WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspense horror poetry

  1. Rediscovering Horror – From Graveyard Poetry to Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Musap

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Horror: A Literary History, edited by Xavier Aldana Reyes, is divided into seven chapters which function as separate essays that can be read without having specific knowledge about the horror genre. If read systematically, the book presents an anthological review which establishes the continuity of the genre from 1764 to the early twenty-first century. Even though it privileges theory over textual analysis, the book can be used to elucidate numerous cultural productions and developments that have influenced the simultaneous evolution and devolution of horror by offering a precise insight into the continual interaction of social and literary spheres. Horror: A Literary History is valuable precisely because it questions the devalorizing stances towards the horror genre by acknowledging the importance of various writers who have contributed to the evolution of American and British literature but have often been marginalized because of their tendencies to transgress into the horror genre.

  2. Rediscovering Horror – From Graveyard Poetry to Popular Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Musap, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Horror: A Literary History, edited by Xavier Aldana Reyes, is divided into seven chapters which function as separate essays that can be read without having specific knowledge about the horror genre. If read systematically, the book presents an anthological review which establishes the continuity of the genre from 1764 to the early twenty-first century. Even though it privileges theory over textual analysis, the book can be used to elucidate numerous cultural productions and developments that ...

  3. Enactive Horror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    to facilitate immersion and the elicitation of negative emotions ranging from disgust to fear in costumers. In contrast to observational horror (e.g. in literature and film), which situates audiences as passive observers, haunts position visitors as active participants in live-action horror scenarios. Haunts...

  4. Sex and Horror

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The combination of sex and horror may be disquieting to many, but the two are natural (if perhaps gruesome) bedfellows. In fact, sex and horror coincide with such regularity in contemporary horror fiction that the two concepts appear to be at least partially intertwined. The sex–horror relationship is sometimes connotative rather than overt; examples of this relationship range from the seduction overtones of 'Nosferatu' and the juxtaposition of nudity and horror promised by European exploitat...

  5. Horror films and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Forcen, Fernando Espi; Shand, John Preston

    2014-10-01

    Horror films have been popular for generations. The purpose of this article is to illustrate psychiatric conditions, themes and practice seen in horror films. Horror films often either include psychiatrists as characters or depict (Hollywood's dangerous version of) serious mental illness. Demonic possession, zombies, and 'slasher' killers are described, as well as the horror genre's characterizations of psychiatrists. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  6. The Humor in Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Cosette

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of horror fiction for teenagers focuses on the element of humor. Topics include parodies, plots, the element of mystery, cover art, end-of-chapter cliffhangers, and formula books. An annotated list of 10 pertinent titles is included. (LRW)

  7. Narrating horror: the horror film as cultural construct

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, Simon

    1997-01-01

    This thesis examines horror films through an application of cultural analysis (primarily the work of Pierre Bourdieu) to selected texts in order to answer critics employing psychoanalytic perspectives to horror. It argues that psychoanalysis misses much of the heart of horror texts through its claims that textual 'meaning' lies within individuals rather than in the society in which horror texts were produced.\\ud Bourdieu's hypotheses are applied to films, along with the work of more specific ...

  8. Three paradigms of horror

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Ognjanović

    2016-01-01

    Starting with the definition of horror as a literary genre the core story of which is based on a meeting with threatening Otherness whose influx into consensual reality and it’s tacit normality creates unrest and awakens fear in the protagonists and the audience, this paper defines the three key paradigms of the horror genre, based on the causes of fear, or rather the “monstrous” Otherness in them. Paradigm 1 concerns the “fear of one’s own self”: the root of the fear is inside, in the indivi...

  9. Three paradigms of horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Ognjanović

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the definition of horror as a literary genre the core story of which is based on a meeting with threatening Otherness whose influx into consensual reality and it’s tacit normality creates unrest and awakens fear in the protagonists and the audience, this paper defines the three key paradigms of the horror genre, based on the causes of fear, or rather the “monstrous” Otherness in them. Paradigm 1 concerns the “fear of one’s own self”: the root of the fear is inside, in the individual psyche, in the split, deceived, or in some other way unreliable self which is, consciously or unconsciously, harmful to others, and ultimately to itself. Paradigm 2 deals with the “Fear of others”: the root of fear is outside and is concerned with other people and other creatures which have an urge to occupy a certain human microcosm. Paradigm 3 is concerned with the “Fear of the numinous”: the root of the fear is mostly situated on the outside; however its shape is amorphous, ambivalent and unknowable. The “monster” is faceless; it touches on primary forces of the divine/demonic, and as such is situated on the very border between inside/outside. All three paradigms, with their main approaches and constitutive elements, are modulated through two basic possible treatments: the conservative and the progressive (liberal, which affords a total of six basic variations of horror. Starting from definitions given by John Carpenter, Robin Wood and his own, the author analyzes representative examples from horror literature and film for each paradigm and its variation, with a special accent on the image of Otherness and its connection to the norm, its intrusion into the status quo, anthropocentrism and the presence or absence of a happy ending. The paper demonstrates the richness of connotative potential within the horror genre and provides a basis for its taxonomy.

  10. Creating Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  11. Poetry corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Eric P

    2018-05-01

    Presents a piece of poetry by A. A. Milne who is now best known as the author of the Winnie the Pooh (1926) book but was quite well reputed before its publication for his plays and his poetry, including collections such as When We Were Very Young (1924). The style of "Veridical Perception" will be familiar to any who have read his work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. A New Poetry Anew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumman, Bob

    1994-01-01

    Classifies the various forms that exist in a type of poetry dubbed "burstnorm" poetry, a form of lyrical poetry. Differentiates burstnorm from two other types, "plaintext" and "songmode poetry." Describes three types of burstnorm poetry: surrealistic, pluraesthetic, and language poetry. Discusses further subtypes of…

  13. Rich and Strange: The Yuppie Horror Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Barry Keith

    1996-01-01

    States that many critics concerned with genre theory deny that the genres of horror and science fiction are flexible and adaptable. Discusses a group of recent American horror films that present a distinct variation of the horror film, including "Fatal Attraction,""Single White Female," and "After Hours." Concludes…

  14. Religious and Sacred Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Czasopismo poświęcone poezji religijnej i sakralnej, edukacji, religii, kulturze i wychowaniu. The Periodical is dedicated to religious poetry and sacred poetry, education, religion, culture and upbringing.

  15. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the annual annotated list of the best science fiction, fantasy, and horror titles for teens that have been reviewed in this journal. Also includes a sidebar with four annotated titles of nonfiction resources related to science fiction, fantasy, and horror. (LRW)

  16. Adolescents' Motivations for Viewing Graphic Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Deirdre D.

    1995-01-01

    Identifies four motivations adolescents report for viewing graphic horror films: gore watching, thrill watching, independent watching, and problem watching. Argues that viewing motivations are predictors of responses to graphic horror. Finds that viewing motivations were related to viewers' cognitive and affective responses and a tendency to…

  17. Intra-Diegetic Cameras as Cinematic Actor Assemblages in Found Footage Horror Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødje, Kjetil

    2017-01-01

    that comprises what is commonly known as human actors as well as material entities that play an active part in motion picture images. The use of intra-diegetic cameras in contemporary found footage horror films constitutes a particular case of such cinematic actor assemblages. Through a dynamic relational...... performance, cameras here take on roles as active agents with the potential to affect other elements within the images as well as the films’ audiences. In found footage horror the assemblage mode of operation creates suspense, since the vulnerability of the camera threatens the viewer's access to the depicted...... events. While human characters and individual entities making up the camera assemblage are disposable, the recording is not. Found footage horror crucially hinges upon the survival of the footage. I will further suggest that these films allow filmmakers to experiment with the acting capabilities of intra...

  18. The Opportunity of Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, Per; Grisoni, Louise

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on a radio broadcast about the use of poetry in research, management and organization. It describes the approaches in which poetry has influenced organization and management. The implications of the interrelations among poetry, organization, management and research are also hi...

  19. The Creation, Evolution and Aftermath of Lovecraftian Horror

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodrati, Negin

    2013-01-01

    There is a newly-coined genre of horror literature called “Lovecraftian horror.” However, this type of horror has been lurking in modern horror fiction and various productions of arts and entertainment for over half a century. H. P. Lovecraft—whom the genre is named after—was one of the undeniable masters of modern horror fiction. He created a unique form of horror referred to as “cosmic horror” which is the main ingredient for the creation of this genre of horror. This thesis introduces and ...

  20. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror

    OpenAIRE

    Melinda Hall

    2016-01-01

    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, ...

  1. Use of a horror film in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, J M; Derdeyn, A P

    1990-11-01

    Modern improvements in the technology of cinematic special effects have ushered in a new genre of vivid and graphic horror film. The numerous sequels of these films attest to their popularity among adolescents and young adults. Considerable concern has arisen on the part of parents, professionals, and policymakers regarding adverse effects of these films upon children. The authors discuss the meaning of a horror film to a troubled 13-year-old boy and describe the use of the film in his psychotherapy. The modern horror film serves many of the same functions for the adolescent that the traditional fairy tale serves for the younger child.

  2. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 81 science fiction, fantasy, and horror genre titles that were judged best-reads by reviewers in "Voice of Youth Advocates" from June 2001 through April 2002. (LRW)

  3. Can an Evolutionary Analysis Dissolve the Paradox of Horror?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, Jens; Clasen, Mathias; Johnson, John

    The paradox of horror” is the problem of why so many people are motivated to experience the negative emotions induced by horror media. In this talk, we argue that an evolutionary analysis may dissolve the paradox of horror. From an evolutionary perspective, horror may be analyzed as a simulation...... technology that allows users to attain adaptive experience with perceived threat and negative emotion in a safe environment. The argument is supported by results from a comprehensive MTurk survey of American users of horror media (n=1,071). Results include findings on the personal details (e.g., sex......), supernatural beliefs (e.g., paranormal beliefs), personality traits (e.g., Big Five), horror genre preferences (e.g., supernatural versus natural horror), and horror-induced emotional responses of users of horror media. The strongest individual predictors of horror media enjoyment are sex (male preference...

  4. Horror from the Soul--Gothic Style in Allan Poe's Horror Fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe made tremendous contribution to horror fiction. Poe's inheritance of gothic fiction and American literature tradition combined with his living experience forms the background of his horror fictions. He inherited the tradition of the gothic fictions and made innovations on it, so as to penetrate to subconsciousness. Poe's horror…

  5. Gangs and guilt: Towards a new theory of horror film

    OpenAIRE

    Kord, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The most basic and unanimous statement made in scholarship on horror films is that horror films are ‘about’ fear: the primary purpose of horror films is to scare viewers. Based on horror films from the 1970s until the present in which child gangs play a significant part, this essay advances a new theory of horror film, namely that horror films primarily seek to elicit not fear but guilt. The analysis focuses on four topics: themes, camera angles, horror’s cinematic casting of ‘abnormality,’ a...

  6. A Poetry Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary

    Intended to impart the basic ways a poem is constructed, this concise handbook is a prose guide to writing poetry. The handbook talks about meter and rhyme, form and diction, sound and sense, iambs and trochees, couplets and sonnets, and how and why this should matter to any person writing or reading poetry. Interspersing history and analysis with…

  7. Dialogues on Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in this volume pose is whether this match of mediatization and new sensibilities can be seen as a major novel development in the history of poetry. With the title Dialogues on Poetry we wish to signal that the answer to this question can only be pursued through the ongoing process involved in defining...

  8. Horror fusionis: a report of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutstein, R P; Bessant, B

    1996-12-01

    Horror fusionis is an uncommon anomaly and is rarely reported in the literature. Five adults with long-standing diplopia associated with horror fusionis were examined. All patients had strabismus since early childhood and had been treated at that time either with surgery, occlusion, and/or orthoptics/vision therapy. Prisms could not eliminate the diplopia. Graded occlusion was attempted with one patient but was not tolerated. Another patient with an asymmetrical dissociated vertical deviation could ignore the second image by fixating with the eye with the smaller deviation. Two patients reported the diplopia becoming less noticeable over the years. Because of its poor prognosis, the diplopia associated with horror fusionis must be differentiated from other types of diplopia occurring in adults with childhood onset strabismus.

  9. Recreational Terror: Postmodern Elements of the Contemporary Horror Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Isabel

    1996-01-01

    States that the boundaries of any genre are slippery, but this is particularly true of the postmodern horror film, since the definition of postmodern is itself blurry. Argues that postmodern horror films include films from 1968 onward. Defines postmodernism and the characteristics of postmodern horror, including violence, violation of boundaries,…

  10. The Horror! The Horror! Using Science to Take the Fright out of Scary Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.

    2017-12-01

    Science and nature both play significant roles in delivering the scares in many of our favorite horror films. However, when viewed through a scientific lens, many of the frights fade away. The goal in analyzing the science behind these films is not to take the fun away. The goal is to help reassure ourselves that the horrors we just witnessed are not technically possible, and we can sleep tight. This presentation will discuss some of our favorite and most infamous horror films and creepy creatures, and why the bogus science is often the scariest thing about them.

  11. Poetry Workshop. Weave Poetry Through Your Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Bee

    1998-01-01

    Presents a poetry across-the-curriculum activity designed to help primary school students build word-recognition skills and an appreciation for the natural world. Students read a poem about polliwogs aloud, discuss the sounds, examine spelling patterns, and investigate scientific details about polliwogs. The poem, "Polliwogs" is included. (SM)

  12. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  13. Poetry and Poster Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Dina

    1993-01-01

    Describes a school library media project for teaching poetry in which fifth-grade students write and illustrate a poem and produce a poster using the PosterPrinter machine. Suggestions for additional activities are included. (EAM)

  14. Poetry Experiment 1965

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2019-01-01

    POEX 65 was a transdisciplinary experiment and event which took place in Copenhagen December 10-20, 1965. Short for ’POetry EXperiment’, POEX 65 was an exhibition event curated and created by Danish artist Knud Hvidberg (1948-91). It aimed at breaking the boundaries of artgenres, the false devision...... of professional and amateur, as well as the autonomy of the ‘work of art’ through the active use of technological and mediated platforms such as Flexowriters, Punch Paper Poetry, and Electronic Visual Music. As such, it was a very important event in Scandinavian media art history with more than 80 participants...... from 5 countries – from as different field as Conceptual Art, Electronic Music, Modern Jazz Poetry, Fluxus, Performance Art, Modern Dance, Concrete Poetry, Poesie Sonore etc... Nevertheless, POEX 65 somehow was forgotten – and almost erased from the academic memory and public archives. In 1990s POEX 65...

  15. Gaming Horror’s horror: Representation, Regulation and Affect in Horror Videogames

    OpenAIRE

    Krzywinska, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    This position article outlines a personal perspective on the way that Horror games create affect in a complex play between representation and performance and that, in some cases, operate against the usual Vitruvian coordinates of games that are used in order to work with the types of affect associated with pleasure, agency and assuredness. The author argues that against the usual informative pleasures of self-affirmation and a clockwork universe, Horror games configured against normative game...

  16. Rediscovering the Joy of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Katherine Keil, a high school English teacher, has developed an approach that goes beyond simply teaching poetry to creating classrooms that celebrate poetry in order to overcome the fear of poetry in students and the teacher. She encourages students to play with language, publishes student's work to a web site and models the writing process…

  17. Teaching Horror Literature in a Multicultural Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Matek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As a genre, horror tends to be marginalized in literature classes because it is often mistakenly perceived to be inappropriate for the classroom environment due to the intensive emotional effects that the genre’s typical macabre motifs and topics may produce in the reader. However, this paper argues that, for two reasons, horror texts represent a valid and important addition to a literary syllabus. First, they typically have a positive impact on the students’ increased interest in reading, which is, in the pedagogical and scholarly sense, a desirable activity. Second, they tend to contribute significantly to the development of empathy with and tolerance for others, which is an especially valuable learning outcome in a multicultural classroom characterized by implied intercultural communication.

  18. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Hall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically support ableist assumptions, can be used to subvert ableism and open space for alternative social and political thinking about disability. I point to the work of Tim Burton and Stephen King to demonstrate these possibilities in horror.

  19. REFLECTIONS OF POLITICAL EVENT'S IN HORROR MOVIES

    OpenAIRE

    ŞİMŞEK, Gizem

    2014-01-01

    Social events have affected humans throughout the history of humanity causing the formation of many new movements and thoughts. Film industry, being the seventh art form, has also been affected by current social and political events thereby becoming transformed just like all other art forms. Horror movies which were first seen along with the first examples of movies in time became a genre by itself thanks to Hollywood and includes many film varieties that best reflect these transformations. ...

  20. REFLECTIONS OF POLITICAL EVENT'S IN HORROR MOVIES

    OpenAIRE

    ŞİMŞEK, Gizem

    2013-01-01

    Social events have affected humans throughout the history of humanity causing the formation of many new movements and thoughts. Film industry, being the seventh art form, has also been affected by current social and political events thereby becoming transformed just like all other art forms. Horror movies which were first seen along with the first examples of movies in time became a genre by itself thanks to Hollywood and includes many film varieties that best reflect these transformations. ...

  1. Poetry, philosophy, political

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pucheu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering how persistently a certain amount of specialized critics work to diminish contemporary Brazilian poetry, this essay seeks to conceive an articulation among poetry, philosophy and politics. We atempt to do that, on the one hand, through the philosophical concepts of aporia and wonder (thaumazein, and, on the another hand, by considering what Giorgio Agamben refers to as “an insurmontable disjunction between whatever singularity and the State organization”. Among the many poets that could be approached in this context, we chose to close the text with an interpretation some of Tarso de Melo's remarkably and explicitly political poems.

  2. Performing poetry slam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweppenhäuser, Jakob; Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard

    2017-01-01

    – namely the contemporary Western literary poetry reading and a literary network, on the one side, and, on the other side, the rap battle connected to hip hop culture (other genres, such as e.g. stand-up comedy, could also have been drawn into the discussion, but in order to clarify our argument we have...... chosen to keep focus on the two mentioned). The article builds on a generalised perspective negotiating poetry slam as an aesthetic and cultural phenomenon in between hip hop culture and literary culture, but it also includes a close reading/listening aspect deriving from a specific example, namely...

  3. Cunts, Dicks, and Postfeminist Politics: Torture-Porn, the Horror Heroine, and Hostel II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    about the new horror heroine in contemporary horror and the torture porn aesthetics, espcially in Hostel II......about the new horror heroine in contemporary horror and the torture porn aesthetics, espcially in Hostel II...

  4. The children's horror film : characterizing an 'impossible' subgenre

    OpenAIRE

    Lester, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between children and horror is fraught with tension, with children typically assumed to be vulnerable, impressionable, and in need of protection from horrific media lest they become “corrupted” by it. Despite this, a number of horror films intended specifically for the child demographic have been made since the 1980s. This paper situates the children’s horror sub-genre in a generic and industrial context and addresses the key issues that its existence raises: the development ...

  5. Bringing poetry into staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie

    2002-01-01

    "Quello che mai fue detto d'alfcuna," words from Dante, "strive to say which was never said by anyone." This is the art of true verbal expression, the essence of poetry. Poet W. H. Auden once wrote that "poetry can open spaces of meaning for the human spirit that is more intimate to other human beings than it is to ourselves" (Auden, 1968). Poetry has many definitions. To some, it is the rhythmic verse they remember from grade school or from Mother Goose. To others, poetry is a verse of meter and measure, of balance and harmony. However, to most individuals, poetry is the ultimate expression of human emotion. Roy (1999) believed that nursing is in need of poetry, in order to evoke the deepest of images, fears, questions, and quests of the human spirit and the nursing profession. This article examines the use of poetry and how it might be incorporated into staff education.

  6. Developing Awareness through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeming, Robert F., Ed.

    This booklet contains the proceedings of a seminar in which poets demonstrated through readings and analysis of their works how poetry, combining appeals to both reason and emotion, can develop and refine individual awareness of the world and nature around us. The primary participants in the program were Bruce Cutler, Dolores Kendrick, and May…

  7. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  8. Experience, Poetry and Truth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gahrn-Andersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    of philosophical thinking. Specifically, I show that, beneath a highly poetic and obscure prose, Jünger posits how subjective experience and poetry allow individuals to realize truth. I relate parts of Jünger’s insights to contributions by Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, arguing that Jünger offers a unique...

  9. Psychoanalysis as poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Jeanine M

    2013-12-01

    Like psychoanalysis, poetry is possible because of the nature of verbal language, particularly its potentials to evoke the sensations of lived experience. These potentials are vestiges of the personal relational context in which language is learned, without which there would be no poetry and no psychoanalysis. Such a view of language infuses psychoanalytic writings on poetry, yet has not been fully elaborated. To further that elaboration, a poem by Billy Collins is presented to illustrate the sensorial and imagistic potentials of words, after which the interpersonal processes of language development are explored in an attempt to elucidate the original nature of words as imbued with personal meaning, embodied resonance, and emotion. This view of language and the verbal form allows a fuller understanding of the therapeutic processes of speech and conversation at the heart of psychoanalysis, including the relational potentials of speech between present individuals, which are beyond the reach of poetry. In one sense, the work of the analyst is to create language that mobilizes the experiential, memorial, and relational potentials of words, and in so doing to make a poet out of the patient so that she too can create such language.

  10. Movie Smoking, Movie Horror, and Urge to Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARGENT, James D.; MARUSKA, Karin; MORGENSTERN, Matthis; ISENSEE, Barbara; HANEWINKEL, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    It is known that exposure to smoking cues increases urge to smoke (UTS), but little is known about other media factors that might also increase UTS. We hypothesized that horror/thriller movies might also increase UTS by increasing negative affect. We surveyed 536 movie patrons who were smokers aged 18 years or older. Subjects had exited 26 movies, of which 12 contained smoking and two were horror films, one with and one without smoking. We used random effects regression to assess the association between exposure to movie smoking, movie horror, both and UTS, controlling for confounding factors. Median age was 26 years and 52% were female. Mean UTS was 5.9, 6.6, 6.6, and 8.7 for smokers exiting movies without smoking, with smoking, horror without smoking and horror with smoking respectively. Smoking in movies was associated with a significantly higher UTS (0.63 [95% CI 0.31–0.94]). Horror with smoking increased UTS by 2.8 points (95% C.I. 2.3, 3.5); the horror without smoking estimate was 0.88, but not statistically significant. This short report offers preliminary evidence that movie horror as one factor besides visual smoking cues that could increase UTS in a community setting. PMID:20301876

  11. Thinking/Feeling: Emotion, Spectatorship, and the Pedagogy of Horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Allison

    2014-01-01

    When teaching horror films, where the primary texts are created to frighten and disturb their audiences, instructors often find it challenging to find pedagogical strategies that are at once effective and responsible. For students not accustomed to horror, the shocking nature of the texts can sometimes be difficult to handle, while even the horror…

  12. To the problem of attraction of horror films

    OpenAIRE

    Gusak K. S.; Irushkina E. O.; Antipov M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper is devoted to very interesting problem – problem of attraction of horror films. The authors disclose the reasons of appeal of horror films from the different viewpoints: viewpoint of physiology, viewpoint of Kierkegaard’s philosophy of fear, viewpoint of psychoanalytic theory and viewpoint of the philosophy of postmodernism.

  13. Bricoleurs in Preschool: Girls Poaching Horror Media and Gendered Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henward, Allison S.; MacGillivray, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Children's experiences and understandings are often marginalised in discussions of their own television viewing. Moreover, rarely is attention paid to the meaning children make "from" and "with" the ideas and images in media, much less in horror movies. This inquiry examines the horror media talk of a preschool girl in a poor…

  14. Rap Poetry and Postmodernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Molokov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article observes several most significant rap albums of this decade within postmodern literature. Today rap culture ceased to be a sort of “outsider” in academic opinion, because of its influences on the culture and art innovations. We study albums as literary objects according to literary aesthetic theories and principles, display the main postmodern features they have, and analyze the role of rap poetry within postmodernism in general. The results suggest that rap poetry is postmodern not only musically, but also lyrically, as an object of literature. The rap music embodies all the postmodern traits and synthesizes them within the syntheses of music and literature and high art and pop culture.

  15. Tapping the Power of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    "I have become increasingly convinced that poetry offers one of the best-and often most underused--resources for developing literacy foundations," writes Timothy Rasinski. Poetry and songs are typically short and easy to learn, provide opportunities for students to play with the sounds of language, and offer an engaging way to learn…

  16. The Poetry of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the poetry of John Dewey, 101 poems in total. Characteristic of the rhymed and metered poetry of the period, they show a very human side of Dewey. This analysis argues that many of his poems deal with existential themes--love, finitude, and God, for example. On a deeper level these poems are also show connections to Dewey's…

  17. Uncanny behaviour in survival horror games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinwell, Angela; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Williams, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    . The results indicate that attributes of motion and sound do exaggerate the uncanny phenomenon and how frightening that character is perceived to be. Strong correlations were identified for the perceived strangeness of a character with how human-like a character?s voice sounded, how human-like the facial...... expression appeared and how synchronized the character?s sound was with lip movement; characters rated as the least synchronized were perceived to be the most frightening. Based on the results of this study, this article seeks to define an initial set of hypotheses for the fear-evoking aspects of character...... facial rendering and vocalization in survival horror games that can be used by game designers seeking to increase the fear factor in the genre, and that will form the basis of further experiments, which, it is hoped, will lead to a conceptual framework for the uncanny....

  18. Astronomy and Poetry (overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samvelyan, David

    2016-12-01

    Through this work we have tried to show how astronomy penetrates into the poetry of different periods in time and in various poets' works all over the world. The following work has significant cognitive value, demonstrates and reveals the general nature of certain poets' astronomical ideas and provides a brief analysis in some cases. As a result, we have come to the conclusion that astronomy with all its components such as the sky, our solar system and phenomena such as these have always been a source of inspiration for those who create works of art, moreover some of them have even gained actual astronomical knowledge.

  19. Poetry in motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2012-01-01

    individual and social appropriation. Research approach is a hermeneutic interpretation of data from interviews with 12 iPhone users triangulated with models of appropriation, theories of micro and macro level appropriation, and the concept 'expansive learning' Findings/Design Through use, idiosyncratically...... and in collaboration with others, people make the iPhone and its App-world their own to the extent that they use the phone as a port to exercising personal interests like poetry, Italian novels, planning and cookbooks; hence the title of this paper. A closer look shows that in doing so, the interviewees have expanded...... to become a personal access-point to the world of Apps....

  20. Streaming Italian horror cinema in the United Kingdom: Lovefilm Instant

    OpenAIRE

    Baschiera, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the distribution of Italian horror cinema in the age of video streaming, analyzing its presence and categorization on the platform Lovefilm Instant UK, in order to investigate the importance of ‘niche’ in what is known as the long tail of online distribution and the online availability of exploitation films. I argue that looking at the streaming presence of Italian horror and comparing it to its prior distribution on home video formats (in particular VHS and DVD) we ...

  1. Pleasures of the spectatorium: young people, classrooms and horror films.

    OpenAIRE

    Burn, Andrew Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is an ethnographic study of Year 9 school pupils' responses to horror films, and, in particular, The Company of Wolves (Jordan, 1984). It employs social semiotic theory to analyse both film texts and audience engagements with such texts, exploring how such engagements involve transformations of subjectivity, particular kinds of competence in reading visual codes, and certain types of affective response to horror texts. It explores, briefly, histories of elements ...

  2. Mythology, poetry and theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonso Groenewald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have always been mythmakers. However, in view of the heavy negative connotations attached to the word “myth”, the aim of this article may, inter alia, be seen as an attempt to “rehabilitate” the word “myth” as a positive term in order to describe one of the most common genres within the Old Testament tradition. The author will indicate that the presence of myth is a common phenomenon in the Bible, and specifically in the Psalter (as poetry. The authors of the Psalms used (re-used myth, the “mythical” and/or mythical allusions in order to express some of their most profound theologising about Yahweh – the God of Israel – as well as their relationship to that God.

  3. Animal Poetry and Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Brüggemann

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses how our ideas of empathy are influenced by the dichotomy of mind versus body, also known as Cartesian dualism. Within the aesthetic field, this dichotomy is seen when researchers define narrative empathy as imaginatively reconstructing the fictional character’s thoughts and feelings. Conversely, the empathy aroused by a non-narrative work of art is seen as an unconscious bodily mirroring of movements, postures or moods. Thinking dualistically does not only have consequences for what we consider human nature; it also affects our view on animals. To show the untenability of dualistic thinking, this article focuses on the animal poetry genre. Using the ideas of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I analyze two animal poems: “Inventing a Horse” by Meghan O’Rourke and “Spermaceti” by Les Murray. The analysis of these two poems suggests that the presiding ideas about aesthetic empathy and empathy in general need re-evaluation.

  4. Concrete poetry in three languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kremer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes different paths of the development of both the movement and the notion of concrete poetry in three linguistic regions. The German-language konkrete Dichtung turns out to usually denote the original, historical shape of the movement, which was partly created in German- speaking countries and which has been treated as a literary phenomenon. The Englishlanguage term concrete poetry is a much broader category which also encompasses visual poetry and avant-garde texts that are distant from the sources of concretism in its early form. The Polish understanding of ‘poezja konkretna’ [concrete poetry] was influenced by both German- and English- language books and by the movement’s regional version, which appeared in Poland as late as in the 1970s. The selected linguistic areas allowed the author to show three basic ways of thinking about concretism, i.e. about its initial, international, and regional versions.

  5. Effects of Gender Roles and Self Perceptions on Affective Reactions to Horror Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundorf, Norbert; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines responses to graphic horror films based on gender and personality variables. Results indicate that responses to horror movies are largely determined by gender-specific rules for social conduct. (MW)

  6. "This Is Not For You": Reader Agency and Intimacy in Contemporary Horror Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Hauglid, Aslak Rustad

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines how recent/contemporary horror fiction uses the establishment of reader intimacy and challenges to reader agency in order to create experiences of horror. The discussion focuses on a selection of horror texts from different media published between 2000 and 2016. The thesis argues that these two techniques have come to be increasingly important horror tropes over this period, and examines how they are applied in order to propose a new perspective for understanding how cont...

  7. Horror movie aspects and experimentation in Michael Jackson’s Thriller music video

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Herom; Universidade Municipal de São Caetano do Sul - USCS; Gonçalves, Rafael; Universidade Municipal de São Caetano do Sul - USCS

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the use of elements from the horror fi lm genre in the music video Thriller (1982), by Michael Jackson, as experimentation within the field of pop music. Based on the semiotics of culture, grounded on the concepts of cultural text, semiosphere, border and modeling, developed by Iuri Lotman, the analysis identified innovations in the use of horror as humor and, in the music, modeling of creatures, moving among horror, the fantastic and the reality.Keywords: horror, music ...

  8. Relationship of Terror Feelings and Physiological Response During Watching Horror Movie

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Tsukino, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Part 8: ICBAKE 2015 Workshop; International audience; Movie is one of the most popular media types. Horror movie is a kind of attractive movie contents which part of people want to watch very much. Although the users feel terror of the contents, the users want to watch the horror movies to have extraordinary feelings such as excitements. Therefore, terror feelings of the horror movies are considered as an important factor to establish more attractive movie contents, and the effect of horror m...

  9. Putting the Brit into Eurohorror: Exclusions and Exchanges in the History of European Horror Cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, Peter

    2016-01-01

    British horror cinema is often excluded from critical work dealing with European horror cinema or, as it is frequently referred to, ‘Eurohorror’. This article argues that such exclusion is unwarranted. From the 1950s onwards there have been many exchanges between British and continental European-based horror production. These have involved not just international co-production deals but also creative personnel moving from country to country. In addition, British horror films have exerted influ...

  10. Reacting to Graphic Horror: A Model of Empathy and Emotional Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies viewer response to graphic horror films. Reports that undergraduate mass communication students viewed clips from two horror films and a scientific television program. Concludes that people who score high on measures for wandering imagination, fictional involvement, humanistic orientation, and emotional contagion tend to find horror films…

  11. Writing Poetry: A Self-Instructional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Bureau of Educational Research.

    The general design of this book is that of a step-by-step self-instructional program leading toward the writing of poetry. It consists of 156 exercises which lead the student from writing about a picture and poems to kinds of poetry and techniques for writing poetry (alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, metaphor, simile, rhyme, meter…

  12. HORROR AND TERROR IN PSYCHO: THE NOVEL AND THE FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Forrati (UFSM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available

    In 1959, American writer Robert Bloch published the novel Psycho, his most famous work. The story called Alfred Hitchcock’s attention and he produced one of the most famous films of all times. Even though the novel and the film have the same story, they have different plots and explore different aspects of gothic fiction: horror and terror, respectively. Thus, this paper discusses the difference in plot and in the creation of effects (horror and terror to the readership or audience.

  13. Medo de que? : uma historia do horror nos filmes brasileiros

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Loguercio Canepa

    2008-01-01

    Resumo: Neste trabalho, examinam-se as manifestações do gênero horror nos longas-metragens sonoros brasileiros realizados entre 1937 e 2007, elaborando-se um panorama histórico desses filmes, desde os primeiros registros cinematográficos deste gênero de ficção no cinema nacional até os mais recentes, e propondo-se um modelo descritivo para as configurações do horror ficcional no cinema brasileiro. Para isso, partiu-se dos estudos de gêneros cinematográficos, de história do cinema mundial e de...

  14. The horror of stigma: psychosis and mental health care environments in twenty-first-century horror film (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John

    2014-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which modern horror films present stigmatizing depictions of psychosis and mental health care environments. Horror films will often include stigmatizing representations of psychosis and mental health care environments. Cinematic techniques can create stigmatizing depictions of psychosis and mental health care environments. Misinformation is often communicated. Due to these stigmatizing representations, people experiencing mental ill health may be rejected by the public. Stigma is a serious problem affecting the mental health services. It is important for practitioners to understand where stigma arises in order to challenge beliefs and attitudes.

  15. Primary Poetry Workshop. Explore the World through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Bee

    1997-01-01

    This poetry workshop has students read Monica Gunning's poem about her childhood in Jamaica, create lists of what they want to know more about, search for and share the information, then find poems from other parts of the world. The Gunning poem and lists of resources are included. (SM)

  16. The Horror of Being Deaf and in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    2010-01-01

    Being deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant…

  17. School Is Hell: Gendered Fears in Teenage Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Explores the use of schools as settings for teenage horror films. Asserts that these narratives reflect the stress of social pressures and uncertainties, particularly young girls. Focuses on the television show, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," while making this argument. Includes references. (CMK)

  18. College Course File: Studies in Genre--Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott R.

    1996-01-01

    States that a Studies in Genre course essentially explores genre theory with the "hook" of a particular popular genre (in this case, horror) that serves as case study and exemplar for more general theories of genre. Describes the course's modular design so it can be expanded into other genres as time passes. Discusses each unit's…

  19. The poetry of (POP) science

    CERN Document Server

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Only one person from CERN, Thomas Otto, was among the winners of the POPScience international poetry competition recently run in the framework of the EU-funded project of the same name. The TE Departmental Safety Officer won in the English category with three poems inspired by CERN and its people.   Thomas Otto in Building 180 with an LHC magnet, one of the sources of inspiration of his poetry.   After participating as a volunteer in the 2014 European Researchers’ Night – when the POPScience poetry competition was officially launched – Thomas Otto decided to take part in the contest with three poems inspired by CERN. “I’ve always been interested in poetry, but only as a reader,” says Thomas. “At that point I felt inspired and I began to think about all the associations and metaphors I could create to describe CERN and its life to a non-scientific audience.” The three poems pay homage to the LHC, the CM...

  20. Cernuda in Current Spanish Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Fajardo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The poet Luis Cernuda (Spain, 1902-Mexico, 1963 has left his mark on much of the poetry written in Spain since the sixties. First rediscovered in the Peninsula in the late fifties and early sixties by, among others, Francisco Brines, José Angel Valente, and Jaime Gil de Biedma, his influence became pervasive both through the work of these poets, and, through the reading of Cernuda’s poetry itself, available since 1975 in Harris and Maristany edition. Referring in particular to Biedma, whose impact on younger poets has been significant, this paper examines the presence of Cernuda in certain approaches to language and reality in the poetry of several “poetas de la experiencia” ‘poets of experience,’ such as Jesús García Montero, Felipe Benítez Reyes, and Álvaro García. Centering mainly on the simplification of language and the search for a non-rhetorical rhythm, developing in Cernuda from Invocaciones ‘Invocations,’ to Desolación de la Quimera ‘The Disconsolate Chimera,’ this article examines the same traits in Biedma. Thereafter it traces their incorporation in the poetry of García Montero, Benítez Reyes, and García. These readings offer an occasion to reflect on some of the strengths of the “poesía de la experiencia” that underlie its apparent straightforwardness and simplicity.

  1. Poetry Feedback That Feeds Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pooja; Laud, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a description of three seventh grade English teachers' attempt to augment creativity, reading, and deep understanding, and the standards they used to come up with five essential questions surrounding an eight-week unit on poetry. Each of these questions helps to address the school standards and the Common Core State Standards…

  2. Poetry Recitation for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoger, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Poetry recitation removes the distractions of creating and organizing original material so that business students can focus on presentation skills of delivery, confidence, and memory. Delivery includes articulation, emphasis, nonverbals, and presence. Confidence and memory development are complementary. Confidence comes from trusting the memory…

  3. Open to a Changing World: Concrete Poetry in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2010-01-01

    The essay describes the rise of concrete poetry in Denmark in the 1960s, the intermedial roots of concrete poetry, concrete poetry as open work (in Eco's sense), the main Danish poets, the development of concrete poetry into systemic writing and the longer cultural perspectives of concrete poetry...

  4. USELESS POETRY: BRIEF ANALYSIS OF LUÍS QUINTAIS’ POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyse dos Santos Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Marked in gray, pervaded by a vague presence of melancholy, Luís Quin­tais’ verses present us a world framed by fragmented images, opaque and quotidian, whose space and time are interrupted by voids. But what are these voids? These pages, which came from such a question, in their eager to seek answers, encounter another question: after all, why do many of the current poetics, including the poetry of which Luís Quintais is part, attract attention to the word, brushing on their verses a reflection of the poetic language and their (inutility and power of resistance against the society of their time? Thus, when we read Luis Quintais’ poetry, we see that the metalinguistic function is vital to understand the feeling of emptiness in his poems which, in their turn, take us to a reflection on language, memory and history.

  5. Poetry Education Research as an Anchorage of Thought: Using Poetry as Interview Stimulus Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Interviews in qualitative research may sometimes employ stimulus material as a means of eliciting richer data. However, scant consideration has been given to the use of poetry for this purpose, especially within the field of poetry education research. This article seeks to address the gap in the literature by illustrating how the use of poetry as…

  6. Aspect and narration applied to lyrical poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the linguistic category of aspect in relation to the genre of lyrical poetry. Lyrical poetry is characterized in a double mode: at the same time (in accordance with Jakobson) as quasi-quotation and at the same time (in accordance with Aristotle) as some kind of 'the author...... speaking in his own voice'. The main thesis of the paper is that lyrical poetry has a special connexion to imperfect aspect....

  7. Metrics and Its Function in Poetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Zhong-qiong; CHEN Min-jie

    2013-01-01

    Poetry is a special combination of musical and linguistic qualities-of sounds both regarded as pure sound and as mean-ingful speech. Part of the pleasure of poetry lies in its relationship with music. Metrics, including rhythm and meter, is an impor-tant method for poetry to express poetic sentiment. Through the introduction of poetic language and typical examples, the writer of this paper tries to discuss the relationship between sound and meaning.

  8. Review of Japanese Horror Films and the Their American Remakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Harmes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Wee’s monograph on American remakes of Japanese supernatural horror films is a contribution to Routledge’s Advances in Film Studies series and examines a cluster of films made in the late 1990s and early 2000s. These are films which in their first incarnation were Japanese (such as Ringu which were then remade by Hollywood (for example Ringu became The Ring.

  9. What Joy from Misery: the Pleasures of Horror

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the allure of narrative genres, such as horror, that have historically been viewed as philosophically (and often morally) problematic owing to their negative content and the painful emotional responses they elicit. It departs from the majority of classical and contemporary solutions to the alleged paradox posed by such genres, in that it does not attempt to render their pleasures explicable by appealing to their fictive status, thematic or ideological meanings or the ...

  10. Implied...or implode? The Simpsons' carnivalesque Treehouse of Horror

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Since 1990, The Simpsons’ annual “Treehouse of Horror” episodes have constituted a production sub-context within the series, having their own conventions and historical trajectory. These specials incorporate horror plots and devices, as well as general references to science fiction, into the series’ base in situation comedy. The Halloween specials disrupt the series usual family-oriented sitcom structure, dissolving the ideological balances that stabilise that society. By depicting the Family...

  11. Poetry as an oral outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Arden Brill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The text is inspired by some of Freud’s observations, regarding, among other things, the pleasure the child takes from playing with words as preliminary degree of wit. As zealous follower, Brill extends and intensifies the importance of Freud’s thought trying to establish a link, or at least a point of contact between the poetry in a generic sense and the various forms of oral gratification. This gives rise to unusual associations that are for the contemporary reader slightly comical: if poetry can be seen as an expression of the mysteries of oral Erotica, the relationship between poet and gourmet can only be the closest. To define and limit the scopes of fulfillment that is realized in oral poetry, Brill passes rapidly through the various forms this satisfaction takes in neurotics, in psychotics, in the child, in the primitive. The conclusions, unfortunately, are very general: many poets do not go beyond the oral stage and give clear signs of a fixation of libidinal development at this level.

  12. Dreams, Nightmares and Haunted Houses: Televisual Horror as Domestic Imaginary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Griffin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely proclaimed that U.S.Television is currently experiencing a Golden Age with horror at its vanguard, in part enabled by technological innovations that have seen audiences engage with TV in ever more diverse ways, enabled by the advent of Smart T.V. Meanwhile, television has historically positioned itself as a humble and domesticated medium and yet its increasingly sophisticated channels penetrate into the very heart of the contemporary home. With this in mind, I view Suburban Gothic TV series such as American Horror Story (2011 and Hemlock Grove (2013 through the lens of psychoanalytic concepts such as The Uncanny, considering the extent to which such dramas invoke the dark side of the domestic imaginary which haunts that most cherished of spaces, the home. Why does Gothic Horror continue to engage the imaginations of the contemporary home’s technologically orientated inhabitants? And how has technology helped to drive the resurgence of a genre so firmly rooted in a historical-literary form? These are just some of the questions that this article explores.

  13. Re-animated: The contemporary American horror film remake, 2003-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is a study of American horror remakes produced in the years 2003-2013, and it represents a significant academic intervention into an understanding of the horror remaking trend. It addresses the remaking process as one of adaptation, examines the remakes as texts in their own right, and situates them within key cultural, industry and reception contexts. It also shows how remakes have contributed to the horror genre’s evolution over the last decade, ...

  14. The horror of stigma: psychosis and mental health care environments in twenty-first-century horror film (part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights the specific manner in which twenty-first-century horror films stigmatize psychosis and mental health care environments (MHCEs) A search on various film forums using the terms "mental/psychiatric patient," "psychosis/psychoses," and "mental/psychiatric hospital" (limited from 2000 to 2012) revealed 55 films. A literature review revealed criteria for a checklist. Subsequent to viewings, salient recurring criteria were added to the checklist. Films were systematically analyzed under these criteria. Homicidal maniacs are the most common stereotypes. Misinformation is often communicated. Familiar horror tropes are used to stigmatize MHCEs. Practitioners should be aware of the specific manner in which clients are being stigmatized by the media. This paper highlights specific ways in which psychosis and MHCEs are stigmatized, and encourages practitioners to challenge these depictions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Evaluating a poetry workshop in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T J; McLachlan, J C

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating how doing poetry could affect students' understanding of medical practice and at assessing the effectiveness of the evaluation method used. Qualitative research was carried out on the experiences of medical students participating in a poetry workshop, followed by some quantitative analysis. The study was conducted at Peninsula Medical School and St Ives, Cornwall, UK, with three medical students, a poet and a pathologist as participants. Data were collected by interviews, observation and web access. "Doing poetry" with a professional poet was found to assist communication between doctors and patients as it enhanced skills of observation, heightened awareness of the effect of language and fostered deep reflection. Poetry was also found to offer an outlet for medics and patients. The voluntary workshop attracted three participants; however, it might have had an effect on the wider student community because the poetry website received 493 hits in four months. Qualitative methods worked well as a tool for evaluation. "Doing poetry for poetry's sake" seemed to foster the development of skills related to empathy. The opportunity to do poetry should be made available to medical students as part of a wider arts and humanities programme.

  16. On Apes, Poetry, and Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George M., Jr.

    A psychological experiment in which an ape manipulates colored linguistic symbols as a means of ostensibly learning a language suggests to the author that students, analogously, may be able to learn a foreign language by studying the use of linguistic elements in poems. Selected examples of Russian poetry illustrate the potential use of poetry in…

  17. Taking a Technological Path to Poetry Prewriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    2002-01-01

    Offers a strong rationale for the idea that the journey of writing good poetry begins on a path that infuses technology into the first stage of the writing process. Presents several ideas of ways to incorporate technology into the prewriting poetry experience. Concludes that by making technology an ingredient, the true potential for synergy…

  18. Recording Students to Bring Poetry Alive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Poems are filled with musicality. Poetry and music are often described using similar terms: meter, cadence, phrase, form, and more. Poetry also has physical qualities recognized ever since the Greeks classified poetic meter in feet. In this article, the author presents a project that works well across the age spectrum: recording expressive poetry…

  19. Phonics and Poetry in the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2000-01-01

    Describes how some student teachers and cooperating teachers guided pupils in learning phonics through a study of rhyming poetry. Discusses class activities involved in teaching couplets, triplets, imagery in poetry, quatrains, alliteration, limericks, and onomatopoeia, and the rhyme and phonics elements involved. (SR)

  20. My America in Poetry and Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a unit that provides opportunities for students to examine the relationship between poetry and pictures as they select published poems, write their own poetry, and take photographs to accompany the poems in an anthology. Describes lesson one on intellectual property and copyright, and lesson two on appreciation. Includes a unit guide and…

  1. Stylistics and the Metaphysics of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the worth of aesthetic experience in encountering poetry, fresh perspectives are helpful. This paper introduces the reader to modern stylistics: that is linguistic examinations of "the speaker's meaning" in literature and notes such "scientific" approaches to poetry do find common metaphysical ground with leading…

  2. A journey through the stylistics of poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2015-01-01

    Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9.......Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9....

  3. Nigerian Poetry since 1990: History, Disillusionment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant attribute of Nigerian Poetry is its protean character. Every decade depending on its historical nuance, has engendered poetic offerings whose tenor and temper differ from the preceding one. Though, Nigerian Poetry is a recreation of one historical continuum, it can be calibrated into different thematics and ...

  4. Preference for Graphic Horror Featuring Male versus Female Victimization: Personality and Past Film Viewing Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigates the relationship of personality and past film viewing experiences to preferences for different degrees of graphic horror in film, and for female versus male victimization. Finds that the Machiavellian trait of deceit, past exposure to horror films, and, for male subjects only, the enjoyment of pornography were good predictors. (SR)

  5. Predictors of Horror Film Attendance and Appeal: An Analysis of the Audience for Frightening Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Stiff, James

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes the appeal of horror films. Develops a model that finds that important factors in the horror film's appeal are the audience's desire to experience the satisfying resolutions and to see the destruction usually found in these films and the sensation-seeking personality traits of audience members for these films. (NKA)

  6. Prior Exposure to Creatures from a Horror Film: Live versus Photographic Representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Audrey J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Finds that exposure to graphic photographs of worms taken from a horror film increased children's enjoyment of the horror movie segment and reduced fear reactions to the scene. Shows that exposure to a live earthworm was effective in reducing fear reactions to the movie only among boys but did alter children's affective reactions to and judgments…

  7. Selective Exposure to Horror: An Analysis of the Audience for Frightening Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Stiff, James

    A survey of 155 midwestern movie viewers was conducted to determine the factors of the selective exposure and appeal of horror films. Audience members leaving the theatre after viewing "Halloween II" were interviewed using a questionnaire that contained measures of specific reasons for liking horror films as well as measures of several…

  8. The Medieval Swedish Horror Ballad in the Romantic Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhr, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    In the late 18th century the Horror Ballad became popular in Sweden. The rediscovery of medieval tales and ballads inspired the Romantic authors. Clas Livijn uses the medieval folksong of "Hafsfrun" in his dramatic play of the same title (1806). In Livijn’s own library we also find many......” by Baggesen, in turn based on German and English sources. Anna Maria Lenngren followed with several ballads, often based on Danish sources. One more purely Swedish medieval ballad is “Varulven”. From 1810 unto 1971 thirteen versions of this Swedish ballad was discovered and printed. I place the focus...

  9. The monstrous metallic in medicine and horror cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Niall

    2014-01-01

    `This paper considers the monstrous nature of medical tools and devices through the lens of horror cinema and the art of Damien Hirst. In it I argue for a shift from the monster and the monstrous as organic to the threat of the monster as an inorganic object in tools such as the scalpel and syringe. However, the metaphorical significance of the monster is sustained in these tools where human technological creations continue the discourse of the monster as a product of human creativity.

  10. Poetry by Stephanos Stephanides in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanos Stephanides

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephanos Stephanides visited the Australian Studies Centre and gave a lecture and poetry reading to poetry undergraduate classes. The students were so impressed by his poetry that the idea of translating some of his work for this edition of Coolabah. For both the students and the journal this has been a great priviledge. Stephanos Stephanides, himself a Spanish speaker, worked with the students as they translated. A rare chance indeed to work with a poet while translating his work. We are grateful to Stephanos Stephanides for providing this wonderful opportunity for the students.

  11. Discovering Patterns in Mathematics and Poetry

    CERN Document Server

    Birken, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    You are invited to join a fascinating journey of discovery, as Marcia Birken and Anne C. Coon explore the intersecting patterns of mathematics and poetry — bringing the two fields together in a new way.Setting the tone with humor and illustrating each chapter with countless examples, Birken and Coon begin with patterns we can see, hear, and feel and then move to more complex patterns. Number systems and nursery rhymes lead to the Golden Mean and sestinas. Simple patterns of shape introduce tessellations and concrete poetry. Fractal geometry makes fractal poetry possible. Ultimately, patterns f

  12. Family structure and dynamics in DePalma's horror films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N G

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the familial relationships in Brian DePalma's five major horror films reveals a persistent unconscious fantasy formation involving the nuclear family. These single-parent, only-child families are all tragically destroyed because of an inability to adequately mourn the absent parent. Although the asexual young adults in the films are spared the completely disastrous effects of madness and violence, they are still psychologically traumatized. This hidden subtextual theme involving the family parallels DePalma's bleak view of authority figures outside the home, as well as American society in general. Adequate identity formation requires that people both inside and outside the family accept the adolescent as a separate person. The grim psychological truth threading its way throughout DePalma's horror films is that these young adults are psychically devastated by the effects of a primitive, fused symbiotic relationship in interaction with a society that does not provide an adequate role for the developing person. Consequently, their attempt to psychologically move outside the family, which includes the maturation of their sexuality, results in the destruction of the family itself.

  13. Horror films: tales to master terror or shapers of trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballon, Bruce; Leszcz, Molyn

    2007-01-01

    The authors review the literature of cinematic-related psychiatric case reports and report the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with intrusive thoughts of demonic possession and flashbacks of the film The Exorcist. Cinematic neurosis may be considered a form of psychological crisis shaped by exposure to a film narrative that is emotionally and culturally significant to the individual. The structure of horror films are examined from the perspectives of trauma theory, narrative theory, and borderline personality organization theories, using the film The Exorcist as an example. Within this framework, the horror film can be seen as a cultural tale that provides a mechanism for attempting mastery over anxieties involving issues of separation, loss, autonomy, and identity. An individual will identify with narrative elements that resonate in personal life experiences and cultural factors embedded within the film, which carry levels of either stress that will be mastered, or act as a trauma to the viewer. The outcome of this exposure is related to how the individual's personality structure is organized in combination with the stresses they are experiencing.

  14. PATTERNS OF DEVIATION IN NIYI OSUNDARE'S POETRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TAMMY

    creating aesthetics and artistic values in literary works especially in poetry for purposeful and meaningful .... waiting as far as Osundare is concerned waiting, becomes a recurrent phenomenon in the game of life. .... For public safety. And the ...

  15. Horror Image Recognition Based on Context-Aware Multi-Instance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Xiong, Weihua; Wu, Ou; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    Horror content sharing on the Web is a growing phenomenon that can interfere with our daily life and affect the mental health of those involved. As an important form of expression, horror images have their own characteristics that can evoke extreme emotions. In this paper, we present a novel context-aware multi-instance learning (CMIL) algorithm for horror image recognition. The CMIL algorithm identifies horror images and picks out the regions that cause the sensation of horror in these horror images. It obtains contextual cues among adjacent regions in an image using a random walk on a contextual graph. Borrowing the strength of the fuzzy support vector machine (FSVM), we define a heuristic optimization procedure based on the FSVM to search for the optimal classifier for the CMIL. To improve the initialization of the CMIL, we propose a novel visual saliency model based on the tensor analysis. The average saliency value of each segmented region is set as its initial fuzzy membership in the CMIL. The advantage of the tensor-based visual saliency model is that it not only adaptively selects features, but also dynamically determines fusion weights for saliency value combination from different feature subspaces. The effectiveness of the proposed CMIL model is demonstrated by its use in horror image recognition on two large-scale image sets collected from the Internet.

  16. Eastern Europe as the source of horror and humor: Examples films, "Hostel" and "Euro Trip"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Trifunović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the period from 2004. to 2007. three films belonging to two different genres were complete in the American production-a horror and a comedy. These being, Hostel (I and II and Euro Trip. The only similarity found in these films is the same stimulus that motivates the horror and the humor segment in them. That stimulus was identifies where all three films are placed, and that is Eastern Europe, more precisely Slovakia. This phenomenon was considered in Noel Carroll’s theory concerning the relationship of horror and humor in order to explain and understand their existence.

  17. The Poetry Cafe Is Open! Teaching Literary Devices of Sound in Poetry Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalcik, Beth; Certo, Janine L.

    2007-01-01

    A six-week long intervention that introduced second graders to poetry writing is described in this article, ending in a classroom "poetry cafe" culminating event. This article details the established classroom "writing workshop" structure and environment and the perceptions and observations of how students responded to the instruction. Four poetry…

  18. The historical theme in the poetry of Esenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunarikova P. H.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available the article examines the historical theme in the poetry of Esenin. The author explores in his work historical problems in poetry Esenin, shows the role of the poet in contemporary Russia.

  19. Pragmatic approaches to the selection and teaching of poetry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How many people really like poetry enough to read some regularly through adulthood? The unsatisfactory teaching of poetry in schools may be the main cause why ... This paper analyses the problems that alienate students and teachers from ...

  20. Predicting Emotional Responses to Horror Films from Cue-Specific Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Sparks, Glenn G.

    1988-01-01

    Assesses individuals' fear and enjoyment reactions to horror films, applying theories of cognition and affect that predict emotional responses to a stimulus on the basis of prior affect toward specific cues included in that stimulus. (MM)

  1. A quantum physics poetry competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Susanna Wong

    2014-01-01

    What do you think happened when six world-renowned poets from six European countries met eight famous CERN scientists to talk about the Universe and the Higgs boson? Six poems about new quantum physics discoveries were born from this exciting collision of literature and science in an intimate and spontaneous setting!   Express yourself through poetry: this is the call from POPScience, a European Researchers' Night 2014-15 project supported by CERN. The general public can discover the mysteries of particle physics using a series of texts and thematic videos as well as clips of the meetings of the poets and CERN scientists available on the POPScience website. The Big Bang, an expanding Universe, dark energy, matter, antimatter and supersymmetry: what are they and do they exist?  The general public is welcome to give an answer in a poem by signing up to the competition. Poems can be submitted in English, French, Italian, Danish and Spanish; the selected entries will be translated ...

  2. Dark Matter: British Weird Fiction and the Substance of Horror, 1880-1927

    OpenAIRE

    Camara, Anthony Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the origins of British weird horror fiction, an understudied literary genre that had an extraordinary impact on later writers whose works appeared in popular magazines such as The Argosy (1882-1978) and Weird Tales (1923-1954). By far the most popular writer associated with the latter publication is H.P. Lovecraft, an American practitioner of cosmic weird horror whose astounding fictions have become emblematic of the genre in the mainstream imagination. This disse...

  3. Poetry and Narrative as Qualitative Data: Explorations into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, Volume 7, Edition 1 May 2007. Page 1 of 9. The IPJP is ... The use of poetry and narrative as tools in qualitative research is explored. Poetry ... Poetry may be thought of as the emotional microchip, in .... creativity and vitality (Frankl, 1959). Attempts to ..... International Journal of Group.

  4. Aesthetics in Geography: Ideas for Teaching Geography Using Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how poetry can be used for teaching geography. The rational for using and writing poetry, its relationship to the National Standards for Geography, grade levels, pedagogical concerns associated with poetry writing, and subject integration are discussed. There are also classroom activities, sample discussion questions, lesson…

  5. Poetry in South African Sign Language: What is different? | Baker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Poetry in a sign language can make use of literary devices just as poetry in a ... This poem illustrates well the multi-layered meaning that can be created in sign language poetry through ...

  6. The poetry of Sigwavhulimu: On creation and death | Mafela | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W.M.R. Sigwavhulimu is a leading poet in Tshivenḓa. His poetry is concerned with creation and appeals to supernatural beings, religious matters, death and pain. This article investigates the extent to which Christianity has influenced Sigwavhulimu in his poetry, with the focus on religious poetry dealing with creation and ...

  7. "Old Poems Have Heart": Teenage Students Reading Early Modern Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The proposals for the revised National Curriculum in English suggest limiting the pre-twentieth century poetry that GCSE pupils read to "representative Romantic poetry" (Department for Education [DFE], 2013, p. 4). This paper argues that poetry of the early modern period is challenging and enriching study for adolescent pupils and that…

  8. Poetry and the "Me" Generation: Democratizing the "Ars Poetica".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Paul

    The art of poetry is being worn away by democracy, the rule of the average, and by an attitude of narcissism which equates sincere endeavor with significant endeavor. The opening lines of several poems taken from a poetry journal reveal a distinct lack of significant emotion. While poetry is the most significant expression of the Self, the…

  9. Introducing and Sustaining Close Reading and Writing through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Karren M.; Johnson, Angie

    2017-01-01

    Close reading of poetry scaffolds readers and writers as they come to understand the form and function of poetry and transfer those skills to writing. In this teaching tip, the authors explain a way in which primary teachers can introduce close reading and move young students toward composing and presenting poetry.

  10. Christian thought in Momcilo Nastasijevic's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić-Tmušić Aleksandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poetry of Momcilo Nastasijevic gives us undoubted motive to talk about him as a consistent religious poet, a poet of orthodox religious inspiration. He approached towards words as sanctity, he endeavoured to measure each word, reach it, and clean it from accumulated dust of everyday’s blather. His attitude towards poetical locution, his personal law of poetical perfection, represents, brought up to the last consequences, principles of symbolist poetics. He thought of words as magic of sound and rhythm and examines all the effects we can get from it. To him, poetry was identical to crucial and the purest flickering of what he called human soul. The thought of our poet come down to essence of his poetry: who has understood his poems, can be sure that will understand Nastasijevic as a poet.

  11. Innovation and in Baraddooni’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at introducing the contemporary poet and writer of Yemen, Abodllah ibn Saleh, known as Baraddooni. He was a great poet and writer as well as a critic and historian. He studied in ‘Aljameol-Kabir’ in Sana. To continue his education, he then attended ‘Darololum’ from which he graduated in Arabic Literature. He was a Romantic poet with old and new style poetry. He established ‘The Yemen Association for Poets and Writers’. He received several international prizes including the UNESCO prize. He has 12 books of poetry and eight pieces of research. The theme of his poetry is the love for the country and in this line is his criticism of some politicians such as Ahmad Hamidoddin. Also important in his poems are: the issue of Palestine, Arab Nationalism and Arab unity.

  12. 'The verses of madness': schizophrenia and poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-12-20

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of 'madness' and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the 'product' of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: "My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the 'ultimate psychiatrist', and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration."

  13. Ebn Farez and Characteristics of his Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سردار اصلانی

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract     Abou Hafs Omar Ebn Ali known as Ebn Farez is one of the poets of the 6th century. He was famous in the field of poetry. Many great critics like Ebn Khallekan, the writer of Vafiyatolayan also praised him and even regarded him higher than his contemporary poets in position. In this article, we present some features of Soltan Alasheghin Ebn Farez. Ghazal and Khamriyyat are two main types of his poetry. However, his point of view in Khamriyeh is different from Abonavas and others. The reason is that Ebn Farez’s Khamriyyat is full of mystic elements. In addition, in his poetry one can find many uses of literary devices especially pun.

  14. Living the Poet's Life: Using an Aesthetic Approach to Poetry to Enhance Preservice Teachers' Poetry Experiences and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Janine L.; Apol, Laura; Wibbens, Erin; Hawkins, Lisa K.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we argue that preservice teachers have limited experience reading and writing poetry, and that if they are to teach poetry in meaningful ways to their future students, they need to have compelling experiences with poetry in teacher education--ones that take into account their former experiences and incoming dispositions and that…

  15. Romantic refractions : light effects in Ruskin's poetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Garratt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The poetry of John Ruskin – which amounts to a surprisingly large body of work, mostly written in the 1830s and 1840s – reveals the stirrings of the moral perceptual attitude that would emerge with such distinctive force in Modern Painters, yet one guided by the influences of Keats, Shelley and Byron as much as the natural theology of Wordsworth (despite Modern Painters taking its epigraph from The Excursion). Although in some respects a poetry of post-Romantic transition, Ruskin's work also ...

  16. Prosodic Function Row in Persian Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mansouri

    2017-04-01

    The main reason for the emergence of rows in Persian poetry is its prosodic function that has already been paid less. I just found something in the book Ghosn al-ban which the author had some similar view to the row. In this study, we made our attempt to show another reason for the entry and spread of the row in Persian poetry by means of a new approach. It should also be noted that in these lines to avoid as much as possible the repetitive and stereotyped points regarding the row.

  17. Horror, humor e sexo no cinema de bordas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardette Lyra

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Por suas características, modos, técnicas e procedimentos, certos filmes de ficção se enquadram naquilo que chamo de cinema de bordas. O cinema de bordas se faz sobre fragmentos reciclados de gêneros, subgêneros e espécies, sem que, no entanto, nenhum dentre os modelos usados se apresente determinante. Tal reciclagem genérica tem por conseqüência a ausência da novidade e da originalidade, em favor da continuidade e da repetição daquilo já anteriormente conhecido. Nesse sentido, o cinema de bordas comumente recorre a formas que materializam a ação e o sentimento, utilizados tanto por alguns gêneros cinematográficos como pela literatura popular ou literatura de massa. Este trabalho enfoca, em especial, a produção com as formas do horror, do humor e do sexo, quase sempre excluídas do discurso das instituições que consagram uma centralidade canônica. O resultado específico é uma mistura que se alimenta das bordas compostas por diferentes instâncias culturais que vai do estrato mais erudito ao mais popular e vice-versa.

  18. Pen- Name in Persian and Arabic Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Khodayar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Pen-name (Takhalloss is one of the main features of Persian poetry. It has been a matter of concern among many of Persian language geography poets in the orient at least up to the Mashrouteh era. Pen-name has been promoted among the other Muslim nations throuph Persian poetry. Although it is not as famous in the Arab nations as in the Persian speaking nations, it is known as “Alqab-o-shoara” among the Arab nations and, through this way, it has affected the poetrical wealth of the Arabic poets.   The Present paper, using description-analystic approach, compares the pen-names of Persian and Arabic poets under the title of “pen-names” and investigates their features in both cultures. The main research question is: What are the similarities and differences of poetic-names, in Persian and Arabic poets in terms of the type of name, position and importance? The results showed that Pseudonym by its amazing expansion in Persian poetry has also influenced Arabic poetry. In addition to the factors affecting in the choice of pen-names (like pseudonym, pen-name, nickname..., sometimes such external factors as events, commends, community benefactors and climate, as well as internal factors including the poets’ inner beliefs are associated too. .

  19. From Poetry to Music: "Northern Lullaby"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Nancy White Carlstrom's children's book, "Northern Lullaby," conjures through poetry the beauty of the Alaskan landscape in the evening. The book provides an opportunity for music teachers to help their students transform text and visual images to music. The author describes connections for reading comprehension in the general music…

  20. Emotional Self-Repair and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Terry, Rina

    1994-01-01

    Notes that some scholars have argued that writing poetry was harmful for psychological health of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. Contends that their writing probably provided cathartic benefit for them and helped them gain cognitive distance from their inner conflicts. Argues that writing may have helped both poets survive longer than they might…

  1. Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Susan Arpajian

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

  2. Exploring Poetry through Interactive Computer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchinsky, Howard; Camp, Jocelyn

    The goal of a project was to design, test, and evaluate several computer programs that allow students in introductory literature and poetry courses to explore a poem in detail and, through a dialogue with the program, to develop their own interpretation of it. Computer programs were completed on poems by Robert Frost and W.H. Auden. Both programs…

  3. Poetry: A Feast to Form Fluent Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Sheila

    In this lesson plan, grade 3 to 5 students examine elements of fluent reading through oral poetry performance. They use the Internet to identify a poem to prepare and perform for the class. The main objective of this lesson concerns improving fluency. During four hours over a span of five days, students will: be able to identify text written in…

  4. Cervantes and the Lirical Poetry: Don Quixote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Romo Feito

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the lyrical poems included in the first and the second part of Don Quixote. The different classes of poems are studied attending to its narrative context. But the poetry is also studied by relating it with metrical and aesthetical categories: Realism, Parody, Manierism…

  5. Chichewa political poetry in Malawian newspapers*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that we consider Chichewa political poetry as it appears· in the Malawi News ... views known as regards the way the state is run and the foibles of those who run it. .... in that form, "Mnyamata wa chamba" (The cannabis boy) by Chief Mafeke Jr.

  6. SLAM POETRY: A SIMPLE WAY TO GET CLOSER WITH LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murti Ayu Wijayanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching literature in teacher training faculty in which the students are prepared for being English teachers is always challenging as the students think that they have nothing to do with any kinds of literary work. It takes times to prepare them learn literature. Most students think that they have no talent in literature. Thus, it will certainly affect the teaching and learning process. While the lecturer is teaching, the students tend to listen and think of another else but literature. It therefore needs the lecturer‘s effort to deal with this challenge. One part of literary works taught which creates problem for most of students is poetry. One way to encourage students in learning poetry is slam poetry. Slam poetry is a kind of poetry competition which was firstly popularized in America in 1990s. A rumor that only beautiful and rhythmic poetry which is highly appreciated vanishes since the poet will only write what he or she understands. In slam poetry, the students themselves create their own poetry and present it in front of their classmates whereas other students will be the judges and decide who the winner of this slam poetry is. This method will encourage the students to learn poetry as well as appreciate it.

  7. Horror in mainstream- en cult cinema: is het genre extremer geworden?

    OpenAIRE

    Pashley, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the creation of silent movies, directors aim to shock the audience with explicit scenes of violence. Yet, little attention has been given to the evolution of horror movies. In order to create ‘monsters’, ‘dark locations’ and ‘explicit scenes of violence’ directors have to experiment with storylines and new techniques, if they want to shock the audience. The aim of this paper is to examine whether or not horror has become more violent (more extreme) throughout film history. Hence, w...

  8. Desplazamientos. Una reflexión sobre la posibilidad de escuchar el horror

    OpenAIRE

    Acedo Alonso, Noemí

    2013-01-01

    Resumen: Las relaciones que existen entre la poesía y la representación del fenómeno de la Shoah han sido ampliamente estudiadas por la filosofía y los estudios literarios, interesados en todo lo que concierne a la memoria y al recuerdo del horror. Sin embargo, creo que las razones que llevan a algunos sobrevivientes de la última dictadura militar argentina a afirmar que la poesía es el género más adecuado para aproximarse a la representación del horror están todavía insuficientemente explora...

  9. Eastern Europe as the source of horror and humor: Examples films, "Hostel" and "Euro Trip"

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Trifunović

    2016-01-01

    In the period from 2004. to 2007. three films belonging to two different genres were complete in the American production-a horror and a comedy. These being, Hostel (I and II) and Euro Trip. The only similarity found in these films is the same stimulus that motivates the horror and the humor segment in them. That stimulus was identifies where all three films are placed, and that is Eastern Europe, more precisely Slovakia. This phenomenon was considered in Noel Carroll’s theory concerning the r...

  10. Aldo Oliva: a ghost in Argentine poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Crisorio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aldo Oliva (1927-2000 presents several problems to the researcher: acknowledged as an indispensable voice in Argentinian poetry (to quote David Viñas, his work, however, still waits for academic reception, and has circulated for many years in a marginal and reduced way. His reluctance to publish, his distance from any poetic movement of the second half of the XXth century, the complexity of his work explains, in part, this situation. In this context, the present article tries to locate Oliva in the history of Argentinian poetry; to that end, and considering that his work as well as his creative project prevent any linear and chronological approach, I have used the concepts of “anachronism” (Didi-Huberman, “contemporary” (Agamben o “constellation” (Benjamin, that revealed themselves useful to think this spectral figure that is at the same time unavoidable and invisible.

  11. Parole in Jeans: poetry and telematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Barisone

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of project "Parole in Jeans" focuses on poetry and telematics under more 'general education reading in a multimedia context. The theme concerns "the culture of the various Italian regions" created through a collaborative implemented electronically between Genoa Middle School, Udine and Padua. The main aim 'to promote reading, comprehension and production of poetic texts in an interdisciplinary context and key media.

  12. MEMORY FOR POETRY: MORE THAN MEANING?

    OpenAIRE

    Atchley, Rachel M.; Hare, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The assumption has become that memory for words’ sound patterns, or form, is rapidly lost in comparison to content. Memory for form is also assumed to be verbatim rather than schematic. Oral story-telling traditions suggest otherwise. The present experiment investigated if form can be remembered schematically in spoken poetry, a context in which form is important. We also explored if sleep could help preserve memory for form. We tested whether alliterative sound patterns could cue memory for ...

  13. Poetry in teaching pharmacology: Exploring the possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Juhi; Singh, Satendra; Badyal, Dinesh; Barua, Purnima; Sharma, Taruna; Dhasmana, Dinesh Chandra; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-10-01

    To explore poetry as a tool for active learning in linking knowledge and affective domains and to find if correlating learning with imagination can be used in "assessment for learning." After taking a conventional lecture on Asthma, a creative writing assignment in the form of poetry writing was given to the students. Different triggers were given to the students to channelize their thought pattern in a given direction that was linked to specific areas of academic relevance. Students were asked to reflect on this learning experience and the faculty was asked to evaluate the student assignment on a 5-point Likert scale. Most student groups scored well in the "overall assessment" of creative assignments and were rated as good or fair by the faculty. Students reflections were very informative and revealed that more than 90% of the students liked the exercise and many were too exuberant and liberal with emotional reactions that breathed positive. Around 5% students found the exercise average and another 5% found it very childish. Poetry writing turned out to be like a simulation exercise that linked academic knowledge, creativity, and the affective domain in an assumed scenario, rehearsed in free locales of mind. The metaphorical transition embedded in its subtle creation helped assess deeper understanding of the subject and the logical sequence of thought pattern.

  14. Erwin Schrödinger's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronieva, Tzveta

    2014-03-01

    Many of the major figures in the history of science have produced literary works, but the relationship between their poetic texts and their scientific work is often underestimated. This paper illuminates the poetry of Erwin Schrödinger—one of the premier figures in twentieth-century science, and an accomplished poet in both English and his native German. It discusses existing perceptions of his poetry and challenges the assumptions that his poetic work was a mere hobby unrelated to his other achievements by focusing on the interplay between poetic images and scientific ideas in his German-language poems. It emphasizes that more research is needed on the understated role of bilingualism and of—often marginalized—writing in an adopted language in science and in poetry, with the premise that this feature of Schrödinger's life deserves more study. It argues that Schrödinger's literary imagination and his bilingualism are an integral part of his approach to reality and considers Schrödinger's literary work to be an important aspect of his intellectual heritage.

  15. Posthumous Humans, Modern Vampires: Re-use, seriality, chorality of horror tropes in True Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Iannuzzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Why are some of us – inhabitants of increasingly dense and complex narrative ecosystems – compulsive spectators of horrors? What determines the liveliness of horror tropes that already have a long history of being used and re-used in narratives across different media, and what favors their being used incessantly on the small screen? This essay argues that in analyzing contemporary television series, we need to takes into account specific productive and narrative aspects, and (intra- and inter-textual elements as well as sociological ones, starting from the theoretical assumption that the fortune of horror series (and not only of them is in fact determined by those territories where these elements come together. As a case in point, this essay takes a look at True Blood, which was created in 2008 for HBO by Alan Ball, and came to an end with its seventh season in 2014. Positioned within the broader context of horror proliferation in contemporary television series, True Blood offers striking examples of the new mechanisms and distinction practices utilized by the television genre which is bringing about an increasing differentiation of audience segment.

  16. Gothic/Giallo/Genre: hybrid images in Italian horror cinema, 1956-82

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Brown

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n62p173   Italian horror cinema is commonly divided into two periods and genres. An initial classical Gothic period spanned the years from 1956 to 1966 and was followed by a modern giallo (thriller period from 1970 to 1982. Whilst accepting this broad distinction, this paper seeks to add nuance by considering the hybrid elements of three key films by three of the most important directors working in the giallo and horror area, namely Riccardo Freda with I Vampiri (1956, Mario Bava with The Girl Who Knew too Much (1963 and Dario Argento with Deep Red (1975. Drawing in particular upon Nöel Carroll’s idea of “fearing fictions”, I contend that Freda’s film, the first Italian horror movie since the silent era, is notable for being a distinctively modern vampire film; that Bava’s film, a foundational giallo, may be seen as having a palimpsest in Jane Austen’s Gothic parody Northanger Abbey; and that Argento’s film, while often taken as the paradigmatic giallo, has supernatural horror elements that push it in the direction of the Gothic.

  17. Portrait of a Cult Film Audience: "The Rocky Horror Picture Show."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of the cult film and the characteristics of the audiences of the "Rocky Horror Picture Show." Suggests that the preparation, waiting, and finally the active participation in the viewing of the film itself appear to be part of a group ritual which characterizes the cult film as an event. (JMF)

  18. Excerpts from the January 1993 Senate Report: The Valour and the Horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Canadian Senate report on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's (CBC) documentary, "The Valour and the Horror." Includes quotes from official hearings regarding the historical accuracy of the documentary film. Concludes that the CBC was not controlled adequately by its board of directors. (CFR)

  19. The Brood of Frankenstein: Great Literature? Maybe Not, but Teens Love Horror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Amy; Wentling, Sarajo; Wurl, Jody

    2006-01-01

    Young adults have an insatiable thirst for blood, violence, and the supernatural. They love to be scared, and if something grosses them out, so much the better. That is why horror stories--tales that spark powerful feelings of dread, aversion, guilt, anger, and other deliciously dark emotions--are such a hit at libraries. In this article, the…

  20. "Tõeline horror peidab end reality-televisioonis" / Xavier Mendik ; interv. Maria Ulfsak-Sheripova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mendik, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Lääne-Londoni Bruneli ülikooli õppejõud ja kultusfilmide arhiivi juht räägib kultusfilmi olemusest, kultusfilmi ja tavalise filmi erinevustest, õudusfilmidest, filmide publikust. Ka reality-televisioonist. X. Mendik viibis Eestis ja pidas loengu Haapsalu HÖFFil uuest briti horror'ist

  1. Themes of Idealism and Nostalgia in Negritude Poetry | Okune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central thrust of this paper is on the themes of idealism and nostalgia in Negritude poetry. Some critics regard negritude poetry as being sentimental and idealistic. Though true, this observation may be explained by the fact that the historical antecedence that gave rise to this literacy art form, in the first place, ...

  2. Celestino: A Tribute to the Healing Power of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Georgia Heard spent a week with students in New Mexico, encouraging their search for "self-portrait poetry"--poetry in which they saw themselves. She witnessed courage, pain, tragedy, and hope in the choices and writing of those struggling students, and came to learn that at least one among them had found a life-changing outlet.…

  3. Style and the New Poetic Revolution in Niyi Osundare's Poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Modern African/Nigerian poetry from the loins of Euro-Modernist. Poetry. ... contorted cadences of sprung rhythm, the heavy use of alliteration and assonance within a line… .... imbued it with new energy, a new direction and a new urgency”. (49). .... morning message in times of war: .... How many hours will make a minute.

  4. Italian Sign Language (LIS) Poetry: Iconic Properties and Structural Regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Tommaso; Giuranna, Rosaria; Pizzuto, Elena

    2001-01-01

    Explores and describes from a crosslinguistic perspective, some of the major structural irregularities that characterize poetry in Italian Sign Language and distinguish poetic from nonpoetic texts. Reviews findings of previous studies of signed language poetry, and points out issues that need to be clarified to provide a more accurate description…

  5. Echoing Hylas : metapoetics in Hellenistic and Roman poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, Mark Antonius Johannes

    2010-01-01

    I have argued in my thesis that poets throughout classical antiquity used this myth to reflect allegorically on their own poetry. Certain elements of the myth as well as Hylas himself function as metaphors of the art of poetry as such. In the Hellenistic age, for example, Theocritus employs the

  6. Using Digital Media to Interpret Poetry: Spiderman Meets Walt Whitman

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVee, Mary B.; Bailey, Nancy M.; Shanahan, Lynn E.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers and students often express an aversion to poetry based on their experiences with printbased poetry texts that typically dominate school curricula. Given this challenge and the potential affordances of new and multimodal technologies, we investigate how preservice and inservice teachers enrolled in a new literacies master's course began to…

  7. Concrete Poetry as Sign of Technological Changes in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry......This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry...

  8. Affective and Cognitive Responses to Poetry in the University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, Kate; Simecek, Karen

    2016-01-01

    In universities, as in mainstream education more widely, cognitive approaches to poetry are often dominant. Far from being irrelevant to the serious study of literature, we argue that eliciting students' affective responses to poetry can deepen their cognitive understanding and analytical skills. Drawing on recent research in psychology on the…

  9. Poesie et representations culturelles (Poetry and Cultural Representation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    The ways in which poetry can offer the French second-language learner insights into French daily "culture" are examined. Aspects of poetry discussed include the creation of atmosphere in physical context, the power of words to evoke emotion, and the use of rhythm. Two poems are presented for illustration, and reading and writing exercises are…

  10. “Labyrinth of loneliness”: Breyten Breytenbach's prison poetry (1976 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breytenbach's prison poetry is first contextualized as part of a South African subgenre that flourished under apartheid, and then interrogated for its specificities: the singular prison conditions under which he wrote, the nature of the poetry, specific leitmotifs in each of the five volumes published between 1976 and 1985.

  11. A Poetry Coffee House: Creating a Cool Community of Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the sharing of writing through a coffee house--style poetry reading. Although this article focuses on a workshop and share activity used in a preservice teacher language arts and literacy course, it contains tips and ideas for implementing poetry coffee houses with elementary and secondary school students and preservice and…

  12. Art & Poetry: A Magical Combination. Fine Arts Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunchman, Janis; Briggs, Stephanie Bissell

    1995-01-01

    This article describes how to combine painting and poetry by studying famous paintings and poetry of recognized artists from both media. It covers how to design a project, discussing pictures and poems, and giving children a chance to create their own art. A sidebar lists artists and poets that work well together. Includes extension activities.…

  13. 'I have a picture of the Monster!': Il mostro di Frankenstein and the search for Italian horror cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Russ

    2017-01-01

    Typically accounts of Italian horror cinema have highlighted the production and release of Riccardo Freda's 'I vampiri' (Lust of the Vampire) in the late 1950s as marking the beginning of Italian engagement with the horror genre. The logic that follows is often that the nature of fascist censorship impeded any explorations of the genre in the 1920s and 1930s and that in the post war period it was only the commercial success of Hammer Horror that tempted Italian producers to venture into horro...

  14. Politics in poetry: epic poetry as a critique of Dutch culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Heynders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a Dutch volume of epic poetry, using a disciplinary strategy (concepts and devices from narrative studies and a cultural analytical and rhetorical approach. The volume “Roeshoofd hemelt” by Joost Zwagerman (2005 is a political poetic text that raises fundamental questions on issues of mental illness and on consumerism in contemporary Dutch society.

  15. Survey of Poetry Reading Strategy as the Modern Tool to Identify Poetry Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shirin Shafiei; Zainal, Zaidah

    2016-01-01

    This study examines common strategies that English as a Foreign language (EFL) students employ when reading English poetry. To identify the strategies, a survey was designed for data collection from TESL students. The result shows that students significantly tend to use the strategies that require their creativity to construct new ideas in the…

  16. Bleeding Mud: The Testimonial Poetry of Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua

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    Erin S Finzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with Rubén Darío, Nicaragua has long prided itself in being a country of poets. During the Sandinista Revolution, popular poetry workshops dispatched by Minister of Culture Ernesto Cardenal taught peasants and soldiers to write poetry about everyday life and to use poetry as a way to work through trauma from the civil war. When Hurricane Mitch--one of the first superstorms that heralded climate change--brought extreme flooding to Nicaragua in 1998, poetry again served as a way for victims to process the devastation. Examining testimonial poetry from Hurricane Mitch, this article shows how the mud and despair of this environmental disaster function as palimpsests of conquest and imperial oppression.

  17. Poetry and its Essential Constituents According to Feijoo

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    Rodrigo OLAY VALDÉS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout his essays, Feijoo makes numerous references to his own definition of poetry. He argues that the essential constituents of poetry must be «enthusiasm» (intensity and «versification» (rhythm. Feijoo considers that non-fiction should be regarded as another relevant constitutive of poetry, because non-fiction facilitates the teaching ability and usefulness of poetry. On account of his defense of non-fiction as a way to emphasize the docere, Feijoo came to prefer Lucan’s Pharsalia above Virgil’s Aeneid. Finally, Feijoo also maintained that naturalness was the last requisite of poetry, so he criticized the excesses of Baroque and he defended the literary models and the classical composition strategies that Neoclassicism would soon recover.

  18. The Revolutionary Chora in Seamus Heaney’s Kite Poetry

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    Hannah Spruce

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the presence and impact of the Kristevan chora in the kite poetry of Seamus Heaney, demonstrating how the presence of the chora in his final kite poem “A Kite for Aibhín” is used to alter the discursive representation of fatherhood that was handed down to Heaney through symbolic language. The views of Heaney and Kristeva on the revolutionary potential of poetry is analysed alongside Heaney’s poetry to glean an understanding of how poetry has a profound impact on identity and representation. This paper proves that for Heaney poetry afforded weighty individual change, acting as a technological medium through which he could alter language.

  19. Darwin vs. Wallace: When Poetry Dies and When Poetry Survives in the Not-so-Natural Selection of Memetic Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    The theory of memetic evolution--explaining the reproduction of cultural units called "memes"--illuminates the decline of poetry as a cultural presence by clarifying the contrasting attitudes towards poetry manifested by the co-discoverers of natural selection: Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace. Darwin's eventual indifference to poetry…

  20. Poetry magazines: description of an object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Battilana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to examine different mechanisms of poetry magazines as objects of reflections per se. Literary magazines have a cartographical quality in the sense that they organize the map of a group of works and authors. A magazine produces a critical system of selection. Far from suggesting a stable nature of literary magazines, each of their interventions influences a concrete community and temporality in different ways, which turns each historical moment into a stimulus whose effects are not known beforehand.

  1. Intertextuality shapes the poetry of Xhosa poets

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    M.M. Somniso

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Praises among the amaXhosa today are not only performed at traditional gatherings. These praises are also performed in many places such as schools, churches and funerals. The question is whether the praises performed in other places rather than traditional gatherings still possess the characteristics of traditional praises. In many praises Xhosa poets draw terminology from Biblical texts. This strategy can be seen as an attempt to break the boundaries between Christianity and Xhosa poetry. Having said that, the aim of this article is to uncover the interplay between Xhosa traditional poems and Christianity. To do that, this article discusses the interplay between Christianity, elegy, health and social issues. It also discusses new trends of intertextuality in Xhosa poetry. The intertextual theory insists that a text cannot exist as a hermetic or self-sufficient whole and does not function as a closed system. Still and Worton (1991:1 believe that the writer is a reader of the text before she/he is a creator of texts and therefore the work of art is inevitably alive with references, quotations and influences of every kind.

  2. Obscurity of poetry in Paul Celan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Mendonça Cardozo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tensioned between variations of the said and the unsaid, and between figures of light and shadow, Paul Celan's work performs a certain confrontation with the condition of silence and obscurity, breaking all at once with a certain way of making poetry and of relating to reality. In this sense, Celan's work can hardly be reduced to a kind of hermeticism, a category too vague to account for its singularity. In his work saying and silencing together articulate the tension that creates the poetic space in which the poem is inscribed. The poet himself tried to refuse the insistence of some critics on labeling his work as obscure. Despite of its fragmentary nature, the recently published manuscripts of his speech project Von der Dunkelheit des Dichterischen constitutes one of Celan’s most extensive discussions of the matter of obscurity in poetry. This paper aims at presenting the fragments of his speech project and pointing out its importance to the discussion of the notion of obscurity in Paul Celan's work.

  3. Elizabeth Bishop and the Poetry of Meditation

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    James Matthew Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Bishop’s poetry has won the admiration of a number of Christian poets and scholars. This essay argues that one reason for this is Bishop’s subtle engagement with the work of the poet-divines Gerard Manley Hopkins and, especially, George Herbert; through their influence, she enters into the guiding western poetic tradition of the meditative lyric, which is rooted in the Platonic and Christian accounts of the human person as an image of the Triune God in virtue of the mind as a trinity of memory, understanding, and will. Bishop practiced poetry as a moral act open to a divinity it cannot account for or even name, but traces of whose significance run through the world her poems depict. By considering her work, and her poem “The Weed” in particular, in the context of Herbert, the historical studies of Louis L. Martz, and the literary theory of Yvor Winters, we see that Bishop the unbeliever cannot properly be understood as a “secular” poet, but as one who recognizes the meditative lyric as a way of arriving at understanding of a truth that transcends us.

  4. Why we need more poetry in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-23

    Although many well-known poems consider illness, loss and bereavement, medicine tends to view poetry more as an extracurricular than as a mainstream pursuit. Within palliative care, however, there has been a long-standing interest in how poetry may help patients and health professionals find meaning, solace and enjoyment. The objective of this paper is to identify the different ways in which poetry has been used in palliative care and reflect on their further potential for education, practice and research. A narrative review approach was used, drawing on searches of the academic literature through Medline and on professional, policy and poetry websites to identify themes for using poetry in palliative care. I identified four themes for using poetry in palliative care. These concerned (1) leadership, (2) developing organisational culture, (3) the training of health professionals and (4) the support of people with serious illness or nearing the end of life. The academic literature was mostly made up of practitioner perspectives, case examples or conceptual pieces on poetry therapy. Patients' accounts were rare but suggested poetry can help some people express powerful thoughts and emotions, create something new and feel part of a community. Poetry is one way in which many people, including patients and palliative care professionals, may seek meaning from and make sense of serious illnesses and losses towards the end of life. It may have untapped potential for developing person-centred organisations, training health professionals, supporting patients and for promoting public engagement in palliative care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. A estética documental no cinema ficcional de horror

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Neves de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    O presente trabalho tem como proposta estudar o uso de estruturas documentais no cinema ficcional de horror, tipo de narrativa que ficou conhecida popularmente como found footage. Esses filmes fazem uso de uma linguagem propositalmente híbrida, associando a forma do documentário ao conteúdo da ficção e, hoje, encontram-se tão em voga que já possuem até mesmo clichês e estereótipos. A intenção é entender de que forma o gênero do horror se apropria douso de uma estética associada a registros do...

  6. Virgilian Hauntings in the Later Poetry of Seamus Heaney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hickey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the influence of Virgil upon the poetry of Seamus Heaney through the theoretical lens of Jacques Derrida’s Specters of Marx. The paper argues that the present and future are influenced by spectres of the past through what Derrida would term hauntology. Heaney’s later poetry inherits deeply from what has come before it in terms of classical mythology. Similarities are drawn between contemporary Northern Ireland and that of the classical past in the poetry and it is the circular, repetitive nature of history that enables the poet to locate a plateau, outside his primary world, to view the events of his present world.

  7. Feeling Absence: Horror in Cinema from Post War to Post-Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Wynter, Kevin Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1990s the twin leitmotifs of the European art house, and French cinema in particular, have been images of intense graphic violence and explicit sexuality. Scholars and critics generally refer to this phenomenon as a tendency toward "New Extremism" in cinema. In this dissertation, I demonstrate that the violence and sexuality in these films is neither "new" nor "extreme," but extends and expands upon the themes and elements of the modern American horror film. Historical context...

  8. The hunters of humanity: creatures of horror in M. R. James's ghost stories

    OpenAIRE

    Oryshchuk, Nataliya

    2017-01-01

    In his ghost stories, M.R. James disclosed the most irrational and fearful aspects of archaic demonology still haunting the modern world. He turns humans into prey species, hunted and haunted by repulsive insect- and spider-like demons. This paper offers a closer look at the creatures of horror and the recurrent theme of the hunt in James's ghost stories, viewing them in the context of Victorian evolutionary theories as well as traditional medieval beliefs. James's protagonists, unimaginative...

  9. The return of the projected: some thoughts on paranoia and a recent trend in horror films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, R J

    1995-12-01

    I have focused on two interrelated changes in horror films of the last twenty-five years: a tendency for the "horror" to become internalized; and the use of what I call "bubbling flesh" to signify the internalized horror. Taking two films--the 1958 Fly and its 1986 remake--and treating them as (paranoid) fantasies, I have explored what I take to be the unconscious meanings of these changes. Although both films present oedipal as well as pre-oedipal conflicts, and although both employ paranoid mechanisms of negation and projection of an unacceptable wish, the earlier film also makes greater use of repression to keep the preoedipal wishes farther from consciousness. The earlier film is also more successful in its projection: In the later film the projective mechanisms fail and the projected returns to its original locus. The particular unacceptable wish that I see as being fundamental to these two films (and perhaps to all horror films) is a radically passive wish for merger with the mother--a merger wish so radical that it can be seen in terms of Gun-trip's "return to the womb" wishes, and so passive that it can be seen as a nearly pure form o Freud's death drive--the drive toward total quiescence and dissolution. I have associated the differences between the two films with changes in society in the past decades, and especially with changes in traditionally conceived gender roles and their associated senses of gender identity. Finally, I have suggested that we view these historical changes not as signs of societal regression but as the beginnings of the failure of one set of defense mechanisms that can possibly allow an opening to try out new strategies.

  10. Der Gewalt ihre Freiheit - Der Horror-Film als jugendliches Wertekonstrukt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Marci-Boehncke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jugendliche Gewaltbereitschaft wird in der medienkritischen Diskussion nicht selten auf mediale Vorbilder zurück geführt. Anhand qualitativer Daten wird zum einen gezeigt, dass das Erkennen medialer Gewalt in Sprache und Handlung bildungsabhängig ist, zum anderen, dass Jugendliche nach eigenen Angaben aus sehr unterschiedlichen Gründen zur Gewalt bereit wären – etwa, um Freunde zu verteidigen. Besonders betrachtet werden dann Jugendliche, die gern Horrorfilme anschauen. Die Untersuchung zeigt, dass die Fans von Horrorfilmen eine Rezeptionshaltung einnehmen, die zwischen Angst-Lust und Distanz oszilliert. Es interessieren hier keine identifikatorischen Aspekte, sondern Jugendliche haben Spaß an den medialen Inszenierungen des Gruseligen. Jenseits medienmoralischer Warnungen plädiert der Beitrag – unter Verweis auch auf Rezeptionstheorien der Literaturwissenschaft – dafür, distanzierten Horror-Genuss als Spielform nicht zu überbewerten und ihn auch als Ausdruck elaborierter Lese- und Medienkompetenz zu verstehen. Whereas within media-critical discussions violence of teens is sometimes said to be produced by referent power of media, this paper presents empirical data which show that and how teens are able to assume a distance when viewing media violence in horror-films. What they feel is not empathy, but fun. Young people enjoy a kind of delightful horror for themselves and are able to step into distance while talking to peers about their impressions during reception. This way of “delightful horror” is not only a phenomenon of modern media reception but can be found in recent and established horror literature. In so far this article encourages a more relaxed way of judging young people’s media habits.

  11. Figurative Language on Maya Angelou selected Poetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risma Hayani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find out the kinds of figurative language in the five selected poetries of Maya Angelou, the titles are: Alone, Caged Bird, Old Folks Laugh, Phenomenal Woman, Still I Rise. The focus of this study is figurative language which involves: Metaphor, Personification, Hyperbole, Simile, Metonymy, Synecdoche, Irony, Antithesis, Symbolism, and Paradox. Qualitative approach with design of content analysis was used in this study. The researcher acted as the main instrument since she was the one who analyzed the figurative language. Moreover checklist was also used to support her data collection. The data was analyzed through three stages; 1. Data reduction, 2. Data representation, 3. Conclusion. The result of her study showed there were 40 sentences that containing figurative language in five selected poetries of Maya Angelou. They were; Metaphor (13 sentences, Personification (9 sentences, Hyperbole (1 sentence, Simile (8 sentences, Synecdoche (1 sentence, Antithesis (1 sentence, Symbolism (5 sentences, and Paradox (2 sentences. The researcher conclude, if the figurative language used by Angelou to compare, or even symbolize the sentences to bring the meaning come up with beautiful language. Mostly of her poetries told about her experience in the past that rooted to history of the discrimination of American-African.

  12. Experimental Words: sharing science through poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.; Illingworth, S. M.; Simpson, D.; Bravenec, A.; Calder, E.; Palmer, P. I.; Payen, F.; Ailes, K.; Alexander, F.; Garry, D.; McLean, K.; Wilson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Scientific outreach is often understood as the dissemination of results to a wide audience: press conferences and articles are a common example thereof. Despite their significant reach, these productions fail to generate public engagement; conversely, scientific and artistic collaborations, while they touch fewer people, may generate more impact."Experimental Words" explores the exchanges between scientific practice and performing arts. Coordinated by Dr. Sam Illingworth and funded by the National Environment Research Council, this project brought together four duos composed each of a poet from the Loud Poets company and a scientist from the University of Edinburgh. Duos were formed after a four-hour workshop and given a month to create a 10-minute piece representing the scientist's work. Pieces were then sown into a two-hour show by a series of poems and interventions by Dr. Illingworth and poet Dan Simpson; audience members was also offered to write poems of their own. Two promotional videos were uploaded to YouTube® before and after the event. The show itself was performed on June 14th, 2017 at the Scottish Storytelling Centre for an audience of 45 people. The scientific themes included the exploration of atmospheric boundary layers, topographic laser scanning on coastal marshes, the cultural challenges of volcanology in South America, and the various methods used to trace early water. Through a combination of theatre, spoken word poetry and sketching, the performances brought scientists, laboratory experiments, communication technology and even the audience to the stage. The audience, mostly composed of scientists and poetry enthusiasts, was exposed to their familiar interest and to novelty in a show that humanised science and anchored poetry. The performers were similarly enthused: poets acclaimed the inspiration they received from learning about the natural environment, while scientists discovered that seeing their work the poets' eyes changed their

  13. From Exile to Affirmation: The Poetry of Joseph Brodsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patterson

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relation between the exile of the poet from his homeland and the "exile of the word." The notion of the exile of the word pertains to the poet's problem of re-introducing meaning to the word—an excess of meaning that conveys more than the word can normally convey—through his poetry. Showing how the poet in exile becomes a poet of exile, the article examines what poetry has to do with a larger difficulty of exile and homelessness in human life. Brodsky's poetry, the article argues, addresses this very difficulty. The article concludes that the human capacity to dwell in the world is a capacity to instill the word with meaning, and that this is one important message to come to us through the poetry of Joseph Brodsky.

  14. The Image of Women in Shoghi’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    جعفر دلشاد

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Image of Women in Shoghi’s Poetry     Zahra Soleymanpour *   Jafar Delshad **       Abstract     From a long time ago, describing the woman as well as love and mania has allocated a large part of poets’ poetry to itself. It could be said that there is almost no poet some of whose poems are not related to women. Moreover, love and affection are in fact common senses among human beings. In the period of Arabic poetry movement, this issue found a different color and the poets noticed the social status of women and attempted to restore the lost rights. In Shoghi’s poetry, the woman was pictured in two ways. The first was related to social problems with which the women were facing at that time and in fact they were the main factor of the movements which were seeking the women freedom. The second was the woman image as a matter of lyricism. In Shoghi’s poetry, two tendencies could be observed. The first is the classical tendency in the introduction of his eulogy poems as well as those which were purely in the field lyricism. The second is the romantic tendency shown in his presentation poetry. In these poems, the poet writes the poetry through his feeling and emotion and because he speaks by the heroes of the story, he has more freedom of speech. Our aim in this article is to have an analytical investigation of Shoghi’s viewpoints concerning social issues related to women and his lyricism (material or spiritual.     Key words: Shoghi’s poetry, women, social issues, lyric  * Ph.D Candidate in Arabic Language and Literature, University of Isfahan.   E-mail: soleymanpoorza@yahoo.com.  ** Assistant Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, University of Isfahan .

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  16. Transforming the findings of narrative research into poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sharon Lorraine

    2015-05-01

    To offer dramatic poetry as representing findings from narrative research that is more accessible. This article is drawn from the author's doctorate work on how students' stories about their 'clinical' experiences can aid learning. Nursing students' stories of clinical practice experiences when engaged in the care of patients represented as dramatic poetry. Qualitative analytical approaches in narrative data analysis to provide a review of student stories from a variety of perspectives. This article illustrates a method for converting story data to poetry. It suggests that a range of audiences can learn from nursing students' stories of clinical practice when translated into dramatic poetry. Audiences can come close to understanding what students are experiencing in practice when engaged in the care of patients and learning from their practice experiences, when these experiences are expressed as dramatic poetry. Representing findings from narrative research as dramatic poetry can help audiences engage with nursing students' experiences at an emotional level. Enabling researchers and readers to become immersed in the poem transforming their understanding of what the students have learned.

  17. Gadow's romanticism: science, poetry and embodiment in postmodern nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2004-07-01

    Sally Gadow's work is a sophisticated version of a familiar line of thought in nursing. She creates a chain of distinctions which is intended to differentiate cultural narratives, and particularly the 'science narrative', from imaginative narratives, especially poetry. Cultural narratives regulate and restrict; imaginative narratives are creative, liberating and potentially transcendent. These ideological effects are (supposedly) achieved through different structures of language. Scientific language, for example, is abstract and literal, while poetry is sensuous and metaphorical. In this paper, I argue that Gadow's way of discriminating between science and poetry fails. In the first place, the ideological valence she assigns to each of them is unwarranted. Science and poetry can both be harnessed to the project of emancipation, just as both can be incorporated in a strategy of oppression. In the second place, the claim that poetry and science are distinguished by their respective linguistic features--specifically, that one is metaphorical and the other literal--cannot be sustained. I illustrate this argument, as Gadow illustrates hers, by reference to the concept of embodiment, and consider whether Gadow is correct in thinking that poetry, not science, makes it possible for individuals (especially women) to 'reclaim the body'. I also suggest that Gadow's brand of postmodernism echoes Romanticism, whose defining characteristic was an insistent contrast between poetry and science. This is 'flip side' postmodernism, which merely opposes modernist values, preferring subjectivity to objectivity, feeling to rationality, and multiple realities to truth. It is less radical, and far less interesting, than 'remix' postmodernism, whose objective is not to reverse the polarities, but to reconfigure the entire circuit.

  18. The El Horror uranium anomaly in northeastern Sonora, Mexico: Constraints from geochemical and mineralogical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Rodríguez, T.; Valencia-Moreno, M.; Calmus, T.; Del Rio-Salas, R.; Balcázar-García, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work reviews the characteristics of the El Horror uranium prospect in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. It was formerly detected by a radiometric anomaly after airborne gamma ray exploration carried out in the 70's by the Mexican government. As a promising site to contain important uranium resources, the El Horror was re-evaluated by CFE (Federal Electricity Commission) by in situ gamma ray surveys. The study also incorporates rock and stream sediment ICP-MS geochemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectrometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to provide a better understanding of the radiometric anomaly. The results show that, instead of a single anomaly, it comprises at least five individual anomalies hosted in hydrothermally altered Laramide (80-40 Ma) andesitic volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation. Concentrations for elemental uranium and uranium calculated from gamma ray surveys (i.e., equivalent uranium) are not spatially coincident within the anomaly, but, at least at some degree, they do so in specific sites. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry revealed the presence of rutile/anatase, uvite, bukouvskyte and allanite as the more likely mineral phases to contain uranium. SEM studies revealed a process of iron-rich concretion formation, suggesting that uranium was initially incorporated to the system by adsorption, but was largely removed later during incorporation of Fe+3 ions. Stream sediment geochemistry reveals that the highest uranium concentrations are derived from the southern part of the Sierra La Madera batholith (∼63 Ma), and decrease toward the El Horror anomaly.

  19. Writing poetry through the eyes of science a teacher's guide to scientific literacy and poetic response

    CERN Document Server

    Gorrell, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Writing Poetry Through the Eyes of Science: A Teacher's Guide to Scientific Literacy and Poetic Response presents a unique and effective interdisciplinary approach to teaching science poems and science poetry writing in secondary English and science classrooms.

  20. A morfologia do horror : construção e percepção na obra lovecraftiana

    OpenAIRE

    Alcebiades Diniz Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Resumo: O horror ficcional é uma das constantes na produção cultural do século XX, como um reflexo que acompanha o horror político. Esse horror culturalmente produzido, que é estético, podemos vislumbrar em vasta produção da indústria cultural ? que cobre as mais diversas mídias e formas de representação ?, tendo seu momento inicial na ficção fantástica dos séculos XVIII-XIX. Na década de 1920-30, o escritor norte-americano Howard Phillips Lovecraft retomaria essa tradição do fantástico, acre...

  1. Elementi postmoderni nell'horror americano contemporaneo. Forme testuali e culturali della mutazione 1968-1998

    OpenAIRE

    Armentano, Chiara

    2008-01-01

    This research argues for an analysis of textual and cultural forms in the American horror film (1968- 1998), by defining the so-called postmodern characters. The “postmodern” term will not mean a period of the history of cinema, but a series of forms and strategies recognizable in many American films. From a bipolar re-mediation and cognitive point of view, the postmodern phenomenon is been considered as a formal and epistemological re-configuration of the cultural “modern” system...

  2. The horror of madness in Estrella distante and Nocturno de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Rocco

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the thematic dimension of madness present in the novels Estrella distante and Nocturno de Chile by Roberto Bolaño in order to determine the various ways by which the narrator subjectivity develops a critical consciousness of madness from the traumatic experience of the Chilean dictatorship. Also, this dimension evidences the articulation of a language of madness as literary aesthetics of artistic experience of limits: the horror. Accordingly, a preliminary analysis of contemporary history as a meeting place between violent media versus artistic media that account for the chiaroscuro of Latin American modernity is offered.

  3. QUANDO O OLHAR É CAPTURADO: O FASCÍNIO DOS ADOLESCENTES PELA FILMOGRAFIA DE HORROR

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Dalla Côrte Cantarelli

    2015-01-01

    O presente estudo buscou compreender o grande interesse dos adolescentes pela filmografia de horror na atualidade. Para tanto, a pesquisa desenvolveu-se através de uma abordagem qualitativa, de caráter exploratório e utilizou o grupo focal como técnica para análise dos dados. Optou-se por realizar o estudo com alunos de uma escola estadual do interior do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, a qual promove um projeto que objetiva o desenvolvimento de oficinas sobre cinema com os alunos, se...

  4. The diegetic camera: narrative legibility and documental verisimilitude in found footage horror films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Carreiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ake found footage horror films have been massively made in the last two decades. To shoot a fictional script and give to it the texture of a documentary, a filmmaker has to deal with a number of creative restrictions in order to impose to images and sounds an effect of reality present in amateur footage. This essay examines recurring patterns of style, in this subgenre of movies, which have been used to combine narrative clarity and documental verisimilitude – a combination imposed by the presence of recording devices on the diegesis. 

  5. Documenting Horror: The Use of Sound in Non-Fiction 9/11 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Schlotterbeck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available While conventional 9/11 documentaries focus on the most known and visible images of the attack, three films that work against this tendency, 9/11 (2002, 11'09''01 - September 11 (2002 and Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004, avoid the television news coverage of the towers and portray the attacks primarily through sound. These films avoid or scantly interject the too familiar footage, working instead with the audio track’s ability to convey the horrors of the event.  By emphasizing sound, these films address a challenge familiar to documentary studies: how to appropriately represent a historical event whose tragic scale makes aesthetic representation questionable.

  6. Compassionate solidarity: suffering, poetry, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulehan, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suffering is the experience of distress or disharmony caused by the loss, or threatened loss, of what we most cherish. Such losses may strip away the beliefs by which we construct a meaningful narrative of human life in general and our own in particular. The vocation of physicians and other health professionals is to relieve suffering caused by illness, trauma, and bodily degeneration. However, since suffering is an existential state that does not necessarily parallel physical or emotional states, physicians cannot rely solely on knowledge and skills that address physiological dysfunction. Rather, they must learn to engage the patient at an existential level. Unfortunately, however, medical pedagogy encourages "detached concern," which devalues subjectivity, emotion, relationship, and solidarity. The term "compassionate solidarity" summarizes an alternative model, which begins with empathic listening and responding, requires reflectivity and self-understanding, and is in itself a healing act. Poetry, along with other imaginative writing, may help physicians and other health professionals grow in self-awareness and gain deeper understanding of suffering, empathy, compassion, and symbolic healing.

  7. Ecocriticism and Irish Poetry A Preliminary Outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Mc Elroy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a brief thumbnail sketch of how Irish poetry has situated “nature” inside its competing narrative forms. Beginning with Irish poetry’s earliest lyrics and concluding with some of Ireland’s most recent, and most experimental, writers, the goal of the piece is to introduce some rudimentary eco-critical theory as a means of better understanding how nature acts as a complex cultural and political semiotic, so often overlooked, in Irish literature. En route, the article examines and in part deconstructs those critical categories that have often divided Irish literature into two distinct ecological camps: the picturesque (read colonialist/tourist and the oral (read native/indigenous. The article also considers the importance of ecofeminist theory and asks how critics might better read Ireland’s women poets as nature poets in their own right. In closing, the piece turns its attention to a number of recent poets, both men and women, who have exceeded the picturesque/oral divide and now require eco-alternative readings of nature as we enter the second decade of the 21st Century.

  8. Aesthetic and emotional effects of meter and rhyme in poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal.

  9. 'From grade B thrillers to deluxe chillers': prestige horror, female audiences, and allegories of spectatorship in The Spiral Staircase (1946)

    OpenAIRE

    Snelson, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the prestige ‘shocker’ The Spiral Staircase (1946), suggesting that it challenges the perception of the decline in quality in the horror genre in the 1940s, as well as assumptions in scholarship that the genre has historically been addressed to a male audience. Whilst the film is usually discussed as a woman’s film, on release it was centred as part of a distinct shift in the horror genre from ‘grade B thrillers to deluxe chillers’. The reclassification of films like The S...

  10. Effects of a Multimodal Approach on ESL/EFL University Students' Attitudes towards Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyn, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Poetry is a specific genre of literature that has been long argued as being too difficult for ESL/EFL learners. However, poetry is considered a valuable and authentic material for teaching language learners and teaching poetry in the language classroom can lead to a meaningful language learning experience. This study examined the implementation of…

  11. "Poetry Does Really Educate": An Interview with Spoken Word Poet Luka Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spoken word poetry is a means of engaging young people with a genre that has often been much maligned in classrooms all over the world. This interview with the Australian spoken word poet Luka Lesson explores issues that are of pressing concern to poetry education. These include the idea that engagement with poetry in schools can be enhanced by…

  12. Poems about Sandwich Cookies, Jelly, and Chocolate: Poetry in K-3 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2012-01-01

    The author had presented a session on poetry at a children's literature conference sponsored by The Ohio State University, and afterward two teachers invited her to come to their school and read poetry. The children emailed their responses to her shortly after she spent the entire day conducting poetry reading sessions at an elementary school in…

  13. Poetry and World War II: Creating Community through Content-Area Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Elizabeth E. G.; Nixon, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    Two educators and a classroom of fifth grade students integrated poetry writing into social studies curriculum focusing on World War II. Several strategies and approaches to writing poetry are highlighted including list poems, writing from photographs and artifacts, and two voice poems. The study culminated in a poetry reading and the creation of…

  14. Teaching Poetry Tips; Teaching English without Desks; A Brief History of Time and the "Red Clock."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gem; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This issue of "Insights into Open Education" presents three short articles dealing with teaching poetry, English instruction, and the concept of time. The first article, "Teaching Poetry Tips" (Gem Reid), discusses the author's experiences conducting a week-long poetry workshop for a class of 30 second graders. The second article, "Teaching…

  15. Knock Poetry off the Pedestal: It's Time to Make Poems a Part of Children's Everyday Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The author knows firsthand that most kids seem to like poetry, however, something amiss happens along the road to adulthood, and many of those same students end up actively disliking poetry or not relating to it. Who can blame them? Poetry is often presented as a rarefied thing that exists only to be analyzed by professorial types or as…

  16. The first translations of Harlem renaissance poetry in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Petrič

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available From the present-day perspective Harlem Renaissance poetry represents an epoch-making contribution by America's black authors to the mainstream literature. However, in the post World War 1 era black authors struggled for recognition in their homeland. The publication of a German anthology Afrika singt in the late 1920s agitated Europe as well as the German-speaking authors in Slovenia. Mile Klopčič, a representative of the poetry of Social Realism, translated a handful of Har­ lem Renaissance poems into Slovene using, except in two cases, the German anthology as a source text. His translations are formally accomplished but fail to reproduce the cultural significance of the Harlem Renaissance poetry.

  17. IMAGERY ANALYSIS ON EMILY DICKINSON’S POETRY

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    Masagus Sulaiman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to figure out the imagery and its meanings in the five poetry of Emily Dickinson. This research was regarded on a descriptive-qualitative study. The researcher applied documentation technique in collecting the data. In data analysis, psychoanalytic approach by Kristeva was used. The results of the research showed that there were sixty-two types of imagery foundin the five poetry of Emily Dickinson, for instance; fifty-one visual, one auditory, one olfactory, three tactile, one organic and five kinesthetics. In addition, the five poetry of Emily Dickinson had something to do with the themes and meanings of humans’ livesand their relationship with their God that symbolized and illustrated by things, and personally regarded on the reflections of Emily Dickinson’s life.

  18. GENRE IN RELATION TO SACRUM. CRISIS OF FAITH, HORROR AND POP CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Taszycka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the text “Genre in relation to sacrum. Crisis of faith, horror and pop culture” Samuel Nowak and Anna Taszycka ponder over the phenomenon of modern horror raising the subject of sacrum, especially in relation to the motive of possession and exorcism. The authors attempt to prove that the phenomenon is symptomatic for the transition from religiousness, understood in institutional and collective terms, to individual and contemplative spirituality. After analysing selected films from the perspective of “spirituality” (in the meaning given to it by Zbigniew Pasek the authors conclude that today the pop cultural narrations which depict the new function of sacrum and shift the load from institution to an individual may become successful and accepted by viewers.According to the authors the traditional narration – which associates sacrum with a religious experience – is supplanted today by stories which treat sacrum rather in terms of a spiritual experience. This transformation leads to many possible alternative interpretations of selected films which in this text were described in categories of pensiveness or meta-interpretation.

  19. Interior Design Based on Forough Farrokhzad Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sanami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to correlate between art, literature, architect and visualization to translate the emotions and aspirations embodied in a well-known poet such as Forough Farrokhzad. Forough Farrokhzad widely regarded as a famous Iranian poet and an advocate for women’s liberation and independence. She wrote during a time when Iranian women were facing extensive discrimination and prejudice. Many of her works are rich in feminist related aspects of Iranian women. By visualization of Forough’s inner feelings, one can see a great revaluation in society towards women feelings and emotions. Like any other human, poets and artist both have thoughts and dreams rich in colors and words capsulizing their imaginary world in possible dreams which are all related to each person’s personality, culture, environment and etc. One of the ways to understand a poet is to understand the depth of his/her thoughts through his/her poems. Thus the main purpose of this research is to review interior design based on in depth analysis of related poems. Psychoanalysis of symbols, themes and colors used in poems, can be used to supplement words in extracting symptoms and energy depicting the poet inner feelings and imaginations when designing. The results of the discussing symbols and colors used by Forough in most of her poems, indicate her interest in life, death, love, society, intellectuality and philosophy. Finally the researchers through usage of visual effects and pictures used in her designs tries to assist the viewers to understand and feel the poet’s emotions and passions for life at the time of creating the poems. Thus, it can be assumed that the interior design is based on poetry rich in motion and dynamism.

  20. Blood, Monstrosity and Violent Imagery: Grand-Guignol, the French Theatre of Horror as a Form of Violent Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Jurković

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the sixty-year period of its existence, Grand-Guignol, the French theatre of horror, gained a status of a legendary theatre which dealt with horrors and terrors of human mind, successfully connecting faits divers (common, everyday facts with the erotic and titillating scenes of violence on stage. The performance style, the writing, the special effects, and the directorship over the course of years, made this theatre a legendary place where blood flowed in streams and people fainted during performances, in this way making its indelible mark in horror genre today. In this paper, the author is trying to focus the attention on the theatre of Grand-Guignol as a form of violent entertainment and the way the representations of violence and horror enacted on its stage affected the audience, through Goldstein’s theory of the importance of visual imagery in different media today. Furthermore, through comparison of violent acts presented on the stage of the Grand-Guignol and the atmosphere they create in the viewer’s mind with some of the aspects of Artaud’s vision of his theatre of cruelty, the author attempts to show how this form of violent entertainment in the theatrical media influences the vision of that same violence within the audience, with the sense of security as the main idea in which the viewers feel safe to enjoy, envision and in a way become the participants in the performances enacted on the small stage of the Grand-Guignol.

  1. Nationalism, racism and propaganda in early Weimar Germany: contradictions in the campaign against the "black horror on the Rhine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Julia

    2012-01-01

    During the early 1920s, an average of 25,000 colonial soldiers from North Africa, Senegal and Madagascar formed part of the French army of occupation in the Rhineland. The campaign against these troops, which used the racist epithet ‘black horror on the Rhine’ (schwarze Schmach am Rhein), was one of the most important propaganda efforts of the Weimar period. In black horror propaganda, images of alleged sexual violence against Rhenish women and children by African French soldiers served as metaphors for Germany’s ‘victimization’ through the Versailles Treaty. Because the campaign initially gained broad popular and official support, historians have tended to consider the black horror a successful nationalist movement bridging political divides and strengthening the German nation state. In contrast, this essay points to some of the contradictions within the campaign, which often crystallized around conflicts over the nature of effective propaganda. Extreme racist claims about the Rhineland’s alleged ‘mulattoization’ (Mulattisierung) increasingly alienated Rhinelanders and threatened to exacerbate traditional tensions between the predominantly Catholic Rhineland and the central state at a time when Germany’s western borders seemed rather precarious in the light of recent territorial losses and separatist agitation. There was a growing concern that radical strands within the black horror movement were detrimental to the cohesion of the German nation state and to Germany’s positive image abroad, and this was a major reason behind the campaign’s decline after 1921/22. The conflicts within the campaign also point to some hitherto neglected affinities between the black horror and subsequent Nazi propaganda.

  2. Suspension trauma; Le traumatisme de suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel, S. [Le Centre de sante et de services sociaux du rocher Perce, Chandler, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the precautions that should be taken to avoid falls from wind turbines or transmission towers. Suspension trauma was explained by a medical doctor in terms of physiology and the body's normal circulation and the elements that disturb normal physiology when in suspension. The trauma occurs following a fall, which carries the risk of 1or more disorders, such as massive hemorrhage, high cardiac pulse, and constriction of blood vessels. Nausea, vertigo, cardiac arrhythmia and sweating occur 15 to 20 minutes following the fall. The presentation emphasized the importance of having qualified personnel at the site and wearing proper harnesses and equipment that supports the neck. figs.

  3. Soil in Persian Poetry and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem AlaviPanah, Seyed; Taghavibayat, Aida; Behifar, Maedeh; Alavipanah, Sadroddin

    2017-04-01

    Almost everybody knows that soils are the foundation of food production and foodsecurity, supplying plants with nutrients, water and supports for their roots, but how many people or policy makes know that: Soil is a Complex, Dynamic, Open System and life also is the same! Increasing public awareness about soil-related outreach involves the dissemination and acceptance of information about soil to stakeholders who have not been aware of its importance. Public awareness can support efforts to involve private sector, indigenous and local communities and NGOs to engage on soil related activities. In this regard utilization of cultural and traditional understanding of soil issues (ethnopedology, art, literature, customs, and poems) is essential and vital to promote soil awareness among policy-makers, donors and the general public in order to find better understanding of soil's role in global issues such as climate change. In this paper we extensively analysis Persian and Iranian poems in order to get better understanding of cultural patterns of soils and its contribution to society. In ancient Cultures Classical elements (earth(Soil), water, air, fire,) explained the nature of all matters around the world, same as many other, in Persian. Each of these elements has their nature and personalities. Soil also refers to one part of human's life cycle. After death we join to soil. Therefore in Persian culture and poetry there is lots of poem which express these concepts such as poem below of Umar Khayyam Neyshabouri which noted the importance and the nature of soil and its relation to vegetation, and their cause-effect relationships about one thousand years ago. "Every unique herb vegetated next to a stream/ is as if grown from the lip of an angelical beauty/ don't stampede (degrade) that herb/ because it is vegetated from the soil of a beauty whose face is like a tulip". and Look how the morning breeze has helped the rosebud bloom/ And how at the sight of the rose the

  4. Civil history and poetry, certainty and truth in Francis Bacon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Manzo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at studying key components of Francis Bacon’s theory of history and of his work as practitioner of civil history, particularly in regard to truth and certainty in historical narratives. It compares Bacon’s theories of history and poetry, and the way in which he conceives their relation to certainty, truth and fiction. It analyzes mainly two sorts of writings. On the one hand, it investigates the programmatic texts where Bacon’s views of history and poetry are developed. On the other hand, it examines the finished and unfinished civil histories written by Bacon as historian. In addition, the article evaluates Bacon’s stances against the background of Renaissance and early modern English historiography. It concludes that although history and poetry constitute separate branches in Bacon’s classification of learning, they share important elements, in keeping with the view of poetry maintained by his contemporary Philip Sidney. Thus, Bacon included fictional patterns in his historical narrative and distinguished certainties from conjectures in a particular way. This attitude towards civil history shows a strong contrast to Bacon’s methodology for natural histories, which, in order to reach certainty, staunchly recommends to exclude any fictional narrative in reporting the facts of nature.

  5. Patterns of deviation in Niyi Osundare's poetry | Dick | Mgbakoigba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... A critical stylistic study of the poetry of Niyi Osundare from Nigeria reveals that he has made an exemplary ... deviate from norms and conventions of language thereby creating aesthetics ...

  6. Poetry in the Academy: A Language of Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggo, Carl

    2018-01-01

    As a poet, researcher, and teacher in the academy, I have pursued my vocation with an abiding commitment to both creative and critical discourse. I inquire into my autobiographical experiences as a poet, researcher, and teacher in the institutional contexts of a Faculty of Education by creating a performance of poetry that seeks to honour…

  7. Possibilities for Biblio/Poetry Therapy Services in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Arleen McCarty

    1990-01-01

    Describes interactive bibliotherapy and poetry therapy as services which use literature as a catalyst for personal growth and healing through a facilitator. Their use in schools, hospitals, nursing homes, adult education centers, prisons, and chemical dependency units is discussed; reading bibliotherapy is described; and use for spiritual growth…

  8. An Audio-Visual Presentation of Black Francophone Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Charlotte H.

    1982-01-01

    A college class project to develop a videocassette presentation of African, Caribbean, and Afro-American French poetry is described from its inception through the processes of obtaining copyright and translation permissions, arranging scripts, presenting at various functions, and reception by Francophone and non-Francophone audiences. (MSE)

  9. Enhancing Poetry Writing through Technology: The Yin and the Yang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Schmidt, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Describes the outcome of an innovative mentoring program that paired technology faculty and methods faculty in order to form partnerships to facilitate the modeling of technology for preservice teachers. Discusses the creation of useful applications for enhancing poetry writing through technology for elementary school students. (SG)

  10. Poetry and narrative therapy for anxiety about spinal surgery | Naidu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case study presents the use of poetry in psychotherapy with an adolescent girl, Buhle (a pseudonym), who needed surgery to correct a curvature of her spine due to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. She experienced anxiety which prevented surgeons from doing the procedure. Psychotherapists used narrative therapy to ...

  11. Tuning the Self : George Herbert's poetry as cognitive behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Eelco

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a cognitive analysis of the poetry of George Herbert (1593- 1633). From Herbert’s own thinking, recorded in his prose treatises, can be deduced that his poems should serve a specific function: teaching self-knowledge to his readers. Self-knowledge is a necessary skill, to be

  12. Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

    2005-01-01

    Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

  13. ON PATTERNS OF INTERSUBJECTIVE COGNITION IN DIDACTIC POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gabor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical reception of didactic poetry has displayed two tendencies in the past few decades. Firstly, the emphasis has been on what is taught in the works of art instead of how the teaching process is structured. Therefore rhetorical and philological approaches dominate theory and interpretation. Secondly, the status of didactic poetry as a poetic genre is often questioned despite the fact that its ancient Aristotelian critique has been revised. The aim of the paper is to reconsider both aspects from the viewpoint of cognitive genre theory. I examine what kinds of cognitive patterns organise the teaching process in three texts: in De rerum natura (On Nature by Titus Lucretius Carus, in A méltóság keserve (The Lament of Dignity by the Hungarian poet György Bessenyei, and in Die Metamorphose der Pflanzen (The Metamorphosis of Plants by Johann Wolfgang Goethe. In the demonstration of how the teacher-pupil interaction serves as the basis of the complex didactic process I apply the evolutionary model of teaching behaviour. The main results of the investigation are (i drawing attention to the indirect adaptations of teaching behaviour (e.g. social tolerance, local enhancement, evaluative feedback represented in didactic poetry; (ii demonstrating the importance of poetic imagery in didactic poetry, emphasising the close relation between poetic and didactic configurations; (iii rethinking the notion of genre as a specific pattern of cognition mediating between particular sociocultural contexts.

  14. [Poetry: Literature Curriculum, Grades Five and Six; Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Oregon Elementary English Project.

    This curriculum guide is intended to introduce fifth and sixth grade children to the study of poetry. Separate units include discussion of, suggested activities for, and questions about (1) metrics and scansion; (2) rhyme scheme and stanza; (3) diction, denotation and connotation, and onomatopoeia; (4) rhyme (end rhyme, masculine and feminine…

  15. The Sky Clears; Poetry of the American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, A. Grove

    More than 200 authentic poems and lyrics of North American Indians are compiled in this anthology. The poetry was translated from tribal languages into English over the past 100 years by students of Indian language, lore, and life. The poems, taken from about 40 North American tribes, include songs of Eskimos of the Arctic coasts, totem-pole…

  16. Poetry for Social Consciousness, Criticism and Change: A Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For Ezenwa-Ohaeto, a poet and a critic of international repute, the idea of writing and reading literature (poetry) for its own sake, is, in the words of Chunualumogu Achebe, “a deodorized shit.” In consonance with Achebe's views on the utility of literature, Ezenwa-Ohaeto, in most of his anthologies of poems, reveals himself ...

  17. Oguega Divination Poetry In Edo State, Nigeria Abstract Introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frederick Iraki

    Although Oguega terms are esoteric, one notices that the poetry which goes with the codified .... It is a normal thing to go through the door to access a room and an abnormal thing to use the window ... This is of course why such persons may be seen as poor historians. .... Encarta Encarta Microsoft Corporation1993-2008.

  18. Intertextual resonance in Christopher Okigbo's poetry | Okune | Lwati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artistic creativity can be demonstrated in several ways, one of which is in the area of intertextuality as a literary endeavour. Intertextuality is the by-product of wide scholarship, which Christopher Okigbo exemplifies in his poetry. No work of art exists in a vacuum, as every writer is said to operate within a given literary tradition ...

  19. Expressive intent, ambiguity, and aesthetic experiences of music and poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth; Levine, William H; Simchy-Gross, Rhimmon; Kroger, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author's intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts-excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts). Moreover, the information modulated the aesthetic experience of the excerpts in different ways for the different excerpt types: positive intent information increased enjoyment and the degree to which people found the musical excerpts to be moving, but negative intent information increased these qualities for poetry. Additionally, positive intent information was judged to better match musical excerpts and negative intent information to better match poetic excerpts. These results suggest that empathy with a perceived human artist is indeed an important shared factor across experiences of music and poetry, but that other mechanisms distinguish the generation of aesthetic appreciation between these two media.

  20. Learning about Yeast through Science, Art and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lois; Brade, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cross-curricular project designed to enhance learning about micro-organisms. This project includes studies in art and poetry, not subjects that teachers would think of linking with science, however research notes that scientists and poets share the ability to pay close attention to things, a key skill also…

  1. Memory decreases for prose, but not for poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Dowling, W Jay

    2007-06-01

    Memory for details of text generally declines relatively rapidly, whereas memory for propositional and context-based meanings is generally more resilient over time. In the present study, we investigated short-term memory for two kinds of verbal material: prose and poetry. Participants heard or read prose stories or poems in which aphrase near the start of the passage served as a target. The text continued, and after various delays, memory was tested with a repetition of the target (old verbatim; O), a paraphrased lure (P), or a lure in which the meaning was changed. For prose, memory for surface details (as measured by O/P discrimination) declined over time (Experiments 2-4), as was expected. For poetry, memory for surface details (O/P discrimination) did not decline with increasing delay (Experiments 1, 3, and 4). This lack of decline in memory for the surface details of poetry is discussed in relation to similar results previously observed for musical excerpts (Dowling, Tillmann, & Ayers, 2001), suggesting that a particular role is played by the temporal organization and rhythmic structure of poetry andmusic.

  2. Pedagogy for Liberation: Spoken Word Poetry in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Mia

    2015-01-01

    The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, hip hop of the 1980s and early 1990s, and spoken word poetry have each attempted to initiate the dialogical process outlined by Paulo Freire as necessary in overturning oppression. Each art form has done this by critically engaging with the world and questioning dominant systems of power. However,…

  3. New Directions in Computational Analysis of Biblical Poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peursen, W.T.; Jonker, Louis; Kotzé, Gideon R.; Maier, Christl M.

    2017-01-01

    Since the publication of Robert Lowth’s De sacra poesi Hebraeorum (1753) there has been a strong tendency in biblical studies to consider biblical poetry primarily as literary compositions. In Psalms research, literary structures such as parallelism received more attention than syntactic patterns

  4. Promoting emotional health through haiku, a form of Japanese poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M S

    1998-02-01

    This teaching technique can be adapted to use with young children. The use of rhymes may be easier and more fun for younger students. Also, this teaching technique can be used to address numerous health issues, which makes it appropriate for all health content areas. In addition to using student selections that illustrate various emotions, other resources are available for this activity. Libraries and bookstores offer wide selections of books containing poetry and quotations. In addition to books about haiku, consider general poetry selections by Maya Angelou, e.e. cummings, Ogden Nash, and Shel Silverstein. Musical selections can represent different styles, such as the Beatles' "Yesterday"; Blind Melon's "Change"; Garth Brooks' "The Dance"; Eric Clapton's "Tears from Heaven"; Gloria Estefan's "Coming Out of the Dark"; Whitney Houston's "Emotional" and "I Will Always Love You"; and Elton John's "Circle of Life." Internet sites also can be accessed for poetry samples (see Internet Resources). An Internet resource for ordering discounted books, including selections about haiku and poetry, is Amazon.com--Earth's Largest Book store, at http:www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ subst/home/home.html/0184-8423170-571096.

  5. Chiasmus as a Stylistic Device in Donne's and Vaughan's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    I'jam, Dunya Muhammad Miqdad; Fadhil, Zahraa Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates chiasmus as a stylistic device in ten metaphysical poems (five for John Donne and five for Henry Vaughan). It aims at showing how both, Donne and Vaughan, utilize chiasmus at the different linguistic levels as a stylistic device in their poetry. Thus, to achieve this aim, it is hypothesized that chiasmus as used by Donne…

  6. The Sound of Violets: The Ethnographic Potency of Poetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Saunders, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    This paper takes the form of a dialogue between the two authors, and is in two halves, the first half discursive and propositional, and the second half exemplifying the rhetorical, epistemological and metaphysical affordances of poetry in critically scrutinising the rhetoric, epistemology and metaphysics of educational management discourse. The…

  7. Poet's Market, 1997: Where & How To Publish Your Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christine, Ed.; Bentley, Chantelle, Ed.

    This directory provides 1700 listings and evaluations of poetry publishers--300 more than in the previous edition--along with complete submission and contact information. Listings include both domestic and international markets, from mass circulation and literary magazines to small presses and university quarterlies, and contain complete profiles…

  8. Riddle Hero: Play and Poetry in the Exeter Book Riddles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higl, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The author discusses the Exeter Book riddles, some of the earliest poems in English, specifically Old English, as perfect examples of how play and poetry intersect. Their playfulness, he claims, is most apparent in the original manuscript, but notes that few modern readers read Old English. The orthography of the manuscript also helps to make the…

  9. Narrative Medicine: Community Poetry Heals Young and Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Allison S.

    2016-01-01

    This is a snapshot of a service learning course founded on narrative medicine, a clinical practice designed to replace impersonal care with empathic listening. By utilizing poetry therapy techniques among nursing home populations, a program called "HPU LifeLines" promotes a community literacy of illness and provides psychological and…

  10. Exploring the Options: Teaching Economic Decision-Making with Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    High-stakes standardized tests in reading and limited instructional time are two powerful disincentives for teaching economics in the elementary classroom. In this article, integrating instruction in poetry and economic decision-making is presented as one way to maximize the use of scarce instructional time. Following a brief introduction to the…

  11. The Primacy of Poetry: Oral Culture and the Young Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbink, Laura Apol

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the spoken word and the tradition of nursery verse and other forms of poetry. Encourages teachers and students to never abandon the rhythm, balance, and pleasurable taste of language as it was first learned through oral chants, jingles, and rhymes of early childhood. (MG)

  12. The poetics of Francisco Pino, rare avis in Spanish poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Hub.

    Francisco Pino (1910-2002) can be considered as a "rara avis" in Spanish poetry. Having published dozens of books rather anonymously, and generally with small private presses, he began publishing through more renowned publishing companies in 1978. His various new editions, anthologies and editions

  13. DEATH AND DESPAIR IN THE POETRY OF TORU DUTT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Sigroha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the short time that she lived Toru Dutt's literary output as a poet was prodigious. Her yearning for the past and her deep sense of many faceted losses are apparent in her poetry. The evocative acceptance of approaching death in one so young presents a picture of a girl mature beyond her years. A study of her poetry reveals her close affinity with the Romantic poets. Referring to various poems of Toru Dutt, the paper studies the role that religion, and her interpretation of religion/s she was exposed to, has to play in this embracing of the inevitability of fate. This paper analyses the reasons for the presence of the elements of death, despair, nostalgia and a yearning for the past and the role that religion plays in her acceptance of the inevitability of death in the poetry of Toru Dutt. Through a critical examination of various poems, the paper tries to uncover the beautiful interplay of memories of past experiences, stories heard long ago and the moments in the present in Dutt's poetry. It traces the journey of the poet from her exposure to death, to a questioning of death, its nature and the forms it might take, to the final acceptance of death as something as inevitable and precious as love.

  14. Representations of 'Economic Hit Men' in selected Malawian poetry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Bright Molande imagine the Bretton Woods Institutions in sub-Saharan Africa and simultaneously negotiate the relationship between 'the West and the rest of us' in their poetry. I also argue that a reading of the poems allows for an opening up of a discursive debate on the effects of neoliberal ideologies in the 'Third World.

  15. Expressive intent, ambiguity, and aesthetic experiences of music and poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth; Levine, William H.; Simchy-Gross, Rhimmon; Kroger, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of studies are investigating the way that aesthetic experiences are generated across different media. Empathy with a perceived human artist has been suggested as a common mechanism [1]. In this study, people heard 30 s excerpts of ambiguous music and poetry preceded by neutral, positively valenced, or negatively valenced information about the composer's or author’s intent. The information influenced their perception of the excerpts—excerpts paired with positive intent information were perceived as happier and excerpts paired with negative intent information were perceived as sadder (although across intent conditions, musical excerpts were perceived as happier than poetry excerpts). Moreover, the information modulated the aesthetic experience of the excerpts in different ways for the different excerpt types: positive intent information increased enjoyment and the degree to which people found the musical excerpts to be moving, but negative intent information increased these qualities for poetry. Additionally, positive intent information was judged to better match musical excerpts and negative intent information to better match poetic excerpts. These results suggest that empathy with a perceived human artist is indeed an important shared factor across experiences of music and poetry, but that other mechanisms distinguish the generation of aesthetic appreciation between these two media. PMID:28746376

  16. Becoming a Cultural Tourist: Explorations in Caribbean Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the writer's own experience as a reader, this article discusses poetry by Eric Roach, Derek Walcott, Linton Kwesi Johnson, John Agard, Edward Baugh, Michael Smith and Velma Pollard. It explores the sense of place felt by writer and reader, going on to analyse the poets' use of Nation Language, poetic metre and intertextuality in…

  17. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-03-01

    of poet’s era more than any criteria. 1-The nature of images: In Persian “illustration” is a equivalent for “image” in European literature. It was 1st introduced to Persian poetry by Shafeei Kadkani in his salient book known as “Types of Imagery”. It goes: A manipulation of the concept of nature an man by the poet whereby he tries to make a relation between man and nature. It is the thing we call “imagination” or “illustration”. Admittedly others have proposed definitions of their own. 1-1- Different expressions of imagery: As Fotohi Rood Mojani has noted, illustrations are classified on the basis of their functions as positive (objective versus imaginative (subjective. He also attributes deep and surface values for images on the basis of their covert (internal and overt (external feature and for this very reason the article is founded on a description of different imagery levels. Furthermore an analysis of poetical illustrations based on their subjectivity and objectivity (deep & surface characteristics is proposed. For the purpose of better understanding these concepts and their related terms are discussed in detail. Internal and external perspective of imageries: poetic images are elaborated from superficial descriptions to more profound ones in accordance with their imagery functions. It is quite clear that such imagination is more of 2ndary kind. For this very reason the illustrations are known as superficial and substantial manifestations. Superficial descriptions: from artistic and literary point of view as well as their functionality, superficial descriptions are the simplest poetic representations through which the poet presents the simplest kind of imaginations –what Hawks describes them just appealing to the public and without any poetical emotion or “ description “ Profound (deep imageries: Core of these illustrations is figures of speech that encompass richness and profundity. These

  18. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-04-01

    s era more than any criteria. 1-The nature of images: In Persian “illustration” is a equivalent for “image” in European literature. It was 1st introduced to Persian poetry by Shafeei Kadkani in his salient book known as “Types of Imagery”. It goes: A manipulation of the concept of nature an man by the poet whereby he tries to make a relation between man and nature. It is the thing we call “imagination” or “illustration”. Admittedly others have proposed definitions of their own. 1-1- Different expressions of imagery: As Fotohi Rood Mojani has noted, illustrations are classified on the basis of their functions as positive (objective versus imaginative (subjective. He also attributes deep and surface values for images on the basis of their covert (internal and overt (external feature and for this very reason the article is founded on a description of different imagery levels. Furthermore an analysis of poetical illustrations based on their subjectivity and objectivity (deep & surface characteristics is proposed. For the purpose of better understanding these concepts and their related terms are discussed in detail. Internal and external perspective of imageries: poetic images are elaborated from superficial descriptions to more profound ones in accordance with their imagery functions. It is quite clear that such imagination is more of 2ndary kind. For this very reason the illustrations are known as superficial and substantial manifestations. Superficial descriptions: from artistic and literary point of view as well as their functionality, superficial descriptions are the simplest poetic representations through which the poet presents the simplest kind of imaginations –what Hawks describes them just appealing to the public and without any poetical emotion or “ description “ Profound (deep imageries: Core of these illustrations is figures of speech that encompass richness and profundity. These figures make the host of literary devices of any language

  19. A Lyrical War: Gallipoli War through Poetry in Anzac Diaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali Çelikel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the First World War, Dardanelles witnessed one of the fiercest clashes in history between the British and the Turkish forces. This eight-month-war caused the settlement of British army that included Australian and New Zealand Army Corps known as Anzacs on particularly the Gallipoli Peninsula. The Australian and New Zealander soldiers and officers constantly kept diaries and wrote letters that in a sense recorded history from the personal perspective contributing to history with individual observation. If Anzac diaries kept during the Gallipoli clashes in 1915 function as secondary historical sources, they also do function as reminiscences of military officers who found consolation in expressing themselves lyrically during harsh conflicts. Some Anzac officers quote poems in their diaries and some write their own poetry to cope with the violence of war using the aestheticism of poetry. Their poems, on the other hand, remain not only as the lyrical reflections of a deadly reality but also as even more painful portrayals of war. This paper aims to read poems either quoted or written in the diaries of Anzac soldiers and officers in order to analyse the emotional effects of war on individuals. The poems will be analysed through the perspective of cultural landscape and question the influence of landscape on the perception of war in the minds of the Anzacs. From the new historicist perspective, the diaries bearing poetry will be read not as the sources of historical information but as the texts that use history as the material for poetry. The paper will also question whether or not the individual observations change the perception of official history that does not become the main impulse behind the writing of poetry but turns merely into one of its sources.

  20. Shake, Rattle and Roll Horror Franchise and the Specter of Nation-Formation in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando B. Tolentino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks into the most successful horror franchise in Philippine history. Shake, Rattle and Roll has had a successful 14-film run since its introduction in 1984, and is composed of a three-part segment, each tackling a horrific experience: ghosts and folk creatures in provincial and city settings. My paper maps out the narratives, and the social and political contexts of the series. Specif ically, the period beginning 1984 marks a series of national transition: the political crisis of the Marcoses, People Power 1, the rise of Corazon Aquino, the economic crises in 1997 and 2007, the ousting of Joseph Estrada, the rise of neoliberalism, the coming of Noynoy Aquino, and the incarceration of Gloria Arroyo. How might these films also be read as analog of the anxieties of the nation?

  1. An evaluation of mental health stigma perpetuated by horror video gaming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickens, E. G.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Video games often feature mental patients in their storylines. This review is intended to test the hypothesis that these depictions potentially contribute to stigma surrounding mental health communities, and may negatively reflect on those with mental health difficulties. The criteria for evaluating the chosen games were created by combining elements from four separate academic papers. The games were analyzed via screenshots from online videos detailing a playthrough of chosen games, and text from the games themselves. The research within this paper suggests stigma can exist outside of conventional media platforms and highlights the availability of stigma-related horror video games inside the gaming market. This study also emphasizes how the depictions of those with mental health difficulties inside of video games have the capacity to harm mental health communities.

  2. Guerilla poetry(ing): Postdigitální hra ve veřejném prostoru?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piorecký, Karel; Piorecká, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 21 (2016), s. 14-15 ISSN 0862-657X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28489S Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : guerilla poetry * postdigital culture * public space Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  3. Inner Otherness as a Source of Fear: Elements of Horror in Balkan Travelogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Lazarević-Radak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Travel fiction has created numerous Others, assigning them an ontologically unstable status, while the traditional travelogue spread a fear of the dark interior of Europe, presenting images of daily political strife, assassinations, wars and uprisings. Just like the Gothic novel, which entertained its readers with images of ruins and gloomy structures in Eastern Europe, the travelogue spread a fear of the Balkans through Europe, depicting the Balkans as a place that could pose a threat to the entire continent. While enjoying the mysterious terror of the Gothic novel, Europe also derived a kind of pleasure from the shocking images that were to be found in travelogues from the Balkans. The paper re-examines the elasticity of the boundaries of the travelogue genre, and identifies convenient transformations of certain parts of the travelogue into text aimed at inspiring terror, shocking and appalling its readers. The transformations show that it is impossible to draw a strict boundary between travel fiction and travelogues, and at the same time reveal the hidden discourse used by both genres. The parallel presence of awareness of the geographic identity of the Balkans as European, and of the aspiration to depict them as the strange inner Otherness of Europe, is accompanied by the production of terrifying images. Although these images cannot be viewed solely as a threat of "reverse colonization", the assumption that hybridity is the basis on which the terrifying nature of the Balkans is produced is re-examined. The travelogue chapters, sections and illustrations assume the features of horror, particularly body horror, revealing Europe’s fear of the possibility of the Orient infiltrating the "body of the Occident", or of the possibility of the latter being infected by elements of "alien" i.e. Oriental culture.

  4. MODERN POETRY THAT COULD/COULDN’T EXHAUST THR CLASSICAL POETICA AND SUFISM DOCTRINE FROM A MYSTIC CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Hasan AKTAS

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The poetry of classical age was pouring from twomain vessels as Divan and Mysticism. The poem of thesetwo channels were standing on two strongepistemic/basic source like Quran and Tradition. Divanand mystic poetry are in a way a secular/visible andmystic/esoteric evolution of these two rooted/epistemicsource. This evolution is being made confirm andclassical by sealing with secrets sometimes. In a way, thiscaused the Divan poetry turning into a hidden treasure.Turkish poetry which suddenly lost it’s treasure withmodernism, got contemporary and positivist with anagression of no borders. This marginality is stopped themodern poetry. This blockage entailed new developmentwhich was through the Divan and mystic poetry. Altoughthis tendency, modern poetry couldn’t exhaust Divan andmystic poetry/sufism doctrine as it produce them.Because, modern poetry hasn’t got enough power toexhaust the wonderful treasure of Divan and mysticpoetry.

  5. The Rocky Horror (Picture) Show: a Camp Parody of the Gothic between Mary Shelley, J. B. Priestley and James Whale

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Rotondi

    2016-01-01

    Lo spettacolo teatrale The Rocky Horror Show (1973) di Richard O’Brien e, successivamente, l’adattamento cinematografico The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) di Jim Sharman possono essere considerate due pietre miliari del musical. Per temi e struttura, essi rappresentano la massima espressione della rivoluzione sessuale che va a cavalli tra gli anni '60 e '70 ed emblema del movimento di libertà sessuale. Il successo del musical risiede nella presa in giro degli stereotipi del gotico sia lett...

  6. From within the Abyss of the Mind : Psychological Horror in H. P. Lovecraft’s “The Call of Cthulhu”

    OpenAIRE

    Joakim, Bengtsson

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT An attempt to put the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft on the map of psychoanalytical criticism, this analysis examines Lovecraft’s use of setting, characters, and narrative mode and structure in “The Call of Cthulhu” (1926) to show how his construction of horror has its ground in psychology, or, more specifically, in ideas of identity and violated boundaries of the self. In addition, brief reflections on Modernist art, its connections with psychoanalysis, and its analogies to Lovecraft...

  7. Rheology of organoclay suspension

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hato, MJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors have studied the rheological properties of clay suspensions in silicone oil, where clay surfaces were modified with three different types of surfactants. Dynamic oscillation measurements showed a plateau-like behavior for all...

  8. Hydropneumatic suspension systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    Hydropneumatic suspensions systems combine the excellent properties of gas springs with the favourable damping properties of hydraulic fluids. The advantages of these systems are particularly appropriate for automotive applications, such as passenger cars, trucks and agricultural equipment. In this book, Dr. Bauer provides an extensive overview of hydropneumatic suspension systems. Starting with a comparison of different types of suspension systems, the author subsequently describes the theoretical background associated with spring and damping characteristics of hydropneumatic systems and furthermore explains the design of the most important system components. Additionally he gives an overview of level control systems and various special functions. Finally the technology is illustrated by design examples and the outlook for future hydropneumatic suspensions is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24-2004, updated 2011 This Safety ... the harness, the environmental conditions, and the worker's psychological state all may increase the onset and severity ...

  10. Different Types of Fantastic Etiology in Hafez Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Ghasemipour

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Fantastic etiology in Persian poetry has such a high status that we can say that this figure of speech is one of the most interested figures between classic Persian poets. This figure is frequently used by Hafez in his poetries so that after equivocalness it is the second rhetorical figure in his poetries. The definition of fantastic etiology is that causality in poetry is based on similarity and it must be aesthetical and satisfactory, not scientific and discursive. By Fantastic etiology poets create imaginative connection between two phenomena; in the other hand, this figure rationally proves the possibility of the impossible and thus presents the lies disguised as truth. The poet’s goal in fantastic etiology is not to invent the cause, but rather to make the conventional descriptions sound unusual. For example, in the line “Because the cloud weeps without reason, tulips and roses laugh at it,” it is the groundless tears of the cloud which cause mockery on the part of the tulips and roses. In this example, two conventional expressions- “the cloud’s tears” (describing the spring rain and “the flowers’ laughter” (describing their blossoming - are connected by a causal relationship which does not exist in reality.   In classical Persian poetry Hafez, along with equivocalness, utilized of fantastic etiology in the best form . His uses of this literary device, like another figures of speech in his poetry, is very natural and unassuming. Understanding, interpreting and aesthetical purpose of some Hafez poetries is based on fantastic etiology.   Companionship, concomitancy and admixture of poetical figures are factors that must be discussed in stylistic analysis of poetry. Literary figures occasionally uses alone in poetry and some when uses together. Though fantastic etiology in rhetoric or figure of thought is an independent figure, but this devise occasionally uses with another

  11. The Mystical Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Santiesteban Oliva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mistical suspension, silence, time, absolute, ontology, ineffability, aletheiaIn the mystical ecstasy there is a sensorial and intellectual suspension when contemplating the absolute, the ontological Being. Silence is not only significant: it is revealing. The greatest expression of experience inner silence . The word is insufficient when the ontological reality is revealed. Revelation or truth , the Greek concept of aletheia, takes on greater significance in that transcendental experience. It is also suspended phenomenological time and remains eternity open.

  12. Vertigo, poetry and creed of Alfred Hitchcock's cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael J. Pascual

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyse the film Vertigo -undoubtedly one of the North-American film di- rector Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece- as an audiovisual poem we could identify with such a characteristic and defining name as film-poetry. We will try to show some elements very typical of cinema -the use of the light, colour, and music, the aesthetic treatment of image and the camera movement- they all aspects that in- fluence -as well as does plot- the rhythm, form and content in the same way as a poem does, in order to place cinema at the same level as poetry. We will try to describe in a very essential way the relations between cinema and arts such as music, painting and literature.

  13. THE CRITICAL READER IN THE POETRY OF MANUEL GUSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide Anchieta de Lima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the poetry of Manuel Gusmão, the reader is invited to actively partici­pate in writing and reading scenes. To the poet-critic, the act of reading, understood as emancipatory and political practice, is sharing the aesthe­tic experience and the development of our sensitive-cognitive instances, beyond the world learning outside and inside the text. In this sense, our article aims to examine the critical reader configuration from three aspects present in that poetry – act of co-motion, epistemological construction and erratic tissue habitation. With this perspective, we turn to the theoretical­-critical of Roland Bathes, Jacques Rancière and Eduardo Prado Coelho.

  14. The Displaced Female Voice: Poetry of Natalya Gorbanevskaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneerah Badr Almahasheer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Natalya Gorbanevskaya’s poetry uses unanchored imagery, direct address, and other specific means of creating a mood of rootlessness that is ambiguous and echoes her own experience as a Russian exile. Her work focuses on themes of displacement and trauma that are common to those who are forcibly made to leave their homes. This article is one of the first close readings of selected poems by Gorbanevskaya that is to merit attention to her displacement, marginalized feminine identity and resistance to the hegemony of political repression. The loss of her home in a literal and a geographical sense, and her status as an expatriate in Paris, can be understood as a complete displacement for Gorbanevskaya, forging her identity as a political refugee poet. Her work further reveals the power of poetry in reclaiming identity, asserting memory, and resisting the patriarchal system.

  15. Under scrutiny. As public anxiety grows over health care horror stories, consumers are starting to fight back. Guess who's winning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchik, G S

    1996-05-05

    "We're getting dozens of calls every day from people who are frustrated and fed up," says one health care consumer rights advocate. The scenario is familiar: first come the horror stories, then trailblazing, media-engaging lawsuits, and finally the public learning curve starts to accelerate. Then the heat gets turned up on the government to act. That's where we're at right now. Where will we be tomorrow?

  16. ["Anxiety glistens on our brows". Dream reports in literary works on the horrors of ghettos and concentration camps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J

    1991-06-01

    Dream reports occupy a special place in literature about confinement in concentration camps and ghettos (Robert Antelme, Charlotte Delbo, Anna Langfus, André Schwarz-Bart). They are central elements in the narrative that relate the anxiety of those threatened with destruction more faithfully than any realistic account could. They disrupt the chronological linearity and rationality and represent in images horror beyond memory or description.

  17. Imagery in traditional and modern praise poetry in Zulu

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. This is a survey of the use of imagery in both traditional and modern Zulu praise poetry. For the purposes of this corpus, emphasis will be placed on izibongo (praise poems) of the Zulu kings, chiefs, prominent figures, and also minor characters. The following are the main figures of speech which are worth mentioning in this study: metaphor, personification, symbolism, metonymy, simile, and hyperbole. The definitions of the aforementioned images by various critics will be given in thi...

  18. Stamatina Dimakopoulou onMing-QianMa’s Poetry as Re-Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Qian Ma. Poetry as Re-Reading: American Avant-Garde Poetry and the Poetics of Counter-Method. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 2008. Pp. 301. ISBN 978-0810124851In the Preface to the 1979 Enlarging the Temple: New Directions in American Poetry during the 1960s – Charles Altieri formulated a re-alignment that defined much criticism of postwar and contemporary American poetry to come. Altieri set “the work of Heidegger and the later Wittgenstein,” in resonance with the “i...

  19. Home Army in the Poetry of Jerzy Ficowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kandziora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evolution of the theme of Armia Krajowa (Home Army and the Warsaw Uprising, in Ficowski’s poetry. The theme, engaged by the poet in the late 1940s (Ołowiani żołnierze, 1948, was quickly abandoned as incompatible with the imaginary, magical direction in the development of young Ficowski’s poetry. Neither was the theme fostered by the general political background of the “dead season” of Communist Poland, by censorship, and by Ficowski’s fear of settling for the post-Romantic stereotype and patriotic myth-making. The theme returned in the 1970s (Gryps, 1979; Errata, 1981, which was related to Ficowski’s decision to liberate himself from self-censorship, and his readiness to express the once repressed content in his own, mature poetic idiom. The present study presents two aspects of historical narration in the Home-Army poems from the 1970s: the fabulous quality, which positions history in Ficowski’s private topics and intimate memory, and the scientific, naturalistic quality, which relates history to physical and cosmic categories. Both aspects redeem the poetry from the narrow specificity of Polish national myth, and make it possible to reconcile individual truth of the experience of death and suffering with the discourse of concepts and historiosophy, which also touches upon the cosmic order.

  20. Cult of mother Jugović in Serbian epic poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baćović Vukašin K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The poetry about Kosovo is a poetry about the Fenix Bird and torture. Because of its esthetic worthiness it is included in the greatest poetry accomplishments of Serbian people and the human kind in general. The Death of the Mother of Jugović is the poem in which spirit trolds the central position. The nature of this mother is characterized by two most supreme human feelings: patriotism and maternity. The poem accumulates pain reaching enormous power of personal, family and collective misery. Love of the mother of Jugović is always fresh because it rises from the never ending spring of a mother's soul. Only great poets such as: Sofocles in Antigona, Aesylus in Prometheus Bound, Shakespeare in Hamlet, Njegoš in The Mountain Wreath and some particular poets of the Bible created similar poetic branches. The cult of the mother of Jugović needs to be breaded new generations may reach new cognitions and new worlds.

  1. Eghterab’ in Iraqi Emigrants\\' Poetry: The Case of Ahmad Matar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سید عدنان اشکوری

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Eghterab’ in Iraqi Emigrants' Poetry: The Case of Ahmad Matar    Jafar Delshad *  Seyyed Adnan Eshkewaree **    Abstract  The word ‘eghterab’ in human sciences has different concepts which could be classified into three groups: 1 Westernization and tending to western culture or being alien with eastern authenticity 2 nostalgia and homesickness caused by being away from his/her motherhood land and hometown. Most of this group of poets are emigrants or are in exile and 3 having the sense of nostalgia but being in home country. It means that this group of poets have very high ideals which no one in their homeland can take and bare these ideals. The poet perceives that ideals which are essential for him/her are higher than the society in which he/she lives can grasp. This essay makes an attempt to study the various concepts of ‘eghterab’ by focusing on Ahmad Matar as a prominent poet with regard to the third concept and deal with the third concept of Eghterab from three points of view: political, social and spiritual. This article examines some samples of these three parts in Ahmad Matar's poetry.    Key words: nostalgia, poetry, emigration, Ahmad Matar, Iraq   * Assistant Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, University of IsfahanE-mail: delshad@fgn.ui.ir  ** Assistant Professor, University for Teacher Training, E-mail: eshkewaree@yahoo.com.

  2. HACIA UNA EXPERIENCIA DEL HORROR: FEMINICIDIO Y ALIENACIÓN SENSORIAL COMO NATURALIZACIÓN DE LA BARBARIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Gasquez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo nos proponemos pensar la problemática de la experiencia en torno al horror. Partimos de considerar que la barbarie actual, bajo sus múltiples formas (asesinatos, violaciones, genocidios, feminicidios, etc. abandonó su condición histórica sin dejar de ser histórica, se proclamó naturaleza sabiéndose contingencia e instaló los cuadros del horror como parte de una imagen que posee otros encuadres y matices posibles. En este marco consideramos que el hombre contempla el horror por fuera de sí mismo y se niega a asumir la experiencia de la destrucción dando lugar a la naturalización de la barbarie. Para dar cuenta del tópico propuesto nos detenemos especialmente en el caso de “las muertas de Juárez”, en tanto representa un caso paradigmático de muertes en América Latina.  Este caso permite dar cuenta de un sistema de disciplinamiento que conjuga feminicidio, perpetuidad y alienación sensorial. Estrategias estas que posibilitan la naturalización de la barbarie. 

  3. The Rocky Horror (Picture Show: a Camp Parody of the Gothic between Mary Shelley, J. B. Priestley and James Whale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rotondi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lo spettacolo teatrale The Rocky Horror Show (1973 di Richard O’Brien e, successivamente, l’adattamento cinematografico The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975 di Jim Sharman possono essere considerate due pietre miliari del musical. Per temi e struttura, essi rappresentano la massima espressione della rivoluzione sessuale che va a cavalli tra gli anni '60 e '70 ed emblema del movimento di libertà sessuale. Il successo del musical risiede nella presa in giro degli stereotipi del gotico sia letterario che cinematografico, creando una enorme, irriverente parodia. Se il riferimento più evidente è il Frankenstein di Mary Shelley e la versione cinematografica di James Whale, meno analizzato è il rapporto con Benighted (1927 by John B. Priestley e la pellicola The Old Dark House (1932 sempre di Whale e adattata dal romanzo di Priestley. Proprio questa risulta, infatti, vera fonte di ispirazione per il lavoro di O’Brien, piuttosto che il Frankestein. Il contributo analizzerà questo rapporto, focalizzando la sua attenzione sugli elementi della “liturgia del Rocky Horror Show”, sui riferimenti in parodia e proponendo una visione dell’opera di O’Brien come una meta-aprodia.

  4. Visual and Artistic Functions of Letters Khaghani’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. Zolfaghari

    Full Text Available The intensity of emotion and vibration of meaning in the poet's mind causes him to go beyond the ordinary language and through metaphors, similes and linguistic preparation he conveys intellectual and emotional meanings. He has a sharp eye and a sensitive spirit and creative temprement and by inventing new images shows the creativity and imagination in various arenas and attempts in the way of literary strength and creating personal style and this point more than anything else must be done by presenting images and newness. Perhaps in the sixth century, and especially in Azerbaijani school, more than other periods, poets have been looking for creating innovative style in eloquence. Their major attempts were mainly in imaging, it was a wide field that they have competed and it is natural that in this illustration the alphabet letters would be very helpful. Khaghani poetry as one of the greatest poets of this school has the perfect poetrical book of painting and meaning, and delicated pattern in new and different scientific, cultural and religious paintings and letters are a broad range of elements that put a new field in front of the poet and he is aware of the potential features of the letters and also the new images and the artistic creativity.This paper shows descriptive - analytical study of various aspects of Khaghani’s poetry and frequency of letters in the alphabet, authentic images based on alphabet, taken at different pseudo relevance of poetry in the context of multiple semantic and literal characters, making figures of speech based on literary characters, images and characters and the sense of connection . . . which has been shown in his poetry.Letter has double and even multiple uses in Khaghani poetic works (divan and more than the construction of words which is the real and common sense that is used as an artistic. There is a world in the heart of every letter, word and morpheme lies in the poet's point of view is the last and

  5. European do-it-yourself (DIY) biology: beyond the hope, hype and horror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Günter; Pei, Lei; Schmidt, Markus

    2014-06-01

    The encounter of amateur science with synthetic biology has led to the formation of several amateur/do-it-yourself biology (DIYBio) groups worldwide. Although media outlets covered DIYBio events, most seemed only to highlight the hope, hype, and horror of what DIYBio would do in the future. Here, we analyze the European amateur biology movement to find out who they are, what they aim for and how they differ from US groups. We found that all groups are driven by a core leadership of (semi-)professional people who struggle with finding lab space and equipment. Regulations on genetic modification limit what groups can do. Differences between Europe and the US are found in the distinct regulatory environments and the European emphasis on bio-art. We conclude that DIYBio Europe has so far been a responsible and transparent citizen science movement with a solid user base that will continue to grow irrespective of media attention. © 2014 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.; Chaud, X.; Gautier-Picard, P.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductors, especially high T c ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO

  7. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keckler, C.R.; Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report

  8. A Comparative Study of Allusions in the Poetry of English Poet John Milton and Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Comparative literary studies characterize similarities and dissimilarities found in poetic works of two writers of different cultures. This study focuses on the use of allusions in poetry of John Milton particularly with reference to Paradise Lost and poetry of Persian Poet Hafiz Sherazi. Using allusions in poetry has been a common style of poets…

  9. The Conveyor Belt Curriculum? Poetry Teaching in the Secondary School: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the effects of the British National Curriculum and the SATs on teaching and changes in how poetry is examined. States that some teachers view these changes as having a detrimental effect on student poetry experiences, while others see a positive advantage in the changes. (CMK)

  10. "I Am the Book"--Deaf Poets' Views on Signed Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-01-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when…

  11. Dancing with Words: Transference and Countertransference in Biblio/Poetry Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihanus, Juhani

    1998-01-01

    Argues that within biblio/poetry therapy, self and others are invented through expressive resources inherent in language. Shows how poetic communication conveys, through texts, "transformative" transferences and countertransferences that foster creative imagination. Sees biblio/poetry therapy as a performance scene where co-tellings,…

  12. Remaking Poems: Combining Translation and Digital Media to Interest High School Students in Poetry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Amy Beth

    2017-01-01

    In American high schools, the practice of poetry analysis as a study of language art has declined. Outworn methods have contributed to the trend away from close interactions with the text, to the unfortunate end that millennial high school students neither understand nor enjoy poetry. Digital technology coupled with principles of translation…

  13. China’s Second World of Poetry : The Sichuan Avant-Garde, 1982-1992

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, Michael

    2005-01-01

    China's Second World of Poetry remedies a deficiency in scholarship to date. In post-Mao China, types of poetry variously dubbed underground, unofficial, experimental, avant-garde, non-mainstream and so on have outshined texts produced by a state-sanctioned politico-cultural establishment that

  14. Surviving the War by Singing the Blues: The Contemporary Ethos of American Indian Political Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsosie, Rebecca

    1986-01-01

    Explores major themes in contemporary American Indian poetry that comprise the Native ethos of cultural resistance and survival. Correlates certain themes of Indian poetry with those of Black spiritual and blues. Discusses Western and Indian world views, political and social conflict, and art as the agent of criticism and change. Contains 28…

  15. The Effort to Increase the Students' Achievement in Poetry Mastery through Semiotic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirgeyasa, I Wy.

    2017-01-01

    The obejectives of this research are to know the improvement of the students' achievement in poetry mastery and their perception regarding to the semiotic method in teaching and learning poetry in English Education Department, Languages and Art Faculty of State University of Medan. The research method used is the Classroom Action Research (CAR).…

  16. Lyricist’s Lyrical Lyrics: Widening the Scope of Poetry Studies by Claiming the Obvious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelens, G.

    2011-01-01

    Poetry is all but absent from Cultural Studies. Most treatments of the genre tend to focus on canonized poets whose work is wilfully difficult and obscure. Alternative histories should be explored, opening up possibilities to view poetry again as a culturally relevant art form. The demotic and

  17. Teaching Poetry Reading in Secondary Education: Findings from a Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvardsson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review research on poetry reading pedagogy in secondary education from 1990 to 2015. Today there is little research on poetry teaching in Sweden and thus little guidance for secondary teachers. Therefore, this study thematically analyses peer-reviewed articles from English language international journals. Articles were…

  18. Assigning poetry reading as a way of introducing students to qualitative data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raingruber, Bonnie

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the paper is to explain how poetry reading can be used to teach interpretive analysis of qualitative data. A number of studies were located in the nursing literature that focused on using poetry to help students develop empathy for patients, to teach students to reflect on their own practice, and to assist them in developing self-understanding. No studies were found that described the use of poetry reading as a way of teaching the skill of interpretive analysis. There are, however, a number of parallels between the principles of poetry reading and qualitative analysis that suggest that this method of teaching would be successful. International papers published on PubMed, Medline, and CINAHL were reviewed to identify challenges facing educators and ways of teaching the process of qualitative data analysis using poetry reading. Using poetry reading to teach skills of qualitative data analysis helps motivate students, cultivates a reflective mindset, and develops the skill of working as a member of an interpretive group. Framing interpretive work as being like reading poetry helps students pick up more quickly on the art that is a major component of the work. This approach also helps students learn the importance of cultural and contextual particulars as they begin analyzing qualitative data. Using poetry reading to introduce students to the complex skill of qualitative data analysis is an effective pedagogical strategy.

  19. Reassessing Pocho Poetics: Americo Paredes's Poetry and the (Trans) National Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguin, B.V.

    2005-01-01

    Americo Paredes's first collection of poetry, Cantos de Adolescencia in 1937, alongside his second poetry anthology, Between Two Worlds in 1991 is examined. Paredes's discourses of Mexican American identity demand a reassessment of the pocho as an icon for Chicanao literary and cultural studies.

  20. Writing and Reading Multiplicity in the Uni-Verse: Engagements with Mathematics through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radakovic, Nenad; Jagger, Susan; Jao, Limin

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we explore the reading and writing of mathematical poetry from our experiences as mathematics teacher educators. First, we outline how our own engagement with mathematical poetry encouraged us to incorporate it into our teaching of pre-service teachers. We describe how our initial disappointment with the mathematical content of…

  1. Compressible Fluid Suspension Performance Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogterp, Francis

    2003-01-01

    ... compressible fluid suspension system that was designed and installed on the vehicle by DTI. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the possible performance benefits of the compressible fluid suspension system...

  2. Multiobjective suspension control problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, de A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a (controller) design problem in the field of suspension systems for transport vehicles. A ten degrees-of-freedom model for a tractor-semitrailer vehicle is presented, using parameters derived from a real vehicle, which should be used for design and verification purposes. Road

  3. MUSICAL IMAGES AND MOTIVES IN THE POETRY OF A. PLATONOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V. Khramykh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Th e fi rst literary experiments of  A. Platonov, like among many novelists of the twenties, are connected with poems, which occupy a signifi cant place in his early works. Poems are the texts where was formed a unique style of  the writer. Th is article analyzes the musical images and motifs from Platonov`s two books of poetry: “Blue Depth” (1922 and “Th e Singing Th oughts” (1926—1927. Th e leitmotif of the fi rst part of the book of poems “Blue depth” is music of machines. Th e presence of this motive is caused by the infl uence of Proletkult poetry. In a number of poems in this section the music of machines is a part of the characteristics of the utopian New Town, which is being built by the proletarians. At the end of the fi rst part of “Blue depth” appears the image of unsung songs. Th is image indicates to the ways of knowing of the world, which are rational-technocratic alternative ways. In the plot of the second part of this book of poetry the motif of music machines is transformed into the image of music of thought. Analysis of the cycle of poems “Th e Singing Th oughts” has shown that in comparison with the “Blue depth” this book has a  plot where a new interaction between musical motifs and themes takes place. Th e development of this plot is based on the principle of a counterpoint.

  4. Analysing Old Testament poetry: Basic issues in contemporary exegesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. M. Prinsloo

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available The wealth of publications on matters relating to Old Testament poetry is witness to the fact that this subject has become a focal point in Old Testament studies. In this paper, an overview of contemporary publications is given. The basic issues, both on the level of poetic theory and practical application, are pointed out. A tendency towards a comprehensive literary approach is definitely present and should be encouraged. Only when a poem is analysed on all levels and by all means, will the richness of its meaning be appreciated.

  5. "Reflections of the Loss of Rumeli on the Turkish Poetry"

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNEŞ, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Losing the land of Rumeli has had significant reflections on the Turkish poetry. Poets such as Rıza Tevfik, Mehmet kif, Aka Gündüz, Arif Nihat, etc. wrote poems on how much the sudden loss of Rumeli, which had long been under the Turkish rule, influenced the feelings of the Turkish people quite negatively. They harshly criticized the negligence and the incompetence of the rulers which accelerated the loss of the land during the Balkan War. One can easily observe the dramatic style in such po...

  6. Reflections of the Loss of Rumeli on the Turkish Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNEŞ, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Losing the land of Rumeli has had significant reflections on the Turkish poetry. Poets such as Rıza Tevfik, Mehmet Âkif, Aka Gündüz, Arif Nihat, etc. wrote poems on how much the sudden loss of Rumeli, which had long been under the Turkish rule, influenced the feelings of the Turkish people quite negatively. They harshly criticized the negligence and the incompetence of the rulers which accelerated the loss of the land during the Balkan War. One can easily observe the dramatic style in such p...

  7. Italic Typography and Wordsworth's Later Sonnets as Visual Poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Peter

    2007-01-01

      The later Wordsworth understood the sonnet as a form of visual poetry. The essay investigates this in relation to Wordsworth's sense of layout in his 1838 book of sonnets, his conceptualization of the sonnet as "picture," "frame," and "monument," and his use of italic typeface in printings...... of the sonnet "After-Thought" after 1827. The positive sense of the visual thus articulated by the later poet constitutes one way in which he swerves from his earlier self, and, the essay argues in contrast to traditional readings of the career, enriches even as it complicates our understanding of his work....

  8. The Influence of the Andalusi Muashah on the Troubadour Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled S. Khalafat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between the Andalusi Muashah and the Troubadour that appeared in the eleventh century in southern France with the coexistence of the Arab Islamic presence in Andalusia where the Andalusi Muashah appeared in the fourth century AH. The study also examined the different perspectives about the origins of the Troubadour, and how the Andalusi Muashah reached this type of poetry. Besides, the present study further shed light on the structure of the Andalusi Muashah and the Troubadourian poems, thus presenting the overlapping between these two literary genres in terms of form, structure and divisions.

  9. The Floral Symbol in the Poetry of Heinrich Heine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Chepelyk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted the plant symbolics which became the inalienable constituent of the original creation of Heinrich Heine. The distinctive traits of the artist’s lyric poetry are floral images, which are able to reflect the psychology of the human soul in the correlation with the spiritual substance – the divine nature. The immersion of Heinrich Heine in the world of the plants was conducived to the activation of the special emotional and psychological loading with the purpose of the comprehension of the internal experience of the lyric subject, represented in the sensory perceptible figurative, sound and visual landscapes.

  10. Posthumous Humans, Modern Vampires: Re-use, seriality, chorality of horror tropes in True Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia Iannuzzi

    2016-01-01

    Cosa rende alcuni di noi – abitatori di ecosistemi narrativi sempre più densi e complessi – compulsivi spettatori dell'orrore? Cosa decreta la vivacità di tropi horror dotati di una storia già lunga alle spalle e il loro corrente, inesausto riuso catodico?La proposta critica che avanziamo in questa sede è un invito a contemperare nell'analisi delle produzioni televisive seriali contemporanee, aspetti narratologici e produttivi, fattori (intra- e inter)testuali e sociologici, a partire dalla c...

  11. La cultura del horror en las sociedades avanzadas: de la sociedad centrípeta a la sociedad centrífuga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO BERICAT ALASTUEY

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo expone los principales resultados de una investigación realizada con el objeto de analizar el papel que cumplen las emociones colectivas en el mantenimiento del orden social. En concreto, trata de explicar el hecho de que las noticias más importantes que aparecen en los medios de comunicación sean noticias de horror, es decir, noticias en las que la muerte siempre aparece en el primer plano de la escena. Los informativos de los medios de comunicación expresan y fomentan la cultura del horror característica de nuestras sociedades avanzadas. Ahora bien, para entender esta cultura es preciso determinar previamente la naturaleza emocional del horror, así como establecer una definición sociológica de este sentimiento. El horror es una emoción compleja compuesta por sentimientos de terror, de asco y de conmoción. El horror, sociológicamente, puede entenderse como "la emoción mediante la que un orden social señala sus límites más extremos". El estudio concluye señalando que existen dos modos alternativos de mantener el orden y la cohesión en el seno de un sistema social. El primer modo de legitimación, característico de las sociedades centrípetas, funciona mediante la gran potencia atractiva que ejerce sobre el campo social un núcleo central de valores sociales positivos. El segundo, característico de las sociedades centrífugas, funciona mediante la gran potencia repulsiva que ejercen sobre el campo social las transgresiones flagrantes del orden moral. El modo típico en el que las sociedades centrífugas regulan el orden social explica la cultura del horror característica de nuestras sociedades avanzadas.

  12. JEAN CLAUDE RENARD: (POETRY AS CRAFT OF TRANSPARENCY

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    María del Sagrario Rollán

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The work of Jean-Claude Renard (Toulon 1922- Paris 2002 appears from the beginning marked by the metaphor of the journey - Songs for land lost (1947, and the craft of transparency. The poet begins the journey - that originates in the experience of death and destruction of a world shaken by the war, with a word that transcends the nonsense, and calls for “the country where forgiveness is / and are childhoods “a word that is built in search of human spaces and anticipates them. The adventure through the exercise of Solitude (1951, requirement beyond itself, a kind of internal and painful split: “I am separated from my heart,” releasing it, in turn, to the knowledge of the world and the gift that transfigures. The metamorphosis of the World (1951 takes place in the act of writing itself, for in him a knowledge of the essential reality is given, from which the party of pure celebrated say, “Oh breathing started / in the center of the loaf and snow “. Poetry as craft of transparency J.C. Renard develops in Un autre parole  (1981, prose poetry admirably clarifies its internal relations with theology and mysticism. The poet moves beyond “ailleurs” to a previous or future place of reconciliation and love letters between beings: “One happy pasture / leads above child / each wisdom to your name / and every love your body.”

  13. Praising the Ruler: Panegyrical Poetry and Russian Absolutism

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    Joachim Klein

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to overrate the importance of the panegyric tradition for early modern Russian literature. Between the middle of the 17th to the end of the 18th century, it was practiced in many different genres—almost all Russian poets praised the ruler. This poetry deserves our interest as a specific form of political literature. As such it is not only relevant for the cult of the Russian monarchs, but it also sheds some light on the political mentality of their loyal—and literate—subjects in the age of Russian absolutism. Panegyrical poetry is per definitionem a thoroughly affirmative, noncritical form of political literature. But this did not prevent it from offering a certain scope for the expression of diverse and even contradictory political ideals. This can be exemplified by the panegyrical poems written in the early 1760s in the context of the coup d’état staged by Catherine II and against the backdrop of the Russo-Prussian peace treaty initiated by her predecessor, Peter III. In this situation, a fundamental difference of opinion about the tasks of the monarch and the mission of the Russian state emerged.

  14. Indigenous women in Spanish American Historic Epic Poetry

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    Lise Segas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epic poetry has always been considered a masculine genre. The eruption of a group identity, masculine, white, aristocratic and christian, is the result of the representation and the exclusion of the Other, fictitious and singular, but in fact composed of a variety of ethnic groups, origins, sex, genders, religions and different degrees between fiction and historicity. Indeed, in the historical epic poetry which narrated the Conquest, except for the conquistadors listed at length and the indigenous kings and caciques, only few characters are distinguished by a historical individualisation. The Other, Amerindian and female, makes a shy entrance into history, into singularity, into the (historical and christian truth. It is the case of interpreters: Malinche and India Catalina, only historical native women that appear as part of the narrative plot as well as in the conquest enterprise in the poems of Lasso de la Vega (Cortés valeroso y Mexicana, Mexicana, of Juan de Castellanos (Elegías de varones ilustres de Indias and of Saavedra Guzmán (El peregrino indiano.

  15. El culpable de la imagen. Genealogía del acto de anteponer un culpable para testimoniar el horror en el cine

    OpenAIRE

    Fillol, S. (Santiago)

    2017-01-01

    En 1945 el batallón que integraba el futuro cineasta Samuel Fuller entró en el campo de concentración de Falkenau. Ante el descubrimiento del horror, el capitán americano ordenó a Fuller esconderse para rodar cómo los soldados aleccionaban a los pobladores civiles alemanes, enfrentándolos antes las montañas de cadáveres. El gesto de anteponer un culpable como figura del plano, para poder mirar el agujero de sentido que provoca el horror de fondo, es una marca definitoria de dos polémicos docu...

  16. The change of the concept of poetry in Vasko Popa's later collections

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    Vladušić Slobodan V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The text starts from the fact that literary critics tend to disregard Vasko Popa's later poetry collections - Živo meso (1975, Kuća nasred druma (1975, and Rez (1981 - thus implicitly or explicitly denying their value. This paper aims to prove that in the given poetry collections there exists a change in the concept of poetry, rather than a mere poetic transformation inside the same concept of modern poetry. First trait of this new poetry concept is the repersonalization of the poetic act, which requires the introduction of the poetic subject (instead of the lyrical subject. The poetic subject of this kind of poetry, does not, however, have anything in common with the Romantic poetic subject, because the issue is not the separation of the subject from the collective of its contemporaries, as was the case in Romanticism. Quite the contrary. So as to understand this shift in the poetic concept, we used the term 'personality.' We defend the thesis that Popa, in his three poetry collections all published in the same year of 1975 (Vučija so, Živo meso, Kuća nasred druma wanted to demonstrate three spheres of personality: mythical, personal, and collectively-political. In the same way, we tried to show that Popa's poems from the collection Živo meso ought to be read as elements of an experience that is made into a life story of personality, not merely as aesthetical objects independent of any kind of personalization.

  17. Particle interactions in concentrated suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondy, L.A.; Graham, A.L.; Abbott, J.R.; Brenner, H.

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of research that focuses on slow flows of suspensions in which colloidal and inertial effects are negligibly small. The authors describe nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments to quantitatively measure particle migration occurring in concentrated suspensions undergoing a flow with a nonuniform shear rate. These experiments address the issue of how the flow field affects the microstructure of suspensions. In order to understand the local viscosity in a suspension with such a flow-induced, spatially varying concentration, one must know how the viscosity of a homogeneous suspension depends on such variables as solids concentration and particle orientation. The authors suggest the technique of falling ball viscometry, using small balls, as a method to determine the effective viscosity of a suspension without affecting the original microstructure significantly. They also describe data from experiments in which the detailed fluctuations of a falling ball's velocity indicate the noncontinuum nature of the suspension and may lead to more insights into the effects of suspension microstructure on macroscopic properties. Finally, they briefly describe other experiments that can be performed in quiescent suspensions (in contrast to the use of conventional shear rotational viscometers) in order to learn more about boundary effects in concentrated suspensions

  18. China’s Second World of Poetry: The Sichuan Avant-Garde, 1982-1992

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Michael

    2005-01-01

    China's Second World of Poetry remedies a deficiency in scholarship to date. In post-Mao China, types of poetry variously dubbed underground, unofficial, experimental, avant-garde, non-mainstream and so on have outshined texts produced by a state-sanctioned politico-cultural establishment that continues to pay lip service to maoist literary doctrine. For the 1980s and the early 1990s, most foreign-language scholarship has Beijing - and exile poetry scenes - as its focus, failing to do justice...

  19. Of Mermaids and Changelings: Human Rights, Folklore and Contemporary Irish Language Poetry

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    Rióna Ní Fhrighil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the intersection of human rights discourse, Irish folklore and contemporary Irish-language poetry. The author contends that contemporary Irish-language poets Louis de Paor and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill exploit the multi-faceted nature of international folklore motifs, along with their local variants, to represent human rights violations in their poetry. Focusing specifically on the motif of the changeling in De Paor’s poetry and on the motif of the mermaid in Ní Dhomhnaill’s, the author traces how folklore material is reimagined in ways that eschew uncomplicated transnational solidarity but which engender empathetic settlement.

  20. A poesia ‘é-sou’ negra = Negro poetry

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    José Pires Laranjeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Os diversos cânones da poesia brasileira não contemplam a poesia negrobrasileira como deveria ser. Sendo o poeta Luiz Gama ainda hoje menosprezado, em comparação com Castro Alves, é necessário, pois, colocá-lo no seu verdadeiro lugar de significação. Porém, esse esforço deve servir também para compreender que Gama, na sua poesia, ainda mostra alguma conformidade com certos preconceitos rácicos próprios do século XIX e que se encontram, por exemplo, em poetas angolanos. Já o poeta Solano Trindade, devido à sua formação ideologicamente comprometida com os pobres e miseráveis da sociedade, trata o negro como um ser social, econômico e cultural de corpointeiro, concepção aprofundada por Cuti, que, finalmente, deixa de apelidar o mestiço de mulato, segundo a conformidade com o Movimento Negro. Por outro lado, é um poeta da modernidade mais avançada, quer formalmente, quer atingindo o âmago do subconsciente negro, ao versar o seu sofrimento íntimo, de modo inédito. Brazilian poetry’s several literary canons fail to fully investigate Brazilian Black Poetry as it should be. In spite of the fact that the poet Luiz Gama is currently not in the limelight when compared to Castro Alves, the replacing of his real place of significance is actually worthwhile. This effort should also be needed to understand that Gama in his poetry shows a type of conformity with certain racial bias common in the 19th century as, for example, in the poetry of Angola. On the other hand, due to his ideologically committed ideology with the poor and destitute in society, the poet Solano Trindade deals with the Negro as a social, economical and cultural person. This concept is partook by Cuti who, at long last, do not call the half-breed as ‘mulato’, following orientations of the Negro Movement. On the other hand, he is formally poet featuring themost advanced modernity as he reaches the heart of the Negro subconscious in his singing of deep

  1. Administrative license suspension: Does length of suspension matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, James C; Scherer, Michael

    2017-08-18

    Administrative license revocation (ALR) laws, which provide that the license of a driver with a blood alcohol concentration at or over the illegal limit is subject to an immediate suspension by the state department of motor vehicles, are an example of a traffic law in which the sanction rapidly follows the offense. The power of ALR laws has been attributed to how swiftly the sanction is applied, but does the length of suspension matter? Our objectives were to (a) determine the relationship of the ALR suspension length to the prevalence of drinking drivers relative to sober drivers in fatal crashes and (b) estimate the extent to which the relationship is associated to the general deterrent effect compared to the specific deterrent effect of the law. Data comparing the impact of ALR law implementation and ALR law suspension periods were analyzed using structural equation modeling techniques on the ratio of drinking drivers to nondrinking drivers in fatal crashes from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). States with an ALR law with a short suspension period (1-30 days) had a significantly lower drinking driver ratio than states with no ALR law. States with a suspension period of 91-180 days had significantly lower ratios than states with shorter suspension periods, while the three states with suspension lengths of 181 days or longer had significantly lower ratios than states with shorter suspension periods. The implementation of any ALR law was associated with a 13.1% decrease in the drinking/nondrinking driver fatal crash ratio but only a 1.8% decrease in the intoxicated/nonintoxicated fatal crash ratio. The ALR laws and suspension lengths had a significant general deterrent effect, but no specific deterrent effect. States might want to keep (or adopt) ALR laws for their general deterrent effects and pursue alternatives for specific deterrent effects. States with short ALR suspension periods should consider lengthening them to 91 days or longer.

  2. Phobias in Poetry: Coleridge′s Ancient Mariner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satendra; Khetarpal, Abha

    2012-01-01

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner was written by Coleridge and is a classic poetry about retribution, punishment, guilt, and curse. Religious beliefs and delusions can arise from neurologic lesions and anomalous experiences, suggesting that at least some religious beliefs can be pathological. Looking at the poem through the psychiatric and psychological domain, the symbolism, the narration and the entire setting of the poem represents Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Mariner′s reactions are beautifully portrayed from the psychoanalytic point of view and the literary piece shows claustrophobia, stygiophobia, dikephobia, and poinephobia. The mental stress of a person under a crisis situation has remarkably been evoked in this poem. This incredible piece of art expresses how the realization of divine love within oneself has the power to heal pain and suffer. PMID:23162202

  3. The Intimacy of Internationalism in the Poetry of Joachim Sartorius

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    Neil H. Donahue

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers Joachim Sartorius in his various cultural and literary activities as diplomat, administrator, editor, translator, and poet as a possible model for the German intellectual after reunification, and links those activities through the concept of "internationalism," which has shifted in meaning from programmatic politics to an understanding of cultural difference and mediation with an Other, whether as public and private spheres, Self and Other, or Subject and Object. For Sartorius, however, poetry defines most closely or most intimately that notion of mediation, and thus requires 'close' reading. That notion distances him from the 'impersonal' Modernist poetics of Bertolt Brecht and Gottfried Benn, and links him internationally to W. C. Williams and Pierre Jean Jouve. By examining that connection, this essay defines the international and philosophical base for Sartorius's poetics of intimacy.

  4. Persian Words Used in Kazi Nazrul Islam's Poetry

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    Md. Mumit Al Rashid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kazi Nazrul Islam, the national poet of Bangladesh, popularly known as Nazrul-the rebel poet, is undoubtedly one who may rightly be called as one of the greatest “poets of people” of the world. He was the first poet in Bengali literature that used extensive Arabic and Persian words to express his views and to create a Muslim renaissance within the whole Bengali nation. He was a multi-lingual poet. That’s why we see huge Arabic, Persian, Hindi, Sanskrit and Urdu words, even sentences in almost everywhere of his literature. This article is about the Persian words that Nazrul had used in his poetry. Though the majority of his poems consists of more or less Persian words, in this article, we discussed five of his poems named Shat-il-Arab, Moharram, Kamal Pasha, Qorbani and the 12th Fateha that has most Persian words comparatively.

  5. Performance Poetry as a Method to Understand Disability

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    Lee-Ann Fenge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Seen but Seldom Heard project was a performative social science (PSS project which used performance poetry to illuminate the experiences of young people with physical impairments. Two performance poets, a group of young people with physical impairments, and academics from social science and media/communication backgrounds worked together to explore various aspects of the lived experience of disability exploring issues associated with identity, stereotypes, stigma and representation. In this article, we will present an overview of the project and consider how PSS offers a method to engage seldom heard voices, and illustrate this through two poems which shed light on the lived experience of disability. The article will consider the impact of these poems as PSS, and how this method allows the audience to develop a deeper understanding of the "lived" experience of disability and to reflect upon their own understandings of disability and discrimination. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1602118

  6. THE PHYSICS OF MELTING IN EARLY MODERN LOVE POETRY

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    Andrea Brady

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melting is a familiar trope in early modern erotic poetry, where it can signify the desire to transform the beloved from icy chastity through the warmth of the lover’s passion. However, this Petrarchan convention can be defamiliarised by thinking about the experiences of freezing and melting in this period. Examining melting in the discourses of early modern meteorology, medicine, proverb, scientific experiments, and preservative technologies, as well as weather of the Little Ice Age and the exploration of frozen hinterlands, this essay shows that our understanding of seeming constants – whether they be the physical properties of water or the passions of love – can be modulated through attention to the specific histories of cognition and of embodiment.

  7. USING POETRY AS A MODEL FOR CREATING ENGLISH POEMS

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    Yasemin Kırkgöz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how poems can effectively be used in English language classesto reinforce students’ knowledge of the English language - vocabulary and grammar- andfoster their creative writing. A careful selection of poems appropriate to students’ languagerequirements was incorporated into the curriculum of English Language Teaching. Employingthe Writing-using models technique, a three-step guided writing was developed to consolidatestudents’ language knowledge and creative writing skills. Feedback obtained from thestudents through student journals and interviews demonstrated that the use of poetry hascontributed to students’ practicing effectively and meaningfully their knowledge of grammar;it offered them opportunities for vocabulary enrichment; it broadened their imagination, andfreed them from the routine procedures in the classroom. Sample writings of poems producedby learners are included in the article to demonstrate how the efficient exploitation of thisliterary genre can maximize learner involvement and creativity.

  8. Song, Poetry and Images in Writing: Sami Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Gaski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is an overview of Sami literature, past and present, with a specific emphasis on the connection between tradition and innovation, in which literature is regarded in a broader sense than only limited to the written word. Thus the relationship between the traditional epic yoik songs and contemporary poetry is being dealt with, as is the multimedia approach that several Sami artists have chosen for their creative expression. It is almost more the rule than an exemption that Sami artists express themselves through the use of more than only one medium. Through the introduction to Sami literature, the reader also gets acquainted with the history and the culture of the Sami, who are the indigenous people of the northern regions of Scandinavia, Finland and the Kola peninsula in Russia.

  9. The Society Problems in the Modern Islamic Poetry

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    Anas H. Saeed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research addresses the problems faced by the modern communities in terms of its social milieu. It also tries to shed some light on the most prominent of these problems that are monitored by the modern Muslims poets in their poetries and poems. These societal challenges involve homelessness, poverty and hunger, delusion and confusion, freedom restriction and injustice; cruelty of the society, sadness and worry, depression, drug addiction as well as moral corruption and the exploitation of women. These poets put their hands on those risks and social ills as a prelude to offer solutions to them to provide a decent life for human being and to build new societies towards being more stable and secure; full of happiness; respect; freedom; justice and to live a prosperous carefree life.

  10. Notes for a Theory of the Infant Poetry

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    Ramón Luis Herrera Rojas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The essential features of infant poetry, under an integrating and interdisciplinary vision, taking into account Language and Literature contemporary sciences are presented in this work. Language turns on itself in a phonic-rhythmic materializing of stimulating meanings of ludic actions; interculturality with oral traditional flow; the isotopic density favoring text coherence; speech dynamiting narration; the prevailing of imaginary remarkable sense over abstract; the visual constitution of lyric infantile speakers are, among other, factors tending to a singular relation with tradition and moving among exceptionally solved tensions in the work of many highly creative poets. Such aspects are exemplified by means of some texts, by relevant Spanish and Latin American authors.

  11. Problems in Translating Musical Elements in African American Poetry after 1950

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    Kristina Kočan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, African American poetry eschews traditional literary norms. Contemporary African American poets tend to ignore grammatical rules, use unusual typography on many occasions, include much of their cultural heritage in their poetry, and interweave musical elements into literary genres. The influence of such musical genres as jazz, blues, soul, and gospel, together with the dilemmas that occur for the translator, will be shown to great extent, since music, like black speech, is a major part of African American culture and literature. The translator will have to maintain the specific African American rhythm, blues adaptations and the improvisational language under the jazz impact. The paper presents the problems in translating post-1950 African American poetry into Slovene, and asks to what extent can one successfully transfer the musical elements within this poetry for the target culture? Inevitably, it will identify a share of elements that are lost in translation.

  12. A Linguistic Investigation of the Main Concepts of Amazigh Poetry in Morocco and Algeria

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    Hamza Chafii

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates three main concepts designating Amazigh poetry. These concepts are amarg, asefru and tamdyazt. It also attempts to define Amazigh literature and shed light on the question of orality in this literature. Moreover, the paper discusses Amazigh poetry as one of the most important forms of Amazigh literature and lists its common sub-genres prevailing mostly in Morocco. Finally, it examines, on the basis of linguistic/ etymological analyses, the three aforementioned concepts which refer to Amazigh poetry in Morocco and Algeria. The rationale for his study contends that tamdyazt is a linguistically appropriate concept that can be applied as a universal literary term for Amazigh poetry by researchers in Tamazight.

  13. Affinity for Poetry and Aesthetic Appreciation of Joyful and Sad Poems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Maria; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Artworks with sad and affectively negative content have repeatedly been reported to elicit positive aesthetic appreciation. This topic has received much attention both in the history of poetics and aesthetics as well as in recent studies on sad films and sad music. However, poetry and aesthetic evaluations of joyful and sad poetry have received only little attention in empirical studies to date. We collected beauty and liking ratings for 24 sad and 24 joyful poems from 128 participants. Following previous studies, we computed an integrated measure for overall aesthetic appreciation based on the beauty and liking ratings to test for differences in appreciation between joyful and sad poems. Further, we tested whether readers' judgments are related to their affinity for poetry. Results show that sad poems are rated significantly higher for aesthetic appreciation than joyful poems, and that aesthetic appreciation is influenced by the participants' affinity for poetry.

  14. The Dionysian value and musicality in performatic poetry. Case of Joyelle McSweeney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Salomón

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the philosophy of Nietzsche regarding music and words, and proposes to establish relationships between his arguments on the musical experience, and the performance poetry of Joyelle McSweeney. In short, performance poetry is a type of contemporary poetry written to be read aloud with the most primitive and ritualistic actions of the body and the senses. Thus, the author constructs a poetic universe that aims to unsettle the reader, to ironically deconstruct the syntactic bases of language and to exploit vocalic, musical and rhythmic possibilities of expression in reading. In this sense, this paper justifies the value of music as the highest art (as conceived by Nietzsche in his works The Birth of Tragedy, and the fragment “On Music and Words”, as well as it observes its role in McSweeney´s poetry and its effect on the listener.

  15. "what's the use of poetry..." : [luuletused] / Jürgen Rooste ; tlk. Eric Dickens

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rooste, Jürgen, 1979-

    2006-01-01

    "what's the use of poetry..." ; "in danish town rivers are flowing..." ; "at work..." ; "WILL YOU LOVE ME UNTIL THE EDGE OF ETERNETY...". Orig.: "milleks on vaja luulet..." ; "töö juures..." ; "KASSA ARMASTAD MIND IGAVIKU ÄÄRENI..."

  16. Literary context of interwar Serbian choral music composed to verses of artistic poetry

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    Tasić Nataša D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choral music in Serbia between two world wars developed simultaneously in the genre fields of spiritual and folklore music, and music written to the verse of artistic poetry. Literary context of the latter genre mostly involved poetry from the period of romanticism. Apart from that, certain authors gladly wrote music to the lyric poetry of their contemporaries, and there are also examples in which composers reached out to the poetry from distant past. This paper deals with the analysis of representation of verses of certain poets in the work of musical artists. The reasons for the domination of certain thematic fields and influence of stylistic orientation of lyricists to composer's choices are some of the most significant conclusions of this text.

  17. Exploring Lyric, Epic, and Dramatic Voices: Stages of Incandescence in the Poetry of the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. Ann

    1992-01-01

    Identifies true relationships between the psyche and the lyric, epic, and dramatic voices of poetry. Shows how the acts of identifying, responding to, and composing in these three voices engage healing, inspiration, and active imagination among the aging. (SR)

  18. The Mechanic Eye: North American Visual Poetry in the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goicoechea de Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2012v8n1p78 This paper offers a revision of North American visual poetry from the contemporary perspective of the digital revolution. From the Native American chants to the digital poetry found on the Web, it will explore the internal drives of this sort of poetic manifestations that have endured through different time periods, aesthetic currents and cultural functions despite the various mediums employed for their production and dissemination. Digital poetry nourishes itself from previous literary traditions as well as from the multimedia convergence favored by the digital medium. We will analyze these influences, and the new reading strategies required to contextualize and make sense out of the digital work of poetry. As readers and writers reorganize their reading pacts, researchers of literature face a new challenge: the polymorphic and metamorphosing liquid text made possible by the digital language

  19. The far East in the Poetry of Rosa Romojaro

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    Yanghongyi Ou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article pays attention, in the first place, to the new conditions which provide a wide reception of the East Asian literature in the western area. Coming up next, in this context, a study of the poetries of Rosa Romojaro has been carried out, from the key points and compared motives, especially with the Chinese lyrical poetries and its tradition. After presenting the creative work of Rosa Romojaro, one of the most outstanding Spanish poets nowadays, standing on the point of view of a Chinese original critic, fundamental motives are given in advance in the chosen texts, and constantly linking with the Asian canon: so as the nature, and the degree of the symbolic subtlety in the writing of the poet according to the eastern point of view; the feeling of “Hen”, which contains the emotion of bittersweet and also associates with the passage of time; the essence of the poems and every word of hers, which is fulfilled with sentiments; the symbolism of the moon and its metaphorical reflections of the nocturne; the great motive of voyage and motions, and attached to them, the hope and the seasons, the fall; the adventure of  discovery within the heart of the known places and the purity driven by her glance; the synesthetic evocations; and, lastly, the relationship of her poems with the vital prolongation, making up every poem of Rosa Romojaro in a center of expressivity shared with universal motives which look up to the tradition and the modernity.  

  20. Technical structure of Complaint Poetry Until 3 A.H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Technical structure of Complaint Poetry Until 3 A.H       * Gholam Abbas Rezai   * * Sherafat Karimi     Abstract   Complaint refers to the poetic works in which the poet talks about the Vehemence of his/her painful feeling. It is the description of pains, personal and social problems and in a way is confiding whatever has annoyed his/her soul and body. Complaint can be categorized into social and personal ones. The personal complaints composed at the time of Islam were generally complaining about the Time, death, aging and separation from the beloved. This was due to the poets' shallow viewpoint on life and their nihilistic inclinations. These subjects were still present in first three centuries and were added by new subjects such as complaining about sensual desires.   The general characteristic, style, structure and elements of meaning were simplicity in word and meaning , sincere and ample feeling, using many words with denotative meanings, utilizing maxims, proverbs and wise sayings, rhetorical statements, rich cadence (musical tones, as well as uniformity and simple imagination. Complaint is an independent poetic technique which as a result of the close relation to other sorts of poetic subjects is threaded through various sorts of elegy and sometimes is composed as an independent elegy.     Key words : Complaint Poetry Structure Style Poetic Subject       * Associate Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, university of Tehran . E-mail: GHREZAEE@UT.AC.IR .   ** PhD .candidate university of Tehran .E-mail: KARIMI.SHARAFAT@yahoo.com

  1. INTELLECTUAL RELIGIOSITY OF ISLAMIC BOARDING SCHOOL IN A. MUSTOFA BISRI’S POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wahid Bambang Suharto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to uncover A. Mustofa Bisri as a literary writer who “departs from Islamic boarding school” which conveys intellectual religiosity through poetry. The concept of thinking used in this paper by exposing poetry as text, the world of Islamic boarding school as a con- text, and the interrelations both in poetry and religious Islamic intellectu- als as contextualization. First, the intensity of the written poetry is based on the intellectualreligiosity in theIslamicboarding school, so it is reli- giously timeless, and beyond the limitations of language usage. Aspects of events, aspects of experience, and aspects of the view of life (weltan- schauung unite in the particular language and culture. Secondly, the prin- ciple that the idiocencracy of religious poetry based on Islamic values in the form of a poetical language is important to mark one’s poet as the context of the poetical of A. Mustofa Bisri. It should be interpreted not only as a symptom of poetical language that breaks away from the mean- ing of poetry (the religious experience expressed and simultaneously dis- played in poetry, but also the dynamics interrelated between poets, po- ems, and cultural backgrounds that surround them. Third, the religious experience manifested in the language of poetry is the deepestform of religious intellectual abstraction, i.e., divined and cherished love. This condition is shaped by the crystallization of knowledge as an action in the deepest dimension of one’s humanity to voice inner perceptions. By loving God, people will love God’s creation, man and the universe, as he loves himself. By loving each other and the universe as God’s creation, a lover will treat himself as a person of faith and do good deeds, and remind each other to hold fast to the truth, and remind each other to be patient. The concept cannot be separated from the perspective of al-Qur’an and al-Hadith.

  2. Political System of the Great Cultural Revolution Reflected in Misty Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Špela Oberstar

    2014-01-01

    The article outlines Chinese literature following the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in relation to Mao’s Communist policy. It presents the occurrence of Misty poetry as an opposition to the political ideology of the Great Cultural Revolution (1966–1976). Misty poetry is understood as a spontaneous illegal poetic movement of individuals who veiled their political demands directed against Mao’s ideology in metaphors. This oppositional stance resembled the movement of 4th May 1...

  3. Poetry and cultural identity in F. T. Pacéré's writing: from identity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My concern is the socio-cultural characteristics of F. T. Pacéré's poetry and their aesthetic and semantic structuring role. Pacéré's poetry is not just about identity affirmation; it is also about being open to the world, namely other people and other cultures. Through this, it seeks to achieve universal humanism. I conclude my ...

  4. Solitude and modernity: Some reflections on Annette von Droste-Hülshoff’s poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Alba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solitude and modernity: Some reflections on Annette von Droste-Hülshoff’s poetry. The text aims to an analysis of Droste’s poetry in consideration of the condition of the modern poet, who reflects upon himself’s loneliness. Far from being an individual, autobiographical condition, it is the basis for a consideration about general human’s condition, his social alienation which has made him/her incapable of feeling nature.

  5. La estética del horror en tres relatos fantásticos de Honoré de Balzac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Lozano Sampedro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study wants to emphasize the topic of horror in Honoré de Balzac’s writings, mainly through the analysis of three fantastic stories: La Peau de chagrin, Mel-moth réconcilié and L’Elixir de longue vie. These three stories are included in the Études philosophiques, the part of La Comédie Humaine in which Balzac intends to show the invisible mechanisms of man-kind and society. So, it is in the Études philosophiques where one of the most im-portant ideas of Balsac’s writings is ex-pressed: the power of thought which, in Balzac’s fantastic stories, reveals itself to be destructive.

  6. Hands of beauty, hands of horror: fear and Egyptian art at the Fin de Siècle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefel, Aviva

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines the gothicization of Egyptian manual productions in late-Victorian mummy narratives. These narratives often isolate the mummy's hand as a signifier of craftsmanship, a troubling object for a culture that was mourning the figurative loss of its artisans' hands to mechanized production. Focusing on Bram Stoker's 1903 novel, The Jewel of Seven Stars, I contend that the horror of the mummy's hand emanates from its ambiguous position as an artifact that is itself a means of production. It displaces Friedrich Engels's conception of the Western hand as a self-creating appendage into the atavistic domain of a long-lost Egyptian tradition, and in doing so, it forces the English observer to recognize the irrecoverable nature of aesthetic craftsmanship. Brought into violent contact with the creative potential of the mummy's hand, the characters in Stoker's novel try to disassociate the mummy from manual production but only succeed in confirming their own status as products of a mechanized age.

  7. Magnetorheological suspension electromagnetic brake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2004-01-01

    The magnetorheological suspension (MRS) brake is of the monoblock type. The main part of the electromagnetic brake is an electromagnet, between whose poles two MRS disks are placed. For distances between disks of 0.65x10 -3 m±10%, revolutions of the electric motor, coupled to the electromagnetic brake, ranging between 200 and 1600 rev/min and braking powers of up to 85 W, there are no differences in revolutions between the disks of the electromagnetic brake. For fixed revolutions of the electric motor, the revolution of the parallel disk can be modified continuously by means of the intensity of the magnetic field. In all cases, the quantity of MRS is of 0.35x10 -3 kg

  8. "Poetry Is Not a Special Club": How Has an Introduction to the Secondary Discourse of Spoken Word Made Poetry a Memorable Learning Experience for Young People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymoke, Sue

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a Spoken Word Education Programme (SWEP hereafter) on young people's engagement with poetry in a group of schools in London, UK. It does so with reference to the secondary Discourses of school-based learning and the Spoken Word community, an artistic "community of practice" into which they were being…

  9. Connect and immerse: a poetry of codes and signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Olsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how codes and signals were employed in avant-garde poetry and art in the 1960s, and how such attempts were performed in the wake of cybernetics and (partly through the use of new media technologies, such as the tape recorder and the computer. This poetry—as exemplified here by works by Åke Hodell, Peter Weibel, and Henri Chopin—not only employed new materials, media, and methods for the production of poems; it also transformed the interface of literature and the act of reading through immersion in sound, through the activation of different cognitive modes, and through an intersensorial address. On the one hand, this literary and artistic output can be seen as a response to the increasing intermedation (in Katherine Hayles's sense in culture and society during the last century. On the other hand, we might, as contemporary readers, return to these poetic works in order to use them as media archaeological tools that might shed light on the aesthetic transformations taking place within new media today.

  10. The Gutenberg English Poetry Corpus: Exemplary Quantitative Narrative Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur M. Jacobs

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a corpus of about 3,000 English literary texts with about 250 million words extracted from the Gutenberg project that span a range of genres from both fiction and non-fiction written by more than 130 authors (e.g., Darwin, Dickens, Shakespeare. Quantitative narrative analysis (QNA is used to explore a cleaned subcorpus, the Gutenberg English Poetry Corpus (GEPC, which comprises over 100 poetic texts with around two million words from about 50 authors (e.g., Keats, Joyce, Wordsworth. Some exemplary QNA studies show author similarities based on latent semantic analysis, significant topics for each author or various text-analytic metrics for George Eliot’s poem “How Lisa Loved the King” and James Joyce’s “Chamber Music,” concerning, e.g., lexical diversity or sentiment analysis. The GEPC is particularly suited for research in Digital Humanities, Computational Stylistics, or Neurocognitive Poetics, e.g., as training and test corpus for stimulus development and control in empirical studies.

  11. Introducing Helaehili, an Oral Poetry From Sentani, Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigati Yektiningtyas Modouw

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is partially taken from my research on a Sentani oral poetry, helaehili that is sung in mourning occasions or funerals. It is also usually known as a song of lamentation. The research was conducted in Sentani, Papua, for almost four years (2004-2008. The data were taken directly from the field through recording. The data were then transcribed, translated into English and analyzed. Through the research, it is found that helaehili is rarely heard. Not many people, especially those who live near Jayapura city and young generation, know the song. It is predicted that helaehili will extinct in some years. The research finds the composition, formula, theme, and notation of helaehili. Abstrak: Tulisan ini merupakan sebagian dari penelitian saya tentang lantunan lisan Sentani, helaehili yang biasanya dilantunkan ketika ada kedukaan atau penguburan jenazah. Lantunan ini juga disebut sebagai ratapan. Penelitian dilakukan di wilayah Sentani, Papua selama hampir empat tahun, pada 2004-2008. Data diambil melalui rekaman langsung dari para pelantun di lapangan, kemudian ditranskripsi, diterjemahkan ke dalam bahasa Indonesia, dan dianalisis. Mela- lui penelitian ini ditemukan bahwa helaehili sudah jarang dilantunkan. Tidak banyak orang, terutama yang tinggal dekat kota Jayapura dan para generasi muda yang mengenalinya. Dengan demikian, diprediksi bahwa lantunan ini akan hilang pada beberapa tahun ke depan. Penelitan ini menemukan komposisi, formula, tema, dan notasi mayor helaehili. Kata-Kata Kunci: puisi lisan, formula, tema, helaehili

  12. Controlling active cabin suspensions in commercial vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, W.J.E.; Besselink, I.J.M.; Teerhuis, A.P.; Knaap, van der A.C.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2009-01-01

    The field of automotive suspensions is changing. Semi-active and active suspensions are starting to become viable options for vehicle designers. Suspension design for commercial vehicles is especially interesting given its potential. An active cabin suspension for a heavy-duty truck is considered,

  13. The Black Star: Lived Paradoxes in the Poetry of Paul Celan

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    Dorit Lemberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Celan’s poetry is deemed universal and experimental, and its main characteristic is to “explore possibilities of sense-making.” His poetry is also acknowledged to be the apex of Jewish post-Holocaust poetry, contending with existentialist questions such as the existence God in the Holocaust and the possibility of restoring Jewish identity. In this paper I will examine how Celan uses paradoxes in his poetry to create atheistic and skeptical expressions. The technique of paradox expresses the concurrent existence of two contradictory possibilities; the article will present three types of paradox typical of Celan’s poetry: (1 the affirmation and denial of the existence of God; (2 the mention of rituals from Jewish tradition, while voiding them of their conventional meaning; (3 the use of German, specifically, for the reconstitution of Jewish identity. My main argument is that paradox in Celan’s work creates a unique voice of atheism and skepticism, since it preserves the ideas that it rejects as a source for fashioning meaning. In order to explore how Celan constructs paradox, I will use Wittgenstein’s resolutions of the paradoxes that emerge from the use of language, and I will show how they illuminate Celan’s use of this technique. The article will examine three Wittgensteinian methods of resolving the paradoxes that Celan employs in his oeuvre: highlighting, containing, and dissolving.

  14. The Islamic Ethics in the poetry of ‘Abdullah bin al-Mubarak (Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Muhammad Ismail Bin Abdul Salam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ‘Abdullah bin al-Mubark was born in Marw’ one of the prime cities in Khurasan, (nowadays in the surroundings of Afghanistan and Central Asia, in the year 118 AH. In addition to his many talents, achievements and abilities, ‘Abdullah bin al-Mubarak was also gifted in literacy, particularly in the art of poetry. He held an eloquent tongue which was recognized by all who conversed with him and his language displayed the nature of someone who had been taught well. Most of the poetry which has been recorded from him is actually his advice to others, whether they were close friends or high-ranking Caliphs and Rulers. The topics spoken of concerned the common issues which had arisen in his time (e.g. matters pertaining to theology, politics, the worldview, the community etc and as always, they contained much wisdom and hence the books of history have sealed them and recorded them. This research article discussed Biography of Abdullah ibn Al Mubarak, The Islamic Ethics in his poetry,\tImpact of Rhetoric on his poetry with special concentration on the four kinds i.e. citation, impact of Quranic words, Quranic pictorial and Quranic style on his poetry.

  15. Syntactically Silent Subjects: Luis Muñoz and the Poetry of Ellipsis

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    Judith Nantell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Luis Muñoz (1966 is one of contemporary Spain’s most salient poets. His work has been described as demonstrating a discourse of ellipsis; yet no study has examined in detail his masterful use of syntactic and figurative omission. In fact, even though Muñoz’s published collections to date span two centuries, no single study has been devoted to his decidedly innovative expressivity. His work has been commented on in various panoramic essays considering contemporary poetry published in Spain at this temporal intersection and a number of his poems have been gathered into noteworthy anthologies of this same era. His poetry has been nominated for prestigious awards in Spain and in 2001 Correspondencias ‘Correspondences’ received the fourth Premio Internacional de Poesía del 27 as well as the Premio de Ojo Crítico de Poesía . The present study examines Muñoz’s most recent Querido silencio (2006 ‘Dear Silence’ where ellipsis figures prominently as the poet maximizes and exploits conceptual and linguistic efficiency. In one exemplary poem, “Dejar la poesía” ‘Leave Poetry,’ two syntactically silent subjects engage in an innovative conversation concerning the nature of poetry. At the same time this intriguing dialogue also offers a unique response to the essential question framing this poem and the collection as a whole: Why is poetry an addiction?

  16. Taras Ševčenko in the Prose and Poetry of Vasyl’ Stus

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    Alessandro Achilli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Ševčenko in the poetry of Vasyl’ Stus and Stus’s widespread stereotypical image as a reincarnation of Ševčenko in the 20th century have occupied an important role in both literary studies and popularization. In my article I reconsider this fundamental issue by discussing Stus’s reception of Ševčenko in his critical essays, his letters, and his poetry. My focus is on both Ševčenko’s presence as a ‘fictional character’ in some poems by Stus and the overall influence of Ševčenko’s poetry on Stus’s poetic writing. Moreover, Stus’s representation of Ševčenko is compared with other images of the 19th-century poet in modern Ukrainian poetry from the Avant-garde up to the Seventies. In the conclusion I point out how Ševčenko’s Romanticism should not be confused with Stus’s Modernism. The former should be seen as a part of the complex intertextual mechanism which lies at the heart of Stus’s poetry.

  17. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This wondrous show in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local population. There will be three perfo...

  18. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This wondrous show in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local pop...

  19. "Point de suspension"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN - Globe of Science and Innovation 20 and 21 October Acrobatics, mime, a cappella singing, projections of images, a magical setting... a host of different tools of a grandeur matching that of the Universe they relate. A camera makes a massive zoom out to reveal the multiple dimensions of Nature. Freeze the frame: half way between the infinitesimally small and the infinitesimally large, a man suspends his everyday life (hence the title "Point de Suspension", which refers to the three dots at the end of an uncompleted sentence) to take a glimpse of the place he occupies in the great history of the Universe. An unusual perspective on what it means to be a human being... This spectacle in the Globe of Science and Innovation, specially created by the Miméscope* company for the official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is a gift from the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva, which also wishes to share this moment of wonder with the local population. There will be three performances for...

  20. Information about Editor-in-Chief and the Secretary of the International Scholarly Board of Religious and Sacred Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Tytko, Marek Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Tekst jest informacją biograficzną o redaktorze naczelnym i Sekretarzu Międzynarodowej Rady Naukowej "Religious and Sacred Poetry". The text is the biographical information about editor-in-chief and the secretary of the International Scholarly Board of Religious and Sacred Poetry

  1. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  2. Cynthia J. Miller and A. Bowdoin Van Riper (eds.), The Laughing Dead: The Horror-Comedy Film from Bride of Frank

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The Laughing Dead is as hybrid as its subject, covering American and British film and television in a broad manner. Most of the essays here do not delve deeply into film aesthetics or theory, but they do provide a different perspective on both commonly analyzed and lesser-known films. The essays dealing with suburbia and gender are the strongest of the book. This collection of sixteen articles explores ways in which comedy and horror subvert generic norms, shattering expectations and forcing ...

  3. Wisdom in the Poetry of Muḥmood Sami al Barodi(Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Khansa’ Muḥammad Dieb al Jaji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Muḥmood Sami al Barodi is a famous poet who was named the Resurrector of poetry in the early times when many poets of the old era were the cause of the decline in poetry. His poems had been studied from many aspects and by many scholars but no one ever spoke about al Barodi’s writings about wisdom. This article is focusing on the verses and poems that focus on the meaning of wisdom and everything that relate to it. He talked about the importance of wisdom in the poems as he encouraged the other poets to give attention to this meaning. Some published books and articles helped me write this article but I haven’t found any of them that gave this point enough significance though his poetry is full of verses about wisdom and so I chose to write about it..

  4. 'Looking Back is Looking Forward': Towards a Theory of Tradition in Niyi Osundare's Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Anyokwu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As T.S. Eliot informs us, no one ever has his meaning alone, since the artist does not create ex nihilo. Thus, every artist looks to the past-or Tradition - for inspiration and, indeed, for the very material of creativity. This Eliotesque theory of tradition, it is observed, seems to fundamentally inform and shape Niyi Osundare's poetry insofar as he relies mainly on Yoruba orature and the poetries of the English-speaking world. In this study, therefore, we examine the place of tradition in Osundare's verse with a view to generating a theory of tradition in his work in particular and modern Nigerian poetry of English expression in general.

  5. Musical Metaphors in the Poetry of Wallace Stevens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kennedy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wallace Stevens’s “The Man with the Blue Guitar” (1937 is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential poems of the 20th century. Inspired by Picasso’s painting The Old Guitarist, the poem in turn inspired Michael Tippett’s sonata for solo guitar, “The Blue Guitar” (Tippett 1983 and David Hockney’s The Blue Guitar: Etchings by David Hockney who was inspired by Wallace Stevens who was inspired by Pablo Picasso (Hockney and Stevens 1977. Central to “The Man with the Blue Guitar,” the metaphor of the musical instrument as a transformational symbol of the imagination is common in Stevens’s poems. The structure of “The Man with the Blue Guitar,” according to J. Hillis Miller, is the structure of stream-of-consciousness. Stevens’s poem creates what has been called “the deconstructed moment in modern poetry,” “an attempt to project a spatialized time that can be viewed from the privileged position of a timeless, static moment capable of encompassing a life at a glance” (Jackson 1982. This consciousness, which Derrida refers to as the “trace,” Stevens calls “the evasive movement of language.” The trace is the perception of the absence of meaning after the word or perception has passed, the glimpse of a hidden meaning that immediately vanishes. Stevens’s poem influenced not only other poets, artists and composers; references to and echoes of his ideas and techniques can be seen in popular music and culture well into the 21st century.

  6. “Word upon a Word”: Parallelism, Meaning, and Emergent Structure in Kalevala-meter Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Tarkka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay treats parallelism as a means for articulating and communicating meaning in performance. Rather than a merely stylistic and structural marker, parallelism is discussed as an expressive and cognitive strategy for the elaboration of notions and cognitive categories that are vital in the culture and central for the individual performers. The essay is based on an analysis of short forms of Kalevala-meter poetry from Viena Karelia: proverbs, aphorisms, and lyric poetry. In the complex system of genres using the same poetic meter parallelism transformed genres and contributed to the emergence of cohesive and finalized performances.

  7. Sena, Sophia, Magalhães: on Portuguese poetry before and after the 1974 revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Roriz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With a brief summary of the situation of Portuguese poetry from the end of the 1920’s, fomented to a large degree by lines of strategy of refusal and dialogue with the modernist heritage of Fernando Pessoa and the generation of Orpheu, this article seeks to reflect on how some aesthetic and ideological projects, such as those operated by the poets Jorge de Sena, Sophia de Mello Breyner and Joaquim Manuel Magalhaes, presented, in their possible points of contact and divergence, different forms of critical articulation between history, ethics and poetry.

  8. Self-identification of the lyrical subject in Russian poetry (a draft typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Anatolievich Faustov

    2014-07-01

    The revolution that affected the strategies of lyrical self-identification in Russian poetry of the Silver Age manifested itself in some fundamental shifts. First of all, kaleidoscopic multiplication of lyrical I’s, both through the lyrics of specific poets and even within individual poems. Second, blurred boundaries between different incarnations of the lyrical subject that had been more or less clearly contrasted in poetry of the 19th century. Third, theatralization and problematization (to the extent of open conflicts of the relationship between the author and his/her lyrical ‘doubles’.

  9. Exile and insile: split subject policies and representations in chilean poetry of the seventies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naín Nómez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is an inventory and analysis of Chilean Poetry in the seventies, written in Chileand abroad, emphasizing the "exilio" and "insilio" concept. Apart from focusing on the "exilio-insilio" problem, its development and subsequent integration, this work analyzes the relationships between poets and their enviroment by means of subjective representations in different situations and places (especially urban. The cities of Chile, as well as foreign cities in the countries of exile, acquire repressive connotations, which influence the problems of the divided subject in this poetry.

  10. Shakespeare and the Popularity of Poetry Books in Print, 1583-1622

    OpenAIRE

    Erne, Lukas; Badcoe, Tamsin

    2017-01-01

    Shakespeare’s poems had very uneven success in the early modern book trade: Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece became immediate bestsellers, whereas the Sonnets received not a single reprint in the 30 years following their original publication in 1609. We argue that an examination of the popularity of poetry books in the book trade is necessary to come to a better understanding of the status of Shakespeare’s printed poems in their own time. What were the best-selling poetry books of the...

  11. Creative poetry workshop as a means to develop creativity and provide psychological security of a teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Oganesyan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A creative approach to the implementation of the Federal state standard of general education implies a supportive psychologically safe learning environment, professional readiness of educators to teaching, expressed in creativity, emotional stability, as well as reflection. The teachers’ creativity and psychological stability level can be improved by the use of certain forms of work: training and creative poetry workshops. The results of the author's research suggest that participation in the poetry workshops stimulates reflection, increases stress resistance and creativity of teachers. Our approach allows us to consider the problem of stimulating the development of teachers’ personality as members of creative poetic process in theoretical and practice oriented perspective.

  12. Prominent stylistic aspects in music of Nāser Khosrow's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohseni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is axiomatic  for those who are stylistically a little familiar  about  the periods of  Persian  poetry  that  quasidas  of  Nāser-e Khosrow are totally  different  from  those  of  the  poets  in  fifth  lunar  century  both  in  terms  of  their  contents  and  technically.  This difference  is  seen  even  in  those  areas  of  his  poetry in which the poet is confided to make innovations. This paper investigates Nāser-e Khosrow's style in the field of the music of poetry. It also aims to identify his slylistic differences comparing with those of his most famous contemporaries (Onsori, Farrokhi and Manoochehri in external, lateral and internal areas.      As the first  step, all the Nāser Khosrow's poems -exept for additions section- was considered the Scope of this study, accompanied by main parts of other three cited  poets' divans (poetical works which consists almost 23600 distiches. For the second stage, each poet's divan were separatly scrutinized in three fields of the music of poetry. The frequency of each cases were recorded and after comparing statistics related to Nāser-e Khosrow's poems with other tree poets,  stylistic charachteristics of his poetry were explored. Statistical information related to the poets were generally recorded in a table and some parts of them were shown in a bar graph. It seems necessary to note that the researcher considered two items of  innovation and frequncy in all phases of the study.     Most of the studies done in the field of Nāser-e Khosrow's music of poetry, investigated the prosody and meter of his poetry. Most of these studies considered difficulty and relevancy as the important prosodic characteristics of  his poetry. Regarding the lateral and internal areas of Nāser-e Khosrow's poetry, there are not much argument proposed except for using difficult rhymes and nominal radifs ( for lateral music of poetry and attending to figures of

  13. "Social horror": A critical analysis of ideological and poetic function of the motive of victim in the contemporary Serbian film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kronja Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses achievements of Serbian cinematography after 2000, which narrative strategies and visual aesthetics are focused on the issues of violence and victims in the context of social despair, post-communist transition and ongoing global value crisis. Films made by Mladen Đorđević Life and Death of a Porn Gang (2009, Srđan Spasojević A Serbian Movie (2010, and Marko Novaković Menagerie (2012 integrate these complex characteristics of disintegration of Serbian community and dysfunctional state system into their cinematic poetics. These films present examples of radical film aesthetics, which, through strategies of making things unusual, and the influence of underground, pornography and horror on the realistic drama, speak about permanently traumatised Serbian society. They directly connect collective political state and the domain of personal, family, intimate and sexual, controversially relying on the images and narratives of gender misogyny and the violence it produces and its victims. The paper critically approaches these issues from the gender- feminist perspective.

  14. From One Master of Horror to Another: Tracing Poe’s Influence in Stephen King’s The Shining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buday Maroš

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the work of two of the most prominent horror fiction writers in American history, namely Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King. The focus of this study is put on the comparative approach while tracing the influence of Poe’s several chosen narratives in King’s novel called The Shining (1977. The chosen approach has uncovered that King’s novel embodies numerous characteristics, tendencies, and other signs of inspiration by Poe’s narratives. The Shining encompasses Poe’s tales such as “The Masque of the Red Death”, “The Fall of the House of Usher”, and “The Black Cat” which are shown to be pivotal aspects of King’s novel. The analysis has shown that the aforementioned King’s novel exhibits Shakespearean elements intertwined with Poe’s “Masque of the Red Death”, the Overlook Hotel to be a composite consisting of various Poesque references, and that The Shining’s protagonist is a reflection of autobiographical references to specific aspects of the lives of Poe and King themselves.

  15. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps...

  16. 76 FR 12786 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Poetry in Clay: Korean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Determinations: ``Poetry in Clay: Korean Buncheong Ceramics from the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art'' SUMMARY... in Clay: Korean Buncheong Ceramics from the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects are imported...

  17. Forms of Political Consciousness in the Poetry of Tanure Ojaide: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanure Ojaide has become a major force in contemporary Nigerian poetry. Indeed, in the generation of Nigerian writers after the Achebe – Clark – Okigbo – Soyinka era, Ojaide's ascendancy is incontrovertible. This relevance is not just in the prolificacy of his output, but also in his social relevance as the voice of the ...

  18. The Vestige Of Court Poetry In Modern Yoruba Music: A Study Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the retention of some features of traditional court poetry in modern Yoruba music. The article's focus is the juju music even as Sikiru Ayinde Barrister attracts the attention of the article. Efforts are made to establish the similarities between court poets and modern musicians in the performance of the roles ...

  19. Daughters of the Fifth Sun: A Collection of Latina Fiction and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Bryce, Ed.; And Others

    This anthology of contemporary fiction and poetry by Hispanic American women writers contains material ranging from national award winners to emerging talents. Noting that until recently 20th-century academic literary criticism described ethnic American literature as parochial and politically driven, the anthology's introduction discusses how the…

  20. "A Unified Poet Alliance": The Personal and Social Outcomes of Youth Spoken Word Poetry Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article places youth spoken word (YSW) poetry programming within the larger framework of arts education. Drawing primarily on transcripts of interviews with teen poets and adult teaching artists and program administrators, the article identifies specific benefits that participants ascribe to youth spoken word, including the development of…

  1. “No More Boomerang”: Environment and Technology in Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Charles Ryan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based in oral traditions and song cycles, contemporary Aboriginal Australian poetry is full of allusions to the environment. Not merely a physical backdrop for human activities, the ancient Aboriginal landscape is a nexus of ecological, spiritual, material, and more-than-human overlays—and one which is increasingly compromised by modern technological impositions. In literary studies, while Aboriginal poetry has become the subject of critical interest, few studies have foregrounded the interconnections between environment and technology. Instead, scholarship tends to focus on the socio-political and cultural dimensions of the writing. How have contemporary Australian Aboriginal poets responded to the impacts of environmental change and degradation? How have poets addressed the effects of modern technology in ancestral environments, or country? This article will develop an ecocritical and technology-focused perspective on contemporary Aboriginal poetry through an analysis of the writings of three significant literary-activists: Jack Davis (1917–2000, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (1920–1993, and Lionel Fogarty (born 1958. Davis, Noonuccal, and Fogarty strive poetically to draw critical attention to the particular impacts of late modernist technologies on Aboriginal people and country. In developing a critique of invasive technologies that adversely affect the environment and culture, their poetry also invokes the Aboriginal technologies that sustained (and, in places, still sustain people in reciprocal relation to country.

  2. Mbem mask chants as poetry: a brief expose | Okoye | Creative Artist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Mbem mask chants as poetry: a brief ...

  3. The Stone and its Images: The Poetry of Nancy Morejón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan West

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The essay explores the roots of Nancy Morejón's poetry within the context of a transculturated afro-Cuban identity. Beginning by an examination of the poems that directly deal with the orishas of santería, the essay moves on to some of her more lyric poetry. Morejón's relationship to Dulce María Loynaz provides particular interest in how both writers treat the metaphor of the house in two important poems. This is followed by a discussion of some of Morejón's overtly feminist poetry, placed both within a Cuban context of the history of its revolution, and the displacement of exile (in dialogue with Cuban women outside the island. Morejón's aesthetic scope is wide and her affinities with Poe, the French symbolists, the Cuban poetic tradition, and the plastic arts (Mendive, Brueghel, as well as the essays of Bachelard, are drawn upon to understand the multiple sources of her work. Throughout the essay different critical methods are brought to bear on how Morejón weaves together nature, politics, myth, aesthetic insight, and personal testimony in a poetry with enormous historical resonance.

  4. Saying It "More Intensely": Using Sensory Experience To Teach Poetry Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Suggests the best way to help high school students write poetry is to bring them to memories that would stimulate the expression of everything more intensely. Describes four workshops that appeal to the senses: scent writing, taste writing, music writing, and sight writing. (RS)

  5. The Snake Charmer(ess intermedia dialogue between Henri Rousseau's Painting and Sylvia Plath's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanov Dajana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines possible interpretations of poetry and poetic image analysing the dialogue between the arts of literature and painting. The paper studies the poet Sylvia Plath's referencing Henri Rousseau's painting The Snake Charmer in her poem 'Snakecharmer'. What is analysed is the creative superstructure based upon nonliterary reference, as well as the visual elements attained through two diverse artistic media.

  6. FRUIT IMAGE IN MODERN TURKISH POETRY / MODERN TÜRK SIIRINDE MEYVE IMGESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ramazan GÜLENDAM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The manes of friut appear in similies andmetaphors in Turkish Poetry. The shapes, colours,consistencies, shine and appeal of these fruit depict thebeauty of the beloved. Exanples are given from the poetryof Bedri Rahmi Eyüboğlu, Atilla Đlhan, Nazım Hikmet,Semsi Belli.

  7. An International Experience for Social Work Students: Self-Reflection through Poetry and Journal Writing Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Rich; Coyne, Ann; Negi, Nalini Junko

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive article explores the uses of poetry and journaling exercises as means of helping students develop their self-reflective capacities within the context of international social work. First, self-reflection and its importance to social work practice and education is discussed. Second, the importance of self-reflection in international…

  8. From Keats to Kanye: Romantic Poetry and Popular Culture in the Secondary English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowmer, Megan E.; Curwood, Jen Scott

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined a Romanticism unit within a Year 9 English class in Sydney, Australia. It considered whether popular culture could build connections between students' lives and Romanticism, and whether the process of remixing "high" Romantic poetry with "low" popular culture could foster student engagement. Thematic…

  9. An Examination of Digital Game-Based Situated Learning Applied to Chinese Language Poetry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Lin, You-Shiuan

    2016-01-01

    By gradually placing more importance on game-based education and changing learning motivation by applying game-playing characteristics, students' learning experiences can be enhanced and a better learning effect can be achieved. When teaching the content of Chinese poetry in Taiwanese junior high schools, most teachers only explain the meaning of…

  10. Minority rights and resource-conflict in the poetry of Ibiwari Ikiriko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minority rights appear to be more contentious wherever resource-distribution is contested. Oil and Power are linked inextricably in the poetry that Ibiwari Ikiriko, Nnimmo Bassey and Ogaga Ifowodo have written on the Niger Delta mosaic. Power determines control and dispossession. Thus, these poets have depicted the ...

  11. Poetry in Motion: In Search of the Poetic in Health and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Katie

    2018-01-01

    This article uses poetry to show how we might reimagine the body and movement in ways that speak back to and subvert dominant and neoliberal conceptions of health and physical education (HPE). Drawing on the notion of poiesis and Arnold's conceptualisation of physical education as "in through and about movement," I explore possibilities…

  12. Does Feeling Come First? How Poetry Can Help Readers Broaden Their Understanding of Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva-Wood, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    Assuming that readers' emotional responses can enhance readers' metacognitive experiences and inform literary analysis, this study of 11th-grade poetry readers features instruction that models both cognitive and affective reading processes. The author: (1) Presents a case for more explicit attention to emotion in language arts classrooms; (2)…

  13. A Joyous Lifeline in a Target-Driven Job: Teachers' Metaphors of Teaching Poetry Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Vygotsky's notion, developed by Bruner, of learners growing into "the intellectual life of those around them", this paper reports on a small-scale questionnaire survey of teachers' thinking about poetry writing and their instructional practices of teaching it. Thirty-three teachers, with a range of teaching experience and…

  14. Jack the Giant Tamer: Poetry Writing in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief case report on the use of poetry writing in the treatment of a patient with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Notes that, after 23 sessions in which the patient said nothing, the patient brought a poem for the therapist to read at the 24 session. (SR)

  15. Biblical Poetry as Ethical Reflection: An X-Ray | Nmah | UJAH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UJAH: Unizik Journal of Arts and Humanities. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Special Edition 2011 >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Biblical Poetry as Ethical Reflection: An X- ...

  16. Poetry as Deep Intelligence: A Qualitative Approach for the Organizational Behavior Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buskirk, William; London, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that poetry provides a valuable if overlooked resource to the organizational behavior professor. The authors describe a workshop designed to evoke students' innate poetic metaphors to enable a more lively engagement with course material. Because many of students' personal, private, and emotionally charged…

  17. "CANDID CAMERA?" (FROM THE PRESENCE AND USES OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IN SOME CONTEMPORANEOUS PORTUGUESE POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alexandre Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to examine the presence and functions of the photographic paradigm in some Portuguese contemporary poetry, so as to shed some light both on its thematic diversity and on the strategies of poetic composition encompassed by it.

  18. Poetry and Alkali Metals: Building Bridges to the Study of Atomic Radius and Ionization Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, J. L.; Morais, C.; Paiva, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Exploring chemistry through its presence in the literature in general, and poetry in particular, may increase students' curiosity, may enhance several basic skills, such as writing, reading comprehension and argumentative skills, as well as may improve the understanding of the chemistry topics covered. Nevertheless, the pedagogical potential of…

  19. Unsayable Somethings: Modern American Poetry, Language, and the Logic of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    By exploring the categorical similarities between popular models of science, political economy, psychology, and sexuality, this dissertation addresses modern U.S. poetry's obsession with conjuring the unsayable. Chapters 1 and 2 explore the social and conceptual landscape that came to align the sayable with the cognitive and credible, while…

  20. English: Listening with the Third Eye; Writing Poetry Through Mental and Sensory Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Aaron

    This document contains a separate memorandum and course outline for both students and teachers on the reading and writing of poetry. The memorandum for students includes a list of goals and objectives, a description of the course, required work, optional and additional processes, and a description of grading and testing procedures. The course…

  1. Echo, Not Quotation: What Conversation Analysis Reveals about Classroom Responses to Heard Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John

    2012-01-01

    This article applies conversation analysis to classroom talk-in-interaction where pupils respond to poetry they have heard. The phenomenon of repeating in discussion details from the poem, including patterns of delivery, is considered and named echo to distinguish it from quotation in writing. The phenomenon is significant to the pedagogy of…

  2. Action Poetry as an Empowering Art: A Manifesto for Didaction in Arts Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon, Francois Victor

    2000-01-01

    Explains that didaction is an expressive action in search of internal consistency. Analyzes the didactic implications of the poetic transposition into action and the construction of a postmodern action literature through poetry. Presents the process of poetic emergence in Francophone Switzerland and Ontario. (CMK)

  3. An adaptive-critic look to contemporary poetry in Iran and Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rreza Kiani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Radical innovations in imagery and trying to create new images and combination in nowadays poetry, lead the language out of the monotony and revitalize it. Contemporary poets with personalizing sentiments in two axes companion and succession, rejected arbitrarily the principles and highlighted their words. In this way, poets of Iran and Iraq due to the proximity of certain intellectual and cultural issues, and influencing by various factors of life today, seeking to create fresh images, violating the rules of the meaning of language have created hesitations deliberately in the audiences’ understanding. Most of criticisms in this area are relevant and thought-provoking and can be used in the field of contemporary criticism as a topic worth discussing. In other words, poets have used language not as an opportunity to manifest their poetry, but as a tool to destroy the norms of the past, have taken advantage. In general, the use of frequent and dead images, the lack of illustrations, the use of compounds abandoned, oldness, orientation to the stereotypes and outdated themes, scare senses, due to the role of transformational language, regardless of other applications... are among the issues related to pathology in "beauty-removing" in contemporary poetry of Iran and Iraq which in continue the effects of the three aspects_ langue, mental form and imagination_ have been reviewed. In other words, the findings of this research show that "extremism in tabular arrangement of words and disruption of family practice words", "Rely on the use of stereotypical language," "intellectual solidity on archaic situations" and some of the factors considered in the scope of the meaning of language, contemporary aesthetic realm make poetry of Iran and Iraq vulnerable; This means that poets carry out in the realm of semantic, have not always been associated with success and beauty, and whenever it was lower in the creative process, it is  criticized. It should be

  4. Vanguards and revolution: the concrete poetry
    Vanguardas e revolução: a poesia concreta

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique Manuel Ávila

    1992-01-01

    With no regards to the provincialism ant the resentment present in its attitude, the Brazilian Concrete Poetry movement had the intention, in the mid 50s, to haven taken a major qualitative-revolutionary step towards the evolution of the west world poetry forms, surpassing insofar, at least in technical terms, the great cultural and economic power centers of Europe and North America. Harshe/l8d by the leftist cultural movements of the sixties, the concrete poetry saw its form as the only effi...

  5. Serbs in the poetry of Theodore Prodromos and anonymous Manganeios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Vlada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous rhetorical writings of the Comnenian period constitute a fruitful field of research, both with respect to historical data, i.e. hard historical facts hidden, though still recognizable, behind the peculiar and somewhat abstract mode of expression of the authors of the twelfth century, and with regard to the poetics of the literary works themselves, i.e. the internal elements characteristic not only for the genre chosen, but also for each particular author. A comparative, historical and literary approach to these works renders their sense clearer and their complex allusions more readily understood. This is a matter of some importance, since allusions constitute one of the basic elements of historical rhetoric, which reached its peak at the time of Emperor Manuel Komnenos (1143-1180, especially during the first half of his reign, i.e. till the end of the fifties of the twelfth century. The poetry of Theodore Prodromes and of the somewhat younger Anonymous ('Prodromos' Manganeios is an excellent example of this intertwining of historical and literary elements, i.e. of the presentation of historical data through rhetorical patterns. One has to concentrate on individual works attempting to determine, as far as possible, the date of composition, the circumstances of writing and the purpose of a particular poem, the occasion for which it was written and the character of the expected audience, in order to better understand both the poetry written by these two rhetoricians and the individual features of the authors, as well as their respective positions in the circle around Emperor Manuel Komnenos. The poems dealt with in the present paper stand out for calling the Serbs by their real name. This naming practice was invariably employed by both rhetoricians in cases when new achievements of the basileus were to be announced and proclaimed immediately after the event, on the occasions of first reports, first celebrations of the new victories and

  6. Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Four-wheel suspension system uses simple system of levers with no compliant components to provide three-point suspension of chassis of vehicle while maintaining four-point contact with uneven terrain. Provides stability against tipping of four-point rectangular base, without rocking contact to which rigid four-wheel frame susceptible. Similar to six-wheel suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354).

  7. Heavy vehicle pitch dynamics and suspension tuning

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Dongpu; Rakheja, Subhash; Su, Chun-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The influence of suspension tuning of passenger cars on bounce and pitch ride performance has been explored in a number of studies, while only minimal efforts have been made for establishing similar rules for heavy vehicles. This study aims to explore pitch dynamics and suspension tunings of a two-axle heavy vehicle with unconnected suspension, which could also provide valuable information for heavy vehicles with coupled suspensions. Based on a generalised pitch-plane model of a two-axle heav...

  8. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  9. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is Part 1 in a series of two describing probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal (shedding) in a 350 MWth suspension boiler, firing straw and wood. The influence of fuel type (straw share in wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550, and 600 °C), and flu...

  10. Nonlinear models of suspension bridges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malík, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 2 (2006), s. 828-850 ISSN 0022-247X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : suspension bridges * principle of minimum energy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2006

  11. Fracture in Kaolinite clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2017-11-01

    Clay minerals are involved in many natural (landslides, river channels) and industrial processes (ceramics, cosmetics, oil recovery). They are plate shaped charged colloids and exhibit different flow properties than simpler colloids when suspended in a liquid such as thixotropy and shear-banding. kaolinite platelets are non-swelling, meaning that the stacks formed by the platelets do not have water layers, and thus the suspension does not have a sol-gel transition. However, it has been shown that kaolinite suspensions possesses a non-zero yield stress even at low concentrations, indicating that the particles arrange themselves in a structure through attractive interactions. Here, we experimentally investigate the sedimentation of kaolinite suspensions in a Hele-Shaw cell. The sedimentation of these dilute suspensions can display solid behavior like fracture, revealed in cross-polarized light, which is linked to the failure of the weakly-bonded structure (typical yield stress 10-2 Pa). By changing the interaction potential of the particles (by sonication or introducing salts), we show through these sedimentation experiments, how the fracture pattern can be avoided. Research was sponsored by the Army Research Laboratory and was accomplished under Grant Number 569074.

  12. 49 CFR 570.8 - Suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension systems. 570.8 Section 570.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Pounds or Less § 570.8 Suspension systems. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or...

  13. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 570.61 Section 570.61... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION VEHICLE IN USE INSPECTION STANDARDS Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut...

  14. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B H; Ju, L; Blair, D G

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz

  15. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B H; Ju, L; Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)

    2006-03-02

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz.

  16. Perspectives on the emblems of the nation in contemporary Estonian and Anglo-Welsh poetry / Ene-Reet Soovik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soovik, Ene-Reet, 1968-

    2000-01-01

    Kaasaegse eesti luule ja Walesi ingliskeelse luule võrdlemiseks on kasutatud uusi antoloogiaid: Eesti luule antoloogia II (koost. Raivo Kuusk, 1998), Twentieth-century anglo-welsh poetry (ed. Dannie Abse, 1997)

  17. A Gentle Frost: Poet Helen Frost Talks about the Healing Power of Poetry and Her Latest Novel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with poet Helen Frost. Frost talked about how poetry can help at-risk children. She also related the challenges she faced when she wrote her latest book titled "The Braid."

  18. Biblical Allusions in Expressionist Poetry in the Context of Austrian, German, and Ukrainian Literature : A Comparative Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mykhalchuk, T.

    2016-01-01

    With the application of comparative methodology, this article analyzes biblical allusions, reminiscences, paraphrases, direct and indirect quotations, and symbols in the poetry of Austrian, German, and Ukrainian writers (Georg Heym, Mykola Bazhan, Mykola Khvyliovyj Todosii, T. Osmachka, Pavlo

  19. La sombra sobre Marvel : reescrituras del horror arquetípico en los cómics del Doctor Extraño.

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Desde que H.P. Lovecraft sentó las bases del horror cósmico, otros muchos autores y medios han seguido el influjo de esta manifestación de lo fantástico. Entre ellos, el comic book americano también ha tratado de incorporar a sus códigos los terrores arquetípicos imaginados por el autor de Providence. Nuestro estudio pretende analizar un caso paradigmático: el superhéroe de la editorial Marvel conocido como Doctor Extraño, pues las particularidades de este personaje parecen óptimas para la tr...

  20. O horror como performance da morte: José Mojica Marins e a tradição do Grand Guignol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio De Franciscis dos Reis Piedade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses aspects of the “Coffin Joe” trilogy directed by José Mojica Marins (At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul, 1964; This Night I’ll Possess Your Corpse, 1967; Embodiment of Evil, 2008, taking as its starting point the French tradition of the Theatre of the Grand Guignol (1897-1962. We also discuss how the graphic elements of horror were inserted and recycled in these films, according to paradigm shifts in the genre on the international scene since the 1960s.

  1. Information about Editor-in-Chief and the Secretary of the International Scholarly Board of "Religious and Sacred Poetry"

    OpenAIRE

    Tytko, Marek Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Tekst jest informacją biograficzną o dr. Marku Mariuszu Tytko, redaktorze naczelnym i sekretarzu Międzynarodowej Rady Naukowej "Religious and Sacred Poetry : An International Quarterly of Religion, Culture and Education". The text is the biographical information on Marek Mariusz Tytko, PhD, EDitor-in-Chief and secretary of the International Scholarly Council of "Religious and Sacred Poetry : An International Quarterly of Religion, Culture and Education".

  2. Speaking Laterally: Transnational Poetics and the Rise of Modern Arabic and Persian Poetry in Iraq and Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Thomas Levi

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation critically investigates the transnational movements that shaped the making of modernist poetry in Iraq and Iran. Following a brief introduction to the project’s historical and critical framework, the first chapter provides the dissertation’s theoretical foundation. It thus engages conversations about literary commitment, the transnational dimension of literary development, and world literature to situate these two poetries as integral to the broader modernist movement. Chapt...

  3. Improvement in patient–reported outcomes after group poetry therapy of women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Gozashti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the best ways of achieving the patients’ views and expectations about the effects of a therapeutic or palliative intervention on their quality of life is using PatientReported Outcome Measures (PROMs. Poetry therapy as a psychotherapy intervention has been used for palliation of stressful conditions of several chronic diseases and disabilities. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of group poetry therapy on the quality of life measures in women with breast cancer.Methods: A total of 30 women with breast cancer, undergoing chemotherapy at a referral center in the north of Iran, participated in the current quasi-experimental before-after study conducted in 2016. The study protocol included eight weekly sessions of group poetry therapy using poems from the great Persian poets. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30 was completed by the patients before beginning group poetry therapy and, twice more, one week and two months after the last session. Items of the questionnaire were manually scored and then analyzed using appropriate statistical tests in IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.Results: A total of 28 patients participated in all the group poetry therapy sessions and completed the questionnaire. The mean and standard deviation of age were 45±66. The changes in the score of quality of life from 51.8 to 65.5 and 69 were observed to be significant in the one-week and two-month follow ups (both with P=0.002. Also, changes in symptom score from 34.5 to 23.7 (P=0.01 and functional score from 65.6 to 77.2 (P=0.01 in the two-month follow up were found to be statistically significant.Conclusion: Based on the findings of the study, it can be concluded that group poetry therapy, as a psychotherapy approach, can be used to improve quality of life in breast cancer patients.

  4. Chain Dynamics in Magnetorheological Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, A. P.; Furst, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) suspensions are composed of colloidal particles which acquire dipole moments when subjected to an external magnetic field. At sufficient field strengths and concentrations, the dipolar particles rapidly aggregate to form long chains. Subsequent lateral cross-linking of the dipolar chains is responsible for a rapid liquid-to-solid-like rheological transition. The unique, magnetically-activated rheological properties of MR suspensions make them ideal for interfacing mechanical systems to electronic controls. Additionally, the ability to experimentally probe colloidal suspensions interacting through tunable anisotropic potentials is of fundamental interest. Our current experimental work has focused on understanding the fluctuations of dipolar chains. It has been proposed by Halsey and Toor (HT) that the strong Landau-Peierls thermal fluctuations of dipolar chains could be responsible for long-range attractions between chains. Such interactions will govern the long-time relaxation of MR suspensions. We have synthesized monodisperse neutrally buoyant MR suspensions by density matching stabilized ferrofluid emulsion droplets with D2O. This allows us to probe the dynamics of the dipolar chains using light scattering without gravitational, interfacial, and polydispersity effects to resolve the short-wavelength dynamics of the dipolar chains. We used diffusing wave spectroscopy to measure these dynamics. The particle displacements at short times that show an independence to the field strength, but at long times exhibit a constrained, sub-diffusive motion that slows as the dipole strength is increased. The experiments are in good qualitative agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations of dipolar chains. Although there have been several important and detailed studies of the structure and interactions in MR suspensions, there has not been conclusive evidence that supports or contradicts the HT model prediction that long-range interactions exist between

  5. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  6. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  7. Polymorphism in Bacterial Flagella Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Walter J.

    Bacterial flagella are a type of biological polymer studied for its role in bacterial motility and the polymorphic transitions undertaken to facilitate the run and tumble behavior. The naturally rigid, helical shape of flagella gives rise to novel colloidal dynamics and material properties. This thesis studies methods in which the shape of bacterial flagella can be controlled using in vitro methods and the changes the shape of the flagella have on both single particle dynamics and bulk material properties. We observe individual flagellum in both the dilute and semidilute regimes to observe the effects of solvent condition on the shape of the filament as well as the effect the filament morphology has on reptation through a network of flagella. In addition, we present rheological measurements showing how the shape of filaments effects the bulk material properties of flagellar suspensions. We find that the individual particle dynamics in suspensions of flagella can vary with geometry from needing to reptate linearly via rotation for helical filaments to the prevention of long range diffusion for block copolymer filaments. Similarly, for bulk material properties of flagella suspensions, helical geometries show a dramatic enhancement in elasticity over straight filaments while block copolymers form an elastic gel without the aid of crosslinking agents.

  8. “To the glory that was Greece": Hellenic patterns in Poe's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Tsokanos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe’s poetry has repeatedly drawn the attention of many literary critics since his poems have meticulously been delved into from different perspectives. Undeniably, a multitude of references that allude to ancient Greek mythology and classical literature are present within his verses. These have been noticed and delineated by noteworthy Poe scholars such as Scott Peeples, Kenneth Silverman, Daniel Hoffman and Kevin Hayes in several of their researches in the past. However, despite the wide range of studies that have been published, one cannot encounter any mention regarding the existence of Hellenic motifs or even a reference to an apparent Hellenism in Poe’s poetry. In an effort to outline what has already been affirmed with respect to this topic and to unearth additional links between Poe’s works and Greece, the present essay aims to determine the presence of Hellenic motifs in Poe’s “To Helen” and “Lenore”.

  9. ‘Text’ and ‘voice’ in recent South African poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Woeber

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores in some depth two volumes of poetry which are indicative of a tension between the poem as ‘text’ and the poem as ‘voice’, or the self-conscious (metaphoric ‘reading' or ‘rewriting ’ of the world versus the outward (prophetic ‘speaking' to the world. While neither book is hermetically sealed and, like all rich poetry, delights in transgressing categories, each is distinctive enough to lend itself to exploration in terms of ‘text’ and ‘voice’. The article argues that John Mateer, the self-avowed iconoclast yet to find an individual voice, is postmodern in his reading and rewriting of the fragmented world, while Joan Metelerkamp is closer to the modernists in her speaking to the hallowed world as poet-prophet, eschewing textual pyrotechnics while situating herself within poetic tradition.

  10. The Possibility of Love Explored Through the Poetry of William Wordsworth

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    Kathleen O'Dwyer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the poetry of William Wordsworth as a significant expression of literary romanticism. It argues for a more comprehensive understanding of the tenets of romantic poetry, and consequently for a greater acknowledgement of its contribution to human knowledge, human understanding and human development than has hitherto been recognized. In particular, the paper explores Wordsworthrsquo;s reflections on the role of love in human living, the obstacles to the experience of love and the essential necessity of love in human flourishing. The concentration on the concept of love enables the promotion of a strong argument in favour of a broader interpretation of romanticism than has been previously been accepted.br /

  11. Conversion in poetic communication of Afanasy Fet’s lyric poetry

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    Bezrukov Andrei Nikolayevich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of the analysis in this work is lyrics by Afanasy Fet. Component analysis is performed from the perspective of realization of the aesthetic communicative dialogue’s conversion in the poetic world model. The personalized world of Fet’s poetry is a condition not only for the external specification of feelings and emotions. The main topics of his legacy are nature, beauty, feeling, landscape, and love. However, in our opinion, Fet’s lyric poetry is much more complicated and extensive. In the poetic text there is a fusion of the static in the episodes of reality and the dynamics in the emotional experience of the lyric hero. Consequently, the reader observes the conversion of poetic communication which in turn is sufficiently productive for the objective evaluation of the narrative. In conclusion, the poetic discourse combinatorically connects different facets of language realization which forms semantic variety of lyrics and unordinary nature of the reader's reception.

  12. . . . und . . . Fried . . . und . . .: The Poetry of Erich Fried and the Structure of Contemporaneity

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    Nora M. Alter

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay looks at the poetry of Erich Fried in the context of tensions within contemporary cultural studies. Fried's contemporaneity is linked to his status on the margins of various cultures, media, and ideologies—thus making both his life and his works appear as exemplary paradigms for the postmodern condition, with its various theoretical celebrations of "exile," "border crossing," "transgression," "deterritorialization," and so forth. Yet, at the same time, seemingly in contrast with his labile identity is Fried's rigid Marxist political ideological core which surfaces in his political poetry. Focusing, in particular, on Fried's poems directed against the Vietnam War, this essay seeks to situate the tension beteen these two positions as a deep structure already in his work.

  13. Rescribir el horror. Historia y poética de la memoria en la obra de Roberto Bolaño

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    Alba Solà Garcia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Con los horrores del siglo XX, el mal ha caído en un vacío ontológico que lo hace ininteligible: la desemantización de su lenguaje y la atrofia de sus fórmulas niegan la posibilidad de erigir un discurso válido, sea éste en el plano moral, político o filosófico. La literatura, sin embargo, se aventura a resignificar el espacio del mal a partir de su reelaboración en la dimensión simbólica de la ficción. Roberto Bolaño reconstruye el discurso histórico chileno en Estrella distante y Nocturno de Chile, denunciando el fenómeno del mal y su reiterada aparición en la Historia y resignificando su lenguaje a partir de una poética del ocultamiento y la sugerencia que permite visibilizar el horror y sus espacios, convirtiendo sus ficciones en documentos testimoniales que reelaboran la memoria histórica latinoamericana y reivindican sus episodios olvidados.

  14. 'No me digas nada: yo te diré quién eres': El engranaje de la estereotipa y el horror ocampianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Zapata

    2003-11-01

    de sus versiones (chiste, parodia, sátira el rasgo de humor conjura el efecto perturbador que produce la aparición súbita del motivo de horror. El estereotipo, componente esencial de la sátira ocampiana, juega con la ambigüedad, tanto a nivel de los personajes como para el alcance pragmático de los relatos. Potencialmente peligroso y despreciable, el estereotipo es fuente de cohesión social: cuando, privados de conocimientos empíricos, nos remitimos a fuentes de segunda mano y asimilamos imágenes de manera indiscriminada porque “así lo quiere la tradición”, apelamos al estereotipo, que nos conforta en la sensación de pertenecer a un cuerpo social solidario... y nos aleja del cuerpo. A nivel de los textos ocampianos, para que el estereotipo sea eficaz y logre hacer reír a pesar de la presencia obvia del horror (cuerpos deformes, crímenes, violaciones... debe poder ser reconocido por un público advertido. Sin embargo, el vértigo que produce la oscilación entre lo familiar y lo que “no soy yo” alcanzará probablemente también a un lector extranjero

  15. THE ART OF POETRY AND PAINTING: NEW SUBJETIVITIES IN POST-INDEPENDENCE ANGOLA

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Lúcia Tindó Secco

    2008-01-01

    The art of poetry and painting: new poetic and pictorial subjectivities in Angola after its Independence. The post 80's decades and the rising of other forms of revolution in the aesthetic language. Themes and creative literary procedures: the existential reason, the individual sensitivities, the literary imagination. The presence of love, the myths, of History, of the dreams in the Angolan arts of the last decades as strategies of cultural resistance.

  16. THE ART OF POETRY AND PAINTING: NEW SUBJETIVITIES IN POST-INDEPENDENCE ANGOLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lúcia Tindó Secco

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The art of poetry and painting: new poetic and pictorial subjectivities in Angola after its Independence. The post 80's decades and the rising of other forms of revolution in the aesthetic language. Themes and creative literary procedures: the existential reason, the individual sensitivities, the literary imagination. The presence of love, the myths, of History, of the dreams in the Angolan arts of the last decades as strategies of cultural resistance.

  17. Plotting poetry: On mechanically enhanced reading, 5th–7th October, Basel, Switzerland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plecháč, Petr; Cantón, C. M.; Fabo, P. R.; Seláf, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), s. 126-137 ISSN 2346-6901. [Plotting Poetry: On Mechanically Enhanced Reading. Basilej, 05.10.2017-07.10.2017] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-01723S Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : conference overview * versification * digital humanities Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision OBOR OECD: Specific literatures

  18. The Word ("Qara'a") (Read) in the Holy Koran and Pre-Islamic Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Deeky, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This research deals with the verb "qara'a" (read) and with what is derived from or built on in Qur'an and pre Islam poetry. The research stems from the assumption that this item (read) did not appear in pre-Islam Arabic in the meaning agreed upon regarding the concept of reading a written text, and what is stated in the Qur'an regarding…

  19. Going Begging:Casino Culture and its Contrasts as Revealed in the New Macao Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kelen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the key themes of contemporary Macao poetry, chance and luck loom large, along with their figuration in Macao life through sites such as casinos and temples, through personae such as those of the gambler, the beggar, the prostitute. Macao as dot-on-the-map is likewise conceived as a site for all kinds of portal semiotics, as paradigm for cultural crossing and cultural shift. Macao may be re-garded as a work enduring (in Brechtian terms because it is unfinished. While this is a formula that could be notionally applied to any city, this view seems par-ticularly apt given both the extraordinary pace of change in post-handover Macao (i.e. since 1999, and the present bubble-bursting effect of the 2008 "financial tsunami". Relating Augé's conception of "non-places" to Eco's notion of open (as op-posed to closed text, this paper observes that consciousness of place in contem-porary Macao poetry appears to be dominated by two kinds of space, glossed here as "Macao space" and "anywhere space". Macao space is uniquely of an historical moment and place, something culturally positioned; in anywhere space (e.g. in-side of a casino or an airport subjects are hailed by consumption-oriented reifica-tions of putative universal value. The contemporary Macao poetry typically values Macao space and sees it as under threat from the "non-negotiable" space of cul-ture that could be anywhere. Interested in the paradoxes, ironies and hypocrisies inherent in the present-day culture, politics and international position of Macao, the new Macao poetry re-veals a place-based poetics deeply concerned with Macao identity, its evolution and potentials.

  20. Bilingual poetry: expanding the cognitive and cultural dimensions of children’s learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kenner, Charmian; Al-Azami, Salman; Gregory, Eve E.; Ruby, Mahera

    2008-01-01

    Stories and poetry have long been considered a resource for the language and literacy development of bilingual children, particularly if they can work with texts in both mother tongue and English. This paper demonstrates that bilingual learning is also beneficial for second and third generation children whose English is often stronger than their mother tongue. Presenting data from an action research project in East London primary schools, we show how children investigated metaphor and cultura...

  1. Creative poetry workshop as a means to develop creativity and provide psychological security of a teacher

    OpenAIRE

    N.T. Oganesyan

    2013-01-01

    A creative approach to the implementation of the Federal state standard of general education implies a supportive psychologically safe learning environment, professional readiness of educators to teaching, expressed in creativity, emotional stability, as well as reflection. The teachers’ creativity and psychological stability level can be improved by the use of certain forms of work: training and creative poetry workshops. The results of the author's research suggest that participation in the...

  2. Chemistry, Poetry, and Artistic Illustration: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching and Promoting Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Kitson, Herbert; Andes, Cynthia

    2007-10-01

    This article describes a successful interdisciplinary collaboration among chemistry, humanities and English faculty members, who utilized poetry and artistic illustration to help students learn, appreciate, and enjoy chemistry. Students taking general chemistry classes were introduced to poetry writing and museum-type poster preparation during one class period. They were then encouraged to use their imagination and creativity to brainstorm and write chemistry poems or humors on the concepts and principles covered in the chemistry classes and artistically illustrate their original work on posters. The project, 2 3 months in length, was perceived by students as effective at helping them learn chemistry and express their understanding in a fun, personal, and creative way. The instructors found students listened to the directives because many posters were witty, clever, and eye-catching. They showed fresh use of language and revealed a good understanding of chemistry. The top posters were created by a mix of A-, B-, and C-level students. The fine art work, coupled with poetry, helped chemistry come alive on campus, providing an aesthetic presentation of materials that engaged the general viewer.

  3. Repercussions of Isinai Lyric Poetry on Culture-Based Values Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girlie F. Salas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available - Lyric poetry is an important manifestation of the people’s psychology, character, and individuality. Belonging to one of the ethnolinguistic groups of Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines which embraces a rich lyric poetry are the Isinais who inhabit Dupax del Sur, particularly the barangays of Domang, Dopaj, and Balzain, as well as those found in Barangays Buag and Banggot in Bambang. This qualitative study focused on the folksongs as a literary form evolved by the Isinais in the foregoing setting and how these pieces could contribute to a more meaningful culture-based values education among college students of the Nueva Vizcaya State University-Bambang Campus strategically located at the heart of southern Nueva Vizcaya populated primarily by Igorots, Ifugaos, Ilocanos and Isinais. Key informants divulged published and unpublished Isinai folksongs, whose features as to origin, musical structure, cultural and social traits, and implications to values education, were thoroughly investigated in this study. Problems were identified as an attempt to initially help derive a mechanism which can preserve and promote the Isinai lyric poetry. The findings incited better standpoints on preparing prospective teachers of the university by encouraging them to integrate culture in values education; participation of school administrators and local officials in preserving the Isinai culture; involvement of music and literature teachers and researchers of the university in exploring and promoting the Isinai culture; and supporting the program of the provincial government in preserving Isinai dialect, songs and dances.

  4. “Satire” in Khorasani Poetry in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries

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    جواد  غلا‌م‌علی‌زاده

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sayyed Mohammad Bagher Hosseini *   Javad Gholamalizade **     Abstract     The fourth and fifth centuries are known as the golden age of Arab poetry in Khorasan, in such a way that Khorasan became a place for great poets and scholars from all over the Islamic world. One of the poetic genres culminated in this period is usually created when human is faced with an affair that irritates him and makes him angry and sad, and makes him interpret sometimes explicitly, sometimes implicitly, sometimes by nasty speech and sometimes by a virgin mode. Through analysis of related poems, the present study makes an attempt to investigate the reasons for creating satire, types of satire and its use in Khorasani poetry.     Key words : poetry/ poem, satire, Khorasan, satire form Dehkhoda    * Associate Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, Ferdowsi University – Mashhad.   E-mail: hoseinifmb@yahoo.com.  ** Ph.D Candidate in Arabic Language and Literature, Ferdowsi University – Mashhad.   E-mail: javad_gh61@yahoo.com.

  5. METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES OF THE SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY OF POETRY (the use of semantic differentials in sociopoetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Antonov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In sociology, literature, along with the study of the content of works of art and social characteristics of characters it is important to study the creative process. Here is an attempt to look at the poetry writing and its results through the prism of the behavioral approach on the basis of the poetry content analysis. Creation of the poem is considered as a behavioral creative process of self-actualization of creative potential, interactions of the system of requirements and social situations verbally expressed by means of language. During the framing actualized thoughts and feelings of the poet translated into poetic form. The main hypothesis is that the emotional dissonance express itself poetically. Semantic differential (SD technique provides a clue to the text. Content analysis of poems (cycles, books of separate poets through SD method could provide the understanding of similarities and differences of successive stages of the creating creative process of the same master, or explain the dissimilarity of poets compared to each other. The analysis of separate poems of Blok, Gumilev, Yesenin, Akhmatova ect. may demonstrate style features, the individual originality of each poets considered in terms of the dialectic opposition. The article discusses the possibilities of the SD method and the antonyms scales search in the author’s text in the study of the creative process, based on the characteristics of the poetry of classical Russian poet Alexander Blok.

  6. Political System of the Great Cultural Revolution Reflected in Misty Poetry

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    Špela Oberstar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines Chinese literature following the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in relation to Mao’s Communist policy. It presents the occurrence of Misty poetry as an opposition to the political ideology of the Great Cultural Revolution (1966–1976. Misty poetry is understood as a spontaneous illegal poetic movement of individuals who veiled their political demands directed against Mao’s ideology in metaphors. This oppositional stance resembled the movement of 4th May 1919 which took place after the collapse of the last Chinese dynasty and criticised the traditional dominant ideology of Confucianism and sought democratization of the Chinese society. The same desire was shared by the Misty poets but this time under the dominance of the political ideology of the Chinese Communist Party in the period following 1942 which was indicated by Mao Zedong in his speech in Yan’an. Mao’s policy was repressive in nature since the role of literature and art, and thereby also poetry, was seen only as being utilitarian and was thus sealed in the dictated reflection of the class struggle. Therefore, in essence, the communist period laid its path to capitalism.

  7. Through Emersonian Hermeneutics: Landscapes of the spirit or transcendental in Sylvia Plath's poetry

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    Mušović Azra A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Criticism rarely portraits Plath as a nature poet, but landscapes occur regularly throughout her work. Her exploration of the relationship between the individual and the natural world is fundamental to the development of her mature voice. This development reveals the continuing influence of the American Transcendentalist poet, theologian and philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose beliefs fundamentally shaped the society in which Plath was raised. In his often-quoted essay Nature, the philosopher said: ‘Nature always wears the colors of the spirit’ - expressing his belief in a dynamic interchange between the mood of the perceiver and the mood of nature. Emersonian attitudes permeated and shaped Plath’s vision - as they have permeated so much American poetry and culture - throughout her writing life. More fundamentally, his insistence on integrating the external world - or, in Emersonian terms, ‘the NOT ME’ - into the soul is an ambition which Plath’s poetry shares. This paper shows that not only does the brutal imagery of Plath’s later poetry connect this spiritual pursuit, but the inescapable centrality of the self and its experiences can be traced back to the lasting influence of Emersonian idealism.

  8. ‘Flirting with International Socialism’: Love, Politics and Intertextuality in the Poetry of Gerry Murphy

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    Pilar Villar-Argáiz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After almost three decades writing poetry, Gerry Murphy has attained a place as one of the most popular, idiosyncratic and unconventional contemporary Irish poets. His voice is certainly unique in Irish poetry, as regards the content, form and sarcastic tone of his poems. This  “extraordinary juggler of conflicts”,  as poet Thomas McCarthy (2010 defines him, has indeed provoked controversy in some circles. One funny anecdote of his many literary performances includes his reading of “A Note on the Demise of Communism” in front of the Dean and 600 Chinese students in Fudan University (Shangai, and the troubling expectancy this event arose before finding out that it was just a love poem after all. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introductory critical perspective on Gerry Murphy. First, I will discuss the cluster of themes which dominate his work, by particularly focusing on the predominant sensual eroticism and the awkward, almost uneasy, interplay of love and politics observed in much of his poetry. Other elements of analysis will include Murphy’s frequent use of dramatic monologue, his literary influences, the stylistic variety of his work, and the use of sarcasm as a very powerful means of exerting criticism.

  9. The Song of Disappearance: Memory, History, and Testimony in the Poetry of Antonio Gamoneda

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    Daniel Aguirre-Oteiza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores Antonio Gamoneda’s poetry as an Adornian form of testimony. With its enigmatic foregrounding of lies, the book-length poem Descripción de la mentira ‘Description of the Lie’ can be read as a “contradictory testimony” in which the act and memory of witnessing go, as it were, underground—only to resurface, rife with loss, years after Spain’s transition from dictatorship to democracy. Yet the abstruse character of this poetic writing prevents readers from drawing straightforward political truths about Spanish history from the poem. Losses are inscribed in the text catachrestically, as they truly are: losses. Gamoneda’s poetry has been read amid changing representations of Spain’s recent past, and thus contrastingly seen as an “undecipherable symbolic code” and as “realm of memory.” This reading, which draws on Holocaust studies, allows for a redefinition of the fraught place of modern poetry in the field of Hispanic cultural studies. Examining Descripción de la mentira within the context of the debate about historical memory in Spain sheds light on the theoretical difficulties that dominant aesthetic tendencies encounter in the study of how Spanish poets of recent decades try to establish a dialogue with the reader regarding society, memory, and reality.

  10. The Political Use of the Figure of John Coltrane in American Poetry

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    Samo Šalamon

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available John Coltrane; one of the most influential and important musicians and composers of the 20th century; began to inspire jazz musicians and American poets in the 1960s with the Black Arts Movement poets. His music was interpreted and used for the promotion of political ideas in the poetics of Amiri Baraka; Sonia Sanchez; Askia Muhammad Toure; Larry Neal and others. This is the political Coltrane poetry. On the other hand; Coltrane’s music inspired another kind of poets; the musical poets; which began to emerge in the 1970s. In this case; the poetry reflects the true nature of Coltrane’s spiritual music quest. The poets belonging to this group; like Michael S. Harper; William Matthews; Jean Valentine; Cornelius Eady; Philip Levine; Nathaniel Mackey and others; go beyond politics; beyond race or gender. The paper will examine the first type of the Coltrane poetry; where Coltrane’s music was used to promote the political ideas of the Black Art Movement in connection with the political movement of Malcolm X. These poets changed; rearticulated and shifted Coltrane’s spiritually musical message towards the principles of the black nationalism.

  11. Reading Sara Pujol Russell’s Poetry of Contemplation and Connection

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    Anita M. Hart

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Pujol Russell’s poetry captures a process of expanding consciousness and personal renewal. Through contemplation and attention to nature, the poet-speaker in her works generates a sense of connection that moves her beyond daily concerns. Pujol’s poetry is both metaphysical and also different in that it resists easy classification and is not representative of mainstream trends. This essay approaches the distinctiveness of Pujol’s work by studying selected poems from her third book of poetry in Spanish, Para decir sí a la carencia, sí a la naranja, al azafrán en el pan (2004 ‘To Say Yes to Lack, Yes to the Orange, to the Saffron in the Bread.’ Incorporating philosopher María Zambrano’s thoughts on contemplation, it shows Pujol’s poet-speaker establishing a connection with nature and spirit, experiencing a heightened consciousness, and searching for expression. The poetic language is characterized by vision, intimacy, enigma, and contradiction. In its subjective, intuitive way, Pujol’s work reveals the poet-speaker’s winding path of discovery and challenges the reader to look closely inside and outside in engaging life’s mysteries.

  12. (TRANSATLANTIC ROUTES IN COLONIAL TIME AFRICAN POETRY: THE CASE OF NOÉMIA DE SOUSA

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    Simone Pereira Schmidt

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available From the mid-twentieth century on, African authors mark their poetry with strong libertarian tones. Their poems can be interpreted as a discourse of identity affirmation that played an important role in anti­-colonial struggle. Among these authors, the Mozambican Noemia de Sousa took an important part, and in her poetry we can read a dialogue with intellectuals and artists linked, directly or indirectly, with the stru­ggles of American black movement for civil rights. This article seeks to interpret the dialogue established by Noemia e Sousa, in her poetry, with the construction of a ‘black identity’ discourse, especially in the con­solidation of black movements in West and in the growth of an anti-colonial consciousness in African countries. By reading some Noémia de Sousa poems, we intend to investigate the routes traced by such dis­courses, also considering the gender issues involved in the poet’s work.

  13. From Albion's shore: Lord Byron' poetry in Slovene translations until 1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication in 1830 of the early poems of the doyen of Slovene poetry - Dr France Prešeren  in Kranjska čbelica (The Carniola Bee - marks the beginning of Slovene Romanticism, which ends in 1848, -with the last of his poems published in the fifth volume of the same literary magazine. The period from 1830 to the »revolutionary« year of 1848 is thus committed to Romanticism as the leading movement of Slovene literature, artfully embodied in Prešeren's fine lyrical poetry that aimed at and considerably contributed to national unification and identification, as well as in the Europe-oriented literary criticism of Matija čop.  Comparing the trends of the English and Slovene Romantic Revival, we can readily establish that the emergence of Romantic tenets expressed in poetry was somewhat late on Slovene ground. In England, of course, the crucial years are1789, when Lyrical Ballads were published by Wordsworth and Coleridge, and the year 1832, which marks the death of Sir Walter Scott.

  14. UTOPISTIC JOURNEY OF POETRY AGAINST HEGEMONIC CORRUPTION A study on the cultural movement of Indonesian poets 434 resisting against corruption through poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB. Edi Pramono

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of Indonesian poets have declared a cultural movement to resist against hegemonic corruption through poetry. Poetry is believed to be powerful and thus must have didactic, moral, and utilitarian functions to change society. As Horace said ―dulce and utile‖, literature is supposed to enlighten people and persuade society for a better life. This paper is intended to present the struggle of Puisi Menolak Korupsi (PMK cultural movement during this 4-year journey and what it has gained. 6 anthologies have been published. 47 road shows have run in the entire country to both disseminate the idea and persuade more people to rebuff corruption, and it is still counting. Gauri Viswanathan explained hegemonic control by showing how the humanistic functions traditionally associated with the study of literature can be vital in the process of sociopolitical control. Indonesia was ranked 90 in corruption index 2016 among 176 surveyed countries in the world. Corruption seems to be a hegemonic control to this country, from the top until the bottom level. Corruption becomes hegemonic since it has power and is powerful. The massiveness of hegemonic corruption tends to make this cultural movement of resistance autopistic journey. Faith and spirit are the keys to keep persisting the movement.

  15. Attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, David B.; Fontana, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic suspension systems can be used in a wide variety of applications. The decision of whether to use an attractive or repulsive suspension system for a particular application is a fundamental one which must be made during the design process. As an aid to the designer, we compare and contrast attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems and indicate whether and under what conditions one or the other system is preferred.

  16. Introducing Dual Suspension System in Road Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Imtiaz Hussain; Jawaid Daudpoto; Ali Asghar Memon

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of suspension system is to reduce the motions of the vehicle body with respect to road disturbances. The conventional suspension systems in road vehicles use passive elements such as springs and dampers to suppress the vibrations induced by the irregularities in the road. But these conventional suspension systems can suppress vibrations to a certain limit. This paper presents a novel idea to improve the ride quality of roads vehicles without compromising vehicle?s stability...

  17. Time Varying Behavior of the Loudspeaker Suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2007-01-01

    The suspension part of the electrodynamic loudspeaker is often modelled as a simple linear spring with viscous damping, however the dynamic behaviour of the suspension is much more complicated than predicted by such a simple model. At higher levels the compliance becomes non-linear and often chan...... changes during excitation at high levels. This paper investigates how the compliance of the suspension depends on the excitation, i.e. level and frequency content. The measurements are compared with other known measurement methods of the suspension....

  18. Introducing Dual Suspension System in Road Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Hussain

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of suspension system is to reduce the motions of the vehicle body with respect to road disturbances. The conventional suspension systems in road vehicles use passive elements such as springs and dampers to suppress the vibrations induced by the irregularities in the road. But these conventional suspension systems can suppress vibrations to a certain limit. This paper presents a novel idea to improve the ride quality of roads vehicles without compromising vehicle?s stability. The paper proposes the use of primary and secondary suspension to suppress the vibrations more effectively.

  19. Visual and Artistic Functions of Letters in Khaghani’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Zolfaghari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intensity of emotion and fluctuation of meaning in the poet's mind causes him to go beyond the ordinary language and convey intellectual and emotional meanings through metaphors, similes and linguistic preparations. He has sharp eyes and a sensitive spirit and creative temperament and attempts strengthening his own literary language and creating personal style by inventing novel images, showing the creativity and imagination and entering in various arenas of imagination. This point more than anything else could be done by presenting images and new figures. Perhaps in the sixth century, and especially in Azerbaijani school, more than other periods, poets have been looking for creating innovative style in eloquence. Their major attempts were mainly in imaging, a wide field that they have competed. It is obvious that in this illustration the alphabet letters would be very helpful. Khaghani's Divan of poetry, as one of the greatest poets of this school, is the perfect poetical book of paintings in which meaning has been hidden under a delicate pattern and new different scientific, cultural and religious images. Letters are a broad range of elements that put a new field in front of the poet and he is aware of the potential features of the letters, new images, and artistic creativity techniques as well. This paper shows descriptive - analytical study of various aspects of Khaghani’s poetry and frequency of letters in the alphabet letters, alphabetic-based authenticity of images, different similarity reasons, semantic and literal multi-relevance of letters in the context of poetry, producing figures of speech based on letters, sensational relationship exists between images and letters which have been shown in his poetry. Letter have a double and even multiple application in Khaghani's poetic works (divan and moreover the construction of words and conveying meaning which is the real and common usage, they were used as artistic instruments

  20. Mystery and Horror: English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Billie R.; Troilo, Vivian

    This quinmester course guide focuses upon a course that explores various kinds of mysteries, including the detective story, the Gothic mystery, and stories of the supernatural. Discussion of specific criteria for evaluating the mystery story is emphasized. By capitalizing on the wide appeal of the mystery, it is hoped that students who seldom read…

  1. Horror Haapsalus / Kaisa Karu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karu, Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    23.-25. aprillini Haapsalus toimuva 5. Haapsalu Õudus- ja Fantaasiafilmide festivali (HÕFF) filmidest: režissööride Yannick Dahan'i ja Benjamin Rocher "Hord", Srdjan Spasojevic'i "Serbia film", Cory McAbee "Stingray Sam", režissöör Tom Six' "Inimsajajalgne", Shinya Tsukamoto "Tetsuo"

  2. Prospective ESL/EFL Teachers’ Perceptions towards Writing Poetry in a Second Language: Difficulty, Value, Emotion, and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Yu Liao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to explore how 18 M.A. TESOL students, who are prospective or experienced ESL/EFL teachers, perceive poetry writing in a second language. A qualitative interview-based design was utilized. Following Iida’s (2012a analytical framework in examining EFL students’ perceptions toward writing haiku in English, this current study investigates 18 prospective ESL/EFL teachers’ perspectives through the lens of difficulty, value, emotion, and attitude. In order to validate the coding of the interviews, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC test was computed among three interview coders including the primary researcher, which yields a great agreement rate at .86. The results indicate that while these prospective ESL/EFL teachers understand writing poetry in a second language involves various difficulties, they acknowledge the values of utilizing poetry writing in second language classrooms. The results also show that writing poetry in a second language contains both positive and negative emotions, but positive ones are more frequently addressed. Most importantly, the data suggests that writing poetry in a second language is considered as an applicable practice in ESL/EFL language classrooms.

  3. Getting poetic with data: Using poetry to disseminate the first-person voices of parents of children with a disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Bernie; Sanders, Caroline; Bray, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    This paper considers the limitations of traditional prose-based approaches to research dissemination and explores the potential merits and tensions in adopting a poetic approach to disseminate participants' experiences and perspectives. Drawing on our experience of using I-poetry to create first-person poems from our research data we discuss the attractiveness of the subjective, expressive and relational opportunities of poetry, and its ability to compress experience and create emotional connections and evoke emotion. We also reflect upon and discuss the limitations, challenges and criticisms of the use of research poetry, with a specific focus on the use of data poems and their value in disseminating research findings. Using poetry compelled us to think with our data differently and our poems have generated visceral responses from parents and professionals. Research poetry has value within academic and clinical worlds but its greatest potential perhaps lies in providing a means of disseminating research to the wider range of stakeholders. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Da poesia visual concreta à poesia virtual concreta: a ciberliteratura na sala de aula / From the concrete poetry to virtual poetry: the ciberliterature in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Agra de Brito Neves

    2010-12-01

    the universal experimentation in writing, in sound and in image, opened by the European avant-garde and concrete poetry - virtual poetry embryo. Promote student interaction with poetry animated by computer - that is a new challenge for education.

  5. 36 CFR 296.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 296.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for management...

  6. Design analysis of formula student race car suspension system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, Julian Wisnu; Ubaidillah, Aditra, Rama; Alnursyah, Rafli; Rahman, Rizki Abdul; Cahyono, Sukmaji Indro

    2018-02-01

    Design analysis of suspension especially for racecar suspension is very crucial to achieve maximum performance and handling. Suspension design may vary depending on the road terrain and the vehicle purpose itself, such as high speed or off-road vehicle. This paper focused on the suspension which used for racecar vehicle. The suspension type used was unequal double wishbone. This model is used because of its stability for high-speed usage compared to another kind of suspension. The suspension parameter was calculated to achieve desired performance. The result is the motion ratio of the designed suspension geometry. The obtained value of motion ratio was 1:2 for front suspension and 1:1 for the rear suspension. These calculation result the front suspension is still too soft, which the optimal motion ratio should be kept around 1:1 for better handling. This problem caused by the lack of space for suspension linkage.

  7. 39 CFR 320.9 - Revocation or amendment of suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUSPENSION OF THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 320.9 Revocation or amendment of suspensions. These suspensions... of operations (in dollar or volume terms, whichever is larger) lower than that antedating the...

  8. Linear viscoelastic properties of aging suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnomo, E.H.; Purnomo, E.H; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mellema, J.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the linear viscoelastic behavior of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) microgel suspensions in order to obtain insight in the aging processes in these densely packed suspensions at various temperatures below the volume transition temperature. The system is found to display a strong

  9. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... braking system. The vehicle shall be level (not tilting to the left or right). Air leakage shall not be... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension systems. 393.207 Section 393.207... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393...

  10. 41 CFR 105-74.670 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 105-74.670 Section 105-74.670 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.670 Suspension...

  11. 36 CFR 25.3 - Supervision; suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision; suspensions. 25.3 Section 25.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL MILITARY PARKS; LICENSED GUIDE SERVICE REGULATIONS § 25.3 Supervision; suspensions. (a) The guide service will operate under the direction...

  12. Symbol, Mask and Myth in the Poetry of Resistance by Qaisar Aminpoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Rowshanfekr

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analytical and statistical method of research is used in current study. After discovering and classifying of symbols and myths, they categorized into five areas which derived from nature, positive and negative characters, animals and other items which with regard to their essence cannot be included among natural, characteristic and animal areas. Then functional range of these sections and variety and ingenuity of the poet in the use of these concepts will be examined in this study and we'll try to answer to these questions that how much quantity range of symbol , mask and myth elements are used in Aminpoor's poetry and what kinds of concepts are included in his poetry?  Poetry of war in early years, had fallen into a slogan Poets policy was improvement of speech toward imaginary horizons. The use of symbolic speech is one way of emergence, consolidation and spread of the poetic imagination in the war poem (Poorjafi., 1384: p 22. Identity, ambiguity and seeking a path to literary and artistic richness are the major trends of Aminpoor in the use of symbolic elements.  Mythic approach and using of historic characters, which became a part of nation's history (Abbas, 1992: p 125, in Aminpoor's poetry are used to create a hero and heroism in his poetry and expressing resistance ideas as well. Hence, poets by recreating historical, national and religious characters, according to the needs of the community, strengthen a sense of strength, durability against foreign domination and flatter their power and steady to their enemies (Lak, 1384: pp. 64, 69.  However, in mask poetry, Aminpoor uses historical, religious and Sufi figures and with recreating these characters, impose his own thoughts and perspectives upon them completely (Ahmad Ali El Zobaidi, 2008: pp. 140 & Ashari Zayed, 1978: p 93.  "from the countless names of your martyr / Abel was the first name / anymore / do not remember these days / Abel / was my other name" (A. M., 1388: p

  13. The Functions of Onomatopoeia in Modern English and Arabic Poetry: A Study in Selected Poems by Lawrence and al-Sayyab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zubbaidi, Haitham K.

    2014-01-01

    Onomatopoeia has always been a functional poetic device which enjoys a high sound significance in the poetry of many languages. In modern English and Arabic poetry alike, it proves to be vital and useful at different levels: musical, thematic and at the level of meaning. Still, the cultural difference looms large over the ways it is employed by…

  14. Osmotic consolidation of suspensions and gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.T.; Zukoski, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    An osmotic method for the consolidation of suspensions of ceramic particles is demonstrated. Concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) are separated from a suspension of ceramic particles by a semipermeable membrane, creating a gradient in solvent chemical potential. Solvent passes from the suspension into the polymer solution, lowering its free energy and consolidating the suspension. Dispersions of stable 8-nm hydrous zirconia particles were consolidated to over 47% by volume. Suspensions of α-alumina in three states of aggregation (dispersed, weakly flocculated, and strongly flocculated) were consolidated to densities greater than or equal to those produced in conventional pressure filtration. Moreover, the as-consolidated alumina bodies were partially drained of fluid during the osmotic consolidation process, producing cohesive partially dried bodies with improved handling characteristics

  15. Hope Amidst Horror: Documenting the Effects of the "War On Drugs" Among Female Sex Workers and Their Intimate Partners in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Jennifer L; Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Mittal, María Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Sensationalistic media coverage has fueled stereotypes of the Mexican border city of Tijuana as a violent battleground of the global drug war. While the drug war shapes health and social harms in profoundly public ways, less visible are the experiences and practices of hope that forge communities of care and represent more private responses to this crisis. In this article, we draw on ethnographic fieldwork and photo elicitation with female sex workers who inject drugs and their intimate, non-commercial partners in Tijuana to examine the personal effects of the drug war. Drawing on a critical phenomenology framework, which links political economy with phenomenological concern for subjective experience, we explore the ways in which couples try to find hope amidst the horrors of the drug war. Critical visual scholarship may provide a powerful alternative to dominant media depictions of violence, and ultimately clarify why this drug war must end.

  16. Analizando el psico-horror en el cine español del nuevo milenio. Estudio comparativo entre ‘Plenilunio’ y ‘Caníbal’

    OpenAIRE

    Raya Bravo, Irene; Liberia Vayá, Irene

    2017-01-01

    El presente artículo revisa la figura del asesino en serie en la cinematografía española, reflejando la destacada variedad genérica y también los rasgos “locales” que caracterizan al psico-horror nacional, como son la tendencia a lo cómico, las referencias a tradiciones culturales propias o la inclusión del contexto político-social. Para ello, se abordan primero en el plano teórico los aspectos fundamentales de este género y se recogen, a continuación, algunos de los títulos más relevantes de...

  17. Disidir el régimen de horror y muerte: colectivos juveniles femeninos en Ciudad Juárez (México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Salazar Gutiérrez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El texto muestra algunos hallazgos en torno al análisis de acciones colectivas en Ciudad Juárez (México, las cuales plantean una serie de estrategias para develar y disentir del régimen de horror y muerte caracterizado por la violencia durante las dos últimas décadas. Por medio de un trabajo etnográico con los colectivos Batallones Femeninos y Nuestras Hijas de Regreso a Casa, presenta cómo prácticas organizativas asociadas con la música o a la intervención urbana de murales son estrategias para promover una ética por la vida en relación con mujeres jóvenes.

  18. Clogging in constricted suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro; Lhuissier, Henri; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2018-02-01

    The flow of a charged-stabilized suspension through a single constricted channel is studied experimentally by tracking the particles individually. Surprisingly, the behavior is found to be qualitatively similar to that of inertial dry granular systems: For small values of the neck-to-particle size ratio (D /d reported for granular systems and agree for moderate particle volume fraction (ϕ ≈20 % ) with a simple stochastic model for the number of particles at the neck. For larger neck sizes (D /d >3 ), even at the largest ϕ (≈60 %) achievable in the experiments, an uninterrupted particle flow is observed, which resembles that of an hourglass. This particularly small value of D /d (≃3 ) at the transition to a practically uninterrupted flow is attributed to the low effective friction between the particles, achieved by the particle's functionalization and lubrication.

  19. Next Generation Suspension Dynamics Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, Peter Randall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Higdon, Jonathon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chen, Steven [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This research project has the objective to extend the range of application, improve the efficiency and conduct simulations with the Fast Lubrication Dynamics (FLD) algorithm for concentrated particle suspensions in a Newtonian fluid solvent. The research involves a combination of mathematical development, new computational algorithms, and application to processing flows of relevance in materials processing. The mathematical developments clarify the underlying theory, facilitate verification against classic monographs in the field and provide the framework for a novel parallel implementation optimized for an OpenMP shared memory environment. The project considered application to consolidation flows of major interest in high throughput materials processing and identified hitherto unforeseen challenges in the use of FLD in these applications. Extensions to the algorithm have been developed to improve its accuracy in these applications.

  20. The Language of Paradox in the Ironic Poetry of Emily Dickinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zeki Cirakli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Language of Paradox in the Ironic Poetry of Emily Dickinson Abstract Emily Dickinson’s poetry is characterized by her emphasis on ironic use of discourse that amounts to her persistent manifestation of individuality against hypocrisy and vanity. She exerts her peculiar poetic language in a way that helps deplore as well as explore the paradoxical human condition. This paper argues that Dickinson produces a language of poetry, which, in Cleanth Brooks’ terms, provides the reader with the “language of paradox.” Dickinson’s ironic poetry exemplifies Brooks’ idea that ironic poetry is self-conscious and satiric in nature and is made up of a language of paradox. The study, therefore, aims to reveal how the language of paradox in Dickinson’s poetry yields to irony which is primarily associated with her salient assertiveness, isolation and strong individuality. Emily Dickinson’ın İronik Şiirlerinde Paradokslu Dil Öz Emily Dickinson’ın şiirlerini söylemin ironik kullanımı karakterize eder ve bu özellik onun şiirlerinin toplumdaki iki yüzlülük ve riyakârlığa karşı sürdürdüğü kararlı bireysel duruş ve isyanının dışavurumudur. Dickinson, kendine özgü şiirsel dili insanlık durumunun paradoksal niteliğini araştırmak için olduğu kadar eleştirmek için de etkili biçimde kullanmıştır. Dickinson’ın şiiri, Cleanth Brooks’un “paradokslu dil” olarak tanımladığı bir dil kullanır. Brooks, ironik şiirin öz-farkındalığı olan ve doğası gereği eleştirel tonu yüksek ve temelde paradokslu dilden oluşmuş olduğunu ileri sürer. Bu çalışma, Dickinson’ın ironik şiir dilinin Brooks’un bu kanısını doğruladığını ortaya koymaktadır. Dolayısıyla bu çalışma, Dickinson’un şiirlerindeki paradokslu dilin yazarın dikkat çekici sesi, kendini toplumdan soyutlaması ve toplum karşısındaki güçlü bireyselliğinin dışa vurumunu imleyen ironiyi incelemektedir.

  1. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  2. Erasmus Darwin's Deistic Dissent and Didactic Epic Poetry: Promoting Science Education to a Mixed Audience Under the Banner of Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kirsten Anne

    Erasmus Darwin's task as a Deistic Dissenter poet who wished to promote science education to a mixed audience was complex. There was mainstream concern over what Deists and Dissenters actually believed about God, their involvement in science, and, especially, how their published works, whatever the subject, might affect public morality and politics. I argue that Darwin's poetry is primarily in the genre of Lucretian didactic epic but that it also involves elements of other written traditions (literary and non-literary). I focus on English didactic poetry, the theological written traditions of Dissent and Deism, and a particular tradition of erotic satire. The genre of Lucretian didactic epic and the tradition of English didactic poetry are non-identical. In Darwin's Lucretian didactic epic, resemblances to such poems as Pope's Essay on Man challenge ideas about what kind of narrative a didactic poem in the English language can deliver. Techniques from the theological written traditions of Dissent and Deism reflect Darwin's affiliations, signal that science education fits within a larger debate about intellectual freedom, and promote tolerance for differences of opinion about nature. Mimicry of a particular tradition of erotic satire helps to downplay the address to a mixed audience while satirising some common misconceptions about poetry, botany, and women in the period. Darwin's poetry challenges ideas about what people from his community of belief meant to communicate or transmit by writing for the general public, what the general public was entitled to learn, and what poetry was able to teach. Perhaps Darwin's biggest modification of Lucretian didactic epic was that he did not tell his readers exactly what to think, but how.

  3. Musicality as an Aesthetic Process of Filtering in Thomas W. Shapcott's Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Abbas Eidan Al-Ta'an

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available How does music transcend individual experience? Is music the filter to purify everything? How does everything in the poet become music? Such questions are raised, now and then, by the conscious reader of poetry in general and that of the Australian poet Thomas W. Shapcott in particular. My present research-paper attempts to present an answer for these questions via probing the individuality of Shapcott's poetic experience and how does the poet's personal and experimental musicality as an artistic motif and aesthetic perspective play a key role in purifying language of its lies and its daily impurities. In the first place, my account is apt to find an aesthetic meaning for the action of transcending the individual experience in selected poems written by Shapcott. The philosophical and ritual thought of musicality is interplayed with the aesthetic power of poetry. Both aesthetic energies stem from the individual experience of the poet to transcend the borders of individuality and being absorbed and saturated in the wide pot of human universality. In other words, the poem after being filtered and purified musically and aesthetically is no longer an individual experience owned by its producer only, rather it becomes a human experience for its conscious readers. Music as a motif and meaning, regardless of its technical significance, is controversial in Shapcott's poetic diction. Music, here, is not a mere artistic genre; rather it is a ritualistic and philosophical thought. The paper is to investigate how Shapcott's musicality is constructed on aesthetics of balance and conformity in poetry and life.

  4. Reflective writing: the student nurse's perspective on reflective writing and poetry writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Dawn; Willis, Diane S

    2015-07-01

    Reflective writing is a mandatory part of nurse education but how students develop their skills and use reflection as part of their experiential learning remains relatively unknown. Understanding reflective writing in all forms from the perspective of a student nurse is therefore important. To explore the use of reflective writing and the use of poetry in pre-registered nursing students. A qualitative design was employed to explore reflective writing in pre-registered nursing students. A small university in Scotland. BSc (Hons) Adult and Mental Health Pre-registration Student Nurses. Two focus groups were conducted with 10 student nurses during March 2012. Data was analysed thematically using the framework of McCarthy (1999). Students found the process of reflective writing daunting but valued it over time. Current educational methods, such as assessing reflective accounts, often lead to the 'narrative' being watered down and the student feeling judged. Despite this, reflection made students feel responsible for their own learning and research on the topic. Some students felt the use of models of reflection constricting, whilst poetry freed up their expression allowing them to demonstrate the compassion for their patient under their care. Poetry writing gives students the opportunity for freedom of expression, personal satisfaction and a closer connection with their patients, which the more formal approach to reflective writing did not offer. There is a need for students to have a safe and supportive forum in which to express and have their experiences acknowledged without the fear of being judged. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyuan; Erkkinen, Michael G; Healey, Meghan L; Xu, Yisheng; Swett, Katherine E; Chow, Ho Ming; Braun, Allen R

    2015-09-01

    Creativity, a multifaceted construct, can be studied in various ways, for example, investigating phases of the creative process, quality of the creative product, or the impact of expertise. Previous neuroimaging studies have assessed these individually. Believing that each of these interacting features must be examined simultaneously to develop a comprehensive understanding of creative behavior, we examined poetry composition, assessing process, product, and expertise in a single experiment. Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) was active during both phases, yet responses in dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal executive systems (DLPFC/IPS) were phase-dependent, indicating that while motivation remains unchanged, cognitive control is attenuated during generation and re-engaged during revision. Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control. Importantly however, similar overall patterns were observed in both groups, indicating the same cognitive resources are available to experts and novices alike. Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry. Crucially, each of these three key features can be understood in the context of a single neurocognitive model characterized by dynamic interactions between medial prefrontal areas regulating motivation, dorsolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas regulating cognitive control and the association of these regions with language, sensorimotor, limbic, and subcortical areas distributed throughout the brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Naratriptan hydrochloride in extemporaneosly compounded oral suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y P; Trissel, L A; Fox, J L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmaceutical acceptability and chemical stability of naratriptan hydrochloride in three extemporaneously compounded suspension formulations. The naratriptan-hydrochloride oral suspensions were prepared from 2.5-mg commercial tablets yielding a nominal naratriptan concentration of 0.5 mg/mL. The suspension vehicles selected for testing were Syrpalta, an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet, and an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet SF. The tablets were crushed and thoroughly triturated to a fine powder using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The powder was incorporated into a portion of the Syrpalta or Ora-Plus suspension vehicle and mixed until homogeneous. The mixtures were then brought to volume with Syrpalta, Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF, as appropriate. The suspensions were packaged in amber, plastic, screw-cap prescription bottles and stored at 23 deg C for seven days and 4 deg C for 90 days. An adequate suspension was never achieved in Syrpalta. The crushed-tablet powder did not produce a uniformly dispersed mixture and exhibited clumping and a high rate of sedimentation. A distinct layer of the solid tablet material settled immediately after shaking. Over the next four hours, a densely packed, yellow, caked layer formed at the bottom of the containers, making resuspension difficult. During storage, the caking became worse. Chemical analysis was not performed. The Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF suspensions had a slight greenish cast and were resuspended without difficulty by shaking for approximately ten seconds, yielding easily poured and homogeneous mixtures throughout the study. Visible settling and layering did not begin for four hours with the Ora-Sweet suspension and 24 hours for the Ora-Sweet SF suspension. High pressure liquid chromatographic analysis found that the naratriptan concentration in both suspension-vehicle combinations exhibited little or no loss for seven days at 23

  7. Ian D. Copestake, The Ethics of William Carlos Williams’s Poetry.

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    Aristotle University of Greece

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ian D. Copestake’s monograph on William Carlos Williams’s poetry offers a well-informed and well-documented insight into the connection between Williams’s writing with Unitarianism and Emersonian thinking. In this very well-written and accessible book, the reader gets introduced to a number of poems in addition to excerpts from Williams’s essays, letters and autobiography which facilitate the understanding and appreciation of the poet’s attempt to promote “independent thought and action” (5....

  8. Sylvia Plath and the failure of emotional self-repair through poetry.

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    Silverman, M A; Will, N P

    1986-01-01

    Creativity serves not only an aesthetic function but also psychological self-repair for the creative artist. The authors examine the failure of Sylvia Plath's efforts to control her suicidal violence and to bridge her isolation from others via the shared affective experience of poetry. At first, she used traditional forms and mediated images, but when she abandoned them for a more personal expressive art, she lost the shaping, controlling devices she had been using for self-containment and self-repair. They were no longer available to her when she underwent a sweeping narcissistic regression following some very stressful life events. Her emotional deterioration ultimately cost her her life.

  9. Heather Clark. The Ulster Renaissance - Poetry in Belfast 1962-1972

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    Maryvonne BOISSEAU

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of what has been termed an Ulster Renaissance to refer to the surge of new poetry in the North of Ireland in the late 1960s and 1970s together with what is known as the Belfast Group is often dismissed by the poets themselves and serious critics as a mere shorthand and inaccurate way to describe the vitality of that decade. Heather Clark’s study, originally a PhD dissertation, challenges this and argues for the significant impact of Hobsbaum’s group, later Heaney’s group, as well as ...

  10. A Wound on Poetry: a Reading of Pasolini’s Teorema

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    NICOLINI, ANDREA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Wound on Poetry: a Reading of Pasolini’s Teorema Through analyzing Pasolini’s Teorema, the intention of the paper is to suggest that besides a sublimated effervescence that, according to Durkheim, blends people together, there is also another force that does not let itself be sublimated and for this reason checkmates the Symbolic order of society. This force is the death drive, namely the drive that, according to Freud, is beyond the pleasure principle and works against the flourishing of the individual inside society.

  11. Neurology, poetry and the first world war of 1914-1918.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Thorpe, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The First World War of 1914-1918 produced a wealth of disability and death and much has been written of this catastrophe for mankind. Prose is prolific and much poetry has been written too, some of it discussed here; it consists of works by healthcare workers and also about the effects of the war upon those who fought and those who were left behind. Some of the work is by neurologists and some deals with the neurological disorders of those who fought. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Poetry and Community in the Work of José Ángel Valente

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    Manus O'Dwyer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the work of Spanish poet José Ángel Valente (1929-2000 in terms of his exploration of the relation between the poet, poetic language, and community. In it I discuss the tension in Valente’s work between a desire to create a language that would be foundational of community and the ethical commitment to alterity. I argue that the poetry of the second half of Valente’s career, which has been considered hermetic, or even solipsistic, can be read in terms of a contemporary philosophical discourse that seeks to think community in terms that are not exclusive of alterity.

  13. Field Studies: Novels as Darwinian Niches, Poetry for Physicists and Mathematicians

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    Daniel Walter Brown

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This brief forum contribution reflects upon some historical factors in the formation of nineteenth century science and of the literature and science discipline that has since arisen to study its literary receptions. Noting the preponderance of studies focusing upon forms of scientific developmentalism, principally Darwinian biology, and of novels and other prose, and more broadly, on literary figures, rather than the writings of scientists, the paper introduces some poetry on science by scientists. It concentrates principally on those working and writing in the fields of physics and mathematics, areas that have been neglected in literature and science studies.

  14. Un-earthing emotions through art: facilitating reflective practice with poetry and photographic imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapum, Jennifer; Yau, Terrence; Church, Kathryn; Ruttonsha, Perin; David, Alison Matthews

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we comment upon and provide an arts-informed example of an emotive-focused reflection of a health care practitioner. Specifically, we use poetry and photographic imagery as tools to un-earth practitioners' emotions within agonizing and traumatic clinical encounters. In order to recognize one's own humanness and authentically engage in the art of medicine, we immerse ourselves in the first author's poetic and photographic self-reflection. The poem and image are intended to inspire interpretation and meaning based on the reader's own professional and/or personal context. The last line of the poem is "I take off the gloves. My hands are marked."

  15. MAMA-AFRICA REPRESENTATIONS IN THE MOZAMBICAN AND AFRO-BRAZILIAN POETRIES

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    Santos, Donizeth; USP

    2012-01-01

    Through the analysis of poems, “Sangue negro”, by the Mozambican poet Noémia de Sousa, “Regressão” and “Elo”, by the Afro-Brazilian poet Oliveira Silveira, the article shows that Mother-Africa is represented in a Mozambican poetry as the biological black mother, the nation and the African continent, while in the Afro-Brazilian, besides being the progenitor of the black mankind, the African continent, is also the promised land, the lost paradise. Através da análise dos poemas “Sangue negro”...

  16. The Dramaturgy of the Body in the Indian Theatre as a Visible Poetry

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    Ricardo Carlos Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to analyze the concept of dṛśya kāvya (visible poetry from the Indian scenic tradition, as a proposal to a dramaturgy of the body. Starting from the impact that the Asian scenic tradition caused in the European theater in the 20th century, we will examine some concepts and acting techniques from the Indian classical dance-theater (specially Orissi and Kathakali, which are based in the translation of the word into physical gesture. We also question the relevance of this discussion to a theater seeking to distance itself from a logocentric model, in an intercultural perspective.

  17. Schoolchildren’s Creative Abilities Development in the Course of Poetry Study

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    Tat'yana V. Petrovskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some methodological aspects of the development of creative abilities of schoolchildren in the course of poetry study in elementary and primary schools. The development of creative and imaginative abilities and tropology of junior schoolchildren along with reading and artworks analysis is disclosed. The types of perception of poetic texts by children are studied. The work of teacher in the classes of the "Poetics" course, using study guides for the lower school is presented.The analysis of the studied data enabled to examine the problem of schoolchildren’s creative abilities development more thoroughly and to identify the possible prospects.

  18. The Poetry of Robert Burns: “A Melancholy not unallied to Mirth.”

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    Karyn COSTA

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available When Allan Cunningham concluded his 1834 Life of Burns with this critical judgement of Robert Burns’s poetry he was in fact summing up the schizophrenic nature of the Scottish character and identity. Scottish duality is still prevalent in the Highland-Lowland divide, the Catholic-Protestant rivalry, the linguistic differences Scots versus Gaelic, the English and Scottish competition for power, the past battling with the present in the search for a national identity free from myth and a sense ...

  19. Between “Some” and “Others”. Reflections on the Poetry of Hélder Faife

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    Nazir Ahmed Can

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on Poemas em sacos vazios que ficam de pé, by Hélder Faife, this article aims to reflect on the relationship between poetry and literary institutionalization in Mozambique. After some considerations on the positions in the literary field, we will observe how the author, in his first book, proposes a kind of intersection between language and society: based on small prosodic variations (that give an organic musicality to the verses and morphosyntactic displacements (that suggest the general movement between the protagonists, Faife presents some of the major contradictions in the Mozambican urban space. Keywords: Hélder Faife, Mozambique, poetry, literary field.

  20. La poesía imantada de César Vallejo (Magnetic poetry by César Vallejo

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    Marco Martos Carrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Se describe analíticamente el recorrido de la obra poética de César Vallejo, su relación con el modernismo y cómo se convirtió en el portaestandarte de la vanguardia en lengua española, hasta alcanzar una significativa originalidad en la tradición hispanoamericana. This article provides an overview of Cesar Vallejo’s poetry and its relation to modernism. Mention is made of how his poetry became the leader of the vanguard in the Spanish language to the point that he reached a meaningful originality within Spanish-American tradition.