its mark on oral tradition and epic poetry. Care for the poor, almsgiving and charitable deeds were a religious obligation, and in the course of time, the repetitiveness and habitual character of poor relief became an important issue in structuring cultural patterns. Ethical, educative and humanistic potential of charity, and its being founded on cases witnessed in real life directly connect charity to the shaping of poetic narrative models. Epic models reflect and poeticize socio-cultural patterns and characters, which is represented both in medieval documents and in epic tradition, in similarity of their themes and formulas on the level of contents and structure. This resemblance has led to the conclusion that charitable giving, care for the poor and salvation of soul existed as specific patterns and intergeneric symbols, which were handed down in various oral and written forms.

  20. Indigenous women in Spanish American Historic Epic Poetry

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    Lise Segas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epic poetry has always been considered a masculine genre. The eruption of a group identity, masculine, white, aristocratic and christian, is the result of the representation and the exclusion of the Other, fictitious and singular, but in fact composed of a variety of ethnic groups, origins, sex, genders, religions and different degrees between fiction and historicity. Indeed, in the historical epic poetry which narrated the Conquest, except for the conquistadors listed at length and the indigenous kings and caciques, only few characters are distinguished by a historical individualisation. The Other, Amerindian and female, makes a shy entrance into history, into singularity, into the (historical and christian truth. It is the case of interpreters: Malinche and India Catalina, only historical native women that appear as part of the narrative plot as well as in the conquest enterprise in the poems of Lasso de la Vega (Cortés valeroso y Mexicana, Mexicana, of Juan de Castellanos (Elegías de varones ilustres de Indias and of Saavedra Guzmán (El peregrino indiano.

  1. "I am the book"--Deaf poets' views on signed poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-10-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when they perform their poetry, including who they aim their work at, and how their perceived audiences influence their performances. This allows us to understand more clearly what challenges audiences face when trying to understand the poetry and how the poets can help audiences meet those challenges. We find that signing poets understand how deaf audiences have been conditioned to respond to poetry, and create connections between themselves and deaf audiences by using the shared specific cultural and linguistic experiences of deaf people. Although deaf audiences are their ultimate preferred audiences, poets welcome hearing audiences, especially if their engagement with the poetry leads to increased understanding of Deaf culture or encourages them to learn sign language. The close, embodied relationship between the poet, poem, and audience makes them inseparable. Written poetry may be abstracted and contained in a book; in contrast, the signing poet is, in effect, the book. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Evaluation of the Effects of Music and Poetry in Oncologic Pain Relief: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Maurilene Andrade Lima Bacelar; Garcia, Marília Arrais; Garcia, João Batista Santos

    2016-09-01

    Various forms of art therapy have been tested as adjuvants in the treatment of physical and emotional disorders, including music and poetry. To evaluate the effect of passive listening to music and poetry on the variation in pain, depression, and hope scores. This was a randomized trial, with multiple aspects and an allocation ratio of 1:1:1, in which one group listened to music, one group listened to poetry, and another group received no intervention over a period of three days. A total of 75 adult patients experiencing pain and hospitalized in a cancer facility were included. The study was conducted over a period of three months. The primary outcome consisted of pain evaluation using a Visual Analog Scale, and the secondary outcomes consisted of evaluations of depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and hope (Herth Hope Scale). The final sample consisted of 65 participants, with 22 in the music group, 22 in the poetry group, and 21 controls. Music promoted an improvement in pain (p pain (p music and poetry groups and the control group after the study was only observed for the pain outcome (p music and poetry produced a similar improvement in the pain intensity. The two therapies also affected depression scores, and only poetry increased hope scores. Further investigation of the effects and comparisons between the two therapies should be performed.

  3. Finding the Words to Say It: The Healing Power of Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Carroll

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available My purpose in this paper is to help you experience for yourself the potential of poetry to heal by feeling its power through your own voice. Many people have an intuitive sense that voice in general and poetry in particular can be healing. We have all experienced the comfort of soothing words. Finding the words to articulate a traumatic experience can bring relief. A letter between friends who are fighting can heal a relational wound. People are frequently moved to write a poem in times of extremity. In mainstream culture there are subjects that are not talked about. They are taboo. For example, each of us is going to die, but we do not talk about dying. We are all in the dialogue of illness, death and dying, whether or not we are talking about it. Poetry gives us ways to talk about it. Multiple ways of utilizing poetry for healing, growth and transformation will be presented including the Poetry and Brain Cancer project at UCLA. Particular attention will be given to issues of Palliative care. The reader will be directed to the scientific evidence of the efficacy of utilizing expressive writing. The developing professional field of Poetry Therapy, and The National Association for Poetry Therapy will be discussed.

  4. Finding the Words to Say It: The Healing Power of Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Robert

    2005-06-01

    My purpose in this paper is to help you experience for yourself the potential of poetry to heal by feeling its power through your own voice. Many people have an intuitive sense that voice in general and poetry in particular can be healing. We have all experienced the comfort of soothing words. Finding the words to articulate a traumatic experience can bring relief. A letter between friends who are fighting can heal a relational wound. People are frequently moved to write a poem in times of extremity. In mainstream culture there are subjects that are not talked about. They are taboo. For example, each of us is going to die, but we do not talk about dying. We are all in the dialogue of illness, death and dying, whether or not we are talking about it. Poetry gives us ways to talk about it. Multiple ways of utilizing poetry for healing, growth and transformation will be presented including the Poetry and Brain Cancer project at UCLA. Particular attention will be given to issues of Palliative care. The reader will be directed to the scientific evidence of the efficacy of utilizing expressive writing. The developing professional field of Poetry Therapy, and The National Association for Poetry Therapy will be discussed.

  5. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension. ...

  6. Peritraumatic fear, helplessness and horror and peritraumatic dissociation: do physical and cognitive symptoms of panic mediate the relationship between the two?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikretoglu, Deniz; Brunet, Alain; Best, Suzanne R; Metzler, Thomas J; Delucchi, Kevin; Weiss, Daniel S; Fagan, Jeffrey; Liberman, Akiva; Marmar, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine whether panic mediates the relationship between fear, helplessness, and horror (PTSD criterion A2) and dissociation at the time of trauma. The study sample included 709 police officers and 317 peer-nominated civilians who had been exposed to a variety of critical incidents. Participants filled out measures of critical incident exposure, PTSD criterion A2, panic, and dissociation. Results indicate that together, physical and cognitive symptoms of panic completely mediate the relationship between criterion A2 and dissociation in civilians, and partially mediate that relationship in police. These results provide support for the idea that panic mediates the relationship between fear, helplessness, and horror (criterion A2) and dissociation at the time of trauma. The results also raise the possibility, however, that the mediational role of panic may be further moderated by additional variables.

  7. 'No me digas nada: yo te diré quién eres': El engranaje de la estereotipa y el horror ocampianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Zapata

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available En los cuentos de Silvina Ocampo, el horror y el humor resultan a menudo indisociables. En cada una de sus versiones (chiste, parodia, sátira el rasgo de humor conjura el efecto perturbador que produce la aparición súbita del motivo de horror. El estereotipo, componente esencial de la sátira ocampiana, juega con la ambigüedad, tanto a nivel de los personajes como para el alcance pragmático de los relatos. Potencialmente peligroso y despreciable, el estereotipo es fuente de cohesión social: cuando, privados de conocimientos empíricos, nos remitimos a fuentes de segunda mano y asimilamos imágenes de manera indiscriminada porque “así lo quiere la tradición”, apelamos al estereotipo, que nos conforta en la sensación de pertenecer a un cuerpo social solidario... y nos aleja del cuerpo. A nivel de los textos ocampianos, para que el estereotipo sea eficaz y logre hacer reír a pesar de la presencia obvia del horror (cuerpos deformes, crímenes, violaciones... debe poder ser reconocido por un público advertido. Sin embargo, el vértigo que produce la oscilación entre lo familiar y lo que “no soy yo” alcanzará probablemente también a un lector extranjero

  8. A poesia ‘é-sou’ negra = Negro poetry

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    José Pires Laranjeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Os diversos cânones da poesia brasileira não contemplam a poesia negrobrasileira como deveria ser. Sendo o poeta Luiz Gama ainda hoje menosprezado, em comparação com Castro Alves, é necessário, pois, colocá-lo no seu verdadeiro lugar de significação. Porém, esse esforço deve servir também para compreender que Gama, na sua poesia, ainda mostra alguma conformidade com certos preconceitos rácicos próprios do século XIX e que se encontram, por exemplo, em poetas angolanos. Já o poeta Solano Trindade, devido à sua formação ideologicamente comprometida com os pobres e miseráveis da sociedade, trata o negro como um ser social, econômico e cultural de corpointeiro, concepção aprofundada por Cuti, que, finalmente, deixa de apelidar o mestiço de mulato, segundo a conformidade com o Movimento Negro. Por outro lado, é um poeta da modernidade mais avançada, quer formalmente, quer atingindo o âmago do subconsciente negro, ao versar o seu sofrimento íntimo, de modo inédito. Brazilian poetry’s several literary canons fail to fully investigate Brazilian Black Poetry as it should be. In spite of the fact that the poet Luiz Gama is currently not in the limelight when compared to Castro Alves, the replacing of his real place of significance is actually worthwhile. This effort should also be needed to understand that Gama in his poetry shows a type of conformity with certain racial bias common in the 19th century as, for example, in the poetry of Angola. On the other hand, due to his ideologically committed ideology with the poor and destitute in society, the poet Solano Trindade deals with the Negro as a social, economical and cultural person. This concept is partook by Cuti who, at long last, do not call the half-breed as ‘mulato’, following orientations of the Negro Movement. On the other hand, he is formally poet featuring themost advanced modernity as he reaches the heart of the Negro subconscious in his singing of deep

  9. Affinity for Poetry and Aesthetic Appreciation of Joyful and Sad Poems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Maria; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Artworks with sad and affectively negative content have repeatedly been reported to elicit positive aesthetic appreciation. This topic has received much attention both in the history of poetics and aesthetics as well as in recent studies on sad films and sad music. However, poetry and aesthetic evaluations of joyful and sad poetry have received only little attention in empirical studies to date. We collected beauty and liking ratings for 24 sad and 24 joyful poems from 128 participants. Following previous studies, we computed an integrated measure for overall aesthetic appreciation based on the beauty and liking ratings to test for differences in appreciation between joyful and sad poems. Further, we tested whether readers' judgments are related to their affinity for poetry. Results show that sad poems are rated significantly higher for aesthetic appreciation than joyful poems, and that aesthetic appreciation is influenced by the participants' affinity for poetry.

  10. Problems in Translating Musical Elements in African American Poetry after 1950

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    Kristina Kočan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, African American poetry eschews traditional literary norms. Contemporary African American poets tend to ignore grammatical rules, use unusual typography on many occasions, include much of their cultural heritage in their poetry, and interweave musical elements into literary genres. The influence of such musical genres as jazz, blues, soul, and gospel, together with the dilemmas that occur for the translator, will be shown to great extent, since music, like black speech, is a major part of African American culture and literature. The translator will have to maintain the specific African American rhythm, blues adaptations and the improvisational language under the jazz impact. The paper presents the problems in translating post-1950 African American poetry into Slovene, and asks to what extent can one successfully transfer the musical elements within this poetry for the target culture? Inevitably, it will identify a share of elements that are lost in translation.

  11. The figure of the mother in the English poetry by Rose Auslander

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    Vikyrchak Iryna Oleksandrivna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the English poetry of a well-known German-language poet Rose Auslander. Through the example of three poems from the English-language book “The Forbidden Tree” the article analyses the figure of the mother. The English poetry belongs to the third period of Auslander's writing; it was also post-traumatic period in her life: experiences of Chernivtsi ghetto and the death of her mother left a deep scar in the soul of the poetess and caused the change of the language in the poet’s creativity. The search of the contact with her mother through the poetry – despair, hope for the reunion with her native German language, and with Bukovina are the main motifs accompanying the figure of the mother in Auslander's poetry of this period.

  12. The Mechanic Eye: North American Visual Poetry in the Digital Age

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    Maria Goicoechea de Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2012v8n1p78 This paper offers a revision of North American visual poetry from the contemporary perspective of the digital revolution. From the Native American chants to the digital poetry found on the Web, it will explore the internal drives of this sort of poetic manifestations that have endured through different time periods, aesthetic currents and cultural functions despite the various mediums employed for their production and dissemination. Digital poetry nourishes itself from previous literary traditions as well as from the multimedia convergence favored by the digital medium. We will analyze these influences, and the new reading strategies required to contextualize and make sense out of the digital work of poetry. As readers and writers reorganize their reading pacts, researchers of literature face a new challenge: the polymorphic and metamorphosing liquid text made possible by the digital language

  13. Stereotype notions of the moon in the language of the German poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Дмитрий Сергеевич Трынков

    2010-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of the German stereotype of the moon in the language of the German poetry. The stereotype characteristic is verified in consequence of the analysis of some traditional poetical figurative meanings.

  14. Stereotype notions of the moon in the language of the German poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дмитрий Сергеевич Трынков

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the German stereotype of the moon in the language of the German poetry. The stereotype characteristic is verified in consequence of the analysis of some traditional poetical figurative meanings.

  15. Trailing the Growth from Nativism to Africanity in Lusophone African Poetry

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    Sovon Sanyal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Article explored the development of African poetry, that is from nativism to be Africanity, in Lusophone African poetries. The study used library research by analysing the impact of printing press, public education, and freedom of expression emergences toward literary activities in Portuguese colonies in Africa. In this regard ethnological and historical studies on the colonies had an important role to play for the later development of nationalism among the colonised African peoples. Article’s discussion concerned with describing proper literary activities in Portuguese began in the Lusophone countries of Africa, poetry characterization by the “black” and “white” presentations, added by some example of poetries. It can be concluded the problematic of colour is present in African poems in Portuguese right from its inception, The common purpose of the nineteenth century Lusophone African poets was to discover the regional cultural history and identity, which was denied to them for centuries by the foreign rulers. 

  16. Poetry as a Means for the Structuring of a Social Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomringer, Eugen

    1976-01-01

    Reviews the interrelationships between concrete poetry, industrial design and the plastic arts over the past fifteen years to illustrate the sort of team work necessary if poets are to have an active voice in our contemporary society. (Author/HOD)

  17. Harold Bloom's Charge that Multiculturalism in American Poetry Is a Mask for Mediocrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanni, Nikki; Aubert, Alvin; Hernton, Calvin; Moore, Leonard D.

    1998-01-01

    Yale professor Harold Bloom has concluded that cultural guilt has resulted in a 30-year intellectual decline in which politics has come to dominate U.S. poetry. Four leading African-American poets comment critically on Bloom's conclusions. (SLD)

  18. Borders and boundaries in Northern Ireland and the poetry of Seamus Heaney

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    Ruben Moi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses the borders and boundaries between the poetry of Seamus Heaney, the 1995 Nobel Laureate from Northern Ireland, and the Troubles of the border-riven society from which it stems.

  19. The Dionysian value and musicality in performatic poetry. Case of Joyelle McSweeney

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    Sabrina Salomón

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the philosophy of Nietzsche regarding music and words, and proposes to establish relationships between his arguments on the musical experience, and the performance poetry of Joyelle McSweeney. In short, performance poetry is a type of contemporary poetry written to be read aloud with the most primitive and ritualistic actions of the body and the senses. Thus, the author constructs a poetic universe that aims to unsettle the reader, to ironically deconstruct the syntactic bases of language and to exploit vocalic, musical and rhythmic possibilities of expression in reading. In this sense, this paper justifies the value of music as the highest art (as conceived by Nietzsche in his works The Birth of Tragedy, and the fragment “On Music and Words”, as well as it observes its role in McSweeney´s poetry and its effect on the listener.

  20. "what's the use of poetry..." : [luuletused] / Jürgen Rooste ; tlk. Eric Dickens

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rooste, Jürgen, 1979-

    2006-01-01

    "what's the use of poetry..." ; "in danish town rivers are flowing..." ; "at work..." ; "WILL YOU LOVE ME UNTIL THE EDGE OF ETERNETY...". Orig.: "milleks on vaja luulet..." ; "töö juures..." ; "KASSA ARMASTAD MIND IGAVIKU ÄÄRENI..."