WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspended-sediment transport conditions

  1. Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary - Brazil: pre jetty conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Siegle; SCHETTINI, Carlos A. F.; KLEIN, Antonio H. F.; Toldo Jr.,Elírio E.

    2009-01-01

    Estuarine hydrodynamics is a key factor in the definition of the filtering capacity of an estuary and results from the interaction of the processes that control the inlet morphodynamics and those that are acting in the mixing of the water in the estuary. The hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary were assessed by two field campaigns conducted in 1998 that covered both neap and spring tide conditions. The period measured represents the estuarine hydrodynamics an...

  2. Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary - Brazil: pre jetty conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Siegle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine hydrodynamics is a key factor in the definition of the filtering capacity of an estuary and results from the interaction of the processes that control the inlet morphodynamics and those that are acting in the mixing of the water in the estuary. The hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary were assessed by two field campaigns conducted in 1998 that covered both neap and spring tide conditions. The period measured represents the estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport prior to the construction of the jetty in 2003 and provides important background information for the Camboriú estuary. Each field campaign covered two complete tidal cycles with hourly measurements of currents, salinity, suspended sediment concentration and water level. Results show that the Camboriú estuary is partially mixed with the vertical structure varying as a function of the tidal range and tidal phase. The dynamic estuarine structure can be balanced between the stabilizing effects generated by the vertical density gradient, which produces buoyancy and stratification flows, and the turbulent effects generated by the vertical velocity gradient that generates vertical mixing. The main sediment source for the water column are the bottom sediments, periodically resuspended by the tidal currents. The advective salt and suspended sediment transport was different between neap and spring tides, being more complex at spring tide. The river discharge term was important under both tidal conditions. The tidal correlation term was also important, being dominant in the suspended sediment transport during the spring tide. The gravitational circulation and Stokes drift played a secondary role in the estuarine transport processes.As trocas de água e materiais através das desembocaduras de estuários são de difícil quantificação e são de fundamental importância para o entendimento do funcionamento de estuários e da zona costeira. A

  3. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud. Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  4. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  5. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Ratheesh; Rajawat, A. S.

    2012-10-01

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are realized with respect to the sediment size distribution and the bottom bed materials observed in the Gulf. Simulated SSCs are compared with alternate OCM derived SSC. The results are observed to be impetus where the model is able to generate the spatial dynamics of the sediment concentrations. Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. Tidal range is observed as the important physical factor controlling the deposition and resuspension of sediments within the Gulf. From the simulation studies; maximum residual current velocities, tidal fronts and high turbulent zones are found to characterise the islands and shoals within the Gulf, which results in high sediment concentrations in those regions. Remarkable variability in the bathymetry of the Gulf, different bed materials and varying tidal conditions induces several circulation patterns and turbulence creating the unique suspended sediment concentration pattern in the Gulf.

  6. Dynamic transport of suspended sediment by solitary wave: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    cho, JaeNam; Kim, DongHyun; Hwang, KyuNam; Lee, SeungOh

    2016-04-01

    Solitary waves are able to transport a large amount of suspended sediment when approaching on the beach, which sometimes causes - serious beach erosion, especially in the east and south coastal lines in Korea. But it has rarely been known about the method how to evaluate or estimate the amount of beach erosion caused by solitary waves. Experimental assessment is necessary to comprehend the process of sediment transport on a slope. The prismatic rectangular channel is 12 m long, 0.8 m wide, and 0.75 m high. A sluice gate is applied at prismatic channel in order to produce the solitary waves. Upstream water depth is more than channel water depth and the sluice gate is suddenly opened to simulate conditions of solitary waves. A sand slope with a 1/6 and a sediment thickness is 0.03 m. The experimental sediments are used anthracite (d_50=1.547 mm ,C_u=1.38) and Jumoonjin sand (d_50=0.627 mm ,C_u=1.68). Specific laboratory equipment are designed to collect suspended sediment samples at the same time along the wave propagation at 5 points with evenly space. Each amount of sampling is approximately 25 ml and they are completely dried in oven over 24 hours according to the USGS (Guideline and standard techniques and method 3-C4). Two video cameras (Model No. : Sony, HDR-XR550) are mounted for capturing images at top and side-view when the processes of solitary wave and run up/down on slope. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between Suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Turbidity is used to verify suspended sediment concentration. Dimensionless analyses of experimental results carried out in this study. One dimensionless parameter is expressed with pressure of solitary wave on a slope to suspended sediment concentration, which is concerned about lifting force. The other is relate to drag force presenting with run up/down velocity on a slope and

  7. Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú Estuary - Brazil : prejetty conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Toldo Junior, Elirio Ernestino; SIEGLE,EDUARDO; Schettini, Carlos Augusto França; Klein, Antonio Henrique da Fontoura

    2009-01-01

    As trocas de água e materiais através das desembocaduras de estuários são de difícil quantificação e são de fundamental importância para o entendimento do funcionamento de estuários e da zona costeira. A hidrodinâmica e transporte de sedimentos em suspensão no estuário do rio Camboriú foram estudados através da realização de duas campanhas de campo em 1998 cobrindo as condições de quadratura e sizígia. O período do levantamento foi anterior à obra de construção do molhe em 2003 que alterou a ...

  8. A wave-resolving model for nearshore suspended sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Chou, Yi-Ju; Shi, Fengyan

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a wave-resolving sediment transport model, which is capable of simulating sediment suspension in the field-scale surf zone. The surf zone hydrodynamics is modeled by the non-hydrostatic model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012). The turbulent flow and suspended sediment are simulated in a coupled manner. Three effects of suspended sediment on turbulent flow field are considered: (1) baroclinic forcing effect; (2) turbulence damping effect and (3) bottom boundary layer effect. Through the validation with the laboratory measurements of suspended sediment under nonbreaking skewed waves and surfzone breaking waves, we demonstrate that the model can reasonably predict wave-averaged sediment profiles. The model is then utilized to simulate a rip current field experiment (RCEX) and nearshore suspended sediment transport. The offshore sediment transport by rip currents is captured by the model. The effects of suspended sediment on self-suspension are also investigated. The turbulence damping and bottom boundary layer effects are significant on sediment suspension. The suspended sediment creates a stably stratified water column, damping fluid turbulence and reducing turbulent diffusivity. The suspension of sediment also produces a stably stratified bottom boundary layer. Thus, the drag coefficient and bottom shear stress are reduced, causing less sediment pickup from the bottom. The cross-shore suspended sediment flux is analyzed as well. The mean Eulerian suspended sediment flux is shoreward outside the surf zone, while it is seaward in the surf zone.

  9. Progress towards Acoustic Suspended Sediment Transport Monitoring: Fraser River, BC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, M. E.; Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.; Kostaschuk, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to predict the timing and quantity of suspended sediment transport is limited because fine sand, silt and clay delivery are supply limited, requiring empirical modeling approaches of limited temporal stability. A solution is the development of continuous monitoring techniques capable of tracking sediment concentrations and grain-size. Here we examine sediment delivery from upstream sources to the lower Fraser River. The sediment budget of the lower Fraser River provides a long-term perspective of the net changes in the channels and in sediment delivery to Fraser Delta. The budget is based on historical sediment rating curves developed from data collected from 1965-1986 by the Water Survey of Canada. We explore the possibility of re-establishing the sediment-monitoring program using hydro-acoustics by evaluating the use of a 300 kHz side-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp), mounted just downstream of the sand-gravel transition at Mission, for continuous measurement of suspended sediment transport. Complementary field observations include conventional bottle sampling with a P-63 sampler, vertical profiles with a downward-looking 600 kHz aDcp, and 1200 kHz aDcp discharge measurements. We have successfully completed calibration of the downward-looking aDcp with the P-63 samples; the side-looking aDcp signals remain under investigation. A comparison of several methods for obtaining total sediment flux indicates that suspended sediment concentration (SSC) closely follows discharge through the freshet and peaks in total SSC and sand SSC coincide with peak measurements of discharge. Low flows are dominated by fine sediment and grain size increases with higher flows. This research assesses several techniques for obtaining sediment flux and contributes to the understanding of sediment delivery to sand-bedded portions of the river.

  10. Hydrodynamic and suspended sediment transport controls on river mouth morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, F.; Piliouras, A.; Garra, R.; Guerin, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Rowland, J.; Paola, C.

    2014-01-01

    mouths building into standing bodies of water have strikingly varied growth habits. This presents a compelling pattern formation problem that is also of great practical relevance for subsurface prediction and managing coastal wetlands. Here we present a generalized 2.5-dimensional potential vorticity (PV) theory that explains sedimentation patterns of a sediment-laden stationary jet by coupling an understanding of vorticity with suspended sediment concentration fields. We explore the physical meaning of this new sediment-PV definition, and its impact on outflow depositional patterns, by analyzing data from a shallow wall-bounded plane jet experiment and by discussing new theoretical insights. A key result is that lateral advection and diffusion of suspended sediment are directly proportional to jet vorticity, a feature that reveals the mechanistic process that forms elongated channels by focused levee deposition. The new PV theory constitutes a more generalized mathematical framework that expands the Rouse theory for the equilibrium of suspended sediment.

  11. Modelling Suspended Sediment Transport in Monsoon Season: A Case Study of Pahang River Estuary, Pahang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariya, Razak; Ahmad, Zuhairi; Saad, Shahbudin; Yaakop, Rosnan

    2013-04-01

    Sediment transport based on 2-dimensional real time model was applied to Pahang River estuary, Pahang, Malaysia and has been evaluated and verified with time series of tidal elevation, flow and suspended sediment load. Period of modelling was during highest high tide and lowest low tide in Northeast Monsoon (NE) which happened in December 2010 and Southwest Monsoon (SW) in July 2011. Simulated model outputs has been verify using Pearson's coefficient and has showed high accuracy. The validated model was used to simulate hydrodynamic and sediment transport of extreme conditions during both monsoon seasons. Based on field measurement and model simulation, tidal elevation and flow velocity, freshwater discharge of Pahang River were found to be higher during NE Monsoon. Based on the fluxes, the estuary also showed 'ebb-dominant' characteristic during highest high tide and lowest low tide in NE monsoon and normal ebbing-flooding characteristics during SW monsoon. In the Pahang River estuary, inflow and outflow patterns were perpendicular to the open boundary with circular flow formed at the shallow area in the middle of estuary during both monsoons. Referring to sea water intrusion from the river mouth, both seasons show penetration of more than 9 km (upstream input boundary) during higher high water tide. During higher lower water tide, the water intrusion stated varies which 5.6km during NE monsoon and 7.8km during SW monsoon. Regarding to the times lap during high tide, the sea water takes 2.8 hours to reach 9km upstream during NE monsoon compared to 1.9 hour during SW monsoon. The averages of suspended sediment concentration and suspended sediment load were higher during Northeast monsoon which increased the sedimentation potentials.Total of suspended sediment load discharged to the South China Sea yearly from Pahang River is approximately 96727.5 tonnes/day or 3.33 tonnes/km2/day which 442.6 tonnes/day during Northeast Monsoon and 25.3 tonnes/day during Southwest

  12. The rheology of non-suspended sediment transport mediated by a Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio

    2017-04-01

    Using a coupled DEM/RANS numerical model of non-suspended sediment transport in a Newtonian fluid (Durán et al., POF 103306, 2012), we find that the gas-like part of the granular transport flow can be described by a universal condition that constrains the average geometry of interparticle collisions. We show that this condition corresponds to a constant sliding friction coefficient μ at an appropriately defined bed surface, thus explaining the success of Bagnold's old idea to describe the sediment transport in analogy to sliding friction. We are currently exploring whether this rheology applies to gas-like granular flows in general. We further find a transition of the gas-like flow to either a solid-like flow (solid-to-gas transition), which is typical for aeolian sediment transport ('saltation'), or a liquid-like flow (liquid-to-gas transition), which is typical for subaqueous sediment transport ('bedload'). The transition occurs at about the location of maximal particle collision frequency. If there is a liquid-like flow below the transition, we find that it can be described by a μ(I) rheology, where I is the visco-intertial number, an appropriately defined average of the viscous and intertial number.

  13. Spatially Explicit Estimates of Suspended Sediment and Bedload Transport Rates for Western Oregon and Northwestern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J. E.; Wise, D. R.; Mangano, J.; Jones, K.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical analyses of suspended sediment and bedload transport gives estimates of sediment flux for western Oregon and northwestern California. The estimates of both bedload and suspended load are from regression models relating measured annual sediment yield to geologic, physiographic, and climatic properties of contributing basins. The best models include generalized geology and either slope or precipitation. The best-fit suspended-sediment model is based on basin geology, precipitation, and area of recent wildfire. It explains 65% of the variance for 68 suspended sediment measurement sites within the model area. Predicted suspended sediment yields range from no yield from the High Cascades geologic province to 200 tonnes/ km2-yr in the northern Oregon Coast Range and 1000 tonnes/km2-yr in recently burned areas of the northern Klamath terrain. Bed-material yield is similarly estimated from a regression model based on 22 sites of measured bed-material transport, mostly from reservoir accumulation analyses but also from several bedload measurement programs. The resulting best-fit regression is based on basin slope and the presence/absence of the Klamath geologic terrane. For the Klamath terrane, bed-material yield is twice that of the other geologic provinces. This model explains more than 80% of the variance of the better-quality measurements. Predicted bed-material yields range up to 350 tonnes/ km2-yr in steep areas of the Klamath terrane. Applying these regressions to small individual watersheds (mean size; 66 km2 for bed-material; 3 km2 for suspended sediment) and cumulating totals down the hydrologic network (but also decreasing the bed-material flux by experimentally determined attrition rates) gives spatially explicit estimates of both bed-material and suspended sediment flux. This enables assessment of several management issues, including the effects of dams on bedload transport, instream gravel mining, habitat formation processes, and water-quality. The

  14. Formulating Fine to Medium Sand Erosion for Suspended Sediment Transport Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Dufois

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an advection/diffusion model to predict sand transport under varying wave and current conditions is evaluated. The horizontal sand transport rate is computed by vertical integration of the suspended sediment flux. A correction procedure for the near-bed concentration is proposed so that model results are independent of the vertical resolution. The method can thus be implemented in regional models with operational applications. Simulating equilibrium sand transport rates, when erosion and deposition are balanced, requires a new empirical erosion law that involves the non-dimensional excess shear stress and a parameter that depends on the size of the sand grain. Comparison with several datasets and sediment transport formulae demonstrated the model’s capacity to simulate sand transport rates for a large range of current and wave conditions and sand diameters in the range 100–500 μm. Measured transport rates were predicted within a factor two in 67% of cases with current only and in 35% of cases with both waves and current. In comparison with the results obtained by Camenen and Larroudé (2003, who provided the same indicators for several practical transport rate formulations (whose means are respectively 72% and 37%, the proposed approach gives reasonable results. Before fitting a new erosion law to our model, classical erosion rate formulations were tested but led to poor comparisons with expected sediment transport rates. We suggest that classical erosion laws should be used with care in advection/diffusion models similar to ours, and that at least a full validation procedure for transport rates involving a range of sand diameters and hydrodynamic conditions should be carried out.

  15. Transport of phosphorus, wash load and suspended sediment in the River Varde A in southwest Jutland, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodsen, Hans; Hasholt, Bent; Pejrup, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Total phosphorus (TP) concentrations, suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and wash load have been measured at three river monitoring stations in the River Varde Angstrom system since 1998. This provides the possibility of studying the link between SSC and wash load and concentrations of TP....... Transport rates of TP, suspended sediment and wash load at the three stations, calculated using rating curves, indicate the dependence of TP transport on the transport of suspended sediment and wash load. Two stations are located on tributaries flowing upstream of the third station located at a weir...... at the end of a small impoundment. Transport rates at the upstream stations were 57% higher for suspended sediment and 27% higher for wash load than at the downstream station, while transport of TP was the same. This indicates that phosphorus is transported adhered to the finest grain size fractions that do...

  16. Temporal dynamics of suspended sediment transport in a glacierized Andean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Luca; Carrillo, Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    Suspended sediment transport can affect water quality and aquatic ecosystems, and its quantification is of the highest importance for river and watershed management. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge were measured at two locations in the Estero Morales, a Chilean Andean stream draining a small basin (27 km2) hosting glacierized areas of about 1.8 km2. Approximately half of the suspended sediment yield (470 t year- 1 km- 2) was transported during the snowmelt period and half during glacier melting. The hysteresis patterns between discharge and SSC were calculated for each daily hydrograph and were analysed to shed light on the location and activity of different sediment sources at the basin scale. During snowmelt, an unlimited supply of fine sediments is provided in the lower and middle part of the basin and hysteresis patterns tend to be clockwise as the peaks in SSC precede the peak of discharge in daily hydrographs. Instead, during glacier melting the source of fine sediments is the proglacial area, producing counterclockwise hysteresis. It is suggested that the analysis of hysteretic patterns over time provides a simple concept for interpreting variability of location and activity of sediment sources at the basin scale.

  17. Residual fluxes and suspended sediment transport in the lower reaches of Muvattupuzha River, southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Revichandran, C.; Balachandran, K.K.; Xavier, J.K.; Rejendran, N.C.

    Spatial and seasonal variation of different physical processes governing the transport of salt and sediment of the Muvattupuzha River, in Kerala, India are discussed. Salt and suspended sediment due to tidal pumping was directed upstream, salt...

  18. The role of suspension events in cross-shore and longshore suspended sediment transport in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Suspension of sand in the surf zone is intermittent. Especially striking in a time series of concentration are periods of intense suspension, suspension events, when the water column suspended sediment concentration is an order of magnitude greater than the mean concentration. The prevalence, timing, and contribution of suspension events to cross-shore and longshore suspended sediment transport are explored using field data collected in the inner half of the surf zone during a large storm at Duck, NC. Suspension events are defined as periods when the concentration is above a threshold. Events tended to occur during onshore flow under the wave crest, resulting in an onshore contribution to the suspended sediment transport. Even though large events occurred less than 10 percent of the total time, at some locations onshore transport associated with suspension events was greater than mean-current driven offshore-directed transport during non-event periods, causing the net suspended sediment transport to be onshore. Events and fluctuations in longshore velocity were not correlated. However, events did increase the longshore suspended sediment transport by approximately the amount they increase the mean concentration, which can be up to 35%. Because of the lack of correlation, the longshore suspended sediment transport can be modeled without considering the details of the intensity and time of events as the vertical integration of the product of the time-averaged longshore velocity and an event-augmented time-averaged concentration. However, to accurately model cross-shore suspended sediment transport, the timing and intensity of suspension events must be reproduced.

  19. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  20. Unified theory of non-suspended sediment transport mediated by a Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio

    2017-04-01

    saltation transport, which we find occurs when the bed surface becomes fully mobile (`stage-3 bedload') at Θ≈0.1. Our theory and simulations indicate that the impact number Im together with the particle-fluid density ratio s are more appropriate in characterizing the threshold than the shear-velocity-based particle Reynolds number, and we therefore propose a modification of the classical Shields diagram. We also propose a novel universal distinction of non-suspended sediment transport regimes: bedload is the regime in which the transport layer extent is mainly determined by interparticle collisions (i.e., contact contributions to the particle pressure dominate), whereas saltation is the regime in which the transport layer extent is mainly determined by the ballistic motion of particles (i.e., kinetic contributions to the particle pressure dominate).

  1. Density-salinity-suspended sediment experimental curves for Guadalquivir River estuary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero García, M.; Jurado López, A.; Contreras Arribas, E.; Polo Gómez, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Estuarine water in Mediterranean watersheds contains high suspended sediment concentrations due to both the fine textured nature of the materials reaching the final stretch of the fluvial network, and the agricultural predominance of soil uses upstream. Saline conditions induce flocculation processes which alter the original behavior of the soil particles in water. The final high density mixture of water-salts-sediments has physicochemical characteristics very different from the saline water alone. However, this is not often included when modeling the dynamics of estuaries, adopting the density, viscosity, etc., values corresponding to the present level of salinity found at each point. The nature of the local sediments influences the density values finally found. The Guadalquivir River estuary (southwestern Spain) extends along the 105 km between the Alcalá del Río dam, upstream, and its mouth in Sanlúcar de Barrameda. It is an Atlantic mesotidal estuary (Díez-Minguito et al., 2010) with a mainly longitudinal salinity gradient. The sediments in the estuary are very fine-textured due to the great length of the river and, mainly, the extreme trapping efficiency of the dense reservoir network upstream along the 57400 km2 of the contributing area. With an average value of 0.5 - 4.5 g L-1 for the suspended sediment range along the estuary, extreme values up to 160 g L-1 can be found associated with persistent turbidity events forced by different combinations of conditions. This work shows the density variation with changing bivariate conditions of salinity-suspended sediments, following the combined range found along the estuary. Laboratory measurements were made at 19° C for synthetic seawater with 35 g L-1salinity and the decreasing range found upstream by dilution until a final value of 0.2 g L-1, for which an increasing suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was induced by adding sediments locally extracted from the estuary. The final density of these sets of

  2. Tidal straining effect on the suspended sediment transport in the Huanghe (Yellow River) Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Hua; Wang, Houjie

    2010-10-01

    Tidal straining effect on sediment transport dynamics in the Huanghe (Yellow River) estuary was studied by field observations and numerical simulations. The measurement of salinity, suspended sediment concentration, and current velocity was conducted during a flood season in 1995 at the Huanghe river mouth with six fishing boats moored at six stations for 25-h hourly time series observations. Based on the measurements, the intra-tidal variations of sediment transport in the highly turbid river mouth was observed and the tidal straining effect occurred. Our study showed that tidal straining of longitudinal sediment concentration gradients can contribute to intra-tidal variability in sediment stratification and to asymmetries in sediment distribution within a tidal cycle. In particular, the tidal straining effect in the Huanghe River estuary strengthened the sediment-induced stratification at the flood tide, thus producing a higher bottom sediment concentration than that during the ebb. A sediment transport model that is capable of simulating sediment-induced stratification effect on the hydrodynamics in the bottom boundary layers and associated density currents was applied to an idealized estuary to demonstrate the processes and to discuss the mechanism. The model-predicted sediment processes resembled the observed characteristics in the Huanghe River estuary. We concluded that tidal straining effect is an important but poorly understood mechanism in the transport dynamics of cohesive sediments in turbid estuaries and coastal seas.

  3. Measurement of Suspended Sediment Transport Processes off the Holderness Coast - Southern North Sea, England

    OpenAIRE

    Blewett, Joanna Catherine

    1998-01-01

    A field campaign was set up as part of the LOIS-RACS coastal program (1994-1996), to identify the near-bed physical processes responsible for suspended sediment movement in shallow water (10-20m depth) off the Holdemess coast, NE England. A new benthic tripod system Boundary Layer Intelligent Sensor System (BLISS) has been developed and deployed along a transect at three sites, normal to the coastline at Tunstall. Measurements of current velocity, suspended sediment concentrati...

  4. Transport of salt and suspended sediments in a curving channel of a coastal plain estuary: Satilla River, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Jackson O.; Seim, Harvey; Alexander, Clark; Amft, Julie; Kineke, Gail

    2003-08-01

    This study describes the transport of salt and suspended sediment in a curving reach of a shallow mesotidal coastal plain estuary. Circulation data revealed a subtidal upstream bottom flow during neap tide, indicating the presence of a gravitational circulation mode throughout the channel. During spring tide, landward bottom flow weakened considerably at the upstream end of the channel and changed to seaward in the middle and downstream areas of the reach, suggesting the importance of tidal pumping. Salt flux near-bottom was landward at both ends of the channel during neap tide. At spring, however, the salt flux diverged along the bottom of the thalweg suggesting that tidal pumping caused a transfer of salt vertically and laterally into the intertidal zone. Thus, landward flux of salt is maintained even in the presence of subtidal seaward flow along the bottom at the downstream end of the channel. Landward bottom stress is greater than seaward stress, preferentially transporting suspended sediments upstream. Compared with salt, however, the weight of the suspended sediments causes less upward transfer of sediments into the intertidal zone. Flood flow carried more suspended sediments landward at the upstream end compared with the downstream end. We speculate that secondary flow in the curving channel picks up increasing amounts of suspended sediments along the sides during flood and adds them to the axial flow in the thalweg. Since the landward flow along the bottom of the thalweg weakens and even reverses during spring tide, there appears to be a complex re-circulation system for sediments re-suspended in curving channels that complicates the picture of a net transport of sediments landward.

  5. Transport and Sources of Suspended Sediment in the Mill Creek Watershed, Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Casey J.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, evaluated suspended-sediment transport and sources in the urbanizing, 57.4 mi2 Mill Creek watershed from February 2006 through June 2007. Sediment transport and sources were assessed spatially by continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity as well as sampling of suspended sediment at nine sites in the watershed. Within Mill Creek subwatersheds (2.8-16.9 mi2), sediment loads at sites downstream from increased construction activity were substantially larger (per unit area) than those at sites downstream from mature urban areas or less-developed watersheds. Sediment transport downstream from construction sites primarily was limited by transport capacity (streamflow), whereas availability of sediment supplies primarily influenced transport downstream from mature urban areas. Downstream sampling sites typically had smaller sediment loads (per unit area) than headwater sites, likely because of sediment deposition in larger, less sloping stream channels. Among similarly sized storms, those with increased precipitation intensity transported more sediment at eight of the nine monitoring sites. Storms following periods of increased sediment loading transported less sediment at two of the nine monitoring sites. In addition to monitoring performed in the Mill Creek watershed, sediment loads were computed for the four other largest watersheds (48.6-65.7 mi2) in Johnson County (Blue River, Cedar, Indian, and Kill Creeks) during the study period. In contrast with results from smaller watersheds in Mill Creek, sediment load (per unit area) from the most urbanized watershed in Johnson County (Indian Creek) was more than double that of other large watersheds. Potential sources of this sediment include legacy sediment from earlier urban construction, accelerated stream-channel erosion, or erosion from specific construction sites, such as stream-channel disturbance during bridge

  6. Suspended sediment transport around a large-scale laboratory breaker bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Joep; van der A, D.A.; Hurther, D.; Caceres, I.; O' Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents novel insights into suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes under a large-scale laboratory plunging wave. Measurements of sediment concentrations and velocities were taken at 12 locations around an evolving breaker bar, covering the complete breaking region from shoaling to

  7. Circulation and suspended sediment transport in a coral reef lagoon: the south-west lagoon of New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouillon, S; Douillet, P; Lefebvre, J P; Le Gendre, R; Jouon, A; Bonneton, P; Fernandez, J M; Chevillon, C; Magand, O; Lefèvre, J; Le Hir, P; Laganier, R; Dumas, F; Marchesiello, P; Bel Madani, A; Andréfouët, S; Panché, J Y; Fichez, R

    2010-01-01

    The south-west lagoon of New Caledonia is a wide semi-open coral reef lagoon bounded by an intertidal barrier reef and bisected by numerous deep inlets. This paper synthesizes findings from the 2000-2008 French National Program EC2CO-PNEC relative to the circulation and the transport of suspended particles in this lagoon. Numerical model development (hydrodynamic, fine suspended sediment transport, wind-wave, small-scale atmospheric circulation) allowed the determination of circulation patterns in the lagoon and the charting of residence time, the later of which has been recently used in a series of ecological studies. Topical studies based on field measurements permitted the parameterisation of wave set-up induced by the swell breaking on the reef barrier and the validation of a wind-wave model in a fetch-limited environment. The analysis of spatial and temporal variability of suspended matter concentration over short and long time-scales, the measurement of grain size distribution and the density of suspended matter (1.27 kg l(-1)), and the estimation of erodibility of heterogeneous (sand/mud, terrigenous/biogenic) soft bottoms was also conducted. Aggregates were shown to be more abundant near or around reefs and a possible biological influence on this aggregation is discussed. Optical measurements enabled the quantification of suspended matter either in situ (monochromatic measurements) or remotely (surface spectral measurements and satellite observations) and provided indirect calibration and validation of a suspended sediment transport model. The processes that warrant further investigation in order to improve our knowledge of circulation and suspended sediment transport in the New Caledonia lagoon as well as in other coral reef areas are discussed, as are the relevance and reliability of the numerical models for this endeavour. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Temperature signal in suspended sediment export from an Alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Stutenbecker, Laura; Bakker, Maarten; Silva, Tiago A.; Schlunegger, Fritz; Lane, Stuart N.; Loizeau, Jean-Luc; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2018-01-01

    hillslope erosion by rainfall on snow-free surfaces, and increased meltwater production on snow-free glacier surfaces. Despite the rise in air temperature, changes in mean discharge in the mid-1980s were not statistically significant, and their interpretation is complicated by hydropower reservoir management and the flushing operations at intakes. Overall, the results show that to explain changes in suspended sediment transport from large Alpine catchments it is necessary to include an understanding of the multitude of sediment sources involved together with the hydroclimatic conditioning of their activation (e.g. changes in precipitation, runoff, air temperature). In addition, this study points out that climate signals in suspended sediment dynamics may be visible even in highly regulated and human-impacted systems. This is particularly relevant for quantifying climate change and hydropower impacts on streamflow and sediment budgets in Alpine catchments.

  9. Nutrient and Suspended-Sediment Transport and Trends in the Columbia River and Puget Sound Basins, 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Daniel R.; Rinella, Frank A.; Rinella, Joseph F.; Fuhrer, Greg J.; Embrey, Sandra S.; Clark, Gregory M.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on three areas that might be of interest to water-quality managers in the Pacific Northwest: (1) annual loads of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and suspended sediment (SS) transported through the Columbia River and Puget Sound Basins, (2) annual yields of TN, TP, and SS relative to differences in landscape and climatic conditions between subbasin catchments (drainage basins), and (3) trends in TN, TP, and SS concentrations and loads in comparison to changes in landscape and climatic conditions in the catchments. During water year 2000, an average streamflow year in the Pacific Northwest, the Columbia River discharged about 570,000 pounds per day of TN, about 55,000 pounds per day of TP, and about 14,000 tons per day of SS to the Pacific Ocean. The Snake, Yakima, Deschutes, and Willamette Rivers contributed most of the load discharged to the Columbia River. Point-source nutrient loads to the catchments (almost exclusively from municipal wastewater treatment plants) generally were a small percentage of the total in-stream nutrient loads; however, in some reaches of the Spokane, Boise, Walla Walla, and Willamette River Basins, point sources were responsible for much of the annual in-stream nutrient load. Point-source nutrient loads generally were a small percentage of the total catchment nutrient loads compared to nonpoint sources, except for a few catchments where point-source loads comprised as much as 30 percent of the TN load and as much as 80 percent of the TP load. The annual TN and TP loads from point sources discharging directly to the Puget Sound were about equal to the annual loads from eight major tributaries. Yields of TN, TP, and SS generally were greater in catchments west of the Cascade Range. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that TN yields were significantly (p < 0.05) and positively related to precipitation, atmospheric nitrogen load, fertilizer and manure load, and point-source load, and were negatively

  10. Monitoring of suspended sediment in South Tyrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalet, Rudi; Dinale, Roberto; Pernter, Martin; Maraldo, Luca; Peterlin, Dieter; Richter, Arnold; Comiti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), which aims to achieve a good status of European water bodies, the Hydrographic Office of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano (Italy) extended in 2014 its institutional activities including the monitoring of suspended sediment in the river channel network. Currently, the only active monitoring station is on the Adige River at the gauging station of Ponte Adige near Bolzano (drainage area 2705 km2). The applied monitoring strategy and the data analysis concept are both based on the guidelines issued by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW). The results indicates that the temporal variability strongly differs during the investigated period (2014-2015). In addition to the analysis of precipitation and water discharge, temperature and lightning activity were also included to better understand the sediment transport dynamics observed at the station. In summer 2015, the combination of constantly high daily temperature throughout the Adige basin (which drove intense glacier melting in the headwaters) with a high frequency of convective rainfall events (90% more than in 2014, obtained through lightning detection), led to an annual mass of transported suspended sediment of 260000 t. Interestingly, this value is similar to the one estimated for 2014 (300000 t), which was characterized by very different meteorological conditions (colder and wetter summer), but with the occurrence of an important flood in August, which transported half of the annual amount. Finally, we can conclude that the adopted monitoring strategy is applicable for institutional aims in terms of costs as well as in terms of time effort. During the next years, other stations for suspended sediment monitoring are planned to be installed in the Province to cover the most important river segments.

  11. Longshore suspended sediment transport and its implications for submarine erosion off the Yangtze River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bing; Wu, Hui; Yang, Shilun; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Coastal currents that originate from large rivers play a key role in delivering sediment to shelf regions. Quantifying their transport capability is therefore essential to understanding the sediment budgets and the consequent deposition or erosion of coastal areas. In February 2012, we observed the sediment transport carried by the Min-Zhe Coastal Current that originates from the Yangtze River mouth and calculated a flux of 18.7 tons per second on a cross-shore section. In this period the coastal current was at a typical status, which allowed us to estimate a total annual sediment transport of 0.27billion tons southward. This result was more than three times the present annual Yangtze River sediment discharge, suggesting that considerable net sediment removal occurs in the coastal regions. The sediment transport 0.27 billion tons/year is probably the deposition/erosion threshold for the East China Sea coast north of our study site. Analysis of historical Yangtze River sediment influx records showed, that the onset and acceleration of coastal erosion was closely linked with the operation of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) upstream of the Yangtze River.

  12. QUASI-2D TRANSPORT MODEL OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN A WAVE FLUME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sabaruddin; Mano, Akira; Udo, Keiko

    A quasi-2D model of hydrodynamics and sediment transport has been developed in this study. An eddy viscosity model with a function of artificial viscosity has been applied to the Boussinesq-type equations to produce wave decay as well as sediment transport due to breaking. Numerical results are then compared with laboratory experimental data in order to verify the applicability of the numerical model. The results demonstrate that the proposed eddy viscosity model can be used to simulate wave propagation in the surf zone as well as suspended concentration distribution. Erosion before the breaking point can be predicted fairly well. However, the bar crest and erosion in the surf zone can not be predicted accurately.

  13. 3D CFD simulations of trailing suction hopper dredger plume mixing: a parameter study of near-field conditions influencing the suspended sediment source flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Lynyrd; Talmon, A M; van Rhee, C

    2014-11-15

    Frequency, duration and intensity of stresses like turbidity and sedimentation caused by dredging must be known to determine the environmental impact of dredging projects. These stresses depend on the amount of sediment spill from a dredger and on how much of this spill still is in suspension near environmentally sensitive areas. Near-field mixing close to a dredger influences the deposition behaviour of the sediment spill. This is investigated systematically with computational fluid dynamics simulations for 136 different conditions of trailing suction hopper dredger overflow sediment plume mixing. Most important influences are found for the ambient depth and the crossflow velocity (vector sum of the dredging speed and the ambient velocity), which can result in a completely different suspended sediment source flux behind the dredger. The simulation results are translated into mathematical relations to predict the suspended sediment source flux without computational effort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of nutrients and suspended sediment conditions in and near the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Northwest Minnesota, 2008–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nustad, Rochelle A.; Galloway, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    In response to concerns about water-quality impairments that may affect habitat degradation in Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Minnesota, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected streamflow data, discrete nutrient and suspended- sediment samples, and continuous water-quality data from 2008 to 2010. Constituent loads were estimated for nutrients and suspended sediment using sample data and streamflow data. In addition, a potential water-quality and streamflow monitoring program design was developed for Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge. Results from this study can be used by resource managers to address identified impairments and protect wildlife habitat and public water supply, and may contribute toward developing more effective water-management plans for Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge.

  15. Temperature signal in suspended sediment export from an Alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2018-01-01

    concentration through hillslope erosion by rainfall on snow-free surfaces, and increased meltwater production on snow-free glacier surfaces. Despite the rise in air temperature, changes in mean discharge in the mid-1980s were not statistically significant, and their interpretation is complicated by hydropower reservoir management and the flushing operations at intakes. Overall, the results show that to explain changes in suspended sediment transport from large Alpine catchments it is necessary to include an understanding of the multitude of sediment sources involved together with the hydroclimatic conditioning of their activation (e.g. changes in precipitation, runoff, air temperature. In addition, this study points out that climate signals in suspended sediment dynamics may be visible even in highly regulated and human-impacted systems. This is particularly relevant for quantifying climate change and hydropower impacts on streamflow and sediment budgets in Alpine catchments.

  16. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    face area, shape, minerals and source) and conse- quent interaction with heavy metal concentrations. (HMCs). Recent studies have shown a growing awareness of the wider environmental significance of the suspended sediment loads transported by rivers and streams. This includes the importance of fine grain sediment in ...

  17. Suspended-sediment transport and storage: A demonstration of acoustic methods in the evaluation of reservoir management strategies for a small water-supply reservoir in western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cory A.; Richards, Rodney J.; Collins, Kent L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and local stakeholder groups are evaluating reservoir-management strategies within Paonia Reservoir. This small reservoir fills to capacity each spring and requires approximately half of the snowmelt-runoff volume from its sediment-laden source waters, Muddy Creek. The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting high-resolution (15-minute data-recording interval) sediment monitoring to characterize incoming and outgoing sediment flux during reservoir operations at two sites on Muddy Creek. The high-resolution monitoring is being used to establish current rates of reservoir sedimentation, support USBR sediment transport and storage models, and assess the viability of water-storage recovery in Paonia Reservoir. These sites are equipped with in situ, single-frequency, side-looking acoustic Doppler current meters in conjunction with turbidity sensors to monitor sediment flux. This project serves as a demonstration of the capability of using surrogate techniques to predict suspended-sediment concentrations in small streams (less than 20 meters in width and 2 meters in depth). These two sites provide the ability to report near real-time suspended-sediment concentrations through the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) web interface and National Real-Time Water Quality websites (NRTWQ) to aid in reservoir operations and assessments.

  18. Fluvial geomorphology and suspended-sediment transport during construction of the Roanoke River Flood Reduction Project in Roanoke, Virginia, 2005–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, John D.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth

    2015-09-30

    Beginning in 2005, after decades of planning, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) undertook a major construction effort to reduce the effects of flooding on the city of Roanoke, Virginia—the Roanoke River Flood Reduction Project (RRFRP). Prompted by concerns about the potential for RRFRP construction-induced geomorphological instability and sediment liberation and the detrimental effects these responses could have on the endangered Roanoke logperch (Percina rex), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnered with the USACE to provide a real-time warning network and a long-term monitoring program to evaluate geomorphological change and sediment transport in the affected river reach. Geomorphological change and suspended-sediment transport are highly interdependent and cumulatively provide a detailed understanding of the sedimentary response, or lack thereof, of the Roanoke River to construction of the RRFRP.

  19. Optimal control of suspended sediment distribution model of Talaga lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratianingsih, R.; Resnawati, Azim, Mardlijah, Widodo, B.

    2017-08-01

    Talaga Lake is one of several lakes in Central Sulawesi that potentially to be managed in multi purposes scheme because of its characteristic. The scheme is addressed not only due to the lake maintenance because of its sediment but also due to the Algae farming for its biodiesel fuel. This paper governs a suspended sediment distribution model of Talaga lake. The model is derived from the two dimensional hydrodynamic shallow water equations of the mass and momentum conservation law of sediment transport. An order reduction of the model gives six equations of hyperbolic systems of the depth, two dimension directional velocities and sediment concentration while the bed elevation as the second order of turbulent diffusion and dispersion are neglected. The system is discreted and linearized such that could be solved numerically by box-Keller method for some initial and boundary condition. The solutions shows that the downstream velocity is play a role in transversal direction of stream function flow. The downstream accumulated sediment indicate that the suspended sediment and its changing should be controlled by optimizing the downstream velocity and transversal suspended sediment changing due to the ideal algae growth need.

  20. A spatially explicit suspended-sediment load model for western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Daniel R.; O'Connor, Jim

    2016-06-27

    We calibrated the watershed model SPARROW (Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes) to give estimates of suspended-sediment loads for western Oregon and parts of northwestern California. Estimates of suspended-sediment loads were derived from a nonlinear least squares regression that related explanatory variables representing landscape and transport conditions to measured suspended-sediment loads at 68 measurement stations. The model gives estimates of model coefficients and their uncertainty within a spatial framework defined by the National Hydrography Dataset Plus hydrologic network. The resulting model explained 64 percent of the variability in suspended-sediment yield and had a root mean squared error value of 0.737. The predictor variables selected for the final model were (1) generalized lithologic province, (2) mean annual precipitation, and (3) burned area (by recent wildfire). Other landscape characteristics also were considered, but they were not significant predictors of sediment transport, were strongly correlated with another predictor variable, or were not as significant as the predictors selected for the final model.

  1. An inversion of the estuarine circulation by sluice water discharge and its impact on suspended sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kirstin; Gerkema, Theo

    2018-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is characterized by a complex topography of branching channels and intertidal flats, in which the interplay between fresh water discharges, wind forcing and the tidal current causes sediment transport rates and direction to be highly variable in space and time. During three field campaigns, indications of a negative estuarine circulation have been found in a channel adjacent to the coast in the Western Dutch Wadden Sea. Contrary to the classical picture of estuarine circulation, a periodic density stratification was observed that builds up during flood and breaks down during ebb. This can be related to a large freshwater source at the mouth of the channel, the sluice in Kornwerderzand. In this study, observations of this phenomenon are presented, and with the help of a numerical model the different drivers for residual suspended matter transport in this area, namely tidal asymmetries in the current velocity and the above mentioned periodic stratification, are investigated. It is found that the residual current in the area of interest points in ebb direction, caused by both the elongated ebb flow phase and the periodic stratification. On the contrary, the stronger flood currents cause a transport of suspended matter in flood direction. This transport is counteracted and therefore diminished by the effects of the sluice discharge.

  2. Spatial distribution of soil erosion and suspended sediment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sediment transport rate for Chou-Shui river basin ... 5, Anzhong Road,. Tainan 70970, Taiwan. 4. Department of Hydraulics and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1,. University Road, Tainan ... surface runoff discharge, suspended sediment transport rate, quantity of soil erosion, and spatial distribu-.

  3. Seasonal variability in the composition of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) associated with suspended sediment transported by the Mekong River, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E. E.; Richey, J. E.; Truxal, L. T.; Keil, R. G.; Ingalls, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The branched/isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index has been proposed to be a proxy for the relative amounts of terrestrially verses marine-derived organic matter preserved in coastal sediments. To accurately interpret this index, it is first necessary to understand how this index and its constituents vary in non-marine environments, such as rivers and soils. As the composition of organic matter exported by tropical rivers can vary considerably between the dry and rainy seasons, we assessed the seasonal variability of the branched and isoprenoid GDGTs (glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers) associated with suspended sediment exported by the Mekong River. Our results demonstrate that the concentration (in ng/L) of crenarchaeol (GDGT IV), and branched GDGTs (GDGTs I, II, and III) was positively correlated with discharge and suspended sediment. When normalized to organic carbon (OC) content, dry-season values were consistently lower than rainy-season values for crenarchaeol (1.0 ± 0.6 vs. 4.1 ± 2.1 ng GDGT/mg OC) and branched (3.8 ± 1.5 vs. 16.8 ± 10.6 ng GDGT/mg OC) GDGTs. Low dry-season values were likely due to the dilution of GDGTs by phytoplankton production. The BIT index of suspended sediments ranged from 0.56 to 0.93 throughout the year, with a mean of 0.77. No seasonal trends were observed in this variability, nor was it correlated with bulk suspended sediment concentration or composition. These values are considerably lower than the theoretical terrestrial end-member of 1 due to the presence of crenarchaeol. Between 47 to 59% of the crenarchaeol associated with riverine suspended sediments was derived from intact polar groups bound to core GDGTs, whereas 48 to 65% of the branched GDGTs were intact. To further understand additional sources of GDGTs within the Mekong River catchment, we analyzed soil and sediment samples from rainforests, pastures, wetlands, river beds, and river banks during the rainy season. Anaerobic environments, such as wetlands and river

  4. Effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County, northeast Kansas, February 2006 through November 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County, Kansas, Stormwater Management Program, investigated the effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County from February 2006 through November 2008. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated at 15 sites within the urbanizing 57-square-mile Mill Creek Basin, and 4 sites downstream from the other largest basins (49 to 66 square miles) in Johnson County. The largest sediment yields in Johnson County were observed downstream from basins with increased construction activity. Sediment yields attributed to the largest (68 acre) active construction site in the study area were 9,300 tons per square mile in 2007 and 12,200 tons per square mile in 2008; 5 to 55 times larger than yields observed at other sampling sites. However, given erodible soils and steep slopes at this site, sediment yields were relatively small compared to the range in historic values from construction sites without erosion and sediment controls in the United States (2,300 to 140,000 tons per square mile). Downstream from this construction site, a sediment forebay and wetland were constructed in series upstream from Shawnee Mission Lake, a 120-acre reservoir within Shawnee Mission Park. Although the original intent of the sediment forebay and constructed wetland were unrelated to upstream construction, they were nonetheless evaluated in 2008 to characterize sediment removal before stream entry into the lake. The sediment forebay was estimated to reduce 33 percent of sediment transported to the lake, whereas the wetland did not appear to decrease downstream sediment transport. Comparisons of time-series data and relations between turbidity and sediment concentration indicate that larger silt-sized particles were deposited within the sediment forebay, whereas smaller silt and clay-sized sediments were transported through the wetland and

  5. Concentrations and transport of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 Mississippi River flood, April through July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.; Coupe, Richard H.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    High streamflow associated with the April–July 2011 Mississippi River flood forced the simultaneous opening of the three major flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin for the first time in history in order to manage the amount of water moving through the system. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected samples for analysis of field properties, suspended-sediment concentration, particle-size, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and up to 136 pesticides at 11 water-quality stations and 2 flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin from just above the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers downstream from April through July 2011. Monthly fluxes of suspended sediment, suspended sand, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were estimated at 9 stations and 2 flood-control structures during the flood period. Although concentrations during the 2011 flood were within the range of what has been observed historically, concentrations decreased during peak streamflow on the lower Mississippi River. Prior to the 2011 flood, high concentrations of suspended sediment and nitrate were observed in March 2011 at stations downstream of the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, which probably resulted in a loss of available material for movement during the flood. In addition, the major contributor of streamflow to the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during April and May was the Ohio River, whose water contained lower concentrations of suspended sediment, pesticides, and nutrients than water from the upper Mississippi River. Estimated fluxes for the 4-month flood period were still quite high and contributed approximately 50 percent of the estimated annual suspended sediment, nitrate, and total phosphorus fluxes in 2011; the largest fluxes were estimated at

  6. A Coupled Model of the 1D River Network and 3D Estuary Based on Hydrodynamics and Suspended Sediment Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available River networks and estuaries are very common in coastal areas. Runoff from the upper stream interacts with tidal current from open sea in these two systems, leading to a complex hydrodynamics process. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the two systems as a whole to study the flow and suspended sediment transport. Firstly, a 1D model is established in the Pearl River network and a 3D model is applied in its estuary. As sufficient mass exchanges between the river network and its estuary, a strict mathematical relationship of water level at the interfaces can be adopted to couple the 1D model with the 3D model. By doing so, the coupled model does not need to have common nested grids. The river network exchanges the suspended sediment with its estuary by adding the continuity conditions at the interfaces. The coupled model is, respectively, calibrated in the dry season and the wet season. The results demonstrate that the coupled model works excellently in simulating water level and discharge. Although there are more errors in simulating suspended sediment concentration due to some reasons, the coupled model is still good enough to evaluate the suspended sediment transport in river network and estuary systems.

  7. Suspended sediment fluxes in a tropical estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Srinivas, K.

    Annual transport processes of suspended sediments in Beypore estuary - a tropical estuary along the south west coast of India - were investigated based on time series measurements within the system. It's observed that the sediment transport...

  8. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    these sites. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are presented for the general river application of the method.Quantification of errors in sediment-transport measurements made using this acoustical method is essential if the measurements are to be used effectively, for example, to evaluate uncertainty in long-term sediment loads and budgets. Several types of error analyses are presented to evaluate (1) the stability of acoustical calibrations over time, (2) the effect of neglecting backscatter from silt and clay, (3) the bias arising from changes in sand grain size, (4) the time-varying error in the method, and (5) the influence of nonrandom processes on error. Results indicate that (1) acoustical calibrations can be stable for long durations (multiple years), (2) neglecting backscatter from silt and clay can result in unacceptably high bias, (3) two frequencies are likely required to obtain sand-concentration measurements that are unbiased by changes in grain size, depending on site-specific conditions and acoustic frequency, (4) relative errors in silt-and-clay- and sand-concentration measurements decrease substantially as concentration increases, and (5) nonrandom errors may arise from slow changes in the spatial structure of suspended sediment that affect the relations between concentration in the acoustically ensonified part of the cross section and concentration in the entire river cross section. Taken together, the error analyses indicate that the two-frequency method produces unbiased measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and sand concentration, with errors that are similar to, or larger than, those associated with conventional sampling methods.

  9. Tracing suspended sediment sources in the Upper Sangamon River Basin using fingerprinting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Neal, C.; Anders, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    As the awareness of water pollution, eutrophication and other water related environmental concerns grows, the significance of sediment in the transport of nutrients and contaminants from agricultural areas to streams has received increasing attention. Both the physical and geochemical properties of suspended sediment are strongly controlled by sediment sources. Thus, tracing sources of suspended sediment in watersheds is important for the design of management practices to reduce sediment loads and contributions of sediment-adsorbed nutrients from agricultural areas to streams. However, the contributions of different sediment sources to suspended sediment loads within intensively managed watersheds in the Midwest still remain insufficiently explored. This study aims to assess the provenance of suspended sediment and the relation between channel morphology and production of suspended sediment in the Upper Sangamon River Basin, Illinois. The 3,690-km2 Upper Sangamon River Basin is characterized by low-relief, agricultural lands dominated by row-crop agriculture. Sediment source samples were collected in the Saybrook and Wildcat Slough sub-watersheds from six potential sources: row-crop agriculture, forest, floodplains, river banks, pastures, and grasslands. Event-based suspended sediment samples were collected by in situ suspended sediment samplers and ISCO automatic pump samplers from the streams. A quantitative geochemical fingerprinting technique, combining statistically verified multicomponent signatures and an unmixing model, was employed to estimate the relative contributions of sediment from six potential sources to the suspended sediment loads. Our preliminary results indicate that the majority of suspended sediment is derived from channel banks and forest adjacent to meandering reaches in the downstream portions of the watersheds, while only minor amounts of suspended sediment are derived from upland areas adjacent to channelized rivers in the low

  10. Residual fluxes of water, salt and suspended sediment in the Beypore Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; Revichandran, C.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Josanto, V.

    The monthly trends of the residual fluxes of salt and water and the transportation of suspended sediments in the Beypore estuarine system, Kerala, India were examined. At the river mouth the water flux was directed seaward during the postmonsoon...

  11. Substantial export of suspended sediment to the global oceans from glacial erosion in Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, I.; Hudson, Brian D; Syvitski, James P. M.; Mikkelsen, Andreas B.; Hasholt, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Noel, B. P. Y.; Morlighem, M.

    2017-01-01

    Limited measurements along Greenland’s remote coastline hamper quantification of the sediment and associated nutrients draining the Greenland ice sheet, despite the potential influence of river-transported suspended sediment on phytoplankton blooms and carbon sequestration. Here we calibrate

  12. High concentration suspended sediment measurments using acontinuous fiber optic in-stream transmissometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Chris G.; Laycak, Danny T.; Hoppes, William; Tran,Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2004-05-26

    Suspended sediment loads mobilized during high flow periods in rivers and streams are largely uncharacterized. In smaller and intermittent streams, a large storm may transport a majority of the annual sediment budget. Therefore monitoring techniques that can measure high suspended sediment concentrations at semi-continuous time intervals are needed. A Fiber optic In-stream Transmissometer (FIT) is presented for continuous measurement of high concentration suspended sediment in storm runoff. FIT performance and precision were demonstrated to be reasonably good for suspended sediment concentrations up to 10g/L. The FIT was compared to two commercially available turbidity devices and provided better precision and accuracy at both high and low concentrations. Both turbidity devices were unable to collect measurements at concentrations greater than 4 g/L. The FIT and turbidity measurements were sensitive to sediment particle size. Particle size dependence of transmittance and turbidity measurement poses the greatest problem for calibration to suspended sediment concentration. While the FIT was demonstrated to provide acceptable measurements of high suspended sediment concentrations, approaches to real-time suspended sediment detection need to address the particle size dependence in concentration measurements.

  13. Assessment of Total Suspended Sediment Distribution under Varying Tidal Conditions in Deep Bay: Initial Results from HJ-1A/1B Satellite CCD Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiao Tian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using Deep Bay in China as an example, an effective method for the retrieval of total suspended sediment (TSS concentration using HJ-1A/1B satellite images is proposed. The factors driving the variation of the TSS spatial distribution are also discussed. Two field surveys, conducted on August 29 and October 26, 2012, showed that there was a strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.9623 between field-surveyed OBS (optical backscatter measurements (5-31NTU and laboratory-analyzed TSS concentrations (9.89–35.58 mg/L. The COST image-based atmospheric correction procedure and the pseudo-invariant features (PIF method were combined to remove the atmospheric effects from the total radiance measurements obtained with different CCDs onboard the HJ-1A/1B satellites. Then, a simple and practical retrieval model was established based on the relationship between the satellite-corrected reflectance band ratio of band 3 and band 2 (Rrs3/Rrs2 and in-situ TSS measurements. The R2 of the regression relationship was 0.807, and the mean relative error (MRE was 12.78%, as determined through in-situ data validation. Finally, the influences of tide cycles, wind factors (direction and speed and other factors on the variation of the TSS spatial pattern observed from HJ-1A/1B satellite images from September through November of 2008 are discussed. The results show that HJ-1A/1B satellite CCD images can be used to estimate TSS concentrations under different tides in the study area over synoptic scales without using simultaneous in-situ atmospheric parameters and spectrum data. These findings provide strong informational support for numerical simulation studies on the combined influence of tide cycles and other associated hydrologic elements in Deep Bay.

  14. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  15. Suspended sediment diffusion mechanisms in the Yangtze Estuary influenced by wind fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Zhou, Yunxuan; Shen, Fang

    2018-01-01

    The complexity of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) distribution and diffusion has been widely recognized because it is influenced by sediment supply and various hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. Sediment suspended by waves and transported by currents are the dominant sediment transport mechanisms in estuarine and coastal areas. However, it is unclear to what extent the SSC distribution is impacted by each hydrodynamic factor. Research on the quantitative influence of wind fields on the SSC diffusion range will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of sediment transport change and sedimentary geomorphic evolution. This study determined SSC from three Envisat Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer acquisitions, covering the Yangtze Estuary and adjacent water area under the same season and tidal conditions but with varying wind conditions. SSC was examined based on the Semi-Empirical Radiative Transfer model, which has been well validated with the observation data. Integrating the corresponding wind field information from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts further facilitated the discussion of wind fields affecting SSC, and in turn the influence of water and suspended sediment transportation and diffusion in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal area. The results demonstrated that the SSC present much more distinctive fluvial features in the inner estuary and wind fields are one of the major factors controlling the range of turbid water diffusion.

  16. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediment Dynamics in the Mississippi Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, D. N.; Skarke, A. D.; Silwal, S.; Dash, P.

    2016-02-01

    The Mississippi Sound is a semi-enclosed estuary between the coast of Mississippi and a chain of offshore barrier islands with relatively shallow water depths and high marine biodiversity that is wildly utilized for commercial fishing and public recreation. The discharge of sediment-laden rivers into the Mississippi Sound and the adjacent Northern Gulf of Mexico creates turbid plumes that can extend hundreds of square kilometers along the coast and persist for multiple days. The concentration of suspended sediment in these coastal waters is an important parameter in the calculation of regional sediment budgets as well as analysis of water-quality factors such as primary productivity, nutrient dynamics, and the transport of pollutants as well as pathogens. The spectral resolution, sampling frequency, and regional scale spatial domain associated with satellite based sensors makes remote sensing an ideal tool to monitor suspended sediment dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Accordingly, the presented research evaluates the validity of published models that relate remote sensing reflectance with suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), for similar environmental settings, with 51 in situ observations of SSC from the Mississippi Sound. Additionally, regression analysis is used to correlate additional in situ observations of SSC in Mississippi Sound with coincident observations of visible and near-infrared band reflectance collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Aqua satellite, in order to develop a site-specific empirical predictive model for SSC. Finally, specific parameters of the sampled suspended sediment such as grain size and mineralogy are analyzed in order to quantify their respective contributions to total remotely sensed reflectance.

  17. Chemical concentrations in water and suspended sediment, Green River to Lower Duwamish Waterway near Seattle, Washington, 2016–17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.; Peterson, Norman T.; Senter, Craig A.; Chapman, Elena A.

    2018-01-05

    From August 2016 to March 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected representative samples of filtered and unfiltered water and suspended sediment (including the colloidal fraction) at USGS streamgage 12113390 (Duwamish River at Golf Course, at Tukwila, Washington) during 13 periods of differing flow conditions. Samples were analyzed by Washington-State-accredited laboratories for a large suite of compounds, including metals, dioxins/furans, semivolatile compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, butyltins, the 209 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, and total and dissolved organic carbon. Concurrent with the chemistry sampling, water-quality field parameters were measured, and representative water samples were collected and analyzed for river suspended-sediment concentration and particle-size distribution. The results provide new data that can be used to estimate sediment and chemical loads transported by the Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway.

  18. The effects of sample scheduling and sample numbers on estimates of the annual fluxes of suspended sediment in fluvial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Clarke, Robin T.; Merten, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970s, there has been both continuing and growing interest in developing accurate estimates of the annual fluvial transport (fluxes and loads) of suspended sediment and sediment-associated chemical constituents. This study provides an evaluation of the effects of manual sample numbers (from 4 to 12 year−1) and sample scheduling (random-based, calendar-based and hydrology-based) on the precision, bias and accuracy of annual suspended sediment flux estimates. The evaluation is based on data from selected US Geological Survey daily suspended sediment stations in the USA and covers basins ranging in area from just over 900 km2 to nearly 2 million km2 and annual suspended sediment fluxes ranging from about 4 Kt year−1 to about 200 Mt year−1. The results appear to indicate that there is a scale effect for random-based and calendar-based sampling schemes, with larger sample numbers required as basin size decreases. All the sampling schemes evaluated display some level of positive (overestimates) or negative (underestimates) bias. The study further indicates that hydrology-based sampling schemes are likely to generate the most accurate annual suspended sediment flux estimates with the fewest number of samples, regardless of basin size. This type of scheme seems most appropriate when the determination of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment-associated chemical concentrations, annual suspended sediment and annual suspended sediment-associated chemical fluxes only represent a few of the parameters of interest in multidisciplinary, multiparameter monitoring programmes. The results are just as applicable to the calibration of autosamplers/suspended sediment surrogates currently used to measure/estimate suspended sediment concentrations and ultimately, annual suspended sediment fluxes, because manual samples are required to adjust the sample data/measurements generated by these techniques so that they provide depth-integrated and cross

  19. Tracing suspended sediment sources in the Upper Sangamon River Basin using conservative and non-conservative tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Stumpf, A.

    2015-12-01

    As the awareness of water pollution, eutrophication and other water related environmental concerns grows, the significance of sediment in the transport of nutrients and contaminants from agricultural areas to streams has received increasing attention. Both the physical and geochemical properties of suspended sediment are strongly controlled by sediment sources. Thus, tracing sources of suspended sediment in watersheds is important for the design of management practices to reduce sediment loads and contributions of sediment-adsorbed nutrients from agricultural areas to streams. However, the contributions of different sediment sources to suspended sediment loads within intensively managed watersheds in the Midwest still remain insufficiently explored. This study aims to assess the provenance of suspended sediment and the relation between channel morphology and production of suspended sediment in the Upper Sangamon River Basin, Illinois, USA. The 3,690-km2 Upper Sangamon River Basin is characterized by low-relief, agricultural lands dominated by row-crop agriculture. Sediment source samples were collected in the Saybrook from five potential sources: farmland, forests, floodplains, river banks, and grasslands. Event-based and accumulated suspended sediment samples were collected by ISCO automatic pump samplers and in situ suspended sediment samplers and from the stream at watershed outlet. A quantitative geochemical fingerprinting technique, combining statistically verified multicomponent signatures and an un-mixing model, was employed to estimate the relative contributions of sediment from five potential sources to the suspended sediment loads. Organic matter content, trace elements, and radionuclides from soil samples were used as potential tracers. Our preliminary results indicate that the majority of suspended sediment is derived from floodplains in the downstream portions of the watersheds, while only minor amounts of suspended sediment are derived from upland

  20. Ensemble Modeling of Suspended Sediment in Steep Mountain Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Raseman, W. J.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Livneh, B.

    2016-12-01

    Climatic and land cover changes present important uncertainties into the rates of soil erosion and sedimentation in watersheds. Soil erosion adds constituents to streams, altering water chemistry and streambed morphology, which can adversely affect aquatic life and poses a critical challenge for water treatment and reservoir management. The goal of this research is to establish estimates of sediment transport within large-scale mountainous catchments (>1000 km2). As sedimentation rates are impacted by numerous physical processes including soil, land cover, slope and climate; the results from seven models will be presented to quantify uncertainty and improve predictability. A broader inquiry made here is into the efficacy of model structure under different conditions. We present the results from empirical, stochastic, conceptual and physical models. These include empirical models: monovariate rating curve, multivariate regression and the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE), to models with conceptual components: Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to more physically based models: Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM). Key uncertainties will be characterized resulting from forcing inputs, parameter selection, scale discretization, and model structure. Calibration results from a multi-objective optimization routine will be presented that optimize parameters and identify performance trade-offs that will be used to develop uncertainty estimates in both streamflow and sediment projections. The outcomes of this research will highlight critical issues relevant to large-scale hydrologic and suspended sediment prediction initiatives.

  1. Introduction to suspended-sediment sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, K. Michael; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the amount and timing of sediment transport in streams is important to those directly or indirectly responsible for developing and managing water and land resources. Such data are often used to judge the health of watershed and the success or failure of activities designed to mitigate adverse impacts of sediment on streams and stream habitats. This training class presents an introduction to methods currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to sample suspended-sediment concentrations in streams. The presentation is narrated, but you control the pace of the presentation. If the computer you are using can view 'MPEG' videos you will be able to take advantage of videos interspersed in the presentation. A test, found at the end of the presentation, can be taken to assess how well you understood the training material. The class, which is registered as class SW4416 with the National Training Center of the USGS, should take two or three hours to complete. In order to use the presentation provided via this Web page, you will need to download a large disc images (linked below) and 'burn' it to a blank CD-ROM using a CD-ROM recorder on your computer. The presentation will only run on a Windows-based personal computer (PC). The presentation was developed using Macromedia Director MX 20041 and is contained in the file 'SIR05-5077.exe' which should autolaunch. If it does not, the presentation can be started by double-clicking on the file name. A sound card and speakers are necessary to take advantage of narrations that accompany the presentation. Text of narrations is provided, if you are unable to listen to narrations. Instructions for installing and running the presentation are included in the file 'Tutorial.htm', which is on the CD. 1 Registered Trademark: Macromedia Incorporated

  2. Investigating suspended sediment dynamics in contrasting agricultural catchments using ex situ turbidity-based suspended sediment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, S. C.; Rowan, J. S.; Melland, A. R.; Jordan, P.; Fenton, O.; hUallachain, D. O.

    2015-08-01

    Soil erosion and suspended sediment (SS) pose risks to chemical and ecological water quality. Agricultural activities may accelerate erosional fluxes from bare, poached or compacted soils, and enhance connectivity through modified channels and artificial drainage networks. Storm-event fluxes dominate SS transport in agricultural catchments; therefore, high temporal-resolution monitoring approaches are required, but can be expensive and technically challenging. Here, the performance of in situ turbidity sensors, conventionally installed submerged at the river bankside, is compared with installations where river water is delivered to sensors ex situ, i.e. within instrument kiosks on the riverbank, at two experimental catchments (Grassland B and Arable B). The in situ and ex situ installations gave comparable results when calibrated against storm-period, depth-integrated SS data, with total loads at Grassland B estimated at 12 800 and 15 400 t, and 22 600 and 24 900 t at Arable B, respectively. The absence of spurious turbidity readings relating to bankside debris around the in situ sensor and its greater security make the ex situ sensor more robust. The ex situ approach was then used to characterise SS dynamics and fluxes in five intensively managed agricultural catchments in Ireland which feature a range of landscape characteristics and land use pressures. Average annual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was below the Freshwater Fish Directive (78/659/EEC) guideline of 25 mg L-1, and the continuous hourly record demonstrated that exceedance occurred less than 12 % of the observation year. Soil drainage class and proportion of arable land were key controls determining flux rates, but all catchments reported a high degree of inter-annual variability associated with variable precipitation patterns compared to the long-term average. Poorly drained soils had greater sensitivity to runoff and soil erosion, particularly in catchments with periods of bare soils. Well

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in a shallow estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ruhl

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Shallow subembayments respond differently than deep channels to physical forces acting in estuaries. The U.S. Geological Survey measured suspended-sediment concentrations at five locations in Honker Bay, a shallow subembayment of San Francisco Bay, and the adjacent channel to investigate the spatial and temporal differences between deep and shallow estuarine environments. During the first freshwater pulse of the wet season, the channel tended to transport suspended sediments through the system, whereas the shallow area acted as off-channel storage where deposition would likely occur. Following the freshwater pulse, suspended-sediment concentrations were greater in Honker Bay than in the adjacent deep channel, due to the larger supply of erodible sediment on the bed. However, the tidal variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in both Honker Bay and in the adjacent channel was greater after the freshwater pulse than before. During wind events, suspended-sediment concentrations in the channel were not affected; however, wind played a crucial role in the resuspension of sediments in the shallows. Despite wind-wave sediment resuspension in Honker Bay, tidally averaged suspended-sediment flux was controlled by the flood-dominated currents.

  4. Estimating total suspended sediment yield with probability sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The ""Selection At List Time"" (SALT) scheme controls sampling of concentration for estimating total suspended sediment yield. The probability of taking a sample is proportional to its estimated contribution to total suspended sediment discharge. This procedure gives unbiased estimates of total suspended sediment yield and the variance of the...

  5. Suspended sediment levels and turbidity along the Guadalquivir river related to the hydrological regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero García, Miriam; Contreras Arribas, Eva; Jurado Lopez, Alicia; Aguilar Porro, Cristina; José Polo Gómez, María

    2013-04-01

    In Mediterranean watersheds, soil loss is enhanced by the marked seasonality and torrential character of the rainfall regime, together with the usually predominant agricultural usesd. This fact determines the nature and amount of the discharges to the fluvial network in the Guadalquivir River (Spain), where the dense reservoir network within the contributing areas to the main stream alters the original sediment dynamics, and the transport and deposition patterns along the river, especially in the final stretch. The Guadalquivir River basin is located in southern Spain, with a contributing area of 57500 km2. It is a Mediterranean basin with a mean annual rainfall of 600 mm year-1.The changes of soil uses in the basin are associated with an increase of the irrigated area (in 201290 ha until 2007 upstream) and olive area (in 311115 ha until 2007).The suspended sediment concentration in the river is very high, with extreme values up to 16 g/l in the final stretch, which includes the estuary, associated with persistent turbidity events forced by different combinations of conditions. The solids are very fine- textured due to the great length of the river and, mainly, the extreme trapping efficiency of the dense reservoir network upstream. This work shows the spatial-temporal evolution of the suspended sediment concentration and turbidity regime along the Guadalquivir river and its relation with the different soil uses in the different contribunting areas within the watershed, together with the dependence on the hydrological annual regime. Turbidity trends are estimatedby means of data from Landsat-7 ETM that were validated with the quantified suspended sediment concentration values obtained from both field campaigns and automated monitored control points along the river. The results show a time lag between fluvial contributions and suspended sediment concentration due to the intense regulation in the watershed, that is dependent on the storage capacity upstream, the

  6. Suspended sediments limit coral sperm availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Gerard F.; Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Humanes, Adriana; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended sediment from dredging activities and natural resuspension events represent a risk to the reproductive processes of coral, and therefore the ongoing maintenance of reefal populations. To investigate the underlying mechanisms that could reduce the fertilisation success in turbid water, we conducted several experiments exposing gametes of the corals Acropora tenuis and A. millepora to two sediment types. Sperm limitation was identified in the presence of siliciclastic sediment (230 and ~700 mg L−1), with 2–37 fold more sperm required to achieve maximum fertilisation rates, when compared with sediment-free treatments. This effect was more pronounced at sub-optimum sperm concentrations. Considerable (>45%) decreases in sperm concentration at the water’s surface was recorded in the presence of siliciclastic sediment and a >20% decrease for carbonate sediment. Electron microscopy then confirmed sediment entangled sperm and we propose entrapment and sinking is the primary mechanism reducing sperm available to the egg. Longer exposure to suspended sediments and gamete aging further decreased fertilisation success when compared with a shorter exposure. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that high concentrations of suspended sediments effectively remove sperm from the water’s surface during coral spawning events, reducing the window for fertilisation with potential subsequent flow-on effects for recruitment. PMID:26659008

  7. Flow modelling to estimate suspended sediment travel times for two Canadian Deltas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Fassnacht

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The approximate travel times for suspended sediment transport through two multi-channel networks are estimated using flow modelling. The focus is on the movement of high sediment concentrations that travel rapidly downstream. Since suspended sediment transport through river confluences and bifurcation movement is poorly understood, it is assumed that the sediment moves at approximately the average channel velocity during periods of high sediment load movement. Calibration of the flow model is discussed, with an emphasis on the incorporation of cross-section data, that are not referenced to a datum, using a continuous water surface profile. Various flow regimes are examined for the Mackenzie and the Slave River Deltas in the Northwest Territories, Canada, and a significant variation in travel times is illustrated. One set of continuous daily sediment measurements throughout the Mackenzie Delta is used to demonstrate that the travel time estimates are reasonable. Keywords: suspended sediment; multi-channel river systems; flow modelling; sediment transport

  8. Numerical modelling of hydro-morphological processes dominated by fine suspended sediment in a stormwater pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Mingfu; Ahilan, Sangaralingam; Yu, Dapeng; Peng, Yong; Wright, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Fine sediment plays crucial and multiple roles in the hydrological, ecological and geomorphological functioning of river systems. This study employs a two-dimensional (2D) numerical model to track the hydro-morphological processes dominated by fine suspended sediment, including the prediction of sediment concentration in flow bodies, and erosion and deposition caused by sediment transport. The model is governed by 2D full shallow water equations with which an advection-diffusion equation for fine sediment is coupled. Bed erosion and sedimentation are updated by a bed deformation model based on local sediment entrainment and settling flux in flow bodies. The model is initially validated with the three laboratory-scale experimental events where suspended load plays a dominant role. Satisfactory simulation results confirm the model's capability in capturing hydro-morphodynamic processes dominated by fine suspended sediment at laboratory-scale. Applications to sedimentation in a stormwater pond are conducted to develop the process-based understanding of fine sediment dynamics over a variety of flow conditions. Urban flows with 5-year, 30-year and 100-year return period and the extreme flood event in 2012 are simulated. The modelled results deliver a step change in understanding fine sediment dynamics in stormwater ponds. The model is capable of quantitatively simulating and qualitatively assessing the performance of a stormwater pond in managing urban water quantity and quality.

  9. Modeling of suspended sediment concentrations under combined wave-current flow over rippled bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Xiao Hua; Babanin, Alexander V.; Aijaz, Saima; Sun, Younjong; Teng, Yong; Jung, Kyung-Tae; Qiao, Fangli

    2017-12-01

    Ripples appear and disappear dynamically on coastal bed. The bottom stress can significantly be enhanced when ripples appear, and then the sediment transport will be influenced by the ripple-enhanced stress. However, ripples' impact on suspended sediments is seldom discussed. In this study, a bedform (ripples) module based on combined wave and current flow is coupled with a bottom boundary layer (BBL) model. This BBL model outputs our improved bottom shear stress (BSS) to both the sediment model (UNSW-sed) and the hydrodynamic model (POM). Model results in Jervis Bay of Australia show that the simulated suspended sediment concentration (SSC) of an abrupt rising is significantly improved by considering ripples rather than setting a uniform roughness (Kb) without ripples. However, the SSC is still underestimated by using previous schemes. Differently from the previous estimation of ripple-enhanced shear velocity U∗ cwe , noted as U∗ cwe _ NL , we introduce an U∗ cwe improved by calculating through ripple-enhanced ripple-enhanced Kb , which is noted as U∗ cwe _Kb . Simulation shows that U∗ cwe _Kb produces significantly increased SSC under high wave conditions, resulting in reasonable agreements with the measurements. The wave friction factor fw is shown to play a crucial role in causing the difference between U∗ cwe _Kb and U∗ cwe _ NL .

  10. How Much Water and Suspended Sediment Does a Large Tropical Island Shed During a Major Hurricane? Hydrologic and Geomorphologic Effects of Hurricane Georges, September 1998, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M. C.; Webb, R. M.; Warne, A. G.

    2005-05-01

    On September 21-22 1998, Hurricane Georges, a category-3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, produced heavy rainfall, flooding, and landslides in the mountains and coastal plains of Puerto Rico. In general, rainfall, runoff, and sediment yield vary across the 8,711 square kilometer island of Puerto Rico because of an orographic barrier, the Cordillera Central. Mean annual runoff for the island is estimated to be 910 mm (equal to 8 billion cubic meters), which is about 57 percent of mean annual precipitation: 1,600 mm (14 billion cubic meters). Mean annual suspended-sediment discharge from Puerto Rico into surrounding coastal waters is estimated at 5.9 (+/- 3.2) million metric tonnes. The largely mountainous watersheds of the island are small (tens to hundreds of square kilometers), channel gradients are steep, and most stream valleys tend to be well-incised and narrow. Major rainstorms are intense but brief. As a consequence, flood waters rise rapidly (minutes to tens of minutes) with peak discharges several orders of magnitude above base discharge, and flood waters recede quickly (hours). Major storms transport a substantial portion of suspended sediment from uplands to the coast, based on data from a set of nine suspended-sediment monitoring stations representative of typical conditions in Puerto Rico. During Hurricane Georges, U. S. Geological Survey and National Weather Service rain-gage networks recorded 2-day rainfalls that ranged from about 100 mm to 630 mm (average was 300 mm, equal to about 2.6 billion cubic meters of water). Many streams rose more than 5 meters, resulting in severe flooding in northern, southwestern, and western watersheds. Landslides dissected roads and isolated communities on both the northern and southern slopes of the Cordillera Central. More than twice the mean annual discharge flowed from some watersheds (approximately 1 billion cubic meters of water for the entire island) carrying with it one to six times the mean annual load of

  11. Element geochemical analysis of the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment in desert stream flash floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  12. Element Geochemical Analysis of the Contribution of Aeolian Sand to Suspended Sediment in Desert Stream Flash Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  13. Environmentally-suspended sediment production of the Nasia River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the level of suspended sediment produced in the Nasia River Basin. Hydrological and meteorological data and water samples were used for the study. Average suspended sediment yield (33 years) in the basin was 19.90 t/km2/yr. With mean annual runoff of 439.13m3/s, 322.43 t/yr suspended sediment ...

  14. Sources of suspended-sediment flux in streams of the chesapeake bay watershed: A regional application of the sparrow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakebill, J.W.; Ator, S.W.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the sources and transport of fluvial suspended sediment in nontidal streams of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and vicinity. We applied SPAtially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes, which spatially correlates estimated mean annual flux of suspended sediment in nontidal streams with sources of suspended sediment and transport factors. According to our model, urban development generates on average the greatest amount of suspended sediment per unit area (3,928 Mg/km2/year), although agriculture is much more widespread and is the greatest overall source of suspended sediment (57 Mg/km2/year). Factors affecting sediment transport from uplands to streams include mean basin slope, reservoirs, physiography, and soil permeability. On average, 59% of upland suspended sediment generated is temporarily stored along large rivers draining the Coastal Plain or in reservoirs throughout the watershed. Applying erosion and sediment controls from agriculture and urban development in areas of the northern Piedmont close to the upper Bay, where the combined effects of watershed characteristics on sediment transport have the greatest influence may be most helpful in mitigating sedimentation in the bay and its tributaries. Stream restoration efforts addressing floodplain and bank stabilization and incision may be more effective in smaller, headwater streams outside of the Coastal Plain. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. No claim to original U.S. government works.

  15. Suspended sediment and turbidity after road construction/improvement and forest harvest in streams of the Trask River Watershed Study, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan Arismendi; Jeremiah D. Groom; Maryanne Reiter; Sherri L. Johnson; Liz Dent; Mark Meleason; Alba Argerich; Arne E. Skaugset

    2017-01-01

    Transport of fine-grained sediment from unpaved forest roads into streams is a concern due to the potential negative effects of additional suspended sediment on aquatic ecosystems. Here we compared turbidity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) dynamics in five nonfish bearing coastal Oregon streams above and below road crossings, during three consecutive time...

  16. Development of an Integrated Suspended Sediment Sampling System - Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerantzaki, Sofia; Moirogiorgou, Konstantia; Efstathiou, Dionissis; Giannakis, George; Voutsadaki, Stella; Zervakis, Michalis; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Karatzas, George P.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by a unique micro-climate and a complex geologic and geomorphologic environment caused by its position in the Alpine orogenesis belt. Unique features of the region are the temporary rivers that are dry streams or streams with very low flow for most of the time over decadal time scales. One of their key characteristics is that they present flashy hydrographs with response times ranging from minutes to hours. It is crucial to monitor flash-flood events and observe their behavior since they can cause environmental degradation of the river's wider location area. The majority of sediment load is transferred during these flash events. Quantification of these fluxes through the development of new measuring devices is of outmost importance as it is the first step for a comprehensive understanding of the water quality, the soil erosion and erosion sources, and the sediment and nutrient transport routes. This work proposes an integrated suspended sediment sampling system which is implemented in a complex semi-arid Mediterranean watershed (i.e. the Koiliaris River Basin of Crete) with temporary flow tributaries and karstic springs. The system consists of sensors monitoring water stage and turbidity, an automated suspended sediment sampler, and an online camera recording video sequence of the river flow. Water stage and turbidity are continuously monitored and stage is converted to flow with the use of a rating curve; when either of these variables exceeds certain thresholds, the pump of the sediment sampler initiates sampling with a rotation proportional to the stage (flow weighted sampling). The water passes through a filter that captures the sediment, the solids are weighted after each storm and the data are converted to a total sediment flux. At the same time, the online camera derives optical measurements for the determination of the two-dimensional river flow velocity and the spatial sediment distribution by analyzing the Hue

  17. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  18. Storage and residence time of suspended sediment in gravel bars of Difficult Run, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J.; Benthem, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Skalak, K.

    2016-12-01

    Reducing the export of suspended sediment is an important consideration for restoring water quality to the Chesapeake Bay, but sediment budgets for in-channel landforms are poorly constrained. We quantified fine (mapped in a 150m headwater reach at Miller Heights (bankfull width 11m; total bar volume 114 m3) and 6 gravel bars were mapped in a 160m reach downstream near Leesburg Pike (bankfull width 19m; total bar volume 210 m3). Grain size analyses of surface and subsurface samples from 2 bars at each reach indicate an average suspended sediment content of 55%, suggesting a total volume of suspended sediment stored in the mapped bars to be 178 m3, or 283000 kg, comprising 5% of the average annual suspended sediment load of the two study reaches. Estimates of the annual bedload flux at Miller Heights based on stream gaging records and the Wilcock-Crowe bedload transport equation imply that the bars are entirely reworked at least annually. Scour chains installed in 2 bars at each site (a total of 50 chains) recorded scour and fill events during the winter and spring of 2016. These data indicate that 38% of the total volume of the bars is exchanged per year, for a residence time of 2.6 ± 1.2 years, a value we interpret as the residence time of suspended sediment stored in the bars. These results are supported by mapping of topographic changes derived from structure-from-motion analyses of digital aerial imagery. Storage in alluvial bars therefore represents a significant component of the suspended sediment budget of mid-Atlantic streams.

  19. Concentrations, loads, and yields of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment and bacteria concentrations in the Wister Lake Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas, 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stephanie D.

    2014-01-01

    -quality station. The estimated mean annual total phosphorus yield was largest during base flow at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla., water-quality station and at both of the Poteau River water-quality stations during runoff conditions. The estimated mean annual total nitrogen yields were largest at the Poteau River water-quality stations. Estimated mean annual total nitrogen yields were largest during base-flow and runoff conditions at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla., water-quality station. The estimated mean annual suspended sediment yield was largest at the Poteau River near Heavener, Okla., water-quality station during base-flow and runoff conditions. Flow-weighted mean concentrations indicated that total phosphorus inputs from the Poteau River Basin in the Wister Lake Basin were larger than from the Fourche Maline Basin. Flow-weighted mean concentrations of total nitrogen did not vary spatially in a consistent manner. The Poteau River and the Fourche Maline contributed estimated annual total phosphorus loads of 137 to 278 tons per year (tons/yr) to Wister Lake. Between 89 and 95 percent of the annual total phosphorus loads were transported to Wister Lake during runoff conditions. The Poteau River and the Fourche Maline contributed estimated annual total nitrogen loads of 657 to 1,294 tons/yr, with 86 to 94 percent of the annual total nitrogen loads being transported to Wister Lake during runoff conditions. The Poteau River and the Fourche Maline contributed estimated annual total suspended sediment loads of 110,919 to 234,637 tons/yr, with 94 to 99 percent of the annual suspended sediment loads being transported to Wister Lake during runoff conditions. Most of the total phosphorus and suspended sediment were delivered to Wister Lake during runoff conditions in the spring. The majority of the total nitrogen was delivered to Wister Lake during runoff conditions in winter.

  20. Near bed suspended sediment flux by single turbulent events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahi, Seyed Mohammad; Kwoll, Eva; Winter, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The role of small scale single turbulent events in the vertical mixing of near bed suspended sediments was explored in a shallow shelf sea environment. High frequency velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC; calibrated from the backscatter intensity) were collected using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). Using quadrant analysis, the despiked velocity time series was divided into turbulent events and small background fluctuations. Reynolds stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) calculated from all velocity samples, were compared to the same turbulent statistics calculated only from velocity samples classified as turbulent events (Reevents and TKEevents). The comparison showed that Reevents and TKEevents was increased 3 and 1.6 times, respectively, when small background fluctuations were removed and that the correlation with SSC for TKE could be improved through removal of the latter. The correlation between instantaneous vertical turbulent flux (w ‧) and SSC fluctuations (SSC ‧) exhibits a tidal pattern with the maximum correlation at peak ebb and flood currents, when strong turbulent events appear. Individual turbulent events were characterized by type, strength, duration and length. Cumulative vertical turbulent sediment fluxes and average SSC associated with individual turbulent events were calculated. Over the tidal cycle, ejections and sweeps were the most dominant events, transporting 50% and 36% of the cumulative vertical turbulent event sediment flux, respectively. Although the contribution of outward interactions to the vertical turbulent event sediment flux was low (11%), single outward interaction events were capable of inducing similar SSC ‧ as sweep events. The results suggest that on time scales of tens of minutes to hours, TKE may be appropriate to quantify turbulence in sediment transport studies, but that event characteristics, particular the upward turbulent flux need to be accounted for when considering sediment transport

  1. An investigation of spatial variation of suspended sediment concentration induced by a bay bridge based on Landsat TM and OLI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, LiNa; Tang, DanLing; Li, CongYing

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the spatial variation of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) induced by Hangzhou Bay Bridge (HBB) in the coastal waters of the East China Sea. Based on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), Operational Land Imager (OLI) data and in-situ measurements, spectral characteristics of waters in Hangzhou Bay and SSC retrieved from near infrared single band have been analyzed. The results revealed significant difference of SSC in the water on two sides of HBB. SSC increases downstream of the bridge under conditions of low turbidity (SSC 400 mg l-1) upstream. This study shows that the interaction of bridge piers and currents has important influences on SSC distribution by inducing hydrodynamic factors and by changing suspended sediment transport. Remotely sensed data with high spatial resolution as TM and OLI can be applied to investigate SSC variations induced by a bridge in the bay area.

  2. A suspended sediment yield predictive equation for river basins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An empirical equation that can be used for estimating the suspended sediment yields of river drainage basins without sediment data has been established for basins in the sub-tropical forest Southwestern river basin system of Ghana. The power law equation relates mean annual specific suspended sediment yield (t km-2 ...

  3. Quantifying suspended sediment loads delivered to Cheney Reservoir, Kansas: Temporal patterns and management implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Juracek, Kyle E.; Graham, Jennifer; Foster, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir, constructed during 1962 to 1965, is the primary water supply for the city of Wichita, the largest city in Kansas. Sediment is an important concern for the reservoir as it degrades water quality and progressively decreases water storage capacity. Long-term data collection provided a unique opportunity to estimate the annual suspended sediment loads for the entire history of the reservoir. To quantify and characterize sediment loading to Cheney Reservoir, discrete suspended sediment samples and continuously measured streamflow data were collected from the North Fork Ninnescah River, the primary inflow to Cheney Reservoir, over a 48-year period. Continuous turbidity data also were collected over a 15-year period. These data were used together to develop simple linear regression models to compute continuous suspended sediment concentrations and loads from 1966 to 2013. The inclusion of turbidity as an additional explanatory variable with streamflow improved regression model diagnostics and increased the amount of variability in suspended sediment concentration explained by 14%. Using suspended sediment concentration from the streamflow-only model, the average annual suspended sediment load was 102,517 t (113,006 tn) and ranged from 4,826 t (5,320 tn) in 1966 to 967,569 t (1,066,562 tn) in 1979. The sediment load in 1979 accounted for about 20% of the total load over the 48-year history of the reservoir and 92% of the 1979 sediment load occurred in one 24-hour period during a 1% annual exceedance probability flow event (104-year flood). Nearly 60% of the reservoir sediment load during the 48-year study period occurred in 5 years with extreme flow events (9% to 1% annual exceedance probability, or 11- to 104-year flood events). A substantial portion (41%) of sediment was transported to the reservoir during five storm events spanning only eight 24-hour periods during 1966 to 2013. Annual suspended sediment load estimates based on streamflow were, on

  4. A Spatially Distributed Conceptual Model for Estimating Suspended Sediment Yield in Alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Anghileri, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Suspended sediment is associated with nutrient and contaminant transport in water courses. Estimating suspended sediment load is relevant for water-quality assessment, recreational activities, reservoir sedimentation issues, and ecological habitat assessment. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) along channels is usually reproduced by suspended sediment rating curves, which relate SSC to discharge with a power law equation. Large uncertainty characterizes rating curves based only on discharge, because sediment supply is not explicitly accounted for. The aim of this work is to develop a source-oriented formulation of suspended sediment dynamics and to estimate suspended sediment yield at the outlet of a large Alpine catchment (upper Rhône basin, Switzerland). We propose a novel modelling approach for suspended sediment which accounts for sediment supply by taking into account the variety of sediment sources in an Alpine environment, i.e. the spatial location of sediment sources (e.g. distance from the outlet and lithology) and the different processes of sediment production and transport (e.g. by rainfall, overland flow, snowmelt). Four main sediment sources, typical of Alpine environments, are included in our model: glacial erosion, hillslope erosion, channel erosion and erosion by mass wasting processes. The predictive model is based on gridded datasets of precipitation and air temperature which drive spatially distributed degree-day models to simulate snowmelt and ice-melt, and determine erosive rainfall. A mass balance at the grid scale determines daily runoff. Each cell belongs to a different sediment source (e.g. hillslope, channel, glacier cell). The amount of sediment entrained and transported in suspension is simulated through non-linear functions of runoff, specific for sediment production and transport processes occurring at the grid scale (e.g. rainfall erosion, snowmelt-driven overland flow). Erodibility factors identify different lithological units

  5. Comparison of turbidity to multi-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler data and suspended-sediment data in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voichick, Nicholas; Topping, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Water clarity is important to biologists when studying fish and other fluvial fauna and flora. Turbidity is an indicator of the cloudiness of water, or reduced water clarity, and is commonly measured using nephelometric sensors that record the scattering and absorption of light by particles in the water. Unfortunately, nephelometric sensors only operate over a narrow range of the conditions typically encountered in rivers dominated by suspended-sediment transport. For example, sediment inputs into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon caused by tributary floods often result in turbidity levels that exceed the maximum recording level of nephelometric turbidity sensors. The limited range of these sensors is one reason why acoustic Doppler profiler instrument data, not turbidity, has been used as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration and load of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. However, in addition to being an important water-quality parameter to biologists, turbidity of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon has been used to strengthen the suspended-sediment record through the process of turbidity-threshold sampling; high turbidity values trigger a pump sampler to collect samples of the river at critical times for gathering suspended-sediment data. Turbidity depends on several characteristics of suspended sediment including concentration, particle size, particle shape, color, and the refractive index of particles. In this paper, turbidity is compared with other parameters coupled to suspended sediment, namely suspended-silt and clay concentration and multifrequency acoustic attenuation. These data have been collected since 2005 at four stations with different sediment-supply characteristics on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. These comparisons reveal that acoustic attenuation is a particularly useful parameter, because it is strongly related to turbidity and it can be measured by instruments that experience minimal fouling and record over the entire range

  6. Substantial export of suspended sediment to the global oceans from glacial erosion in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Hudson, B. D.; Syvitski, J. P. M.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Noël, B. P. Y.; Morlighem, M.

    2017-11-01

    Limited measurements along Greenland's remote coastline hamper quantification of the sediment and associated nutrients draining the Greenland ice sheet, despite the potential influence of river-transported suspended sediment on phytoplankton blooms and carbon sequestration. Here we calibrate satellite imagery to estimate suspended sediment concentration for 160 proglacial rivers across Greenland. Combining these suspended sediment reconstructions with numerical calculations of meltwater runoff, we quantify the amount and spatial pattern of sediment export from the ice sheet. We find that, although runoff from Greenland represents only 1.1% of the Earth's freshwater flux, the Greenland ice sheet produces approximately 8% of the modern fluvial export of suspended sediment to the global ocean. Sediment loads are highly variable between rivers, consistent with observed differences in ice dynamics and thus with control by glacial erosion. Rivers that originate from deeply incised, fast-moving glacial tongues form distinct sediment-export hotspots: just 15% of Greenland's rivers transport 80% of the total sediment load of the ice sheet. We conclude that future acceleration of melt and ice sheet flow may increase sediment delivery from Greenland to its fjords and the nearby ocean.

  7. Feedbacks between bivalve density, flow, and suspended sediment concentration on patch stable states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Giovanni; Thrush, Simon F; Green, Malcolm O; Hewitt, Judi E

    2006-11-01

    We explore the role of biophysical feedbacks occurring at the patch scale (spatial scale of tens of meters) that influence bivalve physiological condition and affect patch stability by developing a numerical model for the pinnid bivalve, Atrina zelandica, in cohesive sediments. Simulated feedbacks involve bivalve density, flow conditions (assumed to be primarily influenced by local water depth and peak current speed), suspended sediment concentration (evaluated through a balance between background concentration, deposition, and erosion), and changes in the physiology of Atrina derived from empirical study. The model demonstrates that high bivalve density can lead to skimming flow and to a concomitant decrease in resuspension that will affect suspended sediment concentration over the patch directly feeding back on bivalve physiology. Consequently, for a given flow and background suspended sediment load, the stability of a patch directly depends on the size and density of bivalves in the patch. Although under a range of conditions patch stability is ensured independently of bivalve density, simulations clearly indicate that sudden changes in bivalve density or suspended sediment concentration can substantially affect patch structure and lead to different stable states. The model highlights the role of interactions between organisms, flow, and broader scale environmental conditions in providing a mechanistic explanation for the patchy occurrence of benthic suspension feeders.

  8. Suspended-sediment rating curve response to urbanization and wildfire, Santa Ana River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    River suspended-sediment concentrations provide insights to the erosion and transport of materials from a landscape, and changes in concentrations with time may result from landscape processes or human disturbance. Here we show that suspended-sediment concentrations in the Santa Ana River, California, decreased 20-fold with respect to discharge during a 34-year period (1968−2001). These decreases cannot be attributed to changes in sampling technique or timing, nor to event or seasonal hysteresis. Annual peak and total discharge, however, reveal sixfold increases over the 34-year record, which largely explain the decreases in sediment concentration by a nonlinear dilution process. The hydrological changes were related to the widespread urbanization of the watershed, which resulted in increases in storm water discharge without detectable alteration of sediment discharge, thus reducing suspended-sediment concentrations. Periodic upland wildfire significantly increased water discharge, sediment discharge, and suspended-sediment concentrations and thus further altered the rating curve with time. Our results suggest that previous inventories of southern California sediment flux, which assume time-constant rating curves and extend these curves beyond the sampling history, may have substantially overestimated loads during the most recent decades.

  9. Temporal variability in the suspended sediment load and streamflow of the Doce River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Kyssyanne Samihra Santos; Quaresma, Valéria da Silva

    2017-10-01

    Long-term records of streamflow and suspended sediment load provide a better understanding of the evolution of a river mouth, and its adjacent waters and a support for mitigation programs associated with extreme events and engineering projects. The aim of this study is to investigate the temporal variability in the suspended sediment load and streamflow of the Doce River to the Atlantic Ocean, between 1990 and 2013. Streamflow and suspended sediment load were analyzed at the daily, seasonal, and interannual scales. The results showed that at the daily scale, Doce River flood events are due to high intensity and short duration rainfalls, which means that there is a flashy response to rainfall. At the monthly and season scales, approximately 94% of the suspended sediment supply occurs during the wet season. Extreme hydrological events are important for the interannual scale for Doce River sediment supply to the Atlantic Ocean. The results suggest that a summation of anthropogenic interferences (deforestation, urbanization and soil degradation) led to an increase of extreme hydrological events. The findings of this study shows the importance of understanding the typical behavior of the Doce River, allowing the detection of extreme hydrological conditions, its causes and possible environmental and social consequences.

  10. Suspended sediment concentration profiles from synoptic satellite observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Rajawat, A; Chauhan, O.S.

    A method is developed to estimate vertical suspended sediment concentration (SSC) profiles in Gulf of Kachchh, from the sediment concentration values derived from synoptic observations of Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM). Under the influence of currents...

  11. Suspended sediment apportionment in a South-Korean mountain catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Axel; Meusburger, Katrin; Park, Ji-Hyung; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Due to the rapid agricultural expansion and intensification during the last decades in South-Korea, large areas of hill slope forests were transformed to paddies and vegetable fields. The intensive agriculture and the easily erodible soils in our catchment are a major reason for the increased erosion causing suspended sediments to infiltrate into the close drinking water reservoir. The drinking water reservoir Lake Soyang provides water supply for over ten million people in Seoul. Landscape managers need to know the exact origin of these sediments before they can create landscape amelioration schemes. We applied a compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) approach (Alewell et al., 2015) to apportion the sources of the suspended sediments between forest and agricultural soil contribution to the suspended sediments in a different catchment and applied the same approach to identify and quantify the different sources of the suspended sediments in the river(s) contributing to Lake Soyang. We sampled eight soil sites within the catchment considering the different landuse types forest, rice paddies, maize and vegetables. Suspended sediments were sampled at three outlets of the different sub-catchments. Soils and suspended sediments are analysed for bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, compound-specific carbon isotopes of plant-wax derived long-chain fatty acids and long-chain n-alkanes. Fatty acid and alkane isotopes are then used in mixing calculations and the mixing model software IsoSource to find out the contribution of the different source soils to the suspended sediments. We present first data of the source soils and the suspended sediments. C. Alewell, A. Birkholz, K. Meusburger, Y. Schindler-Wildhaber, L. Mabit, 2015. Sediment source attribution from multiple land use systems with CSIA. Biogeosciences Discuss. 12: 14245-14269.

  12. Estimates of suspended sediment entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta, San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, L.J.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) data collected at Mallard Island as a means of determining suspended-sediment load entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin River watersheds. Optical backscatter (OBS) data were collected every 15 min during water years (WYs) 1995-2003 and converted to SSC. Daily fluvial advective sediment load was estimated by combining estimated Delta outflow with daily averaged SSC. On days when no data were available, SSC was estimated using linear interpolation. A model was developed to estimate the landward dispersive load using velocity and SSC data collected during WYs 1994 and 1996. The advective and dispersive loads were summed to estimate the total load. Annual suspended-sediment load at Mallard Island averaged 1.2??0.4 Mt (million metric tonnes). Given that the average water discharge for the 1995-2003 period was greater than the long -term average discharge, it seems likely that the average suspended-sediment load may be less than 1.2??0.4 Mt. Average landward dispersive load was 0.24 Mt/yr, 20% of the total. On average during the wet season, 88% of the annual suspended-sediment load was discharged through the Delta and 43% occurred during the wettest 30-day period. The January 1997 flood transported 1.2 Mt of suspended sediment or about 11% of the total 9-year load (10.9 Mt). Previous estimates of sediment load at Mallard Island are about a factor of 3 greater because they lacked data downstream from riverine gages and sediment load has decreased. Decreasing suspended-sediment loads may increase erosion in the Bay, help to cause remobilization of buried contaminants, and reduce the supply of sediment for restoration projects. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instrument: A case study of Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinovantyo, Angga; Manik, Henry M.; Prartono, Tri; Susilohadi; Ilahude, Delyuzar

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the parameters needed to determine the characteristics of sediment transport. However, the measurement of SSC nowadays still uses conventional technique and it has limitations; especially in temporal resolution. With advanced technology, the measurement can use hydroacoustic technology such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). ADCP measures the intensity of backscatter as echo intensity unit from sediment particles. The frequency of ADCP used in this study was 400 kHz. The samples were measured and collected from Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. The highest concentration of suspended sediment was 98.89 mg L-1 and the lowest was 45.20 mg L-1. Time series data showed the tidal condition affected the SSC. From the research, we also made correction from sound signal losses effect such as spherical spreading and sound absorption to get more accurate results by eliminating these parameters in echo intensity data. Simple linear regression analysis at echo intensity measured from ADCP to direct measurement of SSC was performed to obtain the estimation of the SSC. The comparison result of estimation of SSC from ADCP measurements and SSC from laboratory analyses was insignificantly different based on t-test statistical analysis with 95% confidence interval percentage.

  14. Prediction and forecast of Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) on the Upper Yangtze basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, José Pedro; Hassan, Marwan; Lu, Xixi; Franca, Mário J.

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport in suspension may represent 90% or more of the global annual flux of sediment. For instance, more than 99% of the sediment supplied to the sea by the Yangtze River is suspended load. Suspended load is an important component for understanding channel dynamics and landscape evolution. Sediments transported in suspension are a major source of nutrients for aquatic organisms in riparian and floodplain habitats, and play a beneficial role acting as a sink in the carbon cycle. Excess of fine sediments may also have adverse effects. It can impair fish spawning by riverbed clogging, disturb foraging efficiency of hunting of river fauna, cause algae and benthos scouring, reduce or inhibit exchanges through the hyporheic region. Accumulation of fine sediments in reservoirs reduces storage capacity. Although fine sediment dynamics has been the focus of many studies, the current knowledge of sediment sources, transfer, and storage is inadequate to address fine sediment dynamics in the landscape. The theoretical derivation of a complete model for suspended sediment transport at the basin scale, incorporating small scale processes of production and transport, is hindered because the underlying mechanisms are produced at different non-similar scales. Availability of long-term reliable data on suspended sediment dynamics is essential to improve our knowledge on transport processes and to develop reliable sediment prediction models. Over the last 60 years, the Yangtze River Commission has been measuring the daily Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) at the Pingshan station. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to examine temporal variability and controls of fine sediment dynamics in the Upper Yangtze basin. The objective of this study is to describe temporal variation of fine sediment dynamics at the Pingshan station making use of the extensive sediment monitoring program undertaken at that location. We test several strategies of prediction and forecast

  15. Particle Size Characteristics of Fluvial Suspended Sediment in Proglacial Streams, King George Island, South Shetland Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the characterization of particle size distribution of suspended sediment that is transported by streams (Ornithologist Creek, Ecology Glacier Creeks, Petrified Forest Creek, Czech Creek, Vanishing Creek, Italian Creek) in the area of the Arctowski Polish Antarctic Station is presented. During the first period of the summer season, the aforementioned streams are supplied by the melting snow fields, while later on, by thawing permafrost. The water samples were collected from the streams at monthly intervals during the Antarctic summer season (January - March) of 2016. The particle size distribution was measured in the laboratory with a LISST-25X laser diffraction particle size analyser. According to Sequoia Scientific Inc., LISST-25X can measure particle sizes (Sauter Mean Diameter) between 2.50 and 500 μm. The results of particle size measurements were analysed in relation to flow velocity (0.18–0.89 m/s), the cross-sectional parameters of the streams, suspended sediment concentration (0.06–167.22 mg/dm3) and the content of particulate organic matter (9.8–84.85%). Overall, the mean particle size ranged from 28.8 to 136 μm. The grain size of well-sorted sediments ranged from 0.076 to 0.57, with the skewness and kurtosis values varying from -0.1 to 0.4, and from 0.67 to 1.3, respectively. Based on the particle size characteristics of suspended sediment, the streams were divided into two groups. For most of the streams, the sediment was very well sorted, while fine sand and very fine sand were dominant fractions displaying symmetric and platykurtic distributions, respectively. Only in two streams, the suspended sediment consisted of silt-size grains, well or moderately well sorted, with coarse-skewness and mostly mesokurtic distribution. The C-M chart suggested that the transportation processes of suspended sediment included the suspended mode only. The grain-size distribution of suspended sediment was mainly influenced by the stream runoff

  16. Suspended-sediment and nutrient loads for Waiakea and Alenaio Streams, Hilo, Hawaii, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Todd K.; Jamison, Marcael T.J.; Nishimoto, Dale C.

    2008-01-01

    Suspended sediment and nutrient samples were collected during wet-weather conditions at three sites on two ephemeral streams in the vicinity of Hilo, Hawaii during March 2004 to March 2006. Two sites were sampled on Waiakea Stream at 80- and 860-foot altitudes during March 2004 to August 2005. One site was sampled on Alenaio Stream at 10-foot altitude during November 2005 to March 2006. The sites were selected to represent different land uses and land covers in the area. Most of the drainage area above the upper Waiakea Stream site is conservation land. The drainage areas above the lower site on Waiakea Stream, and the site on Alenaio Stream, are a combination of conservation land, agriculture, rural, and urban land uses. In addition to the sampling, continuous-record streamflow sites were established at the three sampling sites, as well as an additional site on Alenaio Stream at altitude of 75 feet and 0.47 miles upstream from the sampling site. Stage was measured continuously at 15-minute intervals at these sites. Discharge, for any particular instant, or for selected periods of time, were computed based on a stage-discharge relation determined from individual discharge measurements. Continuous records of discharge were computed at the two sites on Waiakea Stream and the upper site on Aleniao Stream. Due to non-ideal hydraulic conditions within the channel of Alenaio Stream, a continuous record of discharge was not computed at the lower site on Alenaio Stream where samples were taken. Samples were analyzed for suspended sediment, and the nutrients total nitrogen, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and total phosphorus. Concentration data were converted to instantaneous load values: loads are the product of discharge and concentration, and are presented as tons per day for suspended sediment or pounds per day for nutrients. Daily-mean loads were computed by estimating concentrations relative to discharge using graphical constituent loading analysis techniques. Daily

  17. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  18. Storage filters upland suspended sediment signals delivered from watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, James E.; Keeler, Jeremy; Skalak, Katherine; Karwan, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Climate change, tectonics, and humans create long- and short-term temporal variations in the supply of suspended sediment to rivers. These signals, generated in upland erosional areas, are filtered by alluvial storage before reaching the basin outlet. We quantified this filter using a random walk model driven by sediment budget data, a power-law distributed probability density function (PDF) to determine how long sediment remains stored, and a constant downstream drift velocity during transport of 157 km/yr. For 25 km of transport, few particles are stored, and the median travel time is 0.2 yr. For 1000 km of transport, nearly all particles are stored, and the median travel time is 2.5 m.y. Both travel-time distributions are power laws. The 1000 km travel-time distribution was then used to filter sinusoidal input signals with periods of 10 yr and 104 yr. The 10 yr signal is delayed by 12.5 times its input period, damped by a factor of 380, and is output as a power law. The 104 yr signal is delayed by 0.15 times its input period, damped by a factor of 3, and the output signal retains its sinusoidal input form (but with a power-law “tail”). Delivery time scales for these two signals are controlled by storage; in-channel transport time is insignificant, and low-frequency signals are transmitted with greater fidelity than high-frequency signals. These signal modifications are essential to consider when evaluating watershed restoration schemes designed to control sediment loading, and where source-area geomorphic processes are inferred from the geologic record.

  19. Extending the turbidity record: making additional use of continuous data from turbidity, acoustic-Doppler, and laser diffraction instruments and suspended-sediment samples in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voichick, Nicholas; Topping, David J.

    2014-01-01

    range of sediment concentrations in the study area using data from the ADP instruments is particularly useful for biological studies. In Grand Canyon, turbidity has been correlated with food availability for aquatic organisms (gross primary production) as well as with fish behavior specific to predator-prey interactions. On the basis of the complete “extended” turbidity record and the relation between suspended-sediment concentration and turbidity, levels were higher before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam by a factor of approximately 2,000 at the Lees Ferry monitoring station (15 miles downstream from the dam) and by a factor of approximately 20 at the monitoring station 87 miles downstream from Lees Ferry (102 miles downstream from the dam). A comparison of turbidity data with data from Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) laser-diffraction instruments, suspended-sediment concentration data, and ADP data shows the influence of the physical properties of suspended sediment. Apparent outliers in relations between turbidity, ADP, and suspended-sediment data during two events within the study period, a 2007 tributary flood from a watershed altered by a recent wildfire and a 2008 experimental controlled-flood release from Glen Canyon Dam, are explained in part by atypical grain sizes, shapes, densities, colors, and (or) clay mineral assemblages of suspended sediment occurring in the Colorado River during these two events. These analyses demonstrate the value of using multiple data-collection strategies for turbidity and sediment-transport studies and of continuous monitoring for capturing the full range and duration of turbidity and sediment-transport conditions, identifying the provenance of the sediment causing turbidity, and detecting physical and chemical processes that may be important for management of critical physical and biological resources.

  20. Modelling suspended sediment distribution in the Selenga River Delta using LandSat data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Chalov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Selenga River is the largest tributary of Baikal Lake and it's delta covers around 600 km2. Suspended sediment concentrations (SSC in the Selenga river delta were modelled based on LandSat images data. The seasonal variability in suspended sediment retention during the period 1989 to 2015 was calculated. The results suggest that sediment storage in the Selenga delta is observed during high discharges (> 1500 m3 s−1, whereas sediment export increases under lower flow conditions (< 1500 m3 s−1. The changes in seasonal SSC patterns are explained by wetland inundation during floods and channel erosion or Baikal wind surge during low flow periods.

  1. A simplified approach for monitoring hydrophobic organic contaminants associated with suspended sediment: methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B J; Van Metre, P C

    2003-04-01

    Hydrophobic organic contaminants, although frequently detected in bed sediment and in aquatic biota, are rarely detected in whole-water samples, complicating determination of their occurrence, load, and source. A better approach for the investigation of hydrophobic organic contaminants is the direct analysis of sediment in suspension, but procedures for doing so are expensive and cumbersome. We describe a simple, inexpensive methodology for the dewatering of sediment and present the results of two case studies. Isolation of a sufficient mass of sediment for analyses of organochlorine compounds and PAHs is obtained by in-line filtration of large volumes of water. The sediment is removed from the filters and analyzed directly by standard laboratory methods. In the first case study, suspended-sediment sampling was used to determine occurrence, loads, and yields of contaminants in urban runoff affecting biota in Town Lake, Austin, TX. The second case study used suspended-sediment sampling to locate a point source of PCBs in the Donna Canal in south Texas, where fish are contaminated with PCBs. The case studies demonstrate that suspended-sediment sampling can be an effective tool for determining the occurrence, load, and source of hydrophobic organic contaminants in transport.

  2. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogner, Sr., Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  3. Contemporary suspended sediment dynamics within two partly glacierized mountain drainage basins in western Norway (Erdalen and Bødalen, inner Nordfjord)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja; Storms, Joep E. A.

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on environmental controls, spatiotemporal variability and rates of contemporary fluvial suspended sediment transport in the neighboring, partly glacierized and steep Erdalen (79.5 km2) and Bødalen (60.1 km2) drainage basins in the fjord landscape of the inner Nordfjord in western Norway. Field work, including extended samplings and measurements, was conducted since 2004 in Erdalen and since 2008 in Bødalen. The distinct intra- and inter-annual temporal variability of suspended sediment transport found is mostly controlled by meteorological events, with most suspended sediment transport occurring during pluvial events in autumn (September-November), followed by mostly thermally determined glacier melt in summer (July-August), and by mostly thermally determined snowmelt in spring (April-June). Extreme rainfall events (> 70 mm d- 1) in autumn can trigger significant debris-flow activity that can cause significant transfers of suspended sediments from ice-free surface areas with sedimentary covers into main stream channels and is particularly important for fluvial suspended sediment transport. In years with occurring relevant debris-flow activity the total annual drainage-basin wide suspended sediment yields are strongly determined by these single extreme events. The proportion of glacier coverage, followed by steepness of slopes, and degree of vegetation cover in ice-free surface areas with sedimentary covers are the main controls for the detected spatial variability of suspended sediment yields. The contemporary sediment supply from glacierized surface areas and the Jostedalsbreen ice cap through different defined outlet glaciers shows a high spatial variability. The fact that the mean annual suspended sediment yield of Bødalen is with 31.3 t km- 2 yr- 1 almost twice as high as the mean annual suspended sediment yield of Erdalen (16.4 t km- 2 yr- 1) is to a large extent explained by the higher proportion of glacier coverage in Bødalen (38% of

  4. Measurement of light attenuation extends the application of suspended sediment monitoring in rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Hughes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Turbidity is often monitored continuously as a proxy for suspended sediment in catchment sediment load studies, but is less often applied to measuring optical ‘loads’ as they affect water quality in downstream waters. We added measurements of visual clarity, from which light (beam attenuation can be estimated, to auto-sampler monitoring over storm events in tributary rivers of the Kaipara Harbour, a large barrier enclosed estuary complex in northern New Zealand. This paper presents, for the first time, evidence of the mutual relationships between turbidity, total suspended sediment (TSS, and visual clarity, from water samples collected under event flow conditions. The mutual relationships between turbidity, TSS and visual clarity for our monitoring sites were fairly close over about three orders of magnitude (TSS ranging from about 1–1000 mg L−1. Our results show that visual clarity (and hence light attenuation can be predicted from turbidity, at least as precisely as more traditional predictions of TSS from turbidity. The estimation of light attenuation and corresponding load estimates from visual clarity measurements, for relatively little marginal extra effort, extends the environmental relevance and application of suspended sediment monitoring.

  5. Turbulence Flow Characteristics of Suspended Sediments and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These are inturn integrated to give the hydraulic resistance law for sediment laden flow. The law of velocity distribution in open channel flow with suspended sediments was derived introducing Monin-Obukhov Length L . The distribution equation agrees well with the observation of velocity profile in the experiments.

  6. Reduction in density of suspended - sediment - laden natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Desa, E.; Smith, D.; Peshwe, V.B.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, J.A.E.

    to 0.4% - 4.5%) that of the density of the same water without suspended sediment. Teh values of peff in a given site differed from one tidal cycle to another (approx equal to 1.9%). These values varied slightly (less than 0.8%) from mid-tide to slack...

  7. A novel method for sampling the suspended sediment load in the tidal environment using bi-directional time-integrated mass-flux sediment (TIMS) samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Emily A.; Monbureau, Elaine; Walters, Glenn W.; Elliott, Mark A.; McKee, Brent A.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.

    2017-12-01

    Identifying the source and abundance of sediment transported within tidal creeks is essential for studying the connectivity between coastal watersheds and estuaries. The fine-grained suspended sediment load (SSL) makes up a substantial portion of the total sediment load carried within an estuarine system and efficient sampling of the SSL is critical to our understanding of nutrient and contaminant transport, anthropogenic influence, and the effects of climate. Unfortunately, traditional methods of sampling the SSL, including instantaneous measurements and automatic samplers, can be labor intensive, expensive and often yield insufficient mass for comprehensive geochemical analysis. In estuaries this issue is even more pronounced due to bi-directional tidal flow. This study tests the efficacy of a time-integrated mass sediment sampler (TIMS) design, originally developed for uni-directional flow within the fluvial environment, modified in this work for implementation the tidal environment under bi-directional flow conditions. Our new TIMS design utilizes an 'L' shaped outflow tube to prevent backflow, and when deployed in mirrored pairs, each sampler collects sediment uniquely in one direction of tidal flow. Laboratory flume experiments using dye and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to characterize the flow within the sampler, specifically, to quantify the settling velocities and identify stagnation points. Further laboratory tests of sediment indicate that bidirectional TIMS capture up to 96% of incoming SSL across a range of flow velocities (0.3-0.6 m s-1). The modified TIMS design was tested in the field at two distinct sampling locations within the tidal zone. Single-time point suspended sediment samples were collected at high and low tide and compared to time-integrated suspended sediment samples collected by the bi-directional TIMS over the same four-day period. Particle-size composition from the bi-directional TIMS were representative of the array of

  8. A comparison of selection at list time and time-stratified sampling for estimating suspended sediment loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas; Jack Lewis

    1993-01-01

    Time-stratified sampling of sediment for estimating suspended load is introduced and compared to selection at list time (SALT) sampling. Both methods provide unbiased estimates of load and variance. The magnitude of the variance of the two methods is compared using five storm populations of suspended sediment flux derived from turbidity data. Under like conditions,...

  9. Responses of water environment to tidal flat reduction in Xiangshan Bay: Part II locally re-suspended sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Guan, Weibing; He, Zhiguo; Yao, Yanming; Xia, Yuezhang

    2017-11-01

    Xiangshan Bay is a semi-enclosed bay in China, in which tidal flats have been substantially reclaimed to support the development of local economies and society over previous decades. The loss of tidal flats has led to changes of tides and locally suspended sediment in the bay. The effects of tidal flat reduction on locally suspended sediment dynamics was investigated using a numerical model forced by tidal data and calibrated by observed tidal elevation and currents. The model satisfactorily reproduces observed water levels, currents, and suspended sediment concentration in the estuary, and therefore is subsequently applied to analyze the impact of tidal flat reclamation on locally suspended sediment transport. After the loss of the tidal flats from 1963 to 2010, the suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) at the bottom boundary layer were reduced/increased in the outer bay/tidal flat areas due to weakened tidal currents. In the inner bay, the SSC values near the bottom level increased from 1963 to 2003 due to the narrowed bathymetry, and then decreased from 2003 to 2010 because of the reduced tidal prism. The model scenarios suggest that: (1) a reduction of tidal flat areas appears to be the main factor for enhancing the transport of sediments up-estuary, due to the increased Eulerian velocity and tidal pumping; (2) A reduction of tidal flat areas impacts on spatial and temporal SSC distribution: reducing the SSC values in the water areas due to the reduced current; and (3) a tidal flat reduction influences the net sediment fluxes: lessening the erosion and inducing higher/lower landward/seaward sediment transportation.

  10. An inventory of suspended sediment stations and type of data analysis for Pennsylvania streams, 1947-1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Arthur N.; Commings, Allen B.

    1972-01-01

    Data concerning suspended sediment concentrations and loads, frequency of occurrence of suspended sediment concentrations, and long-term trends of annual suspended sediment loads are important tools for today's environmental manager. These data are required background for those concerned with establishing and enforcing erosion and sedimentation control regulations and sediment concentration or turbidity standards for water-quality criteria, or those concerned with designing for adequate long-term water storage in reservoirs (sediment load), for efficient municipal and industrial plant operation (sediment concentration frequency), etc.This is a compilation of the location, period of record, sampling frequency and type of data synthesis for suspended sediment carried by Pennsylvania streams. Figures 1 and 2 show the approximate locations of sediment sampling stations in Pennsylvania. All of the sediment data listed were collected by the U. S. Geological Survey mainly in cooperation with the following Federal, State, and local agencies.Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources     Bureau of Engineering and Construction     Soil and Water Conservation CommissionPennsylvania Department of TransportationCity of PhiladelphiaBrandywine Valley AssociationDelaware Geological SurveyConestoga Valley AssociationLehigh County Soil and Water Conservation DistrictCorps of Engineers, U. S. Army

  11. Changes in particle size distribution of suspended sediment affected by gravity erosion on the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Liu, Ya-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Zhu, Ming-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Gravity erosion generates an enormous volume of sediment on the steep hillslopes throughout the world, yet the response from particle size distribution (PSD) of suspended sediment to mass failure remains poorly understood. Here rainfall simulation experiments were conducted on the natural loess slopes to induce a series of mass failures under rainfall intensity of 48 mm h-1, and then an index of enrichment/dilution ratio was used to quantitatively explore the change trend of suspended sediment PSD affected by gravity erosion. To determine suspended sediment, water samples were collected in a polyethylene bottle directly from the gully runoff and channel flow in the pre and during- slope failures events. Then, the particle fractions of samples were done by combining sieving method and photoelectric sedimentometer technique. The results are shown as follows: (1) Gravity erosion has a significant influence on the particle size distribution of suspended sediment. As the mass erosion occurred, the proportion of sand-sized particles was decreased from 71.2 to 50.8%, whereas the proportions of clay and silt were increased remarkably from 1.3 to 7.3% and 27.5 to 41.9%, respectively. Hence the sediment can be more easily transported into channel flow while the suspended sediment load becomes finer as gravitational erosion occurs. (2) The median particle size (d50), sediment heterogeneity (H) and fractal dimensions (D) were significantly correlated with gravity erosion. As a result, d50 was decreased from 0.084 to 0.051 mm, H was increase from 5.6 to 26.8, and D was magnified from 2.60 to 2.78. This implies that mass failure makes the particle size distribution of suspended sediment more nonuniform and irregular. (3) Suspended sediment tended to enrich in the silt and clay fractions, while it diluted in the sand fractions during landslide erosion. Meanwhile, the enrichment/dilution ratios were 13.9 for the clay fractions, 1.4 for clay, and 0.7 for sand. This reflects the

  12. Technological advances in suspended-sediment surrogate monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Surrogate technologies to continuously monitor suspended sediment show promise toward supplanting traditional data collection methods requiring routine collection and analysis of water samples. Commercially available instruments operating on bulk optic (turbidity), laser optic, pressure difference, and acoustic backscatter principles are evaluated based on cost, reliability, robustness, accuracy, sample volume, susceptibility to biological fouling, and suitable range of mass concentration and particle size distribution. In situ turbidimeters are widely used. They provide reliable data where the point measurements can be reliably correlated to the river's mean cross section concentration value, effects of biological fouling can be minimized, and concentrations remain below the sensor's upper measurement limit. In situ laser diffraction instruments have similar limitations and can cost 6 times the approximate $5000 purchase price of a turbidimeter. However, laser diffraction instruments provide volumetric-concentration data in 32 size classes. Pressure differential instruments measure mass density in a water column, thus integrating substantially more streamflow than a point measurement. They are designed for monitoring medium-to-large concentrations, are generally unaffected by biological fouling, and cost about the same as a turbidimeter. However, their performance has been marginal in field applications. Acoustic Doppler profilers use acoustic backscatter to measure suspended sediment concentrations in orders of magnitude more streamflow than do instruments that rely on point measurements. The technology is relatively robust and generally immune to effects of biological fouling. Cost of a single-frequency device is about double that of a turbidimeter. Multifrequency arrays also provide the potential to resolve concentrations by clay silt versus sand size fractions. Multifrequency hydroacoustics shows the most promise for revolutionizing collection of continuous

  13. Spatial variability of suspended sediment concentration within a tidal marsh in San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, K.; Drexler, J. Z.; Schoellhamer, D. H.; Buffington, K.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    The sustainability of existing marshes and feasibility of future marsh restoration projects in San Francisco Estuary and elsewhere are threatened by a potential imbalance between accelerating sea-level rise and tidal marsh accretion rates. Marsh accretion is, in large part, dependent upon the availability of suspended sediment supplied from adjacent waterways. As water and sediment move across a marsh plain, suspended sediment settles and is trapped by vegetation near the source, resulting in less suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and deposition in the interior of the marsh. Measurements of deposition and limited observations of SSC within marshes have confirmed a decrease in sediment supply and accumulation from the marsh edge to the marsh interiors, but the spatial variability of SSC has not been quantified in a manner that allows for comparison to a theoretical sediment transport model. For this study, transects of SSC were collected within a marsh at China Camp State Park in the San Francisco Estuary which demonstrate that a dominant pattern of settling can be quantified and generally matches the exponentially decreasing pattern of SSC predicted by a simple advection-settling model. The observed pattern suggests that sediment settling and marsh flow characteristics are consistent both spatially (between transects) and temporally (between monthly sampling events). However, deviations from the predicted pattern occurred systematically at some locations and are likely related to resuspension of sediment from the marsh surface or small, unmapped creek channels that supply sediment to the marsh. Despite these deviations, our data show this simple 1-D model of advection and settling can be used to generalize within-marsh sediment transport as a function of distance from the nearest sediment source.

  14. Variability of suspended sediment yields within the Loire river basin (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, A.; Cerdan, O.; Delmas, M.; Desmet, M.

    2014-11-01

    Suspended sediment fluxes and their variability in time and space have received much attention over the past decades. Large databases compiling suspended sediment load (SL) data are often used to serve these purposes. Analyses of these databases have highlighted the following two major limitations: (i) the role of lowland areas in sediment production and transfer has been minimised, and studies on small-scale catchments (with a drainage area of ⩽ 102 km2) are practically non-existent in the literature; and (ii) inhomogeneous data and calculation methods are used to estimate and compare the SL values. In this context, the present study aims to complete the existing studies by providing a reliable comparison of SL values for various catchments within lowland river basins. Therefore, we focused on the Loire and Brittany river basins (France). 111 small to large catchments covering 78% of this area and representative of the basins landscape diversity were chosen. We first present a large database of area-specific suspended sediment yields (SY) calculated from the suspended sediment concentration and flow discharge data over 7-40 yr of measurements at gauging stations. Two calculation methods are used, and the calculated loads are confined within a factor of 0.60-1.65 of the real values. Second, we analyse the temporal and spatial variability of the calculated SY values. Finally, using a nested catchment approach, we provide insight into sediment transport from upstream to downstream gauging stations and into the role of small- and medium- scale catchments in sediment production and transfers. The SL values at the outlet of the catchments range from 2.5 * 102 to 8.6 * 105 t yr-1, and the SY values range from 2.9 to 32.4 t km-2 yr-1. A comparison with the limited values available in the literature for this region corroborates our estimations. Sediment exports from the Loire and Brittany river basins are very low compared with mountainous regions and European exports

  15. Assessment of catchment scale connectivity in different catchments using measured suspended sediment output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselink, Rens; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in hydrology and geomorphology include the connectivity principle, which describes how different elements in a landscape are connected and how water and matter moves between these elements. So far, studies on connectivity have been mainly of a conceptual nature and have been done on a small scale, while studies that map, quantitatively establish relations, and model water and sediment transport in connectivity are rare. In this study we established a relation between change in connectivity within four catchments and the time of year by using suspended sediment data. The data were collected for four catchments in Navarra, Spain of which two catchments are dominated by forest and pasture, while the other two catchments are dominated by agriculture and have no forest. Data were collected during a 13 year period; 4 samples were taken a day at 6 hour intervals which were mixed to obtain a daily average suspended sediment concentration. This was then converted into daily suspended sediment output using the measured total daily discharge. The effect of precipitation on the sediment output data was minimized by using an antecedent precipitation index (API), which consists of the precipitation of the current day added by the precipitation of the previous 14 days, where the influence of the previous days decays exponentially with time. The daily total suspended sediment output was divided by the API, to obtain a measure for sediment output independent of precipitation. This sediment output then serves as a measure for the connectivity within the catchment. The connectivity of the four catchments throughout the years will be compared to each other and we hypothesise that the two catchments dominated by forests and pastures will change only slightly throughout the year, whereas we expect to see large differences in connectivity in the two agricultural catchments. The agricultural catchments are likely to display a highly varying connectivity throughout the

  16. Empirical model for estimating vertical concentration profiles of re-suspended, sediment-associated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H. W.; Cheng, P. D.; Li, W.; Chen, J. H.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Vertical distribution processes of sediment contaminants in water were studied by flume experiments. Experimental results show that settling velocity of sediment particles and turbulence characteristics are the major hydrodynamic factors impacting distribution of pollutants, especially near the bottom where particle diameter is similar in size to vortex structure. Sediment distribution was uniform along the distance, while contaminant distribution slightly lagged behind the sediment. The smaller the initial sediment concentration was, the more time it took to achieve a uniform concentration distribution for suspended sediment. A contaminants transportation equation was established depending on mass conservation equations. Two mathematical estimation models of pollutant distribution in the overlying water considering adsorption and desorption were devised based on vertical distribution of suspended sediment: equilibrium partition model and dynamic micro-diffusion model. The ratio of time scale between the sediment movement and sorption can be used as the index of the models. When this ratio was large, the equilibrium assumption was reasonable, but when it was small, it might require dynamic micro-diffusion model.

  17. Remote Sensing Studies of Suspended Sediment Concentration Variation in Barito Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisanty, Deasy; Nur Saputra, Aswin

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta depend on the process in upstream. Agriculture, mining, and illegal logging in Barito River upstream has an effect for suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The objective of research is to estimate the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The data of research consist of Landsat 7 in year 2011 and measurement result data of suspended sediment concentration both in wet season and dry season in year 2011. Data analysis is regression analysis to estimates the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The method of research compares three types of spectral transformation for suspended sediment that is Normalized Suspended Material Index (NSMI), Normalized Differences Suspended Sediment Index (NDSSI), and band ratio (green/blue). The result of the transformation is compared with the value of the field measurement. Based on the result of the comparison can be known the suitable type of transformation for the suspended sediment estimation in Barito Delta. The result of research explains that NSMI has the highest value to estimate the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta.

  18. Determination of the Runoff and Suspended Sediment from Two Different Slope Length Using Field Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Şensoy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of slope length on runoff and suspended sediment yield has been investigated by using plots on uniform slopes under natural rainfall conditions. From September 2007 to September 2009, during two year-period, measurements were done in Dallıca village experimental area in Bartın province. In this study, six field plots with a width of 1.87 m were used. Three of them were 5.5 m long (short plots and remaining three were 11.05 m long (long plots. Plots were located on bare soil surface that has no conservative vegetation. During the period of experimentation, a total of 158 rainy days were registered and average annual rainfall amount was 1194.8 mm. Average annual runoff per square meter was 270.81 mm, and 311.27 mm in long and short plots, respectively. Average annual suspended sediment was 809.68 g m-2, and 766.53 g m-2 from long and short plots, respectively. While statistically significant differences were found in runoff amount from plots with different lengths, there were no statistically significant differences in terms of the amount of eroded sediment.

  19. A 2-D process-based model for suspended sediment dynamics: a first step towards ecological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achete, F. M.; van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, D.; Jaffe, B.

    2015-06-01

    In estuaries suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the most important contributors to turbidity, which influences habitat conditions and ecological functions of the system. Sediment dynamics differs depending on sediment supply and hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. A robust sediment transport model is a first step in developing a chain of models enabling simulations of contaminants, phytoplankton and habitat conditions. This works aims to determine turbidity levels in the complex-geometry delta of the San Francisco estuary using a process-based approach (Delft3D Flexible Mesh software). Our approach includes a detailed calibration against measured SSC levels, a sensitivity analysis on model parameters and the determination of a yearly sediment budget as well as an assessment of model results in terms of turbidity levels for a single year, water year (WY) 2011. Model results show that our process-based approach is a valuable tool in assessing sediment dynamics and their related ecological parameters over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The model may act as the base model for a chain of ecological models assessing the impact of climate change and management scenarios. Here we present a modeling approach that, with limited data, produces reliable predictions and can be useful for estuaries without a large amount of processes data.

  20. A 2-D process-based model for suspended sediment dynamics: A first step towards ecological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achete, F. M.; van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, D.; Jaffe, B.

    2015-01-01

    In estuaries suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the most important contributors to turbidity, which influences habitat conditions and ecological functions of the system. Sediment dynamics differs depending on sediment supply and hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. A robust sediment transport model is a first step in developing a chain of models enabling simulations of contaminants, phytoplankton and habitat conditions. This works aims to determine turbidity levels in the complex-geometry delta of the San Francisco estuary using a process-based approach (Delft3D Flexible Mesh software). Our approach includes a detailed calibration against measured SSC levels, a sensitivity analysis on model parameters and the determination of a yearly sediment budget as well as an assessment of model results in terms of turbidity levels for a single year, water year (WY) 2011. Model results show that our process-based approach is a valuable tool in assessing sediment dynamics and their related ecological parameters over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The model may act as the base model for a chain of ecological models assessing the impact of climate change and management scenarios. Here we present a modeling approach that, with limited data, produces reliable predictions and can be useful for estuaries without a large amount of processes data.

  1. Sources of suspended-sediment loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, south Texas, 1958–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District; City of Corpus Christi; Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority; San Antonio River Authority; and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2010 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in south Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-7 and 2010 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations (08211000 Nueces River near Mathis, Tex. [the Mathis gage], 08211200 Nueces River at Bluntzer, Tex. [the Bluntzer gage], and 08211500 Nueces River at Calallen, Tex. [the Calallen gage]), and at one ungaged location on a Nueces River tributary (USGS station 08211050 Bayou Creek at Farm Road 666 near Mathis, Tex.). The Mathis gage is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, which was completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River downstream from the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at the Nueces River near the Mathis, Tex., gage were considerably lower for a given annual mean discharge after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed.

  2. Depth-integrated suspended sediment and geochemical fluxes in large rivers: the Amazon River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchez, J.; Lupker, M.; Gaillardet, J.; Metivier, F.; France-Lanord, C.; Maurice, L.

    2010-12-01

    Erosion and weathering produce a wide range of residual solid products, in terms of size, density, mineralogy and chemical composition. These solid products are then transported by rivers from the continents to the oceans as suspended particulate matter (SPM) and bedload. Large rivers account for an important part of this transfer of sediments at the global scale. In those rivers, deep channels allow for vertical differentiation, or sorting, of suspended sediment, following their size and density. This hydrodynamic sorting results in vertically heterogeneous depth-profiles in terms of SPM concentration and size distribution (e.g. Garcia, 2008), which in turn likely result in an heterogeneous chemical composition of SPM throughout channel depth (e.g. Galy, 2007), which has to be evaluated. We sampled river water of the main tributaries of the Amazon River system (in the lowland basin), at two distinct water-stages, at various depths following depth-profiles, using a point depth-sampler. After filtration, and SPM recovery, SPM concentration, grain size distribution and chemical composition were determined. River discharge and water velocity throughout the sampled cross-sections were recorded using Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). The large increase in SPM concentration with depth observed at most of the sampled depth-profiles is well accounted for by the Rouse model (e.g. Rouse, 1950). This analysis allows us to reliably infer the SPM concentration and grain size distribution throughout the sampled river cross-section, and thus to estimate the spatially-integrated instantaneous SPM flux using ADCP data (Bouchez et al., 2010). The study also emphasizes the potential role of particle aggregation, within the river system, as a complicating factor regarding the prediction of these depth-integrated SPM fluxes from easily measurable hydrodynamic parameters (surface SPM concentration and grain size, and water velocity). Then, using the previous analysis, combined

  3. Suspended sediment in a high-Arctic river

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard-Pedersen, Pernille; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Kroon, Aart

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying fluxes of water, sediment and dissolved compounds through Arctic rivers is important for linking the glacial, terrestrial and marine ecosystems and to quantify the impact of a warming climate. The quantification of fluxes is not trivial. This study uses a 8-years data set (2005......-2012) of daily measurements from the high-Artic Zackenberg River in Northeast Greenland to estimate annual suspended sediment fluxes based on four commonly used methods: M1) is the discharge weighted mean and uses direct measurements, while M2-M4) are one uncorrected and two bias corrected rating curves......-daily sampling together with a sampling frequency of 2h during extreme events. The most consistent estimation method was an uncorrected rating curve of bi-daily measurements (M2), combined with a linear interpolation of extreme event fluxes. Sampling can be reduced to every fourth day, with both method...

  4. Identifying the controls of soil loss in agricultural catchments using ex situ turbidity-based suspended sediment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, S. C.; Rowan, J. S.; Melland, A. R.; Jordan, P.; Fenton, O.; Ó'hUallacháin, D.

    2015-03-01

    Soil erosion and suspended sediment (SS) pose risks to chemical and ecological water quality. Agricultural activities may accelerate erosional fluxes from bare, poached or compacted soils, and enhance connectivity through modified channels and artificial drainage networks. Storm-event fluxes dominate SS transport in agricultural catchments; therefore, high temporal-resolution monitoring approaches are required but can be expensive and technically challenging. Here, the performance of in situ turbidity-sensors, conventionally installed submerged at the river bankside, is compared with installations where river water is delivered to sensors ex situ, i.e. within instrument kiosks on the riverbank, at two experimental catchments (Grassland B and Arable B). Calibrated against storm-period depth-integrated SS data, both systems gave comparable results; using the ex situ and in situ methods respectively, total load at Grassland B was estimated at 128 ± 28 and 154 ± 35, and 225 ± 54 and 248 ± 52 t at Arable B. The absence of spurious turbidity peaks relating to bankside debris around the in situ sensor and its greater security, make the ex situ sensor more robust. The ex situ approach was then used to characterise SS dynamics and fluxes in five intensively managed agricultural catchments in Ireland which feature a range of landscape characteristics and land use pressures. Average annual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was below the Freshwater Fish Directive (FFD) guideline of 25 mg L-1, and the continuous hourly record demonstrated that exceedance occurred less than 12% of the observation year. Soil drainage class and proportion of arable land were key controls determining flux rates, but all catchments reported a high degree of inter-annual variability associated with variable precipitation patterns compared to the long-term average. Poorly-drained soils had greater sensitivity to runoff and soil erosion, particularly in catchments with periods of bare soils

  5. Suspended sediment, turbidity, and stream water temperature in the Sauk River Basin, western Washington, water years 2012-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Kristin L.; Curran, Christopher A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Morris, Scott T.; Moran, Patrick W.; Reams, Katherine A.

    2017-11-01

    The Sauk River is a federally designated Wild and Scenic River that drains a relatively undisturbed landscape along the western slope of the North Cascade Mountain Range, Washington, which includes the glaciated volcano, Glacier Peak. Naturally high sediment loads characteristic of basins draining volcanoes like Glacier Peak make the Sauk River a dominant contributor of sediment to the downstream main stem river, the Skagit River. Additionally, the Sauk River serves as important spawning and rearing habitat for several salmonid species in the greater Skagit River system. Because of the importance of sediment to morphology, flow-conveyance, and ecosystem condition, there is interest in understanding the magnitude and timing of suspended sediment and turbidity from the Sauk River system and its principal tributaries, the White Chuck and Suiattle Rivers, to the Skagit River.Suspended-sediment measurements, turbidity data, and water temperature data were collected at two U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the upper and middle reaches of the Sauk River over a 4-year period extending from October 2011 to September 2015, and at a downstream location in the lower river for a 5-year period extending from October 2011 to September 2016. Over the collective 5-year study period, mean annual suspended-sediment loads at the three streamgages on the upper, middle, and lower Sauk River streamgages were 94,200 metric tons (t), 203,000 t, and 940,000 t streamgages, respectively. Fine (smaller than 0.0625 millimeter) total suspended-sediment load averaged 49 percent at the upper Sauk River streamgage, 42 percent at the middle Sauk River streamgage, and 34 percent at the lower Sauk River streamgage.

  6. Satellite estimates of wide-range suspended sediment concentrations in Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary using MERIS data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, F.; Verhoef, W.; Zhou, Y.; Salama, M.S.; Liu, X.

    2010-01-01

    The Changjiang (Yangtze) estuarine and coastal waters are characterized by suspended sediments over a wide range of concentrations from 20 to 2,500 mg l-1. Suspended sediment plays important roles in the estuarine and coastal system and environment. Previous algorithms for satellite estimates of

  7. Use of an ADCP to compute suspended-sediment discharge in the tidal Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Gary R.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Litten, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can provide data needed for computation of suspended-sediment discharge in complex river systems, such as tidal rivers, in which conventional methods of collecting time-series data on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and water discharge are not feasible. Although ADCPs are not designed to measure SSC, ADCP data can be used as a surrogate under certain environmental conditions. However, the software for such computation is limited, and considerable post-processing is needed to correct and normalize ADCP data for this use. This report documents the sampling design and computational procedure used to calibrate ADCP measures of echo intensity to SSC and water velocity to discharge in the computation of suspended-sediment discharge at the study site on the Hudson River near Poughkeepsie, New York. The methods and procedures described may prove useful to others doing similar work in different locations; however, they are specific to this study site and may have limited applicability elsewhere.

  8. Quantitative suspended sediment mapping using aircraft remotely sensed multispectral data. [in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Suspended sediment is an important environmental parameter for monitoring water quality, water movement, and land use. Quantitative suspended sediment determinations were made from analysis of aircraft remotely sensed multispectral digital data. A statistical analysis and derived regression equation were used to determine and plot quantitative suspended sediment concentration contours in the tidal James River, Virginia, on May 28, 1974. From the analysis, a single band, Band 8 (0.70-0.74 microns), was adequate for determining suspended sediment concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.89 was obtained with a mean inaccuracy of 23.5 percent for suspended sediment concentrations up to about 50 mg/l. Other water quality parameters - secchi disc depth and chlorophyll - also had high correlations with the remotely sensed data. Particle size distribution had only a fair correlation with the remotely sensed data.

  9. Classification and Prediction of Event-based Suspended Sediment Dynamics using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshaw, S. D.; Underwood, K.; Wemple, B. C.; Rizzo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment transport can be an immensely complex process, yet plays a vital role in the transport of substances and nutrients that can impact receiving waters. Advancements in the use of sensors for indirect measurement of suspended sediments have allowed access to high frequency sediment data. This has promoted the use of more advanced computational tools to identify patterns in sediment data to improve our understanding of physical processes occurring in the watershed. In this study, a network of weather stations and in-stream turbidity sensors were deployed to capture more than three years of sediment dynamics and meteorological data in the Mad River watershed in central Vermont. Monitoring sites were located along the main stem of the the Mad River and on five tributaries. Separate storm events were identified from the data at each site to study event sediment dynamics associated with erosion and deposition over space and time. Two types of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a self-organizing map (SOM) and a radial basis function (RBF), were used to cluster the storm event data based on hydrometeorological metrics and were subsequently compared to traditional classes of hysteresis patterns in suspended sediment concentration - discharge (SSC-Q) relationships. Hysteresis patterns were also directly used as inputs to both ANNs to identify distinct patterns and test the applicability of performing pattern recognition on hysteresis patterns. The results of this study will be used to gain insight into the dynamic physical processes (both spatial and temporal) occurring in the watershed based on patterns observed in SSQ-Q data.

  10. Investigation of suspended sediment transport using ultrasonic techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1994-01-01

    The results of the initial experimental studies involving the scattering of ultrasonic signals from canonical and non-canonical shaped suspended particles with known elastical qualities are reported. These results have formed the basis for the development of a numerical model for ultrasound...

  11. Modelling suspended sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta of the Mekong River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Vo Quoc; Reyns, Johan; Wackerman, Chris; Eidam, Emily F.; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-09-01

    Fluvial sediment is the major source for the formation and development of the Mekong Delta. This paper aims to analyse the dynamics of suspended sediment and to investigate the roles of different processes in order to explore flux pattern changes. We applied modelling on two scales, comprising a large-scale model (the whole delta) to consider the upstream characteristics, particularly the Tonle Sap Lake's flood regulation, and a smaller-scale model (tidal rivers and shelf) to understand the sediment processes on the subaqueous delta. A comprehensive comparison to in-situ measurements and remote sensing data demonstrated that the model is capable of qualitatively simulating sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta. It estimates that the Mekong River supplied an amount of 41.5 mil tons from April 2014 to April 2015. A substantial amount of sediment delivered by the Mekong River is deposited in front of the river mouths in the high flow season and resuspended in the low flow season. A sensitivity analysis shows that waves, baroclinic effects and bed composition strongly influence suspended sediment distribution and transport on the shelf. Waves in particular play an essential role in sediment resuspension. The development of this model is an important step towards an operational model for scientific and engineering applications, since the model is capable of predicting tidal propagation and discharge distribution through the main branches, and in predicting the seasonal SSC and erosion/deposition patterns on the shelf, while it is forced by readily available inputs: discharge at Kratie (Cambodia), GFS winds, ERA40 reanalysis waves, and TPXO 8v1 HR tidal forcing.

  12. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  13. Trend of suspended sediment load in the Velika Morava River in the period 1967-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafić Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with identifying changes in the time series of discharge (Q, suspended sediment concentration (SSC and sediment load (Qs of the Velika Morva River. The catchment area on farthest hydrological profile Ljubičevski most on Velika Morava River is approximately 35,496 km2. In this profile were carried out daily measurements of flow and concetration of silt in the period from 1967 to 2007. Average perennial transport of suspended sediment is 2.57ˣ106 t (72.4 t/km2/yr and ranged from 0.17ˣ106 t (4.8 t/km2/yr to 10.02ˣ106 t (282.2 t/km2/yr. Trends determined for Q, SSC and Qs are statistically obtained using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. Results of Mann-Kendall test show that Q has a slight declining trend of annual values which do not show statistical significance. Decline in trendline SSC and Qs is a significant at the level of 0.01. Calculating the standardized regression coefficients, it was found that the relative impact of SSC on sediment load is 3.1 time higher than the impact of discharge. From 1967 to 2007 the average decrease in sediment load at the mouth of the Velika Morava into the Danube was 3.1 t/km2/yr. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007: The Research on Climate Change Influences on Environment: Influence Monitoring, Adaptation and Mitigation, subproject No. 9: Torrential Floods Frequency, Soil and Water Degradation as the Consequence of Global Changes

  14. Suspended-sediment loads, reservoir sediment trap efficiency, and upstream and downstream channel stability for Kanopolis and Tuttle Creek Lakes, Kansas, 2008-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous streamflow and turbidity data collected from October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2010, at streamgage sites upstream and downstream from Kanopolis and Tuttle Creek Lakes, Kansas, were used to compute the total suspended-sediment load delivered to and released from each reservoir as well as the sediment trap efficiency for each reservoir. Ongoing sedimentation is decreasing the ability of the reservoirs to serve several purposes including flood control, water supply, and recreation. River channel stability upstream and downstream from the reservoirs was assessed using historical streamgage information. For Kanopolis Lake, the total 2-year inflow suspended-sediment load was computed to be 600 million pounds. Most of the suspended-sediment load was delivered during short-term, high-discharge periods. The total 2-year outflow suspended-sediment load was computed to be 31 million pounds. Sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir was estimated to be 95 percent. The mean annual suspended-sediment yield from the upstream basin was estimated to be 129,000 pounds per square mile per year. No pronounced changes in channel width were evident at five streamgage sites located upstream from the reservoir. At the Ellsworth streamgage site, located upstream from the reservoir, long-term channel-bed aggradation was followed by a period of stability. Current (2010) conditions at five streamgages located upstream from the reservoir were typified by channel-bed stability. At the Langley streamgage site, located immediately downstream from the reservoir, the channel bed degraded 6.15 feet from 1948 to 2010. For Tuttle Creek Lake, the total 2-year inflow suspended-sediment load was computed to be 13.3 billion pounds. Most of the suspended-sediment load was delivered during short-term, high-discharge periods. The total 2-year outflow suspended-sediment load was computed to be 327 million pounds. Sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir was estimated to be 98 percent. The mean

  15. Quantification of suspended sediment transfers in a lowland agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Blanes, Sebastien; Manière, Louis; Grangeon, Thomas; Cerdan, Olivier; Evrard, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Vandromme, Rosalie

    2017-04-01

    Lowland agricultural landscapes underwent important changes since the second half of the XXth century such as hedges removal, implementation of drainage systems, stream redesign and land reallocation. It resulted in changes in sediment transfer processes, and in widespread morphological alterations of water bodies. However, little is known about the sediment dynamics in these environments. The Louroux catchment (25 km2) is located in central France. It is a typical intensively cultivated and tile drained lowland catchment. The Xth century pond located at its outlet (52 ha) is undergoing large siltation, with a current sedimentation rate 60 fold higher than the pre-1950 period. Five monitoring stations, measuring water levels and turbidity at high frequency (15 mn and 1 mn respectively), combined with automatic samplers, were implemented in 2013. Three stations are located at the main tributaries outlets of the pond, one in a sub-catchment, and one at a tile drain outlet. 45 floods were observed during the three studied hydrological years. They occurred mostly between December and March (33 floods) and in May-June (8 floods). Specific sediment yields ranged from 0.02 to 0.38 t.ha-1.yr-1 depending on the monitoring site and the considered year. The vast majority of suspended sediment transfers occur during the winter floods. While large water volumes were also measured during spring floods, the sediment yields remained low. Suspended sediment yields present large inter-annual (ratio ranging between 2 and 6 depending on the monitoring station) and spatial variations, due to significant differences in total rainfall amounts during the winter season and variations in land use, respectively. The processes related to sediment transfers are most likely linked to soil saturation during winter despite the presence of a tile drainage network, with transfers occurring both at the soil surface and through the drainage system. While sediment transfer rates can be considered as

  16. How are River Discharge - Suspended Sediment Relations Influenced by Watershed and Channel-Floodplain Morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. A.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Erosion, transport and deposition of fine sediment (clay, silt and fine sand) influence the form and function of river systems. Excess suspended sediment degrades stream ecosystems and is implicated as a leading cause of water quality and aquatic life impairment. Consequently, understanding the factors that control fine sediment transport regimes is an interesting topic for basic science and one that has important management and policy implications. Fine sediment is mostly transported in suspension as a non-capacity load; transport rates are dependent on sediment supply in addition to a river's transport capacity. Many studies have investigated watershed-scale topographic, hydrologic, climatic, and land use influences on fine sediment erosion and transport regimes. Several recent studies in a wide range of landscapes have demonstrated that the majority of suspended sediment may be sourced from the near-channel environment; therefore, near-channel morphological characteristics may provide better predictive power compared to watershed averages. This study analyzes recent total suspended solids (TSS) data from 45 gages on 35 separate rivers. The rivers span the state of Minnesota, draining basins ranging from 33 km2 to 68100 km2 with distinct settings in terms of topography, land cover, hydrology and geologic history. We generate rating curves of the form TSS = aQb, where Q is normalized discharge and a and b are parameters that describe the shape of the relations. Values of a range from 4 to 138 mg/L; b values range from -0.53 to 1.86. We use high resolution lidar topography data to characterize the near-channel environment upstream of gages. In addition to commonly studied metrics describing the topographic, climatic/hydrologic and land use setting of the basin, we extract near-channel morphometrics that we hypothesize to influence fine sediment generation and transport: the difference in height of banks/bluffs (a measure of the amount of material available to be

  17. Aerial Photo Utilization in Estimating Suspended Sediment in the Wuryantoro Watershed, Wonogiri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiharto Budi Santoso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment load flowing out from a watershed is normally predicated by analysis os suspended sediment of water sample, and the volume of suspended sediment be calculated based on sediment concentration and river discharge. Such field measurements need a lot of field data and they are time consuming. Another method for prediction of suspended sediment by using remote sensing imagery data and recorded rainfall data. The objective of this research is to 1 examine the capability of remote sensing technique to obtain the parameters of the physical data of land in the prediction of suspended sediment; 2 examine the accuracy of the model for prediction suspended sediment. This research is carried out in Wuryantoro watershed, Wonogiri. The main data to obtain the parameters of the physical data of land is infrared aerial photograph on scale 1 : 10.000. the method that used in this research is interpretation of remote sensing imagery data, combined with rainfall data. The result show that the accuracy of landuse is 88.5%, the accuracy of slope is 87.67%. the accuracy of the prediction of suspended sediment by model A3 87.07%, model C1 86.63%, model C2 90.57%, model A8 84.13%, model A9 80.1%, and model C4 78.6%.

  18. Suspended-sediment loads and reservoir sediment trap efficiency for Clinton Lake, Kansas, 2010-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous streamflow and turbidity data collected from October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2012, at a site upstream and downstream from Clinton Lake, Kansas, were used to compute the total suspended-sediment load delivered to and released from the reservoir as well as the sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir. Ongoing sedimentation is inhibiting the ability of Clinton Lake to serve several purposes including flood control, water supply, and recreation. The inflow suspended-sediment load was substantially larger than the outflow load and most of the suspended-sediment load was delivered during short-term, high-discharge periods. Respectively, the total 2-year inflow and outflow suspended-sediment loads were computed to be 44.4 and 1.49 million pounds. Sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir was estimated to be 97 percent. The mean annual suspended-sediment yield from the upstream basin was estimated to be 60,500 pounds per square mile. Because this study was completed during a drought, the estimated inflow suspended-sediment load and suspended-sediment yield likely are substantially less than what would occur during a period of average or above average precipitation and runoff.

  19. Mucous Secretion and Cilia Beating Defend Developing Coral Larvae from Suspended Sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard F Ricardo

    Full Text Available Suspended sediments produced from dredging activities, or added to the sediment budget via river runoff, are a concern for marine resource managers. Understanding the impact of suspended sediments on critical life history stages of keystone species like corals is fundamental to effective management of coastlines and reefs. Coral embryos (Acropora tenuis and A. millepora and larvae (A. tenuis, A. millepora and Pocillopora acuta were subjected to a range of suspended sediment concentrations of different sediment types (siliciclastic and carbonate to assess concentration-response relationships on ecologically relevant endpoints, including survivorship and ability to metamorphose. Embryos were subjected to short (12 h suspended sediment exposures from ages of 3-12 hours old or a long (30 h exposure at 6 hours old. Neither the survivorship nor metamorphosis function of embryos were significantly affected by realistic sediment exposures to ~1000 mg L-1. However, some embryos exhibited a previously undescribed response to dynamically suspended sediments, which saw 10% of the embryos form negatively buoyant cocoons at siliciclastic suspended sediment concentrations ≥35 mg L-1. Scanning electron and optical microscopy confirmed the presence of a coating on these embryos, possibly mucus with incorporated sediment particles. Cocoon formation was common in embryos but not in larvae, and occurred more often after exposure to siliciclastic rather than carbonate sediments. Once transferred into sediment-free seawater, functional ~36-h-old embryos began emerging from the cocoons, coinciding with cilia development. Ciliated (> 36-h-old larvae exposed to suspended sediments for 60 h were also observed to secrete mucus and were similarly unaffected by suspended sediment concentrations to ~800 mg L-1. This study provides evidence that mucous secretion and cilia beating effectively protect coral embryos and larvae from suspended sediment and that these mechanisms

  20. Trace Elemental Analyses of Suspended Sediments in the San Francisco Estuary and its Tidal Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud-Roam, F. P.; Ingram, B. L.; Yang, W.; Collins, J.

    2004-12-01

    This research evaluates the trace elemental compositions of inorganic sediments in the San Francisco Bay estuary marshes over space and time. These sediments create and maintain the tidal marshes that surround the Sand Francisco Bay, yet a thorough analysis of the sources of these sediments remains understudied. Determining the sources of sediments is of interest because current mitigation and restoration projects around the Bay must consider whether the sediment supply will be sufficient for projects, or if opening diked wetlands to tidal flow will result in salt water intrusion further up-estuary (into the Delta). Results of trace element analyses of suspended sediments that pass through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta) are compared with those of local watershed tributaries. Differences in bedrock lithology can be seen in the varying trace elemental concentrations; for example, K, Nd, Sm, Rb and Sr concentrations are significantly lower in the Sacramento river sediments than those of the San Joaquin river and can be used to differentiate further the Delta input. Results from marsh surface samples throughout the North Bay and preliminary results from 4 1-m long sediment cores collected along a transect of the Novato creek marsh (NCM) reflect local versus Delta sediment source patterns. The suspended sediment samples from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and from local creeks reflect the end members of the sediment supply for local marshes. The marsh surface samples represent the most recent period (last few years or so) and reflect the extent of Delta influence into the estuary. Finally, the cores collected from the Novato creek marsh provide details on the gradient of dominant source supply (i.e., are the sediments well inland predominantly from the local watershed and how far does that influence extend downstream), as well as a history of how the sediment supply conditions have changed, comparing pre-Gold Rush and agriculture era (before about

  1. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotope signature as tracers of the sources of suspended sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Liechti, R.; Alewell, C.

    2012-06-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by affecting the health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase of pasture and arable land downstream of the river. The mean fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment decreased from up to downstream and increased during high flow at all measuring sites along the course of the river. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture, forest and arable land. The latter increased during rainy and warmer winter periods, most likely because both triggered snow melt and thus erosion. The measured increase in DOC and nitrate concentrations during high flow support these modeling results. Enhanced soil erosion processes on pasture and arable land are expected with increasing heavy rain events and less snow during winter seasons due to climate change. Consequently, SS and organic matter in the river will increase, which will possibly affect brown trout negatively.

  2. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediment Over Gulf of Martaban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matamin Abd Rahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gulf of Martaban is located at the north of Andaman, and is one of the world most turbid areas. The presence of suspended sediment concentration (SSC in the water body could reduce the underwater transmittance. This study has been conducted to investigate the variation of SSC over the Gulf of Martaban. Remote sensing reflectance (Rrs of 667 nm is used as a proxy to represent the sediment SSC variation over the study area. The data for the period of July 2002 to March 2014 acquired from MODIS Aqua 4 km resolution are used in this study. As a result, there is no obvious yearly variation in the SSC cover area. The SSC variation over this study area is found to be seasonal. High homogenous SSC covers area observably during the northeast (NE monsoon season that occurs from December to January. The sediment cover area could reach the latitude of 15°N that located at the south of the gulf. During southwest (SW monsoon season that occurs from May to September, low and sparse SSC cover area is observed. As a consequence, the area covered by the SSC is higher during the NE monsoon season as compared to the SW monsoon season. Hence, the SSC cover area during the NE monsoon season is greater than the yearly averaged SSC cover area. Meanwhile the SSC cover area during the rainy SW monsoon season is less than the yearly and NE monsoon season.

  3. Determining annual suspended sediment and sediment-associated trace element and nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Suspended sediment is a major factor in the biological and geochemical cycling of trace elements and nutrients in aquatic systems. The design of effective studies involving the collection, processing, and subsequent chemical analysis of suspended sediment requires a clear understanding of the problems associated with using this sample medium. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge relative to the various issues/problems associated with the collection of representative suspended sediment samples in fluvial systems. It also addresses issues associated with accurately determining the concentrations and fluxes of sediment-associated trace elements and nutrients.

  4. Characterization of Suspended-Sediment Loading to and from John Redmond Reservoir, East-Central Kansas, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Casey J.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Storage capacity in John Redmond Reservoir is being lost to sedimentation more rapidly than in other federal impoundments in Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, initiated a study to characterize suspended-sediment loading to and from John Redmond Reservoir from February 21, 2007, through February 21, 2008. Turbidity sensors were installed at two U.S. Geological Survey stream gages upstream (Neosho River near Americus and the Cottonwood River near Plymouth) and one stream gage downstream (Neosho River at Burlington) from the reservoir to compute continuous, real-time (15-minute) measurements of suspended-sediment concentration and loading. About 1,120,000 tons of suspended-sediment were transported to, and 100,700 tons were transported from John Redmond Reservoir during the study period. Dependent on the bulk density of sediment stored in the reservoir, 5.0 to 1.4 percent of the storage in the John Redmond conservation pool was lost during the study period, with an average deposition of 3.4 to 1.0 inches. Nearly all (98-99 percent) of the incoming sediment load was transported during 9 storms which occurred 25 to 27 percent of the time. The largest storm during the study period (peak-flow recurrence interval of about 4.6-4.9 years) transported about 37 percent of the sediment load to the reservoir. Suspended-sediment yield from the unregulated drainage area upstream from the Neosho River near Americus was 530 tons per square mile, compared to 400 tons per square mile upstream from the Cottonwood River near Plymouth. Comparison of historical (1964-78) to current (2007) sediment loading estimates indicate statistically insignificant (99 percent) decrease in sediment loading at the Neosho River at Burlington. Ninety-percent confidence intervals of streamflow-derived estimates of total sediment load were 7 to 21 times larger than turbidity-derived estimates. Results from this study can be used by natural resource

  5. Numerical modeling of suspended sediment tansfers at the catchment scale with TELEMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Florent; Antoine, Germain; Delestre, Olivier; Goutal, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    Water equations. The numerical scheme developed by Chen and Noelle (2015) appears to be the best compromise between robustness and accuracy. The sediment transport module SISYPHE of TELEMAC-MASCARET is also used for simulating suspended sediment transport and erosion in this configuration. Then, an application to a real, well-documented watershed is performed. With a total area of 86.4 ha, the Laval watershed is located in the Southern French Alps. It takes part of the Draix-Bleone Observatory, on which 30 years of collected data are available. On this site, several rainfall events have been simulated using high performance clusters and parallelized computation methods. The results show a good robustness and accuracy of the chosen numerical schemes for hydraulic and sediment transport. Furthermore, a good agreement with measured data is obtain if an infiltration model is added to the Shallow Water equations. This study gives promising perspectives for simulating sediment transfers at the catchment scale with a physically based approach. G. Chen et S. Noelle: A new hydrostatic reconstruction scheme motivated by the wet-dry front. 2015. G. Kirstetter et al: Modeling rain-driven overland fow: empirical versus analytical friction terms in the shallow water approximation. Journal of Hydrology, 2015.

  6. Response of suspended sediment concentration to tidal dynamics at a site inside the mouth of an inlet: Jiaozhou Bay (China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of fair weather currents and suspended sediment concentrations (SSC were made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler and two YSI turbidity sensors over a neap to spring time cycle at a site near the inner mouth of a semi-enclosed mesotidal-macrotidal embayment (Jiaozhou Bay to examine the influence of tidal dynamics on concentration and transport of suspended sediment. During the investigation, SSC varied from about 3 to 16 mg L–1 at the surface and about 6 to 40 mg L–1 close to the bed, while the current velocity reached 79 cm s–1 at the surface and 61 cm s–1 near the bed. SSC was tidally cyclic. The near-bed instantaneous SSC was closely related to current velocity with almost no time lag, indicating that the variability of SSC was governed by current-induced settling/resuspension. At the surface, however, instantaneous SSC was poorly related to instantaneous current velocity because the peak SSC tended to occur around ebb slack water. This suggests that the surface SSC was controlled by horizontal advection from landward higher concentration areas. Both at the surface and near the bed, on the other hand, tidally-averaged SSC was well correlated to tidal range and current speed. Current velocity and SSC were flood-dominated for all the tides investigated, which resulted in significant landward residual suspended sediment transport at the study site. The observed flood dominance was mainly attributed to the location of the study site on the landward side of the bay’s inlet where flow separation is favoured during flood tide. It was concluded that tides are the dominant hydrodynamic component controlling the variability of SSC during fair weather at the study area. Keywords: sediment, concentration, suspension, advection, currents, shoalling effect, Jiaozhou Bay, China

  7. Particulate flux calculation based on metal contents and suspended sediment concentrations relationship: case study of turbid alpine river (Isere, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutordoir, Solene; Nemery, Julien; Guedron, Stéphane; Arnaud, Jérémy; Minaudo, Camille; Belleudy, Philippe; Landas-Maneval, Jacqueline; Rivière, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the context of increasing stress on aquatic environment, the improvement of pollutant flux quantification in large rivers presents a strong stake. Isere at Grenoble city (5570 km2) is an alpine river in the Northern French Alps with high suspended sediment transport reaching 10 to 20 g L-1 during floods. It is known that for elements like P, Ni, Mn, Cr, Pb, Fe et Al, most of river transport is done under particulate forms. Isere River is susceptible to transport particulate pollutants such as metals, given mining history and industrial activities at the upstream watershed. Moreover, this river receives Grenoble city's effluents (500 000 inhabitants) and stormwaters during rain events. Three metals (Hg, Ni, Pb) identified as priority substances regarding European Water Framework Directive and As known to be one of the most metal of concern were chosen in this study. High frequency samplings of suspended sediments were realized between 2011 and 2012 in order to evaluate the temporal variation of metals contents and to determine geochemical background during high flow periods. In the same sampling site (situated upstream urban effluents of Grenoble city), discharge and suspended sediment concentration by turbidity were measured at 30 min frequency by a monitoring station. The use of historical and new databases ranging between low and high discharge (10 years return flood) allowed determining relationships between metal contents and suspended sediment concentrations and discharges. Results show a good correlation for the studied metals and permit to defined the geochemical backgrounds for each metals measured above 0.5 g L-1, (Hg = 68 +/- 48 ng g-1, Ni = 30 +/- 10 mg g-1, Pb = 43 +/-13 mg g-1, As = 15 +/- 4 mg g-1). These models were validated on a separated period than the one used for the calibration and applied to calculate particulate metals concentrations and associated incertitude at 30 min frequency using SSC and discharge database. Cumulative 30 minutes

  8. Field evaluation of the error arising from inadequate time averaging in the standard use of depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Wright, Scott A.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Several common methods for measuring suspended-sediment concentration in rivers in the United States use depth-integrating samplers to collect a velocity-weighted suspended-sediment sample in a subsample of a river cross section. Because depth-integrating samplers are always moving through the water column as they collect a sample, and can collect only a limited volume of water and suspended sediment, they collect only minimally time-averaged data. Four sources of error exist in the field use of these samplers: (1) bed contamination, (2) pressure-driven inrush, (3) inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration, and (4) inadequate time averaging. The first two of these errors arise from misuse of suspended-sediment samplers, and the third has been the subject of previous study using data collected in the sand-bedded Middle Loup River in Nebraska. Of these four sources of error, the least understood source of error arises from the fact that depth-integrating samplers collect only minimally time-averaged data. To evaluate this fourth source of error, we collected suspended-sediment data between 1995 and 2007 at four sites on the Colorado River in Utah and Arizona, using a P-61 suspended-sediment sampler deployed in both point- and one-way depth-integrating modes, and D-96-A1 and D-77 bag-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers. These data indicate that the minimal duration of time averaging during standard field operation of depth-integrating samplers leads to an error that is comparable in magnitude to that arising from inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration. This random error arising from inadequate time averaging is positively correlated with grain size and does not largely depend on flow conditions or, for a given size class of suspended sediment, on elevation above the bed. Averaging over time scales >1 minute is the likely minimum duration required

  9. Continuous-flow centrifugation to collect suspended sediment for chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Black, Robert W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Foreman, James R.; Senter, Craig A.; Peterson, Norman T.

    2016-12-22

    Recent advances in suspended-sediment monitoring tools and surrogate technologies have greatly improved the ability to quantify suspended-sediment concentrations and to estimate daily, seasonal, and annual suspended-sediment fluxes from rivers to coastal waters. However, little is known about the chemical composition of suspended sediment, and how it may vary spatially between water bodies and temporally within a single system owing to climate, seasonality, land use, and other natural and anthropogenic drivers. Many water-quality contaminants, such as organic and inorganic chemicals, nutrients, and pathogens, preferentially partition in sediment rather than water. Suspended sediment-bound chemical concentrations may be undetected during analysis of unfiltered water samples, owing to small water sample volumes and analytical limitations. Quantification of suspended sediment‑bound chemical concentrations is needed to improve estimates of total chemical concentrations, chemical fluxes, and exposure levels of aquatic organisms and humans in receiving environments. Despite these needs, few studies or monitoring programs measure the chemical composition of suspended sediment, largely owing to the difficulty in consistently obtaining samples of sufficient quality and quantity for laboratory analysis.A field protocol is described here utilizing continuous‑flow centrifugation for the collection of suspended sediment for chemical analysis. The centrifuge used for development of this method is small, lightweight, and portable for the field applications described in this protocol. Project scoping considerations, deployment of equipment and system layout options, and results from various field and laboratory quality control experiments are described. The testing confirmed the applicability of the protocol for the determination of many inorganic and organic chemicals sorbed on suspended sediment, including metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and

  10. Recent Trends in Suspended Sediment Load & Water Quality in the Upper Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, L. A.; Ackleson, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    The Chesapeake Bay spans several major cities on the US east coast and drains a large watershed (164,200 km2) to the Atlantic Ocean. Upstream deforestation and agriculture have led to a major decline in water quality (increased sediment and nutrient load) of the Bay over the past century. Sediment flux into the Chesapeake Bay is a natural process, but has become an environmental concern as land use changes have exacerbated natural suspended sediment loads and saturated the capacity of the estuary to filter and remove sediments. In situ measurements of suspended sediments and surface reflectance from the Potomac, Patapsco, and Severn River were used to develop algorithms that convert surface reflectance from Landsat (1-3, 4-5, 7, 8) imagery to suspended sediment concentration for the entire Chesapeake Bay. A unique time series of suspended sediment load in the Chesapeake Bay was compiled from Landsat imagery dating from 1977-2015. Particular focus is given to the upper Chesapeake Bay near Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD to understand urban effects. In particular, the Potomac, Patapsco, and Severn River are examined from both remote sensing and in situ measurements. Landsat imagery combined with in situ monitoring provides environmental scientists and resource managers with detailed trends in sediment distribution and concentration, a key measure of water quality. Trends of suspended sediment load in several rivers and the upper Chesapeake Bay will be presented, along with a discussion of suspended sediment algorithms for Landsat imagery. Advantages of Landsat 8 (improved signal-to-noise performance and more bands) versus previous sensors will be examined for suspended sediment applications.

  11. Effects of cadmium accumulation from suspended sediments and phytoplankton on the Oyster Saccostrea glomerata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Helena A.; Maher, William A., E-mail: bill.maher@canberra.edu.au; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Saccostrea glomerata accumulated cadmium from sediments and phytoplankton. • Effects were similar for both pathways. • Antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation and lysosomal destabilisation were affected. • Clear exposure–dose–response relationships were demonstrated. - Abstract: Metals are accumulated by filter feeding organisms via water, ingestion of suspended sediments or food. The uptake pathway can affect metal toxicity. Saccostrea glomerata were exposed to cadmium through cadmium-spiked suspended sediments (19 and 93 μg/g dry mass) and cadmium-enriched phytoplankton (1.6–3 μg/g dry mass) and cadmium uptake and effects measured. Oysters accumulated appreciable amounts of cadmium from both low and high cadmium spiked suspended sediment treatments (5.9 ± 0.4 μg/g and 23 ± 2 μg/g respectively compared to controls 0.97 ± 0.05 μg/g dry mass). Only a small amount of cadmium was accumulated by ingestion of cadmium-enriched phytoplankton (1.9 ± 0.1 μg/g compared to controls 1.2 ± 0.1 μg/g). In the cadmium spiked suspended sediment experiments, most cadmium was desorbed from sediments and cadmium concentrations in S. glomerata were significantly related to dissolved cadmium concentrations (4–21 μg/L) in the overlying water. In the phytoplankton feeding experiment cadmium concentrations in overlying water were <0.01 μg/L. In both exposure experiments, cadmium-exposed oysters showed a significant reduction in total antioxidant capacity and significantly increased lipid peroxidation and percentage of destabilised lysosomes. Destabilised lysosomes in the suspended sediments experiments also resulted from stress of exposure to the suspended sediments. The study demonstrated that exposure to cadmium via suspended sediments and to low concentrations of cadmium through the ingestion of phytoplankton, can cause sublethal stress to S. glomerata.

  12. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, and transports harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011 indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in the driftless region of southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. During the 2011 spring runoff, the single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis- St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been determined to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. Because of this, the MPCA was interested in quantifying the differences between SSC and TSS in different parts of the State. Comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. The largest percent difference between SSC and TSS was measured at the South Branch Buffalo River at Sabin, and the smallest difference was observed at the Des Moines

  13. Plume front and suspended sediment dispersal off the Yangtze (Changjiang) River mouth, China during non-flood season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanghua; Li, Luqian; Chen, Dechao; Xu, Kaiqin; Wei, Taoyuan; Gao, Jianhua; Zhao, Yiwen; Chen, Zhongyuan; Masabate, Watanabe

    2007-01-01

    A sea survey was conducted in May 2001 using CTD together with direct-reading current meter and water sampling to investigate the sediment dynamics off the Yangtze River mouth. Data obtained from five observational sites reveal density flows characterized by the halocline, thermocline and associated sharp current velocity gradients that prevail in the study area, especially at the freshwater plume front. The interaction of the Yangtze freshwater plume, littoral current and tidal current has generated these density flows. Particularly, the anomalous high speed (>140 cm s -1) current recorded at the freshwater plume front during the early flood stage leads to the resuspension of the sediment (SSC reaching 0.5 g l -1) off the river mouth during that time period. The suspended sediment flux measured at B2, the ideal site for recording frontal processes in the estuary, indicates the main trend of southward transport of fine-grained sediment up to 60 kg m -2 s -1 at early flood stage and 1.32 kg m -2 s -1 as net flux during two tidal periods. It is inferred that the density flow at the plume front plays key roles in dispersing the Yangtze fine suspended sediments southward during the non-flood season.

  14. Physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size using multi-frequency arrays of acoustic-doppler profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2014-01-01

    As the result of a 12-year program of sediment-transport research and field testing on the Colorado River (6 stations in UT and AZ), Yampa River (2 stations in CO), Little Snake River (1 station in CO), Green River (1 station in CO and 2 stations in UT), and Rio Grande (2 stations in TX), we have developed a physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size at 15-minute intervals using multifrequency arrays of acoustic-Doppler profilers. This multi-frequency method is able to achieve much higher accuracies than single-frequency acoustic methods because it allows removal of the influence of changes in grain size on acoustic backscatter. The method proceeds as follows. (1) Acoustic attenuation at each frequency is related to the concentration of silt and clay with a known grain-size distribution in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (2) The combination of acoustic backscatter and attenuation at each frequency is uniquely related to the concentration of sand (with a known reference grain-size distribution) and the concentration of silt and clay (with a known reference grain-size distribution) in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (3) Comparison of the suspended-sand concentrations measured at each frequency using this approach then allows theory-based calculation of the median grain size of the suspended sand and final correction of the suspended-sand concentration to compensate for the influence of changing grain size on backscatter. Although this method of measuring suspended-sediment concentration is somewhat less accurate than using conventional samplers in either the EDI or EWI methods, it is much more accurate than estimating suspended-sediment concentrations using calibrated pump measurements or single-frequency acoustics. Though the EDI and EWI methods provide the most accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration, these measurements are labor-intensive, expensive, and

  15. Interaction between suspended sediment and tidal amplification in the Guadalquivir Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng Bing; Winterwerp, Johan C.; He, Qing

    2014-10-01

    Water level records at two stations in the Guadalquivir Estuary (Spain), one near the estuary mouth (Bonanza) and one about 77 km upstream (Sevilla), have been analysed to study the amplification of the tide in the estuary. The tidal amplification factor shows interesting temporal variation, including a spring-neap variation, some extreme low values, and especially the anomalous behaviour that the amplification factor is larger during a number of periods. These variations are explained by data analysis combined with numerical and analytical modelling. The spring-neap variation is due to the quadratic relation between the bottom friction and the tidal flow velocity. The river flood events are the direct causes of the extreme low values of the amplification factor, and they trigger the non-linear interaction between the tidal flow and suspended sediment transport. The fluvial sediment input during a river flood causes high sediment concentration in the estuary, up to more than 10 g/l. This causes a reduction of the effective hydraulic drag, resulting in stronger tidal amplification in the estuary for a period after a river flood. After such an event the tidal amplification in the estuary does not always fall back to the same level as before the event, indicating that river flood events have significant influence on the long-term development of this estuary.

  16. Parameterization of Time-Averaged Suspended Sediment Concentration in the Nearshore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Doug Yoon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the effect of wave breaking turbulence on sediment transport in the nearshore, the vertical distribution of time-averaged suspended sediment concentration (SSC in the surf zone was parameterized in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE at different cross-shore locations, including the bar crest, bar trough, and inner surf zone. Using data from a large-scale laboratory experiment, a simple relationship was developed between the time-averaged SSC and the time-averaged TKE. The vertical variation of the time-averaged SSC was fitted to an equation analogous to the turbulent dissipation rate term. At the bar crest, the proposed equation was slightly modified to incorporate the effect of near-bed sediment processes and yielded reasonable agreement. This parameterization yielded the best agreement at the bar trough, with a coefficient of determination R2 ≥ 0.72 above the bottom boundary layer. The time-averaged SSC in the inner surf zone showed good agreement near the bed but poor agreement near the water surface, suggesting that there is a different sedimentation mechanism that controls the SSC in the inner surf zone.

  17. Evaluating external nutrient and suspended-sediment loads to Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, using surrogate regressions with real-time turbidity and acoustic backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Liam N.; Anderson, Chauncey W.; Diaz, Paul; Stewart, Marc A.

    2016-12-22

    Executive SummarySuspended-sediment and total phosphorus loads were computed for two sites in the Upper Klamath Basin on the Wood and Williamson Rivers, the two main tributaries to Upper Klamath Lake. High temporal resolution turbidity and acoustic backscatter data were used to develop surrogate regression models to compute instantaneous concentrations and loads on these rivers. Regression models for the Williamson River site showed strong correlations of turbidity with total phosphorus and suspended-sediment concentrations (adjusted coefficients of determination [Adj R2]=0.73 and 0.95, respectively). Regression models for the Wood River site had relatively poor, although statistically significant, relations of turbidity with total phosphorus, and turbidity and acoustic backscatter with suspended sediment concentration, with high prediction uncertainty. Total phosphorus loads for the partial 2014 water year (excluding October and November 2013) were 39 and 28 metric tons for the Williamson and Wood Rivers, respectively. These values are within the low range of phosphorus loads computed for these rivers from prior studies using water-quality data collected by the Klamath Tribes. The 2014 partial year total phosphorus loads on the Williamson and Wood Rivers are assumed to be biased low because of the absence of data from the first 2 months of water year 2014, and the drought conditions that were prevalent during that water year. Therefore, total phosphorus and suspended-sediment loads in this report should be considered as representative of a low-water year for the two study sites. Comparing loads from the Williamson and Wood River monitoring sites for November 2013–September 2014 shows that the Williamson and Sprague Rivers combined, as measured at the Williamson River site, contributed substantially more suspended sediment to Upper Klamath Lake than the Wood River, with 4,360 and 1,450 metric tons measured, respectively.Surrogate techniques have proven useful at

  18. Recent changes of suspended sediment yields in the Upper Yangtze River and its headwater tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Long, Y.; He, X.; Wen, A.

    2015-03-01

    Suspended sediment yields in the Upper Yangtze River and its four headwater tributaries (i.e. Jinsha, Min, Jialing and Wu) have declined significantly during recent decades. Compared with 1956-1970, mean annual suspended sediment yield during 2001-2011 was reduced by 84% in the Upper Yangtze River at Yichang, by 34% in the Jinsha at Pingshan, by 84% in the Jialing at Beibei, by 75% in the Wu at Wulong, and by 48% in the Min at Gaochang. Linking these observed decadal changes of runoff discharge and suspended sediment load to dam construction and multiple environmental rehabilitation projects (e.g. soil-water conservation, reforestation) during the past decades, it can be concluded that the construction of large dams on the main stem and major tributaries of the Upper Yangtze River has played a principal role in the reduction of fluvial suspended sediment yields, while the environment rehabilitation projects may make limited contributions to the changes in suspended sediment yields, except for the Jialing River.

  19. Recent changes of suspended sediment yields in the Upper Yangtze River and its headwater tributaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment yields in the Upper Yangtze River and its four headwater tributaries (i.e. Jinsha, Min, Jialing and Wu have declined significantly during recent decades. Compared with 1956–1970, mean annual suspended sediment yield during 2001–2011 was reduced by 84% in the Upper Yangtze River at Yichang, by 34% in the Jinsha at Pingshan, by 84% in the Jialing at Beibei, by 75% in the Wu at Wulong, and by 48% in the Min at Gaochang. Linking these observed decadal changes of runoff discharge and suspended sediment load to dam construction and multiple environmental rehabilitation projects (e.g. soil-water conservation, reforestation during the past decades, it can be concluded that the construction of large dams on the main stem and major tributaries of the Upper Yangtze River has played a principal role in the reduction of fluvial suspended sediment yields, while the environment rehabilitation projects may make limited contributions to the changes in suspended sediment yields, except for the Jialing River.

  20. Simulation of streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, South Texas, 1958-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District, City of Corpus Christi, Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, San Antonio River Authority, and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program ? FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2008 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in South Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-07 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations, Nueces River near Mathis, Nueces River at Bluntzer, and Nueces River at Calallen. The Nueces River near Mathis station is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River from downstream of the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at a site near the Nueces River at Mathis station were considerably lower, for a given annual mean discharge, after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed. Most of the suspended sediment transported by the Nueces River downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam occurred during high-flow releases from the dam or during floods. During October 1964-September 1971, about 532,000 tons of suspended sediment were transported by the Nueces River near Mathis. Of this amount, about 473,000 tons, or about 89 percent, were transported by large runoff events (mean streamflow exceeding 1,000 cubic feet per second). To develop the watershed model to simulate suspended-sediment

  1. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotope signature as tracers of the sources of suspended sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Schindler Wildhaber

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment (SS and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by affecting the health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C, and nitrogen (N during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase of pasture and arable land downstream of the river. The mean fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment decreased from up to downstream and increased during high flow at all measuring sites along the course of the river. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture, forest and arable land. The latter increased during rainy and warmer winter periods, most likely because both triggered snow melt and thus erosion. The measured increase in DOC and nitrate concentrations during high flow support these modeling results. Enhanced soil erosion processes on pasture and arable land are expected with increasing heavy rain events and less snow during winter seasons due to climate change. Consequently, SS and organic

  2. Monitoring suspended sediments and turbidity in Sahelian basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Elodie; Grippa, Manuela; Kergoat, Laurent; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Pinet, Sylvain; Nogmana, Soumaguel

    2017-04-01

    Suspended matter can carry viruses and bacteria that are pathogenic to humans and can foster their development. Therefore, turbidity can be considered a vector of microbiological contaminants, which cause diarrheal diseases, and it can be used as a proxy for fecal bacteria. Few studies have focused on water turbidity in rural Africa, where many cases of intestinal parasitic infections are due to the consumption of unsafe water from ponds, reservoirs, lakes and rivers. Diarrheal diseases are indeed the second cause of infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Furthermore, in this region, environment survey is minimal or inexistent. Monitoring water turbidity therefore represents a challenge for health improvement. Turbidity refers to the optical properties of water and it is well suited to monitoring by remote sensing. Because it varies in space and time and because the small water bodies (remote sensing and questions the methods developed for less turbid waters. In addition, high aerosol loadings (mineral dust and biomass burning) may be detrimental to turbidity retrieval in this region because of inaccurate atmospheric corrections. We propose a method to monitor water quality of Sahelian ponds, lakes and rivers using in-situ and remote sensing data, which is tested at different sites for which in-situ water turbidity and suspended sediments concentration (SSSC) measurements are acquired. Water sample are routinely collected at two sites within the AMMA-CATCH observatory part of the Réseau de Bassin Versants (RBV) French network: the Agoufou pond in northern Mali (starting September 2014), and the Niger River at Niamey in Niger (starting June 2015). These data are used to evaluate different indexes to derive water turbidity from the reflectance in the visible and infrared bands of high resolution optical sensors (LANDSAT, SENTINEL2). The temporal evolution of the turbidity of ponds, lakes and rivers is well captured at the seasonal and interannual scales with the

  3. A depth integrated model for suspended transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galappatti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new depth averaged model for suspended sediment transport in open channels has been developed based on an asymptotic solution to the two dimensional convection-diffusion equation in the vertical plane. The solution for the depth averaged concentration is derived from the bed boundary condition and

  4. Field calibration of optical sensors for measuring suspended sediment concentration in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guillén

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The water turbidity measured with optical methods (transmittance and backscattering is usually expressed as beam attenuation coefficient (BAC or formazin turbidity units (FTU. The transformation of these units to volumetric suspended sediment concentration (SSC units is not straightforward, and accurate calibrations are required in order to obtain valuable information on suspended sediment distributions and fluxes. In this paper, data from field calibrations between BAC, FTU and SSC are presented and best-fit calibration curves are shown. These calibrations represent an average from different marine environments of the western Mediterranean (from estuary to continental slope. However, the general curves can only be applied for descriptive or semi-quantitative purposes. Comparison of turbidity measurements using the same sensor with different calibration ranges shows the advantage of simultaneously combining two instruments calibrated in different ranges when significant changes in suspended sediment concentrations are expected.

  5. Estuarine Suspended Sediment Dynamics: Observations Derived from over a Decade of Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Reisinger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment dynamics of Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, a shallow-water wind-driven estuary, were investigated by combining field and satellite measurements of total suspended solids (TSS. An algorithm was developed to transform 500-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua satellite reflectance data into estimated TSS values. The algorithm was developed using a reflectance ratio regression of MODIS Band 1 (red and Band 3 (green with TSS measurements (n = 54 collected by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for Corpus Christi Bay and other Texas estuaries. The algorithm was validated by independently collected TSS measurements during the period of 2011–2014 with an uncertainty estimate of 13%. The algorithm was applied to the period of 2002–2014 to create a synoptic time series of TSS for Corpus Christi Bay. Potential drivers of long-term variability in suspended sediment were investigated. Median and IQR composites of suspended sediments were generated for seasonal wind regimes. From this analysis it was determined that long-term, spatial patterns of suspended sediment in the estuary are related to wind-wave resuspension during the predominant northerly and prevalent southeasterly seasonal wind regimes. The impact of dredging is also apparent in long-term patterns of Corpus Christi Bay as concentrations of suspended sediments over dredge spoil disposal sites are higher and more variable than surrounding areas, which is most likely due to their less consolidated sediments and shallower depths requiring less wave energy for sediment resuspension. This study highlights the advantage of how long-synoptic time series of TSS can be used to elucidate the major drivers of suspended sediments in estuaries.

  6. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers – Theory, evaluation, and results from 14 stations on five rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a physically based method for using two acoustic frequencies to measure suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended-sand median grain size in river cross sections at 15-minute intervals over decadal timescales. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the scattering of sound by suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of the specific theoretical relations among acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We briefly describe the theory and methods, demonstrate the application of the method, and compute biases and errors in the method at 14 stations in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustical measurements over many years. Quantification of errors in sediment-transport measurements made using this method is essential if the measurements are to be used effectively, e.g., to evaluate uncertainty in long-term sediment loads and budgets

  7. Linking hysteresis patterns and variations in suspended sediment sources in a highly urbanized river: a case of the River Aire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Kim; Grabowski, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The natural sediment balance of rivers is often disturbed as a result of increased fine sediment influx from soil erosion and/or modifications to the river channel and floodplains, causing numerous problems related to ecology, water quality, flood risk and infrastructure. It is of great importance to understand fine sediment dynamics in rivers in order to manage the problems appropriately. However, despite decades of research, our understanding of fine sediment transport is not yet sufficient to fully explain the spatial and temporal variability in sediment concentrations in rivers. To this end, the study aims to investigate the importance of sediment source variations to explain hysteresis patterns in suspended sediment transport. A sediment fingerprinting technique based on infrared spectrometry was applied in the highly urbanized River Aire catchment in northern England to identify the dominant sources of suspended sediment. Three types of potential sediment source samples were collected: soil samples from pasture in three lithological areas (limestone, millstone grit and coal measures), eroding riverbanks and urban street dust. All source samples were analyzed with Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectrometry (DRIFTS). Discriminant analysis demonstrated that the source materials could be discriminated based on their respective infrared spectra. Infrared spectra of experimental mixtures were then used to develop statistical models to estimate relative source contributions from suspended sediment samples. Suspended sediment samples were collected during a set of high flow events between 2015 and 2016, showing different hysteresis patterns between suspended sediment concentration and discharge. The fingerprinting results suggest that pasture from the limestone area is the dominant source of fine sediment. However, significant variations in source contributions during and between events are present. Small events, in terms of discharge, are marked by

  8. Suspended-sediment concentrations, yields, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, as well as transporting harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples were collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011. Analyses of these data indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. The single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River during the 2011 spring runoff. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been known to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. For this study, comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. Regression analysis indicated that 7 out of 14 sites had poor or no relation between SSC and streamflow. Only two sites, the Knife River and the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, had strong correlations between SSC and streamflow, with coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.82 and 0.80, respectively. In contrast, turbidity had moderate to strong

  9. Characteristics of sediment data and annual suspended-sediment loads and yields for selected lower Missouri River mainstem and tributary stations, 1976-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, David C.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Cline, Teri L.; Pigue, Lori M.; Wagner, Holly R.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended-sediment data from 18 selected surface-water monitoring stations in the lower Missouri River Basin downstream from Gavins Point Dam were used in the computation of annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads for 1976 through 2008. Three methods of suspended-sediment load determination were utilized and these included the subdivision method, regression of instantaneous turbidity with suspended-sediment concentrations at selected stations, and regression techniques using the Load Estimator (LOADEST) software. Characteristics of the suspended-sediment and streamflow data collected at the 18 monitoring stations and the tabulated annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads and yields are presented.

  10. Modeling nearshore dispersal of river-derived multi-class suspended sediments and radionuclides during a flood event around the mouth of Niida River, Fukushima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Tsumune, D.; Misumi, K.; Onda, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A quadruple nested synoptic oceanic downscale modeling based on ROMS was carried out to investigate hydrodynamics, multi-class non-cohesive sediment transport and associated dispersal of suspended radionuclides (cesium-137; 137Cs) originated from the nuclear accident occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Power Plant in March 2011. The innermost model has horizontal grid resolution of 50 m to marginally resolve the topography around the river mouth including the surf zone. The model is forced by the JCOPE2 oceanic reanalysis as the outermost boundary conditions, the GPV-MSM atmospheric reanalysis, and an in-house SWAN spectral wave hindcast embedded in the operational GPV-CWM wave reanalysis. A particular attention is paid to nearshore behaviors and inventory of the nuclides attached to terrestrial minerals with grain sizes ranging from 5 to 79 micrometers that have been occasionally discharged out to the coastal ocean through hydrological processes within the river basin even after several years since the accident. We examine oceanic dispersal of sediment and suspended 137Cs influxes from Niida River, Fukushima, evaluated with the iRIC-Nays2DH river model. Our focus is on the first flood event in late May of 2011 after the accident. Alongshore asymmetry in transport of suspended sediments and 137Cs is exhibited, comprising storm-driven southward transport confined in the shallow area due to shoreward Ekman transport associated with strong northerly wind, followed by northwestward wide-spread transport under mild southerly wind condition. About 70 % of the Niida River-derived suspended 137Cs remains near the mouth for 20 days after the flood event. Nevertheless, our model results as well as an observation suggest that the area is dominated by erosion as for high bed shear stress all the time, thus suspended radionuclides are redistributed to dissipate away in long term.

  11. Discharge, suspended sediment, bedload, and water quality in Clear Creek, western Nevada, water years 2010-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Jena M.; Savard, Charles S.

    2015-09-30

    Clear Creek is a small stream that drains the eastern Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe, flows roughly parallel to the U.S. Highway 50 corridor, and discharges to the Carson River near Carson City, Nevada. Historical and ongoing development in the drainage basin is thought to be affecting Clear Creek and its sediment-transport characteristics. A baseline study from water years 2004–07 collected and evaluated data at three Clear Creek sampling sites. These data included discharge, selected water-quality parameters, and suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, and yields. This study builds on what was learned from the baseline study in water years 2004–07 and serves as a continuation of the data collection and analyses of the Clear Creek discharge regime and associated water-quality and sediment concentrations and loads during water years 2010–12.

  12. Suspended-sediment loads in the lower Stillaguamish River, Snohomish County, Washington, 2014–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scott A.; Curran, Christopher A.; Grossman, Eric E.

    2017-08-03

    Continuous records of discharge and turbidity at a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage in the lower Stillaguamish River were paired with discrete measurements of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in order to estimate suspended-sediment loads over the water years 2014 and 2015. First, relations between turbidity and SSC were developed and used to translate the continuous turbidity record into a continuous estimate of SSC. Those concentrations were then used to predict suspended-sediment loads based on the current discharge record, reported at daily intervals. Alternative methods were used to in-fill a small number of days with either missing periods of turbidity or discharge records. Uncertainties in our predictions at daily and annual time scales were estimated based on the parameter uncertainties in our turbidity-SSC regressions. Daily loads ranged from as high as 121,000 tons during a large autumn storm to as low as –56 tons, when tidal return flow moved more sediment upstream than river discharge did downstream. Annual suspended-sediment loads for both water years were close to 1.4 ± 0.2 million tons.

  13. Vertical Distribution of Suspended Sediment under Steady Flow: Existing Theories and Fractional Derivative Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqian Nie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractional advection-diffusion equation (fADE model is a new approach to describe the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentration in steady turbulent flow. However, the advantages and parameter definition of the fADE model in describing the sediment suspension distribution are still unclear. To address this knowledge gap, this study first reviews seven models, including the fADE model, for the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentration in steady turbulent flow. The fADE model, among others, describes both Fickian and non-Fickian diffusive characteristics of suspended sediment, while the other six models assume that the vertical diffusion of suspended sediment follows Fick’s first law. Second, this study explores the sensitivity of the fractional index of the fADE model to the variation of particle sizes and sediment settling velocities, based on experimental data collected from the literatures. Finally, empirical formulas are developed to relate the fractional derivative order to particle size and sediment settling velocity. These formulas offer river engineers a substitutive way to estimate the fractional derivative order in the fADE model.

  14. Observations of suspended sediment from ADCP and OBS measurements in a mud-dominated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Hoekstra, P.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of a 1.2-MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to measure suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and particle size variation in a mud-dominated environment has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Bay of Banten, Indonesia, where clays and silts in the range of 3-55

  15. Delivery of suspended sediment and associated phosphorus and heavy metals to small rural Danish streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laubel, A. R.

    The aim of this study is to examine delivery pathways for suspended sediment, and particulate phosphorus (P) and heavy metals from open rural areas to small Danish streams. A further aim is to quantify the contribution from different path-ways and source areas. Such studies are useful as a basis...

  16. Potential Impact of Climate Change on Suspended Sediment Yield in NW Spain: A Case Study on the Corbeira Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Luz Rodríguez-Blanco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil losses and the subsequent sediment delivery constitute significant environmental threats. Climate change is likely to have an impact on the availability of water and therefore on sediment yield in catchments. In this context, quantifying the sediment response to an increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change is of utmost importance to the proper management of rural catchments. However, quantitative assessment of climate change impact remains a complex task. In this study, the potential medium (2031–2060 and long-term (2069–2098 impacts of projected changes of temperature, rainfall and CO2 concentration on sediment yield in a small rural catchment located in NW Spain were evaluated using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model. Climate change scenarios were created using future climate data projected by regional climate models from the ENSEMBLES project and two CO2 concentration scenarios (550 and 660 ppm. The results showed that climate change would have a noticeable impact on suspended sediment if the forecast temperature, rainfall and CO2 concentration changes included in this study were met. Overall, suspended sediment is expected to decrease (2031–2060: −11%, 2069–2098: −8% compared to the baseline period (1981–2010, mainly due to decreased streamflow. However, an increase in sediment transport in winter is predicted, possibly associated with increased erosion in cultivated areas (11%–17%, suggesting that, at this time of the year, the effect of soil detachment prevails over sediment transport capacity. Consequently, management practices aimed at reducing soil erosion in cultivated areas should be carried out, because these are the main source of sediment in the study area.

  17. Characterization of streamflow, suspended sediment, and nutrients entering Galveston Bay from the Trinity River, Texas, May 2014–December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Zulimar; Lee, Michael T.

    2017-02-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board and the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, collected streamflow and water-quality data at USGS streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Trinity River watershed from May 2014 to December 2015 to characterize and improve the current understanding of the quantity and quality of freshwater inflow entering Galveston Bay from the Trinity River. Continuous streamflow records at four USGS streamflow-gaging stations were compared to quantify differences in streamflow magnitude between upstream and downstream reaches of the lower Trinity River. Water-quality conditions were characterized from discrete nutrient and sedi­ment samples collected over a range of hydrologic conditions at USGS streamflow-gaging station 08067252 Trinity River at Wallisville, Tex. (hereinafter referred to as the “Wallisville site”), approximately 4 river miles upstream from where the Trinity River enters Galveston Bay.Based on streamflow records, annual mean outflow from Livingston Dam into the lower Trinity River was 2,240 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) in 2014 and 22,400 ft3/s in 2015, the second lowest and the highest, respectively, during the entire period of record (1966–2015). During this study, only about 54 percent of the total volume measured at upstream sites was accounted for at the Wallisville site as the Trinity River enters Galveston Bay. This difference in water volumes between upstream sites and the Wallisville site indicates that at high flows a large part of the volume released from Lake Livingston does not reach Galveston Bay through the main channel of the Trinity River. These findings indicate that water likely flows into wetlands and water bodies surrounding the main channel of the Trinity River before reaching the Wallisville site and is being stored or discharged through other channels that flow directly into Galveston Bay.To characterize suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in

  18. Sediment fingerprinting to determine the source of suspended sediment in a southern Piedmont stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, R; Radcliffe, D E; Ritchie, J C; Risse, L M; McKinley, R A

    2010-01-01

    Thousands of stream miles in the southern Piedmont region are impaired because of high levels of suspended sediment. It is unclear if the source is upland erosion from agricultural sources or bank erosion of historic sediment deposited in the flood plains between 1830 and 1930 when cotton farming was extensive. The objective of this study was to determine the source of high stream suspended sediment concentrations in a typical southern Piedmont watershed using sediment fingerprinting techniques. Twenty-one potential tracers were tested for their ability to discriminate between sources, conservative behavior, and lack of redundancy. Tracer concentrations were determined in potential sediment sources (forests, pastures, row crop fields, stream banks, and unpaved roads and construction sites), and suspended sediment samples collected from the stream and analyzed using mixing models. Results indicated that 137Cs and 15N were the best tracers to discriminate potential sediment sources in this watershed. The delta15N values showed distinct signatures in all the potential suspended sediment sources, and delta15N was a unique tracer to differentiate stream bank soil from upland subsurface soils, such as soil from construction sites, unpaved roads, ditches, and field gullies. Mixing models showed that about 60% of the stream suspended sediment originated from eroding stream banks, 23 to 30% from upland subsoil sources (e.g., construction sites and unpaved roads), and about 10 to 15% from pastures. The results may be applicable to other watersheds in the Piedmont depending on the extent of urbanization occurring in these watersheds. Better understanding of the sources of fine sediment has practical implications on the type of sediment control measures to be adopted. Investment of resources in improving water quality should consider the factors causing stream bank erosion and erosion from unpaved roads and construction sites to water quality impairment.

  19. Suspended sediment load below open-cast mines for ungauged river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksina, L.

    2011-12-01

    Placer mines are located in river valleys along river benches or river ancient channels. Frequently the existing mining sites are characterized by low contribution of the environmental technologies. Therefore open-pit mining alters stream hydrology and sediment processes and enhances sediment transport. The most serious environmental consequences of the sediment yield increase occur in the rivers populated by salmon fish community because salmon species prefer clean water with low turbidity. For instance, placer mining located in Kamchatka peninsula (Far East of Russia) which is regarded to be the last global gene pool of wild salmon Oncorhynchus threatens rivers ecosystems significantly. Impact assessment is limited by the hydrological observations scarcity. Gauging network is rare and in many cases whole basins up to 200 km length miss any hydrological data. The main purpose of the work is elaboration of methods for sediment yield estimation in rivers under mining impact and implementation of corresponding calculations. Subjects of the study are rivers of the Vivenka river basin where open-cast platinum mine is situated. It's one of the largest platinum mines in Russian Federation and in the world. This mine is the most well-studied in Kamchatka (research covers a period from 2003 to 2011). Empirical - analytical model of suspended sediment yield estimation was elaborated for rivers draining mine's territories. Sediment delivery at the open-cast mine happens due to the following sediment processes: - erosion in the channel diversions; - soil erosion on the exposed hillsides; - effluent from settling ponds; - mine waste water inflow; - accident mine waste water escape into rivers. Sediment washout caused by erosion was estimated by repeated measurements of the channel profiles in 2003, 2006 and 2008. Estimation of horizontal deformation rates was carried out on the basis of erosion dependence on water discharge rates, slopes and composition of sediments. Soil

  20. Estimating concentrations of fine-grained and total suspended sediment from close-range remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbrucker, Adam; Spicer, Kurt R.; Christianson, Tami; Uhrich, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sediment, a vital surface water resource, is hazardous in excess. Suspended sediment, the most prevalent source of impairment of river systems, can adversely affect flood control, navigation, fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, recreation, and water supply (e.g., Rasmussen et al., 2009; Qu, 2014). Monitoring programs typically focus on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge (SSQ). These time-series data are used to study changes to basin hydrology, geomorphology, and ecology caused by disturbances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has traditionally used physical sediment sample-based methods (Edwards and Glysson, 1999; Nolan et al., 2005; Gray et al., 2008) to compute SSC and SSQ from continuous streamflow data using a sediment transport-curve (e.g., Walling, 1977) or hydrologic interpretation (Porterfield, 1972). Accuracy of these data is typically constrained by the resources required to collect and analyze intermittent physical samples. Quantifying SSC using continuous instream turbidity is rapidly becoming common practice among sediment monitoring programs. Estimations of SSC and SSQ are modeled from linear regression analysis of concurrent turbidity and physical samples. Sediment-surrogate technologies such as turbidity promise near real-time information, increased accuracy, and reduced cost compared to traditional physical sample-based methods (Walling, 1977; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003; Gray and Gartner, 2009; Rasmussen et al., 2009; Landers et al., 2012; Landers and Sturm, 2013; Uhrich et al., 2014). Statistical comparisons among SSQ computation methods show that turbidity-SSC regression models can have much less uncertainty than streamflow-based sediment transport-curves or hydrologic interpretation (Walling, 1977; Lewis, 1996; Glysson et al., 2001; Lee et al., 2008). However, computation of SSC and SSQ records from continuous instream turbidity data is not without challenges; some of these include environmental fouling, calibration, and

  1. Sediment Size Effects in Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter-Derived Estimates of Suspended Sediment Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Öztürk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Backscatter output from a 10 MHz acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV was used to quantify suspended sediment concentrations in a laboratory setting using sand-sized particles. The experiments included (a well-sorted sand samples ranging in size from 0.112 to 0.420 mm, obtained by the sieving of construction sand, (b different, known mixtures of these well-sorted fractions, and (c sieved natural beach sand with median sizes ranging from 0.112 to 0.325 mm. The tested concentrations ranged from 25 to 3000 mg•L−1. The backscatter output was empirically related to concentration and sediment size, and when non-dimensionalized by acoustic wavelength, a dimensionless sediment size gradation coefficient. Size-dependent upper and lower bounds on measurable concentrations were also established empirically. The range of measurable conditions is broad enough to make the approach useful for sand sizes and concentrations commonly encountered in nature. A new method is proposed to determine concentrations in cases of mixed-size sediment suspensions when only calibration data for well-sorted constituent sands are available. This approach could potentially allow better estimates when the suspended load is derived from but is not fully representative of the bed material, and when the size characteristics of the suspended material are varying in time over the period of interest. Differences in results between the construction and beach sands suggest that sediment shape may also need to be considered, and point to the importance of calibrating to sediments encountered at the site of interest.

  2. Cumulative effects of suspended sediments, organic nutrients and temperature stress on early life history stages of the coral Acropora tenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humanes, Adriana; Ricardo, Gerard F.; Willis, Bette L.; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2017-03-01

    Coral reproduction is vulnerable to both declining water quality and warming temperatures, with simultaneous exposures likely compounding the negative impact of each stressor. We investigated how early life processes of the coral Acropora tenuis respond to increasing levels of suspended sediments in combination with temperature or organic nutrients. Fertilization success and embryo development were more sensitive to suspended sediments than to high temperatures or nutrient enrichment, while larval development (after acquisition of cilia) and settlement success were predominantly affected by thermal stress. Fertilization success was reduced 80% by suspended sediments, and up to 24% by temperature, while the addition of nutrients to suspended sediments had no further impact. Larval survivorship was unaffected by any of these treatments. However, settlement success of larvae developing from treatment-exposed embryos was negatively affected by all three stressors (e.g. up to 55% by suspended sediments), while exposure only during later larval stages predominantly responded to temperature stress. Environmentally relevant levels of suspended sediments and temperature had the greatest impacts, affecting more processes than the combined impacts of sediments and nutrients. These results suggest that management strategies to maintain suspended sediments at low concentrations during coral spawning events will benefit coral recruitment, especially with warming climate.

  3. Use of multispectral satellite remote sensing to assess mixing of suspended sediment downstream of large river confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, M.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Greenberg, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    Although past work has noted that contrasts in turbidity often are detectable on remotely sensed images of rivers downstream from confluences, no systematic methodology has been developed for assessing mixing over distance of confluent flows with differing surficial suspended sediment concentrations (SSSC). In contrast to field measurements of mixing below confluences, satellite remote-sensing can provide detailed information on spatial distributions of SSSC over long distances. This paper presents a methodology that uses remote-sensing data to estimate spatial patterns of SSSC downstream of confluences along large rivers and to determine changes in the amount of mixing over distance from confluences. The method develops a calibrated Random Forest (RF) model by relating training SSSC data from river gaging stations to derived spectral indices for the pixels corresponding to gaging-station locations. The calibrated model is then used to predict SSSC values for every river pixel in a remotely sensed image, which provides the basis for mapping of spatial variability in SSSCs along the river. The pixel data are used to estimate average surficial values of SSSC at cross sections spaced uniformly along the river. Based on the cross-section data, a mixing metric is computed for each cross section. The spatial pattern of change in this metric over distance can be used to define rates and length scales of surficial mixing of suspended sediment downstream of a confluence. This type of information is useful for exploring the potential influence of various controlling factors on mixing downstream of confluences, for evaluating how mixing in a river system varies over time and space, and for determining how these variations influence water quality and ecological conditions along the river.

  4. Mutual relationships of suspended sediment, turbidity and visual clarity in New Zealand rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Ballantine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many river water quality monitoring programmes do not measure suspended particulate matter (SPM mass concentrations despite significant interest in its multiple effects on aquatic ecosystems. Regular monthly sampling usually intercepts rivers in baseflow when suspended sediment mass concentrations and fluxes are relatively low and not of particular interest. New Zealand’s National Rivers Water Quality Network (NRWQN is probably typical in not measuring SPM mass, although visual clarity and nephelometric turbidity are routinely measured. In order to better characterize SPM in NZ rivers, total suspended sediment (TSS was temporarily added to the NRWQN. Turbidity, visual clarity and TSS are mutually inter-related over all 77 sites, although with considerable data scatter. However, within individual rivers turbidity and visual clarity are typically fairly closely related to TSS and provide fair to excellent surrogates. Therefore, TSS need not be measured routinely because it can be estimated with sufficient precision for many purposes from visibility or turbidity.

  5. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Mississippi River suspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, J.; Hites, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Mississippi River Basin drains water from 41% of the conterminous U.S. and is a valuable resource that supplies food, transportation, and irrigation to more than 95 million people of the region. Discharge and runoff from industry, agriculture, and population centers have increased the loads of anthropogenic organic compounds in the river. There has been growing concern over the rising levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in air, sediment, biota, and humans, but there have been no studies to measure the concentrations of these chemicals in North America's largest river system. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of PBDEs (15 congeners including BDE-209) and to identify possible sources within the Mississippi River Basin. We found PBDEs to be widespread throughout the region, rivaling PCBs in their extent and magnitude of contamination. We have also calculated the total amount of PBDEs released to the Gulf of Mexico in 2002.

  6. Analyzing the uncertainty of suspended sediment load prediction using sequential data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisenring, Marc; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    SummaryA first step in understanding the impacts of sediment and controlling the sources of sediment is to quantify the mass loading. Since mass loading is the product of flow and concentration, the quantification of loads first requires the quantification of runoff volume. Using the National Weather Service's SNOW-17 and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) models, this study employed particle filter based Bayesian data assimilation methods to predict seasonal snow water equivalent (SWE) and runoff within a small watershed in the Lake Tahoe Basin located in California, USA. A procedure was developed to scale the variance multipliers (a.k.a hyperparameters) for model parameters and predictions based on the accuracy of the mean predictions relative to the ensemble spread. In addition, an online bias correction algorithm based on the lagged average bias was implemented to detect and correct for systematic bias in model forecasts prior to updating with the particle filter. Both of these methods significantly improved the performance of the particle filter without requiring excessively wide prediction bounds. The flow ensemble was linked to a non-linear regression model that was used to predict suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) based on runoff rate and time of year. Runoff volumes and SSC were then combined to produce an ensemble of suspended sediment load estimates. Annual suspended sediment loads for the 5 years of simulation were finally computed along with 95% prediction intervals that account for uncertainty in both the SSC regression model and flow rate estimates. Understanding the uncertainty associated with annual suspended sediment load predictions is critical for making sound watershed management decisions aimed at maintaining the exceptional clarity of Lake Tahoe. The computational methods developed and applied in this research could assist with similar studies where it is important to quantify the predictive uncertainty of pollutant load

  7. Turbidity and suspended sediment in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Michael R.; Siemion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and turbidity were measured for 2 to 3 years at 14 monitoring sites throughout the upper Esopus Creek watershed in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The upper Esopus Creek watershed is part of the New York City water-supply system that supplies water to more than 9 million people every day. Turbidity, caused primarily by high concentrations of inorganic suspended particles, is a potential water-quality concern because it colors the water and can reduce the effectiveness of drinking-water disinfection. The purposes of this study were to quantify concentrations of suspended sediment and turbidity levels, to estimate suspended-sediment loads within the upper Esopus Creek watershed, and to investigate the relations between SSC and turbidity. Samples were collected at four locations along the main channel of Esopus Creek and at all of the principal tributaries. Samples were collected monthly and during storms and were analyzed for SSC and turbidity in the laboratory. Turbidity was also measured every 15 minutes at six of the sampling stations with in situ turbidity probes.

  8. Spatio-temporal Analysis of suspended sediment Concentration in the Yongjiang Estuary Based on GOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanyan; Dong, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The concentration and spatio-temporal variation of suspended sediment concentration in the estuary area are of great significance to the nearshore engineering, port construction and coastal evolution. Based on multi-period GOCI images and corresponding measured suspended sediment concentration (SSC) data, three inversion models (the linear regression model, the power exponent model and the neural network model) were established after rapid atmospheric correction. The results show that the absolute error of the three models is 0.20, 0.16 and 0.10kg/m3 respectively, and the relative errors are 38%, 23% and 18% respectively. The accuracy of the neural network (8-17-17-1) is the best. The SSC distribution diagrams in an ebb and flow cycle are obtained using this ANN model. The results show that with Yongjiang estuary for segmentation, the high concentration area is located in the north and the lower is in the south around Jintang Island deeper water area. When the tide rises, the water flow disturbs a large amount of sediment, and then the sediment concentration increases and high area high concentrations water body moves along the SE-NW. When the tide falls, flow rate decreases and the sediment concentration decreases. However, with the falling tide, the concentration of suspended sediment in the northern sea areas gradually increases, and is higher than 1kg/m3, and gradually moves along the NW-SE until to the estuary.

  9. Geospatial approach towards enumerative analysis of suspended sediment concentration for Ganges-Brahmaputra Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Palak; Kunte, Pravin D.

    2016-10-01

    This study presents an easy, modular, user-friendly, and flexible software package for processing of Landsat 7 ETM and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS data for estimating suspended particulate matter concentrations in the coastal waters. This package includes 1) algorithm developed using freely downloadable SCILAB package, 2) ERDAS Models for iterative processing of Landsat images and 3) ArcMAP tool for plotting and map making. Utilizing SCILAB package, a module is written for geometric corrections, radiometric corrections and obtaining normalized water-leaving reflectance by incorporating Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS and Landsat 7 ETM+ data. Using ERDAS models, a sequence of modules are developed for iterative processing of Landsat images and estimating suspended particulate matter concentrations. Processed images are used for preparing suspended sediment concentration maps. The applicability of this software package is demonstrated by estimating and plotting seasonal suspended sediment concentration maps off the Bengal delta. The software is flexible enough to accommodate other remotely sensed data like Ocean Color monitor (OCM) data, Indian Remote Sensing data (IRS), MODIS data etc. by replacing a few parameters in the algorithm, for estimating suspended sediment concentration in coastal waters.

  10. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    Accurate measurements of fluvial sediment are important for assessing stream ecological health, calculating flood levels, computing sediment budgets, and managing and protecting water resources. Sediment-enriched rivers in Minnesota are a concern among Federal, State, and local governments because turbidity and sediment-laden waters are the leading impairments and affect more than 6,000 miles of rivers in Minnesota. The suspended sediment in the lower Minnesota River is deleterious, contributing about 75 to 90 percent of the suspended sediment being deposited into Lake Pepin. The Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District collaborate to maintain a navigation channel on the lower 14.7 miles of the Minnesota River through scheduled dredging operations. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has adopted a sediment-reduction strategy to reduce sediment in the Minnesota River by 90 percent by 2040.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District, collected suspended-sediment, bedload, and particle-size samples at five sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin during water years 2011 through 2014 and surrogate measurements of acoustic backscatter at one of these sites on the lower Minnesota River during water years 2012 through 2016 to quantify sediment loads and improve understanding of sediment-transport relations. Annual sediment loads were computed for calendar years 2011 through 2014.Data collected from water years 2011 through 2014 indicated that two tributaries, Le Sueur River and High Island Creek, had the highest sediment yield and concentrations of suspended sediment. These tributaries also had greater stream gradients than the sites on the Minnesota River. Suspended fines were greater than suspended sand at all sites in the study area. The range of median particle sizes matched

  11. Suspended sediment dynamics in the Amazon River of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijos, Elisa; Crave, Alain; Vauchel, Philippe; Fraizy, Pascal; Santini, William; Moquet, Jean-Sèbastien; Arevalo, Nore; Carranza, Jorge; Guyot, Jean-Loup

    2013-07-01

    The erosion and transport of sediments allow us to understand many activities of significance, such as crust evolution, climate change, uplift rates, continental processes, the biogeochemical cycling of pollutants and nutrients. The Amazon basin of Peru has contrasting physiographic and climatic characteristics between the Andean piedmont and the plains and between the north and south of the basin which is why there are 8 gauging stations located along the principal rivers of the Andean piedmont (Marañón, Huallaga, Ucayali) and the plain (Marañón, Tigre, Napo, Ucayali and Amazon rivers). Since 2003, the ORE-Hybam (IRD-SENAMHI-UNALM) observatory has performed out regular measurements at strategic points of the Amazon basin to understand and model the systems, behavior and long-term dynamics. On the Andean piedmont, the suspended yields are governed by a simple model with a relationship between the river discharge and the sediment concentration. In the plain, the dilution effect of the concentrations can create hysteresis in this relationship on a monthly basis. The Amazon basin of Peru has a sediment yield of 541 *106 t year-1, 70% comes from the southern basin.

  12. Near-continuous suspended sediment monitoring of the Rio Grande using multi-frequency acoustic instrumentation in Big Bend National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D. J.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Sabol, T. A.; Griffiths, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, is in disequilibrium. The river in this reach rapidly narrows during low-flow years, and widens during rare, large magnitude floods. One management strategy to improve in-channel habitat for the native ecosystem is to limit the rate and magnitude of channel narrowing during low-flow years through water releases from re-operated upstream dams. The proposed purpose of these dam re-operations is to maximize fine-sediment transport downstream, thereby limiting fine-sediment deposition within the channel and channel narrowing. A suspended-sediment monitoring program consisting of two suspended-sediment gages was established in November 2010 at two sites in Big Bend National Park (BBNP), Texas, to inform these management efforts. Suspended-sediment gages consist of two single-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler profilers that collect data at 15-minute intervals. Acoustic attenuation is used to calculate silt-and-clay concentration, and acoustic backscatter is used to calculate sand concentration in two size classes. Acoustic attenuation and backscatter are calibrated to velocity-weighted suspended silt-and-clay and sand concentrations in the cross sections near the acoustic instrumentation by using standard depth-integrating samplers deployed according to the Equal-Width-Increment (EWI) method. During flood periods, when depth-integrated samples cannot be collected, automatic pump samplers collect suspended-sediment samples to augment the EWI dataset. Initial analyses indicate that steady, long-duration dam releases are able to transport a consistent load of silt and clay through the study reach in BBNP. However, when tributary flash floods are superimposed on dam releases, the large influx of silt and clay from these tributary floods is not transported through the study reach, even though discharge remains high. When tributary flash floods occur during low-flow periods on

  13. Suspended-sediment and suspended-sand concentrations and loads for selected streams in the Mississippi River Basin, 1940-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, David C.; Cline, Teri L.; Glaspie, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents suspended-sediment concentration and streamflow data, describes load-estimation techniques used in the computation of annual suspended-sediment loads, and presents annual suspended-sediment loads for 48 streamgaging stations within the Mississippi River Basin. Available published, unpublished, and computed annual total suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads are presented for water years 1940 through 2009. When previously published annual loads were not available, total suspended-sediment and sand loads were computed using available data for water years 1949 through 2009. A table of suspended-sediment concentration and daily mean streamflow data used in the computation of annual loads is presented along with a table of compiled and computed annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads, annual streamflows, and flow-weighted concentrations for the 48 stations.

  14. Tidal influence on suspended sediment distribution and dispersal in the northern Andaman Sea and Gulf of Martaban

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Rao, P.S.; Rao, K.H.; Thwin, S.; Rao, N.S.; Raiker, V.

    Surface and water column profiles of suspended matter collected during April-May 2002, and satellite images were used to study factors influencing suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) and dispersal in the northern Andaman Sea and Gulf...

  15. Suspended sediment concentration and optical property observations of mixed-turbidity, coastal waters through multispectral ocean color inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multispectral satellite ocean color data from high-turbidity areas of the coastal ocean contain information about the surface concentrations and optical properties of suspended sediments and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Empirical and semi-analytical inversion algorit...

  16. Occurrence of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) on Suspended Sediment in the Donna Canal, Hidalgo County, Texas, 1999-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Miranda, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Some fish in the Donna Canal contain PCBs at levels that might pose a risk to human health if the fish are eaten. Early attempts to locate the source of PCBs in the canal were unsuccessful. An innovative method of sampling and analyzing suspended sediment helped scientists detect PCBs in suspended sediment and narrowed the probable PCB source area(s) from the entire 11-kilometer canal to a 600-meter reach.

  17. Temporal variability of suspended sediment sources in an alpine catchment combining river/rainfall monitoring and sediment fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Navratil, O.; Evrard, O.; Esteves, Michel; Legout, C.; Ayrault, S.; Nemery, J.; Mate-Marin, A.; Ahmadi, M.; Lefevre, I.; Poirel, A.; Bonte, P.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of the rainfall regime on erosion and transfer of suspended sediment in a 905-km(2) mountainous catchment of the southern French Alps was investigated by combining sediment monitoring, rainfall data, and sediment fingerprinting (based on geochemistry and radionuclide concentrations). Suspended sediment yields were monitored between October 2007 and December 2009 in four subcatchments (22-713km(2)). Automatic sediment sampling was triggered during floods to trace the sediment origin ...

  18. Effect of particle size and composition of suspended sediment on denitrification in river water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhimei; Liu, Ting; Xia, Xinghui, E-mail: xiaxh@bnu.edu.cn; Xia, Na

    2016-01-15

    Rivers with high suspended sediment (SPS) concentration are common worldwide, and previous studies reported the occurrence of denitrification on SPS. In this work, effect of particle size and composition of SPS on denitrification in river water was studied in laboratory. The {sup 15}N isotope tracer technique was used to investigate the denitrification in water containing 8 g L{sup −1} SPS with different particle sizes, including < 20 μm, 20–50 μm, 50–100 μm, and 100–200 μm. The results showed that the denitrification rate was negatively related to particle size, and the SPS with particle size below 20 μm had the highest {sup 15}N{sub 2} emission rate of 0.27 mg-N/m{sup 3}·d, which was twice that of 100–200 μm. The denitrifying bacteria population in the system decreased with the increase of particle size, which was positively correlated with denitrification rate (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between organic carbon content of SPS and denitrifying bacteria population (p < 0.01), indicating that organic carbon is a key factor influencing denitrifying bacteria. Different from the {sup 15}N{sub 2} production, {sup 15}N{sub 2}O emission rate reached the highest of 1.02 μg-N/m{sup 3}·d in the system containing SPS of 20–50 μm, which was 14.8 times that of 100–200 μm. This was due to the difference in denitrifying bacteria species in different systems due to different oxic/anoxic conditions around SPS. This study suggests that not only the SPS concentration but also the SPS size and composition should be considered in studying the nitrogen cycle in river systems, especially for the production of N{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • Denitrification rate was negatively related to particle size of SPS. • Denitrification in the < 20 μm SPS had the highest N{sub 2} emission rate of 0.27 mg-N/m{sup 3} d. • {sup 15}N{sub 2}O production in the system with SPS of 20–50 μm was 14.8 times that of 100–200 μm. • The denitrifying bacteria

  19. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8-415 µm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 datasets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-12 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38 – 69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC / volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/ml (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/ml) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over 2 orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/ml (range: 2.56-2.87 g/ml, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  20. Exposure of clownfish larvae to suspended sediment levels found on the Great Barrier Reef: Impacts on gill structure and microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sybille; Wenger, Amelia S; Ainsworth, Tracy D; Rummer, Jodie L

    2015-06-22

    Worldwide, increasing coastal development has played a major role in shaping coral reef species assemblages, but the mechanisms underpinning distribution patterns remain poorly understood. Recent research demonstrated delayed development in larval fishes exposed to suspended sediment, highlighting the need to further understand the interaction between suspended sediment as a stressor and energetically costly activities such as growth and development that are essential to support biological fitness. We examined the gill morphology and the gill microbiome in clownfish larvae (Amphiprion percula) exposed to suspended sediment concentrations (using Australian bentonite) commonly found on the inshore Great Barrier Reef. The gills of larvae exposed to 45 mg L(-1) of suspended sediment had excessive mucous discharge and growth of protective cell layers, resulting in a 56% thicker gill epithelium compared to fish from the control group. Further, we found a shift from 'healthy' to pathogenic bacterial communities on the gills, which could increase the disease susceptibility of larvae. The impact of suspended sediments on larval gills may represent an underlying mechanism behind the distribution patterns of fish assemblages. Our findings underscore the necessity for future coastal development to consider adverse effects of suspended sediments on fish recruitment, and consequently fish populations and ecosystem health.

  1. Computing time-series suspended-sediment concentrations and loads from in-stream turbidity-sensor and streamflow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Doug; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, use of a method for computing suspended-sediment concentration and loads using turbidity sensors—primarily nephelometry, but also optical backscatter—has proliferated. Because an in- itu turbidity sensor is capa le of measuring turbidity instantaneously, a turbidity time series can be recorded and related directly to time-varying suspended-sediment concentrations. Depending on the suspended-sediment characteristics of the measurement site, this method can be more reliable and, in many cases, a more accurate means for computing suspended-sediment concentrations and loads than traditional U.S. Geological Survey computational methods. Guidelines and procedures for estimating time s ries of suspended-sediment concentration and loading as a function of turbidity and streamflow data have been published in a U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods Report, Book 3, Chapter C4. This paper is a summary of these guidelines and discusses some of the concepts, s atistical procedures, and techniques used to maintain a multiyear suspended sediment time series.

  2. Assessment of the caesium-137 flux adsorbed to suspended sediment in a reservoir in the contaminated Fukushima region in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro; Golosov, Valentin; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu

    2014-04-01

    We estimated the flux of caesium-137 adsorbed to suspended sediment in the Kusaki Dam reservoir in the Fukushima region of eastern Japan, which was contaminated by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident. The amount and rate of reservoir sedimentation and the caesium-137 concentration were validated based on the mixed-particle distribution and a sediment transport equation. The caesium-137 and sediment flux data suggested that wash load, suspended load sediment, and caesium-137 were deposited and the discharge and transport processes generated acute pollution, especially during extreme rainfall-runoff events. Additionally, we qualitatively assessed future changes in caesium-137 and sediment fluxes in the reservoir. The higher deposition and discharge at the start of the projection compared to the 2090s are most likely explained by the radioactive decay of caesium-137 and the effects of reservoir sedimentation. Predictions of the impacts of future climate on sediment and caesium-137 fluxes are crucial for environmental planning and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of selected contaminants in streambed- and suspended-sediment samples collected in Bexar County, Texas, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants are typically associated with urban areas such as San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County, the seventh most populous city in the United States. This report describes an assessment of selected sediment-associated contaminants in samples collected in Bexar County from sites on the following streams: Medio Creek, Medina River, Elm Creek, Martinez Creek, Chupaderas Creek, Leon Creek, Salado Creek, and San Antonio River. During 2007-09, the U.S. Geological Survey periodically collected surficial streambed-sediment samples during base flow and suspended-sediment (large-volume suspended-sediment) samples from selected streams during stormwater runoff. All sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and for organic compounds including halogenated organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Selected contaminants in streambed and suspended sediments in watersheds of the eight major streams in Bexar County were assessed by using a variety of methods—observations of occurrence and distribution, comparison to sediment-quality guidelines and data from previous studies, statistical analyses, and source indicators. Trace elements concentrations were low compared to the consensus-based sediment-quality guidelines threshold effect concentration (TEC) and probable effect concentration (PEC). Trace element concentrations were greater than the TEC in 28 percent of the samples and greater than the PEC in 1.5 percent of the samples. Chromium concentrations exceeded sediment-quality guidelines more frequently than concentrations of any other constituents analyzed in this study (greater than the TEC in 69 percent of samples and greater than the PEC in 8 percent of samples). Mean trace element concentrations generally are lower in Bexar County samples compared to concentrations in samples collected during previous studies in the Austin and Fort Worth, Texas, areas, but considering the relatively

  4. The phosphorus content of fluvial suspended sediment in three lowland groundwater-dominated catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Deborah J.; Walling, Desmond E.; Collins, Adrian L.; Leeks, Graham J. L.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryThis paper reports an investigation of the phosphorus (P) content of fluvial suspended sediment samples collected from three lowland groundwater-dominated agricultural catchments in the UK. In-stream trap samplers were installed at a total of 21 locations in the catchments of the Rivers Frome and Piddle in Dorset and in the Upper Tern in Shropshire, UK. Time-integrated suspended sediment samples ( n = 187) were collected at regular intervals over a period of 22 months and analysed for total phosphorus (TP), inorganic phosphorus (IP), organic phosphorus (OP) and algal available phosphorus (AAP). TP concentrations varied between sampling sites in the Rivers Frome and Piddle, allowing key P inputs to be identified, while fractionation of P assisted in identifying the nature of these inputs. There was also significant variation in both the TP concentration and the concentration of individual fractions between the Frome and Piddle catchments and the Upper Tern. These contrasts were attributed to the differing underlying geologies, since the Frome and Piddle are underlain predominantly by chalk, whilst the Upper Tern is underlain by sandstone, and also to the different soil types present. The TP content of suspended sediment collected from the Frome catchment showed a statistically significant relationship with specific surface area, but this relationship was not found for the remaining catchments. Temporal variation in P concentrations at both the seasonal and event scale was also investigated. Seasonal variations were noted for TP concentrations and for the concentrations of IP, OP and AAP in all the study catchments, but no consistent seasonal patterns were discernible. Maximum and minimum concentrations of the individual fractions occurred during different months in each of the study catchments, suggesting that different controls operated in the individual catchments. Short-term temporal variations in TP concentrations were documented for two high flow events

  5. Geology and geomorphology control suspended sediment yield and modulate increases following timber harvest in temperate headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater-Reyes, Sharon; Segura, Catalina; Bladon, Kevin D.

    2017-05-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important contributor to ecologic and geomorphic functions of streams. However, it is challenging to generalize predictions of sediment yield because it is influenced by many factors. In this study, we quantified the relevance of natural controls (e.g., geology, catchment physiography) on suspended sediment yield (SSY) in headwater streams managed for timber harvest. We collected and analyzed six years of data from 10 sites (five headwater sub-catchments and five watershed outlets) in the Trask River Watershed (western Oregon, United States). We used generalized least squares regression models to investigate how the parameters of the SSY rating curve varied as a function of catchment setting, and whether the setting modulated the SSY response to forest harvesting. Results indicated that the highest intercepts (α) of the power relation between unit discharge and SSY were associated with sites underlain primarily by friable rocks (e.g., sedimentary formations). The greatest increases in SSY after forest harvesting (up to an order of magnitude) also occurred at sites underlain by the more friable lithologies. In contrast, basins underlain by resistant lithologies (intrusive rocks) had lower SSY and were more resilient to management-related increases in SSY. As such, the impact of forest management activities (e.g., use of forested buffers; building of new roads) on the variability in SSY was primarily contingent on catchment lithology. Sites with higher SSY, or harvest-related increases in SSY, also generally had a) lower mean elevation and slope, b) greater landscape roughness, and c) lower sediment connectivity. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to further explore the relationship between SSY and several basin physiographic variables. The PCA clearly separated sites underlain by friable geologic units from those underlain by resistant lithologies. Results are consistent with greater rates of weathering and supply of

  6. Metals in the Danube River Suspended Sediments at the Mouth of the Sf. Gheorghe Distributary

    OpenAIRE

    Ungureanu, Viorel Gh.; Popescu, Rodica; STĂNICĂ, Adrian; AXENTE, Valerica; MILU, Consuela

    2004-01-01

    In order to establish the relationship between heavy metal contents in the Danube suspended sediments and various controlling factors, such as time (season), water temperature, Eh, pH, and others, sampling was performed near the Danube’s Sf Gheorghe river mouth over a 9 month-long period. The identified and analyzed metals are Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Se, Sn, Sb, Pb, Bi, U. Most of the concentrations observed are normal for those usually met in this type of environment. It is intere...

  7. Present and Reference Concentrations and Yields of Suspended Sediment in Streams in the Great Lakes Region and Adjacent Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Saad, David A.; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    In-stream suspended sediment and siltation and downstream sedimentation are common problems in surface waters throughout the United States. The most effective way to improve surface waters impaired by sediments is to reduce the contributions from human activities rather than try to reduce loadings from natural sources. Total suspended sediment/solids (TSS) concentration data were obtained from 964 streams in the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy River Basins from 1951 to 2002. These data were used to estimate median concentrations, loads, yields, and volumetrically (flow) weighted (VW) concentrations where streamflow data were available. SPAtial Regression-Tree Analysis (SPARTA) was applied to land-use-adjusted (residualized) TSS data and environmental-characteristic data to determine the natural factors that best described the distribution of median and VW TSS concentrations and yields and to delineate zones with similar natural factors affecting TSS, enabling reference or natural concentrations and yields to be estimated. Soil properties (clay and organic-matter content, erodibility, and permeability), basin slope, and land use (percentage of agriculture) were the factors most strongly related to the distribution of median and VW TSS concentrations. TSS yields were most strongly related to amount of precipitation and the resulting runoff, and secondarily to the factors related to high TSS concentrations. Reference median TSS concentrations ranged from 5 to 26 milligrams per liter (mg/L), reference median annual VW TSS concentrations ranged from 10 to 168 mg/L, and reference TSS yields ranged from about 980 to 90,000 kilograms per square kilometer per year. Independent streams (streams with no overlapping drainage areas) with TSS data were ranked by how much their water quality exceeded reference concentrations and yields. Most streams exceeding reference conditions were in the central part of the study area, where agricultural activities

  8. Water-quality assessment of the eastern Iowa basins- nitrogen, phosphorus, suspended sediment, and organic carbon in surface water, 1996-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Kent D.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Barnes, Kimberlee K.; Miller, Von E.

    2001-01-01

    Twelve sites on streams and rivers in the Eastern Iowa Basins study unit were sampled monthly and during selected storm events from March 1996 through September 1998 to assess the occurrence, distribution, and transport of nitrogen, phosphorus, suspended sediment, and organic carbon as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. One site was dropped from monthly sampling after 1996. Dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus were detected in every water sample collected. Nitrate accounted for 92 percent of the total dissolved nitrogen. About 22 percent of the samples had nitrate concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter as nitrogen for drinking-water regulations. The median concentration of total dissolved nitrogen for surface water in the study unit was 7.2 milligrams per liter. The median total phosphorus concentration for the study unit was 0.22 milligram per liter. About 75 percent of the total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended total phosphorus concentration of 0.10 milligram per liter or less to minimize algal growth. Median suspended sediment and dissolved organic-carbon concentrations for the study unit were 82 and 3.5 milligrams per liter, respectively.

  9. Constructing a near-continuous suspended-sediment budget using acoustic instrumentation on the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D. J.; Topping, D. J.; Griffiths, R. E.; Sabol, T. A.; Schmidt, J. C.; Bennett, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, is in disequilibrium. The river in this reach rapidly narrows during low-flow years, and widens during rare, large magnitude floods. One management strategy to improve in-channel habitat for the native ecosystem is to limit the rate and magnitude of channel narrowing during low-flow years through water releases from re-operated upstream dams. The proposed purpose of these dam re-operations is to maximize fine-sediment transport downstream, thereby limiting fine-sediment deposition and channel narrowing. This management strategy requires extensive knowledge of the quantity of fine-sediment supplied to the river channel, the predominant source areas of the supplied sediment, and the suspended-sediment transport dynamics over a range of flow magnitudes and durations. To address these issues, a near-continuous suspended-sediment monitoring program consisting of two suspended-sediment gages was established at two sites in Big Bend National Park, Texas. Suspended-sediment gages consist of two single-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler profilers that collect data at 15-minute intervals. Acoustic attenuation is used to calculate silt-and-clay concentration, and acoustic backscatter adjusted for silt-and-clay concentration is used to calculate sand concentration in two size classes. Acoustic attenuation and backscatter are calibrated using standard depth-integrated samples and cross-section-calibrated automatic pump samples. Two types of floods affect the sediment budgets of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, long-duration releases from upstream dams and short-duration flash floods originating in tributaries upstream or between the gages. Initial analyses of suspended-sediment dynamics during long-duration dam releases show that dam releases have the potential to export fine sediment from the national park reach. Dam releases transported approximately 8% of the total silt

  10. Reconstructing the suspended sediment load of the Yellow River since 1470 CE using the Drought and Flood Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiongxin

    2017-12-01

    The Yellow River of China is well known around the world for its large sediment yield and suspended sediment load (SSL). To better understand the cause of SSL variability, we need long-term perspectives that go back 100-1000 yr. However, few long-term reconstructions have been published, especially with high temporal resolution. In this study, we show that the Drought and Flood Index (IDF) based on historical document analysis can be used as a proxy to reconstruct the SSL, the high-flow season (June-October) stream flow, and the annual precipitation of the middle Yellow River from 1470-1919. The calibration equation explains 57.6% of the variance in the SSL produced from the drainage area between the Hekouzhen and Longmen stations on the Yellow River. Variation in the IDF reflects the variation in the summer monsoon in China that causes the variation in water vapor transport, precipitation, and soil erosion. These links explain the mechanism of reconstructing the SSL based on the IDF. The reconstructed 450 yr series shows that the SSL responds sensitively to El Niño events. The reconstructed SSL may be used as a baseline to assess the effects of human activity on the SSL for the period after 1970, and the reduction in SSL for the period 1971-2013 was estimated as 4.09 × 108 t/yr, accounting for 48.9% of the annual SSL induced by only climate.

  11. Effect of Hydrograph Separation on Suspended Sediment Concentration Predictions in a Forested Headwater with Thick Soil and Weathered Gneiss Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Kabeya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Two-component hydrograph separation using oxygen-18 concentrations was conducted at a sediment runoff observation weir installed in a small subcatchment of a forested gneiss catchment in Japan. The mean soil thickness of this catchment is 7.27 m, which comprises 3.29 m of brown forest soil (A and B layers and a 3.98-m layer of heavily weathered gneiss. Data were collected for a storm on 20–21 May 2003, and the percentage of event water separated by the stable isotope ratio in comparison with the total rainfall amount was about 1%. This value is within the ratio of a riparian zone in a drainage area. Temporal variation of suspended sediment concentration exhibited higher correlation with the event water component than with the total runoff or pre-event water component. This shows that the riparian zone causes rainwater to flow out quickly during a rain event, and that this is an important area of sediment production and transportation in a forested headwater with thick soil and weathered gneiss layers.

  12. An assessment of the suspended sediment rating curve approach for load estimation on the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Seán T.; Harrington, Joseph R.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the suspended sediment rating curve approach for load estimation on the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue in Ireland. The rivers, located in the South of Ireland, are underlain by sandstone, limestones and mudstones, and the catchments are primarily agricultural. A comprehensive database of suspended sediment data is not available for rivers in Ireland. For such situations, it is common to estimate suspended sediment concentrations from the flow rate using the suspended sediment rating curve approach. These rating curves are most commonly constructed by applying linear regression to the logarithms of flow and suspended sediment concentration or by applying a power curve to normal data. Both methods are assessed in this paper for the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue. Turbidity-based suspended sediment loads are presented for each river based on continuous (15 min) flow data and the use of turbidity as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration is investigated. A database of paired flow rate and suspended sediment concentration values, collected between the years 2004 and 2011, is used to generate rating curves for each river. From these, suspended sediment load estimates using the rating curve approach are estimated and compared to the turbidity based loads for each river. Loads are also estimated using stage and seasonally separated rating curves and daily flow data, for comparison purposes. The most accurate load estimate on the River Bandon is found using a stage separated power curve, while the most accurate load estimate on the River Owenabue is found using a general power curve. Maximum full monthly errors of - 76% to + 63% are found on the River Bandon with errors of - 65% to + 359% found on the River Owenabue. The average monthly error on the River Bandon is - 12% with an average error of + 87% on the River Owenabue. The use of daily flow data in the load estimation process does not result in a significant loss of accuracy on

  13. Satellite Observation of Changes in Suspended Sediment Induced by a Bay Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lina; Tang, Danling; Li, Congying

    2014-11-01

    Nearshore bridges may have impacts on ocean environments. This paper introduced how to investigate suspended sediment changes induced by a bay-bridge using remote sensing method. Hangzhou Bay Bridge (HBB) crossing Hangzhou Bay, in China, was taken as example. The spectral features of water were analyzed, and unsupervised classification of water quality was conducted, suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was inversed from Landsat TM data (30m spatial resolution) using a new established model. Those three aspects together revealed details of SSC changes induced by HBB. When water turbidity was low upstream, SSC increased 3% - 60% (8.4 mg. l-1 -176.29 mg. l-1) downstream. In general, the more turbid the water in upstream, the less SSC increases amplitude downstream. If water turbidity was high (> 350 mg. l-1) upstream, SSC decrease can be observed in the range of 300 meters or further downstream from the bridge. It decreases nearly 2% -17.5% (12.6 mg. l-1-62.98 mg. l-1). This study shows that Landsat TM data and corresponding methods can display the changing patterns of SSC induced by a nearshore bridge in coastal waters.

  14. Quantification and Analysis of Suspended Sediments Concentration Using Mobile and Static Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwinovantyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP can be used not only for measuring ocean currents, but also for quantifying suspended sediment concentrations (SSC from acoustic backscatter strength based on sonar principle. Suspended sediment has long been recognized as the largest sources of sea contaminant and must be considered as one of the important parameters in water quality of seawater. This research was to determine SSC from measured acoustic backscattered intensity of static and mobile ADCP. In this study, vertically mounted 400 kHz and 750 kHz static ADCP were deployed in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. A mobile ADCP 307.2 kHz was also mounted on the boat and moved to the predefined cross-section, accordingly. The linear regression analysis of echo intensity measured by ADCP and by direct measurement methods showed that ADCP is a reliable method to measure SSC with correlation coefficient (r 0.92. Higher SSC was observed in low water compared to that in high water and near port area compared to those in observed areas. All of this analysis showed that the combination of static and mobile ADCP methods produces reasonably good spatial and temporal data of SSC.

  15. A combined use of acoustic and optical devices to investigate suspended sediment in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Haun, Stefan; Baranya, Sandor

    2017-04-01

    The use of acoustic and optic devices has become more and more common for estimating suspended sediment loads in rivers. The echo intensity levels (EIL) recorded by means of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) have been applied in different methods, which provided relationships between scattering particles features derived from samples (i.e., concentration and grain size) and corresponding backscattering strength and sound attenuation. At the same time, the laser diffraction was applied by an in-stream sampler (LISST-SL) to measure suspended sediment concentration and the corresponding particle size distribution (PSD). These two techniques exhibited different limitations in terms of the measured range of concentration, sensitivity to a certain spectrum of particle sizes, and instruments deploy feasibility especially in large rivers, in a way that the use of sampled PSD by LISST-SL to validate ADCP methods may not be trivial. The aim of this study was to combine the vertical profiling of EIL by an ADCP with results from LISST-SL, eventually demonstrating the possibility of using moving ADCP measurements to detect different suspended matters along a Danube River section characterized by a small tributary junction. At the same time, this work elucidates optical to acoustic method deviations that hinders an actual validation of ADCP methods based on LISST-SL rather than with physical samplings.

  16. A Preliminary SPARROW Model of Suspended Sediment for the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Gregory E.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary Spatially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model of suspended sediment for the conterminous United States. The analysis is based on flux estimates compiled from more than 1,800 long-term monitoring stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the period 1975-2007. The SPARROW model is structured on the Reach File 1 (RF1) stream network, consisting of approximately 62,000 reach segments. The reach network has been modified to include more than 4,000 reservoirs, an important landscape feature affecting the delivery of suspended sediment. The model identifies six sources of sediment, including the stream channel and five classes of land use: urban, forested, Federal nonforested, agricultural and other, and noninundated land. The delivery of sediment from landform sources to RF1 streams is mediated by soil permeability, erodibility, slope, and rainfall; streamflow is found to affect the amount of sediment mobilized from the stream channel. The results show agricultural land and the stream channel to be major sources of sediment flux. Per unit area, Federal nonforested and urban lands are the largest landform sediment sources. Reservoirs are identified as major sites for sediment attenuation. This report includes a description for how the model results can be used to assess changes in instream sediment flux and concentration resulting from proposed changes in the regulation of sediment discharge from construction sites.

  17. Tropical river suspended sediment and solute dynamics in storms during an extreme drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathryn E.; Shanley, James B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Perdrial, Nicolas; Perdrial, Julia N.; Plante, Alain F.; McDowell, William H.

    2017-05-01

    Droughts, which can strongly affect both hydrologic and biogeochemical systems, are projected to become more prevalent in the tropics in the future. We assessed the effects of an extreme drought during 2015 on stream water composition in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. We demonstrated that drought base flow in the months leading up to the study was sourced from trade-wind orographic rainfall, suggesting a resistance to the effects of an otherwise extreme drought. In two catchments (Mameyes and Icacos), we sampled a series of four rewetting events that partially alleviated the drought. We collected and analyzed dissolved constituents (major cations and anions, organic carbon, and nitrogen) and suspended sediment (inorganic and organic matter (particulate organic carbon and particulate nitrogen)). The rivers appeared to be resistant to extreme drought, recovering quickly upon rewetting, as (1) the concentration-discharge (C-Q) relationships deviated little from the long-term patterns; (2) "new water" dominated streamflow during the latter events; (3) suspended sediment sources had accumulated in the channel during the drought flushed out during the initial events; and (4) the severity of the drought, as measured by the US drought monitor, was reduced dramatically after the rewetting events. Through this interdisciplinary study, we were able to investigate the impact of extreme drought through rewetting events on the river biogeochemistry.

  18. Tropical river suspended sediment and solute dynamics in storms during an extreme drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathryn E.; Shanley, James B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Perdrial, Nicolas; Perdrial, Julia N.; Plante, Alain F.; McDowell, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Droughts, which can strongly affect both hydrologic and biogeochemical systems, are projected to become more prevalent in the tropics in the future. We assessed the effects of an extreme drought during 2015 on stream water composition in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. We demonstrated that drought base flow in the months leading up to the study was sourced from trade-wind orographic rainfall, suggesting a resistance to the effects of an otherwise extreme drought. In two catchments (Mameyes and Icacos), we sampled a series of four rewetting events that partially alleviated the drought. We collected and analyzed dissolved constituents (major cations and anions, organic carbon, and nitrogen) and suspended sediment (inorganic and organic matter (particulate organic carbon and particulate nitrogen)). The rivers appeared to be resistant to extreme drought, recovering quickly upon rewetting, as (1) the concentration-discharge (C-Q) relationships deviated little from the long-term patterns; (2) “new water” dominated streamflow during the latter events; (3) suspended sediment sources had accumulated in the channel during the drought flushed out during the initial events; and (4) the severity of the drought, as measured by the US drought monitor, was reduced dramatically after the rewetting events. Through this interdisciplinary study, we were able to investigate the impact of extreme drought through rewetting events on the river biogeochemistry.

  19. Source and dispersal of suspended sediment in the macro-tidal Gulf of Kachchh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, V; Nath, B Nagender; Vethamony, P; Illangovan, D

    2007-06-01

    The macro-tidal Gulf of Kachchh, covering nearly 7000 km(2), is located about 150 km south of the Indus River mouth. In spite of semi-arid climate and lack of major rivers flowing into it, the Gulf is highly turbid with suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) during October-November 2002 ranging between 0.5 and 674 mgl(-1). Highly turbid waters are observed towards the northern portion of the mouth of the Gulf, at the head of the Gulf and adjacent to the numerous shoals present within the Gulf. Perennial high SSC in the Gulf is due to resuspension of sediments by strong tidal currents, shallow bathymetry and presence of fine-grained sediments on the sea floor. Numerical model studies show that there is a dynamic barrier in the central Gulf, which prevents the exchange of water and suspended sediments between the outer and inner Gulf. This dynamic barrier associated with strong east-west tidal currents restricts the turbid waters mainly to the northern Gulf, resulting in relatively clear waters (SSCKachchh is the Indus River. Although the Indus discharge has been severely curtailed in the recent decades due to construction of numerous dams and barrages, the Gulf of Kachchh continues to receive resuspended sediments from the numerous meso and macro-tidal creeks of the Indus delta. The sediments at the head of the Gulf appear to be a mixture of sediments derived from the Indus as well as the numerous seasonal rivers draining the Rann of Kachchh.

  20. Contributions of suspended sediment from highway construction and other land uses to the Olentangy River, Columbus, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsel, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Highway construction within the Olentangy River flood plain in Columbus, Ohio, was projected to be a large source of suspended sediment to the river system. A monitoring program was begun by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 to quantify the implacts of construction process. Sediment information was collected daily at six gaging stations located above, below, and within the construction area. Yields of suspended sediment from the active construction area ranged from 9,580 to 15,700 tons per square mile per year. Surrounding suburban terrain yielded 428 to754 tons per square mile per year. However, the size of the construction project was small in comparison to the surrounding suburbs contributing sediment. No more than 4 percent of the yearly downstream suspended-sediment loads were produced by high-way construction during the monitoring periods.

  1. The effects of unpaved roads on suspended sediment concentration of third- to fifth-order streams- A case study from southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, E. L.; Vestena, L. R.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    L-1) or a value that was 26 and 9 times higher than upstream and downstream samples, respectively. Event-by-event comparisons for each individual site display a tendency for road crossings to statistically increase mean concentration by an average of 6.9 times relative to upstream values only for those streams with the smallest catchment areas (< 2.6 km2). Meanwhile, for stream segments draining an excess of 9.5 km2 there was a tendency for upstream and downstream mean concentration to be statistically similar, presumably due to the minimal amount of road runoff contributed at a single crossing relative to the discharge being carried by the streams. The localized increase in sediment concentration by unpaved road crossing was not found to be associated to road surface area nor average slope. In summary, these findings suggest that the effect of unpaved roads on the local concentration of suspended sediment being transported by streams is strongly scale-dependent in that the impact tends to be important for the low-order headwater streams and undetectable for their higher order counterparts. These results point to the importance of low-order stream crossings in degrading water quality and the need to further explore the role of unpaved roads as agents of degradation in rural areas.

  2. Trends in Streamflow and Nutrient and Suspended-Sediment Concentrations and Loads in the Upper Mississippi, Ohio, Red, and Great Lakes River Basins, 1975-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, David L.; Robertson, Dale M.; Hall, David W.; Saad, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Many actions have been taken to reduce nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations and the amount of nutrients and sediment transported in streams as a result of the Clean Water Act and subsequent regulations. This report assesses how nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in selected streams have changed during recent years to determine if these actions have been successful. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in concentrations and trends in loads from 1993 to 2004 were computed for total nitrogen, dissolved ammonia, total organic nitrogen plus ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total suspended material (total suspended solids or suspended sediment), and total suspended sediment for 49 sites in the Upper Mississippi, Ohio, Red, and Great Lakes Basins. Changes in total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total suspended-material loads were examined from 1975 to 2003 at six sites to provide a longer term context for the data examined from 1993 to 2004. Flow-adjusted trends in total nitrogen concentrations at 19 of 24 sites showed tendency toward increasing concentrations, and overall trends in total nitrogen concentrations at 16 of the 24 sites showed a general tendency toward increasing concentrations. The trends in these flow-adjusted total nitrogen concentrations are related to the changes in fertilizer nitrogen applications. Flow-adjusted trends in dissolved ammonia concentrations from 1993 to 2004 showed a widespread tendency toward decreasing concentrations. The widespread, downward trends in dissolved ammonia concentrations indicate that some of the ammonia reduction goals of the Clean Water Act are being met. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in total organic plus ammonia nitrogen concentrations from 1993 to 2004 did not show a distinct spatial pattern. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in dissolved nitrite plus nitrate concentrations from 1993 to 2004 also did not show a distinct spatial pattern

  3. Nutrient, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River Basin in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Waldron, Marcus C.; DeSimone, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River and selected tributaries were estimated from composite water-quality samples in order to better understand the distribution and sources of these constituents in the river basin. The flow-proportional composite water-quality samples were collected during sequential 2-week periods at six stations along the river’s main stem, at three stations on tributaries, and at four wastewater treatment plants in the Massachusetts segment of the basin from June 2007 to September 2009. Samples were collected at an additional station on the Blackstone River near the mouth in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, from September 2008 to September 2009. The flow-proportional composite samples were used to estimate average daily loads during the sampling periods; annual loads for water years 2008 and 2009 also were estimated for the monitoring station on the Blackstone River near the Massachusetts-Rhode Island border. The effects of hydrologic conditions and net attenuation of nitrogen were investigated for loads in the Massachusetts segment of the basin. Sediment resuspension and contaminant loading dynamics were evaluated in two Blackstone River impoundments, the former Rockdale Pond (a breached impoundment) and Rice City Pond.

  4. The influence of a semi-arid sub-catchment on suspended sediments in the Mara River, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Christopher L; Subalusky, Amanda L; Anisfeld, Shimon C; Njoroge, Laban; Rosi, Emma J; Post, David M

    2018-01-01

    The Mara River Basin in East Africa is a trans-boundary basin of international significance experiencing excessive levels of sediment loads. Sediment levels in this river are extremely high (turbidities as high as 6,000 NTU) and appear to be increasing over time. Large wildlife populations, unregulated livestock grazing, and agricultural land conversion are all potential factors increasing sediment loads in the semi-arid portion of the basin. The basin is well-known for its annual wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) migration of approximately 1.3 million individuals, but it also has a growing population of hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius), which reside within the river and may contribute to the flux of suspended sediments. We used in situ pressure transducers and turbidity sensors to quantify the sediment flux at two sites for the Mara River and investigate the origin of riverine suspended sediment. We found that the combined Middle Mara-Talek catchment, a relatively flat but semi-arid region with large populations of wildlife and domestic cattle, is responsible for 2/3 of the sediment flux. The sediment yield from the combined Middle Mara-Talek catchment is approximately the same as the headwaters, despite receiving less rainfall. There was high monthly variability in suspended sediment fluxes. Although hippopotamus pools are not a major source of suspended sediments under baseflow, they do contribute to short-term variability in suspended sediments. This research identified sources of suspended sediments in the Mara River and important regions of the catchment to target for conservation, and suggests hippopotami may influence riverine sediment dynamics.

  5. 7Be/210Pbxs Ratio as an Indicator of Suspended Sediment Age or Fraction New Sediment in Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisoff, G.; Wilson, C. G.; Whiting, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    We present a technique to use the 7Be/210Pbxs ratio as a measure of suspended sediment age or as an indicator of the fraction of the suspended sediment that is recently eroded from the landscape. Although both 7Be and 210Pbxs are delivered seasonally and stochastically to the landscape by precipitation, the ratio of the two radionuclides varies substantially less. The 7Be/210Pbxs ratios measured in three different watersheds decrease in the following manner: precipitation (~16) > suspended sediments in rivers (6-7) > suspended sediments in estuaries (4-6) > sediment collected in sediment traps in the estuary (~1) > surface sediment of the estuary (~0.5). Decreases in the 7Be/210Pbxs ratio in suspended sediments can be interpreted to be the result of increased age of the sediment, since 7Be decays faster than 210Pb. Alternatively, a decrease in the 7Be/210Pbxs ratio in suspended sediments can be interpreted to be the result of dilution of newly-tagged 7Be-rich sediment by 7Be-dead sediment, for example, by erosion of soil below the 7Be-enriched surface layer or by resuspension of 7Be-dead bottom sediment. We present a model which uses the 7Be/210Pbxs ratio in suspended sediments to determine the time since the particles were tagged by precipitation-derived radionuclides (i.e., the age of the suspended sediment). In addition, we present an alternative model to determine the fraction of the sediment that is `newly-tagged'. These two models are applied to three watersheds - Old Woman Creek, Ohio; Weeks Bay, Alabama; and South Slough, Oregon - and yield similar findings at all three sites. Sediment ages increase from 0 in newly tagged material to 50-80 days in rivers to about 80-100 days in the estuaries to about 200 days in the sediment traps to about 300 days on surface bottom sediments. Alternatively, the percent new sediment decreases from 100% in newly-tagged material to about 35-50% in rivers to 25-35% in the estuary to less than 10% in the sediment traps to 1

  6. Evaluating turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration relations from the North Fork Toutle River basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington; annual, seasonal, event, and particle size variations - a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Christianson, Tami

    2015-01-01

    Regression of in-stream turbidity with concurrent sample-based suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) has become an accepted method for producing unit-value time series of inferred SSC (Rasmussen et al., 2009). Turbidity-SSC regression models are increasingly used to generate suspended-sediment records for Pacific Northwest rivers (e.g., Curran et al., 2014; Schenk and Bragg, 2014; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003). Recent work developing turbidity-SSC models for the North Fork Toutle River in Southwest Washington (Uhrich et al., 2014), as well as other studies (Landers and Sturm, 2013, Merten et al., 2014), suggests that models derived from annual or greater datasets may not adequately reflect shorter term changes in turbidity-SSC relations, warranting closer inspection of such relations. In-stream turbidity measurements and suspended-sediment samples have been collected from the North Fork Toutle River since 2010. The study site, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage 14240525 near Kid Valley, Washington, is 13 river km downstream of the debris avalanche emplaced by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981), and 2 river km downstream of the large sediment retention structure (SRS) built from 1987–1989 to mitigate the associated sediment hazard. The debris avalanche extends roughly 25 km down valley from the edifice of the volcano and is the primary source of suspended sediment moving past the streamgage (NF Toutle-SRS). Other significant sources are debris flow events and sand deposits upstream of the SRS, which are periodically remobilized and transported downstream. Also, finer material often is derived from the clay-rich original debris avalanche deposit, while coarser material can derive from areas such as fluvially reworked terraces.

  7. A reassessment of the suspended sediment load in the Madeira River basin from the Andes of Peru and Bolivia to the Amazon River in Brazil, based on 10 years of data from the HYBAM monitoring programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchel, Philippe; Santini, William; Guyot, Jean Loup; Moquet, Jean Sébastien; Martinez, Jean Michel; Espinoza, Jhan Carlo; Baby, Patrice; Fuertes, Oscar; Noriega, Luis; Puita, Oscar; Sondag, Francis; Fraizy, Pascal; Armijos, Elisa; Cochonneau, Gérard; Timouk, Franck; de Oliveira, Eurides; Filizola, Naziano; Molina, Jorge; Ronchail, Josyane

    2017-10-01

    The Madeira River is the second largest tributary of the Amazon River. It contributes approximately 13% of the Amazon River flow and it may contribute up to 50% of its sediment discharge to the Atlantic Ocean. Until now, the suspended sediment load of the Madeira River was not well known and was estimated in a broad range from 240 to 715 Mt yr-1. Since 2002, the HYBAM international network developed a new monitoring programme specially designed to provide more reliable data than in previous intents. It is based on the continuous monitoring of a set of 11 gauging stations in the Madeira River watershed from the Andes piedmont to the confluence with the Amazon River, and discrete sampling of the suspended sediment concentration every 7 or 10 days. This paper presents the results of the suspended sediment data obtained in the Madeira drainage basin during 2002-2011. The Madeira River suspended sediment load is estimated at 430 Mt yr-1 near its confluence with the Amazon River. The average production of the Madeira River Andean catchment is estimated at 640 Mt yr-1 (±30%), the corresponding sediment yield for the Andes is estimated at 3000 t km-2 yr-1 (±30%), and the average denudation rate is estimated at 1.20 mm yr-1 (±30%). Contrary to previous results that had mentioned high sedimentation rates in the Beni River floodplain, we detected no measurable sedimentation process in this part of the basin. On the Mamoré River basin, we observed heavy sediment deposition of approximately 210 Mt yr-1 that seem to confirm previous studies. But while these studies mentioned heavy sedimentation in the floodplain, we showed that sediment deposition occurred mainly in the Andean piedmont and immediate foreland in rivers (Parapeti, Grande, Pirai, Yapacani, Chimoré, Chaparé, Secure, Maniqui) with discharges that are not sufficiently large to transport their sediment load downstream in the lowlands.

  8. The effect of suspended sediment and color on ultraviolet spectrophotometric nitrate sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2016-03-08

    Four commercially available ultraviolet nitrate spectrophotometric sensors were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) to determine the effects of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on sensor accuracy. The evaluated sensors were: the Hach NITRATAX plus sc (5-millimeters (mm) path length), Hach NITRATAX plus sc (2 mm), S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5 mm), and the Satlantic SUNA V2 (5 mm). A National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable nitrate-free sediment standard was purchased and used to create the turbid environment, and an easily made filtered tea solution was used for the CDOM test. All four sensors performed well in the test that evaluated the effect of suspended sediment on accuracy. The Hach 5 mm, Hach 2 mm, and the SUNA V2 met their respective manufacturer accuracy specifications up to concentrations of 4,500 milligrams per liter (mg/L) SSC. The S::CAN failed to meet its accuracy specifications when the SSC concentrations exceeded 4,000 mg/L. Test results from the effect of CDOM on accuracy indicated a significant skewing of data from all four sensors and showed an artificial elevation of measured nitrate to varying amounts. Of the four sensors tested, the Satlantic SUNA V2’s accuracy was affected the least in the CDOM test. The nitrate concentration measured by the SUNA V2 was approximately 24 percent higher than the actual concentration when estimated total organic carbon values exceeded 44 mg/L. Measured nitrate concentration falsely increased 49 percent when measured by the Hach 5 mm, and 75 percent when measured by the Hach 2 mm. The S::CAN’s reported nitrate concentration increased 96 percent. Path length plays an important role in the sensor’s ability to compensate measurements for matrix interferences, but does not solely determine how well a sensor can handle all interferences. The sensor’s proprietary algorithms also play a key role in matrix

  9. Dynamics of suspended sediment concentration, flow discharge and sediment particle size interdependency to identify sediment source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-11-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of sediment yield is a key for proper watershed management. This study analyzed statistical characteristics and trends of suspended sediment concentration (SCS), flow discharge (FD) and sediment particle sizes using data from 24 gage stations scattered throughout the United States. Analysis showed significant time- and location-specific differences of these variables. The median values of SSC, FD and percentage of particle sizes smaller than 63 μm (P63) for all 24 gage stations were found to be 510.236 mg l-1 (right skewed), 45.406 m3 s-1 (left skewed) and 78.648% (right skewed), respectively. Most of the stations exhibited significant trends (P management practices which may call for local or regional planning based on natural (i.e., precipitation amount, type and erosivity, watershed area, and soil erodibility) and human-affected (i.e., land use and hydraulic structures and water resources management) factors governing the study variables.

  10. Overview of selected surrogate technologies for high-temporal resolution suspended-sediment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases replaced by cost-effective surrogate instruments and methods that produce a temporally dense time series of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common such surrogate technology, and the first to be sanctioned by the U.S. Geological Survey for use in producing data used in concert with water-discharge data to compute sediment concentrations and fluxes for storage in the National Water Information System. Other technologies, including laser-diffraction, digital photo-optic, acoustic-attenuation and backscatter, and pressure-difference techniques are being evaluated for producing reliable sediment concentration and, in some cases, particle-size distribution data. Each technology addresses a niche for sediment monitoring. Their performances range from compelling to disappointing. Some of these technologies have the potential to revolutionize fluvial-sediment data collection, analysis, and availability.

  11. A Tidally Averaged Sediment-Transport Model for San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Megan A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2009-01-01

    A tidally averaged sediment-transport model of San Francisco Bay was incorporated into a tidally averaged salinity box model previously developed and calibrated using salinity, a conservative tracer (Uncles and Peterson, 1995; Knowles, 1996). The Bay is represented in the model by 50 segments composed of two layers: one representing the channel (>5-meter depth) and the other the shallows (0- to 5-meter depth). Calculations are made using a daily time step and simulations can be made on the decadal time scale. The sediment-transport model includes an erosion-deposition algorithm, a bed-sediment algorithm, and sediment boundary conditions. Erosion and deposition of bed sediments are calculated explicitly, and suspended sediment is transported by implicitly solving the advection-dispersion equation. The bed-sediment model simulates the increase in bed strength with depth, owing to consolidation of fine sediments that make up San Francisco Bay mud. The model is calibrated to either net sedimentation calculated from bathymetric-change data or measured suspended-sediment concentration. Specified boundary conditions are the tributary fluxes of suspended sediment and suspended-sediment concentration in the Pacific Ocean. Results of model calibration and validation show that the model simulates the trends in suspended-sediment concentration associated with tidal fluctuations, residual velocity, and wind stress well, although the spring neap tidal suspended-sediment concentration variability was consistently underestimated. Model validation also showed poor simulation of seasonal sediment pulses from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta at Point San Pablo because the pulses enter the Bay over only a few days and the fate of the pulses is determined by intra-tidal deposition and resuspension that are not included in this tidally averaged model. The model was calibrated to net-basin sedimentation to calculate budgets of sediment and sediment-associated contaminants. While

  12. Effects of suspended sediment concentration and grain size on three optical turbidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Gustavo Henrique; Capel, Paul D.; Minella, Jean P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Optical turbidity sensors have been successfully used to determine suspended sediment flux in rivers, assuming the relation between the turbidity signal and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) has been appropriately calibrated. Sediment size, shape and colour affect turbidity and are important to incorporate into the calibration process. Materials and methods: This study evaluates the effect of SSC and particle size (i.e. medium sand, fine sand, very fine sand, and fines (silt + clay)) on the sensitivity of the turbidity signal. Three different turbidity sensors were used, with photo detectors positioned at 90 and 180 degrees relative to the axis of incident light. Five different sediment ratios of sand:fines (0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0) were also evaluated for a single SSC (1000 mg l-1). Results and discussion: The photo detectors positioned at 90 degrees were more sensitive than sensor positioned at 180 degrees in reading a wide variety of grain size particles. On average for the three turbidity sensors, the sensitivity for fines were 170, 40, and 4 times greater than sensitivities for medium sand, fine sand, and very fine sand, respectively. For an SSC of 1000 mg l-1 with the treatments composed of different proportions of sand and fines, the presence of sand in the mixture linearly reduced the turbidity signal. Conclusions: The results indicate that calibration of the turbidity signal should be carried out in situ and that the attenuation of the turbidity signal due to sand can be corrected, as long as the proportion of sand in the SSC can be estimated.

  13. Effects of Suspended Sediment on Early Life Stages of Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedel, Burton C; Wilkens, Justin L; Kennedy, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    The resuspension of sediments caused by activities, such as dredging operations, is a concern in Great Lakes harbors where multiple fish species spawn. To address such concerns, smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) were exposed to uncontaminated suspended sediment (nominally 0, 100, 250, and 500 mg/L) continuously for 72 h to determine the effects on egg-hatching success and swim-up fry survival and growth. The test sediments were collected from two harbors: (1) fine-grained sediment in Grand Haven Harbor, Lake Michigan, and (2) coarser-grained sediment in Fairport Harbor, Lake Erie. Eggs exposed to total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations >100 mg/L resulted in decreased survival of post-hatch larval fish. Fry survival was >90 % at the highest exposure concentration (500 mg/L), but growth was decreased when the exposure concentration was >100 mg/L. Growth and survival of swim-up fry held for a 7- and 26-day post-exposure the grow-out period was variable suggesting that the sediment grain size and strain of fish may influence lingering effects after the cessation of exposure. The results suggest that exposed eggs hatched normally; however, newly hatched larvae, which are temporarily immobile, are more vulnerable to the effects of suspended sediment. The swim-up fry were found to be more sensitive to high TSS concentrations in sandy relative to silty sediment. These data represent a conservative exposure scenario that can be extrapolated to high-energy systems in the field to inform management decisions regarding the necessity for dredging windows or need to implement controls to protect M. dolomieu.

  14. Suspended sediment and phosphorus budget and trophic status of Bukit Merah Reservoir, Perak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najib Sumayyah Aimi Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bukit Merah Reservoir (BMR is one of the 51 impoundments in Malaysia. BMR is the oldest reservoir built in the early 1900s originally to store water for irrigation, but nowadays its functions include also flood control and water supply. Nowadays, it is threatened by land use change in the upper catchments and surrounding activities, which feeding eroded material and chemicals into the reservoir. Suspended sediment, as well as, nutrient fluxes into BMR are becoming an increasing threat to the reservoir, as its sedimentation and eutrophication accelerate. This paper discusses our study on the BMR carried out between March 2008 and April 2009 to assess the water quality status, and to determine the sediment and Total Phosphorus (TP influx into the south pool lake. An estimated amount of suspended sediment fluxes of about 2,900 t year−1 came from the north pool lake (18% and 12,900 t year−1 from the main Kurau River inlet (82% of the total input to the BMR. Of these total sediment input (nearly 15,800 t about 5,600 t (36% of the total sediment influx was trapped in the BMR. TP influx was about 18.8 t year−1 and about 7 t (37% was trapped in the reservoir. The amount sediment and TP stored in the BMR affect the water quality of the lake, therefore the mean trophic state of the lake is eutrophic (TSI of 54.4 related to high productivity. Increasing sediment input into the reservoir has affected the reservoir volume and frequent flooding down-stream of the reservoir during rainy seasons, while eutrophication has caused the lake water quality deterioration.

  15. TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kuznetsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Main aspects that determine conditions of transportation industry effective management and decrease of transportation expenses are discussed. Theoretical concepts making it possible to solve the problem of scientific management of the whole country’s goods transportation costs are provided for. Main approaches are presented to the solution of motor transport operation ecological optimization problem as well as to the rise of motor transport workers’ labor productivity, to the increase of transportation vehicles use efficiency and to determine functional capacity of the motor transport complex.

  16. Estimation of suspended sediment flux in streams using continuous turbidity and flow data coupled with laboratory concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Lewis

    2002-01-01

    The widening use of sediment surrogate measurements such as turbidity necessitates consideration of new methods for estimating sediment flux. Generally, existing methods can be simply be used in new ways. The effectiveness of a method varies according to the quality of the surrogate data and its relation to suspended sediment concentration (SSC). For this discussion,...

  17. Automatic real-time control of suspended sediment based upon high frequency in situ measurements of nephelometric turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Lewis; Rand Eads

    1998-01-01

    Abstract - For estimating suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in rivers, turbidity is potentially a much better predictor than water discharge. Since about 1990, it has been feasible to automatically collect high frequency turbidity data at remote sites using battery-powered turbidity probes that are properly mounted in the river or stream. With sensors calibrated...

  18. Assessing the impact of landuse change, climate change and reservoirs on suspended sediment load in Da river (China-Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Thinh, Le; Soncini, Andrea; Bocchiola, Daniele; Ranzi, Roberto; Rulli, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Sediment issues have critical implications for aquatic ecology, agriculture, water supply and river navigation. Recently, with the construction and operation of several reservoirs in Da river basin (China-Vietnam), such as Hoa Binh, Lai Chau, Son La and so on, this issue has risen high interest and concern. Reservoirs have been built to meet several important needs, including increasing energy, irrigation, and drinking water demand. However, the decision maker should pay attention to the effects on sediment load, namely trapping of sediments, reduction of sediment concentration downstream reservoirs, increasing riverbank erosion, and localized erosion nearby hydraulic structures. In addition, land use changes, and climate changes are also to be considered as causing effect on sediment erosion and transport. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of separate factors (reservoirs, land use change, and climate change) on sediment load in the Da river basin. To this purpose, an updated and enhanced version of the soil erosion and transport model at the catchment scale, namely DIMOSHONG_RUSLE is applied to the Da river basin. More than 50 years of monthly precipitation, runoff and suspended sediment load data are processed. Two historical (1983, 2000) land use maps were generated based on statistic data of the government. The effect of land use change, and reservoirs is assessed on the basis of trends observed in the last decades. To develop the DIMOSHONG_RUSLE model in the period 1961-1985 with land use 1983 (before Hoa Binh reservoir was constructed completely) an updated version of the parameters of the RUSLE equation is determined according to the space variability on the soil types base on experimental data. Then, using chosen optimized parameter of RUSLE, suspended sediment load for the period 1986-2005 (with the Hoa Binh reservoir built and in operation) corresponding with land use in 2000 are calculated. The results are in good agreement with observed

  19. Suspended sediment dynamics in a large-scale turbidity current: Direct measurements from the deep-water Congo Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, S.; Azpiroz, M.; Cartigny, M.; Clare, M. A.; Parsons, D. R.; Sumner, E.; Talling, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Turbidity currents that transport sediment to the deep ocean deposit a greater volume of sediment than any other process on Earth. To date, only a handful of studies have directly measured turbidity currents, with flow durations ranging from a few minutes to a few hours. Our understanding of turbidity current dynamics is therefore largely derived from scaled laboratory experiments and numerical modelling. Recent years have seen the first field-scale measurements of depth-resolved velocity profiles, but sediment concentration (a key parameter for turbidity currents) remains elusive. Here, we present high resolution measurements of deep-water turbidity currents from the Congo Canyon; one of the world's largest submarine canyons. Direct measurements using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) show that flows can last for many days, rather than hours as seen elsewhere, and provide the first quantification of concentration and grain size within deep-water turbidity currents.Velocity and backscatter were measured at 5 second intervals by an ADCP suspended 80 m above the canyon floor, at 2000 m water depth. A novel inversion method using multiple ADCP frequencies enabled quantification of sediment concentration and grain size within the flows. We identify high concentrations of coarse sediment within a thin frontal cell, which outruns a thicker, trailing body. Thus, the flows grow in length while propagating down-canyon. This is distinct from classical models and other field-scale measurements of turbidity currents. The slow-moving body is dominated by suspended fine-grained sediment. The body mixes with the surrounding fluid leaving diffuse clouds of sediment that persist for days after initial entrainment. Ambient tidal flow also controls the mixing within the body and the surrounding fluid. Our results provide a new quantification of suspended sediment within flows and the interaction with the surrounding fluid.

  20. Determining the sources of suspended sediment in a Mediterranean groundwater-dominated river: the Na Borges basin (Mallorca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrany, Joan; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria

    2013-04-01

    Tracers have been acknowledged as a useful tool to identify sediment sources, based upon a variety of techniques and chemical and physical sediment properties. Sediment fingerprinting supports the notion that changes in sedimentation rates are not just related to increased/reduced erosion and transport in the same areas, but also to the establishment of different pathways increasing sediment connectivity. The Na Borges is a Mediterranean lowland agricultural river basin (319 km2) where traditional soil and water conservation practices have been applied over millennia to provide effective protection of cultivated land. During the twentieth century, industrialisation and pressure from tourism activities have increased urbanised surfaces, which have impacts on the processes that control streamflow. Within this context, source material sampling was focused in Na Borges on obtaining representative samples from potential sediment sources (comprised topsoil; i.e., 0-2 cm) susceptible to mobilisation by water and subsequent routing to the river channel network, while those representing channel bank sources were collected from actively eroding channel margins and ditches. Samples of road dust and of solids from sewage treatment plants were also collected. During two hydrological years (2004-2006), representative suspended sediment samples for use in source fingerprinting studies were collected at four flow gauging stations and at eight secondary sampling points using time-integrating sampling samplers. Likewise, representative bed-channel sediment samples were obtained using the resuspension approach at eight sampling points in the main stem of the Na Borges River. These deposits represent the fine sediment temporarily stored in the bed-channel and were also used for tracing source contributions. A total of 102 individual time-integrated sediment samples, 40 bulk samples and 48 bed-sediment samples were collected. Upon return to the laboratory, source material samples were

  1. Relations between continuous real-time turbidity data and discrete suspended-sediment concentration samples in the Neosho and Cottonwood Rivers, east-central Kansas, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Neosho River and its primary tributary, the Cottonwood River, are the primary sources of inflow to the John Redmond Reservoir in east-central Kansas. Sedimentation rate in the John Redmond Reservoir was estimated as 743 acre-feet per year for 1964–2006. This estimated sedimentation rate is more than 80 percent larger than the projected design sedimentation rate of 404 acre-feet per year, and resulted in a loss of 40 percent of the conservation pool since its construction in 1964. To reduce sediment input into the reservoir, the Kansas Water Office implemented stream bank stabilization techniques along an 8.3 mile reach of the Neosho River during 2010 through 2011. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office and funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund, operated continuous real-time water-quality monitors upstream and downstream from stream bank stabilization efforts before, during, and after construction. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity. Discrete sediment samples were collected from June 2009 through September 2012 and analyzed for suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), percentage of sediments less than 63 micrometers (sand-fine break), and loss of material on ignition (analogous to amount of organic matter). Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely measured SSC samples, and turbidity or streamflow to estimate continuously SSC. Continuous water-quality monitors represented between 96 and 99 percent of the cross-sectional variability for turbidity, and had slopes between 0.91 and 0.98. Because consistent bias was not observed, values from continuous water-quality monitors were considered representative of stream conditions. On average, turbidity-based SSC models explained 96 percent of the variance in SSC. Streamflow-based regressions explained 53 to 60 percent of the variance. Mean squared

  2. Improving understanding of mixed-land-use watershed suspended sediment regimes: Mechanistic progress through high-frequency sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elliott; Hubbart, Jason A

    2017-11-15

    Given the importance of suspended sediment to biogeochemical functioning of aquatic ecosystems, and the increasing concern of mixed-land-use effects on pollutant loading, there is an urgent need for research that quantitatively characterizes spatiotemporal variation of suspended sediment dynamics in contemporary watersheds. A study was conducted in a representative watershed of the central United States utilizing a nested-scale experimental watershed design, including five gauging sites (n=5) partitioning the catchment into five sub-watersheds. Hydroclimate stations at gauging sites were used to monitor air temperature, precipitation, and stream stage at 30-min intervals during the study (Oct. 2009-Feb. 2014). Streamwater grab samples were collected four times per week, at each site, for the duration of the study (Oct. 2009-Feb. 2014). Water samples were analyzed for suspended sediment using laser particle diffraction. Results showed significant differences (pland use (e.g. urban stormwater dilution) and surficial geology (e.g. supply-controlled spatial variation of particle size). Correlation analyses indicated weak relationships with both hydroclimate and land use, indicating non-linear sediment dynamics. Suspended sediment parameters displayed consistent seasonality during the study, with total concentration decreasing through the growing season and mean particle size inversely tracking air temperature. Likely explanations include vegetation influences and climate-driven weathering cycles. Results reflect unique observations of spatiotemporal variation of suspended sediment particle size class. Such information is crucial for land and water resource managers working to mitigate aquatic ecosystem degradation and improve water resource sustainability in mixed-land-use watersheds globally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intelligent Models Performance Improvement Based on Wavelet Algorithm and Logarithmic Transformations in Suspended Sediment Estimation

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    R. Hajiabadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One reason for the complexity of hydrological phenomena prediction, especially time series is existence of features such as trend, noise and high-frequency oscillations. These complex features, especially noise, can be detected or removed by preprocessing. Appropriate preprocessing causes estimation of these phenomena become easier. Preprocessing in the data driven models such as artificial neural network, gene expression programming, support vector machine, is more effective because the quality of data in these models is important. Present study, by considering diagnosing and data transformation as two different preprocessing, tries to improve the results of intelligent models. In this study two different intelligent models, Artificial Neural Network and Gene Expression Programming, are applied to estimation of daily suspended sediment load. Wavelet transforms and logarithmic transformation is used for diagnosing and data transformation, respectively. Finally, the impacts of preprocessing on the results of intelligent models are evaluated. Materials and Methods In this study, Gene Expression Programming and Artificial Neural Network are used as intelligent models for suspended sediment load estimation, then the impacts of diagnosing and logarithmic transformations approaches as data preprocessor are evaluated and compared to the result improvement. Two different logarithmic transforms are considered in this research, LN and LOG. Wavelet transformation is used to time series denoising. In order to denoising by wavelet transforms, first, time series can be decomposed at one level (Approximation part and detail part and second, high-frequency part (detail will be removed as noise. According to the ability of gene expression programming and artificial neural network to analysis nonlinear systems; daily values of suspended sediment load of the Skunk River in USA, during a 5-year period, are investigated and then estimated.4 years of

  4. Partial Least Squares Regression for Determining the Control Factors for Runoff and Suspended Sediment Yield during Rainfall Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nufang Fang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistics are commonly used to identify the factors that control the dynamics of runoff or sediment yields during hydrological processes. However, one issue with the use of conventional statistical methods to address relationships between variables and runoff or sediment yield is multicollinearity. The main objectives of this study were to apply a method for effectively identifying runoff and sediment control factors during hydrological processes and apply that method to a case study. The method combines the clustering approach and partial least squares regression (PLSR models. The case study was conducted in a mountainous watershed in the Three Gorges Area. A total of 29 flood events in three hydrological years in areas with different land uses were obtained. In total, fourteen related variables were separated from hydrographs using the classical hydrograph separation method. Twenty-nine rainfall events were classified into two rainfall regimes (heavy Rainfall Regime I and moderate Rainfall Regime II based on rainfall characteristics and K-means clustering. Four separate PLSR models were constructed to identify the main variables that control runoff and sediment yield for the two rainfall regimes. For Rainfall Regime I, the dominant first-order factors affecting the changes in sediment yield in our study were all of the four rainfall-related variables, flood peak discharge, maximum flood suspended sediment concentration, runoff, and the percentages of forest and farmland. For Rainfall Regime II, antecedent condition-related variables have more effects on both runoff and sediment yield than in Rainfall Regime I. The results suggest that the different control factors of the two rainfall regimes are determined by the rainfall characteristics and thus different runoff mechanisms.

  5. Turbidity-based methods for continuous estimates of suspended sediment, particulate carbon, phosphorus and nitrogen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Alsuliman, Malek; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A good evaluation of surface water pollution is mainly limited by the monitoring strategy and sampling frequencies. Carbon and nutrient monitoring at finer time intervals is still very difficult and expensive. Therefore, establishing relationships between grab sampling and continuous commonly available data can be considered as a favorable solution to turn this problem. The aim of this study was to develop a method to continuously estimate instream sediment, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations based on high resolution measurement of turbidity, discharge, electrical conductivity and oxygen concentration. To achieve our gaols, high frequency data (30 min interval) were generated during 3 years at the UFZ- TERENO platform Bode (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories). Samples were analysed for suspended sediment concentration (SSC), particulate organic carbon (POC), total organic carbon (TOC), particulate nitrogen (PN) and particulate phosphorus (PP) using simple and multiple linear regression models. For this study, measurements from six sub-catchments with different geographical characteristics were considered. The available data sets were divided into two years (2010-2012) calibration and one year (2012-2013) validation periods. Results revealed that the turbidity was the most predictor variable in all models, particularly for suspended sediment concentrations. For all gauging stations, the SSC could be explained using simple linear regression model by the turbidity with a lowest correlation coefficient of 0.93. The non-uniqueness of the simple linear equation obtained between the stations reflected the sensitivity of the turbidity signal to the differences in land use and agriculture management between the sub-catchments. Best predictions of POC, TOC, PP and PN were achieved when multiple linear regression models were used including discharge, electrical conductivity and oxygen concentrations as predictor variables in addition to turbidity (lowest

  6. Estimated suspended-sediment loads and yields in the French and Brandywine Creek Basins, Chester County, Pennsylvania, water years 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Olson, Leif E.

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at four stream stations--French Creek near Phoenixville, West Branch Brandywine Creek near Honey Brook, West Branch Brandywine Creek at Modena, and East Branch Brandywine Creek below Downingtown--in Chester County, Pa. Sedimentation and siltation is the leading cause of stream impairment in Chester County, and these data are critical for quantifying sediment transport. This study was conducted by the USGS in cooperation with the Chester County Water Resources Authority and the Chester County Health Department. Data from optical turbidity sensors deployed at the four stations were recorded at 15- or 30-minute intervals by a data logger and uploaded every 1 to 4 hours to the USGS database. Most of the suspended-sediment samples were collected using automated samplers. The use of optical sensors to continuously monitor turbidity provided an accurate estimate of sediment fluctuations without the collection and analysis costs associated with intensive sampling during storms. Turbidity was used as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), which is a measure of sedimentation and siltation. Regression models were developed between SSC and turbidity for each of the monitoring stations using SSC data collected from the automated samplers and turbidity data collected at each station. Instantaneous suspended-sediment loads (SSL) were computed from time-series turbidity and discharge data for the 2008 and 2009 water years using the regression equations. The instantaneous computations of SSL were summed to provide daily, storm, and water year annual loads. The annual SSL contributed from each basin was divided by the upstream drainage area to estimate the annual sediment yield. For all four basins, storms provided more than 96 percent of the annual SSL. In each basin, four storms generally provided over half the annual SSL each water year. Stormflows with the

  7. A New Model to Predict the Total Suspended Sediment Load from a River to the Ocean Based on an End Member Example from the Lowermost Huanghe (Yellow River), China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.

    2016-12-01

    The total suspended sediment load in a river estuary links continentally derived material to marine deposits, and therefore it is important to quantify the physical conditions impacting movement of sediment in an estuary. Depending on its source, suspended riverine sediment comprises proportions of bed material load and wash load whereby bed material sediment originates from the channel bed. Typically after propagation of flow over the channel bed, bed material load at the estuary is always at its transport capacity, and its flux can be predicted based on the local physical conditions. On the contrary, wash load is usually below its transport capacity, because flux is set by upstream input. Therefore, physically-based methods for predicting wash load flux are limited, and instead wash load in rivers is determined by using empirical techniques, which must be constantly updated over time due to changing environmental conditions and anthropogenic pressures. Here, we hypothesize that for any river with a sufficiently high sediment concentration, wash load reaches transport capacity, as set by both hydrodynamic conditions and also constrained by the bed material load. To test this, a sediment transport database obtained from the lower Huanghe, China, is analyzed. We find that for this system, which is the most sediment concentrated river in the world, the bed material load reduces the transport capacity of wash load in the flow. By knowing bed material load, a competitive relationship between this sediment flux and wash load is produced, and used to reveal the remaining transport capacity available for wash load transport. This demonstrates the ability to have a physically based methodology for predicting wash load and, when combined with bed material load, the total fluvial sediment load discharged to the marine environment. However, the examination of applying condition of present methodology reveals that the methodology is generally suitable for rivers with bed

  8. Characterization of water quality and suspended sediment during cold-season flows, warm-season flows, and stormflows in the Fountain and Monument Creek watersheds, Colorado, 2007–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa D.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.

    2017-09-01

    From 2007 through 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, conducted a study in the Fountain and Monument Creek watersheds, Colorado, to characterize surface-water quality and suspended-sediment conditions for three different streamflow regimes with an emphasis on characterizing water quality during storm runoff. Data collected during this study were used to evaluate the effects of stormflows and wastewater-treatment effluent discharge on Fountain and Monument Creeks in the Colorado Springs, Colorado, area. Water-quality samples were collected at 2 sites on Upper Fountain Creek, 2 sites on Monument Creek, 3 sites on Lower Fountain Creek, and 13 tributary sites during 3 flow regimes: cold-season flow (November–April), warm-season flow (May–October), and stormflow from 2007 through 2015. During 2015, additional samples were collected and analyzed for Escherichia coli (E. coli) during dry weather conditions at 41 sites, located in E. coli impaired stream reaches, to help identify source areas and scope of the impairment.Concentrations of E. coli, total arsenic, and dissolved copper, selenium, and zinc in surface-water samples were compared to Colorado in-stream standards. Stormflow concentrations of E. coli frequently exceeded the recreational use standard of 126 colonies per 100 milliliters at main-stem and tributary sites by more than an order of magnitude. Even though median E. coli concentrations in warm-season flow samples were lower than median concentrations in storm-flow samples, the water quality standard for E. coli was still exceeded at most main-stem sites and many tributary sites during warm-season flows. Six samples (three warm-season flow and three stormflow samples) collected from Upper Fountain Creek, upstream from the confluence of Monument Creek, and two stormflow samples collected from Lower Fountain Creek, downstream from the confluence with Monument Creek, exceeded the acute water

  9. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  10. Acoustic doppler velocimeter backscatter for quantification of suspended sediment concentration in South San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet; Work, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A data set was acquired on a shallow mudflat in south San Francisco Bay that featured simultaneous, co-located optical and acoustic sensors for subsequent estimation of suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). The optical turbidity sensor output was converted to SSC via an empirical relation derived at a nearby site using bottle sample estimates of SSC. The acoustic data was obtained using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. Backscatter and noise were combined to develop another empirical relation between the optical estimates of SSC and the relative backscatter from the acoustic velocimeter. The optical and acoustic approaches both reproduced similar general trends in the data and have merit. Some seasonal variation in the dataset was evident, with the two methods differing by greater or lesser amounts depending on which portion of the record was examined. It is hypothesized that this is the result of flocculation, affecting the two signals by different degrees, and that the significance or mechanism of the flocculation has some seasonal variability. In the earlier portion of the record (March), there is a clear difference that appears in the acoustic approach between ebb and flood periods, and this is not evident later in the record (May). The acoustic method has promise but it appears that characteristics of flocs that form and break apart may need to be accounted for to improve the power of the method. This may also be true of the optical method: both methods involve assuming that the sediment characteristics (size, size distribution, and shape) are constant

  11. Acoustic Doppler velocimeter backscatter for quantification of suspended sediment concentration in South San Francisco Bay, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Work, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A data set was acquired on a shallow mudflat in south San Francisco Bay that featured simultaneous, co-located optical and acoustic sensors for subsequent estimation of suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). The optical turbidity sensor output was converted to SSC via an empirical relation derived at a nearby site using bottle sample estimates of SSC. The acoustic data was obtained using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. Backscatter and noise were combined to develop another empirical relation between the optical estimates of SSC and the relative backscatter from the acoustic velocimeter. The optical and acoustic approaches both reproduced similar general trends in the data and have merit. Some seasonal variation in the dataset was evident, with the two methods differing by greater or lesser amounts depending on which portion of the record was examined. It is hypothesized that this is the result of flocculation, affecting the two signals by different degrees, and that the significance or mechanism of the flocculation has some seasonal variability. In the earlier portion of the record (March), there is a clear difference that appears in the acoustic approach between ebb and flood periods, and this is not evident later in the record (May). The acoustic method has promise but it appears that characteristics of flocs that form and break apart may need to be accounted for to improve the power of the method. This may also be true of the optical method: both methods involve assuming that the sediment characteristics (size, size distribution, and shape) are constant.

  12. Hydrologic controls on coastal suspended sediment plumes around the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. W. Chu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising sea levels and increased surface melting of the Greenland ice sheet have heightened the need for direct observations of meltwater release from the ice edge to ocean. Buoyant sediment plumes that develop in fjords downstream of outlet glaciers are controlled by numerous factors, including meltwater runoff. Here, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite imagery is used to average surface suspended sediment concentration (SSC in fjords around ∼80% of Greenland from 2000–2009. Spatial and temporal patterns in SSC are compared with positive-degree-days (PDD, a proxy for surface melting, from the Polar MM5 regional climate model. Over this decade significant geographic covariance occurred between ice sheet PDD and fjord SSC, with outlet type (land- vs. marine-terminating glaciers also important. In general, high SSC is associated with high PDD and/or a high proportion of land-terminating glaciers. Unlike previous site-specific studies of the Watson River plume at Kangerlussuaq, temporal covariance is low, suggesting that plume dimensions best capture interannual runoff dynamics whereas SSC allows assessment of meltwater signals across much broader fjord environments around the ice sheet. Remote sensing of both plume characteristics thus offers a viable approach for observing spatial and temporal patterns of meltwater release from the Greenland ice sheet to the global ocean.

  13. Annual suspended-sediment loads in the Colorado River near Cisco, Utah, 1930-82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Colorado River upstream of gaging station 09180500 near Cisco, Utah, drains about 24,100 square miles in Utah and Colorado. Altitudes in the basin range from 12,480 feet near the headwaters to 4,090 feet at station 09180500. The average annual precipitation for 1894-1982 near the station was 7.94 inches. The average annual precipitation near the headwaters often exceeds 50 inches. Rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene are exposed in the drainage basin upstream from station 09180500. Shale, limestone, siltstone, mudstone, and sandstone probably are the most easily eroded rocks in the basin, and they contribute large quantities of sediment to the Colorado River. During 1930-82, the U.S. Geological Survey collected records of fluvial sediment at station 09180500. Based on these records, the mean annual suspended-sediment load was 11,390,000 tone, ranging from 2,038,000 tons in water year 1981 to 35,700,000 tons in water year 1938. The minimum daily load of 14 tons was on August 22, 1960, and the maximum daily load of 2,790,000 tons was on October 14, 1941. (USGS)

  14. Optical Measurement of Cell Colonization Patterns on Individual Suspended Sediment Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu Ha; Tang, Fiona H. M.; Maggi, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Microbial processes can make substantial differences to the way in which particles settle in aquatic environments. A novel method (OMCEC, optical measurement of cell colonization) is introduced to systematically map the biological spatial distribution over individual suspended sediment aggregates settling through a water column. OMCEC was used to investigate (1) whether a carbon source concentration has an impact on cell colonization, (2) how cells colonize minerals, and (3) if a correlation between colonization patterns and aggregate geometry exists. Incubations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and stained montmorillonite at four sucrose concentrations were tested in a settling column equipped with a full-color microparticle image velocimetry system. The acquired high-resolution images were processed to map the cell distribution on aggregates based on emission spectra separation. The likelihood of cells colonizing minerals increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Colonization patterns were classified into (i) scattered, (ii) well touched, and (iii) poorly touched, with the second being predominant. Cell clusters in well-touched patterns were found to have lower capacity dimension than those in other patterns, while the capacity dimension of the corresponding aggregates was relatively high. A strong correlation of colonization patterns with aggregate biomass fraction and properties suggests dynamic colonization mechanisms from cell attachment to minerals, to joining of isolated cell clusters, and finally cell growth over the entire aggregate. This paper introduces a widely applicable method for analyses of microbial-affected sediment dynamics and highlights the microbial control on aggregate geometry, which can improve the prediction of large-scale morphodynamics processes.

  15. Suspended sediment concentration–discharge relationships in the (sub- humid Ethiopian highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Guzman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Loss of top soil and subsequent filling up of reservoirs in much of the lands with variable relief in developing countries degrades environmental resources necessary for subsistence. In the Ethiopia highlands, sediment mobilization from rain-fed agricultural fields is one of the leading factors causing land degradation. Sediment rating curves, produced from long-term sediment concentration and discharge data, attempt to predict suspended sediment concentration variations, which exhibit a distinct shift with the progression of the rainy season. In this paper, we calculate sediment rating curves and examine this shift in concentration for three watersheds in which rain-fed agriculture is practiced to differing extents. High sediment concentrations with low flows are found at the beginning of the rainy season of the semi-monsoonal climate, while high flows and low sediment concentrations occur at the end of the rainy season. Results show that a reasonably unique set of rating curves were obtained by separating biweekly data into early, mid, and late rainfall periods and by making adjustments for the ratio of plowed cropland. The shift from high to low concentrations suggests that diminishing sediment supply and dilution from greater base flow during the end of the rainfall period play important roles in characterizing changing sediment concentrations during the rainy season.

  16. Nutrients, Select Pesticides, and Suspended Sediment in the Karst Terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin, Kentucky, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Angela S.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, on nutrients, select pesticides, and suspended sediment in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin. Streamflow, nutrient, select pesticide, and suspended-sediment data were collected at seven sampling stations from 2004 through 2006. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate ranged from 0.21 to 4.9 milligrams per liter (mg/L) at the seven stations. The median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate for all stations sampled was 1.6 mg/L. Total phosphorus concentrations were greater than 0.1 mg/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended maximum concentration, in 45 percent of the samples. Concentrations of orthophosphates ranged from less than 0.006 to 0.46 mg/L. Concentrations of nutrients generally were larger during spring and summer months, corresponding to periods of increased fertilizer application on agricultural lands. Concentrations of suspended sediment ranged from 1.0 to 1,490 mg/L at the seven stations. Of the 47 pesticides analyzed, 14 were detected above the adjusted method reporting level of 0.01 micrograms per liter (mug/L). Although these pesticides were detected in water-quality samples, they generally were found at less than part-per-billion concentrations. Atrazine was the only pesticide detected at concentrations greater than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 3 mug/L, and the maximum detected concentration was 24.6 mug/L. Loads and yields of nutrients, selected pesticides, and suspended sediment were estimated at two mainstream stations on Sinking Creek, a headwater station (Sinking Creek at Rosetta) and a station at the basin outlet (Sinking Creek near Lodiburg). Mean daily streamflow data were available for the estimation of loads and yields from a stream gage at the basin outlet station; however, only periodic instantaneous flow measurements were available for the

  17. The effect of source suspended sediment concentration on the sediment dynamics of a macrotidal creek and salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Emma; van Proosdij, Danika; Milligan, Timothy G.

    2017-09-01

    Seasonal variability in the sediment dynamics of a Bay of Fundy tidal creek and salt marsh system was analyzed to better understand the ecomorphodynamics of a high suspended sediment concentration intertidal habitat. Data were collected over 62 tides for velocity, suspended sediment concentration, deposition, and grain size at four stations from the creek thalweg to the marsh surface. Five topographic surveys were also conducted throughout the 14-month study. Deposition rates per tide varied spatially from 56.4 g m-2 at the creek thalweg to 15.3 g m-2 at the marsh surface. Seasonal variations in deposition in the creek and marsh surface were from 38.0 g m-2 to 97.7 g m-2 and from 12.2 g m-2 to 19.6 g m-2 respectively. Deposition and erosion were greatest in late fall and winter. This seasonal change, led by higher suspended sediment concentrations, was observed in the creek and at the marsh bank but notably absent from the marsh edge and marsh surface. Sediments were predominantly deposited in floc form (76-83%). Because of high floc content, higher suspended sediment concentrations led to more rapid loss of sediment from suspension. With increasing sediment concentration, deposition increased in the tidal creek and at the marsh bank but not at the marsh edge or marsh surface. This suggests that in highly flocculated environments the water column clears fast enough that very little sediment remains in suspension when the water reaches the marsh and that the sediment concentration during marsh inundation is independent of the initial concentration in the creek.

  18. Particle size distribution of river-suspended sediments determined by in situ measured remote-sensing reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanzhi; Huang, Zhaojun; Chen, Chuqun; He, Yijun; Jiang, Tingchen

    2015-07-10

    Suspended sediments in water bodies are classified into organic and inorganic matter and have been investigated by remote-sensing technology for years. Focusing on inorganic matter, however, detailed information such as the grain size of this matter has not been provided yet. In this study, we present a new solution for estimating inorganic suspended sediments' size distribution in highly complex Case 2 waters by using a simple spectrometer sensor rather than a backscattering sensor. An experiment was carried out in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in the dry season to collect the remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) and particle size distribution (PSD) of inorganic suspended sediments. Based on Mie theory, PSDs in the PRE waters were retrieved by Rrs, colored dissolved organic matter, and phytoplankton. The retrieved median diameters in 12 stations show good agreement with those of laboratory analysis at root mean square error of 2.604 μm (27.63%), bias of 1.924 μm (20.42%), and mean absolute error of 2.298 μm (24.37%). The retrieved PSDs and previous PSDs were compared, and the features of PSDs in the PRE waters were concluded.

  19. Analysis of Pre- and Post-Monsoon Suspended Sediments in the Gulf of Kachchh, India Using Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of satellite-derived suspended sediment concentration (SSC) during pre- and post-monsoon has been conducted with full-month cycles of tidal responses to study the suspended sediment dynamics in the Gulf of Kachchh. Tidal data were interpreted in conjunction with the OCEANSAT-1 ocean color monitor (OCM)-derived SSC for pre- and post-monsoon. The analysis of the data shows that the Gulf is predominantly affected by the tidal changes. The average SSC during pre-monsoon were 30.8 mg/l (high tide) and 24.1 mg/l (low tide); and during post-monsoon 19.7 mg/l (high tide) and 21.8 mg/l (low tide). The only little monsoonal influence is seen when Indus River discharges sediments during pre-monsoon due to increased sediment flux from its origin, Himalayas in spring (February-April) as compared to less sediment discharge observed during winter (November-December). The pre-monsoon SSC images show overall high suspended sediments whereas post-monsoon SSC images show comparatively low SSC. The use of e...

  20. Suspended sediment transport and shoaling in the Munambam fishery harbour, Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Revichandran, C.; Abraham, P.; Josanto, V.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    phenomena in the harbour region. Based on various physical and geomorphological data available on the harbour and near shore region, remedial measures are suggested to prevent the siltation and shoaling at the entrance channel and the sandbar formation...

  1. LOCAL ALGORITHM FOR MONITORING TOTAL SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS IN MICRO-WATERSHEDS USIN DRONES AND REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS. CASE STUDY: TEUSACÁ RIVER, LA CALERA, COLOMBIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N A Sáenz; D E Paez; C Arango

    2015-01-01

      An empirical relationship of Total Suspended Sediments (TSS) concentrations and reflectance values obtained with Drones' aerial photos and processed using remote sensing tools was set up as the main objective of this research...

  2. Comparison of environmental forcings affecting suspended sediments variability in two macrotidal, highly-turbid estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalón-Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2017-11-01

    The relative contribution of environmental forcing frequencies on turbidity variability is, for the first time, quantified at seasonal and multiannual time scales in tidal estuarine systems. With a decade of high-frequency, multi-site turbidity monitoring, the two nearby, macrotidal and highly-turbid Gironde and Loire estuaries (west France) are excellent natural laboratories for this purpose. Singular Spectrum Analyses, combined with Lomb-Scargle periodograms and Wavelet Transforms, were applied to the continuous multiannual turbidity time series. Frequencies of the main environmental factors affecting turbidity were identified: hydrological regime (high versus low river discharges), river flow variability, tidal range, tidal cycles, and turbulence. Their relative influences show similar patterns in both estuaries and depend on the estuarine region (lower or upper estuary) and the time scale (multiannual or seasonal). On the multiannual time scale, the relative contribution of tidal frequencies (tidal cycles and range) to turbidity variability decreases up-estuary from 68% to 47%, while the influence of river flow frequencies increases from 3% to 42%. On the seasonal time scale, the relative influence of forcings frequencies remains almost constant in the lower estuary, dominated by tidal frequencies (60% and 30% for tidal cycles and tidal range, respectively); in the upper reaches, it is variable depending on hydrological regime, even if tidal frequencies are responsible for up 50% of turbidity variance. These quantifications show the potential of combined spectral analyses to compare the behavior of suspended sediment in tidal estuaries throughout the world and to evaluate long-term changes in environmental forcings, especially in a context of global change. The relevance of this approach to compare nearby and overseas systems and to support management strategies is discussed (e.g., selection of effective operation frequencies/regions, prediction of the most

  3. Suspended Sediment and Phosphorus Removal in a Woodchip Filter System Treating Agricultural Wash Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Tahina; Robertson, Will Dean; Finnigan, Darryl S

    2016-05-01

    Woodchip filters have received attention in recent years for their ability to sustain denitrification activity across multiyear time frames. However, in some freshwater aquatic ecosystems, P rather than N is the nutrient considered most responsible for eutrophication. Previous studies have indicated that woodchip filters have limited ability to remove dissolved P, but in agricultural terrain, P export in watercourses is often dominated by particulate P (PP). Woodchip media, because of their high porosity and permeability and the surface roughness of the particles, could be effective for PP removal. In this study, we tested a woodchip filter for its ability to remove suspended sediment and associated PP at a farm in southern Ontario, Canada, where vegetable wash water with extremely high total suspended solids (TSS) was generated. The treatment system consisted of a 12.3-m concrete sedimentation tank and a slightly larger woodchip filter (16.1 m) installed in a subsurface trench. During 7 mo of full-scale operation, treating 10.8 m d, the filter system removed 71% of influent total P (TP) averaging 8.8 mg L and 99% of TSS averaging 5800 mg L, with most of the removal occurring in the tank and a lesser amount (6-16%) occurring in the woodchip filter. Almost all of the TP removal was associated with PP (91% removal) because dissolved P, averaging 1.5 mg L in the wash water, was little changed. Woodchip filters, when coupled with a solids settling tank, have the potential to provide high-capacity, low-maintenance treatment of suspended solids and associated particulate P in turbid waters. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Remote Sensing Analysis of Temperature and Suspended Sediment Concentration in Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanda Ko, Nyein; Rutten, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Detailed spatial coverage of water quality parameters are crucial to better manage rivers. However, collection of water quality parameters is both time consuming and costly for large rivers. This study demonstrates that Operational Land Image (OLI) Sensor on board of Landsat 8 can be successfully applied for the detection of spatial patterns of water temperature as well as suspended sediment concentration (SSC) using the Ayeyarwady river, Myanmar as a case study. Water temperature estimation was obtained from the brightness thermal Band 10 by using the Split-Window algorithm. The study finds that there is a close agreement between the remote sensing temperature and in-situ temperature with relative error in the range from 4.5% to 8.2%. The sediment load of Ayeyarwady river is ranked as the third-largest sediment load among the world's rivers but there is very little known about this important parameter, due to a lack of adequate gauge data. The single band reflectance of Landsat image (Band 5) seems a good indicator for the estimation of SSC with relative error in the range of less than 10% but the developed empirical formula by the power relation with the only seven ground reference points is uncertain to apply for the entire river basin. It is to note that an important constraint for the sediment analysis is the availability of spatial and temporal ground reference data. Future studies should also focus on the improvement of ground reference data points to become more reliable, because most of the river in Asia, especially in Myanmar, don't have readily available continuous ground sediment data points due to lack of measurement gauge stations through the river.

  5. Guidelines and Procedures for Computing Time-Series Suspended-Sediment Concentrations and Loads from In-Stream Turbidity-Sensor and Streamflow Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Douglas; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    In-stream continuous turbidity and streamflow data, calibrated with measured suspended-sediment concentration data, can be used to compute a time series of suspended-sediment concentration and load at a stream site. Development of a simple linear (ordinary least squares) regression model for computing suspended-sediment concentrations from instantaneous turbidity data is the first step in the computation process. If the model standard percentage error (MSPE) of the simple linear regression model meets a minimum criterion, this model should be used to compute a time series of suspended-sediment concentrations. Otherwise, a multiple linear regression model using paired instantaneous turbidity and streamflow data is developed and compared to the simple regression model. If the inclusion of the streamflow variable proves to be statistically significant and the uncertainty associated with the multiple regression model results in an improvement over that for the simple linear model, the turbidity-streamflow multiple linear regression model should be used to compute a suspended-sediment concentration time series. The computed concentration time series is subsequently used with its paired streamflow time series to compute suspended-sediment loads by standard U.S. Geological Survey techniques. Once an acceptable regression model is developed, it can be used to compute suspended-sediment concentration beyond the period of record used in model development with proper ongoing collection and analysis of calibration samples. Regression models to compute suspended-sediment concentrations are generally site specific and should never be considered static, but they represent a set period in a continually dynamic system in which additional data will help verify any change in sediment load, type, and source.

  6. A preliminary assessment of the spatial sources of contemporary suspended sediment in the Ohio River basin, United States, using water quality data from the NASQAN programme in a source tracing procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.-S.; Collins, A.L.; Horowitz, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable information on catchment scale suspended sediment sources is required to inform the design of management strategies for helping abate the numerous environmental issues associated with enhanced sediment mobilization and off-site loadings. Since sediment fingerprinting techniques avoid many of the logistical constraints associated with using more traditional indirect measurement methods at catchment scale, such approaches have been increasingly reported in the international literature and typically use data sets collected specifically for sediment source apportionment purposes. There remains scope for investigating the potential for using geochemical data sets assembled by routine monitoring programmes to fingerprint sediment provenance. In the United States, routine water quality samples are collected as part of the US Geological Survey's revised National Stream Quality Accounting Network programme. Accordingly, the geochemistry data generated from these samples over a 10-year period (1996-2006) were used as the basis for a fingerprinting exercise to assess the key tributary sub-catchment spatial sources of contemporary suspended sediment transported by the Ohio River. Uncertainty associated with the spatial source estimates was quantified using a Monte Carlo approach in conjunction with mass balance modelling. Relative frequency weighted means were used as an alternative way of summarizing the spatial source contributions, thereby avoiding the need to use confidence limits. The results should be interpreted in the context of the routine, but infrequent nature, of the suspended sediment samples used to assemble geochemistry as a basis for the sourcing exercise. Nonetheless, the study demonstrates how routine monitoring samples can be used to provide some preliminary information on sediment provenance in large drainage basins. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and soil-erosion data from Kaulana and Hakioawa watersheds, Kaho'olawe, Hawai'i,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuka, Scot K.; Abbott, Lyman L.

    2010-01-01

    Various events over the last two centuries have destroyed the vegetation and caused rapid soil erosion on large areas of the small, arid, windy tropical shield-volcano island of Kaho`olawe, Hawai`i. These activities were largely halted in the 1990s, and efforts have been made to restore the island's vegetation in order to stem erosion. In 2003, the Kaho`olawe Island Reserve Commission (KIRC) began restoration efforts using native vegetation. In 2006 to 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the KIRC, monitored streamflow, fluvial suspended-sediment transport, and erosion rates in the Hakioawa and Kaulana watersheds on northeastern Kaho`olawe to provide information needed to assess the effectiveness of restoration efforts. This report presents the results from this monitoring. Results.-Hakioawa and Kaulana gulches were dry about 90 percent of the time during the monitoring period; mean annual flow was 0.06 ft3/s at Hakioawa Gulch gage and 0.01 ft3/s at the Kaulana Gulch gage. For the period when the sediment gages on both gulches were operating concurrently (October 2007 to September 2009), sediment discharge was higher from Hakioawa Gulch than from Kaulana Gulch. The annual suspended-sediment loads for the concurrent period averaged 1,880 tons at the Hakioawa Gulch gage and 276 tons at the Kaulana Gulch gage. Of the 77 erosion-monitoring sites in the Hakioawa and Kaulana watersheds, 50 had overall rates of change indicating erosion for the monitoring period, ranging from -1 to -10 mm/yr and averaging -3 mm/yr. Seven sites had rates of change indicating overall deposition, ranging from 1 to 15 mm/yr and averaging 5 mm/yr. Twenty had rates of change below detection (less than ?1 mm/yr). The average rate of change for the 26 sites in areas that have undergone restoration by the KIRC was below the detection limit of the erosion-monitoring method. In comparison, the 51 sites in nonrestoration areas averaged -2 mm/y. Both of these averages, however

  8. Estimating of suspended sediment loads of rivers in the Seine downstream basin and coastal rivers in Southeastern Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landemaine, Valentin; Cerdan, Olivier; Laignel, Benoit; Fournier, Matthieu; Copard, Yoann

    2014-05-01

    Sediment exports in rivers constitute the essential of materials transfer from the land surface to the ocean and contribute significantly to the transfer of nutrients, pesticides, heavy metals which can affect water quality. Such problems of water pollution are particularly present at the Norman loess plateaus because soil erosion is a frequent phenomena and mudslides are common. In this context, the quantification of sediment load, as well as the short and long term variability analysis are a key component for any sustainable management project of water resources. The quantification of sediment fluxes is based on turbidity, suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and discharge measurements. These measurements must be made with sufficient high frequency for integrating temporal variability of SSC and flows. However, the cost of a high frequency monitoring limits their use at large scale. In France, discharges are monitored using daily frequency (Banque Hydro), while SSC are measured in monthly or bimonthly frequency under the national water quality survey system (RNB). With these low frequency measurements, an algorithm must be used to reconstruct SSC temporal variability and to estimate a sediment flux. Many estimation algorithms have been developed in recent decades, from the simplest to the most elaborate, but no consensus has been reached on the use of a particular algorithm because of the complexity of SSC-discharge relationship. In this study, the analysis focuses on eight Channel coastal watersheds and nine Seine watersheds in the downstream part. We have a several years of high-frequency measurements on nine watersheds with highly variable area (10 km² to 10,000 km²) and low-frequency measurements for all watersheds. From these data, we compared the statistical performance of eleven algorithms to estimate sediment fluxes conventionally used in the literature. These algorithms are: averaging estimator, ratio estimator, linear interpolation, rating curve

  9. Impact of pig slurry amendments on phosphorus, suspended sediment and metal losses in laboratory runoff boxes under simulated rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flynn, C J; Fenton, O; Wilson, P; Healy, M G

    2012-12-30

    Losses of phosphorus (P) when pig slurry applications to land are followed by a rainfall event or losses from soils with high P contents can contribute to eutrophication of receiving waters. The addition of amendments to pig slurry spread on high P Index soils may reduce P and suspended sediment (SS) losses. This hypothesis was tested at laboratory-scale using runoff boxes under simulated rainfall conditions. Intact grassed soil samples, 100 cm-long, 22.5 cm-wide and 5 cm-deep, were placed in runoff boxes and pig slurry or amended pig slurry was applied to the soil surface. The amendments examined were: (1) commercial grade liquid alum (8% Al(2)O(3)) applied at a rate of 0.88:1 [Al:total phosphorus (TP)] (2) commercial-grade liquid ferric chloride (38% FeCl(3)) applied at a rate of 0.89:1 [Fe:TP] and (3) commercial-grade liquid poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) (10% Al(2)O(3)) applied at a rate of 0.72:1 [Al:TP]. The grassed soil was then subjected to three rainfall events (10.3 ± 0.15 mm h(-1)) at time intervals of 48, 72, and 96 h following slurry application. Each sod received rainfall on 3 occasions. Results across three rainfall events showed that for the control treatment, the average flow weighted mean concentration (FWMC) of TP was 0.61 mg L(-1), of which 31% was particulate phosphorus (PP), and the average FWMC of SS was 38.1 mg L(-1). For the slurry treatment, there was an average FWMC of 2.2 mg TP L(-1), 47% of which was PP, and the average FWMC of SS was 71.5 mg L(-1). Ranked in order of effectiveness from best to worst, PAC reduced the average FWMC of TP to 0.64 mg L(-1) (42% PP), FeCl(3) reduced TP to 0.91 mg L(-1) (52% PP) and alum reduced TP to 1.08 mg L(-1) (56% PP). The amendments were in the same order when ranked for effectiveness at reducing SS: PAC (74%), FeCl(3) (66%) and alum (39%). Total phosphorus levels in runoff plots receiving amended slurry remained above those from soil only, indicating that, although incidental losses could be mitigated

  10. Evaluation of intake efficiencies and associated sediment-concentration errors in US D-77 bag-type and US D-96-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Thomas A.; Topping, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration require suspended-sediment samplers to operate isokinetically, within an intake-efficiency range of 1.0 ± 0.10, where intake efficiency is defined as the ratio of the velocity of the water through the sampler intake to the local ambient stream velocity. Local ambient stream velocity is defined as the velocity of the water in the river at the location of the nozzle, unaffected by the presence of the sampler. Results from Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project (FISP) laboratory experiments published in the early 1940s show that when the intake efficiency is less than 1.0, suspended-sediment samplers tend to oversample sediment relative to water, leading to potentially large positive biases in suspended-sediment concentration that are positively correlated with grain size. Conversely, these experiments show that, when the intake efficiency is greater than 1.0, suspended‑sediment samplers tend to undersample sediment relative to water, leading to smaller negative biases in suspended-sediment concentration that become slightly more negative as grain size increases. The majority of FISP sampler development and testing since the early 1990s has been conducted under highly uniform flow conditions via flume and slack-water tow tests, with relatively little work conducted under the greater levels of turbulence that exist in actual rivers. Additionally, all of this recent work has been focused on the hydraulic characteristics and intake efficiencies of these samplers, with no field investigations conducted on the accuracy of the suspended-sediment data collected with these samplers. When depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers are deployed under the more nonuniform and turbulent conditions that exist in rivers, multiple factors may contribute to departures from isokinetic sampling, thus introducing errors into the suspended-sediment data collected by these samplers that may not be predictable on the basis

  11. Climatic Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Trends in Suspended Sediment Flux in the Upper Euphrates River Basin, Eastern Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, O.; Bookhagen, B.; Musaoglu, N.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, some changes have been experienced in the climate in the region related to the dam constructions and lake formations within the scope of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP). In the study, we presented a comprehensive analysis of the spatiotemporal trends in suspended sediment flux based on daily gauge measurements of river discharge (Q) and suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) from seven sites along Euphrates River for 30 years in average. In conjunction with satellite data depicting rainfall we infer climatic evaluation of peak SSC events.All the data were obtained through time in order to provide to make the link to sediment removal and erosion - especially in the aftermath of agricultural development and dam construction. Moreover, we combine these data with remotely sensed rainfall to elucidate driving mechanisms for peak SSC (≥99th percentile) days and assess their impact on the suspended sediment budget. Preliminary results from the gauge data indicate positive correlations between daily river discharge and daily SSC for all stations , i.e. the higher the river discharge, the higher the sediment concentration. This correlation suggests increasing mobilization of transiently stored sediment along the river as the river discharge increases. However, some days are characterized by extraordinary high SSC values that occasionally range 1-2 orders of magnitude above the seasonal average and therefore exhibit large residuals from the fitted Q-SSC relationship. Our preliminary results indicate that in all stations of the study area, the 90th SSC percentile accounts for more than 55% of the total suspended sediment flux and similarly, the 90th discharge percentile accounts for maximum 50% of the total discharge flux. Besides, we defined rainstorms as days during which rainfall exceeds the 99th percentile of all days with rainfall ≥.1 mm/day during the last 15-yr rainfall data set and within each station. We also defined peak SSC days as

  12. Determining sources and transit times of suspended sediment in the Murrumbidgee River, New South Wales, Australia, using fallout 137Cs and 210Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbrink, P. J.; Murray, A. S.; Olley, J. M.; Olive, L. J.

    1998-04-01

    Sediment budgets typically require an estimate of the proportional yield from erosion sources to sediments in transport and storage. This becomes increasingly difficult as catchments become larger, and erosion, storage, and deposition processes become more complex. We demonstrate how fallout radionuclides can be used to estimate the proportional contributions to sediment load, from a tripartite classification of erosion sources in a large catchment (the mid-Murrumbidgee, 13,500 km2). The three major potential sources of sediment within this catchment are cultivated lands (˜22% of the surface area), uncultivated pastoral lands (˜78%), and the numerous channels and gullies found in this region. Concentrations of the fallout radionuclides 210Pbex and 137Cs in representative samples from each of these three sources are significantly different. Employing these values in a simple mixing model shows that the largest contribution of material is currently derived from subsoil channel/gully sources. Alterations to the suspended sediment 210Pbex signature by in situ labeling and decay are also considered. Applying the model with different concentrations of 210Pbex (decayed as a function of residence time in channels) suggests that the mean residence time of fine-grained material within this system is 10±5 years. However, differences in 137Cs concentrations observed between flood and low-flow sediments, and the presence of the short-lived, cosmogenic 7Be, suggest that residence time of some of this fine-grained material may be of the order of only weeks to months.

  13. Surface-water quality and suspended-sediment quantity and quality within the Big River Basin, southeastern Missouri, 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Miya N.

    2016-01-28

    Missouri was the leading producer of lead in the United States—as well as the world—for more than a century. One of the lead sources is known as the Old Lead Belt, located in southeast Missouri. The primary ore mineral in the region is galena, which can be found both in surface deposits and underground as deep as 200 feet. More than 8.5 million tons of lead were produced from the Old Lead Belt before operations ceased in 1972. Although active lead mining has ended, the effects of mining activities still remain in the form of large mine waste piles on the landscape typically near tributaries and the main stem of the Big River, which drains the Old Lead Belt. Six large mine waste piles encompassing more than 2,800 acres, exist within the Big River Basin. These six mine waste piles have been an available source of trace element-rich suspended sediments transported by natural erosional processes downstream into the Big River.

  14. Storm Event Suspended Sediment-Discharge Hysteresis and Controls in Agricultural Watersheds: Implications for Watershed Scale Sediment Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie C; Rowan, John S; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Philip; Melland, Alice R; Mellander, Per-Erik; hUallacháin, Daire Ó

    2016-02-16

    Within agricultural watersheds suspended sediment-discharge hysteresis during storm events is commonly used to indicate dominant sediment sources and pathways. However, availability of high-resolution data, qualitative metrics, longevity of records, and simultaneous multiwatershed analyses has limited the efficacy of hysteresis as a sediment management tool. This two year study utilizes a quantitative hysteresis index from high-resolution suspended sediment and discharge data to assess fluctuations in sediment source location, delivery mechanisms and export efficiency in three intensively farmed watersheds during events over time. Flow-weighted event sediment export was further considered using multivariate techniques to delineate rainfall, stream hydrology, and antecedent moisture controls on sediment origins. Watersheds with low permeability (moderately- or poorly drained soils) with good surface hydrological connectivity, therefore, had contrasting hysteresis due to source location (hillslope versus channel bank). The well-drained watershed with reduced connectivity exported less sediment but, when watershed connectivity was established, the largest event sediment load of all watersheds occurred. Event sediment export was elevated in arable watersheds when low groundcover was coupled with high connectivity, whereas in the grassland watershed, export was attributed to wetter weather only. Hysteresis analysis successfully indicated contrasting seasonality, connectivity and source availability and is a useful tool to identify watershed specific sediment management practices.

  15. In situ densimetric measurements as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentrations in the Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeb E.; Gray, John R.; Hornewer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Surrogate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) are increasingly used to provide continuous, high-resolution, and demonstrably accurate data at a reasonable cost. Densimetric data, calculated from the difference between two in situ pressure measurements, exploit variations in real-time streamflow densities to infer SSCs. Unlike other suspendedsediment surrogate technologies based on bulk or digital optics, laser, or hydroacoustics, the accuracy of SSC data estimated using the pressure-difference (also referred to as densimetric) surrogate technology theoretically improves with increasing SCCs. Coupled with streamflow data, continuous suspended-sediment discharges can be calculated using SSC data estimated in real-time using the densimetric technology. The densimetric technology was evaluated at the Rio Puerco in New Mexico, a stream where SSC values regularly range from 10,000-200,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and have exceeded 500,000 mg/L. The constant-flow dual-orifice bubbler measures pressure using two precision pressure-transducer sensors at vertically aligned fixed locations in a water column. Water density is calculated from the temperature-compensated differential pressure and SSCs are inferred from the density data. A linear regression model comparing density values to field-measured SSC values yielded an R² of 0.74. Although the application of the densimetric surrogate is likely limited to fluvial systems with SSCs larger than about 10,000 mg/L, based on this and previous studies, the densimetric technology fills a void for monitoring streams with high SSCs.

  16. The effect of suspended sediment on fertilization success in the urchin Evechinus chloroticus: analysis of experimental data using hierarchical Bayesian methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S L; Richardson, K; Edwards, P A

    2014-11-15

    Terrestrial sediments are a significant stressor on coastal ecosystems, with both suspended and deposited sediment having adverse effects on aquatic organisms. However, information on the effect of suspended sediments on fertilization success for urchin species is lacking. Using sediment levels similar to those encountered in situ, a controlled experiment was conducted to test whether suspended sediment affects fertilization success in the urchin Evechinus chloroticus. Analyses used generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) and hierarchical Bayesian (HB) regression. Both approaches showed a significant decrease in fertilization success with increased suspended sediment levels. Uncertainties in estimates were narrower for HB models, suggesting that this approach has advantages over GLMMs for sparse data problems sometimes encountered in laboratory experiments. Given future global change scenarios, this work is important for predicting the effects of stressors such as sedimentation that may ultimately impact marine populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of placer mining on suspended sediment budget: case study of north of Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey R Chalov

    2014-01-01

    .... Open-pit mining alters the stream hydrology and enhances sediment transport. The present study focuses on sediment transport in the area of the platinum placer mining located at the north of Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula...

  18. The effects of wind and rainfall on suspended sediment concentration related to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XinFeng; Tang, DanLing; Li, ZiZhen; Zhang, FengPan

    2009-09-01

    The effects of rainfall and wind speed on the dynamics of suspended sediment concentration (SSC), during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, were analyzed using spatial statistical models. The results showed a positive effect of wind speed on SSC, and inconsistent effects (positive and negative) of rainfall on SSC. The effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC weakened immediately around the tsunami, indicating tsunami-caused floods and earthquake-induced shaking may have suddenly disturbed the ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and thus weakened the effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC. Wind speed and rainfall increased markedly, and reached their maximum values immediately after the tsunami week. Rainfall at this particular week exceeded twice the average for the same period over the previous 4years. The tsunami-affected air-sea interactions may have increased both wind speed and rainfall immediately after the tsunami week, which directly lead to the variations in SSC.

  19. Multi-residue method for the analysis of 85 current-use and legacy pesticides in bed and suspended sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-residue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 85 current-use and legacy organochlorine pesticides in a single sediment sample. After microwave-assisted extraction, clean-up of samples was optimized using gel permeation chromatography and either stacked carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction cartridges or a deactivated Florisil column. Analytes were determined by gas chromatography with ion-trap mass spectrometry and electron capture detection. Method detection limits ranged from 0.6 to 8.9 ??g/kg dry weight. Bed and suspended sediments from a variety of locations were analyzed to validate the method and 29 pesticides, including at least 1 from every class, were detected.

  20. Spatial and temporal trends in estimates of nutrient and suspended sediment loads in the Ishikari River, Japan, 1985 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weili; Takara, Kaoru; He, Bin; Luo, Pingping; Nover, Daniel; Yamashiki, Yosuke

    2013-09-01

    Nutrients and suspended sediment in surface water play important roles in aquatic ecosystems and contribute strongly to water quality with implication for drinking water resources, human and environmental health. Estimating loads of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and suspended sediment (SS) is complicated because of infrequent monitoring data, retransformation bias, data censoring, and non-normality. To obtain reliable unbiased estimates, the Maintenance of Variance-Extension type 3 (MOVE. 3) and the regression model Load Estimator (LOADEST) were applied to develop regression equations and to estimate total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and SS loads at five sites on the Ishikari River, Japan, from 1985 to 2010. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) for the best-fit regression models for loads of TN, TP, and SS for the five sites ranged from 71.86% to 90.94%, suggesting the model for all three constituents successfully simulated the variability in constituent loads at all studied sites. Estimated monthly average loads at Yishikarikakou-bashi were larger than at the other sites, with TN, TP, and SS loads ranging from 8.52×10(3) to 2.00×10(5) kg/day (Apr. 1999), 3.96×10(2) to 5.23×10(4) kg/ day (Apr. 1999), and 9.21×10(4) to 9.25×10(7) kg/day (Sep. 2001), respectively. Because of variation in river discharge, the estimated seasonal loads fluctuated widely over the period 1985 to 2010, with the greatest loads occurring in spring and the smallest loads occurring in winter. Estimated loads of TN, TP, and especially SS showed decreasing trends during the study period. Accurate load estimation is a necessary goal of water quality monitoring efforts and the methods described here provide essential information for effectively managing water resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantification of Surface Suspended Sediments along a River Dominated Coast with NOAA AVHRR and SeaWiFS Measurements: Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S. W.; Walker, N. D.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to quantify suspended sediment concentrations accurately over both time and space using satellite data has been a goal of many environmental researchers over the past few decades This study utilizes data acquired by the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Orbview-2 Sea-viewing wide field-of-view (SeaWiFS) ocean colour sensor, coupled with field measurements to develop statistical models for the estimation of near-surface suspended sediment and suspended solids "Ground truth" water samples were obtained via helicopter, small boat and automatic water sampler within a few hours of satellite overpasses The NOAA AVHRR atmospheric correction was modified for the high levels of turbidity along the Louisiana coast. Models were developed based on the field measurements and reflectance/radiance measurements in the visible and near infrared Channels of NOAA-14 and Orbview-2 SeaWiFS. The best models for predicting surface suspended sediment concentrations were obtained with a NOAA AVHRR Channel 1 (580-680nm) cubic model, Channel 2 (725-1100 nm) linear mod$ and SeaWiFs Channel 6 (660-68Onm) power modeL The suspended sediment models developed using SeaWiFS Channel 5 (545-565 nm) were inferior, a result that we attribute mainly to the atmospheric correction technique, the shallow depth of the water samples and absorption effects from non-sediment water constituents.

  2. Catchment soil moisture and rainfall characteristics as determinant factors for discharge/suspended sediment hysteretic loops in a small headwater catchment in the Spanish pyrenees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeger, M.; Beguería, S.; Errea, M.P.; Arnáez, J.; Martí, C.; García-Ruiz, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The concentration of suspended sediment and discharge generated during flood events are not normally homogenous, and the curve representing sediment concentration vs. discharge through time is often a hysteretic loop. Three types of hysteretic loops were found at Arnás, a Mediterranean headwater

  3. Suspended sediment export in five intensive agricultural river catchments with contrasting land use and soil drainage characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Melland, Alice; Jordan, Phil; Fenton, Owen; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion and sediment loss from land can have a negative impact on the chemical and ecological quality of freshwater resources. In catchments dominated by agriculture, prediction of soil erosion risk is complex due to the interaction of physical characteristics such as topography, soil erodibility, hydrological connectivity and climate. Robust measurement approaches facilitate the assessment of sediment loss magnitudes in relation to a range of agricultural settings. These approaches improve our understanding of critical sediment transfer periods and inform development of evidence-based and cost-effective management strategies. The aim of this study was to i) assess the efficacy of out-of-channel (ex-situ) suspended sediment measurement approaches, ii) to quantify the variability of sediment exported from five river catchments with varying hydrology and agricultural land uses over multiple years and iii) to investigate trends in relation to physical and land use characteristics when sediment data were compared between catchments. Sediment data were collected in five intensive agricultural river catchments in Ireland (3-11 km2) which featured contrasting land uses (predominantly intensive grassland or arable) and soil drainage classes (well, moderate and poor). High-resolution suspended sediment concentration data (SSC - using a calibrated turbidity proxy) were collected ex-situ and combined with in-stream discharge data measured at each catchment outlet to estimate suspended sediment yield (SSY - t km-2 yr-1). In two catchments additional in-stream turbidity monitoring equipment replicated ex-situ measurements including site specific calibration of individual in-stream and ex-situ turbidity probes. Depth-integrated samples were collected to assess the accuracy of both approaches. Method comparison results showed that true SSC values (from depth-integrated sampling) were predominantly within the 95% confidence interval of ex-situ predicted SSC consequently

  4. Application of dimensionless sediment rating curves to predict suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, and annual sediment loads for rivers in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Groten, Joel T.; Lorenz, David L.; Koller, Karl S.

    2016-10-27

    Consistent and reliable sediment data are needed by Federal, State, and local government agencies responsible for monitoring water quality, planning river restoration, quantifying sediment budgets, and evaluating the effectiveness of sediment reduction strategies. Heightened concerns about excessive sediment in rivers and the challenge to reduce costs and eliminate data gaps has guided Federal and State interests in pursuing alternative methods for measuring suspended and bedload sediment. Simple and dependable data collection and estimation techniques are needed to generate hydraulic and water-quality information for areas where data are unavailable or difficult to collect.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, completed a study to evaluate the use of dimensionless sediment rating curves (DSRCs) to accurately predict suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs), bedload, and annual sediment loads for selected rivers and streams in Minnesota based on data collected during 2007 through 2013. This study included the application of DSRC models developed for a small group of streams located in the San Juan River Basin near Pagosa Springs in southwestern Colorado to rivers in Minnesota. Regionally based DSRC models for Minnesota also were developed and compared to DSRC models from Pagosa Springs, Colorado, to evaluate which model provided more accurate predictions of SSCs and bedload in Minnesota.Multiple measures of goodness-of-fit were developed to assess the effectiveness of DSRC models in predicting SSC and bedload for rivers in Minnesota. More than 600 dimensionless ratio values of SSC, bedload, and streamflow were evaluated and delineated according to Pfankuch stream stability categories of “good/fair” and “poor” to develop four Minnesota-based DSRC models. The basis for Pagosa Springs and Minnesota DSRC model effectiveness was founded on measures of goodness

  5. Impact of the spatial resolution of satellite remote sensing sensors in the quantification of total suspended sediment concentration: A case study in turbid waters of Northern Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anthropogenic activities on coastal waters is a cause of concern because such activities add to the total suspended sediment (TSS) budget of the coastal waters, which have negative impacts on the coastal ecosystem. Satellite remote sensing provides a powerful tool in monitoring TSS concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution, but coastal managers should be mindful that the satellite-derived TSS concentrations are dependent on the satellite sensor’s radiometric properties, atmospheric correction approaches, the spatial resolution and the limitations of specific TSS algorithms. In this study, we investigated the impact of different spatial resolutions of satellite sensor on the quantification of TSS concentration in coastal waters of northern Western Australia. We quantified the TSS product derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua, Landsat-8 Operational Land Image (OLI), and WorldView-2 (WV2) at native spatial resolutions of 250 m, 30 m and 2 m respectively and coarser spatial resolution (resampled up to 5 km) to quantify the impact of spatial resolution on the derived TSS product in different turbidity conditions. The results from the study show that in the waters of high turbidity and high spatial variability, the high spatial resolution WV2 sensor reported TSS concentration as high as 160 mg L-1 while the low spatial resolution MODIS-Aqua reported a maximum TSS concentration of 23.6 mg L-1. Degrading the spatial resolution of each satellite sensor for highly spatially variable turbid waters led to variability in the TSS concentrations of 114.46%, 304.68% and 38.2% for WV2, Landsat-8 OLI and MODIS-Aqua respectively. The implications of this work are particularly relevant in the situation of compliance monitoring where operations may be required to restrict TSS concentrations to a pre-defined limit. PMID:28380059

  6. Assessing the applicability of TMPA-3B42V7 precipitation dataset in wavelet-support vector machine approach for suspended sediment load prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himanshu, Sushil Kumar; Pandey, Ashish; Yadav, Basant

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, the latest Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) research product 3B42V7 has been evaluated over gauge-based India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded dataset employing statistical and contingency table methods for two South Indian watersheds. A comparative analysis of TMPA-3B42V7 with IMD gauge-based gridded dataset was carried out on daily, monthly, seasonal and yearly basis for 16 years (1998-2013). The study revealed that TMPA estimates performed reasonably well with the gauge-based gridded dataset, however, some significant biases were also observed. It has been observed that TMPA overestimates at very light rain, but underestimates at light, moderate, heavy and very heavy rainfall intensities. Further, the TMPA estimates was evaluated for prediction of daily suspended sediment load (SL) employing Support Vector Machine (SVM) with wavelet analysis (WASVM). Initially, 1-day ahead SL prediction was performed using best WASVM model. The results showed that 1-day predictions were very precise and shows a better agreement with the observed SL data. Later, the developed WASVM model was used for the prediction of SL for the higher leads period. The statistical analysis shows that the developed WASVM model could predict the target value successfully up to 6-days lead and found to be not suitable for higher lead specifically in the selected watersheds with similar hydro-climatic conditions like the ones selected in this study. Predictions results of WASVM model is superior to conventional SVM model and could be used as an effective forecasting tool for hydrological applications. The study suggest that the use of TMPA precipitation estimates can be a compensating approach after suitable bias correction and have potential for SL prediction in data-sparse regions.

  7. Impact of the spatial resolution of satellite remote sensing sensors in the quantification of total suspended sediment concentration: A case study in turbid waters of Northern Western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Dorji

    Full Text Available The impact of anthropogenic activities on coastal waters is a cause of concern because such activities add to the total suspended sediment (TSS budget of the coastal waters, which have negative impacts on the coastal ecosystem. Satellite remote sensing provides a powerful tool in monitoring TSS concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution, but coastal managers should be mindful that the satellite-derived TSS concentrations are dependent on the satellite sensor's radiometric properties, atmospheric correction approaches, the spatial resolution and the limitations of specific TSS algorithms. In this study, we investigated the impact of different spatial resolutions of satellite sensor on the quantification of TSS concentration in coastal waters of northern Western Australia. We quantified the TSS product derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-Aqua, Landsat-8 Operational Land Image (OLI, and WorldView-2 (WV2 at native spatial resolutions of 250 m, 30 m and 2 m respectively and coarser spatial resolution (resampled up to 5 km to quantify the impact of spatial resolution on the derived TSS product in different turbidity conditions. The results from the study show that in the waters of high turbidity and high spatial variability, the high spatial resolution WV2 sensor reported TSS concentration as high as 160 mg L-1 while the low spatial resolution MODIS-Aqua reported a maximum TSS concentration of 23.6 mg L-1. Degrading the spatial resolution of each satellite sensor for highly spatially variable turbid waters led to variability in the TSS concentrations of 114.46%, 304.68% and 38.2% for WV2, Landsat-8 OLI and MODIS-Aqua respectively. The implications of this work are particularly relevant in the situation of compliance monitoring where operations may be required to restrict TSS concentrations to a pre-defined limit.

  8. Impact of the spatial resolution of satellite remote sensing sensors in the quantification of total suspended sediment concentration: A case study in turbid waters of Northern Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorji, Passang; Fearns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anthropogenic activities on coastal waters is a cause of concern because such activities add to the total suspended sediment (TSS) budget of the coastal waters, which have negative impacts on the coastal ecosystem. Satellite remote sensing provides a powerful tool in monitoring TSS concentration at high spatiotemporal resolution, but coastal managers should be mindful that the satellite-derived TSS concentrations are dependent on the satellite sensor's radiometric properties, atmospheric correction approaches, the spatial resolution and the limitations of specific TSS algorithms. In this study, we investigated the impact of different spatial resolutions of satellite sensor on the quantification of TSS concentration in coastal waters of northern Western Australia. We quantified the TSS product derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua, Landsat-8 Operational Land Image (OLI), and WorldView-2 (WV2) at native spatial resolutions of 250 m, 30 m and 2 m respectively and coarser spatial resolution (resampled up to 5 km) to quantify the impact of spatial resolution on the derived TSS product in different turbidity conditions. The results from the study show that in the waters of high turbidity and high spatial variability, the high spatial resolution WV2 sensor reported TSS concentration as high as 160 mg L-1 while the low spatial resolution MODIS-Aqua reported a maximum TSS concentration of 23.6 mg L-1. Degrading the spatial resolution of each satellite sensor for highly spatially variable turbid waters led to variability in the TSS concentrations of 114.46%, 304.68% and 38.2% for WV2, Landsat-8 OLI and MODIS-Aqua respectively. The implications of this work are particularly relevant in the situation of compliance monitoring where operations may be required to restrict TSS concentrations to a pre-defined limit.

  9. Status and trends in suspended-sediment discharges, soil erosion, and conservation tillage in the Maumee River basin--Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Donna N.; Metzker, Kevin D.; Davis, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The relation of suspended-sediment discharges to conservation-tillage practices and soil loss were analyzed for the Maumee River Basin in Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Cropland in the basin is the largest contributor to soil erosion and suspended-sediment discharge to the Maumee River and the river is the largest source of suspended sediments to Lake Erie. Retrospective and recently-collected data from 1970-98 were used to demonstrate that increases in conservation tillage and decreases in soil loss can be related to decreases in suspended-sediment discharge from streams. Average annual water and suspended-sediment budgets computed for the Maumee River Basin and its principal tributaries indicate that soil drainage and runoff potential, stream slope, and agricultural land use are the major human and natural factors related to suspended-sediment discharge. The Tiffin and St. Joseph Rivers drain areas of moderately to somewhat poorly drained soils with moderate runoff potential. Expressed as a percentage of the total for the Maumee River Basin, the St. Joseph and Tiffin Rivers represent 29.0 percent of the basin area, 30.7 percent of the average-annual streamflow, and 9.31 percent of the average annual suspended-sediment discharge. The Auglaize and St. Marys Rivers drain areas of poorly to very poorly drained soils with high runoff potential. Expressed as a percentage of the total for the Maumee River Basin, the Auglaize and St. Marys Rivers represent 48.7 percent of the total basin area, 53.5 percent of the average annual streamflow, and 46.5 percent of the average annual suspended-sediment discharge. Areas of poorly drained soils with high runoff potential appear to be the major source areas of suspended sediment discharge in the Maumee River Basin. Although conservation tillage differed in the degree of use throughout the basin, on aver-age, it was used on 55.4 percent of all crop

  10. Research Note:Effects of human activities on the Yangtze River suspended sediment flux into the estuary in the last century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface erosion area in the Yangtze River basin increased from 364×103 km2 in the 1950s to 707×103 km2 in 2001 due to a great increase in population. Based on the regression relationship between surface erosion area and population, the surface erosion area was predicted to be about 280×103 km2 at the beginning of the 20th century. The sediment yield, which increased by about 30% during the first six decades of the 20th century, was closely related to the surface erosion area in this river basin. The Yangtze annual suspended sediment flux into the estuary was about 395×106 t a-1 at the beginning of the century, and this gradually increased to an average of 509×106 t a-1 in the 1960s. The increase in the suspended sediment flux into the estuary was accelerated in the 1950s and the 1960s due to the rapid increase in population and land use immediately after the Second World War and the Liberation War. After the riverine suspended sediment flux reached its maximum in the 1960s, it decreased to 6 t a-1 in 2003. Construction of dams was found to be the principal cause for this decreasing trend because, during the same period, (a the riverine water discharge did not show a decreasing trend, (b water diversion was not influential and (c sedimentation in lakes and canals of the middle and lower reaches did not increase. The total storage capacity of reservoirs has increased dramatically over the past half century. The amount of sediment trapped in reservoirs has increased to more than half a billion t a-1. As a result, the suspended sediment flux into the estuary dramatically decreased, even though the sediment yield from many areas of the basin increased in recent decades. Human activities gradually increased the suspended sediment flux into the estuary before the 1960s and then rapidly decreased it. The last century was a period when the Yangtze suspended sediment flux into the estuary was dramatically affected by human activities. Keywords

  11. Plutonium removal and diurnal variations of suspended sediment concentrations in the Great Miami River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobula, III, C. M.; Kennedy, C. W.; Bartelt, G. E.

    1979-01-15

    Effluent release experiments previously conducted downstream of the industrial outflal at Mound Laboratory have demonstrated that /sup 238/Pu which enters the aquatic environment as dissolved waste is rapidly adsorbed by suspended solids in the effluent pulse and that the dissolved/particulate distribution of /sup 238/Pu between release events congruent to 5 x 10/sup -2/./sup 3/ Reasonable estimates of the annual transport of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu based upon long-term discharge and sediment loading data have been reported for a large subwatershed in the upper reaches of the Great Miami River Basin. In this report data are given which characterize the short-term variability of suspended particulate transport downriver of a canal system contaminated with /sup 238/Pu.

  12. A Semi-Analytical Model for Remote Sensing Retrieval of Suspended Sediment Concentration in the Gulf of Bohai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ling Kong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment concentration (SSC is one of the most critical parameters in ocean ecological environment evaluation and it can be determined using ocean color remote sensing (RS. The purpose of this study is to develop a model that provides a reliable and sensitive evaluation of SSC retrieval using RS data. Data were acquired for and gathered from the Gulf of Bohai where SSC levels are relatively low with an average value below 30 mg·L−1. The study indicates that the most sensitive band to SSC levels in the study area is the NIR band of Landsat5 TM images. A quadratic polynomial semi-analytical model appears to be the best retrieval model based on the relationship between the inherent optical properties (IOPs and apparent optical properties (AOPs of water as described by the quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA. The model has a higher precision and effectiveness for SSC retrieval than data-driven statistical models, especially when SSC level is relatively high. The average relative error and the root mean square error (RMSE are 12.32% and 4.53 mg·L−1, respectively, while the correlation coefficient between observed and estimated SSC by the model is 0.95. Using the proposed retrieval model and TM data, SSC levels of the entire study region in the Gulf of Bohai were estimated. These estimates can serve as the baseline for efficient monitoring of the ocean environment in the future.

  13. Effect of distal Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outflow on suspended-sediment flux in Lower South San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livsey, D. N.; Downing-Kunz, M.; Schoellhamer, D. H.; Shellenbarger, G.; Wright, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Tidal marshes are an important component of estuarine ecosystems. Within the San Francisco Bay Estuary (SFB) tidal marshes play an important role in food web dynamics, are home to an array of endemic mammals, birds, and fishes, filter pollutants, and dampen coastal flooding. With 80% of SFB tidal marshes lost to human development, numerous restoration efforts are underway. The largest tidal marsh restoration project in SFB, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, is underway in Lower South San Francisco Bay to restore 60,000 ha of this critical habitat; however, rising sea levels, could jeopardize these gains without concomitant vertical accretion rates of the marsh surface via organic matter accumulation and sediment deposition. Recent work in Lower South Bay using continuously collected data from water years (WY) 2009-11 indicates that the direction of net springtime residual sediment flux is related to the amount of springtime Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) outflow. Large outflow freshens the Central Bay, causing a density gradient and inverse gravitational circulation that flushes Lower South Bay. In this study we extend the sediment budget for Lower South Bay from WY 2011 to present using 15-minute turbidity and velocity data paired with Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler cross-sectional measurements and in situ suspended-sediment concentration samples to: 1) further examine the mechanisms controlling net springtime residual sediment flux, and 2) further test the hypothesis that Delta outflow controls the direction of net sediment flux for Lower South Bay.

  14. Using multi-frequency acoustic attenuation to monitor grain size and concentration of suspended sediment in rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S A; Le Coz, J; Hurther, D; Paquier, A

    2013-04-01

    Multi-frequency acoustic backscatter profiles recorded with side-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers are used to monitor the concentration and size of sedimentary particles suspended in fluvial environments. Data at 300, 600, and 1200 kHz are presented from the Isère River in France where the dominant particles in suspension are silt and clay sizes. The contribution of suspended sediment to the through-water attenuation was determined for three high concentration (> 100 mg/L) events and compared to theoretical values for spherical particles having size distributions that were measured by laser diffraction in water samples. Agreement was good for the 300 kHz data, but it worsened with increasing frequency. A method for the determination of grain size using multi-frequency attenuation data is presented considering models for spherical and oblate spheroidal particles. When the resulting size estimates are used to convert sediment attenuation to concentration, the spheroidal model provides the best agreement with optical estimates of concentration, but the aspect ratio and grain size that provide the best fit differ between events. The acoustic estimates of size were one-third the values from laser grain sizing. This agreement is encouraging considering optical and acoustical instruments measure different parameters.

  15. A neural network experiment on the simulation of daily nitrate-nitrogen and suspended sediment fluxes from a small agricultural catchment

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report an application of neural networks to simulate daily nitrate-nitrogen and suspended sediment fluxes from a small 7.1 km2 agricultural catchment (Melarchez), 70km east of Paris,France. Nitrate-nitrogen and sediment losses are only a few possible consequences of soil erosion and biochemical applications associated to human activities such as intensive agriculture. Stacked multilayer perceptrons models (MLPs) like the ones explored here are based on commonly available inp...

  16. LOCAL ALGORITHM FOR MONITORING TOTAL SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS IN MICRO-WATERSHEDS USIN DRONES AND REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS. CASE STUDY: TEUSACÁ RIVER, LA CALERA, COLOMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    N. A. Sáenz; D. E. Paez; C. Arango

    2015-01-01

    An empirical relationship of Total Suspended Sediments (TSS) concentrations and reflectance values obtained with Drones’ aerial photos and processed using remote sensing tools was set up as the main objective of this research. A local mathematic algorithm for the micro-watershed of the Teusacá River at La Calera, Colombia, was developed based on the computing of four component of bands from consumed-grade cameras obtaining from each their corresponding reflectance values from procedures for c...

  17. Change of Rainfall-runoff event hysteresis in suspended sediments due to surface decontamination in the area affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; Taniguchi, K.; Kubo, T.; Smith, H.; Brake, W.; Kuramoto, T.; Sato, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) on March 2011 accident released massive amounts of radiocesium into the terrestrial environment such as Cs-137 and Cs-134. Where deposition density of Cs-137 exceeds loughly 500 kBq/m2, evacuation has been ordered, and the cropland and paddy field have become grassland in the summer of 2011.A large scale government funded research program has been started (Saito and Onda, 2015) to monitor the amount of radiocesium wash off from the catchments started June, 2011 (Yamashiki et al 2013) starting initial 6 sites in the Abukuma river watershed in the nested structure. Two stations were installed on the main river channel (Iwanuma; 5313 km2 and Fushiguro; 3645 km2), and the more highly-contaminated Kuchibuto sub-basin (Mizusakai; 7.5km2, Kuchibuto Upstream; 21.4 km2, Kuchibuto middle stream; 63 km2, Kuchibuto downstream; 135 km2) was selected for detailed monitoring. The sites are increased to 30 sites (Yoshimura et al., 2015) to cover the most of the area within 80 km from the FDNPP in 2013.Continuous measurements of flow and turbidity (for estimating suspended sediment concentration) were made at each monitoring station. Turbidity meters (Analyte turbidity meter, MacVan 3000-NTU) calibrated with bottom sediment of the Horai reservoir upstream the Abukuma river, and water level gauges (RuggedTROLL100) . During our monitoring of topsoil up to 5 cm and replaced with lower part of the soil taken nearby in the two upstream catchments (Kuchibuto upstream, Mizusakai ) mainly in 2014 to 2015.The change of rainfall-runoff event hysteresis in suspended sediments before and after the decontamination was significant. From 2011 to 2013. Most of the response of suspended sediment occurs before the rainfall peak. However, after 2014, the response occurs after the runoff events, and suspended sediment concentration has been increased especially in the stations where decontamination area ratio are high.

  18. Sediment transport and depth variation study of the Gulf of Kutch using remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Wagle, B.G.; Sugimori, Y.

    of actual data and principal components were generated to study sediment transport, depth variation and associated processes by mapping coastal and underwater geomorphic features and suspended sediment plumes. Submerged shoals, located as deep as 20 m below...

  19. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-10-19

    Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity data collected between 1997 and 2008 indicate that the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) is an important distributary of river water and suspended sediments to coastal wetlands in south-central coastal Louisiana. Following natural hydraulic gradients, the GIWW passively distributes freshwater and suspended sediments from the Atchafalaya River to areas at least 30 to 50 miles west and east, respectively, of Morgan City. The magnitude and reach of the discharge in the GIWW increase as stage of the Wax Lake Outlet at Calumet and Lower Atchafalaya River (LAR) at Morgan City increase. The magnitude and duration of discharge vary from year to year depending on the flow regime of the Atchafalaya River. Annual discharge of water in the GIWW was greater during years when stage of the LAR remained anomalously high throughout the year, compared with average and peak flood years. During years when Atchafalaya River flow is low, Bayou Boeuf, a waterway draining the Verret subbasin, becomes a major source of water maintaining the eastward flow in the GIWW. The GIWW is the only means of getting river water to some parts of coastal Louisiana.

  20. The influence of grain size, grain color, and suspended-sediment concentration on light attenuation: why fine-grained terrestrial sediment is bad for coral reef ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Norris, Benjamin; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Sediment has been shown to be a major stressor to coral reefs globally. Although many researchers have tested the impact of sedimentation on coral reef ecosystems in both the laboratory and the field and some have measured the impact of suspended sediment on the photosynthetic response of corals, there has yet to be a detailed investigation on how properties of the sediment itself can affect light availability for photosynthesis. We show that finer-grained and darker-colored sediment at higher suspended-sediment concentrations attenuates photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) significantly more than coarser, lighter-colored sediment at lower concentrations and provide PAR attenuation coefficients for various grain sizes, colors, and suspended-sediment concentrations that are needed for biophysical modeling. Because finer-grained sediment particles settle more slowly and are more susceptible to resuspension, they remain in the water column longer, thus causing greater net impact by reducing light essential for photosynthesis over a greater duration. This indicates that coral reef monitoring studies investigating sediment impacts should concentrate on measuring fine-grained lateritic and volcanic soils, as opposed to coarser-grained siliceous and carbonate sediment. Similarly, coastal restoration efforts and engineering solutions addressing long-term coral reef ecosystem health should focus on preferentially retaining those fine-grained soils rather than coarse silt and sand particles.

  1. Budgeting suspended sediment fluxes in tropical monsoonal watersheds with limited data: the Lake Tana basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimale Fasikaw A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion decreases soil fertility of the uplands and causes siltation of lakes and reservoirs; the lakes and reservoirs in tropical monsoonal African highlands are especially affected by sedimentation. Efforts in reducing loads by designing management practices are hampered by lack of quantitative data on the relationship of erosion in the watersheds and sediment accumulation on flood plains, lakes and reservoirs. The objective of this study is to develop a prototype quantitative method for estimating sediment budget for tropical monsoon lakes with limited observational data. Four watersheds in the Lake Tana basin were selected for this study. The Parameter Efficient Distributed (PED model that has shown to perform well in the Ethiopian highlands is used to overcome the data limitations and recreate the missing sediment fluxes. PED model parameters are calibrated using daily discharge data and the occasionally collected sediment concentration when establishing the sediment rating curves for the major rivers. The calibrated model parameters are then used to predict the sediment budget for the 1994-2009 period. Sediment retained in the lake is determined from two bathymetric surveys taken 20 years apart whereas the sediment leaving the lake is calculated based on measured discharge and observed sediment concentrations. Results show that annually on average 34 t/ha/year of sediment is removed from the gauged part of the Lake Tana watersheds. Depending on the up-scaling method from the gauged to the ungauged part, 21 to 32 t/ha/year (equivalent to 24-38 Mt/year is transported from the upland watersheds of which 46% to 65% is retained in the flood plains and 93% to 96% is trapped on the flood plains and in the lake. Thus, only 4-7% of all sediment produced in the watersheds leaves the Lake Tana Basin.

  2. Nano-mineralogy of suspended sediment during the beginning of coal rejects spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civeira, Matheus S; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; Teixeira, Elba C; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafine and nanometric sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and hazardous elements and have a strong impact on water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in South America. The objective of this work was to study the coal cleaning rejects (CCRs) spill that occurred from a CCRs impoundment pond into the Tubarão River, South Brazil, provided a unique occasion to study the importance and role of incidental nanoparticles associated with pollutant dispersal from a large-scale, acute aquatic pollution event. Multifaceted geochemical research by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS, and Raman spectroscopy, provided an in-depth understanding of importance of a nano-mineralogy approach of Aqueous Pollution Scenarios. The electron beam studies showed the presence of a number of potentially hazardous elements (PHEs) in nanoparticles (amorphous and minerals). Some of the neoformed ultrafine/nanoparticles found in the contaminated sediments are the same as those commonly associated with oxidation/transformation of oxides, silicates, sulfides, and sulfates. These data of the secondary ultra/nanoparticles, puts in evidence their ability to control the mobility of PHEs, suggesting possible presentations in environmental technology, including recuperation of sensitive coal mine. The developed methodology facilitated the sediment transport of the catchment providing consistent results and suggesting its usefulness as a tool for temporary rivers management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 3: implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Current observations and sediment characteristics acquired within and along the rim of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine, were used to characterize periods of sediment transport and to investigate conditions favorable to the settling of suspended sediment. Hourly averaged Shields parameters determined from horizontal current velocity profiles within the center of each pockmark never exceed the critical value (approximated with the theoretical model of Dade et al. 1992). However, Shields parameters estimated at the pockmark rims periodically exceed the critical value, consistent with conditions that support the onset of sediment transport and suspension. Below the rim in the near-center of each pockmark, depth-averaged vertical velocities were less than zero (downward) 60% and 55% of the time in the northern and southern pockmarks, and were often comparable to depth-averaged horizontal velocities. Along the rim, depth-averaged vertical velocities over the lower 8 m of the water column were primarily downward but much less than depth-averaged horizontal velocities indicating that suspended sediment may be moved to distant locations. Maximum grain sizes capable of remaining in suspension under terminal settling flow conditions (ranging 10–170 μm) were typically much greater than the observed median grain diameter (about 7 μm) at the bed. During upwelling flow within the pockmarks, and in the absence of flocculation, suspended sediment would not settle. The greater frequency of predicted periods of sediment transport along the rim of the southern pockmark is consistent with pockmark morphology in Belfast Bay, which transitions from more spherical to more elongated toward the south, suggesting near-bed sediment transport may contribute to post-formation pockmark evolution during typical conditions in Belfast Bay.

  4. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  5. Review of suspended sediment in lower South Bay relevant to light attenuation and phytoplankton blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Manning, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Lower South Bay (LSB), a shallow subembayment of San Francisco Bay (SFB), is situated south of the Dumbarton Bridge, and is surrounded by, and interconnected with, a network of sloughs, marshes, and former salt ponds undergoing restoration (Figure ES.1). LSB receives 120 million gallons per day of treated wastewater effluent from three publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) that service San Jose and the densely populated surrounding region. During the dry season, when flows from creeks and streams are at their minimum, POTW effluent comprises the majority of freshwater flow to Lower South Bay. Although LSB has a large tidal prism, it experiences limited net exchange with the surrounding Bay, because much of the water that leaves on ebb tides returns during the subsequent flood tides. The limited exchange leads to distinctly different biogeochemical conditions in LSB compared to other SFB subembayments, including LSB having the highest nutrient concentrations and highest phytoplankton biomass.

  6. Phosphorus adsorption and sedimentation by suspended sediments from Zhushan Bay, Taihu Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peifang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The process of phosphorus (P) transformation in particulate matter during sediment resuspension and sedimentation was studied. The P-binding forms in resuspended particles (RP) and settled particles (SP) were analyzed by sequential fractionation (modified Psenner method) and an extended extraction with ammonium oxalate. Water quality data and P fractions were used to estimate P release and uptake by the resuspended and settling sediment particles. Results of 8-h resuspension experiments showed increases of dissolved oxygen, pH, total phosphorus, and particulate phosphorus in overlying water, but no change in soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP). P fractions extracted with common sequential fractionation showed that the increase of total P in RP was mainly due to increases of redox-sensitive bound P BD (BD-SRP) and P bound to Al and Fe oxides (NaOH-SRP) (36-52 % and 30-36 % of total increased P, respectively). Comparisons between two sequential fractionations indicated that inorganic P extracted with ammonium oxalate consisted of P bound to amorphous Fe/Al oxy-hydroxides and partially of carbonate-bound P (HCl-SRP) and that increased P in RP was mainly caused by increases in P bound to amorphous oxides. It is concluded that the formation of amorphous oxides and subsequent adsorption of P lead to the increase of P in RP. However, P adsorbed by amorphous oxy-hydroxides in RP is unstable and may be released under sedimentation conditions. Meanwhile, increases in HCl-SRP, refractory P, and crystalline Fe-P were found in SP compared with RP. NaOH-SRP in SP increased gradually under sedimentation conditions. It is suggested that, during sedimentation, mobile P can be transformed to non-mobile P forms that provide long-term P retention. The findings contribute to the understanding of P cycling in particulate matter during sediment resuspension and sedimentation.

  7. Post-fire suspended sediment dynamics in a Mediterranean terraced catchment using a nested approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Comendador, Julián; Fortesa, Josep; Calsamiglia, Aleix; Calvo-Cases, Adolfo; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires promote serious disturbances in the hydrological and sediment dynamics at catchment scale modifying the runoff generation response and the sediment delivery. The hysteretic loops analyses can help to clarify some landscape changes induced by fire. Accordingly, these spatio-temporal relationships between discharge and sediment transport at event scale enable the location of sediment sources, the availability or depletion of sediment and the precipitation threshold necessary to generate functional hillslope-channel connectivity. In addition, a nested catchment approach allows the characterization of the hydro-sedimentological dynamics in different landscape compartments, observing the incidence of the changes generated in the landscape and its evolution to control soil erosion and to implement useful mitigation practices after fire. In July 2013 a large wildfire (2,450 ha) severely affected the western part of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). The hydrological and sediment delivery processes were assessed in the first three post-fire hydrological years in a representative catchment when the window of disturbance is typically more open. A nested approach was applied in which two gauging stations (i.e., US 1.2 km2 and DS 4.8 km2) were established in September 2013 with continuous measurement of rainfall, water and sediment yield. At DS, a minimal runoff (i.e., 11 mm with 2% of coefficient) and low sediment yield (i.e., 6.3 t km2 yr-1) were generated on average in the study period in which rainfall averaged amount (i.e., 468 mm ± 141) and intensities were representative of long-term records. The hysteretic analysis allowed a better understanding of the effects of wildfires and terraces in sediment yields. For the whole study period, the percentage distribution was 43% (US; two monitored years) and 40% (DS; three monitored years) for clockwise loops in front of 57% (US) and 60% (DS) for counter clockwise loops. This percentage of counter clockwise loops was

  8. DNS with Discrete Element Modeling of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksereht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Interactions of glass particles in water in a turbulent open channel flow over a smooth bed with gravity perpendicular to the mean flow is examined using direct numerical simulation (DNS) together with Lagrangian Discrete-Element-Model (DEM) for particles. The turbulent Reynolds number (Reτ) is 710 corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano (JFM, 2004). Particles of size 200 microns with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with standard models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The presence of particles affect the outer as well as inner region of the wall layer where particle inertia and concentration are higher. The DNS-DEM is able to capture the fluid-particle interactions in the outer layer accurately. However, in the inner layer, an increase in mean as well as rms fluid velocity, as observed in the experiments, is not predicted by the DNS-DEM model. It is conjectured that particles slide and roll on the bottom wall, creating slip-like condition. Predictions using different models for drag and lift forces, as well as strong torque coupling are explored and compared with experimental data. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  9. A quarter century of declining suspended sediment fluxes in the Mississippi River and the effect of the 1993 flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Annual fluxes, flow-weighted concentrations and linear least squares trendline calculations for a number of long-term Mississippi River Basin (MRB) sampling sites covering 1981 through 2007, whilst somewhat 'noisy', display long-term patterns of decline. Annual flow-weighted concentration plots display the same long-term patterns of decline, but are less noisy because they reduce/eliminate variations due to interannual discharge differences. The declines appear greatest in the middle MRB, but also are evident elsewhere. The pattern for the lower Ohio River differs and may reflect ongoing construction at the Olmsted lock and dam that began in 1993 and currently is ongoing. The 'Great Flood of 1993' appears to have superimposed a step function (a sharp drop) on the long-term rate of decline in suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), annual fluxes and flow-weighted concentrations in the middle MRB at St Louis and Thebes, Missouri and Vicksburg, Mississippi, and in the lower MRB at St Francisville, Louisiana. Evidence for a step function at other sites is less substantial, but may have occurred. The step function appears to have resulted from losses in available (erodible) sediment, rather than to a reduction in discharge; hence, the MRB appears to be supply limited rather than discharge limited. These evaluations support the need for daily discharge and SSC data collections in the MRB to better address questions regarding long-term trends in sediment-related issues. This is apparent when the results for the Mississippi River at Thebes and St Louis sites are compared with those from other MRB sites where intensive (daily) data collections are lacking. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Importance of suspended sediment (SPS) composition and grain size in the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinghui; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dong; Bao, Yimeng; Li, Husheng; Zhai, Yawei

    2016-07-01

    Hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) tend to associate with suspended sediment (SPS) in aquatic environments; the composition and grain size of SPS will affect the bioavailability of SPS-associated HOCs. However, the bioavailability of HOCs sorbed on SPS with different compositions and grain sizes is not well understood. In this work, passive dosing devices were made to control the freely dissolved concentration of pyrene, a typical HOC, in the exposure systems. The effect of pyrene associated with amorphous organic carbon (AOC), black carbon (BC), and minerals of SPS with grain sizes of 0-50 μm and 50-100 μm on the immobilization and enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna was investigated to quantify the bioavailability of pyrene sorbed on SPS with different grain sizes and compositions. The results showed that the contribution of AOC-, BC-, and mineral-associated pyrene to the total bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene was approximately 50%-60%, 10%-29%, and 20%-30%, respectively. The bioavailable fraction of pyrene sorbed on the three components of SPS was ordered as AOC (22.4%-67.3%) > minerals (20.1%-46.0%) > BC (9.11%-16.8%), and the bioavailable fraction sorbed on SPS of 50-100 μm grain size was higher than those of 0-50 μm grain size. This is because the SPS grain size will affect the ingestion of SPS and the SPS composition will affect the desorption of SPS-associated pyrene in Daphnia magna. According to the results obtained in this study, a model has been developed to calculate the bioavailability of HOCs to aquatic organisms in natural waters considering both SPS grain size and composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioavailability of Pyrene Associated with Suspended Sediment of Different Grain Sizes to Daphnia magna as Investigated by Passive Dosing Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Xia, Xinghui; Li, Husheng; Zhu, Baotong; Dong, Jianwei

    2015-08-18

    Suspended sediment (SPS) is widely present in rivers around the world. However, the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) associated with SPS is not well understood. In this work, the influence of SPS grain size on the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene to Daphnia magna was studied using a passive dosing device, which maintained a constant freely dissolved pyrene concentration (Cfree) in the exposure systems. The immobilization and protein as well as enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna were investigated to study the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene. With Cfree of pyrene ranging from 20.0 to 60.0 μg L(-1), the immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence of 1 g L(-1) SPS was 1.11-2.89 times that in the absence of SPS. The immobilization caused by pyrene associated with different grain size SPS was on the order of 50-100 μm > 0-50 μm > 100-150 μm. When pyrene Cfree was 20.0 μg L(-1), the immobilization caused by pyrene associated with 50-100 μm SPS was 1.42 and 2.43 times that with 0-50 and 100-150 μm SPS, respectively. The protein and enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna also varied with the SPS grain size. The effect of SPS grain size on the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene was mainly due to the difference in SPS ingestion by Daphnia magna and SPS composition, especially the organic carbon type, among the three size fractions. This study suggests that not only the concentration but also the size distribution of SPS should be considered for the development of a biological effect database and establishment of water quality criteria for HOCs in natural waters.

  12. Suspended sediment yield and metal contamination in a river catchment affected by El Niño events and gold mining activities: the Puyango river basin, southern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarras-Wahlberg, N. H.; Lane, S. N.

    2003-10-01

    The suspended sediment yield and the transfer of polluted sediment are investigated for the Puyango river basin in southern Ecuador. This river system receives metal (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) and cyanide pollution generated by mining, and is associated with large-scale hydrological variability, which is partly governed by El Niño events. Field sampling and statistical modelling methods are used to quantify the amount of mine tailings that is discharged into the basin. Annual suspended sediment yields are estimated using a novel combination of the suspended sediment rating method and Monte Carlo simulations, which allow for propagation of the uncertainties of the calculations that lead to final load estimates. Geochemical analysis of suspended and river bed sediment is used to assess the dispersion and long-term fate of contaminated sediment within the river catchment. Knowledge of the inter- and intra-annual variation in suspended sediment yield is shown to be crucial for judging the importance of mining discharges, and the extent to which the resultant pollution is diluted by river flows. In wet years, polluted sediments represent only a very small proportion of the yield estimates, but in dry years the proportion can be significant. Evidence shows that metal contaminated sediments are stored in the Puyango river bed during low flows. Large flood events flush this sediment periodically, both on an annual cycle associated with the rainy season, and also related to El Niño events. Therefore, environmental impacts of mining-related discharges are more likely to be severe during dry years compared with wet years, and in the dry season rather than the wet season. The hydrological consequences of El Niño events are shown to depend upon the extent to which these events penetrate inland. It is, thus, shown that the general conclusion that El Niño events can significantly affect suspended sediment yields needs evaluation with respect to the particular way in which those

  13. Quantifying habitat interactions: sediment transport and freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarek, J. L.; MacGregor, K. R.; Hornbach, D.; Hove, M.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater mussel abundance and distribution are integrally linked with their habitat through sediment transport processes in moving waters, including suspended sediment loads and bed mobility. This research seeks to quantify these complex interactions using a combination of field data collection in the intensively agricultural Minnesota River Basin, and laboratory experiments in the Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) and flumes at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota. The OSL is a field-scale sand-bed meandering stream channel with independent control over sediment feed (recirculated) and water flow (diverted from the Mississippi River). Experiments in the OSL focused on the interactions between moving bedload and freshwater mussel behavior. Flooding experiments were used to quantify the movement during and post flood for three mussel species with different shell sculptures: threeridge (Amblema plicata), plain pockebook (Lampsilus cardium), and white heelsplitter (Lasmigona complanata). Flow fields, bed shear stress, bedform migration, and bar topography were measured during each flooding event with and without mussels present (density = 4/m2) to examine the influence of flooding on mussel movement, and to quantify the influence of mussels on channel morphology under steady state bedload transport. Additional experiments were conducted with threeridge at low flow (no bedload), under aggrading and degrading bed conditions, and doubled mussel density (8/m2). Mussel response to suspended sediment loads was examined in a complementary series of experiments in an indoor flume with Mississippi River water. Mussels outfitted with gape sensors were utilized in paired control/treatment experiments to examine the influence of moderate term (48 hours) exposure to elevated suspended sediment loads on mussel filtering activity. Together, these experiments provide multiple measures of mussel stress under high sediment loads and reveal how freshwater mussels

  14. Hyperspectral and Multispectral Retrieval of Suspended Sediment in Shallow Coastal Waters Using Semi-Analytical and Empirical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochi Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural lagoons and estuaries worldwide are experiencing accelerated ecosystem degradation due to increased anthropogenic pressure. As a key driver of coastal zone dynamics, suspended sediment concentration (SSC is difficult to monitor with adequate spatial and temporal resolutions both in the field and using remote sensing. In particular, the spatial resolutions of currently available remote sensing data generated by satellite sensors designed for ocean color retrieval, such as MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor, are too coarse to capture the dimension and geomorphological heterogeneity of most estuaries and lagoons. In the present study, we explore the use of hyperspectral (Hyperion and multispectral data, i.e., the Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper and ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, and ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite, to estimate SSC through semi-analytical and empirical approaches in the Venice lagoon (Italy. Key parameters of the retrieval models are calibrated and cross-validated by matching the remote sensing estimates of SSC with in situ data from a network of water quality sensors. Our analysis shows that, despite the higher spectral resolution, hyperspectral data provide limited advantages over the use of multispectral data, mainly due to information redundancy and cross-band correlation. Meanwhile, the limited historical archive of hyperspectral data (usually acquired on demand severely reduces the chance of observing high turbidity events, which are relatively rare but critical in controlling the coastal sediment and geomorphological dynamics. On the contrary, retrievals using available multispectral data can encompass a much wider range of SSC values due to their frequent acquisitions and longer historical archive. For the retrieval methods considered in this study, we find that the semi

  15. Use of acoustic backscatter to estimate continuous suspended sediment and phosphorus concentrations in the Barton River, northern Vermont, 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalie, Laura; Chalmers, Ann T.; Kiah, Richard G.; Copans, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, investigated the use of acoustic backscatter to estimate concentrations of suspended sediment and total phosphorus at the Barton River near Coventry, Vermont. The hypothesis was that acoustic backscatter—the reflection of sound waves off objects back to the source from which they came—measured by an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) and recorded as ancillary data for the calculation of discharge, also could be used to generate a continuous concentration record of suspended sediment and phosphorus at the streamgage, thereby deriving added value from the instrument. Suspended-sediment and phosphorus concentrations are of particular interest in Vermont, where impairment of surface waters by suspended sediments and phosphorus is a major concern. Regression models for estimating suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and total phosphorus concentrations evaluated several independent variables: measured backscatter (MB), water-corrected backscatter (WCB), sediment-corrected backscatter (SCB), discharge, fluid-absorption coefficient, sediment-driven acoustic attenuation coefficient, and discharge hysteresis. The best regression equations for estimating SSC used backscatter as the predictor, reflecting the direct relation between acoustic backscatter and SSC. Backscatter was a better predictor of SSC than discharge in part because hysteresis between SSC and backscatter was less than for SSC and discharge. All three backscatter variables—MB, WCB, and SCB—performed equally as predictors of SSC and phosphorus concentrations at the Barton River site. The similar abilities to predict SSC among backscatter terms may partially be attributed to the low values and narrow range of the sediment-driven acoustic attenuation in the Barton River. The regression based on SCB was selected for estimating SSC because it removes potential bias caused by attenuation and temperature

  16. Effects of wind farm construction on concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and suspended sediment from peat catchments at Braes of Doune, central Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Grieve

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the impacts of disturbance associated with the construction of a wind farm on fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and suspended sediment from a blanket peat catchment in central Scotland during the period immediately following completion of construction. Six streams draining the site were sampled on six dates from October 2006, when construction was completed, and an additional three control streams to the west of the site were sampled on the same dates. Turbidity and stage were recorded semi-continuously in the two largest streams (one disturbed and one control, which were also sampled during storm events. Absorbance (400 nm and DOC concentrations were determined on all samples, and suspended sediment was determined on the event samples. Absorbance and DOC were closely correlated in both the disturbed and undisturbed streams, with slightly greater absorbance per unit DOC in the disturbed streams. DOC concentrations in disturbed tributaries were always greater than those in undisturbed streams, with mean differences ranging from 2 to around 5 mg L-1. DOC and stage were positively correlated during events with maximum concentrations in excess of 30 mg L 1 at peak flow. Suspended sediment concentrations were markedly elevated in the disturbed stream with maximum concentrations at peak flow some 4–5 times greater than in the control. The colour of the sediment suggested that it was highly organic in nature at peak flow, and suspended particulate organic carbon represented a further loss of C from the site. Using flow-weighted mean DOC concentrations calculated for the storms monitored in autumn 2007, dissolved carbon losses can be estimated for the catchments of the disturbed and control streams. From these data the additional DOC loss related to disturbance associated with the wind farm is estimated at 5 g m-2.

  17. Water-quality assessment of the Trinity River Basin, Texas - Analysis of available information on nutrients and suspended sediment, 1974-91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Reutter, David C.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an assessment of water quality in the Trinity River Basin as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. During the planning phase of this study, existing information on nutrients and suspended sediment was compiled and analyzed. A total of about 5,700 water-quality samples were analyzed from local, State, and Federal agencies. Of these, about 4,200 were from streams and about 1,500 were from wells. Additionally, atmospheric deposition data for two locations were obtained and analyzed.

  18. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2001-12-20

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada.

  19. Physically based modelling of sediment generation and transport under a large rainfall simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Russell; Elliott, Sandy

    2006-07-01

    A series of large rainfall simulator experiments was conducted in 2002 and 2003 on a small plot located in an experimental catchment in the North Island of New Zealand. These experiments measured both runoff and sediment transport under carefully controlled conditions. A physically based hydrological modelling system (SHETRAN) was then applied to reproduce the observed hydrographs and sedigraphs. SHETRAN uses physically based equations to represent flow and sediment transport, and two erodibility coefficients to model detachment of soil particles by raindrop erosion and overland flow erosion. The rate of raindrop erosion also depended on the amount of bare ground under the simulator; this was estimated before each experiment. These erodibility coefficients were calibrated systematically for summer and winter experiments separately, and lower values were obtained for the summer experiments. Earlier studies using small rainfall simulators in the vicinity of the plot also found the soil to be less erodible in summer and autumn. Limited validation of model parameters was carried out using results from a series of autumn experiments. The modelled suspended sediment load was also sensitive to parameters controlling the generation of runoff from the rainfall simulator plot; therefore, we found that accurate runoff predictions were important for the sediment predictions, especially from the experiments where the pasture cover was good and overland flow erosion was the dominant mechanism. The rainfall simulator experiments showed that the mass of suspended sediment increased post-grazing, and according to the model this was due to raindrop detachment. The results indicated that grazing cattle or sheep on steeply sloping hill-country paddocks should be carefully managed, especially in winter, to limit the transport of suspended sediment into watercourses.

  20. Decline in suspended sediment concentration delivered by the Changjiang (Yangtze) River into the East China Sea between 1956 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhijun; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Mei, Xuefei; Gao, Jinjuan

    2016-09-01

    The temporal evolution of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in a river debouching into the ocean provides vital insights into erosion processes in the watershed and dictates the evolution of the inner continental shelf. While the delivery of sediment from rivers to the ocean has received special attention in the recent past, few studies focused on the variability and dynamics of river SSC, especially in the Changjiang (Yangtze) river, China, the longest river in Asia. Here, variations in SSC delivered by the Changjiang River to the East China Sea and possible causes of its variability were detected based on a long-term time series of daily SSC and monthly water discharge measured at the Datong gauging station. The SSC data are further compared to a hydrological analysis of yearly precipitation covering the entire catchment. The results indicate the presence of a decline in SSC in the period 1956-2013, which can be divided into three phases: (i) high SSC (0.69 kg/m3) in the wet season and low SSC (0.2 kg/m3) in the dry season from 1956 to 1970; (ii) relative high SSC (0.58 kg/m3) in the wet season and low SSC (0.15 kg/m3) in the dry season from 1971 to 2002; and (iii) low SSC (0.19 kg/m3) in the wet season and very low SSC (0.09 kg/m3) in the dry season after 2002. These three periods have a mean yearly SSC values of 0.62, 0.42, and 0.18 kg/m3, respectively. Compared with 1956-1970, the slope of the rating curve between SSC and water discharge decreased, respectively, by 2% and 30% during the period 1971-2002 and 2002-2013. Soil erosion, dam construction, and banks reinforcement along the Changjiang River are the main causes of SSC variations. Fluctuations in water discharge are also controlling the SSC long-term variations. Specifically, from 1956 to 1970, the effect of soil erosion overrules that of dam impoundment, which is likely responsible for the high SSC; during the period 1970-2002, the influence of dam impoundment increases while that of soil erosion

  1. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive

  2. Correlations of turbidity to suspended-sediment concentration in the Toutle River Basin, near Mount St. Helens, Washington, 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Kolasinac, Jasna; Booth, Pamela L.; Fountain, Robert L.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey, Cascades Volcano Observatory, investigated alternative methods for the traditional sample-based sediment record procedure in determining suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge. One such sediment-surrogate technique was developed using turbidity and discharge to estimate SSC for two gaging stations in the Toutle River Basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington. To provide context for the study, methods for collecting sediment data and monitoring turbidity are discussed. Statistical methods used include the development of ordinary least squares regression models for each gaging station. Issues of time-related autocorrelation also are evaluated. Addition of lagged explanatory variables was used to account for autocorrelation in the turbidity, discharge, and SSC data. Final regression model equations and plots are presented for the two gaging stations. The regression models support near-real-time estimates of SSC and improved suspended-sediment discharge records by incorporating continuous instream turbidity. Future use of such models may potentially lower the costs of sediment monitoring by reducing time it takes to collect and process samples and to derive a sediment-discharge record.

  3. Measuring and Modeling Suspended Sediment and Nutrient Yields from a Mixed-Land-Use Watershed of the Central U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, S. J.; Hubbart, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    A nested-scale watershed study design was used to monitor water quantity and quality of an impaired 3rd order stream in a rapidly urbanizing mixed-land-use watershed of the central USA. Grab samples were collected at each gauging site (n=836 samples x 5 gauging sites) and analyzed for suspended sediment, total phosphorus, and inorganic nitrogen species during the four year study period (2010 - 2013). Observed data were used to quantify relationships between climate, land use and pollutant loading. Additionally, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) estimates of monthly stream flow, suspended sediment, total phosphorus, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium were validated. Total annual precipitation ranged from approximately 650 mm during 2012 (extreme drought year) to 1350 mm during 2010 (record setting wet year) which caused significant (pland use (positive correlate), forested land use (negative correlate), and wetland land use (negative correlate). Results from SWAT model performance assessment indicated calibration was necessary to achieve Nash-Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE) values greater than 0.05 for monthly pollutant loads. Calibrating the SWAT model to multiple gauging sites within the watershed improved estimates of monthly stream flow (NSE=0.83), and pollutant loads (NSE>0.78). However, nitrite and ammonium loads were underestimated by more than four orders of magnitude (NSEland-use watersheds.

  4. Geochemistry and magnetic measurements of suspended sediment in urban sewage water vis-à-vis quantification of heavy metal pollution in Ganga and Yamuna Rivers, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarvorty, Munmun; Dwivedi, Akhil Kumar; Shukla, Anil Dutt; Kumar, Sujeet; Niyogi, Ambalika; Usmani, Mavera; Pati, Jayanta Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Sewage water is becoming a key source of heavy metal toxicity in large river systems worldwide and the two major Himalayan Rivers in India (Ganga and Yamuna) are severely affected. The high population density in the river banks combined with increased anthropogenic and industrial activities is contributing to the heavy metal pollution in these rivers. Geochemical data shows a significant increase in the concentration of all heavy metals (Pb, 48-86 ppm; Zn, 360-834 ppm; V, 45-101 ppm; Ni, 20-143 ppm; Cr, 79-266 ppm; Co, 8.62-22.12 ppm and Mn, 313-603 ppm) in sewage and mixed water (sewage and river water confluence site) samples due to increased effluent discharge from the catchment area. The ΣREE content of sewage water (129 ppm) is lower than the average mixed water samples (142 ppm). However, all the samples show similar REE pattern. The mass magnetic susceptibility (Xlf) values of suspended sediments (28 to 1000 × 10(-8) m(3) kg(-1)) indicate variable concentration of heavy metals. The Xlf values show faint positive correlation with their respective bulk heavy metal contents in a limited sample population. The present study comprising geochemical analysis and first magnetic measurement data of suspended sediments in water samples shows a strongly polluted nature of Ganga and Yamuna Rivers at Allahabad contrary to the previous report mainly caused by overtly polluted city sewage water.

  5. Suspended-sediment and turbidity responses to sediment and turbidity reduction projects in the Beaver Kill, Stony Clove Creek, and Warner Creek, Watersheds, New York, 2010–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemion, Jason; McHale, Michael R.; Davis, Wae Danyelle

    2016-12-05

    Suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and turbidity were monitored within the Beaver Kill, Stony Clove Creek, and Warner Creek tributaries to the upper Esopus Creek in New York, the main source of water to the Ashokan Reservoir, from October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2014. The purpose of the monitoring was to determine the effects of suspended-sediment and turbidity reduction projects (STRPs) on SSC and turbidity in two of the three streams; no STRPs were constructed in the Beaver Kill watershed. During the study period, four STRPs were completed in the Stony Clove Creek and Warner Creek watersheds. Daily mean SSCs decreased significantly for a given streamflow after the STRPs were completed. The most substantial decreases in daily mean SSCs were measured at the highest streamflows. Background SSCs, as measured in water samples collected in upstream reference stream reaches, in all three streams in this study were less than 5 milligrams per liter during low and high streamflows. Longitudinal stream sampling identified stream reaches with failing hillslopes in contact with the stream channel as the primary sediment sources in the Beaver Kill and Stony Clove Creek watersheds.

  6. Tide-driven fluid mud transport in the Ems estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Marius; Maushake, Christian; Winter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Ems estuary, located at the border between The Netherlands and Germany, experienced a significant change of the hydrodynamic regime during the past decades, as a result of extensive river engineering. With the net sediment transport now being flood-oriented, suspended sediment concentrations have increased dramatically, inducing siltation and formation of fluid mud layers, which, in turn, influence hydraulic flow properties, such as turbulence and the apparent bed roughness. Here, the process-based understanding of fluid mud is essential to model and predict mud accumulation, not only regarding the anthropogenic impact, but also in view of the expected changes of environmental boundary conditions, i.e., sea level rise. In the recent past, substantial progress has been made concerning the understanding of estuarine circulation and influence of tidal asymmetry on upstream sediment accumulation. While associated sediment transport formulations have been implemented in the framework of numerical modelling systems, in-situ data of fluid mud are scarce. This study presents results on tide-driven fluid mud dynamics, measured during four tidal cycles aside the navigation channel in the Ems estuary. Lutoclines, i.e., strong vertical density gradients, were detected by sediment echo sounder (SES). Acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCP) of different acoustic frequencies were used to determine hydrodynamic parameters and the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentrations in the upper part of the water column. These continuous profiling measurements were complemented by CTD, ADV, and OBS casts. SES and ADCP profiles show cycles of fluid mud entrainment during accelerating flow, and subsequent settling, and the reformation of a lutocline during decelerating flow and slack water. Significant differences are revealed between flood and ebb phase. Highest entrainment rates are measured at the beginning of the flood phase, associated with strong current shear and

  7. A study of the effects of implementing agricultural best management practices and in-stream restoration on suspended sediment, stream habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrates at three stream sites in Surry County, North Carolina, 2004-2007-Lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas G.; Ferrell, G.M.; Harned, Douglas A.; Cuffney, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of agricultural best management practices and in-stream restoration on suspended-sediment concentrations, stream habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were examined in a comparative study of three small, rural stream basins in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces of North Carolina and Virginia between 2004 and 2007. The study was designed to assess changes in stream quality associated with stream-improvement efforts at two sites in comparison to a control site (Hogan Creek), for which no improvements were planned. In the drainage basin of one of the stream-improvement sites (Bull Creek), several agricultural best management practices, primarily designed to limit cattle access to streams, were implemented during this study. In the drainage basin of the second stream-improvement site (Pauls Creek), a 1,600-foot reach of the stream channel was restored and several agricultural best management practices were implemented. Streamflow conditions in the vicinity of the study area were similar to or less than the long-term annual mean streamflows during the study. Precipitation during the study period also was less than normal, and the geographic distribution of precipitation indicated drier conditions in the southern part of the study area than in the northern part. Dry conditions during much of the study limited opportunities for acquiring high-flow sediment samples and streamflow measurements. Suspended-sediment yields for the three basins were compared to yield estimates for streams in the southeastern United States. Concentrations of suspended sediment and nutrients in samples from Bull Creek, the site where best management practices were implemented, were high compared to the other two sites. No statistically significant change in suspended-sediment concentrations occurred at the Bull Creek site following implementation of best management practices. However, data collected before and after channel stabilization at the Pauls

  8. Characterization of sediment transport upstream and downstream from Lake Emory on the Little Tennessee River near Franklin, North Carolina, 2014–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Brad A.; Hazell, William F.; Oblinger, Carolyn J.

    2017-09-06

    Federal, State, and local agencies and organizations have expressed concerns regarding the detrimental effects of excessive sediment transport on aquatic resources and endangered species populations in the upper Little Tennessee River and some of its tributaries. In addition, the storage volume of Lake Emory, which is necessary for flood control and power generation, has been depleted by sediment deposition. To help address these concerns, a 2-year study was conducted in the upper Little Tennessee River Basin to characterize the ambient suspended-sediment concentrations and suspended-sediment loads upstream and downstream from Lake Emory in Franklin, North Carolina. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Duke Energy. Suspended-sediment samples were collected periodically, and time series of stage and turbidity data were measured from December 2013 to January 2016 upstream and downstream from Lake Emory. The stage data were used to compute time-series streamflow. Suspended-sediment samples, along with time-series streamflow and turbidity data, were used to develop regression models that were used to estimate time-series suspended-sediment concentrations for the 2014 and 2015 calendar years. These concentrations, along with streamflow data, were used to compute suspended-sediment loads. Selected suspended-sediment samples were collected for analysis of particle-size distribution, with emphasis on high-flow events. Bed-load samples were also collected upstream from Lake Emory.The estimated annual suspended-sediment loads (yields) for the upstream site for the 2014 and 2015 calendar years were 27,000 short tons (92 short tons per square mile) and 63,300 short tons (215 short tons per square mile), respectively. The annual suspended-sediment loads (yields) for the downstream site for 2014 and 2015 were 24,200 short tons (75 short tons per square mile) and 94,300 short tons (292 short tons per square mile), respectively. Overall, the

  9. Land-use effects on fluxes of suspended sediment, nitrogen and phosphorus from a river catchment of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Heather M.; Walton, Richard S.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryA 6-year study was conducted in the Johnstone River system in the wet tropics of north-eastern Australia, to address concerns that the Great Barrier Reef is at risk from elevated levels of suspended sediment (SS) and nutrients discharged from its river catchments. Aims were to quantify: (i) fluxes of SS, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) exported annually from the catchment and (ii) the influence of rural land uses on these fluxes. Around 55% of the 1602 km2 catchment was native rainforest, with the reminder developed mainly for livestock and crop production. Water quality and stream flow were monitored at 16 sites, with the emphasis on sampling major runoff events. Monitoring data were used to calibrate a water quality model for the catchment (HSPF), which was run with 39 years of historical precipitation and evaporation data. Modelled specific fluxes from the catchment of 1.2 ± 1.1 t SS ha-1 y-1, 2.2 ± 1.8 kg P ha-1 y-1 and 11.4 ± 7.3 kg N ha-1y-1 were highly variable between and within years. Fluxes of SS and P were strongly dominated by major events, with 91% of SS and 84% of P exported during the highest 10% of daily flows. On average, sediment P comprised 81% of the total P flux. The N flux was less strongly dominated by major events and sediment N comprised 46% of total N exports. Specific fluxes of SS, N and P from areas receiving precipitation of 3545 mm y-1 were around 3-4 times those from areas receiving 1673 mm y-1. For a given mean annual precipitation, specific fluxes of SS and P from beef pastures, dairy pastures and unsewered residential areas were similar to those from rainforest, while fluxes from areas of sugar cane and bananas were 3-4 times higher. Specific fluxes of N from areas with an annual precipitation of 3545 mm ranged from 8.9 ± 6.5 kg N ha-1 y-1 (rainforest) to 72 ± 50 kg N ha-1 y-1 (unsewered residential). Aggregated across the entire catchment, disproportionately large fluxes of SS, total P and total N were derived from

  10. Field studies of estuarine turbidity under different freshwater flow conditions, Kaipara River, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Steven B.; Green, Malcolm O.; MacDonald, Iain T.; Pritchard, Mark

    2017-11-01

    We present a first interpretation of three days of measurements made in 2013 from the tidal reaches of the Kaipara River (New Zealand) under both low and high freshwater inputs and a neap tidal cycle. During the first day, we occupied two stations that were approximately 6 km apart in a tidal reach that runs for 25 km from the river mouth to the upstream limit of tidal influence. During the second day, longitudinal surveys were conducted over a distance of 6 km centred on the upstream station. The data reveal a turbidity maximum in the form of a high-concentration 'plug' of suspended mud that was advected downstream on the ebbing tide past the upper (HB) measurement station and which exchanged sediment with the seabed by settling at low slack water and by resuspension in the early flooding tide. The data suggest that fine sediment is transported landwards and trapped in the upper part of the tidal reach under these low-flow conditions. On the third day of measurements we repeated the experiments of the first day but later in the year, for a much higher freshwater flow. This interpretation of our data set highlights the potential contribution of a range of processes to the generation of the observed suspended-sediment signals, including resuspension of local bed sediment, advection by the tidal current, settling of suspended sediment over a long timescale compared to the advection timescale, advection of longitudinal gradients in suspended sediment, and suppression of vertical mixing by density stratification of the water column. The level of temporal and spatial detail afforded by these measurements allows a much clearer understanding of the timing and importance of vertical stratification on the transport of suspended particulate matter than is generally possible using fixed-point sensors.

  11. Factors influencing storm-generated suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in four basins of contrasting land use, humid-tropical Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    The significant characteristics controlling the variability in storm-generated suspended-sediment loads and concentrations were analyzed for four basins of differing land use (forest, pasture, cropland, and urbanizing) in humid-tropical Puerto Rico. Statistical analysis involved stepwise regression on factor scores. The explanatory variables were attributes of flow, hydrograph peaks, and rainfall, categorized into 5 flow periods: (1) the current storm hydrograph, (2) the flow and rainfall since the previous storm event, (3) the previous storm event, (4) 2nd previous storm event, and (5) the 3rd previous storm event. The response variables (storm generated sediment loads and concentrations) were analyzed for three portions of the storm hydrograph: (1) the entire storm, (2) the rising limb, and (3) the recessional limb. Hysteresis differences in sediment concentration between the rising and falling limb were also analyzed using these explanatory variables.

  12. Measurement differences between turbidity instruments, and their implications for suspended sediment concentration and load calculations: A sensor inter-comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymszewicz, A; O'Sullivan, J J; Bruen, M; Turner, J N; Lawler, D M; Conroy, E; Kelly-Quinn, M

    2017-09-01

    The use of turbidity for indicating environmentally detrimental levels of suspended and colloidal matter in freshwater systems, and for defining acceptable water quality standards in national and European drinking water regulations, is well established. Turbidity is therefore frequently adopted as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), or as a relative and objective measure of water clarity in monitoring programmes. Through systematic, controlled experimentation, we tested the response of 12 commercially available turbidity sensors, of various designs, to gauge their measurement consistency when benchmarked against pre-prepared sediment suspensions of known SSC. Results showed that despite calibration to a Formazin standard, sensor responses to identical SSC solutions (in the range of 20-1000 mg L(-1)) varied considerably. For a given SSC, up to five-fold differences in recorded turbidity were recorded across the tested instruments. Furthermore, inconsistent measurements were identified across instruments, regardless of whether they operated using backscatter or side-scatter optical principles. While the findings may have implications for compliance with turbidity-based water quality standards, they are less likely to be an issue when turbidity is being used as a surrogate for SSC, provided that instrument use remains constant and that instrument drift is not an issue. In this study, a field comparison of a subset of four study sensors showed that despite very different absolute turbidity readings for a given SSC, well correlated and reliable turbidity - SSC ratings were established (as evidenced by r(2) coefficients from 0.92 to 0.98). This led to reasonably consistent suspended sediment load estimates of between 64.7 and 70.8 tonnes for a rainfall event analysed. This study highlights the potential for issues to arise when interpreting water turbidity datasets that are often assumed to be comparable, in that measurement inconsistency of the

  13. Oscillatory infragravity wave contribution to surf zone sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Field measurements reported in the literature demonstrate that suspended sediment transport due to infragravity wave motions can sometimes be very large and dominate the net sediment transport at a given measurement location within the surf zone. At other times, however, this transport component ...

  14. Interpreting Hydraulic Conditions from Morphology, Sedimentology, and Grain Size of Sand Bars in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. M.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Grams, P. E.; Buscombe, D.; East, A. E.; Wright, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    During three decades of research on sand bars and sediment transport in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, we have collected unprecedented quantities of data on bar morphology, sedimentary structures, grain size of sand on the riverbed (~40,000 measurements), grain size of sand in flood deposits (dozens of vertical grain-size profiles), and time series of suspended sediment concentration and grain size (more than 3 million measurements using acoustic and laser-diffraction instruments sampling every 15 minutes at several locations). These data, which include measurements of flow and suspended sediment as well as sediment within the deposits, show that grain size within flood deposits generally coarsens or fines proportionally to the grain size of sediment that was in suspension when the beds were deposited. The inverse problem of calculating changing flow conditions from a vertical profile of grain size within a deposit is difficult because at least two processes can cause similar changes. For example, upward coarsening in a deposit can result from either an increase in discharge of the flow (causing coarser sand to be transported to the depositional site), or from winnowing of the upstream supply of sand (causing suspended sand to coarsen because a greater proportion of the bed that is supplying sediment is covered with coarse grains). These two processes can be easy to distinguish where suspended-sediment observations are available: flow-regulated changes cause concentration and grain size of sand in suspension to be positively correlated, whereas changes in supply can cause concentration and grain size of sand in suspension to be negatively correlated. The latter case (supply regulation) is more typical of flood deposits in Grand Canyon.

  15. 10 CFR 71.71 - Normal conditions of transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Normal conditions of transport. 71.71 Section 71.71 Energy..., Special Form, and LSA-III Tests 2 § 71.71 Normal conditions of transport. (a) Evaluation. Evaluation of each package design under normal conditions of transport must include a determination of the effect on...

  16. Evaluation of Total Suspended Sediment (TSS) Distribution Using ASTER, ALOS, SPOT-4 Satellite Imagery in 2005-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyanto, T.; Krisna, T. C.; Pribadi, C. B.; Kurniawan, A.; Sukojo, B. M.; Taufik, M.

    2017-12-01

    Lapindo mud thrown to Porong River from September 27, 2006 brought an enormous impact to the environment and surrounding communities. This will exacerbate the damage Porong ecosystems, and pollute the Madura Strait and surrounding areas (Wibisono, 2006). Disposal of sludge in large quantities and continuously to Porong also indicated sedimentation resulted in Porong River, Porong River estuary and along coastal of Surabaya-Pasuruan. This is because the material sediment transport along water flow, and the influence of geographical conditions, and the waves of the sea water. Satellite image data used in this study is the ASTER in 2005-2008, ALOS/AVNIR-2 in 2010, and SPOT-4 years 2009.2011 and 2012. In the satellite image processing, for obtain the value of is used TSS algorithm of Jing Li (2008) for ASTER satellite imagery, algorithms of Hendrawan and Asai (2008) for the ALOS satellite imagery, and algorithm of Budiman (2004) for the SPOT-4 satellite imagery. TSS value of the image processing results then performed validation / test precision using reference data TSS In-Situ to obtain linear correlation (R2). R2 value was obtained is 0.854 in 2009, 0.761 in 2011, and 0712 in 2013. That indicates that the value of TSS in the field is proportional with the TSS value in image and has a very good correlation. The results show the value of TSS in the study area ranged from 25 until more than 150 mg/L and according to the results of the analysis showed an upward trend of TSS values over time. There are several locations that indicated experiencing severe sedimentation impacts such as in Porong River, Porong River Estuary, Alo River Estuary, and the surrounding area of the estuary. According to Government Regulation Number 82 in 2001, the maximum value of TSS in the river or water is must less than 50 mg/L and so the value of TSS in the study area is very improper that if allowed to continue may damage the ecosystem in the area. Results from this study is expected to be

  17. Can MODIS data calibrate and validate coastal sediment transport models? Rapid prototyping using 250 m data and the ECOMSED model for Lake Pontchartrain, LA USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. L.; Glorioso, M. V.; Georgiou, I.; McCorquodale, J. A.; Crower, K.

    2006-12-01

    Field measurements from small boats and sparse arrays of instrumented buoys often do not provide sufficient data to capture the dynamic nature of bio-geophysical parameters in many coastal aquatic environments. Several investigators have shown that MODIS 250 m images can provide daily synoptic views of suspended sediment concentration in coastal waters to determine sediment transport and fate. However, the use of MODIS for coastal environments can be limited due to a lack of cloud-free images. Sediment transport models are not constrained by sky conditions but often suffer from a lack of in situ observations for model calibration or validation. We will demonstrate the utility of MODIS 250 m to calibrate (set model parameters), validate output, and set or re-set initial conditions of a hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (ECOMSED) developed for Lake Pontchartrain, LA USA. We will present our approach to quickly assess or `prototype' the application of NASA data to support environmental managers and decision makers. The combination of daily MODIS imagery and model simulations offer a more robust monitoring and prediction system of suspended sediments than available from either system alone. We will also present a brief introduction of how this approach will be implemented to assess the future use of NPOES-VIIRS images for monitoring coastal sediment processes.

  18. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  19. Tracing the origin of suspended sediment in a large Mediterranean river by combining continuous river monitoring and measurement of artificial and natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebracki, Mathilde, E-mail: zebracki@free.fr [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Evrard, Olivier [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE/IPSL), Unité Mixte de Recherche 8212 (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Claval, David [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mourier, Brice [Université Lyon 1, UMR 5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, ENTPE, CNRS, 3, Rue Maurice Audin, F-69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Université de Limoges, GRESE, EA 4330, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Gairoard, Stéphanie [Centre de Recherche et d' Enseignement de Géosciences de l' Environnement (CEREGE), Unité Mixte 34 (AMU/CNRS/IRD), Aix-en-Provence (France); and others

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of suspended sediment from large rivers to marine environments has important environmental impacts on coastal zones. In France, the Rhone River (catchment area of 98,000 km{sup 2}) is by far the main supplier of sediment to the Mediterranean Sea and its annual solid discharge is largely controlled by flood events. This study investigates the relevance of alternative and original fingerprinting techniques based on the relative abundances of a series of radionuclides measured routinely at the Rhone River outlet to quantify the relative contribution of sediment supplied by the main tributaries during floods. Floods were classified according to the relative contribution of the main subcatchments (i.e., Oceanic, Cevenol, extensive Mediterranean and generalised). Between 2000 and 2012, 221 samples of suspended sediment were collected at the outlet and were shown to be representative of all flood types that occurred during the last decade. Three geogenic radionuclides (i.e., {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K) were used as fingerprints in a multivariate mixing model in order to estimate the relative contribution of the main subcatchment sources—characterised by different lithologies—in sediment samples collected at the outlet. Results showed that total sediment supply originating from Pre-Alpine, Upstream, and Cevenol sources amounted to 10, 7 and 2.10{sup 6} tons, respectively. These results highlight the role of Pre-Alpine tributaries as the main sediment supplier (53%) to the Rhone River during floods. Other fingerprinting approaches based on artificial radionuclide activity ratios (i.e., {sup 137}Cs/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu) were tested and provided a way to quantify sediment remobilisation or the relative contributions of the southern tributaries. In the future, fingerprinting methods based on natural radionuclides should be further applied to catchments with heterogeneous lithologies. Methods based on artificial radionuclides

  20. Maritime transport operation in conditions of globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Nowosielski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary world economy is subject to dynamic integration processes that cause the most open countries in the free import and export goods. Intensive trade relations requires intercontinental free access to well-functioning transport systems. In the case of trade with distant partners, especially on other continents, an important criterion for the organization of cargo handling is a long range. Technological development of means of transport has meant that transport services have become a cheap and highly accessible to passengers and cargo.

  1. Hydrotechnical Conditions and Inland Transportation's Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupień, Emilia

    2012-12-01

    The article contains a description of the method supporting the organization of broken cargo transportation. The program, which uses the presented method allows the planning of transport including rail and inland waterways. Description of the computer program shows how to calculate the direct costs for transport modes and external costs of inland transport and probability to achieve throughput of individual sections of the waterway. An essential part of the description is providing a method for calculating the probability of the desired depth of the waterway, the continuous number of days needed to complete the task. The reported results were referred to data from the past. The program is intended for use by shipowners and shippers operating the inland waterways.

  2. Local Algorithm for Monitoring Total Suspended Sediments in Micro-Watersheds Usin Drones and Remote Sensing Applications. Case Study: TEUSACÁ River, la Calera, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, N. A.; Paez, D. E.; Arango, C.

    2015-08-01

    An empirical relationship of Total Suspended Sediments (TSS) concentrations and reflectance values obtained with Drones' aerial photos and processed using remote sensing tools was set up as the main objective of this research. A local mathematic algorithm for the micro-watershed of the Teusacá River at La Calera, Colombia, was developed based on the computing of four component of bands from consumed-grade cameras obtaining from each their corresponding reflectance values from procedures for correcting digital camera imagery and using statistical analysis for study the fit and RMSE of 25 regressions. The assessment was characterized by the comparison of reflectance values and 34 in-situ data measurements concentrations between 1.6 and 33 mg L-1 taken from the superficial layer of the river in two campaigns. A large data set of empirical and referenced algorithm from literature were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the relationship. For estimation of TSS, a higher accuracy was achieved using the Tassan's algorithm with the BAND X/ BANDX ratio. The correlation coefficient with R2 = X demonstrate the feasibility of use remote sensed data with consumed-grade cameras as an effective tool for a frequent monitoring and controlling of water quality parameters such as Total Suspended Solids of watersheds, these being the most vulnerable and less compliance with environmental regulations.

  3. Developing of Total Suspended Sediment Model Using Landsat-8 Satellite Image and In-Situ Data at The Surabaya Coast, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Hariyanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The decrease of coastal-water quality in the Surabaya coastal region can be recognized from the conceentration of Total Suspended Sediment(TSS . As a result we need a system for monitoring sediment concentration in the coastal region of Surabaya which regularly measures TSS. The principle to model and monitor TSSconcentration using remote sensing methods is by the integration of Landsat-8OLI satellites image processing using some ofTSS-models then those are analyzed for looking its suitability with TSS value direcly measured in the field ( in-situ measurement. The TSS value modeled from all algorithms validated usingcorrelation analysis and linear regression . The result shows that TSS model with the highest correlation value is TSS algorithm by Budiman (2004with r value 0.991. Hence this algorithm can be used to investigate TSS-distribution which represent the coastal water quality of Surabaya with TSS value between 75 mg/L to 125 mg/L.

  4. A Semi-Analytic Model for Estimating Total Suspended Sediment Concentration in Turbid Coastal Waters of Northern Western Australia Using MODIS-Aqua 250 m Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Dorji

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the concentration of total suspended sediment (TSS in coastal waters is of significance to marine environmental monitoring agencies to determine the turbidity of water that serve as a proxy to estimate the availability of light at depth for benthic habitats. TSS models applicable to data collected by satellite sensors can be used to determine TSS with reasonable accuracy and of adequate spatial and temporal resolution to be of use for coastal water quality monitoring. Thus, a study is presented here where we develop a semi-analytic sediment model (SASM applicable to any sensor with red and near infrared (NIR bands. The calibration and validation of the SASM using bootstrap and cross-validation methods showed that the SASM applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-Aqua band 1 data retrieved TSS with a root mean square error (RMSE and mean averaged relative error (MARE of 5.75 mg/L and 33.33% respectively. The application of the SASM over our study region using MODIS-Aqua band 1 data showed that the SASM can be used to monitor the on-going, post and pre-dredging activities and identify daily TSS anomalies that are caused by natural and anthropogenic processes in coastal waters of northern Western Australia.

  5. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku'ulei S.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Lager, Claire V.; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l−1 (inshore) to 3 mg l−1(offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l−1 as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawaiʻi. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance.

  6. LOCAL ALGORITHM FOR MONITORING TOTAL SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS IN MICRO-WATERSHEDS USIN DRONES AND REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS. CASE STUDY: TEUSACÁ RIVER, LA CALERA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sáenz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An empirical relationship of Total Suspended Sediments (TSS concentrations and reflectance values obtained with Drones’ aerial photos and processed using remote sensing tools was set up as the main objective of this research. A local mathematic algorithm for the micro-watershed of the Teusacá River at La Calera, Colombia, was developed based on the computing of four component of bands from consumed-grade cameras obtaining from each their corresponding reflectance values from procedures for correcting digital camera imagery and using statistical analysis for study the fit and RMSE of 25 regressions. The assessment was characterized by the comparison of reflectance values and 34 in-situ data measurements concentrations between 1.6 and 33 mg L−1 taken from the superficial layer of the river in two campaigns. A large data set of empirical and referenced algorithm from literature were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the relationship. For estimation of TSS, a higher accuracy was achieved using the Tassan’s algorithm with the BAND X/ BANDX ratio. The correlation coefficient with R2 = X demonstrate the feasibility of use remote sensed data with consumed-grade cameras as an effective tool for a frequent monitoring and controlling of water quality parameters such as Total Suspended Solids of watersheds, these being the most vulnerable and less compliance with environmental regulations.

  7. Geochemistry of the suspended sediment in the estuaries of the Mandovi and Zuari rivers, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kessarkar, P.M.; Shynu, R.; Rao, V.P.; Chong, F.; Narvekar, T.; Zhang, J.

    . 1982; Figueres et al. 1985; Turner et al. 1991 and 1994; Turner and Millward 1994; Zwolsman 1994; Negrel 1997; Zwolsman and van Eck 1999). The physico-chemical changes at the mixing zone of river water and seawater lead to a variety of reactions... material being transported by the river is modified before reaching the coastal seas (Yaun- Hui et al. 1984; Morris et al. 1987; Bewers and Yeats 1989). Resuspension of bed sediments and diffusion of metals from sediments to the overlying water column...

  8. Bioavailability of trace metals to green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) exposed to suspended sediments from sites on the Upper Mississippi River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A unique laboratory exposure system was used in applying environmentally relevant conditions (river traffic simulations) and environmentally relevant sediment...

  9. Effects of Land Use and Extreme Precipitation on Hillslope Erosion and Suspended Sediment Yields in the Manawatu River, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, S.; Julian, J.; Kamarinas, I.; Dymond, J.

    2015-12-01

    Landscapes disturbed by intensive land uses are susceptible to sediment erosion that may degrade river water quality. In February 2004, the southern portion of New Zealand's North Island, which is covered by livestock grazing, experienced an extreme precipitation event which resulted in extensive landsliding in the Oroua and Pohangina subcatchments of the Manawatu River catchment. In this study, we (1) assess whether land use influences landslide occurrence; (2) identify landslides that are active sediment sources to river channels; and (3) determine if land use can switch subcatchments from supply-limited (river sediment loads are limited by available sediment in the landscape) to transport-limited (river sediment loads are limited by flow capacity). Results revealed that landslides caused by this extreme precipitation event occurred disproportionately in areas identified as pasture, suggesting that these areas are more susceptible to landsliding than forested areas. The observed sediment load response to flood events for the period of 1999-2014 in the Pohangina subcatchment was variable in relation to flood magnitude, indicating a supply-limited landscape, while in the Oroua subcatchment the observed sediment response was relatively proportional to flood magnitude, indicating a transport-limited landscape. Further analysis of sediment storage and delivery processes within the two subcatchments is necessary to explain the observed sediment load responses. Channel connectivity analysis revealed that approximately 65% of landslide scars were unconnected to river channels, so there will likely be a response lag in sediment loads. As livestock grazing intensity increases in New Zealand, an understanding of the short-term and long-term impacts of land use on soil erosion and water quality is necessary to develop effective management practices.

  10. 42 CFR 486.346 - Condition: Organ preparation and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Organ preparation and transport. 486.346...: Organ preparation and transport. (a) The OPO must arrange for testing of organs for infectious disease... prior to transport, including verification by two individuals, one of whom must be an OPO employee, that...

  11. Modelling lateral entrapment of suspended sediment in estuaries : The role of spatial lags in settling and M4 tidal flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Zhongyong; de Swart, Huib E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449725; Cheng, Heqin; Jiang, Chenjuan; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the joint action of M2 and M4 tidal flow, residual flow and spatial settling lag on the lateral entrapment of sediment is examined in tidally dominated estuaries with an idealized model that assumes along-estuary uniform conditions. Approximate solutions are obtained for arbitrary

  12. Quantifying the transfer times of suspended sediment during floods with 7Be and 210Pbxs measurements in a drained lowland catchment of central France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Le Gall, Marion; Foucher, Anthony; Laceby, J. Patrick; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Manière, Louis; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Vandromme, Rosalie; Ayrault, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Intensification of agriculture after WWII increased soil erosion and sediment supply to rivers in Northwestern Europe. The Louroux Pond catchment (25 km2), located in the Loire River basin (central France), is representative of these intensively cultivated environments and subject to severe soil erosion and river siltation. This catchment was equipped with an extensive network of tile drains that were installed after 1945 to produce crops in this former wetland. In order to decrease the deleterious impacts induced by accelerated soil erosion in this region, there is a need to better understand sediment dynamics during flood events. To this end, natural fallout radionuclides were analysed in both sediment sources and suspended matter transiting the river network to quantify the respective proportions of recently eroded vs. resuspended material. Accordingly, 7Be and 210Pbxs concentrations were measured in overland flow and suspended sediment collected in the pond tributaries during a succession of floods that occurred during winter in 2013-2014 and in 2016. The results show that the mean fraction of recently eroded material transiting these rivers increased from 40 ± 20% to 80 ± 20 in 2013-2014, and from 65 ± 20% to 80 ± 20% in 2016. These results demonstrate an initial flush of sediment previously accumulated in the river channel during the first winter floods. Then, the fraction of sediment recently eroded from the hillslopes significantly increased during subsequent events. This research illustrates the added value of combining continuous river monitoring and fallout radionuclide analyses to improve our knowledge of sediment dynamics and to protect soil and water resources in these environments.

  13. Long-term patterns and short-term dynamics of stream solutes and suspended sediment in a rapidly weathering tropical watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B.; McDowell, William H.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    The 326 ha Río Icacos watershed in the tropical wet forest of the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, is underlain by granodiorite bedrock with weathering rates among the highest in the world. We pooled stream chemistry and total suspended sediment (TSS) data sets from three discrete periods: 1983-1987, 1991-1997, and 2000-2008. During this period three major hurricanes crossed the site: Hugo in 1989, Hortense in 1996, and Georges in 1998. Stream chemistry reflects sea salt inputs (Na, Cl, and SO4), and high weathering rates of the granodiorite (Ca, Mg, Si, and alkalinity). During rainfall, stream composition shifts toward that of precipitation, diluting 90% or more in the largest storms, but maintains a biogeochemical watershed signal marked by elevated K and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. DOC exhibits an unusual "boomerang" pattern, initially increasing with flow but then decreasing at the highest flows as it becomes depleted and/or vigorous overland flow minimizes contact with watershed surfaces. TSS increased markedly with discharge (power function slope 1.54), reflecting the erosive power of large storms in a landslide-prone landscape. The relations of TSS and most solute concentrations with stream discharge were stable through time, suggesting minimal long-term effects from repeated hurricane disturbance. Nitrate concentration, however, increased about threefold in response to hurricanes then returned to baseline over several years following a pseudo first-order decay pattern. The combined data sets provide insight about important hydrologic pathways, a long-term perspective to assess response to hurricanes, and a framework to evaluate future climate change in tropical ecosystems.

  14. Transport of suspended particles in turbulent open channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugem, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments are performed in order to investigate suspended sediment transport in a turbulent open channel flow. The first experiment used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measure the fluid velocity with a high spatial resolution, while particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used to measure

  15. Calibration suspended sediment model Markermeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boderie, P.; Van Kessel, T.; De Boer, G.

    2009-01-01

    In deze studie is een computermodel voor het Markermeer opgezet, ingeregeld en gevalideerd. Het model beschrijft dynamsch de stroming van water, waterpeilen, golven en slib in het water en in de bodem. Het model is gecalibreerd voorde periode augustus 2007 - april 2008 en gevalideerd voor de periode

  16. Consequences of hydrological events on the delivery of suspended sediment and associated radionuclides from the Rhone River to the Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyrolle, Frederique; Antonelli, Christelle; Ferrand, Emmanuelle [IRSN, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France). Pole Radioprotection environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service d' Etude et de Surveillance de la Radioactivite dans l' Environnement; Raimbault, Patrick [Institut Mediterraneen d' Oceanologie, OSU Pytheas, Marseille (France); Aubert, Dominique [CEFREM, Univ. de Perpignan Via Domitia CNRS UMR, Perpignan (France); Jacquet, Stephanie; Radakovitch, Olivier; Raccasi, Guillaume [Aix-Marseille Univ.-CNR-IRD-College de France, Aix en Provence (France); Charmasson, Sabine [IRSN, La Seyne sur mer (France). Pole Radioprotection, environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service d' Etude et de Surveillance de la Radioactivite dans l' Environnement; Gurriaran, Rodolfo [IRSN, Orsay (France). Pole Radioprotection, environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service de Traitement des echantillos et de Metrologie pour l' Environnement

    2012-10-15

    Almost 20 nuclear reactors are situated along the Rhone valley, representing Europe's largest concentration of nuclear power plants. The fate of suspended sediments and natural and artificial particle-bound radionuclides in relation to extreme hydrological events was assessed at the lower course of the Rhone River, which provides the main source of water and sediment inputs to the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. We sampled water at a high frequency over the period 2001-2008 and measured suspended particulate matter (SPM) loads and particle-bound natural and artificial radionuclide concentrations at the SORA observatory station in Arles, France. We monitored various hydrological events (either natural or anthropogenic origin) and characterize their influence on concentrations and fluxes. The relationship between SPM concentration and the very wide range of water discharges did not differ significantly from previous periods, indicating no significant shift in the average sediment delivery over the last 20 years. Unexpected hydrological events of anthropogenic origin, in particular those associated with flushing of reservoirs that are generally not captured by sampling strategies, were recorded and were shown to transfer significant additional sediment and associated contaminants towards the marine environment. Concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides associated with sediment (i.e., {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 110m}Ag, and Pu isotopes) varied over two to three orders of magnitude during periods of low and moderate flow due to variations in the liquid release from nuclear facilities. Except for Pu isotopes, the concentrations of the various particle-bound radionuclides generally showed a decreasing trend with increasing discharge, revealing the geochemical or anthropogenic background values, and providing a useful flood fingerprint for this large fluvial system before its entry into the marine environment. Our approach produced key data on the

  17. Flux of nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment from the Susquehanna River Basin to the Chesapeake Bay during Tropical Storm Lee, September 2011, as an indicator of the effects of reservoir sedimentation on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment are measured at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage at Conowingo Dam at the downstream end of the Susquehanna River Basin in Maryland, where the river flows into the Chesapeake Bay. During the period September 7-15, 2011, in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Lee, concentrations of these three constituents were among the highest ever measured at this site. These measurements indicate that sediment-storage processes behind the three dams on the lower Susquehanna River are evolving. In particular, they indicate that scouring of sediment (and the nitrogen and phosphorus attached to that sediment) may be increasing with time. Trends in flow-normalized fluxes at the Susquehanna River at Conowingo, Maryland, streamgage during 1996-2011 indicate a 3.2-percent decrease in total nitrogen, but a 55-percent increase in total phosphorus and a 97-percent increase in suspended sediment. These large increases in the flux of phosphorus and sediment from the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay have occurred despite reductions in the fluxes of these constituents from the Susquehanna River watershed upstream from the reservoirs. Although the Tropical Storm Lee flood event contributed about 1.8 percent of the total streamflow from the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay over the past decade (water years 2002-11), it contributed about 5 percent of the nitrogen, 22 percent of the phosphorus, and 39 percent of the suspended sediment during the same period. These results highlight the importance of brief high-flow events in releasing nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment derived from the Susquehanna River watershed and stored in the Conowingo Reservoir to the Chesapeake Bay.

  18. Fluvial sediment transport in a glacier-fed high-mountain river (Riffler Bach, Austrian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morche, David; Weber, Martin; Faust, Matthias; Schuchardt, Anne; Baewert, Henning

    2017-04-01

    High-alpine environments are strongly affected by glacier retreat since the Little Ice Age (LIA). Due to ongoing climate change the hydrology of proglacial rivers is also influenced. It is expected that the growing proportions of snow melt and rainfall events will change runoff characteristics of proglacial rivers. Additionally, the importance of paraglacial sediment sources in recently deglaciating glacier forefields is increasing, while the role of glacial erosion is declining. Thus complex environmental conditions leading to a complex pattern of fluvial sediment transport in partly glaciated catchments of the European Alps. Under the umbrella of the joint PROSA-project the fluvial sediment transport of the river Riffler Bach (Kaunertal, Tyrol, Austria) was studied in 3 consecutive ablation seasons in order to quantify sediment yields. In June 2012 a probe for water level and an automatic water sampler (AWS) were installed at the outlet of the catchment (20km2). In order to calculate annual stage-discharge-relations by the rating-curve approach, discharge (Q) was repeatedly measured with current meters and by salt dilution. Concurrent to the discharge measurements bed load was collected using a portable Helley-Smith sampler. Bed load samples were weighted and sieved in the laboratory to gain annual bed load rating curves and grain size distributions. In total 564 (2012: 154, 2013: 209, 2014: 201) water samples were collected and subsequently filtered to quantify suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). Q-SSC-relations were calculated for single flood events due to the high variability of suspended sediment transport. The results show a high inter- and intra-annual variability of solid fluvial sediment transport, which can be explained by the characteristics of suspended sediment transport. Only 13 of 22 event-based Q-SSC-relations show causal dependency. In 2012, during a period with multiple pluvial-induced peak discharges most sediment was transported. On the

  19. Water-quality assessment of the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames river basins study unit; analysis of available data on nutrients, suspended sediments, and pesticides, 1972-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc James; Grady, S.J.; Trench, E.C.; Flanagan, S.M.; Nielsen, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective report examines available nutrient, suspended sediment, and pesticide data in surface and ground water in the Connecticut, Housatonic and Thames Rivers Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of this study is to improve the under- standing of natural and anthropogenic factors affecting water quality in the study unit. Water-quality data were acquired from various sources, primarily, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report examines data for water years 1972-92, focusing on 1980-92, although it also includes additional data from as early as 1905. The study unit lies within the New England Physiographic Province and altitudes range from sea level in coastal Connecticut to 6,288 feet above sea level at Mount Washington, New Hampshire. Two major aquifer types underlie the study unit--unconsolidated glacial deposits and fractured bedrock. The climate generally is temperate and humid, with four distinct seasons. Average annual precipitation ranges from 34 to 65 inches. The study unit has a population of about 4.5 million, which is most highly concentrated in southwestern Connecticut and along the south-central region of the Connecticut River Valley. Surface-water-quality data were screened to provide information about sites with adequate numbers of analyses (50) over sufficiently long periods (1980-90) to enable valid statistical analyses. In order to compare effects of different types of land use on surface-water quality, examination of data required application of several statistical and graphical techniques, including mapping, histograms, boxplots, concentration-discharge plots, trend analysis, and load estimation. Spatial and temporal analysis of surface-water-quality data indicated that, with a single exception, only/stations in the Connecticut water-quality network had sufficient data collected over adequately long time periods to use in detailed analyses. Ground

  20. Transport of persistent organic pollutants by microplastics in estuarine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastics represent an increasing source of anthropogenic contamination in aquatic environments, where they may also act as scavengers and transporters of persistent organic pollutants. As estuaries are amongst the most productive aquatic systems, it is important to understand sorption behaviour and transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) by microplastics along estuarine gradients. The effects of salinity sorption equilibrium kinetics on the distribution coefficients (Kd) of phenanthrene (Phe) and 4,4‧-DDT, onto polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and onto polyethylene (PE) were therefore investigated. A salinity gradient representing freshwater, estuarine and marine conditions, with salinities corresponding to 0 (MilliQ water, 690 μS/cm), 8.8, 17.5, 26.3 and 35 was used. Salinity had no significant effect on the time required to reach equilibrium onto PVC or PE and neither did it affect desorption rates of contaminants from plastics. Although salinity had no effect on sorption capacity of Phe onto plastics, a slight decrease in sorption capacity was observed for DDT with salinity. Salinity had little effect on sorption behaviour and POP/plastic combination was shown to be a more important factor. Transport of Phe and DDT from riverine to brackish and marine waters by plastic is therefore likely to be much more dependent on the aqueous POP concentration than on salinity. The physical characteristics of the polymer and local environmental conditions (e.g. plastic density, particle residence time in estuaries) will affect the physical transport of contaminated plastics. A transport model of POPs by microplastics under estuarine conditions is proposed. Transport of Phe and DDT by PVC and PE from fresh and brackish water toward fully marine conditions was the most likely net direction for contaminant transport and followed the order: Phe-PE >> DDT-PVC = DDT-PE >> Phe-PVC.

  1. Transport synthetic acceleration with opposing reflecting boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme is extended to problems with opposing reflecting boundary conditions. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. A procedure is developed that allows the use of the conjugate gradient (CG) method to solve the resulting low-order system of equations. Several well-known transport iteration algorithms are cast in a linear algebraic form to show their equivalence to standard iterative techniques. Source iteration in the presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions is shown to be equivalent to a (poorly) preconditioned stationary Richardson iteration, with the preconditioner defined by the method of iterating on the incident fluxes on the reflecting boundaries. The TSA method (and any synthetic method) amounts to a further preconditioning of the Richardson iteration. The presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions requires special consideration when developing a procedure to realize the CG method for the proposed system of equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite matrices; this condition requires the algebraic elimination of the boundary angular corrections from the low-order equations. As a consequence of this elimination, evaluating the action of the resulting matrix on an arbitrary vector involves two transport sweeps and a transmission iteration. Results of applying the acceleration scheme to a simple test problem are presented.

  2. Towards the development of a combined Norovirus and sediment transport model for coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, K.; O'Kane, J. P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sewage effluent in coastal waters used for oyster culture poses a risk to human health. The primary pathogen in outbreaks of gastroenteritis following consumption of raw oysters is the Norovirus or "winter vomiting bug". The Norovirus is a highly infectious RNA virus of the Caliciviridae taxonomic family. It has a long survival time in coastal waters (T90 = 30 days in winter). Oysters selectively concentrate Norovirus in their digestive ducts. The virus cannot be removed by conventional depuration. The primary goal of the research is to quantify the risk of Norovirus infection in coastal waters through physically-based high-resolution numerical modelling. Cork Harbour and Clew Bay in Ireland provide case studies for the research. The models simulate a number of complex physical, chemical and biological processes which influence the transport and decay of the virus as well as its bioaccumulation in oyster tissue. The current phase of the research is concerned with the adsorption of the virus to suspended sediment in the water column. Adsorbed viruses may be taken out of the water column when sedimentation occurs and, subsequently, be added to it with resuspension of the bed sediment. Preliminary simulations of the Norovirus-sediment model indicate that suspended sediment can influence the transport of the virus in coastal waters when a high sediment-water partitioning coefficient is used and the model is run under calm environmental conditions. In this instance a certain fraction of the adsorbed viruses are taken out of the water column by sedimentation and end up locked in the bed sediment. Subsequently, under storm conditions, a large number of viruses in the bed are released into the water column by erosion of the bed and a risk of contamination occurs at a time different to when the viruses were initially released into the body of water.

  3. Pituitary-adrenocortical adjustments to transport stress in horses with previous different handling and transport conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fazio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The changes of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis response to a long distance transportation results in increase of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and cortisol levels. The purpose of the study was to quantify the level of short-term road transport stress on circulating ACTH and cortisol concentrations, related to the effect of previous handling and transport experience of horses. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 56 healthy horses after short-term road transport of 30 km. The horses were divided into four groups, Groups A, B, C, and D, with respect to the handling quality: Good (Groups A and B, bad (Group D, and minimal handling (Group C conditions. According to the previous transport, experience horses were divided as follows: Horses of Groups A and D had been experienced long-distance transportation before; horses of Groups B and C had been limited experience of transportation. Results: One-way RM-ANOVA showed significant effects of transport on ACTH changes in Groups B and C and on cortisol changes in both Groups A and B. Groups A and B showed lower baseline ACTH and cortisol values than Groups C and D; Groups A and B showed lower post-transport ACTH values than Groups C and D. Groups A, B, and C showed lower post-transport cortisol values than Group D. Only Groups A and B horses have shown an adequate capacity of stress response to transportation. Conclusion: The previous transport experience and quality of handling could influence the HPA axis physiological responses of horses after short-term road transport.

  4. Progress on ruthenium release and transport under air ingress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Brillant, G. [IRSN DPAM/SEMIC, Cadarache (France); Davidovich, N. [ENEA, Roma (Italy); Dickson, R. [AECL, Chalk River (Canada); Ducros, G. [CEA DEN/DEC/SA3C, Cadarache (France); Dutheillet, Y. [EDF R and D, Clamart (France); Giordano, P. [IRSN DPAM/SEMIC, Cadarache (France); Kunstar, M. [KFKI AEKI, Budapest (Hungary); Kaerkelae, T. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Mladin, M. [INR, Pitesti (Romania); Pontillon, Y. [CEA DEN/DEC/SA3C, Cadarache (France); Seropian, C. [IRSN DPAM/SEMIC, Cadarache (France); Ver, N. [KFKI AEKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-12-15

    A particular concern in the event of a hypothetical severe accident is the potential release of highly radiotoxic fission product (FP) isotopes of ruthenium. The highest risk for a large quantity of these isotopes to reach the containment arises from air ingress following vessel melt-through. One work package (WP) of the source term topic of the EU 6th Framework Network of Excellence project SARNET is producing and synthesizing information on ruthenium release and transport with the aim of validating or improving the corresponding modelling in the European ASTEC severe accident analysis code. The WP includes reactor scenario studies that can be used to define conditions for new experiments. The experimental database currently being reviewed includes the following programmes: - AECL experiments conducted on fission product release in air; results are relevant to CANDU loss of end-fitting accidents; - VERCORS tests on FP release and transport conducted by CEA in collaboration with IRSN and EDF; additional tests may potentially be conducted in more oxidizing conditions in the VERDON facility; - RUSET tests by AEKI investigating ruthenium transport with and without other FP simulants; - Experiments by VTT on ruthenium transport and speciation in highly oxidizing conditions. In addition to the above, at IRSN and at ENEA modelling of fission product release and of fuel oxidation is being pursued, the latter being an essential boundary condition influencing ruthenium release. Reactor scenario studies have been carried out at INR, EDF and IRSN: calculations of air ingress scenarios with respectively ICARE/CATHARE V2; SATURNE-MAAP; and ASTEC codes provided first insights of thermal-hydraulic conditions that the fuel may experience after lower head vessel failure. This paper summarizes the status of this work and plans for the future.

  5. Precipitation, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data for the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson and Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, Colorado, 1966–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L.R.

    2017-08-03

    The U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson (AGFC) and the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) are facilities operated by the U.S. Department of the Army in southern Colorado. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, established a hydrologic and water-quality data-collection network at the AGFC in June 1978 and at the PCMS in October 1982. The data-collection networks are designed to assess the quantity and quality of water resources and monitor the effects of military training activities on streamflow and water quality. Two preexisting U.S. Geological Survey streamgages at the PCMS were incorporated into the data-collection network at the time it was established, providing periods of record that begin as early as 1966. This report presents and summarizes precipitation, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data from 34 U.S. Geological Survey sites on or near the AGFC and the PCMS for the period of record at each site. (Streamflow data are presented as discharge in cubic feet per second.)At AGFC, daily sum precipitation ranged from 0 to 11.85 inches, daily mean discharge ranged from 0 to 836 cubic feet per second, and daily mean suspended-sediment discharge ranged from 0 to 39,900 tons per day. With the exception of total (unfiltered) mercury and filtered sulfate at two sites and filtered manganese at three sites, 95th percentile trace element concentrations and median total (unfiltered) metal concentrations were less than regulatory numeric standards for all samples. However, individual water-quality results occasionally exceeded respective regulatory numeric standards.At the PCMS, daily sum precipitation ranged from 0 to 4.59 inches, daily mean discharge ranged from 0 to 4,190 cubic feet per second, and daily mean suspended-sediment discharge ranged from 0 to 21,100 tons per day. Water-quality results, 95th percentile trace element concentrations, and median total (unfiltered) metal concentrations were less than

  6. Medical Transport of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most notable trends in child health has been the increase in the number of children with special health care needs, including those with complex chronic conditions. Care of these children accounts for a growing fraction of health care resources. We examine recent developments in health care, especially with regard to medical transport and prehospital care, that have emerged to adapt to this remarkable demographic trend. One such development is the focus on care coordination, including the dissemination of the patient-centered medical home concept. In the prehospital setting, the need for greater coordination has catalyzed the development of the emergency information form. Training programs for prehospital providers now incorporate specific modules for children with complex conditions. Another notable trend is the shift to a family-centered model of care. We explore efforts toward regionalization of care, including the development of specialized pediatric transport teams, and conclude with recommendations for a research agenda.

  7. Modeling sediment transport with an integrated view of the biofilm effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H. W.; Lai, H. J.; Cheng, W.; Huang, L.; He, G. J.

    2017-09-01

    Most natural sediment is invariably covered by biofilms in reservoirs and lakes, which have significant influence on bed form dynamics and sediment transport, and also play a crucial role in natural river evolution, pollutant transport, and habitat changes. However, most models for sediment transport are based on experiments using clean sediments without biological materials. In this study, a three-dimensional mathematical model of hydrodynamics and sediment transport is presented with a comprehensive consideration of the biofilm effects. The changes of the bed resistance mainly due to the different bed form dynamics of the biofilm-coated sediment (biosediment), which affect the hydrodynamic characteristics, are considered. Moreover, the variations of parameters related to sediment transport after the biofilm growth are integrated, including the significant changes of the incipient velocity, settling velocity, reference concentration, and equilibrium bed load transport rate. The proposed model is applied to evaluate the effects of biofilms on the hydrodynamic characteristics and sediment transport in laboratory experiments. Results indicate that the mean velocity increases after the biofilm growth, and the turbulence intensity near the river bed decreases under the same flow condition. Meanwhile, biofilm inhibits sediment from moving independently. Thus, the moderate erosion is observed for biosediment resulting in smaller suspended sediment concentrations. The proposed model can reasonably reflect these sediment transport characteristics with biofilms, and the approach to integration of the biological impact could also be used in other modeling of sediment transport, which can be further applied to provide references for the integrated management of natural aqueous systems.

  8. Reliability Evaluation Of The City Transport Buses Under Actual Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymarz Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to present a reliability comparison of two types of city transport buses. Case study on the example of the well-known brands of city buses: Solaris Urbino 12 and Mercedes-Benz 628 Conecto L used at Municipal Transport Company in Lublin was presented in details. A reliability index for the most failure parts and complex systems for the period of time failures was determined. The analysis covered damages of the following systems: engine, electrical system, pneumatic system, brake system, driving system, central heating and air-conditioning and doors. Reliability was analyzed based on Weibull model. It has been demonstrated, that during the operation significant reliability differences occur between the buses produced nowadays.

  9. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder (MBES) sonar systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are now routinely deployed to provide high-resolution object detection and bathymetric surveying in a range of aquatic environments, from the deep-sea to lakes and rivers. MBES systems were developed for bottom-detection and measurement of bed morphology, and have previously discarded the received acoustic back-scatter from the water column after the bottom-detection algorithms have been performed. However, modern data handling and storage technologies have facilitated the logging of this large quantity of acoustic intensity and phase information, and commercial MBES systems are now available that provide this capability. This paper develops a novel methodology to exploit this logging capability to quantify the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport by imaging suspended sediment concentration, associated coherent flow structures and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. This paper presents methods of data analysis and results obtained from deployment of the RESON SeaBat 8125 and 7125 MBES systems in the field and during testing in a controlled environment. The field results were obtained from sites on the Paraná river, Argentina, with the aim of examining the dynamics of suspended sediment transport over dune bedforms and in the region of flow mixing between large rivers of significantly different suspended sediment concentration. Controlled testing was performed in a former ship dry-dock by creating flows density currents of known suspended sediment concentration with different types and mixes of sediment. The results demonstrate the capability of the RESON MBES systems to successfully resolve the contrast in suspended sediment concentration, and hence the spatio-temporal monitoring of the associated coherent flow structures. The

  10. Mechanisms of along-channel sediment transport in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary and their response to large-scale interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, C.; de Swart, H.E.; Liu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of large-scale interventions in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary (the Deep Waterway Project, DWP) on the along-channel flow structure, suspended sediment distribution and its transport along the main channel of this passage are investigated. The focus is explaining the changes in

  11. Meteorological Conditions for Functioning Automobile Transport in Moscow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaeva, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate weather and climate conditions of functioning automobile transport in Moscow region. For this, statistics on the daily number of accidents in the City of Moscow in 2013-2014 were studied and compared with the weather conditions. Various weather phenomena and meteorological parameters that affect the increase and decrease in the number of accidents in warm and cold seasons were identified; the extent of this influence was assessed. Moreover, an analysis of the distribution and change of the frequency of occurrence of these phenomena and meteorological parameters in 1961-2010 in Moscow region was conducted. In the cold season, there are much more weather events influencing the growth in the number of accidents than in the warm season. Fallout of more than 2 cm of snow per date, the reduction in meteorological visibility, drizzle and snow storms lead to an increase of accident rate by 5-15%. In the warm season, when thunderstorms and heavy rainfall there is a decrease in accidents; increase in the number of accidents happens in hot weather (maximum air temperatures over +30 °C). In the period 1991-2010 compared to 1961-1990 in the Moscow oblast the sustained cold period and amount of precipitation under negative air temperature has reduced; a decrease in the number of days with reduced visibility range and the offset of the date of the fallout of the first snow aside winter months is observed, which is favorable for automobile transport. At the same time, there is an increase in the number of days with transitions of air temperature through 0 °C, and the number of hot days, which negatively affects the functioning automobile transport.

  12. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prediction of the transport of sand in armored gravel reaches downstream of dams is complicated by variable bed conditions ranging from sand transported through gravel to sand in transport over buried gravel. Knowledge of the rate of sand transport in these conditions, however, is necessary for...

  13. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Tuff under Episodic Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Sun, Y.; Ewing, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    The current conceptual model of radionuclide transport in unsaturated fractured rock includes water movement in fractures, with migration of the entrained radionuclides being retarded by diffusion into and sorption within the rock matrix. Water infiltration and radionuclide transport through low-permeability unsaturated fractured rock are episodic and intermittent in nature, at least at local scales. Under episodic flow conditions, the matrix is constantly imbibing or draining, and this fluctuating wetness both drives two-way advective movement of radionuclides, and forces changes in the matrix diffusivity. This work is intended to examine, both experimentally and numerically, how radionuclide transport under episodic flow conditions is affected by the interacting processes of imbibition and drainage, diffusion, and matrix sorption. Using Topopah Spring welded volcanic tuff, collected from the potential repository geologic unit at Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste, we prepared a saw-cut fracture core (length 10.2 cm, diameter 4.4 cm, and fracture aperture 100 microns). The dry core was packed into a flow reactor, flushed with CO2, then saturated via slow pumping (0.01 mL/min) of synthetic groundwater. The fractured core was then flushed with air at 97% relative humidity (to simulate in situ unsaturated fractured rock conditions at Yucca Mountain), then the episodic transport experiment was conducted. Episodic flow involved 4 cycles of tracer solution flow within the fracture, followed by flushing with high humidity air. Each flow episode contained a different suite of non-sorbing and sorbing tracers, which included 3H, ReO4- (a chemical analog for 99TcO4-), I- (for 129I-), Sr and Cs (for 90Sr and 137Cs), plus the radionuclides 235U, 237Np, and 241Pu. These radionuclides span a variety of sorption strengths and represent a large fraction of the radionuclides of concern at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. Meanwhile, the non-sorbing 3H and Re

  14. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew W. M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-02-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (˜20-40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  15. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-01-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (∼20–40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  16. Streamflow and fluvial sediment transport in Pool C, restored section of the Kissimmee River: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann; Gellis, Allen C.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Pearman, J. Leroy; Garfield, Ursula; Schenk, Edward R.; Rasmussen, Jim; Habermehl, Philip J.; Mossa, Joann; Valdes, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The Kissimmee River Restoration Project was authorized by Congress in 1992 to restore more than 64 km2 (square kilometers) of river/floodplain ecosystem including 69 km of meandering river channel and 10,900 hectares (ha) of wetlands. Although biologic monitoring is an integral and active part of the Kissimmee River restoration, by 2007 geomorphic monitoring that included sediment transport was lacking. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a cooperative agreement with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to determine sediment transport characteristics of the restored section of the Kissimmee River in Pool C. Sediment transport characteristics that are monitored include suspended-sediment concentrations and loads, bedload, and bed material. In addition, the organic content of suspended sediment and bedload was determined. This chapter describes methods and results of the sediment transport monitoring from July 2007 through September 2008 in the Kissimmee River in Pool C.

  17. Precipitation and streamflow data from the Fort Carson Military Reservation and precipitation, streamflow, and suspended-sediment data from the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, Southeastern Colorado, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U. S. Department of the Army, compiled available precipitation and streamflow data for the years of 2008–2012 from the Fort Carson Military Reservation (Fort Carson) near Colorado Springs, Colo., and precipitation, streamflow, and suspended-sediment loads from the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) near Trinidad, Colo. Graphical representations of the data presented herein are a continuation of work completed by the USGS in 2008 to gain a better understanding of spatial and temporal trends within the hydrologic data. Precipitation stations at Fort Carson and the PCMS were divided into groups based on their land-surface altitude (LSA) to determine if there is a spatial difference in precipitation amounts based on LSA for either military facility. Two-sample t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests indicated statistically significant differences exist between precipitation values at different groups for Fort Carson but not for the PCMS. All five precipitation stations at Fort Carson exhibit a decrease in median daily total precipitation from years 2002–2007 to 2008–2012. For the PCMS, median precipitation values decreased from the first study period to the second for the 13 stations monitored year-round except for Burson and Big Hills. Mean streamflow for 2008–2012 is less than mean streamflow for 1983–2007 for all stream-gaging stations at Fort Carson and at the PCMS. During the study period, each of the stream-gaging stations within the tributary channels at the PCMS accounted for less than three percent of the total streamflow at the Purgatoire River at Rock Crossing gage. Peak streamflow for 2008–2012 is less than peak streamflow for 2002–2007 at both Fort Carson and the PCMS. At the PCMS, mean suspended-sediment yield for 2008–2012 increased by 54 percent in comparison to the mean yield for 2002–2007. This increase is likely related to the destruction of groundcover by a series of

  18. Characterization of the Suspended-Sediment Regime and Bed-Material Gradation of the Mississippi River Basin. Potamology Program (P-I). Report 1, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Needham to investigate the back country west of the Virginia mountains in 1673. Needham was killed by one of the Indian guides, but Gabriel Arthur...remainder is transported southward towards the Gulf of Mexico. As this load approaches Head of Passes, the "freshwater discharge" is often re- tarded

  19. A pre-dam-removal assessment of sediment transport for four dams on the Kalamazoo River between Plainwell and Allegan, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Atiq U.; Bennett, James P.; Rachol, Cynthia M.

    2005-01-01

    Four dams on the Kalamazoo River between the cities of Plainwell and Allegan, Mich., are in varying states of disrepair. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) are considering removing these dams to restore the river channels to pre-dam conditions. This study was initiated to identify sediment characteristics, monitor sediment transport, and predict sediment resuspension and deposition under varying hydraulic conditions. The mathematical model SEDMOD was used to simulate streamflow and sediment transport using three modeling scenarios: (1) sediment transport simulations for 730 days (Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2002), with existing dam structures, (2) sediment transport simulations based on flows from the 1947 flood at the Kalamazoo River with existing dam structures, and (3) sediment transport simulations based on flows from the 1947 flood at the Kalamazoo River with dams removed. Sediment transport simulations based on the 1947 flood hydrograph provide an estimate of sediment transport rates under maximum flow conditions. These scenarios can be used as an assessment of the sediment load that may erode from the study reach at this flow magnitude during a dam failure. The model was calibrated using suspended sediment as a calibration parameter and root mean squared error (RMSE) as an objective function. Analyses of the calibrated model show a slight bias in the model results at flows higher than 75 m3/s; this means that the model-simulated suspended-sediment transport rates are higher than the observed rates; however, the overall calibrated model results show close agreement between simulated and measured values of suspended sediment. Simulation results show that the Kalamazoo River sediment transport mechanism is in a dynamic equilibrium state. Model results during the 730-day simulations indicate significant sediment erosion from the study reach at flow rates higher than 55 m3/s. Similarly, significant

  20. Thermal analysis on NAC-STC spent fuel transport cask under different transport conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yumei [Institute of Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Yang, Jian, E-mail: zdhjkz@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Chao; Wang, Weiping [Institute of Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Zhijun [Department of Material Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Spent fuel cask was investigated as a whole instead of fuel assembly alone. • The cask was successfully modeled and meshed after several simplifications. • Equivalence method was used to calculate the properties of parts. • Both the integral thermal field and peak values are captured to verify safety. • The temperature variations of key parts were also plotted. - Abstract: Transport casks used for conveying spent nuclear fuel are inseparably related to the safety of the whole reprocessing system for spent nuclear fuel. Thus they must be designed according to rigorous safety standards including thermal analysis. In this paper, for NAC-STC cask, a finite element model is established based on some proper simplifications on configurations and the heat transfer mechanisms. Considering the complex components and gaps, the equivalence method is presented to define their material properties. Then an equivalent convection coefficient is introduced to define boundary conditions. Finally, the temperature field is captured and analyzed under both normal and accident transport conditions by using ANSYS software. The validity of numerical calculation is given by comparing its results with theoretical calculation. Obtaining the integral distribution laws of temperature and peak temperature values of all vital components, the security of the cask can be evaluated and verified.

  1. Regionally tuned algorithm to study the seasonal variation of suspended sediment concentration using IRS-P4 Ocean Colour Monitor data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Avinash

    2012-06-01

    The tuned regional algorithm was used to estimate SSC in 2004, 2005 and 2007 which shows the concentration varied from 1.13 to 28.1 mg/l in 2004, 1.84 to 23.12 mg/l in 2005 and 2 to 27.85 mg/l in 2007. Graphical and statistical methods using analysis of variance (ANOVA have shown significant seasonal variability and inter-station spatial variability in SSC. Peak concentrations were recorded in the post-monsoon followed by the pre-monsoon period. The wind, wave and current pattern associated with southwest monsoon possibly controls the seasonal distribution, while nearshore turbulence and littoral transport influence the spatial distribution. This paper clearly demonstrated the potential application of regionally tuned algorithm for SSC mapping to study the spatial and seasonal pattern in shallow water off southern Karnataka.

  2. Transport of Manure Constituents in Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, D.; Guber, A.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Sikora, L. M.; Nemes, A.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2005-12-01

    Fecal coliforms (FC) are often used as indicators of pathogenic bacteria contamination of surface water from surface-applied manure. Manure constituents other than FC may serve as natural tracers of bacterial contamination provided the rates of release from manure and surface transport mechanisms are similar. The objective of this work was to compare fecal coliforms (FC), organic carbon (OC), and water-soluble phosphorus (P) transport from dissolving manure applied on hillslopes with different soil texture and surface cover conditions under simulated rainfall. Two-by-six meters runoff plots were set in triplicate on vegetated and bare 20% slopes with sandy loam and clay loam soils at the ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Fresh bovine manure was applied at the top 30-cm wide strip, and at 50 cm x 30 cm miniplots in the immediate vicinity of runoff plots. Rainfall (ca. 6 cm per hour) was simulated for 1 hour on bare plots and for 1.5 hours on vegetated plots. Runoff was collected from gutters at the edge of runoff plots and miniplots at five-min intervals. In general, the volume of runoff was less from vegetated plots than from bare plots, and was less from sandy loam plots than from clay loam plots. Partitioning of fecal coliforms between runoff and suspended sediment was quantified using the partitioning coefficient Kd. The Kd values were greater for the sandy loam plot than the clay loam soil. The value of the partitioning coefficient increased from spring to fall at all plots. Release kinetics of FC and soluble P were similar. The fast release stage of about 20 minutes was followed by aa relatively slow release stage. Both soil texture and vegetation significantly affected transport of the manure constituents. More than 70% of manure FC and OC were transported with runoff over bare plots, and less than 15% over vegetation plots. Overall, manure-borne P appears to be a promising potential tracer for assessing of manure-borne bacteria transport.

  3. WAYS OF IMPROVEMENT RAILWAY TRANSPORT IN OVERPASS ECONOMIC CRISIS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Deineka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article a problem of adapting the railway transport to market requirements is presented and the ways of improving its competitiveness are investigated. Some measures and reserves of improving the operation efficiency for the railway transport are offered.

  4. Assessing transportation and road conditions in niger state, nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transportation itself was found to be contributing to climate change through the emissions of Carbon from vehicles. Road transport sector is a significant and growing contributor to green house emissions which scientists have linked to be the major cause of global warming. Road deterioration database was generated in the ...

  5. Observed and Modeled Sediment Transport Around Katama Inlet, Martha's Vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Katama Inlet, connecting Katama Bay to the Atlantic Ocean on the southern shoreline of Martha's Vineyard, MA, has migrated eastward more than 2.5 km since it was breached during the Patriot's Day storm in 2007. This morphological evolution, typical of the inlet's decadal cycle of breach-migration-closure, is owing to sediment transport driven by wave-orbital velocities, breaking-wave-generated mean currents, and tidal flows. Here, the rapidly evolving shoreline near Katama Inlet and on the southern edge of Martha's Vineyard is investigated using field observations and numerical model simulations. The bathymetry was surveyed in summer 2013 and 2014, and tides, waves, and currents were measured for a month in August 2013 and 2014 in the surf zone (~2 m water depth), on the outer edge of the ebb shoal offshore of the inlet mouth (~6 m depth), and on the inner continental shelf (~7 m depth). The model [Delft3D with coupled waves (SWAN) and currents] skillfully simulates observed wave heights, wave directions, and tidal currents, and is used here to estimate sediment transport rates. Model results suggest that during the relatively calm August conditions there is little transport on the inner shelf, but there is significant transport that changes directions with the tide on the outer ebb shoal. Transport rates in the surf zone decrease and become more unidirectional (wave-driven) with distance away (west) from the mouth of the inlet. In August, transport of suspended sediments is relatively more important on the outer ebb shoal than near the surf zone, where bedload transport dominates. The relative impact of these types of simulated transport on the migration of Katama Inlet will be discussed. Funded by ONR, ASD(R&E), NSF, and NDSEG.

  6. Flow and suspended sediment yield monitoring of the Apennines' watershed of the Sillaro stream (Prov. BO). 1998 Data analysis; Monitoraggio del deflusso liquido e solido del tratto appenninico del T. Sillaro. Analisi dei dati del 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavanelli, D.; Taglioli, G. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Economia e Ingegneria Agrarie; Sarti, A.

    2000-07-01

    The accurate assessment of surface water erosion in watershed is aided by the indications provided by the yield of fluvial solids and in particular by suspended sediment yield. Confining itself to a research study of hydrological and erosion phenomena present at the mountain watershed of the Sillaro Torrent, a monitoring station of water flow and sediment yield was set up at the enclosed end of the mountain basin. This paper contains the presentation and evaluation of the statistics revealed during the course of 1998. The fluctuation of sediment yield appears to be connected to the variation of water flow, the annual soil loss has been assessed at 54446 t, equal to an average soil loss over the entire basin of 0.26 mm. [Italian] La stima diretta dell'erosione idrica superficiale a scala di bacino idrografico puo' avvalersi delle indicazioni fornite dal trasporto solido fluviale, ed in particolare dal trasporto in sospensione. Nell'ambito di una ricerca volta allo studio dei fenomeni idrologici ed erosivi a carico del bacino montano del T. Sillaro (prov. BO), e' stata realizzata, presso la sezione di chiusa del bacino, una stazione di misura per il monitoraggio dei deflussi liquidi e della torbida. Nella presente nota viene fornita la descrizione e la valutazione dei dati rilevati nel corso del 1998. Le fluttuazioni dei valori di trasporto torbido appaiono legate alle variazioni di portata, mentre il deflusso torbido annuo per il 1998 e' stato valutato in 54.446, pari ad una perdita annua media di suolo sull'intero bacino di 0.26 mm.

  7. Organic carbon transport through a discontinuous fluvial system in a Mediterranean catchment after a greening-up process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; Pérez-Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Martínez-Mena, María

    2017-04-01

    Quantification of different organic carbon pools mobilized by lateral fluxes is important to close organic carbon (OC) budgets at the catchment scale. This quantification helps to identify in which forms OC is transferred, deposited, and mineralized during the erosion cycle. Many Mediterranean mountain catchments have experienced important land use changes in the last 50 years leading to a recovery of the vegetation in many cases. Furthermore, many of them are characterized by stream discontinuity with high runoff rates responding to intensive hydrological pulses. There is a current lack of knowledge on fluvial OC fluxes and their relation to soil organic carbon stocks in these systems. The objective of this research was to quantify the amount of organic carbon transported by these systems in a catchment representative of Mediterranean conditions and to explore how intermittent fluvial systems can affect organic carbon transported by lateral flows. During six years OC fluvial fluxes in a catchment of 77 km2 in SE Spain were monitored. The catchment experienced a greening-up process in the last 50 years through a conversion mainly from agricultural use (decrease 44%) to forest (increase 45%). Data on water discharge, sediment concentration, total organic carbon (OC) of suspended sediments and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were collected throughout 32 rainfall events and 13 sampling periods with base flow conditions. The data were collected from two monitoring stations located on two nested subcatchments covering permanent and ephemeral flow conditions. We found no significant differences in OC concentrations in suspended sediments (10.1 ± 5 g kg-1) and DOC (0.014 ± 0.010 g kg-1) between the ephemeral and the permanent streams. However, sediment concentration, index of aggregation and silt content of suspended load were significantly higher in the ephemeral stream than in the permanent one. OC concentration of suspended sediments was much lower than OC

  8. Nutrient and suspended-sediment trends, loads, and yields and development of an indicator of streamwater quality at nontidal sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, 1985-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, Michael; Blomquist, Joel; Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) updates information on loads of, and trends in, nutrients and sediment annually to help the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) investigators assess progress toward improving water-quality conditions in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. CBP scientists and managers have worked since 1983 to improve water quality in the bay. In 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for the Chesapeake Bay. The TMDL specifies nutrient and sediment load allocations that need to be achieved in the watershed to improve dissolved oxygen, water-clarity, and chlorophyll conditions in the bay. The USEPA, USGS, and state and local jurisdictions in the watershed operate a CBP nontidal water-quality monitoring network and associated database that are used to update load and trend information to help assess progress toward reducing nutrient and sediment inputs to the bay. Data collected from the CBP nontidal network were used to estimate loads and trends for two time periods: a long-term period (1985-2010) at 31 "primary" sites (with storm sampling) and a 10-year period (2001-10) at 33 primary sites and 16 "secondary" sites (without storm sampling). In addition, loads at 64 primary sites were estimated for the period 2006 to 2010. Results indicate improving flow-adjusted trends for nitrogen and phosphorus for 1985 to 2010 at most of the sites in the network. For nitrogen, 21 of the 31 sites showed downward (improving) trends, whereas 2 sites showed upward (degrading) trends, and 8 sites showed no trends. The results for phosphorus were similar: 22 sites showed improving trends, 4 sites showed degrading trends, and 5 sites indicated no trends. For sediment, no trend was found at 40 percent of the sites, with 10 sites showing improving trends and 8 sites showing degrading trends. The USGS, working with CBP partners, developed a new water-quality indicator that combines the results of the 10-year trend

  9. Anthropogenic disturbance on sediment transport processes in the tidal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ho Kyung; Kim, Jong-wook; Woo, Seung-Buhm; Kwon, Hyo Keun

    2017-04-01

    A series of in-situ mooring observations have been conducted to investigate the anthropogenic disturbance of sediment transport processes in the Sihwa tidal power plant (TPP). The mooring data show that the profiels of velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were significantly disturbed over the various time scales. On the short-term (flood-ebb) time scale, resuspension of bottom sediment is mainly controlled by the strong jet-flow (>2 m/s) and anticlockwise rotating vortex associated with the artificial discharge. During ebb phase, the strong flow resulted in suspension of high-concentration near-bed sediment and seaward transport of the suspended sediment. After turning to flood phase, the vortex produced secondary SSC peaks, transporting the suspended sediment toward the TPP. The most active suspension of bottom sediment predominantly occurred during 1-2 hr immediately after the start of artificial discharge. On the fortnightly (spring-neap) time scale, SSC during spring tide was approximately 2-5 times higher than that during neap tide. During the presentation, it will be discussed how the periodic artificial discharge can disturb the responses of SSC in the TPP.

  10. Suspended Sediment Dynamics of Lake Cumberland, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    the rightI magnitude and range to compete with the electrokinetic repulsive forces 17. The forces of attraction and repulsion due to zeta potential...fishing boat approximately 14 feet long and five feet wide. A Johnson 35-horsepower outboard motor provided the necessary propulsion . The only major

  11. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration by acoustic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the acoustic properties of natural sediments vary and depend on many parameters such as particle size, shape, mineralogy and distribution of those parameters in sample. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the possibility of soil sediment concentration with the f and equations, which were obtained ...

  12. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... particle size distribution (PSD) were correlated with HMC by using bivariate and multivariate regression models. Proposed models were then selected based on statistical criteria. The results showed high correlation between dissolved and particulate chromium content with efficiency coefficients beyond 77% ( > 0.001).

  13. Modelling of Suspended Sediment Discharge for Masinga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Masinga reservoir is experiencing high rates of siltation due to accelerated soil erosion in the catchment occasioned by rapid deforestation. There is need, therefore, to devise sediment management strategies both for the reservoir and the catchment to minimize the siltation rate. To give meaningful suggestions on ...

  14. Provincial road condition and round wood timber transport in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The context of the study is the concern over declining provincial road conditions due to insufficient government funding for road maintenance. The roads are used by a ... There is a 20% reduction in the road condition during wet periods, which would indicate poor drainage and/or use of poor quality road building materials.

  15. Transport and deposition of carbon at catchment scale: stabilization mechanisms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mena, María; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; García-Franco, Noelia; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    matter), slow (carbon associated to clay and silt or stabilized in aggregates) and passive (oxidation-resistant OC). In addition, the potential mineralized C (incubation method) in each deposit and soil was determined. Preliminary results indicate a higher OC content in the suspended sediments in transit and in the reservoir deposited sediments than in the alluvial bars, being in all sediments the total OC content lower than in the source soils. Slow and passive pools prevailed in suspended sediments and in reservoir sediments compared to alluvial bars, indicating different OC stabilization mechanisms. In addition, in the alluvial bars, mineralization rates were higher in bars located in channels with ephemeral flow conditions and vegetated areas than in bars located in channels with perennial flow conditions.

  16. Variability of cohesive sediment transport in vicinity of Sihwa tidal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, H. K.; Kim, J. W.; Woo, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the disturbance of sediment dynamics in the world's largest Sihwa tidal power plant (TPP), two mooring observations have been conducted. The mooring results show that the velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were significantly disturbed over the various time scales. For the short-term (flood vs. ebb) time scale, the resuspension of bottom sediment is mainly controlled by the strong jet-flow (>2 m s-1) and resultant anticlockwise rotating vortex associated with the artificial discharge. During ebb phase, the strong flow resulted in the suspension of high-concentration near-bed sediment, transporting the suspended sediment seaward. After turning into flood phase, the vortex produced the secondary peaks of the SSC, transporting the suspended sediment toward the Sihwa TPP. The most active suspension of bed sediment predominantly occurred during 1-2 hr immediately after the start of artificial discharge. For the fortnight (spring vs. neap) time scale, the SSC during spring tide was approximately 2-5 times higher than that during neap tide. During the combined period of ebb and spring tides, in particular, the periodic artificial discharge can enhance the responses of SSC in the vicinity of Sihwa TPP.

  17. Sediment transport and deposition in the lower Missouri River during the 2011 flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jason S.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Rus, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Floodwater in the Missouri River in 2011 originated in upper-basin regions and tributaries, and then travelled through a series of large flood-control reservoirs, setting records for total runoff volume entering all six Missouri River main-stem reservoirs. The flooding lasted as long as 3 months. The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) examined sediment transport and deposition in the lower Missouri River in 2011 to investigate how the geography of floodwater sources, in particular the decanting effects of the Missouri River main-stem reservoir system, coupled with the longitudinal characteristics of civil infrastructure and valley-bottom topography, affected sediment transport and deposition in this large, regulated river system. During the flood conditions in 2011, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, monitored suspended-sediment transport at six primary streamgages along the length of the lower Missouri River. Measured suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in the lower Missouri River varied from approximately 150 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 2,000 mg/L from January 1 to September 30, 2011. Median SSC increased in the downstream direction from 355 mg/L at Sioux City, Iowa, to 490 mg/L at Hermann, Missouri. The highest SSCs were measured downstream from Omaha, Nebraska, in late February when snowmelt runoff from tributaries, which were draining zones of high-sediment production, was entering the lower Missouri River, and releases of water at Gavins Point Dam were small. The combination of dilute releases of water at Gavins Point Dam and low streamflows in lower Missouri River tributaries caused sustained lowering of SSC at all streamgages from early July through late August. Suspended-sediment ranged from 5 percent washload (PW; percent silt and clay) to as much as 98 percent in the lower Missouri River from January 1 to September 30, 2011. Median PW increased in the downstream direction from 24 percent at Sioux City, Iowa, to 78 percent at

  18. Relationships between transport conditions and welfare outcomes during commercial long haul transport of cattle in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, L A; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; Bryan, M; Silasi, R; Brown, F

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to document the relationships between selected welfare outcomes and transport conditions during commercial long haul transport of cattle (≥400 km; 6,152 journeys; 290,866 animals). Surveys were delivered to transport carriers to collect information related to welfare outcomes including the number of dead, non-ambulatory (downer) and lame animals during each journey. Transport conditions surveyed included the length of time animals spent on truck, ambient temperature, animal density, shrinkage, loading time, cattle origin, season, experience of truck drivers, and vehicle characteristics. Overall 0.012% of assessed animals became lame, 0.022% non-ambulatory and 0.011% died onboard. Calves and cull cattle were more likely to die and become non-ambulatory during the journey, feeders intermediate, and fat cattle appeared to be the most able to cope with the stress of transport (P ≤ 0.01). The likelihood of cattle becoming non-ambulatory, lame, or dead increased sharply after animals spent over 30 h on truck (P 0.035). The proportion of total compromised animals decreased with more years of truck driving experience (P long distance transport include the total journey duration, too low or high space allowances, too high or too low ambient temperature, and the experience of the truck drivers.

  19. Formation of transport-logistical systems in the conditions of reforming railway branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Kopytko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The trends of transport-logistic systems formation in conditions of the railway transport reformation in Ukraine, taking into consideration the work experience of the logistic structures of the motor transport, demands of the regional bodies of local government, peculiarities of cross-border cooperation, goods advancement technologies on the basis of mixed approach and concepts of creating the logistic clusters are examined. The formation of logistic transportation systems using technological and competitive components, having conducted a classification of mediators, and on the basis of the above mentioned factors the reduction of transport component that will promote the increased interest of the goods owners in transportation and choice of the kind of transport is offered.

  20. Thermoregulatory and behavioral characteristics of racing pigeons housed under transport conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorssen, J.

    1995-01-01

    Transport is an essential component of racing pigeon contests. Preliminary studies indicated that adverse transport conditions might contribute to the occurrence of flight losses. Flight losses consist of pigeons which do not return to their home loft. In this thesis, physical and social

  1. A systematic study of wave conditions and sediment transport near Mormugao harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, M.P.M.

    Wave conditions and the nature of sediment transport in the Mormugao Harbour area have been evaluated in view of the proposed development project of this harbour It has been found from this study that generally high waves will be experienced...

  2. Perseverative instrumental and Pavlovian responding to conditioned stimuli in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonkes, L.J.P.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimuli can influence behavior via the process of Pavlovian conditioning. Recent genetic research suggests that some individuals are more sensitive to environmental stimuli for behavioral guidance than others. One important mediator of this effect is serotonin transporter (5-HTT)

  3. Modern marketing instruments of freight transportation in the market conditions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Radionova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article considers issues on searching the methods of using marketing instruments for solving the railway transport development problems and functioning this branch in the market conditions.

  4. PROBLEMS OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF UNDERGROUND AND TRANSPORT FACILITIES IN THE CONDITIONS OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sernov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of design and erecting of underground and transport structures, fencing deep excavations in cramped urban conditions on the examples of various projects in the Republic of Belarusis presented in the paper.

  5. Jet transport performance in thunderstorm wind shear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, J.; Blick, E. F.; Bensch, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Several hours of three dimensional wind data were collected in the thunderstorm approach-to-landing environment, using an instrumented Queen Air airplane. These data were used as input to a numerical simulation of aircraft response, concentrating on fixed-stick assumptions, while the aircraft simulated an instrument landing systems approach. Output included airspeed, vertical displacement, pitch angle, and a special approach deterioration parameter. Theory and the results of approximately 1000 simulations indicated that about 20 percent of the cases contained serious wind shear conditions capable of causing a critical deterioration of the approach. In particular, the presence of high energy at the airplane's phugoid frequency was found to have a deleterious effect on approach quality. Oscillations of the horizontal wind at the phugoid frequency were found to have a more serious effect than vertical wind. A simulation of Eastern flight 66, which crashed at JFK in 1975, served to illustrate the points of the research. A concept of a real-time wind shear detector was outlined utilizing these results.

  6. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase I: field sampling program during mean flow Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

    1979-08-01

    A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during November and December 1977 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Suspended sediment, bed sediment, and water samples were collected during mean flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included primarily gamma ray emitters; however, some plutonium, strontium, curium, and tritium analyses were also included. The principal gamma emitter found during the sampling program was /sup 137/Cs where, in some cases, levels associated with the sand and clay size fractions of bed sediment exceeded 100 pCi/g. Elevated levels of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr were found downstream of the Nuclear Fuel Services Center, an inactive plutonium reprocessing plant and low level nuclear waste disposal site. Based on radionuclide levels in upstream control stations, /sup 137/Cs was the only radionuclide whose levels in the creeks downstream of the site could confidently be attributed to the site during this sampling program. This field sampling effort is the first of a three phase program to collect data during low, medium and high flow conditions.

  7. Parameterization of wind turbine impacts on hydrodynamics and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, Aurélie; Bennis, Anne-Claire; Pinon, Grégory; Magar, Vanesa; Gross, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Monopile foundations of offshore wind turbines modify the hydrodynamics and sediment transport at local and regional scales. The aim of this work is to assess these modifications and to parameterize them in a regional model. In the present study, this is achieved through a regional circulation model, coupled with a sediment transport module, using two approaches. One approach is to explicitly model the monopiles in the mesh as dry cells, and the other is to parameterize them by adding a drag force term to the momentum and turbulence equations. Idealised cases are run using hydrodynamical conditions and sediment grain sizes typical from the area located off Courseulles-sur-Mer (Normandy, France), where an offshore windfarm is under planning, to assess the capacity of the model to reproduce the effect of the monopile on the environment. Then, the model is applied to a real configuration on an area including the future offshore windfarm of Courseulles-sur-Mer. Four monopiles are represented in the model using both approaches, and modifications of the hydrodynamics and sediment transport are assessed over a tidal cycle. In relation to local hydrodynamic effects, it is observed that currents increase at the side of the monopile and decrease in front of and downstream of the monopile. In relation to sediment transport effect, the results show that resuspension and erosion occur around the monopile in locations where the current speed increases due to the monopile presence, and sediments deposit downstream where the bed shear stress is lower. During the tidal cycle, wakes downstream of the monopile reach the following monopile and modify the velocity magnitude and suspended sediment concentration patterns around the second monopile.

  8. Mechanical Erosion in a Tropical River Basin in Southeastern Brazil: Chemical Characteristics and Annual Fluvial Transport Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the mechanical erosion processes that occur in a tropical river basin, located in the São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil, through the chemical characterization of fine suspended sediments and the transport mechanisms near the river mouth, from March 2009 to September 2010. The chemical characterization indicated the predominance of SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 and showed no significant seasonal influences on the major element concentrations, expressed as oxides. The concentration variations observed were related to the mobility of chemical species. The evaluation of the rock-alteration degree indicated that the physical weathering was intense in the drainage basin. The fine suspended sediments charge was influenced by the variation discharges throughout the study period. The solid charge estimate of the surface runoff discharge was four times higher in the rainy season than the dry season. The transport of fine suspended sediments at the Sorocaba River mouth was 55.70 t km−2 a−1, corresponding to a specific physical degradation of 37.88 m Ma−1, a value associated with the mechanical erosion rate that corresponds to the soil thickness reduction in the drainage basin.

  9. Comparison of Subaerial and Submarine Mixing and Sediment Transport in Sinuous Channel Bends Using Turbulence-Resolving Numerical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulence and sediment suspension are conducted in both subaerial and submarine meandering channels. The Boussinesq approximation of buoyancy is applied to the spatially-filtered, Navier-Stokes equations through the simultaneous solution of the suspended sediment continuity equation with the Smith-McLean boundary condition. Production of turbulence and, consequently, turbulent kinetic energy is stronger at channel bends than in straight sections. This pattern is more pronounced in subaerial channels. Depth integrated, two-dimensional models of turbidity currents critically rely upon parameterization of the entrainment of water at the top of the flow and sediment exchange with the bed. Secondary flow and turbulence structure due to channel sinuosity significantly alter these parameterizations and the assumed vertical profiles of velocity and sediment concentration. Large turbulent structures episodically inject relatively clear water from the top to the base of the flow at the outside of channel bends, and, simultaneously, sediment laden fluid is ejected from the bed at the inside of channel bends. As a result, sediment deposition in sinuous channels is reduced compared to application of two-dimensional models. The LES turbidity current model is extended to channel morphodynamics by grid adjustment at each fluid and sedment time step. The LES morphodynamic model has been tested, thus far, in strongly depositional sinuous channel turbidity currents. Relatively uniform channel deposition and rapidly developing sharp-crested levees are built in these conditions. Further simulations involving partially erosional conditions and bedload transport will be presented.

  10. Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandlikar, Satish G. [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Lu, Zijie [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Rao, Navalgund [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Sergi, Jacqueline [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Rath, Cody [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); McDade, Christopher [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Trabold, Thomas [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Owejan, Jon [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Gagliardo, Jeffrey [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Allen, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Yassar, Reza S. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Medici, Ezequiel [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Herescu, Alexandru [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2010-05-30

    In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions.

  11. COLD STORAGE-SUPPORTED AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM IN URBAN TRANSPORT VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Jarzyna

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A bottleneck for the development of public transport vehicles is their electricity supply. Electric buses are almost exclusively equipped with electrochemical batteries, while nearly 40% of the energy is used in the processes of air conditioning. For this reason, we developed and built a demonstration system for storing thermal energy in public transport vehicles. The most important effects are: significant reduction of financial expenses and of the total weight of all batteries with the same amount of stored energy.

  12. Silicon in vascular plants: uptake, transport and its influence on mineral stress under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontigo, Sofía; Ribera, Alejandra; Gianfreda, Liliana; de la Luz Mora, María; Nikolic, Miroslav; Cartes, Paula

    2015-07-01

    So far, considerable advances have been achieved in understanding the mechanisms of Si uptake and transport in vascular plants. This review presents a comprehensive update about this issue, but also provides the new insights into the role of Si against mineral stresses that occur in acid soils. Such information could be helpful to understand both the differential Si uptake ability as well as the benefits of this mineral element on plants grown under acidic conditions. Silicon (Si) has been widely recognized as a beneficial element for many plant species, especially under stress conditions. In the last few years, great efforts have been made to elucidate the mechanisms involved in uptake and transport of Si by vascular plants and recently, different Si transporters have been identified. Several researches indicate that Si can alleviate various mineral stresses in plants growing under acidic conditions, including aluminium (Al) and manganese (Mn) toxicities as well as phosphorus (P) deficiency all of which are highly detrimental to crop production. This review presents recent findings concerning the influence of uptake and transport of Si on mineral stress under acidic conditions because a knowledge of this interaction provides the basis for understanding the role of Si in mitigating mineral stress in acid soils. Currently, only four Si transporters have been identified and there is little information concerning the response of Si transporters under stress conditions. More investigations are therefore needed to establish whether there is a relationship between Si transporters and the benefits of Si to plants subjected to mineral stress. Evidence presented suggests that Si supply and its subsequent accumulation in plant tissues could be exploited as a strategy to improve crop productivity on acid soils.

  13. Using GOCI Retrieval Data to Initialize and Validate a Sediment Transport Model for Monitoring Diurnal Variation of SSC in Hangzhou Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC in Hangzhou Bay, China has been investigated using remotely-sensed SSC derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI in combination with a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model for regional and shelf seas (COHERENS. The SSC maps were inferred through a UV-AC atmospheric correction algorithm and an empirical inversion algorithm from the GOCI Level-1B data. The sediment transport model was initialized from maps of the GOCI-derived SSC and the model results were validated through a comparison with remotely-sensed data. The comparison demonstrated that the model results agreed well with the observations. The relationship between SSC distribution and hydrodynamic conditions was analyzed to investigate the sediment transport dynamics. The model’s results indicate that the action of tidal currents dominate the sediment deposition and re-suspension in the coastal waters of the East China Sea. This is especially the case in Hangzhou Bay where the tidal currents are strongest. The satellite-derived sediment data product can not only dramatically improve the specification of the initial conditions for the sediment model, but can also provide valuable information for the model validation, thereby improving the model’s overall performance.

  14. Competitiveness of the railway transportation in the conditions of functioning of the infrastructure new organizational-economic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Mishchenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The transport infrastructure of railways of the countries of EU-27 in the conditions of functioning new organizational-economic mechanism, and also dynamics of level of competitiveness of a railway transportation as result of reforming of railways of the countries of EU-27, in the conditions of realisation of the European transport legislation is investigated.

  15. Dynamic Analysis of the LHC 15-m Cryodipole under Transport and Handling Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Buenaventura, A

    1999-01-01

    The LHC cryodipoles will be transported and handled to their final position in the tunnel and, therefore, they will be subjected to dynamic loads that could damage the dipoles cold masses and cryostats components. The dynamic behaviour of the LHC cryodipoles should be considered when designing the transport and handling equipment. To predict the dynamic behaviour of the cryodipoles under transport and handling conditions, a finite element model of the LHC 15 m cryodipole was developed and validated with experimental data. The natural frequencies and mode shapes predicted by the model were in good agreement with experimental data. The model was used to simulate both a transport on a truck and a handling with a crane of the cryodipole assembly.

  16. Anthropogenic Impact on Sediment Transport in the Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Brittney; Herrmann, Achim; Clift, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Many of the most prominent deltas in the world are suffering from sediment starvation and subsidence due to human alteration of the upper catchments. The Mississippi River Delta is not immune to these problems which are accentuated by the addition of dams and artificial levees diverting sediment from the delta and coast throughout the last century. The Missouri, Ohio, and Arkansas Rivers have historically supplied most of the suspended sediment load to the Lower Mississippi over the last 60 years, with the Missouri being the largest single contributor. While suspended sediment load plays an important role in floodplain and delta construction, the transport of coarser sediment is also important to a healthy coastline. Very little data exists to constrain how coarser sediment is mixed and transported down the Mississippi despite its invaluable importance to the coastal beaches and barrier islands. Using traditional provenance tools it is possible to study both the coarse and fine load of the modern Mississippi River to quantify transportation and mixing models. This, in turn, will demonstrate human impact on both the suspended and bedload of the Mississippi and its tributaries. This study uses apatite rare earth element geochemistry and zircon U-Pb dating in conjunction with Sr-Nd isotope ratios and clay mineralogy to interpret the transportation of both fine and coarse sediment within the modern Mississippi and its tributaries. These data are preliminary and are part of a larger study that will determine anthropogenic impact on the aggradation of the modern delta floodplain over the last 1000 years.

  17. THE PROBLEM OF GENERATING OPTIMAL CAPITAL STRUCTURE OF AIR TRANSPORT ENTERPRISES IN CONDITIONS OF LIQUIDITY CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Asanina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Tendencies of forming the capital structure of enterprises in conditions of the liquidity crisis are analyzed in the article. The basic tendencies of forming the capital structure, which characterize aviation transport enterprises, are determined. The necessity of using the loan capital and its peculiarities are also investigated.

  18. Prior fear conditioning does not impede enhanced active avoidance in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, P.; Henckens, M.J.A.G.; Borghans, B.; Hiemstra, M.; Kozicz, T.; Homberg, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Stressors can be actively or passively coped with, and adequate adaption of the coping response to environmental conditions can reduce their potential deleterious effects. One major factor influencing stress coping behaviour is serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability. Abolishment of 5-HTT is

  19. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Papapostolou, Vassilios

    2017-09-11

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  20. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapostolou, Vassilios; Wacks, Daniel H; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Im, Hong G

    2017-09-14

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  1. Effect of reduced humic acid on the transport of ferrihydrite nanoparticles under anoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Li, Wenlu; Wang, Dengjun; Jiang, Yi; Pan, Chao; Fortner, John D; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-02-01

    Humic acid (HA) occurs ubiquitously in the subsurface environments and is well-known to play a critical role in the fate and transport of ferrihydrite nanoparticles (NPs) and NPs-associated contaminants. Under anoxic conditions, HA can readily be reduced by microorganisms or geochemical reducing species, and the mechanisms and kinetics of ferrihydrite reduction by reduced HA (HAred) are well-documented; however, the role of these redox reactions on the transport of ferrihydrite NPs is largely underestimated. This study provides new knowledge regarding the role of HA (both reduced HA (HAred) and oxidized HA (HAox)) of environmentally relevant concentrations (0-50 mg C/L) on the transport of ferrihydrite NPs in anoxic sand columns. Our findings show that, regardless of the redox state, the presence of a low concentration of HA (3 mg C/L) inhibited ferrihydrite NP's transport due to enhanced aggregation (and deposition) between positively charged ferrihydrite NPs and negatively charged HA molecules. In contrast, higher HA (both HAred and HAox) concentration (≥10 mg C/L) significantly enhanced the mobility of ferrihydrite NPs, primarily due to the enhanced electrostatic and steric stabilization originating from excessively adsorbed HA molecules. Interestingly, the transport of ferrihydrite NPs is substantially lower in the presence of HAred than in the presence of HAox. This distinct effect (HAred vs. HAox) on the particle transport is attributed to the fact that reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite NPs occurs in the presence of HAred (ferrihydrite dissolves and thus total breakthrough decreases), but not in the presence of HAox. Furthermore, the abatement extent of ferrihydrite NPs transport triggered by the presence of HAred is dependent on dissolved HAred concentration. Taken together, our findings provide direct, and much needed insights into the distinct roles of redox state of HA on the transport of redox-sensitive metal-bearing NPs in porous media

  2. Role of Environmental Conditions on the Fate and Transport of Engineered Nanomaterials in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. L.; Chowdhury, I.

    2011-12-01

    Industrial processes and consumer products based on nanotechnology are a fast-rising component of the current economy, predicted to be $1 trillion industry by 2015. As most of the industries are embracing nanotechnology in their production for novel properties and higher efficiency, nanomaterial-based products will capture the significant portion of the consumer market in near future. Hence, nanomaterial-based products will be ubiquitous and the byproducts of the production will be released in the environment, demanding the investigation of fate, transport and toxicity of these novel materials. Therefore, in this study the fate and transport of nanoparticles in aquatic environments have been investigated. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been used as model nanoparticles, as it is one of most widely used nanoparticles in consumer products and industry. The project was developed to identify the fundamental mechanisms involved in the transport of nano-TiO2 and the contribution of various environmental parameters including solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and ion valence), hydrodynamic effects, and the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and bacteria. Extensive physicochemical characterization of the nanoparticles was conducted under various solution condition including electrokinetic characterization, hydrodynamic diameter, and stability of nanoparticles. Transport studies have been conducted in both macroscopic (packed-bed column) and microscopic (parallel plate flow cell) systems. The combination of these transport and characterization tools has demonstrated the critical role that pH, ionic strength and valence, NOM, bacteria, primary nanoparticle size and aggregation state play in the transport. Results from both transport systems, as well as bacterial and particle characterization will be presented, as well as the proposed transport and retention mechanisms observed.

  3. A Transporter of Ibuprofen is Upregulated in MDCK I cells under Hyperosmotic Culture Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten U; Rasmussen, Rune N; Mo, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Ibuprofen is a widely used drug. It has been identified as an inhibitor of several transporters, but it is not clear if ibuprofen is a substrate of any transporter itself. In the present work, we have characterized a transporter of ibuprofen, which is upregulated by hyperosmotic culture conditions...... in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney I (MDCK I) renal cells. [3H]-ibuprofen uptake rate was measured in MDCK I cell cultured under normal (300 mOsm) and hyperosmotic (500 mOsm) conditions. Hyperosmotic conditions were obtained by supplementing urea, NaCl, mannitol or raffinose to culture medium. The effect...... of increased osmolarity was investigated for different incubation times. [3H]-ibuprofen uptake in MDCK I cells was upregulated by hyperosmotic culture condition, and was saturable with a Km-value of 0.37 ± 0.08 µM and a Vmax of 233.1 ± 17.2 pmol· cm-2· min-1. Racemic [3H]-ibuprofen uptake could be inhibited...

  4. Observations of sediment transport on the Amazon subaqueous delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Paulson, B.; Kineke, G.C.; Drake, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    A 19-day time series of fluid, flow, and suspended-sediment characteristics in the benthic boundary layer is analyzed to identify major sedimentary processes active over the prodelta region of the Amazon subaqueous delta. Measurements were made by the benthic tripod GEOPROBE placed on the seabed in 65 m depth near the base of the deltaic foreset beds from 11 February to 3 March 1990, during the time of rising water and maximum sediment discharge of the Amazon River; and the observations included: hourly measurements of velocity and suspended-sediment concentration at four levels above the seabed; waves and tides; and seabed elevation. Results of the first 14-day period of the time series record indicate that sediment resuspension occurred as a result of tidal currents (91% of the time) and surface gravity waves (46% of the time). Observations of suspended sediment indicated that particle flux in this region is 0.4-2% of the flux measured on the adjacent topset deposits and is directed to the north and landward relative to the Brazilian coast (268??T). Fortnightly variability is strong, with particle fluxes during spring tides five times greater than during neap tides. On the 15th day of the data record, a rapid sedimentation event was documented in which 44 cm of sediment was deposited at the study site over a 14-h period. Evaluation of various mechanisms of mass sediment movement suggests that this event represents downslope migration of fluid muds from the upper foreset beds that were set in motion by boundary shear stresses generated by waves and currents. This transport mechanism appears to occur episodically and may represent a major source of sediment to the lower foreset-bottomset region of the subaqueous delta.

  5. Long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuśmierczyk-Michulec, J; Krysta, M; Kalinowski, M; Hoffmann, E; Baré, J

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. The air mass trajectory ideally provides a "link" between a radionuclide release and a detection confirmed by radionuclide measurements. This paper investigates the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions, with special emphasis on evaluating the changes in the simulated activity concentration values due to the inclusion of the convective transport in the ATM simulations. For that purpose a series of 14 day forward simulations, with and without convective transport, released daily in the period from 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2013, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The simulated activity concentrations for the period January 2011 to February 2012 were calculated using the daily emission values provided by the ANSTO facility; outside the aforementioned period, the median daily emission value was used. In the simulations the analysed meteorological input data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5°. It was found that the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective conditions, where convection was included in the ATM simulation, led to a small decrease in the activity concentration, as compared to transport without convection. In special cases related to deep convection, the opposite effect was observed. Availability of both daily emission values and measured Xe-133 activity concentration values was an opportunity to validate the simulations. Based on the paired t-test, a 95% confidence interval for the true mean difference between simulations without convective transport and measurements was constructed. It was estimated that the overall uncertainty lies between 0.08 and 0.25 mBq/m3

  6. Theory and numerical application of subsurface flow and transport for transient freezing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Center

    1995-04-01

    Protective barriers are being investigated for the containment of radioactive waste within subsurface environments. Predicting the effectiveness of cryogenic barriers and near-surface barriers in temperate or arctic climates requires capabilities for numerically modeling subsurface flow and transport for freezing soil conditions. A predictive numerical model is developed herein to simulate the flow and transport of radioactive solutes for three-phase (water-ice-air) systems under freezing conditions. This physically based model simulates the simultaneous flow of water, air, heat, and radioactive solutes through variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media. Expressions for ice (frozen water) and liquid water saturations as functions of temperature, interfacial pressure differences, and osmotic potential are developed from nonhysteretic versions of the Brooks and Corey and van Genuchten functions for soil moisture retention. Aqueous relative permeability functions for variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media are developed from the Mualem and Burdine theories for predicting relative permeability of unsaturated soil. Soil deformations, caused by freezing and melting transitions, are neglected. Algorithms developed for predicting ice and liquid water saturations and aqueous-phase permeabilities were incorporated into the finite-difference based numerical simulator STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). Application of the theory is demonstrated by the solution of heat and mass transport in a horizontal cylinder of partially saturated porous media with differentially cooled ends, with the colder end held below the liquid water freezing point. This problem represents an essential capability for modeling cryogenic barriers in variably saturated geologic media.

  7. Survival of Ucides cordatus (Decapoda: Ocypodidae megalopae during transport under different conditions of density and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Ventura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Target areas for Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 restocking programs are often located far from the laboratory where larval rearing is developed. During translocation, the larvae are submitted to highly stressful conditions due to handling, packing, and transport activities. The aim of the present study was to assess the mortality rates of U. cordatus megalopae caused by different transportation procedures. Megalopae at loading densities of 50, 150, and 300 ind.L-1 were packed in double polyethylene 12 x 25 cm plastic bags with 200 ml of marine water at salinity 30. The bags were filled with oxygen at a proportion of 1:2 parts of water and sealed tightly. The trepidations during transport were simulated by the use of a shaker device (800 vibrations/minute over periods of three and six hours inside a dark container. The survivorship rates of larvae after simulation were compared to those obtained in control groups, which consisted of plastic vials with megalopae at a loading density of 50 ind.L-1 maintained at rest. Immediately after the two transport simulations, there was no significant difference in survivorship between the treatments and the control. However, 24 hours after simulation some of the tested densities resulted in significantly lower survivorships. The results demonstrated that U. cordatus megalopae can tolerate six hours of shaking during transportation, at high densities with minimal mortality.

  8. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  9. PBMC: Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo code for radiative transport in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Muñoz, A.; Mills, F. P.

    2017-08-01

    PBMC (Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo) solves the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE) and can be applied to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. The code builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. In accounting for the polarization in the sampling of photon propagation directions and pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions, PBMC avoids the unstable and biased solutions of classical BMC algorithms for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarizing media such as Rayleigh atmospheres.

  10. Numerical modeling of physical vapor transport under microgravity conditions: Effect of thermal creep and stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of microgravity (micro-g) environments is the manufacture of exotic and high-quality crystals in closed cylindrical ampoules using physical vapor transport (PVT) processes. The quality enhancements are believed to be due to the absence of buoyant convection in the weightless environment - resulting in diffusion-limited transport of the vapor. In a typical experiment, solid-phase sample material is initially contained at one end of the ampoule. The sample is made to sublime into the vapor phase and deposit onto the opposite end by maintaining the source at an elevated temperature with respect to the deposit. Identification of the physical factors governing both the rates and uniformity of crystal growth, and the optimization of the micro-g technology, will require an accurate modeling of the vapor transport within the ampoule. Previous micro-g modeling efforts have approached the problem from a 'classical' convective/diffusion formulation, in which convection is driven by the action of buoyancy on thermal and solutal density differences. The general conclusion of these works have been that in low gravity environments the effect of buoyancy on vapor transport is negligible, and vapor transport occurs in a diffusion-limited mode. However, it has been recently recognized than in the non-isothermal (and often low total pressure) conditions encountered in ampoules, the commonly-assumed no-slip boundary condition to the differential equations governing fluid motion can be grossly unrepresentative of the actual situation. Specifically, the temperature gradients can give rise to thermal creep flows at the ampoule side walls. In addition, temperature gradients in the vapor itself can, through the action of thermal stress, lead to bulk fluid convection.

  11. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  12. Influence of Humic Acid on the Transport and Deposition of Colloidal Silica under Different Hydrogeochemical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport and deposition of colloids in aquifers plays an important role in managed aquifer recharge (MAR schemes. Here, the processes of colloidal silica transport and deposition were studied by displacing groundwater with recharge water. The results showed that significant amounts of colloidal silica transport occurred when native groundwater was displaced by HA solution. Solution contains varying conditions of ionic strength and ion valence. The presence of humic acid could affect the zeta potential and size of the colloidal silica, which led to obvious colloidal silica aggregation in the divalent ion solution. Humic acid increased colloidal silica transport by formation of non-adsorbing aqueous phase silica–HA complexes. The experimental and modeling results showed good agreement, indicating that the essential physics were accurately captured by the model. The deposition rates were less than 10−8 s−1 in deionized water and monovalent ion solution. Moreover, the addition of Ca2+ and increase of IS resulted in the deposition rates increasing by five orders of magnitude to 10−4 s−1. In all experiments, the deposition rates decreased in the presence of humic acid. Overall, the promotion of humic acid in colloidal silica was strongly associated with changes in water quality, indicating that they should receive greater attention during MAR.

  13. Testing ZigBee Motes for Monitoring Refrigerated Vegetable Transportation under Real Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ruiz-Garcia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality control and monitoring of perishable goods during transportation and delivery services is an increasing concern for producers, suppliers, transport decision makers and consumers. The major challenge is to ensure a continuous ‘cold chain’ from producer to consumer in order to guaranty prime condition of goods. In this framework, the suitability of ZigBee protocol for monitoring refrigerated transportation has been proposed by several authors. However, up to date there was not any experimental work performed under real conditions. Thus, the main objective of our experiment was to test wireless sensor motes based in the ZigBee/IEEE 802.15.4 protocol during a real shipment. The experiment was conducted in a refrigerated truck traveling through two countries (Spain and France which means a journey of 1,051 kilometers. The paper illustrates the great potential of this type of motes, providing information about several parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, door openings and truck stops. Psychrometric charts have also been developed for improving the knowledge about water loss and condensation on the product during shipments.

  14. Physiological and hematological responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus to different anesthetics during simulated transport conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diana Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimization of stress during the transportation of live fish is essential in maintaining the welfare and performance of the animals. In order to test the hypothesis that stress during transport of fingerlings of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus can be reduced with the aid of the anesthetics menthol, eugenol or benzocaine, we have assessed the effects of these agents at various concentrations on the physiological parameters and survival rates of fish subjected to conditions simulating those normally used in transportation. Fingerlings (N = 1200 were fasted for 24 hours and distributed in 20 L polyethylene bags (N = 50 per bag containing 5 L of water and an anesthetic at the appropriate concentration. Fingerlings treated with menthol at 75 mg L-1, or eugenol or benzocaine at 20 mg L-1, maintained levels of plasma cortisol and glucose that were lower than those of the stressed but untreated controls and within the physiological limits of the baseline values for this species. Under these conditions, the survival rate was 100%, suggesting that stress was substantially reduced despite dense consignment. Treatments involving higher doses of the studied agents induced significant anesthetic toxicity.

  15. Combining geoelectrical and advanced lysimeter methods to characterize heterogeneous flow and transport under unsaturated transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, M.; Skowronski, J.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous - or preferential - flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we applied systematically varied input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We simultaneously measured the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct ground-truthing of soil moisture and pore fluid resistivity changes estimated noninvasively using ERT. We were able to image both the advancing infiltration front and the advancing tracer front using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long term displacement of the solute front was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential flow fraction was observed to be independent of precipitation rate. This suggests the presence of a fingering process

  16. Sediment loads and transport at constructed chutes along the Missouri River - Upper Hamburg Chute near Nebraska City, Nebraska, and Kansas Chute near Peru, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Brenda K.; Rus, David L.; Moser, Matthew T.; Hall, Brent M.; Andersen, Michael J.

    2016-02-04

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, monitored suspended sediment within constructed Missouri River chutes during March through October 2012. Chutes were constructed at selected river bends by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help mitigate aquatic habitat lost through the creation and maintenance of the navigation channel on the Missouri River. The restoration and development of chutes is one method for creating shallow-water habitat within the Missouri River to meet requirements established by the amended 2000 Biological Opinion. Understanding geomorphic channel-evolution processes and sediment transport is important for the design of chutes, monitoring and maintenance of existing chutes, and characterizing the habitat that the chutes provide. This report describes the methods used to monitor suspended sediment at two Missouri River chutes and presents the results of the data analysis to help understand the suspended-sediment characteristics of each chute and the effect the chutes have on the Missouri River. Upper Hamburg chute, near Nebraska City, Nebraska, and Kansas chute, near Peru, Nebraska, were selected for monitoring. At each study site, monthly discrete samples were collected from April through October in the Missouri River main-channel transects upstream from the chute inlet, downstream from the chute outlet, at the outlet (downstream transect) of both chutes, and at the inlet (upstream transect) of Kansas chute. In addition, grab samples from all chute sampling locations were collected using autosamplers. Suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and grain-size metrics were determined for all samples (discrete and grab). Continuous water-quality monitors recorded turbidity and water temperature at 15-minute intervals at the three chute sampling locations. Two acoustic Doppler velocimeters, one within each chute, measured water depth and current velocities continuously. The depth and velocity data were used to

  17. Hydrographic and suspended sediment measurements of the Mississippi River plume during the historic 2011 flood: a coupled satellite analysis and boat survey approach to determine an efficiency factor for sediment trapping in the nearshore zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, F.; Li, C.; D'Emidio, M.; Lutken, C.; Macelloni, L.; Salusti, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    During the 2011 Mississippi River (MR) flood, sediment carried to sea by the River had the potential to combat wetland loss in some areas. The movement and fate of river sediments is determined by a combination of river plume momentum, and coastal and offshore currents [Walker, 1996; Walker et al., 2005; Rego et al., 2010]. We therefore used a coupled satellite analysis and boat survey approach in order to track mixing and transport of MR plume sediments during one of the largest recorded floods in history. During the flood crest in June of 2010, MR discharge was held at a constant and large value for several weeks, providing a unique experiment that allowed us to study plume structure under steady flow conditions. Sea surface temperature, height, and color data from satellites were employed in order to quantify river plume dispersion, surface sediment concentration [Peckham, 2008; Shi and Wang, 2009] and sediment migration pathways in the nearshore zone for the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, for the duration of the flood. The boat survey measured current velocity, salinity, temperature and sediment concentration of the MR plume, during the peak of the flood. Although plumes emanating from the MR Delta should contribute significant sediment to the coastal zone [cf. Wright and Nittrouer, 1995; D'Sa and Ho, 2008], our investigation shows that the focused jet of the MR during the flood penetrated the coastal current and contributed little to the coastal sediment budget. Collected data allowed calculation of the hydrodynamic structure of the plume and thus its Potential Vorticity. We show that a novel PV, recently described by Falcini and Jerolmack [2010], works as an efficiency factor: the fraction of sediment emitted from each river plume that is trapped in the nearshore zone (and on marshes) is directly related to the PV of each river effluent. This relation may help to better understand and predict how future floods, or human-constructed river diversions, will

  18. Suitability of Commercial Transport Media for Biological Pathogens under Nonideal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Hubbard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is extensive data to support the use of commercial transport media as a stabilizer for known clinical samples; however, there is little information to support their use outside of controlled conditions specified by the manufacturer. Furthermore, there is no data to determine the suitability of said media for biological pathogens, specifically those of interest to the US military. This study evaluates commercial off-the-shelf (COTS transport media based on sample recovery, viability, and quality of nucleic acids and peptides for nonpathogenic strains of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, in addition to ricin toxin. Samples were stored in COTS, PBST, or no media at various temperatures over an extended test period. The results demonstrate that COTS media, although sufficient for the preservation of nucleic acid and proteinaceous material, are not capable of maintaining an accurate representation of biothreat agents at the time of collection.

  19. Conditioning increases the gain of contraction-induced sarcolemmal substrate transport in ultra-endurance racing sled dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Davis

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise relies on transsarcolemmal flux of substrates in order to avoid depletion of intramuscular reserves. Previous studies of endurance trained sled dogs have shown a remarkable capacity of these dogs to adapt rapidly to endurance exercise by decreasing the utilization of intramuscular reserves. The current study tested the hypothesis that the dogs' glycogen-sparing phenotype is due to increased sarcolemmal transport of glucose and fatty acids. Basal and exercise-induced transport of glucose and fatty acids into sarcolemmal vesicles was evaluated in racing sled dogs prior to and after 7 months of exercise conditioning. Sarcolemmal substrate transport capacity was measured using sarcolemmal vesicles and radiolabelled substrates, and transporter abundance was measured using Western blot quantification in whole muscle homogenates and the sarcolemmal vesicle preparations. Conditioning resulted in increased basal and exercise-induced transport of both glucose and palmitate. Neither acute exercise nor conditioning resulted in changes in muscle content of GLUT4 or FAT/CD36, but conditioning did result in decreased abundance of both transporters in the sarcolemmal vesicles used for the basal transport assays, and this decrease was further amplified in the vesicles used for the exercise-induced transport assays. These results demonstrate conditioning-induced increases in sarcolemmal transport of oxidizable substrates, as well as increased gain of exercise-induced sarcolemmal transport of these substrates. These results further indicate that increased sarcolemmal transport of oxidizable substrates may be due to either an increased intrinsic capacity of the existing transporters or to a different population of transporters from those investigated.

  20. Effects of Transport and Storage Conditions on Gene Expression in Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Wyrich, Ralf; Verderio, Paolo; Ciniselli, Chiara; Pazzagli, Mario; Gelmini, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriate handling of blood samples might induce or repress gene expression and/or lead to RNA degradation affecting downstream analysis. In particular, sample transport is a critical step for biobanking or multicenter studies because of uncontrolled variables (i.e., unstable temperature). We report the results of a pilot study implemented within the EC funded SPIDIA project, aimed to investigate the role of transport and storage of blood samples containing and not containing an RNA stabilizer. Blood was collected from a single donor both in EDTA and in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. Half of the samples were sent to a second laboratory both at room temperature and at 4°C, whereas the remaining samples were stored at room temperature and at 4°C. Gene expression of selected genes (c-FOS, IL-1β, IL-8, and GAPDH) known to be induced or repressed by ex vivo blood handling and of blood-mRNA quality biomarkers identified and validated within the SPIDIA project, which allow for monitoring changes in unstabilized blood samples after collection and during transport and storage, were analyzed by RT-qPCR. If the shipment of blood in tubes not containing RNA stabilizer is not performed under a stable condition, gene profile studies can be affected by the effects of transport. Moreover, also controlled temperature shipment (4°C) can influence the expression of specific genes if blood is collected in tubes not containing a stabilizer. The use of dedicated biomarkers or time course experiments should be performed in order to verify potential bias on gene expression analysis due to sample shipment and storage conditions. Alternatively, the use of RNA stabilizer containing tubes can represent a reliable option to avoid ex vivo RNA changes.