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Sample records for suspended single nanostructure

  1. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    of photoresist which is removed using oxygen ashing in a reactive ion etcher (RIE), with CHF3 plasma induced deposition of an fluorocarbon (FC) film acting as an antistiction coating. All in a single RIE sequence. The dry release process is contamination free and batch process compatible. Furthermore......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  2. Suspended graphene with periodic dimer nanostructure on Si cavities for surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Chia; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2017-04-01

    Periodic gold dimer nanoantennas on a one-atomic-layer graphene sheet elevated above Si cavities were fabricated to systematically study the effects of the cavity depth on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The periodic trend of Raman intensity as a function of the cavity depth resulting from the interference effect between the plasmonic resonance of the gold dimer and the cavity resonance of the underlying Si cavity was observed, and the electric field was greatly enhanced compared with the non-suspended system. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the suspended system and to verify the observed SERS response in experiments. Our work has the advantages of combining the superior properties of graphene with suspended metallic nanostructures to result in the enhanced electric field for SERS applications.

  3. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeRoy, B.J.; Lemay, S.G.; Kong, J.; Dekker, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Pt substrate with predefined trenches etched into it. Atomic resolution was obtained on the

  4. Enhanced non-volatile resistive switching in suspended single-crystalline ZnO nanowire with controllable multiple states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xuejiao; Feng, Zhihong; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching nanostructures are a promising candidate for next-generation non-volatile memories. In this report, we investigate the switching behaviors of single-crystalline ZnO nanowires suspended in air. They exhibit significantly higher current density, lower switching voltage, and more pronounced multiple conductance states compared to nanowires in direct contact with substrate. We attribute the effect to enhanced Joule heating efficiency, reduced surface scattering, and more significantly, the positive feedback established between the current density and local temperature in the suspended nanowires. The proposed mechanism has been quantitatively examined by finite element simulations. We have also demonstrated an innovative approach to initiating the current-temperature mutual enhancement through illumination by ultraviolet light, which further confirmed our hypothesis and enabled even greater enhancement. Our work provides further insight into the resistive switching mechanism of single-crystalline one-dimensional nanostructures, and suggests an effective means of performance enhancement and device optimization.

  5. Near bed suspended sediment flux by single turbulent events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahi, Seyed Mohammad; Kwoll, Eva; Winter, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The role of small scale single turbulent events in the vertical mixing of near bed suspended sediments was explored in a shallow shelf sea environment. High frequency velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC; calibrated from the backscatter intensity) were collected using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). Using quadrant analysis, the despiked velocity time series was divided into turbulent events and small background fluctuations. Reynolds stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) calculated from all velocity samples, were compared to the same turbulent statistics calculated only from velocity samples classified as turbulent events (Reevents and TKEevents). The comparison showed that Reevents and TKEevents was increased 3 and 1.6 times, respectively, when small background fluctuations were removed and that the correlation with SSC for TKE could be improved through removal of the latter. The correlation between instantaneous vertical turbulent flux (w ‧) and SSC fluctuations (SSC ‧) exhibits a tidal pattern with the maximum correlation at peak ebb and flood currents, when strong turbulent events appear. Individual turbulent events were characterized by type, strength, duration and length. Cumulative vertical turbulent sediment fluxes and average SSC associated with individual turbulent events were calculated. Over the tidal cycle, ejections and sweeps were the most dominant events, transporting 50% and 36% of the cumulative vertical turbulent event sediment flux, respectively. Although the contribution of outward interactions to the vertical turbulent event sediment flux was low (11%), single outward interaction events were capable of inducing similar SSC ‧ as sweep events. The results suggest that on time scales of tens of minutes to hours, TKE may be appropriate to quantify turbulence in sediment transport studies, but that event characteristics, particular the upward turbulent flux need to be accounted for when considering sediment transport

  6. Increased graphitization in electrospun single suspended carbon nanowires integrated with carbon-MEMS and carbon-NEMS platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Ashutosh; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Madou, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on carbon-MEMS (CMEMS) structures are fabricated by electrospinning of SU-8 photoresist followed by pyrolysis. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core-shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We suggest some tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters that may improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs, making them a good replacement for several carbon nanostructure-based devices. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. Propagation of plasmons in designed single crystalline silver nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Lu, Ying-Wei; Huck, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate propagation of plasmons in single crystalline silver nanostructures fabricated using a combination of a bottom-up and a top-down approach. Silver nanoplates of thickness around 65 nm and a surface area of about 100 μm2 are made using a wet chemical method. Silver nanotips and nanow......We demonstrate propagation of plasmons in single crystalline silver nanostructures fabricated using a combination of a bottom-up and a top-down approach. Silver nanoplates of thickness around 65 nm and a surface area of about 100 μm2 are made using a wet chemical method. Silver nanotips...

  8. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  9. Tellurite suspended nanowire surrounded with large holes for single-mode SC and THG generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meisong; Qin, Guanshi; Yan, Xin; Chaudhari, Chitrarekha; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2011-05-01

    For a suspended nanowire, the holes surrounding the core are expected to be as large as possible to propagate the light at wavelengths as long as possible. However, the fabrication of nanowire surrounded with large holes is still a challenge so far. In this paper, a method which involves pumping positive pressure of nitrogen gas in both the cane fabrication and fiber-drawing processes, is proposed. A suspended nanowire, with a core diameter of 480 nm and an unprecedented large diameter ratio of holey region to core (DRHC) of at least 62, is fabricated in the length of several hundred meters. Owing to the large holes, the confinement loss of the suspended nanowire is insignificant when the wavelength of light propagated in it is 1700 nm. Additionally, the tube-shaped glass cladding of the suspended nanowire shifts the singlemode cutoff wavelength to 810 nm, which is much shorter than the cutoff wavelength, 1070 nm, of a naked nanowire with the same diameter. A single-mode supercontinuum (SC) generation covering a wavelength range of 900-1600 nm is obtained under 1064 nm pump pulse with the peak power as low as 24 W. A single-mode third harmonic generation (THG) is observed by this nanowire under the pump of a 1557 nm femtosecond fiber laser. This work indicates that the suspended nanowire with large holes can provide high nonlinearity together with single-mode propagation, which leads to interesting applications in compact nonlinear devices.

  10. Microfabricated suspended island platform for the measurement of in-plane thermal conductivity of thin films and nanostructured materials with consideration of contact resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaie, Seyedhamidreza; Goettler, Drew F; Abbas, Khawar; Su, Mehmet F; Reinke, Charles M; El-Kady, Ihab; Leseman, Zayd C

    2013-10-01

    A technique based on suspended islands is described to measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of thin films and nano-structured materials, and is also employed for measurements of several samples with a single measurement platform. Using systematic steps for measurements, the characterization of the thermal resistances of a sample and its contacts are studied. The calibration of the contacts in this method is independent of the geometry, size, materials, and uniformity of contacts. To verify the technique, two different Si samples with different thicknesses and two samples of the same SiN(x) wafer are characterized on a single device. One of the Si samples is also characterized by another technique, which verifies the current results. Characterization of the two SiN(x) samples taken from the same wafer showed less than 1% difference in the measured thermal conductivities, indicating the precision of the method. Additionally, one of the SiN(x) samples is characterized and then demounted, remounted, and characterized for a second time. The comparison showed the change in the thermal resistance of the contact in multiple measurements could be as small as 0.2 K/μW, if a similar sample is used.

  11. Resonant tunnelling features in a suspended silicon nanowire single-hole transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, Jordi; Pérez-Murano, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Krali, Emiljana; Wang, Chen; Jones, Mervyn E.; Durrani, Zahid A. K., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es, E-mail: z.durrani@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arbiol, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); CELLS-ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-11-30

    Suspended silicon nanowires have significant potential for a broad spectrum of device applications. A suspended p-type Si nanowire incorporating Si nanocrystal quantum dots has been used to form a single-hole transistor. Transistor fabrication uses a novel and rapid process, based on focused gallium ion beam exposure and anisotropic wet etching, generating <10 nm nanocrystals inside suspended Si nanowires. Electrical characteristics at 10 K show Coulomb diamonds with charging energy ∼27 meV, associated with a single dominant nanocrystal. Resonant tunnelling features with energy spacing ∼10 meV are observed, parallel to both diamond edges. These may be associated either with excited states or hole–acoustic phonon interactions, in the nanocrystal. In the latter case, the energy spacing corresponds well with reported Raman spectroscopy results and phonon spectra calculations.

  12. Length-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Pereira, Luiz F C; Wang, Yu; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Kaiwen; Zhao, Xiangming; Bae, Sukang; Tinh Bui, Cong; Xie, Rongguo; Thong, John T L; Hong, Byung Hee; Loh, Kian Ping; Donadio, Davide; Li, Baowen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-04-16

    Graphene exhibits extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, and extremely high thermal conductivity. Being a very stable atomically thick membrane that can be suspended between two leads, graphene provides a perfect test platform for studying thermal conductivity in two-dimensional systems, which is of primary importance for phonon transport in low-dimensional materials. Here we report experimental measurements and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conduction in suspended single-layer graphene as a function of both temperature and sample length. Interestingly and in contrast to bulk materials, at 300 K, thermal conductivity keeps increasing and remains logarithmically divergent with sample length even for sample lengths much larger than the average phonon mean free path. This result is a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of phonons in graphene, and provides fundamental understanding of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials.

  13. nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. In the present study, we report the synthesis, characterization and application of nanostructured oxide materials. The oxide materials (Cu2O and ZnO) have been synthesized by electrolysis based oxidation and thermal oxidation methods. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanostructures have been synthesized by anodic ...

  14. Single-electron transport in graphene-like nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Kuei-Lin, E-mail: klc43@mit.edu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Xu, Yang, E-mail: yangxu-isee@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 (China)

    2017-01-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials for their versatile band structures and strictly 2D nature have attracted considerable attention over the past decade. Graphene is a robust material for spintronics owing to its weak spin–orbit and hyperfine interactions, while monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possess a Zeeman effect-like band splitting in which the spin and valley degrees of freedom are nondegenerate. The surface states of topological insulators (TIs) exhibit a spin–momentum locking that opens up the possibility of controlling the spin degree of freedom in the absence of an external magnetic field. Nanostructures made of these materials are also viable for use in quantum computing applications involving the superposition and entanglement of individual charge and spin quanta. In this article, we review a selection of transport studies addressing the confinement and manipulation of charges in nanostructures fabricated from various 2D materials. We supply the entry-level knowledge for this field by first introducing the fundamental properties of 2D bulk materials followed by the theoretical background relevant to the physics of nanostructures. Subsequently, a historical review of experimental development in this field is presented, from the early demonstration of graphene nanodevices on SiO{sub 2} substrate to more recent progress in utilizing hexagonal boron nitride to reduce substrate disorder. In the second part of this article, we extend our discussion to TMDs and TI nanostructures. We aim to outline the current challenges and suggest how future work will be geared towards developing spin qubits in 2D materials.

  15. Single-electron transport in graphene-like nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kuei-Lin; Xu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials for their versatile band structures and strictly 2D nature have attracted considerable attention over the past decade. Graphene is a robust material for spintronics owing to its weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, while monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possess a Zeeman effect-like band splitting in which the spin and valley degrees of freedom are nondegenerate. The surface states of topological insulators (TIs) exhibit a spin-momentum locking that opens up the possibility of controlling the spin degree of freedom in the absence of an external magnetic field. Nanostructures made of these materials are also viable for use in quantum computing applications involving the superposition and entanglement of individual charge and spin quanta. In this article, we review a selection of transport studies addressing the confinement and manipulation of charges in nanostructures fabricated from various 2D materials. We supply the entry-level knowledge for this field by first introducing the fundamental properties of 2D bulk materials followed by the theoretical background relevant to the physics of nanostructures. Subsequently, a historical review of experimental development in this field is presented, from the early demonstration of graphene nanodevices on SiO2 substrate to more recent progress in utilizing hexagonal boron nitride to reduce substrate disorder. In the second part of this article, we extend our discussion to TMDs and TI nanostructures. We aim to outline the current challenges and suggest how future work will be geared towards developing spin qubits in 2D materials.

  16. Nanoscale and femtosecond optical autocorrelator based on a single plasmonic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melentiev, P. N.; Afanasiev, A. E.; Tausenev, A. V.; Konyaschenko, A. V.; Klimov, V. V.; Balykin, V. I.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a nanoscale size, ultrafast and multiorder optical autocorrelator with a single plasmonic nanostructure for measuring the spatio-temporal dynamics of femtosecond laser light. As a nanostructure, we use a split hole resonator (SHR), which was made in an aluminium nanofilm. The Al material yields the fastest response time (100 as). The SHR nanostructure ensures a high nonlinear optical efficiency of the interaction with laser radiation, which leads to (1) the second, (2) the third harmonics generation and (3) the multiphoton luminescence, which, in turn, are used to perform multi-order autocorrelation measurements. The nano-sized SHR makes it possible to conduct autocorrelation measurements (i) with a subwavelength spatial resolution and (ii) with no significant influence on the duration of the laser pulse. The time response realized by the SHR nanostructure is about 10 fs.

  17. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phatak, C., E-mail: cd@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Knoop, L. de; Houdellier, F.; Gatel, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Université Paul Sabatier, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Hÿtch, M.J.; Masseboeuf, A. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2016-05-15

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Moreover the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures. - Highlights: • Novel method for tomography of 3D electromagnetic fields from a single image is presented. • The method relies upon using cylindrical symmetry and is applied to 1D nanostructures. • The 3D magnetic field of a Nickel nanowire is reconstructed. • The 3D electric field from a biased carbon cone nanotip is reconstructed. • Our method improves the quantitative measurement of the 3D electromagnetic fields.

  18. Performance Testing of a Magnetically Suspended Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Based on the Single Axis Air Bearing Table

    OpenAIRE

    Jiancheng Fang; Ning Yan; Huijuan Zhang; Peiling Cui

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the res...

  19. Thermal Conductivity in Nanostructured Films: From Single Cellulose Nanocrystals to Bulk Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairo A. Diaz; Zhijiang Ye; Xiawa Wu; Arden L. Moore; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini; Dylan J. Boday; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    We achieved a multiscale description of the thermal conductivity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from single CNCs (~­0.72−5.7 W m−1 K−1) to their organized nanostructured films (~­0.22−0.53 W m−1 K−1) using...

  20. Atom devices based on single dopants in silicon nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moraru, Daniel; Udhiarto, Arief; Anwar, Miftahul; Nowak, Roland; Jablonski, Ryszard; Hamid, Earfan; Tarido, Juli Cha; Mizuno, Takeshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we review our most recent studies on key atom devices with fundamental structures of silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs, such as single-dopant transistors, preliminary memory devices, single...

  1. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Akshay, E-mail: akshaykumar.tiet@gmail.com [Advanced Functional Materials lab, Department of Nanotechnology, Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fatehgarh Sahib-140406 Punjab (India); Kumar, Manjeet [Department of Materials Engineering, Defense Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Pune 411025 (India); Thakur, Anup [Material Science Research Lab, Department of basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University Patiala 147002 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  2. Low-Power Photothermal Probing of Single Plasmonic Nanostructures with Nanomechanical String Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Larsen, Peter Emil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct photothermal probing and mapping of single plasmonic nanostructures via the temperature-induced detuning of nanomechanical string resonators. Single Au nanoslits and nanorods are illuminated with a partially polarized focused laser beam (λ = 633 nm) with irradiances in t......). Our results show that nanomechanical resonators are a unique and robust analysis tool for the low-power investigation of thermoplasmonic effects in plasmonic hot spots....

  3. Research on modeling of the agile satellite using a single gimbal magnetically suspended CMG and the disturbance feedforward compensation for rotors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Peiling; Yan, Ning

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained...

  4. Plasmonic nano-protrusions: hierarchical nanostructures for single-molecule Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuray, Sagnik; Pathak, Avinash; Bok, Sangho; Chen, Biyan; Hamm, Steven C.; Mathai, Cherian J.; Guha, Suchismita; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2017-01-01

    Classical methods for enhancing the electromagnetic field from substrates for spectroscopic applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), have involved the generation of hotspots through directed self-assembly of nanoparticles or by patterning nanoscale features using expensive nanolithography techniques. A novel large-area, cost-effective soft lithographic technique involving glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of silver on polymer gratings is reported here. This method produces hierarchical nanostructures with high enhancement factors capable of analyzing single-molecule SERS. The uniform ordered and patterned nanostructures provide extraordinary field enhancements that serve as excitatory hotspots and are herein interrogated by SERS. The high spatial homogeneity of the Raman signal and signal enhancement over a large area from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2-naphthalenethiol demonstrated the uniformity of the hotspots. The enhancement was shown to have a critical dependence on the underlying nanostructure via the surface energy landscape and GLAD angles for a fixed deposition thickness, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy surface analysis of the substrate. The nanostructured surface leads to an extremely concentrated electromagnetic field at sharp nanoscale peaks, here referred to as ‘nano-protrusions’, due to the coupling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with localized SPR. These nano-protrusions act as hotspots which provide Raman enhancement factors as high as 108 over a comparable SAM on silver. Comparison of our substrate with the commercial substrate Klarite™ shows higher signal enhancement and minimal signal variation with hotspot spatial distribution. By using the proper plasmon resonance angle corresponding to the laser source wavelength, further enhancement in signal intensity can be achieved. Single-molecule Raman spectra for rhodamine 6G are obtained from the best SERS substrate (a

  5. Large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold: a hybrid plasmonic nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R Swathi; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Payne, Scott; Bradley, Michael; Borondics, Ferenc

    2014-06-24

    Graphene-based plasmonic devices have recently drawn great attention. However, practical limitations in fabrication and device architectures prevent studies from being carried out on the intrinsic properties of graphene and their change by plasmonic structures. The influence of a quasi-infinite object (i.e., the substrate) on graphene, being a single sheet of carbon atoms, and the plasmonic device is overwhelming. To address this and put the intrinsic properties of the graphene-plasmonic nanostructures in focus, we fabricate large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold (LFG-Au) sandwich structures and Au nanoparticle decorated graphene (formed via thermal treatment) hybrid plasmonic nanostructures. We observed two distinct plasmonic enhancement routes of graphene unique to each structure via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The localized electronic structure variation in the LFG due to graphene-Au interaction at the nanoscale is mapped using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. The measurements show an optical density of ∼0.007, which is the smallest experimentally determined for single-layer graphene thus far. Our results on freestanding graphene-Au plasmonic structures provide great insight for the rational design and future fabrication of graphene plasmonic hybrid nanostructures.

  6. Towards intrinsic graphene biosensor: A label-free, suspended single crystalline graphene sensor for multiplex lung cancer tumor markers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Cui, Tianhong

    2015-10-15

    Graphene biosensors reported so far are based on polycrystalline graphene flakes which are anchored on supporting substrates. The influence of grain boundary and the scattering from substrate drastically degrade the properties of graphene and conceal the performance of intrinsic graphene as a sensor. Here we report a label-free biosensor based on suspended single crystalline graphene (SCG), which can get rid of grain boundary and substrate scattering, revealing the biosensing mechanism of intrinsic graphene for the first time. Monolayer SCG flakes were derived from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method. Multiplex detection of three different lung cancer tumor markers was realized. The suspended structure can largely improve the sensitivity and detection limit (0.1 pg/ml) of the sensor, and the single crystalline nature of SCG enable the biosensor to have superior uniformity compared to polycrystalline ones. The SCG sensors exhibit superb specificity and large linear detection range from 1 pg/ml to 1 μg/ml, showing the prominent advantages of graphene as a sensing material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetostatic interaction of single NiFe nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar Azad, Mahmoud Reza; Kobs, Andre; Spahr, Hendrik; Beyersdorff, Bjoern; Stickler, Daniel; Froemter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The magneto-static interaction between submicron Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} rectangles with aspect ratio of two has been investigated by means of magnetotransport measurements using anisotropic magneto resistance (AMR). The structures have been carved into a Cr(10nm)/Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}(20nm)/Pt(2,5nm) trilayer utilizing a highly focused ion beam (FIB). The material surrounding the rectangles has been milled paramagnetic by applying a Ga{sup +}-ion dose of 6000 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}, which destroys ferromagnetism but guarantees an adequate electric conductivity. The contacting of the submicron rectangles was performed in situ via a tungsten tip attached to a micromanipulator. Microcircuit milled by FIB enables us to measure the magnetic behavior of one single element of an array of rectangles. Due to the high flexibility of our setup we could systematically vary the distance between the rectangles as well as the size. Besides determining the magnetic energy of the micro-magnetic states, i.e. the Landau state of an individual rectangle, we can measure the strength of the magneto-static interaction between the rectangles.

  8. Liquid-induced damping of mechanical feedback effects in single electron tunneling through a suspended carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, D. R.; Stiller, P. L.; Strunk, Ch.; Hüttel, A. K., E-mail: andreas.huettel@ur.de [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitätsstr. 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    In single electron tunneling through clean, suspended carbon nanotube devices at low temperature, distinct switching phenomena have regularly been observed. These can be explained via strong interaction of single electron tunneling and vibrational motion of the nanotube. We present measurements on a highly stable nanotube device, subsequently recorded in the vacuum chamber of a dilution refrigerator and immersed in the {sup 3}He/ {sup 4}He mixture of a second dilution refrigerator. The switching phenomena are absent when the sample is kept in the viscous liquid, additionally supporting the interpretation of dc-driven vibration. Transport measurements in liquid helium can thus be used for finite bias spectroscopy where otherwise the mechanical effects would dominate the current.

  9. Quantitative and Isolated Measurement of Far-Field Light Scattering by a Single Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyeong; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Jinhyung; Ee, Ho-Seok; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2017-11-01

    Light scattering by nanostructures has facilitated research on various optical phenomena and applications by interfacing the near fields and free-propagating radiation. However, direct quantitative measurement of far-field scattering by a single nanostructure on the wavelength scale or less is highly challenging. Conventional back-focal-plane imaging covers only a limited solid angle determined by the numerical aperture of the objectives and suffers from optical aberration and distortion. Here, we present a quantitative measurement of the differential far-field scattering cross section of a single nanostructure over the full hemisphere. In goniometer-based far-field scanning with a high signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 27.4 dB, weak scattering signals are efficiently isolated and detected under total-internal-reflection illumination. Systematic measurements reveal that the total and differential scattering cross sections of a Au nanorod are determined by the plasmonic Fabry-Perot resonances and the phase-matching conditions to the free-propagating radiation, respectively. We believe that our angle-resolved far-field measurement scheme provides a way to investigate and evaluate the physical properties and performance of nano-optical materials and phenomena.

  10. Large scale fabrication of nitrogen vacancy-embedded diamond nanostructures for single-photon source applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqing; Li, Wuxia; Tang, Chengchun; Chang, Yanchun; Hao, Tingting; Pan, Xinyu; Ye, Haitao; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2016-11-01

    Some color centers in diamond can serve as quantum bits which can be manipulated with microwave pulses and read out with laser, even at room temperature. However, the photon collection efficiency of bulk diamond is greatly reduced by refraction at the diamond/air interface. To address this issue, we fabricated arrays of diamond nanostructures, differing in both diameter and top end shape, with HSQ and Cr as the etching mask materials, aiming toward large scale fabrication of single-photon sources with enhanced collection efficiency made of nitrogen vacancy (NV) embedded diamond. With a mixture of O2 and CHF3 gas plasma, diamond pillars with diameters down to 45 nm were obtained. The top end shape evolution has been represented with a simple model. The tests of size dependent single-photon properties confirmed an improved single-photon collection efficiency enhancement, larger than tenfold, and a mild decrease of decoherence time with decreasing pillar diameter was observed as expected. These results provide useful information for future applications of nanostructured diamond as a single-photon source. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Plan of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0200402), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11574369, 11574368, 91323304, 11174362, and 51272278), and the FP7 Marie Curie Action (project No. 295208) sponsored by the European Commission.

  11. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-07-19

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie; Jin, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Huajie; Li, Di; Ma, Hongwei; Huang, Qing; Gothelf, Kurt V; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-01-16

    Self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures have shown great promise for bottom-up construction of complex objects with nanoscale addressability. Here we show that DNA origami-based 1D nanoribbons and nanotubes are one-pot assembled with controllable sizes and nanoscale addressability with high speed (within only 10-20 min), exhibiting extraordinarily high cooperativity that is often observed in assembly of natural molecular machines in cells (e.g. ribosome). By exploiting the high specificity of DNA-based self-assembly, we can precisely anchor proteins on these DNA origami nanostructures with sub-10 nm resolution and at the single-molecule level. We attach a pair of enzymes (horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase) at the inner side of DNA nanotubes and observe high coupling efficiency of enzyme cascade within this confined nanospace. Hence, DNA nanostructures with such unprecedented properties shed new light on the design of nanoscale bioreactors and nanomedicine and provide an artificial system for studying enzyme activities and cascade in highly organized and crowded cell-mimicking environments.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and formation mechanism of single-phase nanostructure bredigite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhadi, S.M., E-mail: Mirhadi@iaush.ac.ir [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, 86145-311, Shahreza, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavangarian, F.; Emadi, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Single-phase nanocrystalline bredigite powder was successfully synthesized by mechanical activation of talc, calcium carbonate, and amorphous silica powder mixture followed by annealing. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS),and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques were employed to characterize various powders. Single-phase nanostructure bredigite powder with crystallite size of about 65 nm was synthesized by 20 h of mechanical activation with subsequent annealing at 1200 Degree-Sign C for 1 h. The bredigite formation mechanism was studied. During the formation process of nanostructure bredigite powder some intermediate compounds such as wollastonite (CaSiO{sub 3}), larnite (Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), merwinite (Ca{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8}), and calcium magnesium silicate (Ca{sub 5}MgSi{sub 3}O{sub 12}) were formed. It was found that bredigite was not produced directly and that the formation of merwinite, enstatite and Ca{sub 5}MgSi{sub 3}O{sub 12}was unavoidable during the synthesis of bredigite. - Graphical abstract: This paper reports the successful synthesis of nanostructure bredigite powder by mechanical activation with subsequent annealing. The results showed that during the formation of bredigite powder some transition compounds such as wollastonite (CaSiO{sub 3}), larnite (Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), merwinite (Ca{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8}), and calcium magnesium silicate (Ca{sub 5}MgSi{sub 3}O{sub 12}) were formed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical activation improved the kinetics of bredigite formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism was suggested for the nanostructure bredigite formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During the formation of bredigite powder some intermediate compounds were formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanostructure bredigite powder had a mean crystallite

  14. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-16

    Technology, and Entrepreneurship , NST-4.3, San Diego, CA, August 2008. [10] J. E. Seo, T. J. Lee, K. W. Oh, M. M. Sung, J. W. Lee, W. Yi, H. Lee...T. Chen and J.-I, Chyi, Appl . Phys. Lett. 84, 2919 (2004). [30] J. L. Sauvajol, E. Anglaret, S. Rols and L. Alvarez, Car- bon 40, 1697 (2002). [31...Elastic strain of freely suspended single-wall carbon nanotube ropes. Appl Phys Lett. 1999;74(25):3803-5. [2] Tombler TW, Zhou C, Alexseyev L, Kong

  15. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines.

  16. Single crystalline nanostructures of topological crystalline insulator SnTe with distinct facets and morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Shao, S; Li, N; McCall, K; Wang, J; Zhang, S X

    2013-01-01

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) are a new class of topological materials that possess unique metallic surface states protected by crystalline mirror symmetry. Their topological surface properties are expected to strongly depend on the surface orientation. By combining density functional theory (DFT) calculations and synthesis experiments, we demonstrate the controlled growth of single crystalline nanostructures of the prototypical TCI SnTe with distinct facets and morphologies. Our calculations suggest that the excess energy of the {111} surfaces can be either higher or lower than that of the {100} surfaces, depending on the stoichiometry, while the {110} is always higher than the {100}. In our synthesis experiment, we qualitatively controlled the stoichiometry by tailoring the growth temperature and obtained two types of single crystalline nanowires: smooth nanowires dominated by {100} facets at high temperatures and zigzag nanowires composed of both {100} and {111} surfaces at low temperatures. Notably, there is no {110} facet in our nanostructures, strongly supporting the DFT calculations. Our device fabrication and electrical characterizations suggest that both types of nanowires are suitable for transport studies of topological surface states.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of orientational and spectral dynamics of single molecules in nanostructured host-guest materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christophe; Hellriegel, Christian; Platschek, Barbara; Wöhrle, Dieter; Bein, Thomas; Michaelis, Jens; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2007-05-02

    Nanostructured host-guest materials are important for various applications in nanoscience, and therefore, a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the guest molecules within the host matrix is needed. To this aim we used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to simultaneously examine the spectral and the orientational behavior of single molecules in nanostructured porous host materials. Two types of host-guest systems have been investigated. First, oxazine-1 dye molecules were fixed rigidly in the channels of microporous AlPO4-5 crystals. Second, it was shown that terrylenediimide (TDI) dye molecules move in the mesoporous network of an uncalcined M41S thin film. In the first sample both spectral fluctuations ( approximately 5 nm) and rare spectral jumps (>10 nm) of the emission maximum were observed. However, the orientation of the emission dipole of the dye molecules remained constant. In contrast, the second system showed orientational dynamics as well as substantially more spectral dynamics. In this system the molecules were found to move between different regions in the host. The typical motion of the TDI molecules in the pores of M41S was not continuous but characterized by jumps between specific sites. Moreover, the spectral and orientational dynamics were correlated and arose directly from the different environments that were being explored by the mobile molecule.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Suspended in Different Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Dong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antibacterial activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions of sodium cholate, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Among the three surfactants, sodium cholate demonstrated the weakest antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecium and thereby was used to disperse bundled SWCNTs in order to study nanotube antibiotic activity. SWCNTs exhibited antibacterial characteristics for both S. enterica and E. coli. With the increase of nanotube concentrations from 0.3 mg/mL to 1.5 mg/mL, the growth curves had plateaus at lower absorbance values whereas the absorbance value was not obviously affected by the incubation ranging from 5 min to 2 h. Our findings indicate that carbon nanotubes could become an effective alternative to antibiotics in dealing with drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains because of the physical mode of bactericidal action that SWCNTs display.

  19. Mechanical properties of single nanostructures investigated by in-situ AFM and micro-XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, Thomas; Scheler, Thomas; Magalhaes-Paniago, Rogerio; Metzger, Till Hartmut [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, nanostructures attracted enormous attention due to size-effects influencing the structural, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of materials with low dimensions. Concerning the mechanical properties mainly the plastic regime was explored showing a trend that ''smaller is stronger''. In contrast, studies of the elastic behaviour of nanowires revealed contradictory results concerning the influence of size-effects on the elasticity. To investigate single nanoobjects in the elastic regime, we combined an in-situ AFM with XRD in a microfocused beam. The AFM is used to image the sample surface, to select an individual nanostructure, and to apply pressure on a chosen object. Due to the interaction between the AFM-tip and the compressed object the resonance frequency of the AFM force sensor shifts to larger values enabling us to derive the stiffness of the contact area. Simultaneous to the pressure application, XRD images around a pre-defined Bragg peak are recorded. These images allow for the determination of the elastic lattice parameter change in-situ. From the contact stiffness and the lattice parameter change, the Young modulus of an individual nanoobject is derived. Here, we present results both for SiGe islands grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on Si wafers and GaAs nanorods created by selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrates.

  20. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  1. Research on Modeling of the Agile Satellite Using a Single Gimbal Magnetically Suspended CMG and the Disturbance Feedforward Compensation for Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnetically suspended Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG has the advantages of long-life, micro-vibration and being non-lubricating, and is the ideal actuator for agile maneuver satellite attitude control. However, the stability of the rotor in magnetic bearing and the precision of the output torque of a magnetically suspended CMG are affected by the rapid maneuvers of satellites. In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained. The feedforward compensation control method is used to depress the disturbance on the rotor. Simulation results are given to show that the rotor displacement is obviously reduced.

  2. Performance Testing of a Magnetically Suspended Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Based on the Single Axis Air Bearing Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Fang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG, a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10−3°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs.

  3. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  4. Fabricating two-dimensional nanostructured tellurium thin films via pyrolyzing a single-source molecular precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shun, E-mail: shunwang@wzu.edu.c [Nano-materials and Chemistry Key Laboratory, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325027 (China); Wen Haihong; Guan Weipeng; Zhang Lijie; Ma Dekun; Huang Shaoming [Nano-materials and Chemistry Key Laboratory, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325027 (China); Wang Jichang, E-mail: jwang@uwindsor.c [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, ON, Canada N9B 3P4 (Canada)

    2010-05-31

    A simple route to fabricate tellurium (Te) thin film with a well-defined two-dimensional nanostructure is presented in this study. The method involves dip-coating and subsequently pyrolyzing a single-source molecular precursor diethyldithiocarbamato tellurium (TDEC) onto a glass substrate. The pyrolysis temperature and the initial thickness (d) of TDEC film exhibited strong influence on the morphology of Te film, where films composed of uniform Te nanoflakes have been obtained at 440 {sup o}C and d {approx} 490 nm. Investigations on the thermodynamic properties of TDEC through thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry techniques suggest that the production of Te from TDEC features random and continuous nucleation, shedding light on the possible growth mechanism of the two-dimensional Te film.

  5. Single Silver Adatoms on Nanostructured Manganese Oxide Surfaces: Boosting Oxygen Activation for Benzene Abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Ma, Zhen; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2017-02-21

    The involvement of a great amount of active oxygen species is a crucial requirement for catalytic oxidation of benzene, because complete mineralization of one benzene molecule needs 15 oxygen atoms. Here, we disperse single silver adatoms on nanostructured hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) surfaces by using a thermal diffusion method. The single-atom silver catalyst (Ag1/HMO) shows high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation, and 100% conversion is achieved at 220 °C at a high space velocity of 23 000 h(-1). The Mars-van Krevelen mechanism is valid in our case as the reaction orders for both benzene and O2 approach one, according to reaction kinetics data. Data from H2 temperature-programmed reduction and O core-level X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) reveal that Ag1/HMO possesses a great amount of active surface lattice oxygen available for benzene oxidation. Valence-band XPS and density functional theoretical calculations demonstrate that the single Ag adatoms have the upshifted 4d orbitals, thus facilitating the activation of gaseous oxygen. Therefore, the excellent activation abilities of Ag1/HMO toward both surface lattice oxygen and gaseous oxygen account for its high catalytic activity in benzene oxidation. This work may assist with the rational design of efficient metal-oxide catalysts for the abatement of volatile organic compounds such as benzene.

  6. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; de Jong, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325844208; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric

  7. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  8. Suspended microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jean BERTHIER; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale...

  9. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  10. Systematic Investigation of Controlled Nanostructuring of Mn 12 Single-Molecule Magnets Templated by Metal–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulakh, Darpandeep [Department of Chemistry; amp, Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York 13699, United States; Xie, Haomiao [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77845, United States; Shen, Zhe [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77845, United States; Harley, Alexander [Department of Chemistry; amp, Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York 13699, United States; Zhang, Xuan [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Yakovenko, Andrey A. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Dunbar, Kim R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77845, United States; Wriedt, Mario [Department of Chemistry; amp, Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York 13699, United States

    2017-05-25

    This is the first systematic study exploring metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) as platforms for the controlled nanostructuring of molecular magnets. We report the incorporation of seven single-molecule magnets (SMMs) of general composition [Mn12O12(O2CR)16(OH2)4], with R = CF3 (1), (CH3)CCH2 (2), CH2Cl (3), CH2Br (4), CHCl2 (5), CH2But (6), and C6H5 (7), into the hexagonal channel pores of a mesoporous MOF host. The resulting nanostructured composites combine the key SMM properties with the functional properties of the MOF. Synchrotron-based powder diffraction with difference envelope density analysis, physisorption analysis (surface area and pore size distribution), and thermal analyses reveal that the well-ordered hexagonal structure of the host framework is preserved, and magnetic measurements indicate that slow relaxation of the magnetization, characteristic of the corresponding Mn12 derivative guests, occurs inside the MOF pores. Structural host–guest correlations including the bulkiness and polarity of peripheral SMM ligands are discussed as fundamental parameters influencing the global SMM@MOF loading capacities. These results demonstrate that employing MOFs as platforms for the nanostructuration of SMMs is not limited to a particular host–guest system but potentially applicable to a multitude of other molecular magnets. Such fundamental findings will assist in paving the way for the development of novel advanced spintronic devices.

  11. Systematic Investigation of Controlled Nanostructuring of Mn12 Single-Molecule Magnets Templated by Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Darpandeep; Xie, Haomiao; Shen, Zhe; Harley, Alexander; Zhang, Xuan; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Dunbar, Kim R; Wriedt, Mario

    2017-06-19

    This is the first systematic study exploring metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as platforms for the controlled nanostructuring of molecular magnets. We report the incorporation of seven single-molecule magnets (SMMs) of general composition [Mn12O12(O2CR)16(OH2)4], with R = CF3 (1), (CH3)CCH2 (2), CH2Cl (3), CH2Br (4), CHCl2 (5), CH2Bu(t) (6), and C6H5 (7), into the hexagonal channel pores of a mesoporous MOF host. The resulting nanostructured composites combine the key SMM properties with the functional properties of the MOF. Synchrotron-based powder diffraction with difference envelope density analysis, physisorption analysis (surface area and pore size distribution), and thermal analyses reveal that the well-ordered hexagonal structure of the host framework is preserved, and magnetic measurements indicate that slow relaxation of the magnetization, characteristic of the corresponding Mn12 derivative guests, occurs inside the MOF pores. Structural host-guest correlations including the bulkiness and polarity of peripheral SMM ligands are discussed as fundamental parameters influencing the global SMM@MOF loading capacities. These results demonstrate that employing MOFs as platforms for the nanostructuration of SMMs is not limited to a particular host-guest system but potentially applicable to a multitude of other molecular magnets. Such fundamental findings will assist in paving the way for the development of novel advanced spintronic devices.

  12. Detection of a single synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticle with an AMR nanostructure: Comparison between simulations and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, M.; Gobbi, M.; Cantoni, M.

    2010-01-01

    The depinning field of a domain wall in a permalloy nanostructure can be used to detect the presence of a magnetic particle. In this device the displacement of the domain wall in a sweeping magnetic field produces a variation of the voltage drop across a corner due to the anisotropic...

  13. Exploring Nanostructure Arrays for Single-Cell and Subcellular Manipulation and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Månson, Nina

    these, arrays of vertical nanostructures (NSs) with submicron diametersand microscale lengths are particularly promising and are currently being established as bothhighly sensitive protein arrays and as platforms for manipulations and investigations at thesingle-cell or even subcellular level.To date...

  14. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    (within only 10-20 min), exhibiting extraordinarily high cooperativity that is often observed in assembly of natural molecular machines in cells (e.g. ribosome). By exploiting the high specificity of DNA-based self-assembly, we can precisely anchor proteins on these DNA origami nanostructures with sub-10...

  15. Plasmon Mapping in Metallic Nanostructures and its Application to Single Molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering: Imaging Electromagnetic Hot-Spots and Analyte Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camden, Jon P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-12

    A major component of this proposal is to elucidate the connection between optical and electron excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. These accomplishments are reported: developed a routine protocol for obtaining spatially resolved, low energy EELS spectra, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra from the same nanostructures; correlated optical scattering spectra and plasmon maps obtained using STEM/EELS; and imaged electromagnetic hot spots responsible for single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS).

  16. Facile and green fabrication of organic single-crystal hollow micro/nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun; Chen Yingzhi; Ou Xuemei; Zhang Xiaohong [Nano-organic Photoelectronic Laboratory and Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Optoelectronic Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Xiujuan, E-mail: xjzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: xhzhang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Under high humidity and appropriate temperature, tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) solid micro/nanostructures may be etched into hollow structures and still retain their crystalline structures and surface morphologies. The shapes and sizes of the hollow structures are easily adjusted by varying the experimental parameters. Throughout the entire process, water is introduced into the system instead of organic or corrosive solvents, making this method convenient and environmentally friendly; it can also be extended to application in other materials such as TCNQ.

  17. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  18. Nanostructuring on zinc phthalocyanine thin films for single-junction organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Dhirendra K.; Kumar, Lokendra, E-mail: lokendrakr@allduniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211 002 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Vertically aligned and random oriented crystalline molecular nanorods of organic semiconducting Zinc Phthalocyanine (ZnPc) have been grown on ITO coated glass substrate using solvent volatilization method. Interesting changes in surface morphology were observed under different solvent treatment. Vertically aligned nanorods of ZnPc thin film were observed in the films treated with acetone, where as the random oriented nanorods were observed in the films treated with chloroform. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used for characterization of nanostructures. The optical properties of the nanorods have been investigated by UV-Vis. absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  20. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Nedil, Mourad; Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J.; Bentouaf, Ali; Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO2 laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p-n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I- V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm-2, and a fill factor of ˜35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  1. Phase manipulation of Goos–Hänchen shifts in a single-layer of graphene nanostructure under strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss the phase management of Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of a probe light through a cavity with a single-layer graphene nanostructure under a strong magnetic field. By using the quantum mechanical density matrix formalism we study the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. It is realized that negative or positive GH shifts can be achieved simultaneously by tuning some controllable parameters such as relative phase and the Rabi frequency of the applied fields. Moreover, the thickness effect of the cavity structure is considered as an effective parameter for adjusting the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. We find that by choosing suitable parameters, a maximum negative shift of 4.5 mm and positive shift of 5.4 mm are possible for GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light. Our proposed model may be useful for developing all-optical devices in the infrared region.

  2. Strength and Fracture Mechanisms of Nanostructured Metallic Materials Under Single Kinds of Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevtsov, G. V.; Valiev, R. Z.; Klevtsova, N. A.; Zaripov, N. G.; Karavaeva, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of nanostructuring on the strength and fracture mechanism of materials possessing different crystal lattices is analyzed on the basis of available reports and experimental data of the authors. The structure, the hardness, the crack resistance, and the strength and ductility characteristics of steel 10 (bcc lattice), aluminum alloy AK4-1 (fcc lattice), austenitic steel AISI 321 (fcc lattice) are studied after equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and those of Grade 4 titanium (hcp lattice) are studied after a ECAP-conform process (ECAP-C). It is shown that the ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure produced by the ECAP affects ambiguously the static crack resistance of the materials studied. The type of the crystal lattice influences substantially the temperature behavior of the impact toughness of the studied materials with UFG structure.

  3. Single-Cell Optical Distortion Correction and Label-Free 3D Cell Shape Reconstruction on Lattices of Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Jürgen; Keber, Felix; Stierle, Valentin; Rädler, Joachim O; Paulitschke, Philipp

    2017-12-13

    Imaging techniques can be compromised by aberrations. Especially when imaging through biological specimens, sample-induced distortions can limit localization accuracy. In particular, this phenomenon affects localization microscopy, traction force measurements, and single-particle tracking, which offer high-resolution insights into biological tissue. Here we present a method for quantifying and correcting the optical distortions induced by single, adherent, living cells. The technique uses periodically patterned gold nanostructures as a reference framework to quantify optically induced displacements with micrometer-scale sampling density and an accuracy of a few nanometers. The 3D cell shape and a simplified geometrical optics approach are then utilized to remap the microscope image. Our experiments reveal displacements of up to several hundred nanometers, and in corrected images these distortions are reduced by a factor of 3. Conversely, the relationship between cell shape and distortion provides a novel method of 3D cell shape reconstruction from a single image, enabling label-free 3D cell analysis.

  4. Block copolymer systems: from single chain to self-assembled nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Cristiano; Schmidt, Vanessa; Aissou, Karim; Borsali, Redouane

    2010-10-19

    Recent advances in the field of macromolecular engineering applied to the fabrication of nanostructured materials using block copolymer chains as elementary building blocks are described in this feature article. By highlighting some of our work in the area and accounting for the contribution of other groups, we discuss the relationship between the physical-chemical properties of copolymer chains and the characteristics of nano-objects originating from their self-assembly in solution and in bulk, with emphasis on convenient strategies that allow for the control of composition, functionality, and topology at different levels of sophistication. In the case of micellar nanoparticles in solution, in particular, we present approaches leading to morphology selection via macromolecular architectural design, the functionalization of external solvent-philic shells with biomolecules (polysaccharides and proteins), and the maximization of micelle loading capacity by the suitable choice of solvent-phobic polymer segments. The fabrication of nanomaterials mediated by thin block copolymer films is also discussed. In this case, we emphasize the development of novel polymer chain manipulation strategies that ultimately allow for the preparation of precisely positioned nanodomains with a reduced number of defects via block-selective chemical reactivity. The challenges facing the soft matter community, the urgent demand to convert huge public and private investments into consumer products, and future possible directions in the field are also considered herein.

  5. Gain-assisted U-shaped Au nanostructure for ultrahigh sensitivity single molecule detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Jiang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    We report an efficient gain-assisted U-shaped Au nanostructure for ultrahigh sensitivity single-molecule detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) amplification property and SERS characteristics of the proposed nanosystem are numerically analyzed by the finite-element method (FEM). The calculations show that the LSPR strength and the local electric field intensity of the active nanosystem can be greatly amplified when the nanosystem reaches its spaser threshold (k thre). Furthermore, the maximum SERS enhancement factor of the nanosystem is as high as 4.7 × 1017 on the Au surface areas and 5.8 × 1018 in volume, respectively. Moreover, there is a high SERS enhancement factor of 1014-1017 on the entire surface of the active nanosystem, which is sufficient for single-molecule detection. Finally, the plasmon hybridization theory and effective LC circuit are used to qualitatively illustrate the red-shift of the resonance wavelength by increasing the geometric parameter W 2.

  6. Synthesis of anisotropic CdS nanostructures via a single-source route

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rajasekhar Pullabhotla, VSR

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A cadmium tetrahydroisoquinoline dithiocarbamate (DTC) complex has been used as single-source precursor for the synthesis of highly faceted hexadecylamine (HDA) capped CdS nanoparticles. Hexagonal and close to cubic shaped particles with distinct...

  7. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on the behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the electrophoresis cells and aligned growth of SWCNTs by thermal chemical vapor deposition on selectively deposited metallic nanoparticle...

  8. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems including...

  9. A single-stranded architecture for cotranscriptional folding of RNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geary, Cody; Rothemund, Paul; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    . We introduce an architecture for designing artificial RNA structures that fold from a single strand, in which arrays of antiparallel RNA helices are precisely organized by RNA tertiary motifs and a new type of crossover pattern. We constructed RNA tiles that assemble into hexagonal lattices...

  10. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site.

  11. Initial Metallization and Transition Metal Diffusion in ZnO Single Crystals, CVD-Grown Films, and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalinic, Senia; Rangan, Sylvie; Gateau, Rodney; Wu, Pan; Lu, Yicheng; Bartynski, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Transition metal doped ZnO is a promising candidate room temperature dilute magnetic semiconductor for spintronic applications. In previous studies indicate Fe or Mn dopants exhibit significantly different diffusion properties in ZnO. To explore whether this is an inherent property of ZnO or if it is related to non-ideal aspects of the films or nanostructures, we have studied the initial stages of Mn, Fe, and Cu metallization of the single crystal ZnO(0001)[Zn-terminated] and (11-20) surfaces, as well as MOCVD-grown epitaxial a-plane films using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). While deposited Cu forms well defined islands, all three surfaces exhibit substantial disruption upon Fe deposition, including significant change in terrace widths and a markedly smaller fraction of atomic height steps. Upon annealing, Cu islands become mobile and coarsen, but the underlying ZnO structure is not strongly affected. Annealing with Fe on the surface, significant coarsening and roughening of the substrate occurs even at the modest annealing temperature of 200C, and this effect is enhanced upon annealing to 400 C. Initial results suggest that uptake of metals into the epi-film is predominantly determined by the properties of the (11-20) surface that terminates the film.

  12. Mechanical properties and formation mechanisms of a wire of single gold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Bahn, Sune Rastad; Agrait, N.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope supplemented with a force sensor is used to study the mechanical properties of a novel metallic nanostructure: a freely suspended chain of single gold atoms. We find that the bond strength of the nanowire is about twice that of a bulk metallic bond. We perform ab i...

  13. Fabrication of high-resolution nanostructures of complex geometry by the single-spot nanolithography method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Samardak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for the high-resolution production of polymer nanopatterns with controllable geometrical parameters by means of a single-spot electron-beam lithography technique. The essence of the method entails the overexposure of a positive-tone resist, spin-coated onto a substrate where nanoscale spots are exposed to an electron beam with a dose greater than 0.1 pC per dot. A single-spot enables the fabrication of a nanoring, while a chain of spots placed at distance of 5–30 nm from each other allows the production of a polymer pattern of complex geometry of sub-10 nm resolution. We demonstrate that in addition to the naturally oxidized silicon substrates, gold-coated substrates can also successfully be used for the single-spot nanopattering technique. An explanation of the results related to the resist overexposure was demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our nanofabrication method significantly accelerates (up to 10 times the fabrication rate as compared to conventional lithography on positive-tone resist. This technique can be potentially employed in the electronics industry for the production of nanoprinted lithography molds, etching masks, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, NEMS and MEMS devices.

  14. Single-step fabrication of electrodes with controlled nanostructured surface roughness using optically-induced electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Li, M.; Liu, L.; Yang, Y.; Mai, J.; Pu, H.; Sun, Y.; Li, W. J.

    2018-02-01

    The customized fabrication of microelectrodes from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has attracted much attention due to their numerous applications in chemistry and biomedical engineering, such as for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and as catalyst sites for electrochemistry. Herein, we present a novel optically-induced electrodeposition (OED) method for rapidly fabricating gold electrodes which are also surface-modified with nanoparticles in one single step. The electrodeposition mechanism, with respect to the applied AC voltage signal and the elapsed deposition time, on the resulting morphology and particle sizes was investigated. The results from SEM and AFM analysis demonstrated that 80–200 nm gold particles can be formed on the surface of the gold electrodes. Simultaneously, both the size of the nanoparticles and the roughness of the fabricated electrodes can be regulated by the deposition time. Compared to state-of-the-art methods for fabricating microelectrodes with AuNPs, such as nano-seed-mediated growth and conventional electrodeposition, this OED technique has several advantages including: (1) electrode fabrication and surface modification using nanoparticles are completed in a single step, eliminating the need for prefabricating micro electrodes; (2) the patterning of electrodes is defined using a digitally-customized, projected optical image rather than using fixed physical masks; and (3) both the fabrication and surface modification processes are rapid, and the entire fabrication process only requires less than 6 s.

  15. Solution-phase epitaxial growth of noble metal nanostructures on dispersible single-layer molybdenum disulfide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Mengfei; Qi, Xiaoying; Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2013-02-05

    Compared with the conventional deposition techniques used for the epitaxial growth of metallic structures on a bulk substrate, wet-chemical synthesis based on the dispersible template offers several advantages, including relatively low cost, high throughput, and the capability to prepare metal nanostructures with controllable size and morphology. Here we demonstrate that the solution-processable two-dimensional MoS(2) nanosheet can be used to direct the epitaxial growth of Pd, Pt and Ag nanostructures at ambient conditions. These nanostructures show the major (111) and (101) orientations on the MoS(2)(001) surface. Importantly, the Pt-MoS(2) hybrid nanomaterials exhibit much higher electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction compared with the commercial Pt catalysts with the same Pt loading. We believe that nanosheet-templated epitaxial growth of nanostructures via wet-chemical reaction is a promising strategy towards the facile and high-yield production of novel functional materials.

  16. Impacts of Coulomb Interactions on the Magnetic Responses of Excitonic Complexes in Single Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Ying-Jhe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the diamagnetic responses of different exciton complexes in single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs and quantum rings (QRs. For QDs, the imbalanced magnetic responses of inter-particle Coulomb interactions play a crucial role in the diamagnetic shifts of excitons (X, biexcitons (XX, and positive trions (X−. For negative trions (X− in QDs, anomalous magnetic responses are observed, which cannot be described by the conventional quadratic energy shift with the magnetic field. The anomalous behavior is attributed to the apparent change in the electron wave function extent after photon emission due to the strong Coulomb attraction by the hole in its initial state. In QRs, the diamagnetic responses of X and XX also show different behaviors. Unlike QDs, the diamagnetic shift of XX in QRs is considerably larger than that of X. The inherent structural asymmetry combined with the inter-particle Coulomb interactions makes the wave function distribution of XX very different from that of X in QRs. Our results suggest that the phase coherence of XX in QRs may survive from the wave function localization due to the structural asymmetry or imperfections.

  17. Single- and Multilayered Nanostructures via Laser-Induced Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Pawel; Yager, Kevin; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles

    We present a novel method of accelerated self-assembly of block copolymer thin films utilizing laser light, called Laser Zone Annealing (LZA). In our approach, steep temperature transients are induced in block copolymer films by rastering narrowly focused laser line over the light-absorbing substrate. Extremely steep temperature gradients accelerate the process of self-assembly by several orders-of-magnitude compared to conventional oven annealing, and, when coupled to photo-thermal shearing, lead to global alignment of block copolymer domains assessed by GISXAS diffraction studies and real-space SEM imaging. We demonstrate monolithic alignment of various block-copolymer thin films including PS-b-PMMA, PS-b-PEO, PS-b-P2VP, PS-b-PI and observe different responsiveness to the shearing rate depending on the characteristic relaxation timescale of the particular material. Subsequently, we use the aligned polymeric films as templates for synthesis of single- and multi-layered arrays of inorganic, metallic or semiconducting nanowires and nanomeshes and investigate their anisotropic electro-optical properties. Research carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  18. Growth and mechanisms of enamel-like hierarchical nanostructures on single crystalline hydroxyapatite micro-ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guobin; Liu, Xiang Yang; Wang, Mu

    2011-06-01

    In vitro growth of enamel-like microstructured hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals is highly expected for developing novel biomaterials/scaffolds. It is also essential for a clearer understanding of in vivo biomineralization process. In this paper, hierarchical HAP structures are controllably fabricated by growth of nanocrystals on single crystalline micro-ribbon substrates in vitro at biophysical conditions. HAP crystals grown on the substrate change from disordered aggregations of nano-flakes to well-oriented nano-needles, branched bundles of nano-needles, and finally highly porous aggregates, with increase of F- concentrations. The flexibility of the size, morphology, and microstructure control highlights a method to produce hierarchical HAP structures for potential applications in dental restoration or bone implant. We demonstrate that the mutual effects of F- on the crystallinity of HAP and on the supersaturation of the solutions control the morphology and assembly properties of the products. Moreover, the products excellently mimic real tooth enamel structures formed with different F- intakes. The work represents an appropriate simplified model system for an in-depth understanding of the microscopic mechanisms of the effects of F- on enamel growth, and the relationship of enamel microstructures and dental diseases.

  19. Single potential electrodeposition of nanostructured battery materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, James Matthew

    different sizes, shapes, and surface areas. This is advantageous because high surface area materials benefit from improved kinetics for solid state transformations and from decreases in mechanical degradation that occurs during the lithiation and delithiation of battery materials. Intermetallic materials are an alternative to conventional anode materials because they have high capacities and react reversibly with lithium at potentials that hinder the dendrite formation of metallic lithium. Unfortunately, the volume expansion associated with the lithiation and delithiation of intermetallic materials is usually large (over 300%). With this in mind a procedure for the electrodeposition of Cu2Sb from aqueous solutions was developed and is presented in this thesis. Cu2Sb is an intermetallic that lithiates at potentials more positive than the potential needed to plate lithium metal, and has a volume expansion less than 100%. Electrodeposition of an intermetallic with a relatively small volume expansion and with high surface area morphology should dramatically reduce material degradation during battery cycling, thus promoting the life of the material. To electrodeposit Cu2Sb from aqueous solutions, soluble salts of Cu2+ and Sb3+ were needed. There are many Cu2+ salts that are highly soluble in water, but most Sb 3+ salts cause formation of Sb2O3 in aqueous solutions. To obtain Sb3+ in aqueous solutions, citric acid was used as a complexing agent. The results presented in this dissertation show that solution speciation plays an important role in the electrochemistry of aqueous citrate solutions of both copper and antimony. The cyclic voltammograms (CVs) presented here show that the reduction potential of Cu2+ shifted in the negative direction and the reduction potential of Sb 3+ shifted in the positive direction with an increase in pH. Also, Cu2Sb films were deposited at a single potential (-1050 mV vs. SSCE) from aqueous solutions at pH 6. We determined that the deposition

  20. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Peter J; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-04-01

    'Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation' is a new concept for attempting resuscitation from cardiac arrest of patients who currently (totally or temporarily) cannot be resuscitated, such as traumatic exsanguination cardiac arrest. Suspended animation means preservation of the viability of brain and organism during cardiac arrest, until restoration of stable spontaneous circulation or prolonged artificial circulation is possible. Suspended animation for exsanguination cardiac arrest of trauma victims would have to be induced within the critical first 5 min after the start of cardiac arrest no-flow, to buy time for transport and resuscitative surgery (hemostasis) performed during no-flow. Cardiac arrest is then reversed with all-out resuscitation, usually requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Suspended animation has been explored and documented as effective in dogs in terms of long-term survival without brain damage after very prolonged cardiac arrest. In the 1990s, the Pittsburgh group achieved survival without brain damage in dogs after cardiac arrest of up to 90 min no-flow at brain (tympanic) temperature of 10 degrees C, with functionally and histologically normal brains. These studies used emergency cardiopulmonary bypass with heat exchanger or a single hypothermic saline flush into the aorta, which proved superior to pharmacologic strategies. For the large number of normovolemic sudden cardiac death victims, which currently cannot be resuscitated, more research in large animals is needed.

  1. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Jamie E. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Weaver, Brad D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Helenic, Alysha R.; Landi, Brian J. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Chris M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A.; Cox, Nathanael D. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV {sup 11}B{sup +} and 150 keV {sup 31}P{sup +} with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G Prime band peak intensities (D/G Prime ) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G Prime ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using 35 keV C{sup +} ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  2. Electron transport and room temperature single-electron charging in 10 nm scale PtC nanostructures formed by electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Z. A. K.; Jones, M. E.; Wang, C.; Scotuzzi, M.; Hagen, C. W.

    2017-11-01

    Nanostructures of platinum-carbon nanocomposite material have been formed by electron-beam induced deposition. These consist of nanodots and nanowires with a minimum size ∼20 nm, integrated within ∼100 nm nanogap n-type silicon-on-insulator transistor structures. The nanodot transistors use ∼20 nm Pt/C nanodots, tunnel-coupled to Pt/C nanowire electrodes, bridging the Si nanogaps. Room-temperature single-electron transistor operation has been measured, and single-electron current oscillations and ‘Coulomb diamonds’ observed. In nanowire transistors, the temperature dependence from 290 to 8 K suggests that the current is a combination of thermally activated and tunnelling transport of carriers across potential barriers along the current path, and that the Pt/C is p-type at low temperature.

  3. A suspended core nanofiber with unprecedented large diameter ratio of holey region to core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meisong; Chaudhari, Chitrarekha; Yan, Xin; Qin, Guanshi; Kito, Chihiro; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2010-04-26

    For a suspended core nanofiber, the holey region is expected to be as large as possible to propagate the light at wavelengths as long as possible. Additionally, a large holey region is significant for its applications in sensors. However, the fabrication of nanofiber with large holey region is still a challenge so far. In this paper a method, which involves pumping positive pressure of nitrogen gas in both the cane fabrication and fiber-drawing processes, was proposed. A suspended core nanofiber, with a core diameter of around 480 nm and an unprecedented diameter ratio of holey region to core (DRHC) of at least 62, was fabricated in the length of several hundred meters. Owing to the large holey region, the confinement loss of the suspended core nanofiber is insignificant when the wavelength of light propagated in it is 1700 nm. For this fabrication technique, the nanowire length, fabrication efficiency, and the uniformity in the diameter are much superior to those of the nanowires fabricated in other ways. Finally, single mode third harmonic generation was observed by this nanofiber under the pump of a 1557 nm femtosecond fiber laser. This work shows the prospect of fabrication of nanostructured waveguide in glass materials by an inflation technique.

  4. Facile synthesis of hydrangea flower-like hierarchical gold nanostructures with tunable surface topographies for single-particle surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C Y; Zhou, N; Yang, B Y; Yang, Y J; Wang, L H

    2015-10-28

    The physicochemical properties of noble metal nanocrystals depend strongly on their size and shape, and it is becoming clear that the design and facile synthesis of particular nanostructures with tailored shape and size is especially important. Herein a novel class of hydrangea flower-like hierarchical gold nanostructures with tunable surface topographies and optical properties are prepared for the first time by a facile, one-pot, seedless synthesis using ascorbic acid (AA) to reduce hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4) in the presence of (1-hexadecyl)trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The morphologies of the synthesized gold nanoflowers are controlled and fine-tuned by varying the synthetic conditions such as the concentration of reagents and the growth temperature. Due to their unique hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) structures with rich hot spots, these gold nanoflowers exhibit an efficient performance in single-particle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The work stands out as an interesting approach for anisotropic particle synthesis and morphological control, and the proposed novel, hierarchical gold nanoflowers have a number of exciting potential applications in SERS-based sensors.

  5. Nanostructured superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moshchalkov, V. V; Fritzsche, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    ... through nanostructuring and for developing a variety of novel fluxonics devices based on vortex manipulation. Nanostructuring can, in fact, create such conditions for the flux pinning by arrays of nanofabricated antidots or magnetic dots, which could maximize the second important superconducting critical parameter (critical current) up to its theoretical limit ...

  6. Towards new functional nanostructures for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Naomi; Rowlands, J. A. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Nanostructures represent a promising new type of contrast agent for clinical medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging. Currently, most nanostructures are simple, single-purpose imaging agents based on spherical constructs (e.g., liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, macromolecules, dendrimers, and solid nanoparticle structures). In the next decade, new clinical imaging nanostructures will be designed as multi-functional constructs, to both amplify imaging signals at disease sites and deliver localized therapy. Proposals for nanostructures to fulfill these new functions will be outlined. New functional nanostructures are expected to develop in five main directions: Modular nanostructures with additive functionality; cooperative nanostructures with synergistic functionality; nanostructures activated by their in vivo environment; nanostructures activated by sources outside the patient; and novel, nonspherical nanostructures and components. The development and clinical translation of next-generation nanostructures will be facilitated by a combination of improved clarity of the in vivo imaging and biological challenges and the requirements to successfully overcome them; development of standardized characterization and validation systems tailored for the preclinical assessment of nanostructure agents; and development of streamlined commercialization strategies and pipelines tailored for nanostructure-based agents for their efficient translation to the clinic.

  7. Solid-state transformation of single precursor vanadium complex nanostructures to V₂O₅ and VO₂: catalytic activity of V₂O₅ for oxidative coupling of 2-naphthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mukul; Roy, Anindita; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Deb, Dibakar; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-01-28

    A vanadium complex, [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O], of different morphologies has been obtained via a modified hydrothermal procedure using pyridine and VOSO4 salt as the starting material. The evolved [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] nanobelts are of 50-200 nm in width and of a length up to several millimeters. At higher temperatures (600 °C), the solid [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] nanostructures are converted to vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) and vanadium dioxide (VO2) when heated in air and nitrogen atmosphere, respectively. During growth, the mechanism of the evolution of octahedra, truncated octahedra, and hollow truncated octahedra of [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] are reported for the first time. These types of well-structured morphology are also isolated while V2O5 and VO2 are evolved. The as-grown belt-like and octahedral morphologies of [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] are retained during the solid-state transformation, suggesting a route to evolve crystalline nanomaterials. Again, the morphological evolution of the [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] nanostructures has been examined to be pyridine and precursor vanadyl sulfate (VS) concentration dependent. Thus, we are able to isolate truncated octahedra as an intermediate during the formation of [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] nanobelts and nanoflowers with a high pyridine (Py) concentration. Interestingly, longer reaction times successively featured the transformation of truncated octahedra into nanobelts. Nanobelt evolution is not observed at low pyridine concentrations. However, the formation of octahedral morphology takes place at low pyridine concentration. All of the nanostructures were critically examined and characterized thoroughly by various physical techniques to ascertain their purity, structure and composition. An interesting, thermodynamically stable, single crystalline product from DMF soluble [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O] has been characterized, which indirectly supports the composition of [(C5H5N)2V2O3·H2O]. Selectively, vanadium pentoxide nanobelts have been found to be an

  8. Probing ultrafast nonequilibrium dynamics in single-crystal SiC through surface nanostructures induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wanlin; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafast non-equilibrium dynamics on the surface of a 4H-SiC crystal is experimentally investigated with time-delayed copropagating two femtosecond laser pulse trains of different linear polarizations. Rippled nanostructures are produced by this irradiation, and the alignment "slant" angle of the ripples is related to the polarizations. With varying time delays between the two laser pulses, this slant angle is found to change. In the first 10 ps, the slant quickly rotates in the direction associated with the polarization of the second incident laser pulse, but then abruptly freezes to a steady offset angle. A physical model is proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. The first laser pulse produces a transient grating-like modulation of the dielectric constant on the surface, with which the second laser pulse interacts. Because competing fast (Auger) and slow (thermal) relaxation processes reduce the initially induced grating's dielectric constant difference, the vector sum of this partially evolved grating with the second laser pulse's interaction results in the observed slant rotation time dependence. This experiment is straightforward, conceptually simple, and utilizes commercial equipment. The time-resolved slanting of the ripple orientation provides an alternative description of the spatiotemporal evolution of a superheated semiconductor surface.

  9. Single-wavelength-controlled in situ dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging for block copolymer nanostructures via blue-light-switchable FRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wen-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhao, Ling-Xi; Li, Chong; Huang, Zhen-Li; Tang, Ben Zhong; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2016-11-02

    Photoswitchable fluorophores are promising in single-molecule optical devices and super-resolution fluorescence imaging, especially in single-molecule photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) or stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). However, the scarcity of current photoswitchable fluorophores stimulates researchers to develop complicated optical systems and processing software, in accordance with the limited photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and organic fluorophores. Previous efforts to develop synthetic photoswitchable fluorophores have exhibited their promising potential in super-resolution fluorescence imaging. Here, we have designed and synthesized a fluorescence molecular switch with reversible green emission, a napthalimide-hexaarylbiimidazole conjugate (NI-N-HABI), which exhibits strong fluorescence in the emissive state, with fast thermal fading of the photochromism and spontaneous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) induced by blue-light. The photoswitchable fluorophore enables the red-edge wavelength of the optical response to red-shift from the initial near-UV region at less than 400 nm, to 500 nm. The relatively fast fading speed of NI-N-HABI and its sensitivity to longer blue-light irradiation (400-500 nm) have allowed simplification of the optical microscopic system from a two-wavelength laser source to a single-wavelength laser. We applied NI-N-HABI in single-wavelength-controlled in situ dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging for the self-assembly and solvent annealing of amphiphilic block polymers, with 50 nm of optical resolution. Single-wavelength-controlled dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging facilitates nanoscale optical visualization for the dynamic physical and chemical fluctuation processes of stimuli-responsive nanostructures.

  10. Localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe: A new approach to study nuclear nanostructure at single molecule resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Szczurek, Aleksander T. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Prakash, Kirti [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mohana, Giriram K. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lee, Hyun-Keun [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Roignant, Jean-Yves [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Birk, Udo J. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Dobrucki, Jurek W., E-mail: jerzy.dobrucki@uj.edu.pl [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Cremer, Christoph, E-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Higher order chromatin structure is not only required to compact and spatially arrange long chromatids within a nucleus, but have also important functional roles, including control of gene expression and DNA processing. However, studies of chromatin nanostructures cannot be performed using conventional widefield and confocal microscopy because of the limited optical resolution. Various methods of superresolution microscopy have been described to overcome this difficulty, like structured illumination and single molecule localization microscopy. We report here that the standard DNA dye Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet can be used to provide single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images of DNA in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells. This SMLM method enabled optical isolation and localization of large numbers of DNA-bound molecules, usually in excess of 10{sup 6} signals in one cell nucleus. The technique yielded high-quality images of nuclear DNA density, revealing subdiffraction chromatin structures of the size in the order of 100 nm; the interchromatin compartment was visualized at unprecedented optical resolution. The approach offers several advantages over previously described high resolution DNA imaging methods, including high specificity, an ability to record images using a single wavelength excitation, and a higher density of single molecule signals than reported in previous SMLM studies. The method is compatible with DNA/multicolor SMLM imaging which employs simple staining methods suited also for conventional optical microscopy. - Highlights: • Super-resolution imaging of nuclear DNA with Vybrant Violet and blue excitation. • 90nm resolution images of DNA structures in optically thick eukaryotic nuclei. • Enhanced resolution confirms the existence of DNA-free regions inside the nucleus. • Optimized imaging conditions enable multicolor super-resolution imaging.

  11. Cable suspended windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Moses G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A windmill is disclosed which includes an airframe having an upwind end and a downwind end. The first rotor is rotatably connected to the airframe, and a generator is supported by the airframe and driven by the rotor. The airframe is supported vertically in an elevated disposition by poles which extend vertically upwardly from the ground and support cables which extend between the vertical poles. Suspension cables suspend the airframe from the support cable.

  12. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  13. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure-based sensors provide better sensitivity as compared to conventional thin film-based sensors due to their comparable dimensions with respect to Debye length. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are 1-D nanostructures having high electrical mobility, high mechanical strength and high specific surface area that facilitate building of low-power, ultrahigh density sensors within limited space. However, pristine SWNTs posses limited sensitivity and selectivit...

  14. Tunable top-down fabrication and functional surface coating of single-crystal titanium dioxide nanostructures and nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, N.H.; Ha, S.; Janissen, R.; Ussembayev, Y.; van Oene, M.M.; Solano Hermosilla, B.P.

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and

  15. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  16. Dynamic Defrosting on Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Srijanto, Bernadeta R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering; Nguyen, Trung Dac [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Center for Computational Sciences; Vega, Carlos [Univ. Complutense Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Division; Collier, C. Patrick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS)

    2013-07-03

    Water suspended on chilled superhydrophobic surfaces exhibits delayed freezing; however, the interdrop growth of frost through subcooled condensate forming on the surface seems unavoidable in humid environments. It is therefore of great practical importance to determine whether facile defrosting is possible on superhydrophobic surfaces. Here in this paper, we report that nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces promote the growth of frost in a suspended Cassie state, enabling its dynamic removal upon partial melting at low tilt angles (<15°). The dynamic removal of the melting frost occurred in two stages: spontaneous dewetting followed by gravitational mobilization. This dynamic defrosting phenomenon is driven by the low contact angle hysteresis of the defrosted meltwater relative to frost on microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces, which forms in the impaled Wenzel state. Dynamic defrosting on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces minimizes the time, heat, and gravitational energy required to remove frost from the surface, and is of interest for a variety of systems in cold and humid environments.

  17. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  18. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mimicking both petal and lotus effects on a single silicon substrate by tuning the wettability of nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, M K; Zheng, H; Liew, T H; Leong, K C; Foo, Y L; Rajagopalan, R; Khan, S A; Choi, W K

    2011-04-05

    We describe a new method of fabricating large-area, highly scalable, "hybrid" superhydrophobic surfaces on silicon (Si) substrates with tunable, spatially selective adhesion behavior by controlling the morphologies of Si nanowire arrays. Gold (Au) nanoparticles were deposited on Si by glancing-angle deposition, followed by metal-assisted chemical etching of Si to form Si nanowire arrays. These surfaces were chemically modified and rendered hydrophobic by fluorosilane deposition. Au nanoparticles with different size distributions resulted in the synthesis of Si nanowires with very different morphologies (i.e., clumped and straight nanowire surfaces). The difference in nanowire morphology is attributed to capillary force-induced nanocohesion, which is due to the difference in nanowire porosity. The clumped nanowire surface demonstrated the lotus effect, and the straighter nanowires demonstrated the ability to pin water droplets while maintaining large contact angles (i.e., the petal effect). The high contact angles in both cases are explained by invoking the Cassie-Baxter wetting state. The high adhesion behavior of the straight nanowire surface may be explained by a combination of attractive van der Waals forces and capillary adhesion. We demonstrate the spatial patterning of both low- and high-adhesion superhydrophobicity on the same substrate by the simultaneous synthesis of clumped and straight silicon nanowires. The demonstration of hybrid superhydrophobic surfaces with spatially selective, tunable adhesion behavior on single substrates paves the way for future applications in microfluidic channels, substrates for biologically and chemically based analysis and detection where it is necessary to analyze a particular droplet in a defined location on a surface, and as a platform to study in situ chemical mixing and interfacial reactions of liquid pearls.

  20. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  1. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  2. Optomechanics for thermal characterization of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolleman, Robin J.; Houri, Samer; Davidovikj, Dejan; Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J.; Blanter, Yaroslav M.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steeneken, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal response of graphene is expected to be extremely fast due to its low heat capacity and high thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal response of suspended single-layer graphene membranes is investigated by characterization of their mechanical motion in response to a high-frequency modulated laser. A characteristic delay time τ between the optical intensity and mechanical motion is observed, which is attributed to the time required to raise the temperature of the membrane. We find, however, that the measured time constants are significantly larger than the predicted ones based on values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity. In order to explain the discrepancy between measured and modeled τ , a model is proposed that takes a thermal boundary resistance at the edge of the graphene drum into account. The measurements provide a noninvasive way to characterize thermal properties of suspended atomically thin membranes, providing information that can be hard to obtain by other means.

  3. Many-particle theory of optical properties in low-dimensional nanostructures. Dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes and semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, Ermin

    2008-09-02

    This work focuses on the theoretical investigation of optical properties of low-dimensional nanostructures, specifically single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The density-matrix formalism is applied to explain recent experimental results and to give insight into the underlying physics. A microscopic calculation of the absorption coefficient and the Rayleigh scattering cross section is performed by a novel approach combining the density-matrix formalism with the tight-binding wave functions. The calculated spectra of metallic nanotubes show a double-peaked structure resulting from the trigonal warping effect. The intensity ratios of the four lowest-lying transitions in both absorption and Rayleigh spectra can be explained by the different behavior of the optical matrix elements along the high-symmetry lines K-{gamma} and K-M. The Rayleigh line shape is predicted to be asymmetric, with an enhanced cross section for lower photon energies arising from non-resonant contributions of the optical susceptibility. Furthermore, the Coulomb interaction is shown to be maximal when the momentum transfer is low. For intersubband processes with a perpendicular momentum transfer, the coupling strength is reduced to less than 5%. The chirality and diameter dependence of the excitonic binding energy and the transition frequency are presented in Kataura plots. Furthermore, the influence of the surrounding environment on the optical properties of CNTs is investigated. Extending the confinement to all three spatial dimensions, semiconductor Bloch equation are derived to describe the dynamics in QD semiconductor lasers and amplifiers. A detailed microscopic analysis of the nonlinear turn-on dynamics of electrically pumped InAs/GaAs QD lasers is performed, showing the generation of relaxation oscillations on a nanosecond time scale in both the photon and charge carrier density. The theory predicts a strong damping of relaxation oscillations

  4. ZnO nanostructures and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xiaowei, Sun

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the various functional properties and potential applications of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures, from basic principles to our most recent discoveries. It comprises experimental analysis of various properties of ZnO nanostructures, preparation techniques, research methods, and some promising applications. The areas of focus include ZnO-based gas/biochemical sensing devices, field emitters, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, e-papers, and single-nanowire-based transistors.

  5. Microwave-induced nonequilibrium temperature in a suspended carbon nanotube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortensius, H.L.; Öztürk, A.; Zeng, P.; Driessen, E.F.C.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Antenna-coupled suspended single carbon nanotubes exposed to 108?GHz microwave radiation are shown to be selectively heated with respect to their metal contacts. This leads to an increase in the conductance as well as to the development of a power-dependent DC voltage. The increased conductance

  6. Nanostructure and molecular interface for biosensing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiep, Ha M.; Endo, Tatsuro; Kim, Do-Kyun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-09-01

    Nanostructure and molecular interface have currently received the great attractions for highly efficient, simultaneously analysis of a number of important biomolecules from proteomics to genomics. Outstanding optical property of noble metal nanostructures, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), is a powerful phenomenon used in many chemical and biological sensing experiments. This report described two types of gold-capped nanostructures: nanoparticle and nanopore which reveal the strong excitation of LSPR spectra in the UV-visible region. The optical absorbance properties of these nanostructures governing its sensitivity to local environment were studied. The flexibility in design of the goldcapped nanostructures was evidently displayed on the wide-range capacity to develop in many types, from single to multiple to microfluidic formats. Moreover, chemical modifications on the nanostructure surface were thoroughly exploited to archive a highly sensitive protein and gene sensors such as using Protein A linker for orientation antibody or using specific binding of streptavidin and biotinylated PNA or DNA probes... Lastly, we introduced a new form of optical sensor, involving the coupling between interferometry and LSPR properties on the surface of gold-capped nanopore structure. Our optical biosensing devices connecting with the gold-capped nanostructures including both nanoparticle and nanopore are applicable to highly sensitive monitoring the interactions of other biomolecules, such as proteins, whole cells, or receptors with a massively parallel detection capability in a highly miniaturized package.

  7. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... part thereof during a particular period of time specified in the rule. ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means to...

  8. A Facile Surfactant-Assisted Reflux Method for the Synthesis of Single-Crystalline Sb2Te3 Nanostructures with Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heng Quan; Miao, Lei; Liu, Cheng Yan; Li, Chao; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji; Huang, Rong; Tanemura, Sakae

    2015-07-08

    Antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) and its based alloys are of importance to p-type semiconductors for thermoelectric applications near room temperature. Herein, we report a simple, low-energy intensive, and scalable surfactant-assisted reflux method for the synthesis of Sb2Te3 nanoparticles in the solvent ethylene glycol (EG) at low temperatures (120-180 °C). The formation mechanism of platelike Sb2Te3 nanoparticles is proposed. Also, it is found that the size, shape, and chemical composition of the products could be controlled by the introduction of organic surfactants (CTAB, PVP, etc.) or inorganic salts (EDTA-Na2, NaOH, etc.). Additionally, the collected Sb2Te3 nanoparticles were further fabricated into nanostructured pellets using cold-compaction and annealing techniques. Low resistivity [(7.37-19.4) × 10(-6) Ω m], moderate Seebeck coefficient (103-141 μV K(-1)), and high power factor (10-16 × 10(-4) W m(-1) K(-2)) have been achieved in our Sb2Te3-nanostructured bulk materials. The relatively low thermal conductivity (1.32-1.55 W m(-1) K(-1)) is attained in the nanobulk made of PVP-modified nanoparticles, and values of ZT in the range of 0.24-0.37 are realized at temperatures ranging from 50 to 200 °C. Our researches set forth a new avenue in promoting practical applications of Sb2Te3-based thermoelectric power generation or cooling devices.

  9. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  10. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    We report a fabrication method, which uses standard UV-lithography to pattern the catalyst for the chemical vapour deposition(CVD) of suspended double clamped single walled carbon nanotubes. By using an aqueous solution of Fe(NO3)3 the patterning of the catalyst material onto microelectrodes can...... be done with a simple lift-off process with standard photolithographic resist. An applied electric field is sustained between the microelectrodes during CVD to guide the nanotube growth. Comparison with simulations shows that the location and the orientation of the grown carbon nanotubes (CNT) correspond...... to the regions of maximum electric field, enabling accurate positioning of a nanotube by controlling the shape of the microelectrodes. The CNT bridges are deflected tens of nm when a DC voltage is applied between the nanotube and a gate microelectrode indicating that the clamping through the catalyst particles...

  11. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front....... This result indicates the potential of improved cell performance and higher output power at diffuse light conditions and during daily and yearly operation. A second batch of RIEtextured solar cells with laser-doped selective emitters (LDSE) was fabricated. A power conversion eciency of 18.1% and a ll factor...

  12. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  13. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  15. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  16. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  17. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  18. Rippling instabilities in suspended nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Upmanyu, Moneesh

    2012-11-01

    Morphology mediates the interplay between the structure and electronic transport in atomically thin nanoribbons such as graphene as the relaxation of edge stresses occurs preferentially via out-of-plane deflections. In the case of end-supported suspended nanoribbons that we study here, past experiments and computations have identified a range of equilibrium morphologies, in particular, for graphene flakes, yet a unified understanding of their relative stability remains elusive. Here, we employ atomic-scale simulations and a composite framework based on isotropic elastic plate theory to chart out the morphological stability space of suspended nanoribbons with respect to intrinsic (ribbon elasticity) and engineered (ribbon geometry) parameters, and the combination of edge and body actuation. The computations highlight a rich morphological shape space that can be naturally classified into two competing shapes, bendinglike and twistlike, depending on the distribution of ripples across the interacting edges. The linearized elastic framework yields exact solutions for these rippled shapes. For compressive edge stresses, the body strain emerges as a key variable that controls their relative stability and in extreme cases stabilizes coexisting transverse ripples. Tensile edge stresses lead to dimples within the ribbon core that decay into the edges, a feature of obvious significance for stretchable nanoelectronics. The interplay between geometry and mechanics that we report should serve as a key input for quantifying the transport along these ribbons.

  19. Quantitative suspended sediment mapping using aircraft remotely sensed multispectral data. [in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Suspended sediment is an important environmental parameter for monitoring water quality, water movement, and land use. Quantitative suspended sediment determinations were made from analysis of aircraft remotely sensed multispectral digital data. A statistical analysis and derived regression equation were used to determine and plot quantitative suspended sediment concentration contours in the tidal James River, Virginia, on May 28, 1974. From the analysis, a single band, Band 8 (0.70-0.74 microns), was adequate for determining suspended sediment concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.89 was obtained with a mean inaccuracy of 23.5 percent for suspended sediment concentrations up to about 50 mg/l. Other water quality parameters - secchi disc depth and chlorophyll - also had high correlations with the remotely sensed data. Particle size distribution had only a fair correlation with the remotely sensed data.

  20. Self-Suspended Suspensions of Covalently Grafted Hairy Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2015-03-17

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Dispersions of small particles in liquids have been studied continuously for almost two centuries for their ability to simultaneously advance understanding of physical properties of fluids and their widespread use in applications. In both settings, the suspending (liquid) and suspended (solid) phases are normally distinct and uncoupled on long length and time scales. In this study, we report on the synthesis and physical properties of a novel family of covalently grafted nanoparticles that exist as self-suspended suspensions with high particle loadings. In such suspensions, we find that the grafted polymer chains exhibit unusual multiscale structural transitions and enhanced conformational stability on subnanometer and nanometer length scales. On mesoscopic length scales, the suspensions display exceptional homogeneity and colloidal stability. We attribute this feature to steric repulsions between grafted chains and the space-filling constraint on the tethered chains in the single-component self-suspended materials, which inhibits phase segregation. On macroscopic length scales, the suspensions exist as neat fluids that exhibit soft glassy rheology and, counterintuitively, enhanced elasticity with increasing temperature. This feature is discussed in terms of increased interpenetration of the grafted chains and jamming of the nanoparticles. (Chemical Presented).

  1. Nanostructured inorganic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Kevin P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas [Ludwig-Maximilians Univ. Muenchen (DE). Dept. of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS)

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in the development of nanostructured inorganic solar cells is reviewed. Nanostructuring of inorganic solar cells offers the possibility of reducing the cost of photovoltaics by allowing smaller amounts of lower-grade photovoltaic semiconductors to be used. Various fabrication methods used to nanostructure traditional photovoltaic semiconductors are detailed and the performance of resulting devices is discussed. The synthesis of solar cells by solution-based methods using less traditional, abundant materials is identified as a promising route to widescale photovoltaic electricity generation, and nanostructured solar cell geometries are highlighted as essential in this approach. Templating and self-assembling methods used to produce appropriate low-cost nanostructures from solutions are detailed, and the performance of preliminary ultra-low-cost cells made with these structures is reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  3. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  4. 23 Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter Collected at Two Different. Heights above the Ground in A Sub-Urban Site in Kenya. Gitari W. M1, Kinyua A. M. 2, Kamau G. N3 and C. K. Gatebe C. K4. Abstract. Suspended particulate matter samples were collected in a sub-urban area in Nairobi over a 12 month ...

  5. Recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles for nanostructured battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Liu, Chang; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Ye, Han; Cheung, Chunshun; Zhou, Limin

    2015-02-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to using rational nanostructure design to address critical carbonaceous anode material issues for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the fabrication of nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials often involves complex processes and expensive starting materials. Diesel engine is an important source of nanostructured carbon particles with diameters ranging 20 nm-60 nm suspended in air, resulting in a serious scourge of global climate and a series of diseases such as lung cancer, asthma, and cardiovascular disease. Here, we show that diesel carbon nanoparticles collected from diesel engines can be chemically activated to create a porous structure. The resulting nanostructured carbon electrodes have a high specific capacity of 936 mAh g-1 after 40 cycles at 0.05 A/g, and excellent cycle stability while retaining a capacity of ∼210 mAh g-1 after 1200 cycles at 5 A/g. As recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles are readily available due to the several billion tons of diesel fuel consumed every year by diesel engines, their use represents an exciting source for nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials for high-performance LIBs and improves our environment and health.

  6. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...... in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  7. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  8. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  9. Electrical Control of Excitons in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanské, Gabija

    The scope of this thesis covers investigation of the exciton Mott transition in coupled quantum wells, fabrication of photonic-crystal structures with embedded self-assembled quantum dots, and tuning of their properties by means of an external electric field. In the first part of the thesis...... the focus is on quantum dots in photonic nanostructures. The fabrication process of reproducible high-quality photonic-crystal structures on electrically gated GaAs samples is presented. This process is employed to investigate light localization in short photonic-crystal waveguides with a dispersion...... relation facilitating a slow-light effect. The effect of the variations in the local density of optical states on electrically tuned quantum dots embedded in photonic structures is investigated. An electric field is employed to induce strain in suspended GaAs structures, where a bidirectional spectral...

  10. Au25 cluster functionalized metal-organic nanostructures for magnetically targeted photodynamic/photothermal therapy triggered by single wavelength 808 nm near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; An, Guanghui; Dai, Yunlu; Lv, Ruichan; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high biocompatibility and an enhanced synergistic therapeutic effect superior to any single therapy, as verified by in vitro and in vivo assay. This image-guided therapy based on a metal-organic framework may stimulate interest in developing other kinds of metal-organic materials with multifunctionality for tumor diagnosis and therapy.Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and influence of later heat treatment on the structural evolution, optical and electrical properties of nanostructured α-MoO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, A. M.; El-Anssary, E. H.; Elshaikh, H. A.; Afify, H. H.

    2017-12-01

    In the current study, α-MoO3 nanocrystals were successfully synthesized from ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate using a simple hydrothermal route. The influence of calcination temperature on the structural, optical and electrical properties was systematically investigated for the MoO3 powder products. The XRD results were analyzed for these powders, revealing the formation of a mixed phase (β- and α-MoO3) at calcination temperatures ranging from 350 °C–450 °C, and hence a residual monoclinic phase still exists in the samples at the calcination temperature of 450 °C. Subsequently, the mixed phase was completely converted to a pure single phase of α-MoO3 at a calcination temperature of 500 °C. The optical properties of the MoO3 powders were investigated using the transformed diffuse reflectance technique according to Kubelka–Munk theory. For such a powder product, the results of the optical measurements demonstrated the realization of indirect and direct allowed transitions at the spectral ranges 3.31–3.91 eV and 3.66–4.27 eV, respectively. The indirect- and direct-allowed band-gaps of the MoO3 products were found to increase from 2.69–3.12 eV and from 3.43–3.64 eV, respectively, by increasing the calcination temperature from 350 °C–600 °C. The MoO3 powders calcined at different temperatures were converted into five dense tablets for performing the electrical measurements. These measurements were carried out at different working temperatures using a system operating under high vacuum conditions. The results revealed that the dc-conductivity of such a tablet typically increases by more than five orders of magnitude with an increase in the working temperature from 77–300 K. These results also demonstrated a high dependence of dc-conductivity on the calcination temperature for the MoO3 products. The dc-conductivity as a function of the operating temperature revealed the presence of at least three different electrical conduction

  12. Aptamer-targeted DNA nanostructures for therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenphol, Phapanin; Bermudez, Harry

    2014-05-05

    DNA-based nanostructures have been widely used in various applications due to their structural diversity, programmability, and uniform structures. Their intrinsic biocompatibility and biodegradability further motivates the investigation of DNA-based nanostructures as delivery vehicles. Incorporating AS1411 aptamers into DNA pyramids leads to enhanced intracellular uptake and selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells, achieved without the use of transfection reagents. Furthermore, aptamer-displaying pyramids are found to be substantially more resistant to nuclease degradation than single-stranded aptamers. These findings, along with their modularity, reinforce the potential of DNA-based nanostructures for therapeutic applications.

  13. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  14. Structural and spectroscopic study of mechanically synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vij, Ankush, E-mail: vij-anx@yahoo.com [Amity School of Applied Sciences, Amity University Haryana, Gurgaon (India); Kumar, Ravi [Centre for Materials Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology Hamirpur-177005 (India); Presently at Beant College of Engineering and Technology, Gurdaspur-143521 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We report the single step synthesis of SnO{sub 2} nanostructures using high energy mechanical attrition method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the single phase rutile structure with appreciable broadening of diffraction peaks, which is a signature of nanostructure formation. The average crystallite size of SnO{sub 2} nanostructures has been calculated to be ~15 nm. The micro-Raman study reveals the shifting of A{sub 1g} Raman mode towards lower wave number, which is correlated with the nanostructure formation.

  15. Self-replication: Nanostructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures were utilized to replicate a seed pattern that resulted in the growth of populations of nanostructures. Exponential growth could be controlled by environmental conditions depending on the preferential requirements of each population.

  16. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  17. Freestanding nanostructures via reactive ion beam angled etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haig A. Atikian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Freestanding nanostructures play an important role in optical and mechanical devices for classical and quantum applications. Here, we use reactive ion beam angled etching to fabricate optical resonators in bulk polycrystalline and single crystal diamond. Reported quality factors are approximately 30 000 and 286 000, respectively. The devices show uniformity across 25 mm samples, a significant improvement over comparable techniques yielding freestanding nanostructures.

  18. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  19. Technological advances in suspended-sediment surrogate monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Surrogate technologies to continuously monitor suspended sediment show promise toward supplanting traditional data collection methods requiring routine collection and analysis of water samples. Commercially available instruments operating on bulk optic (turbidity), laser optic, pressure difference, and acoustic backscatter principles are evaluated based on cost, reliability, robustness, accuracy, sample volume, susceptibility to biological fouling, and suitable range of mass concentration and particle size distribution. In situ turbidimeters are widely used. They provide reliable data where the point measurements can be reliably correlated to the river's mean cross section concentration value, effects of biological fouling can be minimized, and concentrations remain below the sensor's upper measurement limit. In situ laser diffraction instruments have similar limitations and can cost 6 times the approximate $5000 purchase price of a turbidimeter. However, laser diffraction instruments provide volumetric-concentration data in 32 size classes. Pressure differential instruments measure mass density in a water column, thus integrating substantially more streamflow than a point measurement. They are designed for monitoring medium-to-large concentrations, are generally unaffected by biological fouling, and cost about the same as a turbidimeter. However, their performance has been marginal in field applications. Acoustic Doppler profilers use acoustic backscatter to measure suspended sediment concentrations in orders of magnitude more streamflow than do instruments that rely on point measurements. The technology is relatively robust and generally immune to effects of biological fouling. Cost of a single-frequency device is about double that of a turbidimeter. Multifrequency arrays also provide the potential to resolve concentrations by clay silt versus sand size fractions. Multifrequency hydroacoustics shows the most promise for revolutionizing collection of continuous

  20. Optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kristin Nicole

    Semiconductor nanostructures have unique optical and electronic properties that have inspired research into their technological applications and basic science. This thesis presents approaches to the fabrication and characterization of optoelectronic devices incorporating individual semiconductor nanostructures. Nanowires of the II-VI semiconductors CdSe and CdS were synthesized using nanoparticle-catalysed solution-liquid-solid growth. Single-component nanowires and heterostructure nanowires with axial compositional modulation were generated using this method. Individual nanowires and nanocrystals were then incorporated into devices with a three-terminal field-effect transistor geometry. An experimental platform was developed which allows for simultaneous electrical characterization of devices and measurement of their optical properties. This setup enables the measurement of spatially and spectrally resolved electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) from individual nanostructures and nanostructure devices. It also allows the measurement of photon coincidence histograms for emitted light and the acquisition of photocurrent images via laser scanning microscopy. Electroluminescence was observed from individual CdSe nanocrystals contacted by gold electrodes. Concomitant transport measurements at low temperature showed clear evidence of Coulomb blockade at low bias voltage, with light only emitted from devices exhibiting asymmetric tunnel couplings between the nanocrystal and electrodes. Combined analyses of the data indicate that the resistances of the tunnel barriers are bias voltage dependent and that light emission results from the inelastic scattering of tunneling electrons. Three-terminal devices incorporating individual CdSe nanoNvires exhibited EL localized near the positively-biased electrode. Characterization of these devices by scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) and Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM) indicates that while there are n-type Schottky

  1. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic ...

  2. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  3. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  4. Coupling between electronic transport and longitudinal phonons in suspended nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapmaz, S; Jarillo-Herrero, P; Blanter, Ya M; Zant, H S J van der [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2005-11-15

    Current-voltage characteristics of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube (NT) quantum dots show a series of steps equally spaced in voltage. The energy scale of this harmonic, low-energy excitation spectrum is consistent with that of the longitudinal low-k phonon mode in the NT. Agreement is found with a Franck-Condon-based model in which the phonon-assisted tunnelling process is modelled as a coupling of electronic levels to underdamped quantum harmonic oscillators. Comparison with this model indicates a rather strong electron-phonon coupling factor of order unity. We investigate different electron-phonon coupling mechanisms and give estimates of the coupling factor.

  5. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... to allow for e- cient plasmon-based single-photon sources. Theoretical studies of coupling and propagation properties of plasmonic waveguides reveal that a high-refractive index of the medium surrounding the emitter, e.g. nGaAs = 3.5, limits the realizability of ecient plasmon-based single-photon sources...

  6. Freely suspended nanocomposite membranes as highly sensitive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaoyang; Markutsya, Sergiy; Pikus, Yuri; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2004-10-01

    Highly sensitive sensor arrays are in high demand for prospective applications in remote sensing and imaging. Measuring microscopic deflections of compliant micromembranes and cantilevers is developing into one of the most versatile approaches for thermal, acoustic and chemical sensing. Here, we report on an innovative fabrication of compliant nanocomposite membranes with nanoscale thickness showing extraordinary sensitivity and dynamic range, which makes them candidates for a new generation of membrane-based sensor arrays. These nanomembranes with a thickness of 25-70 nm, which can be freely suspended over large (hundred micrometres) openings are fabricated with molecular precision by time-efficient, spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembly. They are designed as multilayered molecular composites made of a combination of polymeric monolayers and a metal nanoparticle intralayer. We demonstrate that these nanocomposite membranes possess unparalleled sensitivity and a unique autorecovering ability. The membrane nanostructure that is responsible for these outstanding properties combines multilayered polymer/nanoparticle organization, high polymer-chain orientation, and a pre-stretched state.

  7. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  8. Binary DNA Nanostructures for Data Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and secure system for encrypting and decrypting information using DNA self-assembly. Binary data is encoded in the geometry of DNA nanostructures with two distinct conformations. Removing or leaving out a single component reduces these structures to an encrypted solution of ssDNA, whereas adding back this missing "decryption key" causes the spontaneous formation of the message through self-assembly, enabling rapid read out via gel electrophoresis. Applications include auth...

  9. Binary DNA nanostructures for data encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and secure system for encrypting and decrypting information using DNA self-assembly. Binary data is encoded in the geometry of DNA nanostructures with two distinct conformations. Removing or leaving out a single component reduces these structures to an encrypted solution of ssDNA, whereas adding back this missing "decryption key" causes the spontaneous formation of the message through self-assembly, enabling rapid read out via gel electrophoresis. Applications include authentication, secure messaging, and barcoding.

  10. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  11. Nanostructures-History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Nanostructures-History. Inspiration to Nanotechnology-. The Japanese scientist Norio Taniguchi of the Tokyo University of Science was used the term "nano-technology" in a 1974 conference, to describe semiconductor processes such as thin film His definition was, ...

  12. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11] A detailed review article of defects in semiconductor nanostructures is currently under preparation. [12] V Ranjan and Vijay A Singh, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 6415 (2001). [13] V Ranjan, R K Pandey, Manoj K Harbola and Vijay A Singh, Phys. Rev.

  13. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  14. Continuous-flow centrifugation to collect suspended sediment for chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Black, Robert W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Foreman, James R.; Senter, Craig A.; Peterson, Norman T.

    2016-12-22

    Recent advances in suspended-sediment monitoring tools and surrogate technologies have greatly improved the ability to quantify suspended-sediment concentrations and to estimate daily, seasonal, and annual suspended-sediment fluxes from rivers to coastal waters. However, little is known about the chemical composition of suspended sediment, and how it may vary spatially between water bodies and temporally within a single system owing to climate, seasonality, land use, and other natural and anthropogenic drivers. Many water-quality contaminants, such as organic and inorganic chemicals, nutrients, and pathogens, preferentially partition in sediment rather than water. Suspended sediment-bound chemical concentrations may be undetected during analysis of unfiltered water samples, owing to small water sample volumes and analytical limitations. Quantification of suspended sediment‑bound chemical concentrations is needed to improve estimates of total chemical concentrations, chemical fluxes, and exposure levels of aquatic organisms and humans in receiving environments. Despite these needs, few studies or monitoring programs measure the chemical composition of suspended sediment, largely owing to the difficulty in consistently obtaining samples of sufficient quality and quantity for laboratory analysis.A field protocol is described here utilizing continuous‑flow centrifugation for the collection of suspended sediment for chemical analysis. The centrifuge used for development of this method is small, lightweight, and portable for the field applications described in this protocol. Project scoping considerations, deployment of equipment and system layout options, and results from various field and laboratory quality control experiments are described. The testing confirmed the applicability of the protocol for the determination of many inorganic and organic chemicals sorbed on suspended sediment, including metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and

  15. 3D plasmonic nanostructures as building blocks for ultrasensitive Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of complex 3D plasmonic nanostructures opens new scenarios towards the realization of high electric field confinement and enhancement. We exploit the unique properties of these nanostructures for performing Raman spectroscopy in the single/few molecules detection limit. © 2014 OSA.

  16. Biophysical and electrochemical properties of Self-assembled noncovalent SWNT/DNA hybrid and electroactive nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzapoor, Aboulfazl; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    DNA self-assembled hybrid nanostructures are widely used in recent research in nanobiotechnology. Combination of DNA with carbon based nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and carbon quantum dot were applied in important biological applications. Many examples of biosensors, nanowires and nanoelectronic devices, nanomachine and drug delivery systems are fabricated by these hybrid nanostructures. In this study, a new hybrid nanostructure has been fabricated by noncovalent interactions between single or double stranded DNA and SWNT nanoparticles and biophysical properties of these structures were studied comparatively. Biophysical properties of hybrid nanostructures studied by circular dichroism, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Also, electrochemical properties studied by cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, choronoamperometry and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results revealed that the biophysical and electrochemical properties of SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures were different compare to ss-DNA, ds-DNA and SWNT singly. Circular dichroism results showed that ss-DNA wrapped around the nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions. The results indicated that after adding SWNT to ss-DNA and ds-DNA intensity of CD and UV-vis spectrum peaks were decreased. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ss-DNA improves the electron transfer rate of hybrid nanostructures. It was demonstrated SWNT/DNA hybrid nanostructures should be a good electroactive nanostructure that can be used for electrochemical detection or sensing.

  17. 9 CFR 201.81 - Suspended registrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 201.81 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ADMINISTRATION (PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS UNDER THE PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT Services § 201.81 Suspended registrants. No stockyard owner, packer, market agency, or dealer shall employ...

  18. Electrodialytic remediation of suspended mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, Adrian; Pino, Denisse

    2008-01-01

    experiment at 40 mA, with approximately 137.5 g mine tailings on dry basis. The removal for a static (baseline) experiment only amounted 15% when passing approximately the same amount of charge through 130 g of mine tailings. The use of air bubbling to keep the tailings suspended increased the removal...

  19. Environmental toxicology: Acute effects of suspended particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from the control values were found significant at 99% confidence level. Possible inhalatory problems are thus anticipated from prolonged accumulation of the dust in the respiratory system. KEY WORDS: Environmental toxicology, Suspended particulate matter, Dust analysis, Hematological indices, Wister albino rats. Bull.

  20. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    face area, shape, minerals and source) and conse- quent interaction with heavy metal concentrations. (HMCs). Recent studies have shown a growing awareness of the wider environmental significance of the suspended sediment loads transported by rivers and streams. This includes the importance of fine grain sediment in ...

  1. Environmental toxicology: Acute effects of suspended particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elemental contents of suspended particulate matter (dust) samples from Maiduguri, Nigeria, were determined which showed appreciably high levels for especially Pb, Fe, Cu, Zn, K, Ca, and. Na. Wister albino rats were exposed to graded doses of phosphate buffered saline carried dust particles. The hematological ...

  2. A depth integrated model for suspended transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galappatti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new depth averaged model for suspended sediment transport in open channels has been developed based on an asymptotic solution to the two dimensional convection-diffusion equation in the vertical plane. The solution for the depth averaged concentration is derived from the bed boundary condition and

  3. The Shape of Breasts Suspended in Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kleijn, S.C.; Rensen, W.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Philips has designed an optical mammography machine. In this machine the breast is suspended into a cup in which the measurements take place. A special fluid is inserted into the cup to prevent the light from going around the breast instead of going through it but this fluid also weakens the signal.

  4. Flow Laminarization and Acceleration by Suspended Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsch, M.; Hulshof, J.; Prostokishin, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    In [Comm. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci., 4(2009), pp. 153-175], Barenblatt presents a model for partial laminarization and acceleration of shear flows by the presence of suspended particles of different sizes, and provides a formal asymptotic analysis of the resulting velocity equation. In the present

  5. Emulsifying and Suspending Properties of Enterolobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The thermodynamic instability of emulsions and suspensions necessitate the incorporation of emulsifiers and suspending agents respectively, in order to stabilize the formulations and ensure administration of accurate doses. Objective:Enterolobium cyclocarpum gum was characterized and evaluated for its ...

  6. Intrusion and extrusion of a liquid on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabili, M.; Giacomello, A.; Meloni, S.; Casciola, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobicity is connected to the presence of gas pockets within surface asperities. Upon increasing the pressure this ‘suspended’ state may collapse, causing the complete wetting of the rough surface. In order to quantitatively characterize this process on nanostructured surfaces, we perform rare-event atomistic simulations at different pressures and for several texture geometries. Such an approach allows us to identify for each pressure the stable and metastable states and the free energy barriers separating them. Results show that, by starting from the superhydrophobic state and increasing the pressure, the suspended state abruptly collapses at a critical intrusion pressure. If the pressure is subsequently decreased, the system remains trapped in the metastable state corresponding to the wet surface. The liquid can be extruded from the nanostructures only at very negative pressures, by reaching the critical extrusion pressure (spinodal for the confined liquid). The intrusion and extrusion curves form a hysteresis cycle determined by the large free energy barriers separating the suspended and wet states. These barriers, which grow very quickly for pressures departing from the intrusion/extrusion pressure, are shown to strongly depend on the texture geometry.

  7. Impact of suspended solids concentration on sludge filterability in Full-scale membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousada Ferreira, M.D.C.; Van Lier, J.B.; Van der Graaf, J.H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The relation between activated sludge filterability and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is framed in a single hypothesis, explaining results seemingly contradictory. A total of 44 activated sludge samples were collected and analyzed on a variety of

  8. Nanostructured materials in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Sanguansri, Peerasak

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the application, production, and processing of materials at the nanometer scale. Biological- and physical-inspired approaches, using both conventional and innovative food processing technologies to manipulate matter at this scale, provide the food industry with materials with new functionalities. Understanding the assembly behavior of native and modified food components is essential in developing nanostructured materials. Functionalized nanostructured materials are finding applications in many sectors of the food industry, including novel nanosensors, new packaging materials with improved mechanical and barrier properties, and efficient and targeted nutrient delivery systems. An improved understanding of the benefits and the risks of the technology based on sound scientific data will help gain the acceptance of nanotechnology by the food industry. New horizons for nanotechnology in food science may be achieved by further research on nanoscale structures and methods to control interactions between single molecules.

  9. Terahertz-field-induced photoluminescence of nanostructured gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate photoluminescence from nanostructured ultrathin gold films subjected to strong single-cycle terahertz transients with peak electric field over 300 kV/cm. We show that UV-Vis-NIR light is being generated and the efficiency of the process is strongly enhanced at the pe......We experimentally demonstrate photoluminescence from nanostructured ultrathin gold films subjected to strong single-cycle terahertz transients with peak electric field over 300 kV/cm. We show that UV-Vis-NIR light is being generated and the efficiency of the process is strongly enhanced...

  10. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.vasylkiv@nims.go.jp

    2017-04-15

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9–18 nm), rice-seed-like (75–290 nm) and lumpy (75–150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9–15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan. - Highlights: • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are synthesized via self-assembly. • Different morphology can be obtained by adjusting the synthesis parameters. • An attractive combination of magnetic properties and morphology is obtained. • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferrimagnetic and pseudo-single domain.

  11. Nanostructured polymer- and metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun

    This Ph.D. thesis explores the optical properties of nanostructured dielectric and metallic surfaces. Focusing on scalable fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures, this experimental study has resulted in the proof of concept of inexpensive, large area antireflective nanostructures...... in a structural colour filter for specularly transmitted light. By reducing the height and lateral size, the structures enter a regime where scattering of visible light becomes insignificant. In this regime, the BSi structures were shown to be antireflective. An empirical relation between the characteristic...... length scale of the nanostructured surface, and the wavelength at which scattering becomes significant, was shown. The result is thus a design criterion for the use of random nanostructures for non-scattering antireflective surfaces. Antireflective BSi nanostructures were fabricated using injection...

  12. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  13. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  14. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-07

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes.

  16. Integrated Surface and Mechanical Characterization of Freestanding Biological and Other Nano-Structures Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin

    This dissertation is focused on surface and mechanical characterization of freestanding biological and other nano-structures using atomic force microscopy including two parts: cell mechanics and nano-structure mechanics. The main purpose of this work is to investigate how the nano- / micro-scale mechanical properties affect macro-scale function. In cancer cells, efficacy of drug delivery is oftentimes declined due to the thick dendritic network of oligosaccharide mucin chains on the cell surface. AFM is used to measure the force needed to pierce the mucin layer to reach the cell surface. A pool of ovarian, pancreatic, lung, colorectal and breast cancer cells are characterized. The studies offer additional support for the development of clinical and pharmaceutical approaches to combat mucin over-expression in tumors during cancer chemotherapy. Macroscopic adhesion-aggregation and subsequent transportation of microorganisms in porous medium are closely related to the microscopic deformation and adhesion mechanical properties. The classical Tabor's parameter is modified. Multiple bacterial strains are characterized in terms of aggregates size, aggregation index and transportation kinetics. AFM is employed to obtain the microscopic coupled adhesion-deformation properties. The strong correlation between Tabor's parameter and aggregation-deposition-transportation suggests the AFM characterization is capable of making reliable predication of macroscopic behavior. A novel "nano-cheese-cutter" is fabricated on tipless AFM cantilever to measure elastic modulus and interfacial adhesion of a 1-D freestanding nano-structure. A single electrospun fiber is attached to the free end of AFM cantilever, while another fiber is similarly prepared on a mica substrate in an orthogonal direction. An external load is applied to deform the two fibers into complementary V-shapes. This work is extended to investigate the interfacial adhesion energy between dissimilar materials. SWCNT thin

  17. Energy content of suspended detritus from Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Royan, J.P.

    Energy components of suspended matter included phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus inclusive of microorganisms adsorbed to detritus. Of these, detritus contributed most of the energy (98%). The average caloric content of suspended detritus...

  18. The suspended sentence in French Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovašević Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the ancient times until today, criminal law has provided different criminal sanctions as measures of social control. These coercive measures are imposed on the criminal offender by the competent court and aimed at limitting the offender's rights and freedoms or depriving the offender of certain rights and freedoms. These sanctions are applied to the natural or legal persons who violate the norms of the legal order and injure or endanger other legal goods that enjoy legal protection. In order to effectively protect social values, criminal legislations in all countries predict a number of criminal sanctions. These are: 1 imprisonment, 2 precautions, 3 safety measures, 4 penalties for juveniles, and 5 sanctions for legal persons. Apart and instead of punishment, warning measures have a significant role in the jurisprudence. Since they emerged in the early 20th century in the system of criminal sanctions, there has been an increase in their application to criminal offenders, especially when it comes to first-time offenders who committed a negligent or accidental criminal act. Warnings are applied in case of crimes that do not have serious consequences, and whose perpetrators are not hardened and incorrigible criminals. All contemporary criminal legislations (including the French legilation provide a warning measure of suspended sentence. Suspended sentence is a conditional stay of execution of sentence of imprisonment for a specified time, provided that the convicted person does not commit another criminal offense and fulfills other obligations. This sanction applies if the following two conditions are fulfilled: a forma! -which is attached to the sentence of imprisonment; and b material -which is the court assessment that the application of this sanction is justified and necessary in a particular case. In many modern criminal legislations, there are two different types of suspended (conditional sentence: 1 ordinary (classical suspended

  19. Scaling laws for van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobre, Vivekanand V; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Van der Waals interactions have a fundamental role in biology, physics and chemistry, in particular in the self-assembly and the ensuing function of nanostructured materials. Here we utilize an efficient microscopic method to demonstrate that van der Waals interactions in nanomaterials act at distances greater than typically assumed, and can be characterized by different scaling laws depending on the dimensionality and size of the system. Specifically, we study the behaviour of van der Waals interactions in single-layer and multilayer graphene, fullerenes of varying size, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. As a function of nanostructure size, the van der Waals coefficients follow unusual trends for all of the considered systems, and deviate significantly from the conventionally employed pairwise-additive picture. We propose that the peculiar van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials could be exploited to control their self-assembly.

  20. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 1. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures obtained by pyrolysis of ruthenocene and ruthenocene–ferrocene mixtures. L S Panchakarla A ... Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; nanoparticles; nanorods; pyrolysis; metallocene; FeRu alloy.

  1. Estimating total suspended sediment yield with probability sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The ""Selection At List Time"" (SALT) scheme controls sampling of concentration for estimating total suspended sediment yield. The probability of taking a sample is proportional to its estimated contribution to total suspended sediment discharge. This procedure gives unbiased estimates of total suspended sediment yield and the variance of the...

  2. Sedimentation of suspended solids in ultrasound field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikulina Vera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical effects of aquatic environment that occur in an ultrasonic field change the sedimentation rate of coagulated suspension. This might only happen in case of cavitation of ultrasonic filed that causes a change of potentials of the medium. Research of the influence of ultrasonic vibrations on coagulation of suspended solids within water purification allows expanding their scope of implementation. The objective of the research is to estimate the effect of ultrasound on the sedimentation of the suspended solids, to determine of the efficiency of the process in relation to the dose of the coagulant, and to calculate the numerical values of the constants in the theoretical equation. The experiment condition was held in the water with the clay substances before the introduction of the coagulant. The method of magnetostriction ultrasonic generator was applied to receive ultrasonic vibration. Estimate of concentration of clay particles in water was performed using photometry. As a result of the research, the obtained data allow determining the increase in efficiency of suspended particles sedimentation related to the dose of coagulant, depending on time of ultrasonic treatment. The experiments confirmed the connection between the effect of sedimentation in the coagulation process, the coagulant dose and the time of scoring. Studies have shown that the increase in the duration of ultrasonic treatment causes a decrease of administered doses of coagulant.

  3. Suspended sediments limit coral sperm availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Gerard F.; Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Humanes, Adriana; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended sediment from dredging activities and natural resuspension events represent a risk to the reproductive processes of coral, and therefore the ongoing maintenance of reefal populations. To investigate the underlying mechanisms that could reduce the fertilisation success in turbid water, we conducted several experiments exposing gametes of the corals Acropora tenuis and A. millepora to two sediment types. Sperm limitation was identified in the presence of siliciclastic sediment (230 and ~700 mg L−1), with 2–37 fold more sperm required to achieve maximum fertilisation rates, when compared with sediment-free treatments. This effect was more pronounced at sub-optimum sperm concentrations. Considerable (>45%) decreases in sperm concentration at the water’s surface was recorded in the presence of siliciclastic sediment and a >20% decrease for carbonate sediment. Electron microscopy then confirmed sediment entangled sperm and we propose entrapment and sinking is the primary mechanism reducing sperm available to the egg. Longer exposure to suspended sediments and gamete aging further decreased fertilisation success when compared with a shorter exposure. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that high concentrations of suspended sediments effectively remove sperm from the water’s surface during coral spawning events, reducing the window for fertilisation with potential subsequent flow-on effects for recruitment. PMID:26659008

  4. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  5. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  6. Giant magneto-photoelectric effect in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Jens; Kurzmann, Annika; Geller, Martin; Queisser, Friedemann; Lorke, Axel; Schützhold, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We study the optical response of a suspended, monolayer graphene field-effect transistor structure in magnetic fields of up to 9 T (quantum Hall regime). With an illumination power of only 3 μW, we measure a photocurrent of up to 400 nA (without an applied bias) corresponding to a photo-responsivity of 0.13 A W-1, which we believe to be one of the highest values ever measured in single-layer graphene. We discuss possible mechanisms for generating this strong photo-response (17 electron-hole pairs per 100 incident photons). Based on our experimental findings, we believe that the most likely scenario is a ballistic two-stage process including carrier multiplication via Auger-type inelastic Coulomb scattering at the graphene edge.

  7. Development of nanostructured protective "sight glasses" for IR gas sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, René; Davis, Zachary James; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2011-01-01

    In this work protective "sight glasses" for infrared gas sensors showing a sub-wavelength nanostructure with random patterns have been fabricated by reactive ion etching (RIE) in an easy and comparable cheap single step mask-less process. By an organic coating, the intrinsic water repellent prope...

  8. Complex nanostructures: synthesis and energetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, X.; Lin, Y.; Zhou, S.; Sheehan, S.; Wang, D. [Department of Chemistry, Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College, 2609 Beacon St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed. (author)

  9. Quantum Phase Extraction in Isospectral Electronic Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    Quantum phase is not a direct observable and is usually determined by interferometric methods. We present a method to map complete electron wave functions, including internal quantum phase information, from measured single-state probability densities. We harness the mathematical discovery of drum-like manifolds bearing different shapes but identical resonances, and construct quantum isospectral nanostructures possessing matching electronic structure but divergent physical structure. Quantum measurement (scanning tunneling microscopy) of these 'quantum drums' [degenerate two-dimensional electron states on the Cu(111) surface confined by individually positioned CO molecules] reveals that isospectrality provides an extra topological degree of freedom enabling robust quantum state transplantation and phase extraction.

  10. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwei Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed.

  11. Binary DNA nanostructures for data encryption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Halvorsen

    Full Text Available We present a simple and secure system for encrypting and decrypting information using DNA self-assembly. Binary data is encoded in the geometry of DNA nanostructures with two distinct conformations. Removing or leaving out a single component reduces these structures to an encrypted solution of ssDNA, whereas adding back this missing "decryption key" causes the spontaneous formation of the message through self-assembly, enabling rapid read out via gel electrophoresis. Applications include authentication, secure messaging, and barcoding.

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  13. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    Micro- and nanostructured surfaces are interesting due to the unique properties they add to the bulk material. One example is structural colors, where the interaction between surface structures and visible light produce bright color effects without the use of paints or dyes. Several research grou...... instrument, and a small study of the implications if the sample surface is covered with an interface layer, e.g. a thin liquid film. For roughness evaluation on hard-to-reach surfaces, the thesis includes a study of surface replication using the thermosetting polymer PDMS....... are investigating the manufacturing of these structures using established high-volume polymer fabrication methods, such as injection molding and roll-to-roll manufacturing. These methods are interesting as they can ease the industrial uptake of nanopatterning technology. However, for a successful industrial...... regions can be analyzed independently. With color scatterometry, a single exposure with the camera is sufficient to evaluate the grating profile for thousands of individual regions spanning a millimeter-sized area. The accuracy of color scatterometry is evaluated on injection molded polymer line gratings...

  14. Electrical, thermal, catalytic and magnetic properties of nano-structured materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuwei

    Nanotechnology is a subject that studies the fabrication, properties, and applications of materials on the nanometer-scale. Top-down and bottom-up approaches are commonly used in nano-structure fabrication. The top-down approach is used to fabricate nano-structures from bulk materials by lithography, etching, and polishing etc. It is commonly used in mechanical, electronic, and photonic devices. Bottom-up approaches fabricate nano-structures from atoms or molecules by chemical synthesis, self-assembly, and deposition, such as sol-gel processing, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), focused ion beam (FIB) milling/deposition, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and electro-deposition etc. Nano-structures can have several different dimensionalities, including zero-dimensional nano-structures, such as fullerenes, nano-particles, quantum dots, nano-sized clusters; one-dimensional nano-structures, such as carbon nanotubes, metallic and semiconducting nanowires; two-dimensional nano-structures, such as graphene, super lattice, thin films; and three-dimensional nano-structures, such as photonic structures, anodic aluminum oxide, and molecular sieves. These nano-structured materials exhibit unique electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the quantum mechanical regime. Various techniques can be used to study these properties, such as scanning probe microscopy (SPM), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), micro Raman spectroscopy, etc. These unique properties have important applications in modern technologies, such as random access memories, display, solar energy conversion, chemical sensing, and bio-medical devices. This thesis includes four main topics in the broad area of nanoscience: magnetic properties of ferro-magnetic cobalt nanowires, plasmonic properties of metallic nano-particles, photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes, and electro-thermal-optical properties of carbon nanotubes. These materials and their

  15. Monitoring of suspended sediment in South Tyrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalet, Rudi; Dinale, Roberto; Pernter, Martin; Maraldo, Luca; Peterlin, Dieter; Richter, Arnold; Comiti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), which aims to achieve a good status of European water bodies, the Hydrographic Office of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano (Italy) extended in 2014 its institutional activities including the monitoring of suspended sediment in the river channel network. Currently, the only active monitoring station is on the Adige River at the gauging station of Ponte Adige near Bolzano (drainage area 2705 km2). The applied monitoring strategy and the data analysis concept are both based on the guidelines issued by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW). The results indicates that the temporal variability strongly differs during the investigated period (2014-2015). In addition to the analysis of precipitation and water discharge, temperature and lightning activity were also included to better understand the sediment transport dynamics observed at the station. In summer 2015, the combination of constantly high daily temperature throughout the Adige basin (which drove intense glacier melting in the headwaters) with a high frequency of convective rainfall events (90% more than in 2014, obtained through lightning detection), led to an annual mass of transported suspended sediment of 260000 t. Interestingly, this value is similar to the one estimated for 2014 (300000 t), which was characterized by very different meteorological conditions (colder and wetter summer), but with the occurrence of an important flood in August, which transported half of the annual amount. Finally, we can conclude that the adopted monitoring strategy is applicable for institutional aims in terms of costs as well as in terms of time effort. During the next years, other stations for suspended sediment monitoring are planned to be installed in the Province to cover the most important river segments.

  16. Suspended-sediment concentrations, yields, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, as well as transporting harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples were collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011. Analyses of these data indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. The single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River during the 2011 spring runoff. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been known to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. For this study, comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. Regression analysis indicated that 7 out of 14 sites had poor or no relation between SSC and streamflow. Only two sites, the Knife River and the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, had strong correlations between SSC and streamflow, with coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.82 and 0.80, respectively. In contrast, turbidity had moderate to strong

  17. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar,; Arun, [Orinda, CA; Shakouri, Ali [Santa Cruz, CA; Sands, Timothy D [Moraga, CA; Yang, Peidong [Berkeley, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Berkeley, CA; Russo, Richard E [Walnut Creek, CA; Feick, Henning [Kensington, CA; Weber, Eicke R [Oakland, CA; Kind, Hannes [Schaffhausen, CH; Huang, Michael [Los Angeles, CA; Yan, Haoquan [Albany, CA; Wu, Yiying [Albany, CA; Fan, Rong [El Cerrito, CA

    2009-08-04

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  18. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2018-01-30

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  19. Active noise cancellation in a suspended interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Driggers, Jennifer C; Pepper, Keenan; Adhikari, Rana

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate feed-forward vibration isolation on a suspended Fabry-Perot interferometer using Wiener filtering and a variant of the common Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive filter algorithm. We compare the experimental results with theoretical estimates of the cancellation efficiency. Using data from the recent LIGO Science Run, we also estimate the impact of this technique on full scale gravitational wave interferometers. In the future, we expect to use this technique to also remove acoustic, magnetic, and gravitational noise perturbations from the LIGO interferometers. This noise cancellation technique is simple enough to implement in standard laboratory environments and can be used to improve SNR for a variety of high precision experiments.

  20. Geodetic monitoring of suspended particles in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnik, Rok; Maksimova, Daria; Kovačič, Boštjan

    2017-10-01

    There is a trend in modern approach to the management of space of collecting the spatial data, in order to obtain useful information. In this paper a research of suspended particles in the river Drava and Mura will be introduced. The goal is to connect different fields of water management in countries where the rivers Drava and Mura flows in purpose of water management sustainability. The methods such as GNSS for mapping cross sections of the river, the use of ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) measurement system and water sampling to monitor sediment in the water will be presented.

  1. Safety Harness For Work Under Suspended Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoo, Su Young

    1994-01-01

    Safety device protects worker under suspended engine or other heavy load. Mechanically linked with load so if load should fall, worker yanked safely away. Worker wears chest-plate vest with straps crossing eye on back. Lower safety cable connected to eye extends horizontally away from worker to nearby wall, wrapped on pulley and extends upward to motion amplifier or reducer. Safety cables transform any sudden downward motion of overhanging load into rapid sideways motion of worker. Net catches worker, preventing worker from bumping against wall.

  2. CFN lectures on functional nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Vojta, Matthias; Schön, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    This series of books contains selected and edited lectures from summer schools organized by the Center for Functional nanostructures (C.F.N.) at the University of Karlsruhe. The mission of the C.F.N. is to carry out research in the following areas: nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, molecular nanostructures and nanostructured materials. The aim of the summer schools is mainly to exchange new ideas and illustrate emerging research methodologies through a series of topical, introductory lectures. This is reflected by both the selection of topics addressed in the present volume, nanoelectronics, as well as the tutorial aspect of the contributions.

  3. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices....

  4. A Design Tool for Nanostructures with Tunable Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    inorganic materials (mainly nanostructures: Si nanowire and thin film, single-walled carbon naotube (SWCNT) and single layer graphene) and bulk...distributions need to be simulated to accurate capture the dispersion characteristics of the individual material phases. In this project, a simpler and...amide-linked with carbon nanotubes: a first-principle study,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 235436 (2008) 20 T. Yamamoto and K. Watanabe, “Nonequilibrium Green’s

  5. Suspended tungsten-based nanowires with enhanced mechanical properties grown by focused ion beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; María De Teresa, José

    2017-11-01

    The implementation of three-dimensional (3D) nano-objects as building blocks for the next generation of electro-mechanical, memory and sensing nano-devices is at the forefront of technology. The direct writing of functional 3D nanostructures is made feasible by using a method based on focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). We use this technique to grow horizontally suspended tungsten nanowires and then study their nano-mechanical properties by three-point bending method with atomic force microscopy. These measurements reveal that these nanowires exhibit a yield strength up to 12 times higher than that of the bulk tungsten, and near the theoretical value of 0.1 times the Young’s modulus (E). We find a size dependence of E that is adequately described by a core-shell model, which has been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and compositional analysis at the nanoscale. Additionally, we show that experimental resonance frequencies of suspended nanowires (in the MHz range) are in good agreement with theoretical values. These extraordinary mechanical properties are key to designing electro-mechanically robust nanodevices based on FIBID tungsten nanowires.

  6. Suspended tungsten-based nanowires with enhanced mechanical properties grown by focused ion beam induced deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; De Teresa, José María

    2017-11-03

    The implementation of three-dimensional (3D) nano-objects as building blocks for the next generation of electro-mechanical, memory and sensing nano-devices is at the forefront of technology. The direct writing of functional 3D nanostructures is made feasible by using a method based on focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). We use this technique to grow horizontally suspended tungsten nanowires and then study their nano-mechanical properties by three-point bending method with atomic force microscopy. These measurements reveal that these nanowires exhibit a yield strength up to 12 times higher than that of the bulk tungsten, and near the theoretical value of 0.1 times the Young's modulus (E). We find a size dependence of E that is adequately described by a core-shell model, which has been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and compositional analysis at the nanoscale. Additionally, we show that experimental resonance frequencies of suspended nanowires (in the MHz range) are in good agreement with theoretical values. These extraordinary mechanical properties are key to designing electro-mechanically robust nanodevices based on FIBID tungsten nanowires.

  7. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vega-Flick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both “solid” and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  8. DNA origami compliant nanostructures with tunable mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lifeng; Marras, Alexander E; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E

    2014-01-28

    DNA origami enables fabrication of precise nanostructures by programming the self-assembly of DNA. While this approach has been used to make a variety of complex 2D and 3D objects, the mechanical functionality of these structures is limited due to their rigid nature. We explore the fabrication of deformable, or compliant, objects to establish a framework for mechanically functional nanostructures. This compliant design approach is used in macroscopic engineering to make devices including sensors, actuators, and robots. We build compliant nanostructures by utilizing the entropic elasticity of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to locally bend bundles of double-stranded DNA into bent geometries whose curvature and mechanical properties can be tuned by controlling the length of ssDNA strands. We demonstrate an ability to achieve a wide range of geometries by adjusting a few strands in the nanostructure design. We further developed a mechanical model to predict both geometry and mechanical properties of our compliant nanostructures that agrees well with experiments. Our results provide a basis for the design of mechanically functional DNA origami devices and materials.

  9. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay A.; Harbola, Manoj K.; Pathak, Praveen

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  10. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  11. Elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Koutsos, Vasileios; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental determination of the elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2, a promising two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting material combined with high optical quality. The suspended WSe2 membranes have been fabricated by mechanical exfoliation of bulk WSe2 and transfer of the exfoliated multilayer WSe2 flakes onto SiO2/Si substrates pre-patterned with hole arrays. Then, indentation experiments have been performed on these membranes with an atomic force microscope. The results show that the 2D elastic modulus of the multilayer WSe2 membranes increases linearly while the prestress decreases linearly as the number of layers increases. The interlayer interaction in WSe2 has been observed to be strong enough to prevent the interlayer sliding during the indentation experiments. The Young's modulus of multilayer WSe2 (167.3 ± 6.7 GPa) is statistically independent of the thickness of the membranes, whose value is about two thirds of other most investigated 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, namely, MoS2 and WS2. Moreover, the multilayer WSe2 can endure ˜12.4 GPa stress and ˜7.3% strain without fracture or mechanical degradation. The 2D WSe2 can be an attractive semiconducting material for application in flexible optoelectronic devices and nano-electromechanical systems.

  12. Method for forming suspended micromechanical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachining method is disclosed for forming a suspended micromechanical structure from {111} crystalline silicon. The micromachining method is based on the use of anisotropic dry etching to define lateral features of the structure which are etched down into a {111}-silicon substrate to a first etch depth, thereby forming sidewalls of the structure. The sidewalls are then coated with a protection layer, and the substrate is dry etched to a second etch depth to define a spacing of the structure from the substrate. A selective anisotropic wet etchant (e.g. KOH, EDP, TMAH, NaOH or CsOH) is used to laterally undercut the structure between the first and second etch depths, thereby forming a substantially planar lower surface of the structure along a {111} crystal plane that is parallel to an upper surface of the structure. The lateral extent of undercutting by the wet etchant is controlled and effectively terminated by either timing the etching, by the location of angled {111}-silicon planes or by the locations of preformed etch-stops. This present method allows the formation of suspended micromechanical structures having large vertical dimensions and large masses while allowing for detailed lateral features which can be provided by dry etch definition. Additionally, the method of the present invention is compatible with the formation of electronic circuitry on the substrate.

  13. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, and transports harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011 indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in the driftless region of southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. During the 2011 spring runoff, the single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis- St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been determined to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. Because of this, the MPCA was interested in quantifying the differences between SSC and TSS in different parts of the State. Comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. The largest percent difference between SSC and TSS was measured at the South Branch Buffalo River at Sabin, and the smallest difference was observed at the Des Moines

  14. METAL MELTS – NANOSTRUCTURED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stetsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of thermodynamic analysis it is shown that metal melts are the nanostructured systems which consist of phases and atoms nanocrystals. Nanocrystalsmake 97% ofthemeltvolume.

  15. Synthesis of One Dimensional Gold Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchen Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanostructures with shapes of rod, dumbbells, and dog bone have been fabricated by an improved seed-mediated method. It is found that the pH change (the addition of HNO3 or HCl and the presence of Ag+ ions have a great influence on the growth process and aspect ratios of these Au nanocrystals. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra for the Au colloidal show that the transverse plasmon absorption band locates at ~520 nm, while the longitudinal plasmon absorption band shifts in a wide spectra region of 750–1100 nm. The obtained Au nanostructures have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. Based on the characterizations and FDTD simulations, most of the obtained Au nanorods are single crystals, possessing an octagonal cross-section bounded by {110} and {100} faces. One model for the anisotropic growth has been proposed. It is found that slow kinetics favor the formation of single-crystalline Au nanorods.

  16. Environmentally-suspended sediment production of the Nasia River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the level of suspended sediment produced in the Nasia River Basin. Hydrological and meteorological data and water samples were used for the study. Average suspended sediment yield (33 years) in the basin was 19.90 t/km2/yr. With mean annual runoff of 439.13m3/s, 322.43 t/yr suspended sediment ...

  17. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  18. Interaction response of maglev masses moving on a suspended beam shaken by horizontal ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    As a maglev transport route has to cross a region with occasional earthquakes, the train/guideway interaction is an issue of great concern in dominating safety of the maglev system. This paper intends to present a computational framework of interaction analysis for a maglev train traveling over a suspension bridge shaken by horizontal earthquakes. The suspended guideway girder is modeled as a single-span suspended beam and the maglev train traveling over it as a series of maglev masses. Due to motion- dependent nature of magnetic forces in a maglev suspension system, appropriate adjustments of the magnetic forces between magnets and guide-rail require the air gaps be continuously monitored. Thus an on-board hybrid LQR+PID controller with constraint rule base is designed to control the dynamic response of a running maglev mass. Then the governing equations of motion for the suspended beam associated with all the controlled maglev masses are transformed into a set of generalized equations by Galerkin's method, and solved using an incremental-iterative procedure. Numerical investigations demonstrate that when a controlled maglev train travels over a suspended guideway shaken by horizontal earthquakes, the proposed hybrid controller has the ability to adjust the levitation gaps in a prescribed stable region for safety reasons and to reduce the vehicle's acceleration response for ride quality.

  19. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  20. Design consideration for magnetically suspended flywheel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, D.; Kirk, J. A.; Frommer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design, fabrication, and testing of a magnetically suspended flywheel system for energy storage applications in space. The device is the prototype of a system combining passive suspension of the flywheel plate by samarium cobalt magnets and active control in the radial direction using eight separate magnetic coils. The bearing assembly was machined from a nickel-iron alloy, and the machine parts are all hydrogen annealed. Slots in the magnetic plate allow four independent quadrants for control. The motor/generator component of the system is a brushless dc-permanent magnetic/ironless engine using electronic communication. The system has been tested at over 2500 rpm with satisfactory results. The system characteristics of the flywheel for application in low earth orbit (LEO) are given in a table.

  1. Organics and Suspended Solids Removal from Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Y. Hmood

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR method is used for treating samples of waste water taken from hospitals in Mosul. Many run periods are used (6-24 hours for             6 months. It is found that the organics and suspended solids removal increase with increasing the period of run, it is in the range ( 96-82 % and ( 100-95 % respectively, while the pH values are nearly neutral (7.05 to 7.5.     BOD5 and SS concentrations of the effluent are within the limits of Iraqi standards,  40:30 mg/l respectively. Hence, SBR method could be used for treating hospitals, small factories and some  residential sectors waste waters.  

  2. Spin Polarized Electron Probes and Magnetic Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.L. Mills

    2003-10-15

    OAK B188 This report summarizes progress to date in our theoretical research program, for the period from July 1, 2002 to November 1, 2003. In addition, our research priorities for the coming year are set forth. The reporting period has been a most exciting and significant one. For the past several years, one of our principal thrust areas has been development of the theory of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures with emphasis on the use of spin polarized electrons as probes of short wavelength spin dynamics in such entities. Our program stimulated the first experiment which detected large wave vector spin waves in ultrathin films in 1999 through spin polarized electron loss spectroscopy (SPEELS); the publication which announced this discovery was a joint publication between a group in Halle (Germany) with our theory effort. The continued collaboration has led to the design and implementation of the new SPEELS spectrometer and we now have in hand the first detailed measurements of spin wave dispersion in an ultrathin film. A second such spectrometer is now operational in the laboratory of Prof. H. Hopster, at UC Irvine. We are thus entering a most exciting new era in the spectroscopy of spin excitations in magnetic nanostructures. During the reporting period, we have completed very important new analyses which predict key aspects of the spectra which will be uncovered by these new instruments, and the calculations continue to be developed and to expand our understanding. In addition, we have initiated a new series of theoretical studies directed toward spin dynamics of single magnetic adatoms on metal surfaces, with STM based studies of this area n mind. In the near future, these studies will continue, and we will expand our effort into new areas of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures.

  3. Terahertz response of DNA oligonucleotides on the surface of silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, N. T., E-mail: bagraev@mail.ioffe.ru [Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Chernev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Emel’yanov, A. K.; Dubina, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The possibility of identifying DNA oligonucleotides deposited onto the region of the edge channels of silicon nanostructures is considered. The role of various THz (terahertz) radiation harmonics of silicon nanostructures in the resonance response of oligonucleotides is analyzed. In particular, this makes it possible to compare single-stranded 100- and 50-mer DNA oligonucleotides. A technique for the rapid identification of different oligonucleotides by measuring changes in the conductance and transverse potential difference of silicon nanostructures with microcavities, embedded in the edge channels for selecting THz radiation characteristics, is proposed.

  4. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insun Jo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier’s law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm−1K−1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  5. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  7. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Ratheesh; Rajawat, A. S.

    2012-10-01

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are realized with respect to the sediment size distribution and the bottom bed materials observed in the Gulf. Simulated SSCs are compared with alternate OCM derived SSC. The results are observed to be impetus where the model is able to generate the spatial dynamics of the sediment concentrations. Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. Tidal range is observed as the important physical factor controlling the deposition and resuspension of sediments within the Gulf. From the simulation studies; maximum residual current velocities, tidal fronts and high turbulent zones are found to characterise the islands and shoals within the Gulf, which results in high sediment concentrations in those regions. Remarkable variability in the bathymetry of the Gulf, different bed materials and varying tidal conditions induces several circulation patterns and turbulence creating the unique suspended sediment concentration pattern in the Gulf.

  8. A suspended sediment yield predictive equation for river basins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An empirical equation that can be used for estimating the suspended sediment yields of river drainage basins without sediment data has been established for basins in the sub-tropical forest Southwestern river basin system of Ghana. The power law equation relates mean annual specific suspended sediment yield (t km-2 ...

  9. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud. Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  10. Energy values of suspended detritus in Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Royan, J.P.; Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    Energy content of suspended detritus was determined in Andaman Sea waters during April-May 1988. The caloric content of suspended detritus ranged from 987 to 7040 cal. per gram dry wt with an average value of 5530 cal. per gram dry wt. The results...

  11. A wave-resolving model for nearshore suspended sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Chou, Yi-Ju; Shi, Fengyan

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a wave-resolving sediment transport model, which is capable of simulating sediment suspension in the field-scale surf zone. The surf zone hydrodynamics is modeled by the non-hydrostatic model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012). The turbulent flow and suspended sediment are simulated in a coupled manner. Three effects of suspended sediment on turbulent flow field are considered: (1) baroclinic forcing effect; (2) turbulence damping effect and (3) bottom boundary layer effect. Through the validation with the laboratory measurements of suspended sediment under nonbreaking skewed waves and surfzone breaking waves, we demonstrate that the model can reasonably predict wave-averaged sediment profiles. The model is then utilized to simulate a rip current field experiment (RCEX) and nearshore suspended sediment transport. The offshore sediment transport by rip currents is captured by the model. The effects of suspended sediment on self-suspension are also investigated. The turbulence damping and bottom boundary layer effects are significant on sediment suspension. The suspended sediment creates a stably stratified water column, damping fluid turbulence and reducing turbulent diffusivity. The suspension of sediment also produces a stably stratified bottom boundary layer. Thus, the drag coefficient and bottom shear stress are reduced, causing less sediment pickup from the bottom. The cross-shore suspended sediment flux is analyzed as well. The mean Eulerian suspended sediment flux is shoreward outside the surf zone, while it is seaward in the surf zone.

  12. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Cola acuminata gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many natural gums are employed as suspending agents in the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The search to develop locally available natural gum from apparently a waste product as an alternative suspending agent stimulated the interest in this present study. Cola acuminata gum (CAG) extracted from Cola ...

  13. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... time. These new levels may reduce light penetration and lower the rate of photosynthesis and the... suspended particulates persist. The biological and the chemical content of the suspended material may react with the dissolved oxygen in the water, which can result in oxygen depletion. Toxic metals and organics...

  14. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are ...

  15. Evaluation of the suspending property of grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in sulphadimidine suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for sulphadimidine. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  16. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Adansonia digitata gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentation volume and rate, rheology, and ease of redispersion were employed as evaluation parameters. The results showed that both hot and cold water extracts of the gum used at 2-3 % w/v produced a better suspending property than 4 % w/v Compound Tragacanth gum. The suspending ability of the gums was in ...

  17. Evaluation of the Suspending Property of Grewia Gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in metronidazole suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for metronidazole. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  18. Formation of collective excitations in quasi-one dimensional metallic nanostructures: size and density dependance

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, Amy; Grigorenko, Ilya; Haas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the formation of collective excitations in atomic scale quasi-one dimensional metallic nanostructures. The response of the system is calculated within the linear response theory and random phase approximation. For uniform nanostructures a transition from quantum single particle excitations to classical plasmon scaling is observed, depending on the system length and electron density. We find crucial differences in the scaling behavior for quasi-one dimensional and ...

  19. Photonic effects in natural nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey GonzáLez, Rafael Ramón; Barrera Patiã+/-O, Claudia Patricia

    Nature exhibits a great variety of structures and nanostructures. In particular the interaction light-matter has a strong dependence with the shape of the nanostructures. In some cases, in the so called structural color, ordered arrays of nanostructures play a very critical role. One of the most interesting color effects is the iridescence, the angular dependence of the observed color in some species of butterflies, insects, plants, beetles, fishes, birds and even in minerals. In the last years, iridescence has been related with photonic properties. In the present work, we present a theoretical study of the photonic properties for different patterns that exist in natural nanostructures present in wings of butterflies that exhibit iridescence. The nanostructures observed in these cases present spatial variations of the dielectric constant that are possible to model them as 1D and 2D photonic crystal. Partial photonic gaps are found as function of lattice constant, dielectric contrast and geometrical configuration. Also, disordered effects are considered. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  20. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    at {approx} 10 nm resolution over hundreds of microns in 3 spatial dimensions. Super-resolution microcopy methods based upon single molecule localization were originally limited to 2D slices. Recent advances in this field have extended these methods to three dimensions. However, the 3D rendering was limited to viewing sparsely labeled cellular structures over a z-depth of less than 1 micron. Our first goal is to extend super resolution microscopy to z-depths of hundreds of microns. This substantial improvement is needed to image polymer nanostructure over functionally relevant length scales. (2) Benchmark this instrument by studying the 3D nanostructure of diblock co-polymer morphologies. We will test and benchmark our instrument by imaging fluorescently labeled diblock copolymers, molecules that self-assemble into a variety of 3D nano-structures. We reiterate these polymers are useful for a variety of applications ranging from lithography to light harvesting.

  1. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  2. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitenstein Michael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element.

  3. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    in brain-machine interfaces, for drug delivery and for interfacing with cells. The potential health risks associated with nanostructures are also becoming a more pressing issue with the increased production and use of nanostructures. Developing and testing tools for visualising nanostructures interacting...

  4. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  5. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  6. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  7. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature.

  8. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  9. Anodized ZnO nanostructures for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Mao-Chia [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Wang, TsingHai [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environment Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, Bin-Jui [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jing-Chie, E-mail: jclin4046@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ching-Chen [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by electrochemical anodic process. • The parameter of ZnO nanostructure was anodic potential. • The model of growth of ZnO nanostructure was investigated. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were fabricated on the polished zinc foil by anodic deposition in an alkaline solution containing 1.0 M NaOH and 0.25 M Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Potentiostatic anodization was conducted at two potentials (−0.7 V in the passive region and −1.0 V in the active region vs. SCE) which are higher than the open circuit potential (−1.03 V vs. SCE) and as-obtained ZnO nanostrcutures were investigated focusing on their structural, optical, electrical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) characteristics. All samples were confirmed ZnO by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra. Observations in the SEM images clearly showed that ZnO nanostructures prepared at −0.7 V vs. SCE were composed of nanowires at while those obtained at −1.0 V vs. SCE possessed nanosheets morphology. Result from transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction patterns suggested that the ZnO nanowires belonged to single crystalline with a preferred orientation of (0 0 2) whereas the ZnO nanosheets were polycrystalline. Following PEC experiments indicated that ZnO nanowires had higher photocurrent density of 0.32 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.5 V vs. SCE under 100 mW/cm{sup 2} illumination. This value was about 1.9 times higher than that of ZnO nanosheets. Observed higher photocurrent was likely due to the single crystalline, preferred (0 0 2) orientation, higher carrier concentration and lower charge transfer resistance.

  10. NOTE: Effects of powder additives suspended in dielectric on crater characteristics for micro electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, S. H.; Tan, P. C.; Kurnia, W.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of using powder additives suspended in dielectric on crater characteristics for micro electrical discharge machining (PSD micro-EDM) are investigated through the conduct of single RC discharge experiments at low discharge energies of 2.5 µJ, 5 µJ and 25 µJ. Through the introduction of additive particles into the dielectric, results of the single discharge experiments show the formation of craters with smaller diameters and depths, and having more consistent circular shapes than those produced in dielectric without additive. These craters also possess a noticeable morphological difference compared to those generated in dielectric without additive. In addition, discharge current measurements show a smaller amount of charges flowing between the tool electrode and workpiece, and at a slower flow rate when additives are present in the dielectric. Furthermore, based on the experimental results and findings from studies done in nanofluids, a hypothesis is made on the effects of powder suspended dielectric on the crater formation mechanism. The increased viscosity and enhanced thermal conductivity of a powder suspended dielectric lower the plasma heat flux into the electrode and raise the rate of heat dissipation away from the molten cavity. As a result, a smaller-sized crater having a larger amount of resolidified material within the crater cavity is formed.

  11. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  12. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...... for organic solar cell applications, opening new patterning possibilities....

  13. Raman study of lysozyme amyloid fibrils suspended on super-hydrophobic surfaces by shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Moretti, Manola

    2017-05-19

    The shear flow generated at the rim of a drop evaporating on a micro-fabricated super-hydrophobic surface has been used to suspend and orient single/few lysozyme amyloid fibrils between two pillars for substrate-free characterization. Micro Raman spectroscopy performed on extended fibers evidenced a shift of the Amide I band main peak to the value attributed to β-sheet secondary structure, characteristic of the amyloid fibers. In addition, given the orientation sensitivity of the anisotropic molecule, the Raman signal of the main secondary structure was nicely enhanced for a fiber alignment parallel to the polarization direction of the laser. The substrate-free sample generated by this suspending technique is suitable for other structural analysis methods, where fiber crystals are investigated. It could be further employed for generation of arrays and patterns in a controllable fashion, where bio-compatible material is needed.

  14. Diffusion processes in freely suspended smectic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    A molecular model describing translational diffusion in freely suspended smectic films (FSSFs) in air is proposed. This model is based on the random walk theory and allows calculation of the translational diffusion coefficient (TDC) across smectic layers (along the director). All values necessary for calculating the TDC are obtained within the generalized mean-field model considering not only anisotropic interactions between nearest neighbors of molecules forming FSSFs, but also the stabilizing effect of the smectic/air interface. The spatial inhomogeneity of order parameters over the FSSF section, arising in this case, results in the fact that the surface tension at the smectic/air interface not only suppresses thermal fluctuations in surface layers, but also completely suppresses translational diffusion of molecules from the FSSF to air. The results of calculations of dimensional translational diffusion in the bulk of the FSSF formed by 5- n-alkyl-2-(4- n-(perfluoroalkyl-metyleneoxy))pentyl molecules during its thinning show that the TDC monotonically increases as the smectic film is thinned.

  15. Many-body Interactions in Magnetic Films and Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen D. Kevan

    2012-12-12

    We describe results supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER46158, which focused on magnetic interaction at surfaces, in thin films, and in metallic nanostructures. We report on three general topics: 1) The Rashba spin splitting at magnetic surfaces of rare earth metals, 2) magnetic nanowires self-assembled on stepped tungsten single crystals, and 3) magnetic interaction in graphene films doped with hydrogen atoms.

  16. Preparation and characterization of CuO nanostructures on copper substrate as selective solar absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthick Kumar, S. [Department of Natural Resources and Waste Recycling, School of Energy, Environment and Natural Resources, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Murugesan, S., E-mail: smsan@mail.com [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Suresh, S. [Department of Natural Resources and Waste Recycling, School of Energy, Environment and Natural Resources, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India)

    2014-02-14

    Selective solar absorber coatings of copper oxide (CuO) on copper substrates are prepared by room temperature oxidation of copper at different alkaline conditions. The surface morphology and structural analyses of the CuO coatings are carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. XRD and Raman studies indicated the single phase nature and high crystallinity of the prepared CuO nanostructures. Different CuO nanostructures, viz., nanoneedles, nanofibers and nanoparticles are formed at different alkaline conditions. The influence of reaction time on morphology of the CuO nanostructures is also studied. The thermal emittance values of these nanostructured CuO samples are found to be in the range of 6–7% and their solar absorptances are ranged between 84 and 90%. The observed high solar selectivity values (>12.7) suggest that these coatings can be used as selective absorbers in solar thermal gadgets. - Highlights: • Nanostructured CuO thin films on Cu substrate have been prepared by a facile method. • Morphology of the CuO nanostructures varies with reaction pH. • The thin films show high absorptance in the visible region and low thermal emittance. • Multiple absorption in the porous structure leads to high solar absorptance. • Nanostructures posses solar selectivity values >12.

  17. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9-18 nm), rice-seed-like (75-290 nm) and lumpy (75-150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9-15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan.

  18. Light-matter interaction in nanostructured materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    Light-matter interaction in nanostructured materials is studied theoretically with emphasis on spontaneous emission dynamics of quantum dots in photonic crystals. The main topics of the work are electromagnetic scattering calculations, decay dynamics of single quantum dots and multiple quantum dot...... calculations. The method is well suited for multiple scattering problems such as photonic crystals and may be applied to problems with scatterers of arbitrary shape and non-homogeneous background materials. By the introduction of a measure for the degree of fractional decay we quantify to which extent...... the effect is observable in a given material. We focus on the case of inverse opal photonic crystals and locate the position in the crystal where the effect is most pronounced. Furthermore, we quantify the influence of absorptive loss and give example calculations with experimental parameters for Pb...

  19. Plasmonic effects in metal-semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Toropov, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Metal-semiconductor nanostructures represent an important new class of materials employed in designing advanced optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic nanolasers, plasmon-enhanced light-emitting diodes and solar cells, plasmonic emitters of single photons, and quantum devices operating in infrared and terahertz domains. The combination of surface plasmon resonances in conducting structures, providing strong concentration of an electromagnetic optical field nearby, with sharp optical resonances in semiconductors, which are highly sensitive to external electromagnetic fields, creates a platform to control light on the nanoscale. The design of the composite metal-semiconductor system imposes the consideration of both the plasmonic resonances in metal and the optical transitions in semiconductors - a key issue being their resonant interaction providing a coupling regime. In this book the reader will find descriptions of electrodynamics of conducting structures, quantum physics of semiconducto...

  20. Influence of charge carriers on corrugation of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Demid A.; Gorodetsky, Andrei; Baidakova, Marina V.

    2018-02-01

    Electronic degrees of freedom are predicted to play a significant role in mechanics of two-dimensional crystalline membranes. Here we show that appearance of charge carriers may cause a considerable impact on suspended graphene corrugation, thus leading to additional mechanism resulting in charge carriers mobility variation with their density. This finding may account for some details of suspended graphene conductivity dependence on its doping level and suggests that proper modeling of suspended graphene-based device properties must include the influence of charge carriers on its surface corrugation.

  1. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  2. Introduction to suspended-sediment sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, K. Michael; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the amount and timing of sediment transport in streams is important to those directly or indirectly responsible for developing and managing water and land resources. Such data are often used to judge the health of watershed and the success or failure of activities designed to mitigate adverse impacts of sediment on streams and stream habitats. This training class presents an introduction to methods currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to sample suspended-sediment concentrations in streams. The presentation is narrated, but you control the pace of the presentation. If the computer you are using can view 'MPEG' videos you will be able to take advantage of videos interspersed in the presentation. A test, found at the end of the presentation, can be taken to assess how well you understood the training material. The class, which is registered as class SW4416 with the National Training Center of the USGS, should take two or three hours to complete. In order to use the presentation provided via this Web page, you will need to download a large disc images (linked below) and 'burn' it to a blank CD-ROM using a CD-ROM recorder on your computer. The presentation will only run on a Windows-based personal computer (PC). The presentation was developed using Macromedia Director MX 20041 and is contained in the file 'SIR05-5077.exe' which should autolaunch. If it does not, the presentation can be started by double-clicking on the file name. A sound card and speakers are necessary to take advantage of narrations that accompany the presentation. Text of narrations is provided, if you are unable to listen to narrations. Instructions for installing and running the presentation are included in the file 'Tutorial.htm', which is on the CD. 1 Registered Trademark: Macromedia Incorporated

  3. Subwavelength core/shell cylindrical nanostructures for novel plasmonic and metamaterial devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; No, You-Shin

    2017-12-01

    In this review, we introduce novel plasmonic and metamaterial devices based on one-dimensional subwavelength nanostructures with cylindrical symmetry. Individual single devices with semiconductor/metal core/shell or dielectric/metal core/multi-shell structures experience strong light-matter interaction and yield unique optical properties with a variety of functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking, super-scattering/super-absorption, enhanced luminescence and nonlinear optical activities, and deep subwavelength-scale optical waveguiding. We describe the rational design of core/shell cylindrical nanostructures and the proper choice of appropriate constituent materials, which allow the efficient manipulation of electromagnetic waves and help to overcome the limitations of conventional homogeneous nanostructures. The recent developments of bottom-up synthesis combined with the top-down fabrication technologies for the practical applications and the experimental realizations of 1D subwavelength core/shell nanostructure devices are briefly discussed.

  4. Direct laser planting of hybrid Au-Ag/C nanostructures - nanoparticles, flakes and flowers

    CERN Document Server

    Manshina, Alina; Bashouti, Muhammad; Povolotskiy, Alexey; Petrov, Yuriy; Koshevoy, Igor; Christiansen, Silke; Tunik, Sergey; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for forming hybrid metal/carbonaceous nanostructures in a controlled direct laser planting process. Au-Ag nanoclusters in amorphous or crystalline carbonaceous matrices are formed with different morphology: nanoparticles, nanoflakes, and nanoflowers. In contrast to other generation techniques our approach is simple, involving only a single laser-induced process transforming supramolecular complexes dissolved in solvent such as acetone, acetophenone, or dichloroethane into hybrid nanostructures in the laser-affected area of the substrate. The morphology of the hybrid nanostructures can be steered by controlling the deposition parameters, the composition of the liquid phase and the type of substrate, amorphous or crystalline. The carbonaceous phase of the hybrid nanostructures consists of hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the case of nanoparticles and of crystalline orthorhombic graphite of nanoscale thickness in the case of flakes and flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is t...

  5. A Review on the Low-Dimensional and Hybridized Nanostructured Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, besides the breakthrough of high-rate growth of chemical vapor deposited single-crystal diamonds, numerous nanostructured diamond films have been rapidly developed in the research fields of the diamond-based sciences and industrial applications. The low-dimensional diamonds of two-dimensional atomic-thick nanofilms and nanostructural diamond on the surface of bulk diamond films have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. In addition, the diamond-related hybrid nanostructures of n-type oxide/p-type diamond and n-type nitride/p-type diamond, having high performance physical and chemical properties, are proposed for further applications. In this review, we first briefly introduce the three categories of diamond nanostructures and then outline the current advances in these topics, including their design, fabrication, characterization, and properties. Finally, we address the remaining challenges in the research field and the future activities.

  6. Facile method to prepare CdS nanostructure based on the CdTe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ligang; Chen, Yuehui; Wei, Zelu; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: xswu@nju.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS nanostructure is directly fabricated on CdTe film only by heating treatment under H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed atmosphere at a relatively low temperature (450 °C) with gold layer as the intermediate. • Nanostructure of CdS layer, varying from nanowires to nanosheets, may be controlled by the thickness of gold film. • The change of morphology adjusts its luminescence properties. - Abstract: Nanostructured cadmium sulfide (CdS) plays critical roles in electronics and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report a method to fabricate CdS nanostructure directly on CdTe film, via a thermal annealing method in H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed gas flow at a relatively low temperature (450 °C). The microstructure and optical properties of CdS nanostructure are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence. The morphology of CdS nanostructure, evolving from nanowires to nanosheets, can be controlled by the thickness of Au film deposited on the CdTe film. And CdS nanostructures are single crystalline with the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Raman spectroscopy under varying the excitation wavelengths confirm that synthesized CdS-CdTe films contain two layers, i.e., CdS nanostructure (top) and CdTe layer (bottom). The change of morphology modifies its luminescence properties. Obviously, through simply thermal annealing in H{sub 2}S/N{sub 2} mixed gas, fabricating CdS nanostructure on CdTe film can open up the new possibility for obtaining high efficient CdTe solar cell.

  7. Enhanced Ethanol Gas Sensing Properties of SnO2-Core/ZnO-Shell Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tharsika

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ~5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures.

  8. Enhanced Ethanol Gas Sensing Properties of SnO2-Core/ZnO-Shell Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharsika, T.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Akbar, Sheikh A.; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd; Hoong, Wong Yew

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ∼5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures. PMID:25116903

  9. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  10. Suspended sediment concentration profiles from synoptic satellite observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Rajawat, A; Chauhan, O.S.

    A method is developed to estimate vertical suspended sediment concentration (SSC) profiles in Gulf of Kachchh, from the sediment concentration values derived from synoptic observations of Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM). Under the influence of currents...

  11. Monosaccharide composition of suspended particles from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Sankaran, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    Neutral carbohydrates were determined as alditol acetates by capillary gas chromatography in the hydrolysates of suspended particulate samples (40) collected from 8 depths (approx 1 to 1,000 m) at 5 stations of the Bay of Bengal. Eight individual...

  12. Particles matter: Transformation of suspended particles in constructed wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulling, B.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that constructed wetlands transform suspended particles in (treated) municipal wastewater through selective precipitation in ponds, biological filtering by plankton communities and physical and biological retention in reed beds. These processes effectively remove faecal indicator

  13. Controlling light with resonant plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, R.

    2009-06-01

    dispersion in coaxial waveguides depends greatly on the refractive index and thickness of the dielectric channel. A plasmon phase shift up to ? occurs upon reflection off the aperture ends. The phase shift depends greatly on the coax geometry, thereby providing further tunability of the optical behavior of coaxial nanostructures. In chapter 7 we report on calculations of plasmon dispersion relations in coaxial waveguides. We find that certain coax geometries sustain modes of negative refractive index at optical frequencies. The spectral region of negative index can be shifted throughout the entire visible spectral range by changing the dielectric channel width. Furthermore, by fine-tuning the dielectric width, the special cases n=-1 and n=0 can be achieved in the coax, while maintaining a propagation length of 500 nm or more. Finally, in chapter 8 we present a novel optical metamaterial, composed of a single functional layer containing coupled coaxial Ag/GaP/Ag channels, that exhibits a negative index of refraction n=-2 in the blue. Using time-domain simulations we find that the metamaterial index is independent of the angle-of-incidence over an angular range 50 degrees and is independent of polarization. Altogether, this thesis demonstrates several new opportunities for resonant plasmonic nanostructures to control optical fields at the nanoscale. The presented concepts and insights hold great promise for new applications in integrated optics, photovoltaics, solid-state lighting, imaging below the diffraction limit, and even invisibility cloaking.

  14. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  15. Semi-automated quantification of living cells with internalized nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2016-01-15

    Background Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications in biology and medicine, such as agents for medical imaging or cancer therapy. In order to understand their interaction with living cells and their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made in tagging them. Although methods have been developed to measure the number of nanostructures internalized by the cells, there are only few approaches aimed to measure the number of cells that internalize the nanostructures, and they are usually limited to fixed-cell studies. Flow cytometry can be used for live-cell assays on large populations of cells, however it is a single time point measurement, and does not include any information about cell morphology. To date many of the observations made on internalization events are limited to few time points and cells. Results In this study, we present a method for quantifying cells with internalized magnetic nanowires (NWs). A machine learning-based computational framework, CellCognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and no internalized NWs, labeled with the fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, and subsequently to determine the percentage of cells with internalized NWs at different time points. In a “proof-of-concept”, we performed a study on human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells and human epithelial cervical cancer HeLa cells interacting with iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) NWs. Conclusions This study reports a novel method for the quantification of cells that internalize a specific type of nanostructures. This approach is suitable for high-throughput and real-time data analysis and has the potential to be used to study the interaction of different types of nanostructures in live-cell assays.

  16. Suspended-sediment and nutrient loads for Waiakea and Alenaio Streams, Hilo, Hawaii, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Todd K.; Jamison, Marcael T.J.; Nishimoto, Dale C.

    2008-01-01

    -mean loads were computed at the two Waiakea Stream sampling sites for the analyzed constituents, during the period October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2005. No record of daily-mean load was computed for the Alenaio Stream sampling site due to the problems with computing a discharge record. The maximum daily-mean loads for the upper site on Waiakea Stream for suspended sediment was 79 tons per day, and the maximum daily-mean loads for total nitrogen, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and total phosphorus were 1,350, 13, and 300 pounds per day, respectively. The maximum daily-mean loads for the lower site on Waiakea Stream for suspended sediment was 468 tons per day, and the maximum daily-mean loads for total nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate, and total phosphorus were 913, 8.5, and 176 pounds per day, respectively. From the estimated continuous daily-mean load record, all of the maximum daily-mean loads occurred during October 2003 and September 2004, except for suspended sediment load for the lower site, which occurred on September 15, 2005. Maximum values were not all caused by a single storm event. Overall, the record of daily-mean loads showed lower loads during storm events for suspended sediments and nutrients at the downstream site of Waiakea Stream during 2004 than at the upstream site. During 2005, however, the suspended sediment loads were higher at the downstream site than the upstream site. Construction of a flood control channel between the two sites in 2005 may have contributed to the change in relative suspended-sediment loads.

  17. Suspended-sediment and suspended-sand concentrations and loads for selected streams in the Mississippi River Basin, 1940-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, David C.; Cline, Teri L.; Glaspie, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents suspended-sediment concentration and streamflow data, describes load-estimation techniques used in the computation of annual suspended-sediment loads, and presents annual suspended-sediment loads for 48 streamgaging stations within the Mississippi River Basin. Available published, unpublished, and computed annual total suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads are presented for water years 1940 through 2009. When previously published annual loads were not available, total suspended-sediment and sand loads were computed using available data for water years 1949 through 2009. A table of suspended-sediment concentration and daily mean streamflow data used in the computation of annual loads is presented along with a table of compiled and computed annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads, annual streamflows, and flow-weighted concentrations for the 48 stations.

  18. Suspended sediment apportionment in a South-Korean mountain catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Axel; Meusburger, Katrin; Park, Ji-Hyung; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Due to the rapid agricultural expansion and intensification during the last decades in South-Korea, large areas of hill slope forests were transformed to paddies and vegetable fields. The intensive agriculture and the easily erodible soils in our catchment are a major reason for the increased erosion causing suspended sediments to infiltrate into the close drinking water reservoir. The drinking water reservoir Lake Soyang provides water supply for over ten million people in Seoul. Landscape managers need to know the exact origin of these sediments before they can create landscape amelioration schemes. We applied a compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) approach (Alewell et al., 2015) to apportion the sources of the suspended sediments between forest and agricultural soil contribution to the suspended sediments in a different catchment and applied the same approach to identify and quantify the different sources of the suspended sediments in the river(s) contributing to Lake Soyang. We sampled eight soil sites within the catchment considering the different landuse types forest, rice paddies, maize and vegetables. Suspended sediments were sampled at three outlets of the different sub-catchments. Soils and suspended sediments are analysed for bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, compound-specific carbon isotopes of plant-wax derived long-chain fatty acids and long-chain n-alkanes. Fatty acid and alkane isotopes are then used in mixing calculations and the mixing model software IsoSource to find out the contribution of the different source soils to the suspended sediments. We present first data of the source soils and the suspended sediments. C. Alewell, A. Birkholz, K. Meusburger, Y. Schindler-Wildhaber, L. Mabit, 2015. Sediment source attribution from multiple land use systems with CSIA. Biogeosciences Discuss. 12: 14245-14269.

  19. Self-assembly of suspended graphene wrinkles with high pre-tension and elastic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liusi; Niu, Tianxiao; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Xu, Lu; Cao, Guoxin; Cao, Anyuan

    2017-12-01

    Wrinkles exist universally in graphene-based structures, yet their controlled fabrication remains challenging; most graphene wrinkles have been produced either in attachment to elastic substrates or limited in small single sheets. Here, we utilize the phenomenon of gel-cracking to generate uniaxial strains locally on solution-precipitated graphene oxide (GO) sheets, thus creating suspended and aligned wrinkles over the trenches between cracked TiO2 islands. In particular, those GO wrinkles are subjected to a high pre-tension, which is important for making stable suspended configuration, as confirmed by theoretical calculations based on the wrinkle geometry and measured spring constants, respectively. As a result, in situ atomic force microscope indentation reveals elastic deformation with tunable spring constants depending on the gap width. We further obtain chemically reduced GO wrinkles with enhanced spring constants and reversible behavior after 1000 indentation cycles. Our suspended and aligned graphene wrinkles have potential applications in many areas such as sensors, actuators, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.

  20. Writing and functionalisation of suspended DNA nanowires on superhydrophobic pillar arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Miele, Ermanno

    2014-08-08

    Nanowire arrays and networks with precisely controlled patterns are very interesting for innovative device concepts in mesoscopic physics. In particular, DNA templates have proven to be versatile for the fabrication of complex structures that obtained functionality via combinations with other materials, for example by functionalisation with molecules or nanoparticles, or by coating with metals. Here, the controlled motion of the a three-phase contact line (TCL) of DNA-loaded drops on superhydrophobic substrates is used to fabricate suspended nanowire arrays. In particular, the deposition of DNA wires is imaged in situ, and different patterns are obtained on hexagonal pillar arrays by controlling the TCL velocity and direction. Robust conductive wires and networks are achieved by coating the wires with a thin layer of gold, and as proof of concept conductivity measurements are performed on single suspended wires. The plastic material of the superhydrophobic pillars ensures electrical isolation from the substrate. The more general versatility of these suspended nanowire networks as functional templates is outlined by fabricating hybrid organic-metal-semiconductor nanowires by growing ZnO nanocrystals onto the metal-coated nanowires.

  1. Writing and functionalisation of suspended DNA nanowires on superhydrophobic pillar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Ermanno; Accardo, Angelo; Falqui, Andrea; Marini, Monica; Giugni, Andrea; Leoncini, Marco; De Angelis, Francesco; Krahne, Roman; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-07

    Nanowire arrays and networks with precisely controlled patterns are very interesting for innovative device concepts in mesoscopic physics. In particular, DNA templates have proven to be versatile for the fabrication of complex structures that obtained functionality via combinations with other materials, for example by functionalisation with molecules or nanoparticles, or by coating with metals. Here, the controlled motion of the a three-phase contact line (TCL) of DNA-loaded drops on superhydrophobic substrates is used to fabricate suspended nanowire arrays. In particular, the deposition of DNA wires is imaged in situ, and different patterns are obtained on hexagonal pillar arrays by controlling the TCL velocity and direction. Robust conductive wires and networks are achieved by coating the wires with a thin layer of gold, and as proof of concept conductivity measurements are performed on single suspended wires. The plastic material of the superhydrophobic pillars ensures electrical isolation from the substrate. The more general versatility of these suspended nanowire networks as functional templates is outlined by fabricating hybrid organic-metal-semiconductor nanowires by growing ZnO nanocrystals onto the metal-coated nanowires. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Turbulence control of suspended matter aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, C. F.; Jones, S. E.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2003-04-01

    The size and properties of the aggregates which comprise suspended particulate matter (SPM) change on short time and length scales in shelf seas. There is experimental and theoretical evidence to suggest that turbulence plays a key role in aggregation but there is contradictory evidence with respect to disaggregation: it has been proposed that sinking stresses, rather than turbulent stresses, are the dominant control of disaggregation. But there is little observational evidence for turbulence control of particle properties. New observations are presented which provide compelling evidence for turbulence control of both aggregation and disaggregation. TKE dissipation and particle size were measured in situ at stratified sites in the northern North Sea in 110 m water depth during the period of weakening of the seasonal thermocline (in October/November) and in the Clyde Sea in 55 m water depth (April). There were similar vertical distributions of TKE dissipation E, SPM concentration C, and particle size D at both sites. At the base of the thermocline, there were minima in E and C, but a maximum in D, indicating that enhanced aggregation was occurring in this region of low turbulent stress. In the bottom mixed layer, E and C increased, while D decreased due to disaggregation in this region of increasing turbulent stress towards the seabed. Particles settling out of the low stress region at the base of the thermocline began to disaggregate when E increased to 3.2x10-6 watts m-2. D did not correlate directly with E because aggregation is a function of collision frequency (and hence of both C and E): this can be accounted for using a simplified theoretical aggregation model which treats flocs as self-similar fractal entities and allows simultaneous floc formation and break up, specified as functions of C and E. It was found that in the northern North Sea the measured D represents an equilibrium size predicted by the model, while in the Clyde Sea tidal variation in both C

  3. Polyaniline nanostructures tuning with oxidants in interfacial polymerization system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanxin Zeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of nanostructured polyanilines (PANIs were prepared through interfacial polymerization by using ammonium persulfate (APS as a single oxidant, and APS/FeCl3, APS/K2Cr2O7 as composite oxidants, respectively. It is observed that faster formation process and higher yield of nanostructured PANIs could be achieved in the presence of FeCl3 and K2Cr2O7. The as-prepared PANIs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurement. The influence of composite oxidants on the morphology, microstructure, and electrical and electrochemical properties of PANIs was discussed. Interestingly, when APS/K2Cr2O7 was used as the composite oxidants, PANI exhibited petal-like structure with high yield of 57.35% instead of general nanofibrous morphology formed in interfacial polymerization. Compared with those nanofibrous PANIs obtained by using APS as a single oxidant or APS/FeCl3 as composite oxidants, petal-like PANIs exhibited the largest specific capacitance (692.4 F/g at scan rate of 5 mV/s and highest cycle stability among them. It provides a new insight into the control of PANI nanostructures with high yield and energy storage ability by simply selecting suitable composite oxidants in interfacial polymerization.

  4. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development

  5. Magnetic Behavior of Surface Nanostructured 50-nm Nickel Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermally evaporated 50-nm nickel thin films coated on borosilicate glass substrates were nanostructured by excimer laser (0.5 J/cm2, single shot, DC electric field (up to 2 kV/cm and trench-template assisted technique. Nanoparticle arrays (anisotropic growth features have been observed to form in the direction of electric field for DC electric field treatment case and ruptured thin film (isotropic growth features growth for excimer laser treatment case. For trench-template assisted technique; nanowires (70–150 nm diameters have grown along the length of trench template. Coercive field and saturation magnetization are observed to be strongly dependent on nanostructuring techniques.

  6. Ultrathin Nanostructured Metals for Highly Transmissive Plasmonic Subtractive Color Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Beibei; Gao, Yongkang; Bartoli, Filbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic color filters employing a single optically-thick nanostructured metal layer have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to colorant-based color filtering technologies, due to their reliability, ease of fabrication, and high color tunability. However, their relatively low transmission efficiency (~30%) needs to be significantly improved for practical applications. The present work reports, for the first time, a novel plasmonic subtractive color filtering scheme that exploits the counter-intuitive phenomenon of extraordinary low transmission (ELT) through an ultrathin nanostructured metal film. This approach relies on a fundamentally different color filtering mechanism than that of existing plasmonic additive color filters, and achieves unusually high transmission efficiencies of 60 ~ 70% for simple architectures. Furthermore, owing to short-range interactions of surface plasmon polaritons at ELT resonances, our design offers high spatial resolution color filtering with compact pixel size close to the optical diffraction limit (~λ/2), creating solid applications ranging from imaging sensors to color displays. PMID:24100869

  7. Magnetostatic interactions in cylindrical nanostructures with non-uniform magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, O.J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Perez, L.M. [Departamento de Fisica y Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain); Laroze, D., E-mail: david.laroze@gmail.com [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D 55021 Mainz (Germany); Instituto de Alta Investigacion, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Fisica and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    Cylindrical magnetic nanostructures, like nanowires or nanotubes, should be used for the new generation of magnetic devices. Therefore, the investigation of inter-element interaction is an intense area of research. In this paper we investigated cylindrical nanostructures with non-uniform magnetization field. We focus on particles with a periodic magnetization function and using Fourier series we reduced the problem to a single integral expression. Analytical expressions for both, the self and the interaction magnetostatic energy, are given. These expressions are used to analyze multisegmented tubes, as a function of the number of segments and the distance between particles. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic cylindrical nanoparticles like nanowires or nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetostatic interaction between particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-uniform magnetization states.

  8. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling of Nano-Structured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for modeling structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with an equivalent-continuum model. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As an important example with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the model has been applied to determine the effective continuum geometry of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the equivalent-continuum model has been developed with an effective thickness. This effective thickness has been shown to be similar to, but slightly smaller than, the interatomic spacing of graphite.

  9. Modifier effects on chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaonong; Zhang, Xifeng; Yin, Hengbo; Wang, Aili; Xu, Yiqing

    2006-12-01

    Size-controlled chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured Cu was studied in the presence of a single modifier such as polyethylene glycols, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium dodecyl sulfate or a mixture of two different types of modifiers. The Cu nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average particle size and particle size distribution of the nanostructured Cu depend upon the type of modifiers and the modifier effect follows the order: PEG-2000 > SDBS > PEG-600 > SDS > PEG-6000. The experimental results indicate that due to the existence of a synergistic action, a mixture of two types of modifiers has a significant effect on the particle size and the size distribution of Cu nanoparticles.

  10. Modifier effects on chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Xiaonong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang Xifeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)]. E-mail: zhangxf_chzh@163.com; Yin Hengbo [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang Aili [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Xu Yiqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2006-12-30

    Size-controlled chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured Cu was studied in the presence of a single modifier such as polyethylene glycols, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium dodecyl sulfate or a mixture of two different types of modifiers. The Cu nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average particle size and particle size distribution of the nanostructured Cu depend upon the type of modifiers and the modifier effect follows the order: PEG-2000 > SDBS > PEG-600 > SDS > PEG-6000. The experimental results indicate that due to the existence of a synergistic action, a mixture of two types of modifiers has a significant effect on the particle size and the size distribution of Cu nanoparticles.

  11. DNA–melamine hybrid molecules: from self-assembly to nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Kumari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA–melamine hybrid molecular building blocks were synthesized using a phosphoramidation cross-coupling reaction with a zero linker approach. The self-assembly of the DNA–organic hybrid molecules was achieved by DNA hybridization. Following self-assembly, two distinct types of nanostructures in the form of linear chains and network arrays were observed. The morphology of the self-assembled nanostructures was found to depend on the number of DNA strands that were attached to a single melamine molecule.

  12. Stability of DNA nanostructures by junction penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Kim, Hyuncheol

    2013-04-01

    DNA nanostructures have been attracting much attention because of their well-controlled nanoarchitectural features. However, regulating the stability of DNA nanostructures is less well understood because of complexity. In this paper, the stability of DNA nanostructure was studied first in the form of simple building blocks. Since these DNA nanostructures have junctions on the center of the structures, the junctions were mainly investigated as a factor in the instability. In addition, regulation of the stability of complicated nanostructures based on these building blocks was achieved. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods were employed to monitor the conformation change with nano-scale sensitivity. The junction effect on DNA nanostructures was monitored with labeling FRET pairs at various conditions. DNA tile structures was also thoroughly studied by FRET.

  13. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  14. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  15. Chiroplasmonic DNA-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Willner, Itamar

    2017-09-01

    Chiroplasmonic properties of nanoparticles, organized using DNA-based nanostructures, have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest. Theory suggests that the circular dichroism spectra accompanying chiroplasmonic nanoparticle assemblies are controlled by the sizes, shapes, geometries and interparticle distances of the nanoparticles. In this Review, we present different methods to assemble chiroplasmonic nanoparticle or nanorod systems using DNA scaffolds, and we discuss the operations of dynamically reconfigurable chiroplasmonic nanostructures. The chiroplasmonic properties of the different systems are characterized by circular dichroism and further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging and theoretical modelling. We also outline the applications of chiroplasmonic assemblies, including their use as DNA-sensing platforms and as functional systems for information processing and storage. Finally, future perspectives in applying chiroplasmonic nanoparticles as waveguides for selective information transfer and their use as ensembles for chiroselective synthesis are discussed. Specifically, we highlight the upscaling of the systems to device-like configurations.

  16. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    Graphene, as the forefather of 2D-materials, attracts much attention due to its extraordinary properties like transparency, flexibility and outstanding high conductivity, together with a thickness of only one atom. However, graphene also possesses no band gap, which makes it unsuitable for many...... electronic applications like transistors. It has been shown theoretically that by nanostructuring pristine graphene, e.g. with regular holes, the electronic properties can be tuned and a band gap introduced. The size, distance and edge termination of these “defects” influence the adaptability....... Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...

  17. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  18. Spectroelectrochemistry of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2007-05-14

    This review is focused on charge-transfer reactions at carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. The spectroelectrochemistry of fullerenes deals with the spin states of fullerenes, the role of mono-anions and the reactivity of higher charged states in C60. The optical (Vis-NIR) spectroelectrochemistry of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) follows changes in the allowed optical transitions among the Van Hove singularities. The Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT benefits from strong resonance enhancement of the Raman scattering. Here, both semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are analyzed using the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-modes as well as the second order (D, G') and intermediate frequency modes. Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT allows the addressing of index-identified tubes and even single isolated nanotubes. Optical and Raman spectroelectrochemistry of fullerene peapods, C60@SWNT and C70@SWNT indicates effective shielding of the intratubular fullerene (peas). The most striking effect in the spectroelectrochemistry of peapods is the so-called "anodic Raman enhancement" of intratubular C60. Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) give a specific spectroscopic response in Vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry for the inner and the outer tube. They are better distinguishable by Raman spectroelectrochemistry which allows a precise tracing of the specific doping response of outer/inner tubes.

  19. Ballistic transport in graphene nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Terrés, Bernat

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the progress and understanding of the sources of disorder in nano-structured graphene devices. The first part of the thesis starts with the introduction of disordered two-terminal graphene nanoribbons of different aspect ratio, in order to unveil and characterize the amount of potential fluctuations on silicon dioxide ($SiO_2$) substrates. The experimental results reveal the diffusive nature of the transport behavior and a Coulomb blockade dominated transport r...

  20. Hydrogen storage in nanotubes & nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Froudakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last several years, a significant share of the scientific community has focused its attention on the hydrogen storage problem. Since 1997, when carbon nanotubes appeared to be a promising storage material, many theoretical and experimental groups have investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of these carbon nanostructures. These efforts were not always successful and consequently, the results obtained were often controversial. In the current review we attempt to summarize some the ...

  1. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkelid, K.M.; Zwiller, V.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced by electrostatic doping by local gates, and the E11 and E22 resonances in the nanotube could be probed using photocurrent spectroscopy. Current-voltage characteristics were

  2. Thermal and quantum phase slips in niobium-nitride nanowires based on suspended carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Kohei; Takagi, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Takayuki [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Moriyama, Satoshi, E-mail: MORIYAMA.Satoshi@nims.go.jp; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Morita, Yoshifumi, E-mail: morita@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Miki, Norihisa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tanabe, Takasumi [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Maki, Hideyuki, E-mail: maki@appi.keio.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2016-05-30

    Superconducting nanowires have attracted considerable attention due to their unique quantum-mechanical properties, as well as their potential as next-generation quantum nanodevices, such as single-photon detectors, phase-slip (PS) qubits, and other hybrid structures. In this study, we present the results of one-dimensional (1D) superconductivity in nanowires fabricated by coating suspended carbon nanotubes with a superconducting thin niobium nitride (NbN) film. In the resistance-temperature characteristic curves, hallmarks of 1D superconductivity with PS events are observed with unconventional negative magnetoresistance. We also confirm that a crossover occurs between thermal and quantum PSs as the temperature is lowered.

  3. Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    fields on catalysis : “Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures.” For this effort a workshop was organized and held at Brown... Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued...Support for current award "Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" Report Title This is the final report of the ARO project of

  4. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  5. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  6. Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

    2013-09-24

    Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

  7. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns theoretical aspects of electrons in man-made nanostruc- tures. Advances in nanofabrication technology during recent decades have made it possible to produce electrical devices on the nano-scale, whose func- tionality is determined by the quantum mechanical nature of a single...... in the possibilities o®ered by the quantum mechanical behavior of electrons when it comes to informa- tion processing. This branch of research is also concerned with fundamental questions in physics. Besides an introduction to the above-mentioned subjects, the thesis con- tains a number of contributions to the ¯elds...... of coherent electron manip- ulation and the statistical description of electron transport through nano- devices. The physics of the electrons are described with a combination of numerical methods, developed and applied in the thesis, and more analytical approaches, which are also discussed. The thesis...

  8. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  9. Is there a shift to "active nanostructures"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure "changes or evolves its state during its operation," according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a "shift" to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  10. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  11. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  12. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  13. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  14. Semiconductor quantum optics with tailored photonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laucht, Arne

    2011-06-15

    This thesis describes detailed investigations of the effects of photonic nanostructures on the light emission properties of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. Nanoscale optical cavities and waveguides are employed to enhance the interaction between light and matter, i.e. photons and excitons, up to the point where optical non-linearities appear at the quantum (single photon) level. Such non-linearities are an essential component for the realization of hardware for photon based quantum computing since they can be used for the creation and detection of non-classical states of light and may open the way to new genres of quantum optoelectronic devices such as optical modulators and optical transistors. For single semiconductor quantum dots in photonic crystal nanocavities we investigate the coupling between excitonic transitions and the highly localized mode of the optical cavity. We explore the non-resonant coupling mechanisms which allow excitons to couple to the cavity mode, even when they are not spectrally in resonance. This effect is not observed for atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments and its origin is traced to phonon-assisted scattering for small detunings ({delta}E<{proportional_to}5 meV) and a multi-exciton-based, Auger-like process for larger detunings ({delta}E >{proportional_to}5 meV). For quantum dots in high-Q cavities we observe the coherent coupling between exciton and cavity mode in the strong coupling regime of light-matter interaction, probe the influence of pure dephasing on the coherent interaction at high excitation levels and high lattice temperatures, and examine the coupling of two spatially separated quantum dots via the exchange of real and virtual photons mediated by the cavity mode. Furthermore, we study the spontaneous emission properties of quantum dots in photonic crystal waveguide structures, estimate the fraction of all photons emitted into the propagating waveguide mode, and demonstrate the on-chip generation of

  15. Theory of hyperbolic stratified nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Herman M. K.; Dezfouli, Mohsen Kamandar; Axelrod, Simon; Hughes, Stephen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the enhancement of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using hyperbolic stratified nanostructures and compare to metal nanoresonators. The photon Green function of each nanostructure within its environment is first obtained from a semianalytical modal theory, which is used in a quantum optics formalism of the molecule-nanostructure interaction to model the SERS spectrum. An intuitive methodology is presented for calculating the single-molecule enhancement factor (SMEF), which is also able to predict known experimental SERS enhancement factors of a gold nanodimer. We elucidate the important figures-of-merit of the enhancement and explore these for different designs. We find that the use of hyperbolic stratified materials can enhance the photonic local density of states (LDOS) by close to two times in comparison to pure metal nanostructures, when both designed to work at the same operating wavelengths. However, the increased LDOS is accompanied by higher electric field concentration within the lossy hyperbolic material, which leads to increased quenching that serves to reduce the overall detected SERS enhancement in the far field. For nanoresonators with resonant localized surface plasmon wavelengths in the near-infrared, the SMEF for the hyperbolic stratified nanostructure is approximately one order of magnitude lower than the pure metal counterpart. Conversely, we show that by detecting the Raman signal using a near-field probe, hyperbolic materials can provide an improvement in SERS enhancement compared to using pure metal nanostructures when the probe is sufficiently close (<50 nm ) to the Raman active molecule at the plasmonic hotspot.

  16. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G.; Puntes, Victor; Arbiol, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  17. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Aziz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  18. Temperature signal in suspended sediment export from an Alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Stutenbecker, Laura; Bakker, Maarten; Silva, Tiago A.; Schlunegger, Fritz; Lane, Stuart N.; Loizeau, Jean-Luc; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2018-01-01

    Suspended sediment export from large Alpine catchments ( > 1000 km2) over decadal timescales is sensitive to a number of factors, including long-term variations in climate, the activation-deactivation of different sediment sources (proglacial areas, hillslopes, etc.), transport through the fluvial system, and potential anthropogenic impacts on the sediment flux (e.g. through impoundments and flow regulation). Here, we report on a marked increase in suspended sediment concentrations observed near the outlet of the upper Rhône River Basin in the mid-1980s. This increase coincides with a statistically significant step-like increase in basin-wide mean air temperature. We explore the possible explanations of the suspended sediment rise in terms of changes in water discharge (transport capacity), and the activation of different potential sources of fine sediment (sediment supply) in the catchment by hydroclimatic forcing. Time series of precipitation and temperature-driven snowmelt, snow cover, and ice melt simulated with a spatially distributed degree-day model, together with erosive rainfall on snow-free surfaces, are tested to explore possible reasons for the rise in suspended sediment concentration. We show that the abrupt change in air temperature reduced snow cover and the contribution of snowmelt, and enhanced ice melt. The results of statistical tests show that the onset of increased ice melt was likely to play a dominant role in the suspended sediment concentration rise in the mid-1980s. Temperature-driven enhanced melting of glaciers, which cover about 10 % of the catchment surface, can increase suspended sediment yields through an increased contribution of sediment-rich glacial meltwater, increased sediment availability due to glacier recession, and increased runoff from sediment-rich proglacial areas. The reduced extent and duration of snow cover in the catchment are also potential contributors to the rise in suspended sediment concentration through

  19. Electron emission from nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safir, Abdelilah

    In this dissertation, standardized methods for measuring electron emission (EE) from nanostructured materials are established. Design of an emitter array platform, synthesis and nanomanipulation of different types of are successfully conducted. Preexisting as well as novel nanostructures are examined for possible use as electron point sources. Three main categories of emitters are under evaluation: oxide nanowires, metallic nanowires and carbon based nanomaterials (CBNs). Tungsten oxides nanowires have low work function, then metallic nanowires have high electrical conductivity and abundant number of free electrons at and below their Fermi level and lastly, CBNs have superior electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal properties. This evaluation is designed to compare and choose among the nanoemitters that are suitable for EE. Simulation through theoretical modeling is provided to optimize the parameters directly or indirectly affecting EE properties. The models are to enhance the emitter's performance through increase the packing density, reduce the field screening effect, lower the turn-on and the threshold electric fields and increase the emission current densities. The current estimations and the modeling of the validity regions where EE types theoretically exist, help to select and fabricate optimum emitters. An assembly consisting of sample substrate, electrical feedthroughs, electrodes, nano/micro-manipulator and insulators are mounted within a vacuum chamber. An ion vacuum pump and a turbo pump are used to reach a vacuum pressure of 10-7 Torr. Two systems are used for EE characterization of nanostructures: bulk and In-situ configurations. The bulk investigation is realized by designing a vacuum chamber and different sample holders that can resist harsh environment as well as high temperature for both FE and TE experiments. In-situ experiments are conducted in the chamber of the scanning electron microscope (SEM), it consists of designing special sample

  20. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  1. Practical roadmap and limits to nanostructured photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Richard R; Osedach, Timothy P; Brown, Patrick R; Rowehl, Jill A; Bulović, Vladimir

    2011-12-22

    The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is addressed a posteriori. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nano-PV technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also addressed. The analysis suggests that a practical single-junction laboratory power conversion efficiency limit of 17% and a two-cell tandem power conversion efficiency limit of 24% are possible for nano-PVs, which, when combined with operating lifetimes of 10 to 15 years, could position them as a transformational technology for solar energy markets. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Increased anticoagulant activity of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers by nanoscale organization on DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Zhang, Alex M.; Shiyuan Li, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Control over thrombin activity is much desired to regulate blood clotting in surgical and therapeutic situations. Thrombin-binding RNA and DNA aptamers have been used to inhibit thrombin activity and thus the coagulation cascade. Soluble DNA aptamers, as well as two different aptamers tethered...... by a flexible single-strand linker, have been shown to possess anticoagulant activity. Here, we link multiple aptamers at programmed positions on DNA nanostructures to optimize spacing and orientation of the aptamers and thereby to maximize anticoagulant activity in functional assays. By judicious engineering...... of the DNA nanostructures, we have created a novel, functional DNA nanostructure, which is a multi-aptamer inhibitor with activity eightfold higher than free aptamer. Reversal of the thrombin inhibition was also achieved by the use of single-stranded DNA antidotes, thus enabling significant control over...

  3. Piezoelectric nanostructures of zinc oxide: Synthesis, characterization and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Puxian

    In this thesis, a systematic study has been carried out on the synthesis, characterization and device fabrication of piezoelectric ZnO nanstructures. The achieved results are composed of the following four parts. Firstly, through a systematic investigation on the Sn-catalyzed ZnO nanostructure, an improved understanding of the chemical and physical process occurring during the growth of hierarchical nanostructures has been achieved. Decomposed Sn from SnO2 has been successfully demonstrated and proved to be an effective catalyst guiding the growth of not only aligned ZnO nanowires, but also the hierarchical nanowire-nanoribbon junction arrays and nanopropeller arrays. During the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) catalyzing growth process at high temperature, Sn in the liquid state has been proved to be able to guide the growth of nanowires and nanoribbons in terms of growth directions, side facets, and crystallographic interfaces between Sn and ZnO nanostructures. Secondly, using pure ZnO as the only source material, by precisely tuning and controlling the growth kinetics, a variety of hierarchical polar surface dominated nanostructures have been achieved, such as single crystal nanorings, nanobows, nanosprings and superlattice nanohelices. High yield synthesis of ZnO nanosprings over 50% has been successfully obtained by mainly controlling the pre-pumping level associated with the partial pressure of residual oxygen during the vapor-solid growth process. The rigid superlattice nanohelices of ZnO have been discovered, which is a result of minimization of the electrostatic energy induced by polar surfaces. The formation process of the nanohelix has been systematically characterized. Thirdly, two new strategies have been successfully developed for fabricating ZnO quantum dots and synthesis of ZnO nanodiskettes and nanotubes. The formation process is based on a common concept of self-assembly. Finally, a series of devices and applications studies based on several piezoelectric

  4. Hydrodynamic and suspended sediment transport controls on river mouth morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, F.; Piliouras, A.; Garra, R.; Guerin, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Rowland, J.; Paola, C.

    2014-01-01

    mouths building into standing bodies of water have strikingly varied growth habits. This presents a compelling pattern formation problem that is also of great practical relevance for subsurface prediction and managing coastal wetlands. Here we present a generalized 2.5-dimensional potential vorticity (PV) theory that explains sedimentation patterns of a sediment-laden stationary jet by coupling an understanding of vorticity with suspended sediment concentration fields. We explore the physical meaning of this new sediment-PV definition, and its impact on outflow depositional patterns, by analyzing data from a shallow wall-bounded plane jet experiment and by discussing new theoretical insights. A key result is that lateral advection and diffusion of suspended sediment are directly proportional to jet vorticity, a feature that reveals the mechanistic process that forms elongated channels by focused levee deposition. The new PV theory constitutes a more generalized mathematical framework that expands the Rouse theory for the equilibrium of suspended sediment.

  5. Synthetic lipid membrane channels formed by designed DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G; List, Jonathan; Renner, Stephan; Mayer, Michael; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-11-16

    We created nanometer-scale transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers by means of self-assembled DNA-based nanostructures. Scaffolded DNA origami was used to create a stem that penetrated and spanned a lipid membrane, as well as a barrel-shaped cap that adhered to the membrane, in part via 26 cholesterol moieties. In single-channel electrophysiological measurements, we found similarities to the response of natural ion channels, such as conductances on the order of 1 nanosiemens and channel gating. More pronounced gating was seen for mutations in which a single DNA strand of the stem protruded into the channel. Single-molecule translocation experiments show that the synthetic channels can be used to discriminate single DNA molecules.

  6. A kinetic study of biohydrogen production from glucose, molasses and cheese whey by suspended and attached cells of Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascari, Dario; Cappelletti, Martina; Mendes, Jocelia De Sousa; Alberini, Andrea; Scimonelli, Francesco; Manfreda, Chiara; Longanesi, Luca; Zannoni, Davide; Pinelli, Davide; Fedi, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Batch tests of H2 production from glucose, molasses and cheese whey by suspended and immobilized cells of Thermotoga neapolitana were conducted to develop a kinetic model of the process. H2 production was inhibited by neither H2 (up to 0.7 mg L(-1)) nor O2 (up to 0.2 mg L(-1)). The H2 specific rates obtained at different substrate concentrations were successfully interpolated with Andrew's inhibition model. With glucose and molasses, biofilms performed better than suspended cells. The suspended-cell process was successfully scaled-up to a 19-L bioreactor. Assays co-fed with molasses and cheese whey led to higher H2 productivities and H2/substrate yields than the single-substrate tests. The simulation of the suspended-cell continuous-flow process indicated the potential attainment of H2 productivities higher than those of the batch tests (up to 3.6 mmol H2 h(-1) L(-1) for molasses and 0.67 mmol H2 h(-1) L(-1) for cheese whey) and allowed the identification of the optimal dilution rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Process synthesis and optimization for the production of carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyuke, S E; Mamvura, T A; Liu, K; Sibanda, V [School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Meyyappan, M [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Varadan, V K, E-mail: sunny.iyuke@wits.ac.z [HiDEC, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas (United States)

    2009-09-16

    A swirled fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition (SFCVD) reactor has been manufactured and optimized to produce carbon nanostructures on a continuous basis using in situ formation of floating catalyst particles by thermal decomposition of organometallic ferrocene. During the process optimization, carbon nanoballs were produced in the absence of a catalyst at temperatures higher than 1000 {sup 0}C, while carbon nanofibres, single-walled carbon nanotubes, helical carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were produced in the presence of a catalyst at lower temperatures of between 750 and 900 {sup 0}C. The optimum conditions for producing carbon nanostructures were a temperature of 850 {sup 0}C, acetylene flow rate of 100 ml min{sup -1}, and acetylene gas was used as the carbon source. All carbon nanostructures produced have morphologies and diameters ranging from 15 to 200 nm and wall thicknesses between 0.5 and 0.8 nm. In comparison to the quantity of MWCNTs produced with other methods described in the literature, the SFCVD technique was superior to floating catalytic CVD (horizontal fixed bed) and microwave CVD but inferior to rotary tube CVD.

  8. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  9. Dynamic transport of suspended sediment by solitary wave: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    cho, JaeNam; Kim, DongHyun; Hwang, KyuNam; Lee, SeungOh

    2016-04-01

    Solitary waves are able to transport a large amount of suspended sediment when approaching on the beach, which sometimes causes - serious beach erosion, especially in the east and south coastal lines in Korea. But it has rarely been known about the method how to evaluate or estimate the amount of beach erosion caused by solitary waves. Experimental assessment is necessary to comprehend the process of sediment transport on a slope. The prismatic rectangular channel is 12 m long, 0.8 m wide, and 0.75 m high. A sluice gate is applied at prismatic channel in order to produce the solitary waves. Upstream water depth is more than channel water depth and the sluice gate is suddenly opened to simulate conditions of solitary waves. A sand slope with a 1/6 and a sediment thickness is 0.03 m. The experimental sediments are used anthracite (d_50=1.547 mm ,C_u=1.38) and Jumoonjin sand (d_50=0.627 mm ,C_u=1.68). Specific laboratory equipment are designed to collect suspended sediment samples at the same time along the wave propagation at 5 points with evenly space. Each amount of sampling is approximately 25 ml and they are completely dried in oven over 24 hours according to the USGS (Guideline and standard techniques and method 3-C4). Two video cameras (Model No. : Sony, HDR-XR550) are mounted for capturing images at top and side-view when the processes of solitary wave and run up/down on slope. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between Suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Turbidity is used to verify suspended sediment concentration. Dimensionless analyses of experimental results carried out in this study. One dimensionless parameter is expressed with pressure of solitary wave on a slope to suspended sediment concentration, which is concerned about lifting force. The other is relate to drag force presenting with run up/down velocity on a slope and

  10. Design of a LC-tuned magnetically suspended rotating gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2011-04-01

    A inductor-capacitor (LC) tuned magnetically suspended rotating gyroscope prototype is designed and analyzed. High permeability ferrite cores are used for providing suspension force, and the rotation system is designed using the switched reluctance motor (SRM) principle. According to the LC-tuned principle, magnetic suspension force expression has been derived. The electromagnetic properties of the gyroscope are simulated by the Ansoft Maxwell software. And our result is expected to be able to serve as a prototype of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) magnetically suspended rotating gyroscope in future practical applications.

  11. Quantum Hall effect in multi-terminal suspended graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zhao, Yue; Bolotin, Kirill; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    The integer and fractional quantum hall effects have been already observed in two terminal suspended graphene devices. However in this two probe device geometry, mixing between magnetoresistance ρxx and Hall resistance ρxy for incompletely developed quantum Hall states leads to substantial deviation of conductance plateaus values. In this talk, we present the experimental results from four terminal suspended graphene devices. The quality of quantum Hall effect will be discussed in muti-terminal device geometry in conjunction with the current-induced annealing process to improve the quality of graphene samples.

  12. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  13. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we

  14. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Adam, Jost; Barié, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    We propose multi-periodic nanostructures yielded by superposition of multiple binary gratings for wide control over photon emission in thin-film devices. We present wavelength- and angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements of multi-periodically nanostructured organic light-emitting layers...

  15. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  16. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  17. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  18. MEMS fabrication and frequency sweep for suspending beam and plate electrode in electrostatic capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxiong; Song, Weixing

    2018-01-01

    We report a MEMS fabrication and frequency sweep for a high-order mode suspending beam and plate layer in electrostatic micro-gap semiconductor capacitor. This suspended beam and plate was designed with silicon oxide (SiO2) film which was fabricated using bulk silicon micromachining technology on both side of a silicon substrate. The designed semiconductor capacitors were driven by a bias direct current (DC) and a sweep frequency alternative current (AC) in a room temperature for an electrical response test. Finite element calculating software was used to evaluate the deformation mode around its high-order response frequency. Compared a single capacitor with a high-order response frequency (0.42 MHz) and a 1 × 2 array parallel capacitor, we found that the 1 × 2 array parallel capacitor had a broader high-order response range. And it concluded that a DC bias voltage can be used to modulate a high-order response frequency for both a single and 1 × 2 array parallel capacitors.

  19. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography...... and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...... has been produced by injection molding with good structure transfer fidelity. Thus we have demonstrated that by utilizing well-established fabrication techniques, nanostructured steel shims that are used in injection molding, a technique that allows low cost mass fabrication of plastic items...

  20. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  1. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    , the need to fully understand how size and morphology affect domain behaviour in small scale ferroelectrics is obvious. In this talk, observations from a programme of study examining domains in meso and nano-scale BaTiO3 shapes, that have been cut directly from bulk single crystal using focused ion beam milling, will be presented. In general, the equilibrium static domain configurations that occur appear to be the result of a simultaneous desire to minimize both the macroscopic strain and depolarizing fields developed on cooling through the Curie Temperature. While such governing factors might be obvious, the specific patterns that result as a function of morphology are often non-intuitive, and a series of images of domains in nanodots, rods and wires will be presented and rationalised. In addition, the nature in which morphological factors influence domain dynamics during switching will be discussed, with particular focus on axial switching in nanowires, and the manner in which local surface perturbations (such as notches and antinotches) affect domain wall propagation. In collaboration with Alina Schilling, Li-Wu Chang, Mark McMillen, Raymond McQuaid, and Leo McGilly, Queen's University Belfast; Gustau Catalan, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona; and James Scott, University of Cambridge.

  2. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    Novel nanotechnologies have allowed great improvements in the syn-thesis of catalysts with well-controlled size, shape, and surface properties. Transition metal nanostructures with specific sizes and shapes, for instance, have shown great promise as catalysts with high selectivities and relative ease of recycling. Researchers have already demonstrated new selective catalysis with solution-dispersed or supported-metal nanocatalysts, in some cases applied to new types of reactions. Several challenges remain, however, particularly in improving the structural stability of the catalytic active phase. Core-shell nanostructures are nanoparticles encapsulated and protected by an outer shell that isolates the nanoparticles and prevents their migration and coalescence during the catalytic reactions. The synthesis and characterization of effective core-shell catalysts has been at the center of our research efforts and is the focus of this Account. Efficient core-shell catalysts require porous shells that allow free access of chemical species from the outside to the surface of nanocatalysts. For this purpose, we have developed a surface-protected etching process to prepare mesoporous silica and titania shells with controllable porosity. In certain cases, we can tune catalytic reaction rates by adjusting the porosity of the outer shell. We also designed and successfully applied a silica-protected calcination method to prepare crystalline shells with high surface area, using anatase titania as a model system. We achieved a high degree of control over the crystallinity and porosity of the anatase shells, allowing for the systematic optimization of their photocatalytic activity. Core-shell nanostructures also provide a great opportunity for controlling the interaction among the different components in ways that might boost structural stability or catalytic activity. For example, we fabricated a SiO₂/Au/N-doped TiO₂ core-shell photocatalyst with a sandwich structure that showed

  3. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF HEMATITE NANOSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Munayco S., J.; Centro Brasilero de Pesquisas Físicas.; 5aavedra V., I.; Departamento Académico Física del Sólido- Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú; Munayco S., P.; Centro Brasilero de Pesquisas Físicas; Ale B., N.; Departamento Académico de Química Analítica, FQIQ - Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured a-Fe203 (hematite) was produced usíng high-energy ball milling and analized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mi.issbauer spectrometry and magnetization measurements. The results showed that after 2 h milling, a-Fe203 nanosize particles were obtained about 15 nm. The 57 Fe Mossbauer spectrometry correlated with magnetometry showed also that Morin transition was notobserved after 0,75 h milling. Son estudiados los procedimientos de producción nanopartículas de hematita, evaluá...

  4. Transport Properties of Nanostructured Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Despite of its many wonderful properties, pristine graphene has one major drawback: it does not have a band gap, which complicates its applications in electronic devices. Many routes have been suggested to overcome this difficulty, such as cutting graphene into nanoribbons, using chemical methods...... device operation. In this talk I elaborate these ideas and review the state-of-the-art both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view. I also introduce two new ideas: (1) triangular antidots, and (2) nanobubbles formed in graphene. Both of these nanostructuring methods are predicted...

  5. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  6. Hot-Spot Engineering in 3D Multi-Branched Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Chirumamilla, Anisha; Roberts, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The detection of probe molecules at ultralow concentrations, even at the single-molecule level, can be addressed with the breakthrough concept of plasmonic hot-spot engineering. In view of that, the fabrication of nanostructures endowed with sub-10 nm gaps and extremely large near-field enhanceme...

  7. Investigation of milling processes of semiconductor zinc oxide nanostructured powders by X-ray phase analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, I. A.; Averin, I. A.; Yakushova, N. D.; Vishnevskaya, G. V.; Sychov, M. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2017-11-01

    The processes of mechanical activation of nanostructured zinc oxide powders are investigated by X-ray phase analysis. It was determined, that samples remain in a single phase state during the milling process. The particle size decreases according to the linear time law, and microstrains grow parabolically.

  8. Direct mechanical dispersion and in vitro culture of fusiform rust fungus single basidiospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex M. Diner

    1999-01-01

    Single basidiospores of Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme were cast from telia suspended over a solidified nutritional medium affixed to an operating orbital shaker. Spores thus mechanically dispersed and isolated, germinated to develop single-genotype colonies.

  9. Suspended DNA structural characterization by TEM diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2017-12-01

    In this work, micro-fabrication, super-hydrophobic properties and a physiologically compatible preparation step are combined and tailored to obtain background free biological samples to be investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) diffraction technique. The validation was performed evaluating a well-known parameter such as the DNA interbases value. The diffraction spacing measured is in good agreement with those obtained by HRTEM direct metrology and by traditional X-Ray diffraction. This approach addresses single molecule studies in a simplified and reproducible straightforward way with respect to more conventional and widely used techniques. In addition, it overcomes the need of long and elaborated samples preparations: the sample is in its physiological environment and the HRTEM data acquisition occurs without any background interference, coating, staining or additional manipulation. The congruence in the results reported in this paper makes the application of this approach extremely promising towards those molecules for which crystallization remains a hurdle, such as cell membrane proteins and fibrillar proteins.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures from high density polyethylene (HDPE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, M. N. M.; Hashim, M. S.; Hussin, R.; Aida, S.; Kamdi, Z.; Ainuddin, AR; Yunos, MZ

    2017-10-01

    In this study, carbon nanostructures were synthesized from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by single-stage chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. In CVD, iron was used as catalyst and pyrolitic of carbon source was conducted at temperature 700, 800 and 900°C for 30 minutes. Argon gas was used as carrier gas with flow at 90 sccm. The synthesized carbon nanostructures were characterized by FESEM, EDS and calculation of carbon yield (%). FESEM micrograph shows that the carbon nanostructures were only grown as nanofilament when synthesized from PET waste. The synthesization of carbon nanostructure at 700°C was produced smooth and the smallest diameter nanofilament compared to others. The carbon yield of synthesized carbon nanostructures from PET was lower from HDPE. Furthermore, the carbon yield is recorded to increase with increasing of reaction temperature for all samples. Elemental study by EDS analysis were carried out and the formation of carbon nanostructures was confirmed after CVD process. Utilization of polymer waste to produce carbon nanostructures is beneficial to ensure that the carbon nanotechnology will be sustained in future.

  11. Spatial distribution of soil erosion and suspended sediment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sediment transport rate for Chou-Shui river basin ... 5, Anzhong Road,. Tainan 70970, Taiwan. 4. Department of Hydraulics and Ocean Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1,. University Road, Tainan ... surface runoff discharge, suspended sediment transport rate, quantity of soil erosion, and spatial distribu-.

  12. Calamine lotion: experimenting with a new suspending agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, A; Greenwood, R; Akin-Isijola, A; Bullard, J

    1999-01-01

    The use of a new suspending agent is investigated. Calamine lotion, USP contains bentonite magma as a suspending agent. In this study, bentonite magma was partially or completely replaced with a new suspending agent called tahini. Tahini is sesame paste composed of crushed sesame seeds in sesame oil. It is frequently used in middle eastern food as a thickening and suspending agent. Calamine lotion was prepared, generally, according to the USP method. The formula contained 40% v/v magma. Tahini was added instead of bentonite magma by replacing 100%, 99%, 90%, 75%, 50% and 25% of the magma. The sedimentation volume and the degree of flocculation were calculated for the resulting preparations. Rheological characteristics of bentonite- and tahini-containing lotions were also determined. Sedimentation volume showed 0.723 and 0.851 (p=0.05) for the lotions containing 100% bentonite and 100% tahini, respectively. The degree of flocculation was 2.00 and 2.35 (p=0.05) for the 100% bentonite and 100% tahini lotions, respectively. The rheograms of all the suspensions showed pseudoplastic flow. Overall, the use of tahini in calamine lotion has improved the physical stability of the formula.

  13. Turbulence Flow Characteristics of Suspended Sediments and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These are inturn integrated to give the hydraulic resistance law for sediment laden flow. The law of velocity distribution in open channel flow with suspended sediments was derived introducing Monin-Obukhov Length L . The distribution equation agrees well with the observation of velocity profile in the experiments.

  14. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignardi, L.; Dorp, W.F. van; Gottardi, S.; Ivashenko, O.; Dudin, P.; Barinov, A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Stöhr, M.; Rudolf, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron

  15. Geochemistry of suspended and settling solids in two freshwater lakes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    This study describes the 1987–1992 time variationof the bulk chemical composition, levels of heavymetals, arsenic, nitrogen and phosporous insuspended and settling solids in Lake Volkerak andLake Zoom (The Netherlands). Suspended and setlingsolids were collected with continuous flowcentrifuges and

  16. Comparison of Suspended Solid Separation in Advanced Storm Overflow Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Sørensen, Morten Steen

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory investigation of the separation of suspended solids in a circular weir overflow and a vortex separator. The basic idea is to evaluate the efficiency of a vortical flow in the overflow chamber, and to compare these results with other overflow structures....

  17. Current-use insecticides, phosphates and suspended solids in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Western Cape orchard areas, the last pesticide application of the growing season in summer takes place at the end of February. Pesticides, total phosphates and total suspended solids (TSS) were measured in the Lourens River at the beginning of April 1999 prior to the first rainfall of the rainy season and in the middle of ...

  18. Reduction in density of suspended - sediment - laden natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Desa, E.; Smith, D.; Peshwe, V.B.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, J.A.E.

    to 0.4% - 4.5%) that of the density of the same water without suspended sediment. Teh values of peff in a given site differed from one tidal cycle to another (approx equal to 1.9%). These values varied slightly (less than 0.8%) from mid-tide to slack...

  19. Transport of suspended particles in turbulent open channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugem, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments are performed in order to investigate suspended sediment transport in a turbulent open channel flow. The first experiment used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measure the fluid velocity with a high spatial resolution, while particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used to measure

  20. Spatial Distribution of Suspended Particulate Matter in Mtwapa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface water concentrations of inorganic nutrients and suspended particulate matter (SPM) components from Mtwapa and Shirazi creeks in Kenya were measured and compared. This was aimed at assessing the contribution of phytoplankton carbon, particulate organic carbon (POC) and detritus on the total SPM pool, and ...

  1. Nature of suspended particulate matter and concentrations of heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentrations of metals in bottom sediment in the Tanzanian waters of Lake Victoria and the nature of suspended particulate matter (SPM) were analysed. The objective of the study was to compare levels of metals in sediment from different locations and to establish their sources. Metal concentrations were higher in ...

  2. Amino sugars in suspended particulate matter from the Bay of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amino sugars (AS)are important constituents of organic matter.However,very little is known about their cycling in marine waters.In this research,we assessed the distribution and cycling of these compounds in waters of the Bay of Bengal.For this purpose,samples of suspended particulate matter (SPM)were collected from 8 ...

  3. Stabilised suspending efficiency of Laponite XLG and sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charged drugs like Sulphamerazine may make pseudoplastic/plastic materials become Newtonian and loose their suspending power. In this study ... For this purpose, the rheograms of the systems were obtained by the use of a Haake rotoviscometer RV 12 utilizing a cup and rotor sensor system MV 1. In the absence of ...

  4. Spin Transport in High-Quality Suspended Graphene Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guimaraes, Marcos H. D.; Veligura, A.; Zomer, P. J.; Maassen, T.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Tombros, N.; van Arees, B. J.; Wees, B.J. van

    We measure spin transport in high mobility suspended graphene (mu approximate to 10(5)cm(2)/(V s)), obtaining a (spin) diffusion coefficient of 0.1 m(2)/s and giving a lower bound on the spin relaxation time (tau(s) approximate to 150 ps) and spin relaxation length (lambda(s) = 4.7 mu m) for

  5. 40 CFR 52.330 - Control strategy: Total suspended particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Total suspended... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.330 Control strategy..., the State must repromulgate Regulation No. 1 to satisfy reasonably available control technology...

  6. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Abizia zygia gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The suspending properties of Albizia zygia gum (family Mimosoideae) were evaluated comparatively with those of Compound Tragacanth, Acacia and Gelatin at concentration range of 0.5 – 4.0%w/v in Sulphadimidine suspension. Characterization tests were carried out on purified Albizia zygia gum. Sedimentation ...

  7. Discrete Dynamics of Nanoparticle Channelling in Suspended Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Tim; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Andersen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We have observed a previously undescribed stepwise oxidation of mono- and few layer suspended graphene by silver nanoparticles in situ at subnanometer scale in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Over the range of 600–850 K, we observe crystallographically oriented channelling...

  8. Method for separating biological cells. [suspended in aqueous polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D. E. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method for separating biological cells by suspending a mixed cell population in a two-phase polymer system is described. The polymer system consists of droplet phases with different surface potentials for which the cell populations exhibit different affinities. The system is subjected to an electrostatic field of sufficient intensity to cause migration of the droplets with an attendant separation of cells.

  9. Opportunities Suspended: The Disparate Impact of Disciplinary Exclusion from School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Daniel J.; Gillespie, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Well over three million children, K-12, are estimated to have lost instructional "seat time" in 2009-2010 because they were suspended from school, often with no guarantee of adult supervision outside the school. That's about the number of children it would take to fill every seat in every major league baseball park and every NFL stadium…

  10. Investigation of suspended sediment transport using ultrasonic techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1994-01-01

    The results of the initial experimental studies involving the scattering of ultrasonic signals from canonical and non-canonical shaped suspended particles with known elastical qualities are reported. These results have formed the basis for the development of a numerical model for ultrasound...

  11. Evaluation of the Suspending Properties of the Coprecipitate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending ability of the different ratios was evaluated in magnesium trisilicate suspension, and compared with a suspension prepared with Compound Tragacanth Powder BP (CTP) as well as a commercially available magnesium trisilicate suspension (MTS). The parameters tested were sedimentation rate, flow rate, ...

  12. Suspended microstructures of epoxy based photoresists fabricated with UV photolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Caviglia, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present an easy, fast, reliable and low cost microfabrication technique for fabricating suspended microstructures of epoxy based photoresistswith UV photolithography. Two different fabrication processes with epoxy based resins (SU-8 and mr-DWL) using UV exposures at wavelengths...

  13. Electrical Modulation of Fano Resonance in Plasmonic Nanostructures Using Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Pauli blocking of interband transistions gives rise to tunable optical properties in single layer graphene (SLG). This effect is exploited in a graphene-nanoantenna hybrid device where Fano resonant plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated on top of a graphene sheet. The use of Fano resonant...... elements enhances the interaction of incident radiation with the graphene sheet and enables efficient electrical modulation of the plasmonic resonance. We observe electrically controlled damping in the Fano resonances occurring at approximately 2 μm, and the results are verified by full-wave 3D finite...

  14. Efficient generation of linearly polarized Cerenkov radiation in a photonic crystal fiber with suspended rectangle core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xing; Cheng, Lan; Peng, Jinggang; Yang, Luyun; Dai, Nengli; Li, Haiqing; Li, Jinyan

    2017-10-01

    We report high efficiency linearly polarized Cerenkov radiation (CR) generation in a photonic crystal fiber with suspended rectangle core. The frequency up-conversion via the Cerenkov radiation upon pumping of Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser is discussed in details. Experiment results show that the output spectrum contains, besides the infrared supercontinuum, intense green Cerenkov radiation around 536 nm, which carry about 43% of the pump energy at best. The influence of the high birefringence and dispersion character on the Cerenkov radiation generation is discussed. Experiment and simulation results indicate that the rectangle core photonic crystal fiber acts like single-mode single-polarization fiber at the pump wavelength. Only the pulse component along with the slow axis could be confined in the rectangle core well and release Cerenkov radiation efficiently. The Output green Cerenkov radiation is also demonstrated to be linearly polarized. Experiments results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  16. Inorganic nanostructure-organic polymer heterostructures useful for thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Kevin C.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Segalman, Rachel A.; Coates, Nelson E.; Yee, Shannon K.

    2017-11-28

    The present invention provides for an inorganic nanostructure-organic polymer heterostructure, useful as a thermoelectric composite material, comprising (a) an inorganic nanostructure, and (b) an electrically conductive organic polymer disposed on the inorganic nanostructure. Both the inorganic nanostructure and the electrically conductive organic polymer are solution-processable.

  17. Interface controlled growth of nanostructures in discontinuous Ag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interfacial nanostructuring of thin films is demonstrated to be a viable technique to realize a variety of nanostructures. The use of interfacial nanostructuring for plasmonic applications is demonstrated. It is shown that the surface Plasmon resonance of the metal nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range of wavelengths ...

  18. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  19. Aluminum nanostructures for ultraviolet plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jérôme; Khlopin, Dmitry; Zhang, Feifei; Schuermans, Silvère; Proust, Julien; Maurer, Thomas; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2017-08-01

    An electromagnetic field is able to produce a collective oscillation of free electrons at a metal surface. This allows light to be concentrated in volumes smaller than its wavelength. The resulting waves, called surface plasmons can be applied in various technological applications such as ultra-sensitive sensing, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, or metal-enhanced fluorescence, to name a few. For several decades plasmonics has been almost exclusively studied in the visible region by using nanoparticles made of gold or silver as these noble metals support plasmonic resonances in the visible and near-infrared range. Nevertheless, emerging applications will require the extension of nano-plasmonics toward higher energies, in the ultraviolet range. Aluminum is one of the most appealing metal for pushing plasmonics up to ultraviolet energies. The subsequent applications in the field of nano-optics are various. This metal is therefore a highly promising material for commercial applications in the field of ultraviolet nano-optics. As a consequence, aluminum (or ultraviolet, UV) plasmonics has emerged quite recently. Aluminium plasmonics has been demonstrated efficient for numerous potential applications including non-linear optics, enhanced fluorescence, UV-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, optoelectronics, plasmonic assisted solid-state lasing, photocatalysis, structural colors and data storage. In this article, different preparation methods developed in the laboratory to obtain aluminum nanostructures with different geometries are presented. Their optical and morphological characterizations of the nanostructures are given and some proof of principle applications such as fluorescence enhancement are discussed.

  20. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  1. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  2. An analysis of bedload and suspended load interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recking, alain; Navratil, Oldrich

    2013-04-01

    Several approaches were used to develop suspension equations. It includes semi-theoretical equations based on the convection diffusion equation (Einstein 1950; Van Rijn 1984; Camenen and Larson 2008; Julien 2010), semi-empirical tools based on energy concept (Velikanov 1954; Bagnold 1966), empirical adjustments (Prosser and Rusttomji 2000). One essential characteristic of all these equations is that most of them were developed by considering continuity between bedload and suspended load, and that the partitioning between these two modes of transport evolves progressively with increasing shear stress, which is the case for fine bed materials. The use of these equations is thus likely to be welcome in estuaries or lowland sandy rivers, but may be questionable in gravel-bed rivers and headwater streams where the bed is usually structured vertically and fine sediments potentially contributing to suspension are stored under a poorly mobile surface armour comprising coarse sediments. Thus one question this work aimed to answer is does the presence of an armour at the bed surface influence suspended load? This was investigated through a large field data set comprising instantaneous measurements of both bedload and suspension. We also considered the river characteristics, distinguishing between lowland rivers, gravel bed rivers and headwater streams. The results showed that a correlation exist between bedload and suspension for lowland and gravel bed rivers. This suggests that in gravel bed rivers a large part of the suspended load is fed by subsurface material, and depends on the remobilization of the surface material. No correlation was observed for head water streams where the sediment production is more likely related to hillslope processes. These results were used with a bedload transport equation for proposing a method for suspended load estimate. The method is rough, but especially for gravel bed rivers, it predicts suspended load reasonably well when compared to

  3. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  4. Fabrication of metal nanostructures by atomic force microscopy nanomachining and related applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-An; Wu, Yi-Jen; Huang, Jyh-Hann; Lin, Heh-Nan

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the fabrication of metal nanostructures by a combination of atomic force microscopy nanomachining on a thin polymer resist, metal coating and lift-off is presented. Nanodots with sizes down to 20 nm and nanowires with widths ranging between 40 and 100 nm have been successfully created by nanoindenting and nanoscratching. The results exemplify the feasibility and effectiveness of the present technique as an alternative to e-beam lithography. The localized surface plasmon resonance properties of the fabricated nanostructures are characterized. The chemical sensing capability of a single nanowire based on resistance increase is also demonstrated.

  5. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2018-01-23

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  6. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  7. Stimulation of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis in Hindlimb Suspended Rats by Resistance Exercise and Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Whittall, Justen B.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Booth, Frank W.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a single bout of resistance exercise alone or in combination with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis (Ks) in hindlimb suspended (HLS) adult female rats. Plantar flexor muscles were stimulated with resistance exercise, consisting of 10 repetitions of ladder climbing on a 1 m grid (85 deg.), carrying an additional 50% of their body weight attached to their tails. Saline or rhGH (1 mg/kg) was administered 30' prior to exercise, and Ks was determined with a constant infusion of H-3-Leucine at 15', 60', 180', and 360' following exercise. Three days of HLS depressed Ks is approx. equal to 65% and 30-40% in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Exercise increased soleus Ks in saline-treated rats 149% 60' following exercise (p less than or equal to 0.05), decaying to that of non-exercised animals during the next 5 hours. Relative to suspended, non-exercised rats rhGH + exercise increased soleus Ks 84%, 108%, and 72% at 15', 60' and 360' following exercise (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Gastrocnemius Ks was not significantly increased by exercise or the combination of rhGH and exercise up to 360' post-exercise. Results from this study indicate that resistance exercise stimulated Ks 60' post-exercise in the soleus of HLS rats, with no apparent effect of rhGH to enhance or prolong exercise-induced stimulation. Results suggests that exercise frequency may be important to maintenance of the slow-twitch soleus during non-weightbearing, but that the ability of resistance exercise to maintain myofibrillar protein content in the gastrocnemius of hindlimb suspended rats cannot be explained by acute stimulation of synthesis.

  8. Contemporary suspended sediment dynamics within two partly glacierized mountain drainage basins in western Norway (Erdalen and Bødalen, inner Nordfjord)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja; Storms, Joep E. A.

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on environmental controls, spatiotemporal variability and rates of contemporary fluvial suspended sediment transport in the neighboring, partly glacierized and steep Erdalen (79.5 km2) and Bødalen (60.1 km2) drainage basins in the fjord landscape of the inner Nordfjord in western Norway. Field work, including extended samplings and measurements, was conducted since 2004 in Erdalen and since 2008 in Bødalen. The distinct intra- and inter-annual temporal variability of suspended sediment transport found is mostly controlled by meteorological events, with most suspended sediment transport occurring during pluvial events in autumn (September-November), followed by mostly thermally determined glacier melt in summer (July-August), and by mostly thermally determined snowmelt in spring (April-June). Extreme rainfall events (> 70 mm d- 1) in autumn can trigger significant debris-flow activity that can cause significant transfers of suspended sediments from ice-free surface areas with sedimentary covers into main stream channels and is particularly important for fluvial suspended sediment transport. In years with occurring relevant debris-flow activity the total annual drainage-basin wide suspended sediment yields are strongly determined by these single extreme events. The proportion of glacier coverage, followed by steepness of slopes, and degree of vegetation cover in ice-free surface areas with sedimentary covers are the main controls for the detected spatial variability of suspended sediment yields. The contemporary sediment supply from glacierized surface areas and the Jostedalsbreen ice cap through different defined outlet glaciers shows a high spatial variability. The fact that the mean annual suspended sediment yield of Bødalen is with 31.3 t km- 2 yr- 1 almost twice as high as the mean annual suspended sediment yield of Erdalen (16.4 t km- 2 yr- 1) is to a large extent explained by the higher proportion of glacier coverage in Bødalen (38% of

  9. Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation focuses on investigating the synthesis of graphene and its hybrid nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process, as well as their applications in nanoelectronics and energy conversion/storage. The substantial understanding of interaction of graphene layers between the bio-molecules and gas molecules will enable the improvement in the applications of graphene in bio-sensor and chemical sensor. To achieve these objectives, graphene field effect transistors are fabricated to study the interactions of graphene between single stranded Deoxyribonucleic Acids (ssDNA) and gas molecules. ssDNA is found to act as negative potential gating agent that increases the hole density in single layer graphene (SLG). The molecular photodesorption and absorption from pristine and functionalized graphene are studied. The photodesorption induced current decrease in functionalized graphene by concentrated HNO3 becomes less significant than pristine graphene layers. We suggest this is due to the passivation of oxygen-bearing functionalities to CVD grown graphene structure defects via HNO3 functionalization, which prevents the further absorption of gas molecules. The advance of synthesis of graphene and its hybrid nanostructures by CVD promotes their applications in the industrial level. We synthesize the graphene both on nickel thin film and copper foils by CVD, and investigate the grow kinetics, such as the effect of growth pressure on the uniformity and quality of Cu-grown graphene. By controlling the growth pressure we achieve uniform single layer graphene sheets and suggest the feasible methods of synthesizing uniform few-layer graphene. To decrease the sheet resistance, we stack the single layer graphene using layer-layer transfer technique. Highly concentrated HNO3 is employed to improve the conductivity and surface wettability of graphene layers. Four-layer graphene films with optical transmittance of 90% after HNO3 treatment are applied in organic

  10. Influences of InGaP Conical Frustum Nanostructures on the Characteristics of GaAs Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Dinh Lam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conical frustums with quasihexagonal nanostructures are fabricated on an InGaP window layer of single junction GaAs solar cells using a polystyrene nanosphere lithography technique followed by anisotropic etching processes. The optical and photovoltaic characteristics of the conical frustum nanostructured solar cells are investigated. Reflectance of the conical frustum nanostructured solar cells is significantly reduced in a wide range of wavelengths compared to that of the planar sample. The measured reflectance reduction is attributed to the gradual change in the refractive index of the InGaP conical frustum window layer. An increase of 15.2% in the power conversion efficiency has been achieved in the fabricated cell with an optimized conical frustum nanostructure compared to that of the planar cell.

  11. SrZnO nanostructures grown on templated Al2O3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselito P. Labis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The parameters of pulsed laser deposition (PLD have been optimized to design different nanostructures of Strontium-alloyed zinc oxide (SrZnO. In this work, SrZnO nanostructures are grown on Al2O3 substrates via two-step templating/seeding approach. In the temperature range between 300 - 750 oC and O2 background pressures between 0.01 and 10 Torr, the growth conditions have been tailored to grow unique pointed leaf-like- and pitted olive-like nanostructures. Prior to the growth of the nanostructures, a thin SrZnO layer that serves as seed layer/template is first deposited on the Al2O3 substrates at ∼300oC and background oxygen pressure of 10 mTorr. The optical properties of the nanostructures were examined by UV/Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL, while the structures/morphologies were examined by SEM, TEM, and XRD. The alloyed SrZnO nanostructures, grown by ablating ZnO targets with 5, 10, 25% SrO contents, have in common a single-crystal hexagonal nanostructure with (0002 preferential orientation and have shown remarkable changes in the morphological and optical properties of the materials. To date, this is the only reported work on optimization of laser ablation parameters to design novel SrZnO nanostructures in the 5-25% alloying range, as most related Sr-doped ZnO studies were done below 7% doping. Although the physical properties of ZnO are modified via Sr doping, the mechanism remains unclear. The PLD-grown SrZnO nanostructures were directly grown onto the Al2O3 substrates; thus making these nanomaterials very promising for potential applications in biosensors, love-wave filters, solar cells, and ultrasonic oscillators.

  12. SrZnO nanostructures grown on templated Al2O3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labis, Joselito P.; Alanazi, Anwar Q.; Albrithen, Hamad A.; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Hezam, Mahmoud; Elafifi, Hussein Elsayed; Abaza, Osama M.

    2017-09-01

    The parameters of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have been optimized to design different nanostructures of Strontium-alloyed zinc oxide (SrZnO). In this work, SrZnO nanostructures are grown on Al2O3 substrates via two-step templating/seeding approach. In the temperature range between 300 - 750 oC and O2 background pressures between 0.01 and 10 Torr, the growth conditions have been tailored to grow unique pointed leaf-like- and pitted olive-like nanostructures. Prior to the growth of the nanostructures, a thin SrZnO layer that serves as seed layer/template is first deposited on the Al2O3 substrates at ˜300oC and background oxygen pressure of 10 mTorr. The optical properties of the nanostructures were examined by UV/Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL), while the structures/morphologies were examined by SEM, TEM, and XRD. The alloyed SrZnO nanostructures, grown by ablating ZnO targets with 5, 10, 25% SrO contents, have in common a single-crystal hexagonal nanostructure with (0002) preferential orientation and have shown remarkable changes in the morphological and optical properties of the materials. To date, this is the only reported work on optimization of laser ablation parameters to design novel SrZnO nanostructures in the 5-25% alloying range, as most related Sr-doped ZnO studies were done below 7% doping. Although the physical properties of ZnO are modified via Sr doping, the mechanism remains unclear. The PLD-grown SrZnO nanostructures were directly grown onto the Al2O3 substrates; thus making these nanomaterials very promising for potential applications in biosensors, love-wave filters, solar cells, and ultrasonic oscillators.

  13. Synthesis of nanostructured bismuth titanate microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongchu; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Kaskel, Stefan

    2006-07-01

    A hydrothermal method was developed for the synthesis of bismuth titanate nanostructured microspheres. The precursor powder was prepared using a diethylene glycol mediated coprecipitation method. The as-synthesized nanostructured microspheres consisting of granular nanoparticles and nano-platelets were obtained through a hydrothermal treatment of the precursor powder in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. Tailoring of the morphology was achieved by changing the precursor quantity, sodium hydroxide concentration, and reaction time. The formation mechanism of the nanostructured microspheres probably involves aggregation, followed by dissolution and recrystallization. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the phase purities, morphologies, and composition of the products.

  14. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random height...... distribution, at least a part of the cone-shaped structures having a height of at least 100 nm. The first material may be SiC or GaN. A method of manufacturing a non-periodic nanostructured surface on a solar cell, is furthermore provided, the method comprising the steps of providing a surface comprising Si...

  15. Nanostructured thin films and coatings functional properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The second volume in ""The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings"" set, this book focuses on functional properties, including optical, electronic, and electrical properties, as well as related devices and applications. It explores the large-scale fabrication of functional thin films with nanoarchitecture via chemical routes, the fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films, and low-dimensional nanocomposite fabrication and applications. The book also presents the properties of sol-gel-derived nanostructured thin films as well as silicon nanocrystals e

  16. Ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Jagdeep

    1996-01-01

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors and Semiconductor Nanostructures Ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors is currently one of the most exciting areas of research in condensed-matter physics Remarkable recent progress in the generation of tunable femtosecond pulses has allowed direct investigation of the most fundamental dynamical processes in semiconductors This monograph presents some of the most striking recent advances in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy of semiconductors and their nanostructures After a brief overview of the basic concepts and of the recent advances in the techniques of ultrashort pulse generation and ultrafast spectroscopy, it discusses the physics of relaxation, tunneling and transport dynamics in semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures following excitation by femtosecond laser pulses

  17. Temperature signal in suspended sediment export from an Alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment export from large Alpine catchments ( >  1000 km2 over decadal timescales is sensitive to a number of factors, including long-term variations in climate, the activation–deactivation of different sediment sources (proglacial areas, hillslopes, etc., transport through the fluvial system, and potential anthropogenic impacts on the sediment flux (e.g. through impoundments and flow regulation. Here, we report on a marked increase in suspended sediment concentrations observed near the outlet of the upper Rhône River Basin in the mid-1980s. This increase coincides with a statistically significant step-like increase in basin-wide mean air temperature. We explore the possible explanations of the suspended sediment rise in terms of changes in water discharge (transport capacity, and the activation of different potential sources of fine sediment (sediment supply in the catchment by hydroclimatic forcing. Time series of precipitation and temperature-driven snowmelt, snow cover, and ice melt simulated with a spatially distributed degree-day model, together with erosive rainfall on snow-free surfaces, are tested to explore possible reasons for the rise in suspended sediment concentration. We show that the abrupt change in air temperature reduced snow cover and the contribution of snowmelt, and enhanced ice melt. The results of statistical tests show that the onset of increased ice melt was likely to play a dominant role in the suspended sediment concentration rise in the mid-1980s. Temperature-driven enhanced melting of glaciers, which cover about 10 % of the catchment surface, can increase suspended sediment yields through an increased contribution of sediment-rich glacial meltwater, increased sediment availability due to glacier recession, and increased runoff from sediment-rich proglacial areas. The reduced extent and duration of snow cover in the catchment are also potential contributors to the rise in suspended sediment

  18. Three-dimensional ZnO hierarchical nanostructures: Solution phase synthesis and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Sun, Hongyu

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have been studied extensively in the past 20 years due to their novel electronic, photonic, mechanical and electrochemical properties. Recently, more attention has been paid to assemble nanoscale building blocks into three-dimensional (3D) complex hierarchical...... structures, which not only inherit the excellent properties of the single building blocks but also provide potential applications in the bottom-up fabrication of functional devices. This review article focuses on 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures, and summarizes major advances in the solution phase...... synthesis, applications in environment, and electrical/electrochemical devices. We present the principles and growth mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures via different solution methods, with an emphasis on rational control of the morphology and assembly. We then discuss the applications of 3D ZnO hierarchical...

  19. Hybrid luminescent/magnetic nanostructured porous silicon particles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; Sánchez-Vaquero, Vanessa; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Gallach, Darío; Ferro-Llanos, Vicente; Serrano, José Javier; Manso-Silván, Miguel; García-Ruiz, Josefa Predestinación; del Pozo, Francisco; Martín-Palma, Raúl J

    2011-02-01

    This work describes a novel process for the fabrication of hybrid nanostructured particles showing intense tunable photoluminescence and a simultaneous ferromagnetic behavior. The fabrication process involves the synthesis of nanostructured porous silicon (NPSi) by chemical anodization of crystalline silicon and subsequent in pore growth of Co nanoparticles by electrochemically-assisted infiltration. Final particles are obtained by subsequent sonication of the Co-infiltrated NPSi layers and conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) aiming at enhancing their hydrophilic character. These particles respond to magnetic fields, emit light in the visible when excited in the UV range, and internalize into human mesenchymal stem cells with no apoptosis induction. Furthermore, cytotoxicity in in-vitro systems confirms their biocompatibility and the viability of the cells after incorporation of the particles. The hybrid nanostructured particles might represent powerful research tools as cellular trackers or in cellular therapy since they allow combining two or more properties into a single particle.

  20. Enhanced absorption of graphene in the visible region by use of plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Mahdieh; Farzad, Mahmood Hosseini; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    Low absorption of graphene in the visible range of the spectrum makes it difficult to uniquely benefit from this material in ultra-fast optoelectronic applications. We numerically propose to utilize patterned metallic nanostructures to increase light absorption in single-layer graphene. Simulation...... results show that excitation of surface plasmon resonances in the metallic nanostructures significantly enhances the local electromagnetic field near the graphene layer, therefore leading to a dramatic enhancement of the absorption in the graphene layer itself. Broadband high optical absorption can...... be realized by engineering the metal nanostructures, while maintaining insensitivity to the incident angle. Our results pave a new and promising way to enhance visible-light absorption in the graphene layer, which is potentially interesting for graphene-based photovoltaics....

  1. RHEED transmission mode and pole figures thin film and nanostructure texture analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This unique book covers the fundamental principle of electron diffraction, basic instrumentation of RHEED, definitions of textures in thin films and nanostructures, mechanisms and control of texture formation, and examples of RHEED transmission mode measurements of texture and texture evolution of thin films and nanostructures. Also presented is a new application of RHEED in the transmission mode called RHEED pole figure technique that can be used to monitor the texture evolution in thin film growth and nanostructures and is not limited to single crystal epitaxial film growth. Details of the construction of RHEED pole figures and the interpretation of observed pole figures are presented.  Materials covered include metals, semiconductors, and thin insulators. This book also: Presents a new application of RHEED in the transmission mode Introduces a variety of textures from metals, semiconductors, compound semiconductors, and their characteristics in RHEED pole figures Provides examples of RHEED measurements o...

  2. Magnetic resonance of semiconductors and their nanostructures basic and advanced applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, Pavel G; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    This book explains different magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and uses different combinations of these techniques to analyze defects in semiconductors and nanostructures. It also introduces novelties such as single defects MR and electron-paramagnetic-resonance-based methods: electron spin echo, electrically detected magnetic resonance, optically detected magnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance – the designated tools for investigating the structural and spin properties of condensed systems, living matter, nanostructures and nanobiotechnology objects. Further, the authors address problems existing in semiconductor and nanotechnology sciences that can be resolved using MR, and discuss past, current and future applications of MR, with a focus on advances in MR methods. The book is intended for researchers in MR studies of semiconductors and nanostructures wanting a comprehensive review of what has been done in their own and related fields of study, as well as future perspectives.

  3. Variation of index of refraction in cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphle, Amrit; Hari, Parameswar

    2017-10-01

    One dimensional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were fabricated using a low temperature chemical bath deposition technique. The ZnO nanorods were doped with cobalt using cobalt nitrate with cobalt concentration varying from 0% to 9%. The scanning electron microscope images of the nanostructures indicate that the diameter of ZnO nanorods increased with the increase in cobalt doping concentration. The optical characterizations of the doped and undoped samples were performed by investigating the variation in the band gap, the Urbach energy, the index of refraction, and the extinction coefficient with cobalt concentration. The dispersion of index of refraction in cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures was modeled based on the Wemple DiDomenico single oscillator model. The interband oscillator energy and the dispersion energy were estimated for different cobalt doped ZnO nanorod samples based on this model.

  4. Local-field effects and nanostructuring for controlling optical properties and enabling novel optical phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgaleva, Ksenia

    My Ph. D. thesis is devoted to the investigation of the methods of controlling and improving the linear and nonlinear optical properties of materials. Within my studies, two approaches are considered: nanostructuring and invoking local-field effects. These broad topics involve various projects that I have undertaken during my Ph. D. research. The first project is on composite laser gain media. It involves both nanostructuring and using local-field effects to control the basic laser parameters, such as the radiative lifetime, small-signal gain and absorption, and the saturation intensity. While being involved in this project, I have performed both theoretical and experimental studies of laser characteristics of composite materials. In particular, I have developed simple theoretical models for calculating the effective linear susceptibilities of layered and Maxwell Garnett composite materials with a gain resonance in one of their components. The analysis of the results given by the models suggests that local-field effects provide considerable freedom in controlling the optical properties of composite laser gain media. I have also experimentally measured the radiative lifetime of Nd:YAG nanopowder suspended in different liquids to extract information regarding local-field effects. The second project is devoted to the investigation of a not-well-known phenomenon that local-field effects can induce, which is microscopic cascading in nonlinear optics. This project involves the theoretical prediction of local-field-induced microscopic cascading effect in the fifth-order nonlinear response and its first experimental observation. This effect has been mostly overlooked or underestimated, but could prove useful in quantum optics. I have shown that, under certain conditions, the microscopic cascaded contribution can be a dominant effect in high-order nonlinearities. The third project is about characterization of laser performance of a new dye, oligofluorene, embedded into

  5. Suspended sediment profiles derived from spectral attenuation coefficients measurements using neural network method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, G.; Suresh, T.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Desa, E.; Kamath, S.S.

    total suspended matter values from water samples obtained at discrete depths at the same location. An artificial neural network (ANN) model has been used to derive suspended matter from the spectral values of beam attenuation coefficients measured using...

  6. Impact of sound attenuation by suspended sediment on ADCP backscatter calibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vermeulen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Although designed for velocity measurements, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are widely being used to monitor suspended particulate matter in rivers and in marine environments. To quantify mass concentrations of suspended matter, ADCP backscatter is generally calibrated with in situ

  7. Effect of Martian Suspended Dust on Albedo Measurements from the MGS-TES Data

    OpenAIRE

    A. Zinzi; Palomba, E.; Rinaldi, G.; d'Amore, M.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended dust on Mars influences albedo measurements by orbiting instruments, but not necessary the real surface albedo. The aim of this study is to characterize the role of suspended aerosols on albedo measurement by remote sensing instruments.

  8. Design, analysis and control of cable-suspended parallel robots and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zi, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an essential overview of the authors’ work in the field of cable-suspended parallel robots, focusing on innovative design, mechanics, control, development and applications. It presents and analyzes several typical mechanical architectures of cable-suspended parallel robots in practical applications, including the feed cable-suspended structure for super antennae, hybrid-driven-based cable-suspended parallel robots, and cooperative cable parallel manipulators for multiple mobile cranes. It also addresses the fundamental mechanics of cable-suspended parallel robots on the basis of their typical applications, including the kinematics, dynamics and trajectory tracking control of the feed cable-suspended structure for super antennae. In addition it proposes a novel hybrid-driven-based cable-suspended parallel robot that uses integrated mechanism design methods to improve the performance of traditional cable-suspended parallel robots. A comparative study on error and performance indices of hybr...

  9. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  10. Three-Dimensional ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures: Solution Phase Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures have been studied extensively in the past 20 years due to their novel electronic, photonic, mechanical and electrochemical properties. Recently, more attention has been paid to assemble nanoscale building blocks into three-dimensional (3D complex hierarchical structures, which not only inherit the excellent properties of the single building blocks but also provide potential applications in the bottom-up fabrication of functional devices. This review article focuses on 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures, and summarizes major advances in the solution phase synthesis, applications in environment, and electrical/electrochemical devices. We present the principles and growth mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures via different solution methods, with an emphasis on rational control of the morphology and assembly. We then discuss the applications of 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures in photocatalysis, field emission, electrochemical sensor, and lithium ion batteries. Throughout the discussion, the relationship between the device performance and the microstructures of 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures will be highlighted. This review concludes with a personal perspective on the current challenges and future research.

  11. Physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size using multi-frequency arrays of acoustic-doppler profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2014-01-01

    As the result of a 12-year program of sediment-transport research and field testing on the Colorado River (6 stations in UT and AZ), Yampa River (2 stations in CO), Little Snake River (1 station in CO), Green River (1 station in CO and 2 stations in UT), and Rio Grande (2 stations in TX), we have developed a physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size at 15-minute intervals using multifrequency arrays of acoustic-Doppler profilers. This multi-frequency method is able to achieve much higher accuracies than single-frequency acoustic methods because it allows removal of the influence of changes in grain size on acoustic backscatter. The method proceeds as follows. (1) Acoustic attenuation at each frequency is related to the concentration of silt and clay with a known grain-size distribution in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (2) The combination of acoustic backscatter and attenuation at each frequency is uniquely related to the concentration of sand (with a known reference grain-size distribution) and the concentration of silt and clay (with a known reference grain-size distribution) in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (3) Comparison of the suspended-sand concentrations measured at each frequency using this approach then allows theory-based calculation of the median grain size of the suspended sand and final correction of the suspended-sand concentration to compensate for the influence of changing grain size on backscatter. Although this method of measuring suspended-sediment concentration is somewhat less accurate than using conventional samplers in either the EDI or EWI methods, it is much more accurate than estimating suspended-sediment concentrations using calibrated pump measurements or single-frequency acoustics. Though the EDI and EWI methods provide the most accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration, these measurements are labor-intensive, expensive, and

  12. Jumplike microdeformation of nanostructured metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschanskaya, N. N.; Smirnov, B. I.; Shpeĭzman, V. V.

    2008-05-01

    The parameters of microdeformation jumps for copper, aluminum, titanium, and Armco iron with the initial (annealed) structure and after equal-channel angular pressing are investigated in a creep mode under low compressive stresses. The strain rate is measured with a laser interferometer in 0.15-μm linear displacements. It is demonstrated that the values of the microstrain rate and the mean sizes of jumps for the annealed metals are larger than those for the metals subjected to severe deformation. It is revealed that there is a correlation between the jumps of microplastic deformation and the size of nanometal grains. The inference is made that, for nanostructured metals, as for other materials, the structural heterogeneity is one of the factors responsible for the jumplike deformation.

  13. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  14. Homoepitaxial Nanostructures of Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Plakhova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The homoepitaxial ZnO nanostructures (HENS were obtained on different substrates using various techniques. The first type of homoepitaxial ZnO nanorod arrays was grown on Si or ITO substrates by using two alternative sequences: (a seeding → growth from solution → growth from vapor and contrariwise (b seeding → growth from vapor → growth from solution. As follows from transport and cathode luminescence measurements homoepitaxial growth allows enhancing electrical or luminescence properties. The second type of HENS was prepared by growth of vertically or horizontally oriented ZnO nanorod arrays depending on monocrystalline ZnO wafers with [0001] and [10-10] orientation. In all cases the growth occurs along the c-axis of fast growth.

  15. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  16. Hemocompatibility of Polymeric Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S.; Popat, Ketul C.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen and immunoglobulin-G adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces. PMID:23848447

  17. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  18. 48 CFR 52.209-6 - Protecting the Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...'s Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or Proposed for Debarment. 52....209-6 Protecting the Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended... Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or Proposed for Debarment...

  19. Porphyrin-Based Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent significant advances on the design and photocatalytic applications of porphyrin-based nanostructures. The rational strategies, such as texture or crystal modification and interfacial heterostructuring, are described. The applications of the porphyrin-based nanostructures in photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution are presented. Finally, the ongoing challenges and opportunities for the future development of porphyrin nanostructures in high-quality nanodevices are also proposed.

  20. Characterization of optical active nanostructures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgaertel, Thomas; Graaf, Harald; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Center of Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, TU Chemnitz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    It has been recently demonstrated, that nanostructures can be functionalized in a neat way through selective binding of dye molecules and nanoparticles. Anchoring optically active molecules on nanostructured surfaces is a promising step towards building complex structures with variable properties and functions. In our contribution we report on the characterization of nanostructures on silicon, that have been optically functionalized by binding of cationic dyes. The structures have been generated by local anodic oxidation of alkyl-terminated silicon via AFM. Due to the oxidation process, these silicon oxide structures are partially negatively charged. The cationic dyes rhodamine 6G and cresyl violet have been attached to the structures via electrostatic interactions and were studied using wide-field and confocal microscopy. A change in luminescence spectra of the dyes on the nanostructures, compared to the dyes in solution has been found. Furthermore, the bleaching behaviour of the dyes bound to the structure has been investigated.

  1. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented.

  2. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  3. Metallic nanostructures for efficient LED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Verschuuren, M. A.; J. Gomez Rivas,

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are driving a shift toward energy-efficient illumination. Nonetheless, modifying the emission intensities, colors and directionalities of LEDs in specific ways remains a challenge often tackled by incorporating secondary optical components. Metallic nanostructures

  4. Nanostructure Science and Technology. A Worldwide Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegel, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ... and other leading industrialized countries. Topics covered include particle synthesis and assembly, dispersions and coatings of nanoparticles, high surface area materials, functional nanoscale devices, bulk behavior of nanostructured materials...

  5. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  6. Unique mechanical properties of nanostructured metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Recently, it becomes possible to fabricate bulk metals having ultrafine grained or nanocrystalline structures of which grain size is in nano-meter dimensions. One of the promising ways to realize bulk nanostructured metals is severe plastic deformation (SPD) above logarithmic equivalent strain of 4. We have developed an original SPD process, named Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) using rolling deformation in principle, and have succeeded in fabricating bulk nanostructured sheets of various kinds of metals and alloys. The ARB process and the nanostructured metals fabricated by the ARB are introduced in this paper. The nanostructured metals sometimes perform quite unique mechanical properties, that is rather surprising compared with conventionally coarse grained materials. The unique properties seem to be attributed to the characteristic structures of the nano-metals full of grain boundaries.

  7. Noise and dissipation in magnetoelectronic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foros, J.; Brataas, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between current and magnetization fluctuations and dissipation in layered-ferromagnetic-normal-metal nanostructures is investigated. We use scattering theory and magnetoelectronic circuit theory to calculate charge and spin-current fluctuations. Via the spin-transfer torque,

  8. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  9. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsoo S.; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S.; Weiner, Joseph A.; Cook, Ralph W.; Freshman, Ryan D.; Schallmo, Michael S.; Katchko, Karina M.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Smith, Justin T.; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; McClendon, Mark T.; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.; Stupp , Samuel I. (NWU)

    2017-06-19

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  10. Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC is a multi-institutional research center, one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers established by the...

  11. Chemical modifications and reactions in DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has the power to form self-assembled and well-defined nanostructures, such as DNA origami, where the relative positions of each atom are known with subnanometer precision. Our ability to synthesize oligonucleotides with chemical modifications in almost any desired position...... provides rich opportunity to incorporate molecules, biomolecules, and a variety of nanomaterials in specific positions on DNA nanostructures. Several standard modifications for oligonucleotides are available commercially, such as dyes, biotin, and chemical handles, and such modified oligonucleotides can...... be applied directly for integration in DNA nanostructures. In another approach, various molecules and nanomaterials have been functionalized with DNA for incorporation in DNA nanostructures by hybridization to staple strands extending from the origami structure. Multiple copies of functionalities...

  12. Plasmonic Nanostructures: Tailoring Light-matter Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    The flow of light can be molded by plasmonic structures within the nanoscale. In this talk, plasmonic nanostructures for suppressing light transmission, improving light absorption and enhancing photoemissions are to be presented....

  13. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  14. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  15. 78 FR 48145 - Lemon Juice From Argentina: Continuation of Suspended Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Doc No: 2013-19067] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-357-818] Lemon Juice... of the suspended investigation on lemon juice from Argentina would likely lead to continuation or... of the suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina (``suspended...

  16. Suspended 3D pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes for electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemanth, Suhith; Caviglia, Claudia; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2017-01-01

    Carbon microelectrodes have a wide range of applications because of their unique material properties and biocompatibility. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended pyrolytic carbon microstructures serving as three-dimensional (3D) carbon microelectrodes for electrochem...... resistance as compared to 2D carbon electrodes. The higher sensitivity of 3D carbon microelectrodes for electrochemical sensing was illustrated by dopamine detection.......Carbon microelectrodes have a wide range of applications because of their unique material properties and biocompatibility. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of suspended pyrolytic carbon microstructures serving as three-dimensional (3D) carbon microelectrodes...... for electrochemical applications. A 3D polymer template in epoxy based photoresist (SU-8) was fabricated with multiple steps of UV photolithography and pyrolysed at 900 °C to obtain 3D carbon microelectrodes. The pyrolytic carbon microstructures were characterized by SEM, Raman spectroscopy and XPS to determine...

  17. Approximate Series Solutions for Nonlinear Free Vibration of Suspended Cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaobing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents approximate series solutions for nonlinear free vibration of suspended cables via the Lindstedt-Poincare method and homotopy analysis method, respectively. Firstly, taking into account the geometric nonlinearity of the suspended cable as well as the quasi-static assumption, a mathematical model is presented. Secondly, two analytical methods are introduced to obtain the approximate series solutions in the case of nonlinear free vibration. Moreover, small and large sag-to-span ratios and initial conditions are chosen to study the nonlinear dynamic responses by these two analytical methods. The numerical results indicate that frequency amplitude relationships obtained with different analytical approaches exhibit some quantitative and qualitative differences in the cases of motions, mode shapes, and particular sag-to-span ratios. Finally, a detailed comparison of the differences in the displacement fields and cable axial total tensions is made.

  18. Directed spatial organization of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Julia [Albuquerque, NM; Liu, Jun [Richland, WA

    2009-02-17

    A method for controllably forming zinc oxide nanostructures on a surface via an organic template, which is formed using a stamp prepared from pre-defined relief structures, inking the stamp with a solution comprising self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules, contacting the stamp to the surface, such as Ag sputtered on Si, and immersing the surface with the patterned SAM molecules with a zinc-containing solution with pH control to form zinc oxide nanostructures on the bare Ag surface.

  19. Metal oxide nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Ghulam Nabi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers on nanoparticles and nanostructures has received a great deal of attention not only in the area of synthesis and characterization but also in their potential application in various high-technological applications. Nanomaterials are widely used not only for environmental and biological applications but also for electronic and sensing applications. Among various classes of nanomaterials, the metal oxide nanostructures possess particular important because of their significa...

  20. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin Z [Santa Cruz, CA; Schwartzberg, Adam [Santa Cruz, CA; Olson, Tammy Y [Santa Cruz, CA

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  1. AMINO ACIDS APPLICATION TO CREATE OF NANOSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    I. S. Chekman; N. A. Gorchakova; H. O. Sirova; O. O. Kazakova; T. I. Nagorna; V. F. Shatornaya

    2014-01-01

    Review is devoted to the amino acids that could be used for nanostructures creation. The investigation of corresponding properties of amino acids is essential for their role definition in creation of nanomedicines. However, amino acid studying as components of nanostructures is insufficient. Study of nanoparticles for medicines creation was initiated by the development of nanotechnology. Amino acids in complexes with the nanoparticles of organic and inorganic nature play an important role for...

  2. Experimental study of thermal rectification in suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Hu, Shiqian; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Thermal rectification is a fundamental phenomenon for active heat flow control. Significant thermal rectification is expected to exist in the asymmetric nanostructures, such as nanowires and thin films. As a one-atom-thick membrane, graphene has attracted much attention for realizing thermal rectification as shown by many molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate thermal rectification in various asymmetric monolayer graphene nanostructures. A large thermal rectification factor of 26% is achieved in a defect-engineered monolayer graphene with nanopores on one side. A thermal rectification factor of 10% is achieved in a pristine monolayer graphene with nanoparticles deposited on one side or with a tapered width. The results indicate that the monolayer graphene has great potential to be used for designing high-performance thermal rectifiers for heat flow control and energy harvesting.

  3. [Light absorption by suspended particulate matter in Chagan Lake, Jilin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Dong; Liu, Dian-Wei; Song, Kai-Shan; Zhang, Bai; Wang, Zong-Ming; Jiang, Guang-Ji; Tang, Xu-Guang; Lei, Xiao-Chun; Wu, Yan-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Spectral characteristics and the magnitudes of light absorption by suspended particulate matter were determined by spectrophotometry in this optically complex Lake Chagan waters for the purpose of surveying the natural variability of the absorption coefficients to parameterize the bio-optical models for converting satellite or in-situ water reflectance signatures into water quality information. Experiments were carried out on seasonal frozen Lake Chagan, one representative inland case-2 water body in Northeast of China. Particulate absorption properties analyzed using the field data on July 15th and October 12th 2009 were measured using the quantitative filter technique to produce absorption spectra containing several fractions that could be attributed to two main optical active constituents (OACs) phytoplankton pigments and non-algal particulates (mineral sediments, and organic detritus). Results suggested that the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration was higher while phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll-a concentration) was lower in July and that in October. The spectral shape of total suspended particulate matter resembled that of non-algal particulates which contributed greater than phytoplankton in total particulate absorption during both periods. An obvious absorption peak occurring at around 440 nm exhibited an increase in phytoplankton contribution in October. Non-algal particulate absorption at 440 nm (a(NAP) (440)) had better correlation with total suspended particulate matter concentration than that with chlorophyll-a over the two periods. Light absorption by phytoplankton pigments in the Chagan lake region was generally lower than that of non-algal components. Chl. a dominating phytoplankton pigment composition functioned exponentially with its absorption coefficients at 440 and 675 nm specifically, the average values of which in July were 0.146 8 m2 x mg(-1) and 0.050 3 respectively while in October they were 0.153 3 and 0.013 2 m2 x mg(-1

  4. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediment Dynamics in the Mississippi Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, D. N.; Skarke, A. D.; Silwal, S.; Dash, P.

    2016-02-01

    The Mississippi Sound is a semi-enclosed estuary between the coast of Mississippi and a chain of offshore barrier islands with relatively shallow water depths and high marine biodiversity that is wildly utilized for commercial fishing and public recreation. The discharge of sediment-laden rivers into the Mississippi Sound and the adjacent Northern Gulf of Mexico creates turbid plumes that can extend hundreds of square kilometers along the coast and persist for multiple days. The concentration of suspended sediment in these coastal waters is an important parameter in the calculation of regional sediment budgets as well as analysis of water-quality factors such as primary productivity, nutrient dynamics, and the transport of pollutants as well as pathogens. The spectral resolution, sampling frequency, and regional scale spatial domain associated with satellite based sensors makes remote sensing an ideal tool to monitor suspended sediment dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Accordingly, the presented research evaluates the validity of published models that relate remote sensing reflectance with suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), for similar environmental settings, with 51 in situ observations of SSC from the Mississippi Sound. Additionally, regression analysis is used to correlate additional in situ observations of SSC in Mississippi Sound with coincident observations of visible and near-infrared band reflectance collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Aqua satellite, in order to develop a site-specific empirical predictive model for SSC. Finally, specific parameters of the sampled suspended sediment such as grain size and mineralogy are analyzed in order to quantify their respective contributions to total remotely sensed reflectance.

  5. Development of a microfluidic interface for suspended microchannel resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Maillard, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Suspended microchannel resonators (SMRs) are devices that detect particles in liquid samples. In comparison with similar resonating devices that must be immersed, SMRs allow the fluids to flow through microfluidic resonators. This principle of operation leads to a great reduction of the required sample and to enhanced quality factors. As such, SMRs show great potential for a variety of sensing applications. This thesis reports on the final steps of the microfabrication of SMRs and on the deve...

  6. On the Design of Suspended Roofs with Paraboloidal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ungureanu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Some considerations concerning the design of the paraboloidal suspended roofs are made. The main geometric aspects are first time presented. For the roofs we propose, as pattern, the equivalent continuum membranes, and the efforts in the cable are determined by using the membrane efforts and their equations. Two examples are analyzed: elliptic paraboloide and hyperbolic paraboloide, with horizontal projection under the form of an ellipse.

  7. Segment Fixed Priority Scheduling for Self Suspending Real Time Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-11

    for soft real- time systems [15]. Table 1 shows a brief... for execution are the times when a job of task arrives. For 2 ≤ ≤ , when , finishes its execution, it suspends itself for a time duration that lies...assume , and , can take non-negative values such that , ≤ , and let , = , . For each job, a segment , executes for a time duration that lies in

  8. Suspended biofilm carrier and activated sludge removal of acidic pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falås, Per; Baillon-Dhumez, Aude; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Removal of seven active pharmaceutical substances (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, clofibric acid, mefenamic acid, and gemfibrozil) was assessed by batch experiments, with suspended biofilm carriers and activated sludge from several full-scale wastewater treatment plants. A distinct...... and attached solids for the carriers) of diclofenac, ketoprofen, gemfibrozil, clofibric acid and mefenamic acid compared to the sludges. Among the target pharmaceuticals, only ibuprofen and naproxen showed similar removal rates per unit biomass for the sludges and biofilm carriers. In contrast...

  9. Optical response of noble metal alloy nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Amit, E-mail: amit.bansal133@yahoo.com; Verma, S.S.

    2015-01-23

    The optical response, stability, and cost-effectiveness of individual noble metals can be improved by combining them to form alloy nanostructures. The present work reveals the influence of shape, size, and metal type on the optical response of alloy nanoparticles using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) simulations. It is found that sharp corner nanostructures show enhanced plasmonic properties in comparison to rounded counterpart. For all the three shapes, viz., nanocubes, rectangular, and nanobar particles, the increase in length resulted in redshifts of the longitudinal plasmon resonance alongwith enhancement in the scattering yield as well as relative efficiency parameters except for nanocubes of edge length 120 nm. The effect of size on full width at half maxima (FWHM) has also been studied and found to be maximal for nanocubes in comparison to other nanostructures. - Highlights: • The optical response of alloy nanostructures has been studied by discrete dipole approximation. • Sharp corner nanostructures show enhanced plasmonic properties. • Nanobars may be preferred over other nanostructures for absorption-based plasmonic applications. • Nanocubes of edge length greater than 100 nm may be useful for plasmonic solar cells. • Rectangular and nanobar particles may be preferred over nanocubes in plasmon sensing.

  10. Strain sensitivity enhancement in suspended core fiber tapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Ricardo M.; Silva, Susana O.; Becker, Martin; Schuster, Kay; Rothardt, M.; Bartelt, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Frazão, Orlando

    2013-06-01

    Suspended core fiber tapers with different cross sections (with diameters from 70 μm to 120 μm) are produced by filament heating. Before obtaining the taper, the spectral behavior of the suspended core fiber is a multimode interference structure. When the taper is made, an intermodal interference between a few modes is observed. This effect is clearly visible for low taper core dimensions. Since the core and cladding do not collapse, two taper regions exist, one in the core and the other in the cladding. The cladding taper does not affect the light transmission, only the core is reduced to a microtaper. The spectral response of the microtaper based-suspended core fiber is similar to a beat of two interferometers. The strain is applied to the microtaper, and with the reduction in the transverse area, an increase in sensitivity is observed. When the taper is immersed in a liquid with a different index of refraction or subjected to temperature variations, no spectral change occurs.

  11. Optimal control of suspended sediment distribution model of Talaga lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratianingsih, R.; Resnawati, Azim, Mardlijah, Widodo, B.

    2017-08-01

    Talaga Lake is one of several lakes in Central Sulawesi that potentially to be managed in multi purposes scheme because of its characteristic. The scheme is addressed not only due to the lake maintenance because of its sediment but also due to the Algae farming for its biodiesel fuel. This paper governs a suspended sediment distribution model of Talaga lake. The model is derived from the two dimensional hydrodynamic shallow water equations of the mass and momentum conservation law of sediment transport. An order reduction of the model gives six equations of hyperbolic systems of the depth, two dimension directional velocities and sediment concentration while the bed elevation as the second order of turbulent diffusion and dispersion are neglected. The system is discreted and linearized such that could be solved numerically by box-Keller method for some initial and boundary condition. The solutions shows that the downstream velocity is play a role in transversal direction of stream function flow. The downstream accumulated sediment indicate that the suspended sediment and its changing should be controlled by optimizing the downstream velocity and transversal suspended sediment changing due to the ideal algae growth need.

  12. Abrasion properties of self-suspended hairy titanium dioxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao-xia; Liu, Si; Yan, Chao; Wang, Xiao-jing; Wang, Lei; Yu, Ya-ming; Li, Shi-yun

    2017-10-01

    Considering the excellent solubility of pyrrolidone ring organic compounds, the synthesized N-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone chlorides was tethered onto titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles to improve dispersion of TiO2, and then polyethylene oxide (PEO) oligomer through ion exchange embraced the tethered TiO2 to obtain a novel self-suspended hairy TiO2 nanomaterials without any solvent. A variety of techniques were carried out to illustrate the structure and properties of the self-suspended hairy TiO2 nanomaterials. It was found that TiO2 nanoparticles embody monodispersity in the hybrid system though the "false reunion" phenomenon occurring due to nonpermanent weak physical cross-linking. Remarkably, self-suspended hairy TiO2 nanomaterials exhibit lower viscosity, facilitating maneuverable and outstanding antifriction and wear resistance properties, due to the synergistic lubricating effect between spontaneously forming lubricating film and nano-lubrication of TiO2 cores, overcoming the deficiency of both solid and liquid lubricants. This make them promising candidates for the micro-electromechanic/nano-electromechanic systems (MEMS/NEMS).

  13. Contribution of double scattering to structural coloration in quasiordered nanostructures of bird feathers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Cao, Hui (Yale)

    2010-07-28

    We measured the polarization- and angle-resolved optical scattering and reflection spectra of the quasiordered nanostructures in the bird feather barbs. In addition to the primary peak that originates from single scattering, we observed a secondary peak which exhibits depolarization and distinct angular dispersion. We explained the secondary peak in terms of double scattering, i.e., light is scattered successively twice by the structure. The two sequential single-scattering events are considered uncorrelated. Using the Fourier power spectra of the nanostructures obtained from the small-angle x-ray scattering experiment, we calculated the double scattering of light in various directions. The double-scattering spectrum is broader than the single-scattering spectrum, and it splits into two subpeaks at larger scattering angle. The good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data confirms that double scattering of light makes a significant contribution to the structural color.

  14. Contribution of double scattering to structural coloration in quasiordered nanostructures of bird feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O; Mochrie, Simon G J; Dufresne, Eric R; Cao, Hui

    2010-05-01

    We measured the polarization- and angle-resolved optical scattering and reflection spectra of the quasiordered nanostructures in the bird feather barbs. In addition to the primary peak that originates from single scattering, we observed a secondary peak which exhibits depolarization and distinct angular dispersion. We explained the secondary peak in terms of double scattering, i.e., light is scattered successively twice by the structure. The two sequential single-scattering events are considered uncorrelated. Using the Fourier power spectra of the nanostructures obtained from the small-angle x-ray scattering experiment, we calculated the double scattering of light in various directions. The double-scattering spectrum is broader than the single-scattering spectrum, and it splits into two subpeaks at larger scattering angle. The good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data confirms that double scattering of light makes a significant contribution to the structural color.

  15. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-06-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterial's and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  16. Synergistically Enhanced Performance of Ultrathin Nanostructured Silicon Solar Cells Embedded in Plasmonically Assisted, Multispectral Luminescent Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Dhar, Purnim; Chen, Huandong; Montenegro, Angelo; Liaw, Lauren; Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Benderskii, Alexander V.; Yoon, Jongseung

    2017-04-12

    Ultrathin silicon solar cells fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of single-crystalline wafer materials represent an attractive materials platform that could provide many advantages for realizing high-performance, low-cost photovoltaics. However, their intrinsically limited photovoltaic performance arising from insufficient absorption of low-energy photons demands careful design of light management to maximize the efficiency and preserve the cost-effectiveness of solar cells. Herein we present an integrated flexible solar module of ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells capable of simultaneously exploiting spectral upconversion and downshifting in conjunction with multispectral luminescent waveguides and a nanostructured plasmonic reflector to compensate for their weak optical absorption and enhance their performance. The 8 μm-thick silicon solar cells incorporating a hexagonally periodic nanostructured surface relief are surface-embedded in layered multispectral luminescent media containing organic dyes and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocrystals as downshifting and upconverting luminophores, respectively, via printing-enabled deterministic materials assembly. The ultrathin nanostructured silicon microcells in the composite luminescent waveguide exhibit strongly augmented photocurrent (~40.1 mA/cm2) and energy conversion efficiency (~12.8%) than devices with only a single type of luminescent species, owing to the synergistic contributions from optical downshifting, plasmonically enhanced upconversion, and waveguided photon flux for optical concentration, where the short-circuit current density increased by ~13.6 mA/cm2 compared with microcells in a nonluminescent medium on a plain silver reflector under a confined illumination.

  17. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  18. Synthesis and characterization of {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures grown on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jangir, R., E-mail: ravindrajangir@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India); Ganguli, Tapas; Tiwari, Pragya [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India); Porwal, S. [Semiconductor Laser Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India); Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, S.K. [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India); Khattak, B.Q. [Accelerator Components Fabrication Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India); Oak, S.M. [Semiconductor Laser Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India)

    2011-09-01

    {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures including nanowires, nanoribbons and nanosheets were synthesized via thermal annealing of gold coated GaAs substrates in N{sub 2} ambient. GaAs substrates with different dopants were taken as the starting material to study the effect of doping on the growth and photoluminescence properties of {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures. The nanostructures were investigated by Grazing Incident X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, room temperature photoluminescence and optical absorbance. The selected area electron diffraction and High resolution-TEM observations suggest that both nanowires and nanobelts are single crystalline. Different growth directions were observed for nanowires and nanoribbons, indicating the different growth patterns of these nanostructures. The PL spectra of {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures exhibit a strong UV-blue emission band centered at 410 nm, 415 nm and 450 nm for differently doped GaAs substrates respectively. A weak red luminescence peak at 710 nm was also observed in all the samples. The optical absorbance spectrum showed intense absorption features in the UV spectral region. The growth and luminescence mechanism in {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures are also discussed.

  19. Controlling of ZnO nanostructures by solute concentration and its effect on growth, structural and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Yogendra; Rana, Amit Kumar; Bhojane, Prateek; Pusty, Manojit; Bagwe, Vivas; Sen, Somaditya; Shirage, Parasharam M.

    2015-10-01

    ZnO nanostructured films were prepared by a chemical bath deposition method on glass substrates without any assistance of either microwave or high pressure autoclaves. The effect of solute concentration on the pure wurtzite ZnO nanostructure morphologies is studied. The control of the solute concentration helps to control the nanostructure to form nano-needles, and -rods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies revealed highly c-axis oriented thin films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms the modification of the nanostructure dependent on the concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the single crystalline electron diffraction pattern, indicating high quality nano-material. UV-vis results show the variation in the band gap from 3.20 eV to 3.14 eV with increasing concentration as the nanostructures change from needle- to rod-like. Photoluminescence (PL) data indicate the existence of defects in the nanomaterials emitting light in the yellow-green region, with broad UV and visible spectra. A sharp and strong peak is observed at ˜438 cm-1 by Raman spectroscopy, assigned to the {{{{E}}}2}{{high}} optical mode of ZnO, the characteristic peak for the highly-crystalline wurtzite hexagonal phase. The solute concentration significantly affects the formation of defect states in the nanostructured films, and as a result, it alters the structural and optical properties. Current-voltage characteristics alter with the measurement environment, indicating potential sensor applications.

  20. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  1. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  2. Hierarchically nanostructured barium sulfate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ibarra, Issis C; Rodríguez-Gattorno, Geonel; García-Sánchez, Mario F; Sánchez-Solís, Antonio; Manero, Octavio

    2010-05-18

    BaSO(4) nanostructures with controlled morphologies were successfully produced via one-step process through precipitation of BaSO(4) in aqueous and organic media. The synthesis is carried out by mixing solutions of BaCl(2) and Na(2)SO(4) in presence of EDTA (disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) at room temperature. The influence of the reaction conditions such as initial reactants concentration, pH, EDTA/[Ba(2+)] ratio and aging on the BaSO(4) nanoparticles organization is studied. Using EDTA in aqueous media, spherical secondary particles of 500 nm diameter are obtained, which are formed by 4 nm size primary particles. With dimethyl sulfoxide and small amounts of water (5%) and EDTA, the aging process allows the production of long homogeneous fibers, related to hierarchical organization of BaSO(4) nanoparticles. Direct observation of self-assembling of primary particles by HRTEM allows proposing a mechanism for fiber formation, which is based on multipolar attractions that lead to a brick-by-brick organization along a preferential orientation. Results evidence the role of EDTA as controlling agent of the morphology and primary and secondary mean particle size.

  3. Semiconductor nanostructures for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2012-02-01

    Nanowires, with their unique capability to bridge the nanoscopic and macroscopic worlds, have already been demonstrated as important materials for different energy conversion. One emerging and exciting direction is their application for solar to fuel conversion. The generation of fuels by the direct conversion of solar energy in a fully integrated system is an attractive goal, but no such system has been demonstrated that shows the required efficiency, is sufficiently durable, or can be manufactured at reasonable cost. One of the most critical issues in solar water splitting is the development of a suitable photoanode with high efficiency and long-term durability in an aqueous environment. Semiconductor nanowires represent an important class of nanostructure building block for direct solar-to-fuel application because of their high surface area, tunable bandgap and efficient charge transport and collection. Nanowires can be readily designed and synthesized to deterministically incorporate heterojunctions with improved light absorption, charge separation and vectorial transport. Meanwhile, it is also possible to selectively decorate different oxidation or reduction catalysts onto specific segments of the nanowires to mimic the compartmentalized reactions in natural photosynthesis. In this talk, I will highlight several recent examples in this lab using semiconductor nanowires and their heterostructures for the purpose of direct solar water splitting.

  4. Particulate matter from re-suspended mineral dust and emergency cause-specific respiratory hospitalizations in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Vivian C.; Tian, Linwei; Ho, Kin-fai

    2017-09-01

    While contribution from non-exhaust particulate matter (PM) emissions towards traffic-related emissions is increasing, few epidemiologic evidence of their health impact is available. We examined the association of short-term exposure to PM10 apportioned to re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for three major respiratory causes in Hong Kong between 2001 and 2008. Time-series regression model was constructed to examine association of PM10 from re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for upper respiratory infection (URI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma at exposure lag 0-5 days, adjusting for time trends, seasonality, temperature and relative humidity. An interquartile range (6.8 μg/m3) increment in re-suspended mineral dust on previous day was associated with 0.66% (95% CI: 0.12, 0.98) increase in total respiratory hospitalizations, and 1.01% (95% CI: 0.14, 1.88) increase in URI hospitalizations. A significant 0.66%-0.80% increases in risk of COPD hospitalizations were found after exposure to re-suspended mineral dust at lag 3 or later. Exposure to mineral dust at lag 4 was linked to 1.71% increase (95% CI: 0.14, 2.22) in asthma hospitalizations. Associations from single-pollutant models remained significant in multi-pollutant models, which additionally adjusted for PM10 contributing from vehicle exhaust, regional combustion, residual oil, fresh sea salt, aged sea salt, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate, or gaseous pollutants (i.e., nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or ozone), respectively. Our findings provide insight into the biological mechanism by which non-exhaust pollution may be associated with risk of adverse respiratory outcomes, and also stress the needs for strategies to reduce emission and re-suspension of mineral dust. More research is warranted to assess the health effects of different non-exhaust PM emissions under various roadway conditions and vehicle fleets.

  5. Discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended-sand in rivers using side-looking acoustic profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Williams, Cory A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques rely on measurements of ancillary properties that correlate with suspended-sediment concentration and particle size and thus require the collection of traditional samples for calibration. Through in situ deployments, these methods can provide the high temporal resolution that cannot be achieved through traditional sampling. Here we focus on the evaluation of acoustic profiling techniques (e.g. acoustic-Doppler sideways-looking profilers, or ADPs). One major advantage of acoustic profiling is the ability to concurrently measure water velocity (using Doppler-shift methods) and suspended-sediment concentration such that suspended-sediment flux can be directly computed using data from a single instrument. Acoustic-Doppler profilers have become popular for measuring water velocity and discharge in rivers, through both moving-boat operations and from fixed deployments such as bank-mounted sideways-looking instruments (Hirsch and Costa, 2004, Muste et al., 2007). The method presented herein is most suited to sideways-looking applications as a complement to the "index velocity" technique, whereby an index velocity from a sideways-looking instrument is related to the cross-section average velocity (determined from moving-boat discharge measurements) as a means for developing a continuous water-discharge record (Ruhl and Simpson, 2005). Topping et al. (2007) presented a method for discriminating silt-and-clay from suspended sand, using single frequency ADPs. This method takes advantage of the relations among acoustic backscatter, sediment-induced acoustic attenuation, suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), and particle size distribution (PSD). Backscatter is the amount of sound scattered back and received at the transducer while sediment-induced attenuation is the amount of sound scattered in other directions and absorbed by the sediment particles. Both of these parameters can be measured with an ADP, and their different dependencies on SSC and PSD allow for the

  6. Single-mode biological distributed feedback laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Lemmer, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Single-mode second order distributed feedback (DFB) lasers of riboflavin (vitamin B2) doped gelatine films on nanostructured low refractive index material are demonstrated. Manufacturing is based on a simple UV nanoimprint and spin-coating. Emission wavelengths of 543 nm and 562 nm for two differ...

  7. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O [Berkeley, CA; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, CA

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  8. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  9. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  10. Progress towards Acoustic Suspended Sediment Transport Monitoring: Fraser River, BC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, M. E.; Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.; Kostaschuk, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to predict the timing and quantity of suspended sediment transport is limited because fine sand, silt and clay delivery are supply limited, requiring empirical modeling approaches of limited temporal stability. A solution is the development of continuous monitoring techniques capable of tracking sediment concentrations and grain-size. Here we examine sediment delivery from upstream sources to the lower Fraser River. The sediment budget of the lower Fraser River provides a long-term perspective of the net changes in the channels and in sediment delivery to Fraser Delta. The budget is based on historical sediment rating curves developed from data collected from 1965-1986 by the Water Survey of Canada. We explore the possibility of re-establishing the sediment-monitoring program using hydro-acoustics by evaluating the use of a 300 kHz side-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp), mounted just downstream of the sand-gravel transition at Mission, for continuous measurement of suspended sediment transport. Complementary field observations include conventional bottle sampling with a P-63 sampler, vertical profiles with a downward-looking 600 kHz aDcp, and 1200 kHz aDcp discharge measurements. We have successfully completed calibration of the downward-looking aDcp with the P-63 samples; the side-looking aDcp signals remain under investigation. A comparison of several methods for obtaining total sediment flux indicates that suspended sediment concentration (SSC) closely follows discharge through the freshet and peaks in total SSC and sand SSC coincide with peak measurements of discharge. Low flows are dominated by fine sediment and grain size increases with higher flows. This research assesses several techniques for obtaining sediment flux and contributes to the understanding of sediment delivery to sand-bedded portions of the river.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Bing-Jie; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Shih, Fu-Yu; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chih-Yi; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between phonons and electrons induced by the dopants or the substrate of graphene in spectroscopic investigation reveal a rich source of interesting physics. Raman spectra and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of supported and suspended monolayer graphenes were measured and analyzed systemically with different approaches. The weak Raman signals are greatly enhanced by the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which has attracted considerable interests. The technique is regarded as wonderful and useful tool, but the dopants that are produced by depositing metallic nanoparticles may affect the electron scattering processes of graphene. Therefore, the doping and substrate influences on graphene are also important issues to be investigated. In this work, the peak positions of G peak and 2D peak, the I 2D/ I G ratios, and enhancements of G and 2D bands with suspended and supported graphene flakes were measured and analyzed. The peak shifts of G and 2D bands between the Raman and SERS signals demonstrate the doping effect induced by silver nanoparticles by n-doping. The I 2D/ I G ratio can provide a more sensitive method to carry out the doping effect on the graphene surface than the peak shifts of G and 2D bands. The enhancements of 2D band of suspended and supported graphenes reached 138, and those of G band reached at least 169. Their good enhancements are helpful to measure the optical properties of graphene. The different substrates that covered the graphene surface with doping effect are more sensitive to the enhancements of G band with respect to 2D band. It provides us a new method to distinguish the substrate and doping effect on graphene.

  12. Regional volume changes in canine lungs suspended in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrecht, Peter H.; Kyle, Richard R.; Bryant, Howard J.; Feuerstein, Irwin

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the absence of a pleural pressure gradient (simulating the presumed condition found in microgravity) upon regional expansion of the lung. We attempted to produce a uniform pressure over the surface of the lung by suspending excised lungs in air. Such studies should help determine whether or not the absence of a pleural pressure gradient leads to uniform ventilation. A preparation in which there is no pleural pressure gradient should also be useful in studying non-gravitational effects on ventilation distribution.

  13. The Ages in a Self-Suspended Nanoparticle Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2010-01-13

    Telomers ionically tethered to nanometer-sized particles yield self-suspended, nanoparticle-Iaden liquids with unusual dynamical features. By subjecting these suspensions to controlled, modest shear strains, we find that their flow behaviors observed using experiments performed on time scales of tens of seconds can be projected to obtain maps of their dynamical response on geological time scales. That such extraordinarily slow dynamic processes can be uncovered from real-time measurements by simply stretching a system provides a simple but powerful tool for interrogating extremely slow motions in other jammed physical states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Suspended liminality: Vacillating affects in cyberbullying/research

    OpenAIRE

    Kofoed, J.; Stenner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a concept of liminal hotspots in the context of i) a secondary analysis of a cyberbullying case involving a group of school children from a Danish school, and ii) an altered auto-ethnography in which the authors ‘entangle’ their own experiences with the case analysis. These two sources are used to build an account of a liminal hotspot conceived as an occasion of troubled and suspended transformative transition in which a liminal phase is extended and remains unresolved. Th...

  15. Oscillation of a diamagnetic liquid bubble suspended by magnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, R. E-mail: yamane@kokushikan.ac.jp; Tomita, S.; Mai, J.; Park, M.K.; Oshima, S

    2002-11-01

    The levitation of the diamagnetic liquid droplet with the strong magnetic field is experimentally simulated, using the magnetic fluid as the surrounding fluid in place of air or gas, and the water bubble is levitated with the conventional permanent magnet. When the stepwise magnetic field is superposed, the suspended bubble behaves as a typical step response with the overshoot and viscous damping. The effects of the volume of the bubble, the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the magnetic fluid are investigated.

  16. Molecular self-assembly into one-dimensional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2008-12-01

    bundles. Surprisingly, TEM of a PA substituted by a nitrobenzyl group revealed assembly into quadruple helical fibers with a braided morphology. Upon photocleavage of this the nitrobenzyl group, the helices transform into single cylindrical nanofibers. Finally, inspired by the tobacco mosaic virus, we used a dumbbell-shaped, oligo(phenylene ethynylene) template to control the length of a PA nanofiber self-assembly (<10 nm). AFM showed complete disappearance of long nanofibers in the presence of this rigid-rod template. Results from quick-freeze/deep-etch TEM and dynamic light scattering demonstrated the templating behavior in aqueous solution. This strategy could provide a general method to control size the length of nonspherical supramolecular nanostructures.

  17. Enzymatic Self-Assembly of Nanostructures for Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Chen, Gaolin Liang

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules or macromolecules through non-covalent or covalent bonds to build up supramolecular nanostructures is a prevalent and important process in nature. While most chemists use small molecules to assemble nanostructures with physical or chemical perturbations, nature adopts enzymes to catalyze the reaction to assemble biological, functional nanostructures with high efficiency and specificity. Although enzymatic self-assembly of nanostructures has been remained chall...

  18. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  19. Device Fabrication and Probing of Discrete Carbon Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-05-06

    Device fabrication on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using electrical beam lithography (EBL), electron beam induced deposition (EBID), ion beam induced deposition (IBID) methods was carried out, followed by device electrical characterization using a conventional probe station. A four-probe configuration was utilized to measure accurately the electrical resistivity of MWCNTs with similar results obtained from devices fabricated by different methods. In order to reduce the contact resistance of the beam deposited platinum electrodes, single step vacuum thermal annealing was performed. Microscopy and spectroscopy were carried out on the beam deposited electrodes to follow the structural and chemical changes occurring during the vacuum thermal annealing. For the first time, a core-shell type structure was identified on EBID Pt and IBID Pt annealed electrodes and analogous free standing nanorods previously exposed to high temperature. We believe this observation has important implications for transport properties studies of carbon materials. Apart from that, contamination of carbon nanostructure, originating from the device fabrication methods, was also studied. Finally, based on the observations of faster processing time together with higher yield and flexibility for device preparation, we investigated EBID to fabricate devices for other discrete carbon nanostructures.

  20. Orthogonal Protein Assembly on DNA Nanostructures Using Relaxases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Sandra; Pirzer, Tobias; Aghebat Rafat, Ali; Goetzfried, Marisa A; Moncalian, Gabriel; Simmel, Friedrich C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2016-03-18

    DNA-binding proteins are promising reagents for the sequence-specific modification of DNA-based nanostructures. Here, we investigate the utility of a series of relaxase proteins-TrwC, TraI, and MobA-for nanofunctionalization. Relaxases are involved in the conjugative transfer of plasmids between bacteria, and bind to their DNA target sites via a covalent phosphotyrosine linkage. We study the binding of the relaxases to two standard DNA origami structures-rodlike six-helix bundles and flat rectangular origami sheets. We find highly orthogonal binding of the proteins with binding yields of 40-50 % per binding site, which is comparable to other functionalization methods. The yields differ for the two origami structures and also depend on the position of the binding sites. Due to their specificity for a single-stranded DNA target, their orthogonality, and their binding properties, relaxases are a uniquely useful addition to the toolbox available for the modification of DNA nanostructures with proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hybrid Nanostructures Containing Sulfadiazine Modified Chitosan as Antimicrobial Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanel Silvestru Munteanu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CH nanofibrous structures containing sulfadiazine (SDZ or sulfadiazine modified chitosan (SCH in the form of functional nanoparticles attached to nanofibers (hybrid nanostructures were obtained by mono-axial and coaxial electrospinning. The mono-axial design consisted of a SDZ/CH mixture solution fed through a single nozzle while the coaxial design consisted of SCH and CH solutions separately supplied to the inner and outer nozzle (or in reverse order. The CH ability to form nanofibers assured the formation of a nanofiber mesh, while SDZ and SCH, both in form of suspensions in the electrospun solution, assured the formation of active nanoparticles which remained attached to the CH nanofiber mesh after the electrospinning process. The obtained nanostructures were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The SDZ release profiles and kinetics were analyzed. The SDZ or SCH nanoparticles loosely attached at the surface of the nanofibers, provide a burst release in the first 20 min, which is important to stop the possible initial infection in a wound, while the SDZ and SCH from the nanoparticles which are better confined (or even encapsulated into the CH nanofibers would be slowly released with the erosion/disruption of the CH nanofiber mesh.

  3. Nanostructured Thin Film Synthesis by Aerosol Chemical Vapor Deposition for Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Tandeep S.

    Renewable energy sources offer a viable solution to the growing energy demand while mitigating concerns for greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. This has led to a tremendous momentum towards solar and wind-based energy harvesting technologies driving efficiencies higher and costs lower. However, the intermittent nature of these energy sources necessitates energy storage technologies, which remain the Achilles heel in meeting the renewable energy goals. This dissertation focusses on two approaches for addressing the needs of energy storage: first, targeting direct solar to fuel conversion via photoelectrochemical water-splitting and second, improving the performance of current rechargeable batteries by developing new electrode architectures and synthesis processes. The aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD) process has emerged as a promising single-step approach for nanostructured thin film synthesis directly on substrates. The relationship between the morphology and the operating parameters in the process is complex. In this work, a simulation based approach has been developed to understand the relationship and acquire the ability of predicting the morphology. These controlled nanostructured morphologies of TiO2 , compounded with gold nanoparticles of various shapes, are used for solar water-splitting applications. Tuning of light absorption in the visible-light range along with reduced electron-hole recombination in the composite structures has been demonstrated. The ACVD process is further extended to a novel single-step synthesis of nanostructured TiO2 electrodes directly on the current collector for applications as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, mainly for electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The effect of morphology of the nanostructures has been investigated via experimental studies and electrochemical transport modelling. Results demonstrate the exceptional performance of the single crystal one-dimensional nanostructures over granular

  4. Remote Sensing Studies of Suspended Sediment Concentration Variation in Barito Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisanty, Deasy; Nur Saputra, Aswin

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta depend on the process in upstream. Agriculture, mining, and illegal logging in Barito River upstream has an effect for suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The objective of research is to estimate the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The data of research consist of Landsat 7 in year 2011 and measurement result data of suspended sediment concentration both in wet season and dry season in year 2011. Data analysis is regression analysis to estimates the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta. The method of research compares three types of spectral transformation for suspended sediment that is Normalized Suspended Material Index (NSMI), Normalized Differences Suspended Sediment Index (NDSSI), and band ratio (green/blue). The result of the transformation is compared with the value of the field measurement. Based on the result of the comparison can be known the suitable type of transformation for the suspended sediment estimation in Barito Delta. The result of research explains that NSMI has the highest value to estimate the variation of suspended sediment concentration in Barito Delta.

  5. Facile Growth of Multi-twined Au Nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe a facile growth of chain-like Au nanostructures and their spontaneous transformation to multi-twined nanostructure using a mild reducing agent bisphenol A (BPA). The growth Au nanostructures involves the chemical reduction of HAuCl4 by BPA in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as ...

  6. Spin currents in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeschka, Franz Dominik

    2011-09-05

    A pure spin current, i.e., a flow of angular momentum without accompanying net charge current, is a key ingredient in the field of spintronics. In this thesis, we experimentally investigated two different concepts for pure spin current sources suggested by theory. The first is based on a time-dependent magnetization precession which ''pumps'' a pure spin current into an adjacent non-magnetic conductor. Our experiments quantitatively corroborated important predictions expected theoretically for this approach, including the dependence of the spin current on the sample geometry and the microwave power. Even more important, we could show for the first time that the spin pumping concept is viable in a large variety of ferromagnetic materials and that it only depends on the magnetization damping. Therefore, our experiments established spin pumping as generic phenomenon and demonstrated that it is a powerful way to generate pure spin currents. The second theoretical concept is based on the conversion of charge currents into spin currents in non-magnetic nanostructures via the spin Hall effect. We experimentally investigated this approach in H-shaped, metallic nanodevices, and found that the predictions are linked to requirements not realizable with the present experimental techniques, neither in sample fabrication nor in measurement technique. Indeed, our experimental data could be consistently understood by a spin-independent transport model describing the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport. In addition, the implementation of advanced fabrication and measurement techniques allowed to discover a new non-local phenomenon, the non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance. Finally, we also studied spin-polarized supercurrents carried by spin-triplet Cooper pairs. We found that low resistance interfaces are a key requirement for further experiments in this direction. (orig.)

  7. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  8. Phase-shifted response of plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerkararyan, Khachatur V.; Yezekyan, Torgom S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a quantum dipole emitter (QDE) illuminated by a resonant electromagnetic field and placed close to a metal nanostructure, whose response to the incident field is phase shifted by 3π/2 (-π/2). It is found that, due to the phase shift in a field scattered by the nanostruc......We analyze the dynamics of a quantum dipole emitter (QDE) illuminated by a resonant electromagnetic field and placed close to a metal nanostructure, whose response to the incident field is phase shifted by 3π/2 (-π/2). It is found that, due to the phase shift in a field scattered...... by the nanostructure (and acting on the QDE along with the incident field), QDE dynamics is characterized by a fast QDE transition to the excited state followed by relaxation to a stable superposition (of the excited and ground states) with a close to 1 probability of the QDE to be found in the excited state. We...

  9. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Cucurbituril-based supramolecular engineered nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Sinem; Idris, Muazzam; Tuncel, Dönüs

    2015-01-14

    Cucurbituril (CB) is a unique macrocycle with a rigid symmetrical structure, which is composed of two identical hydrophilic portals decorated with partially negatively charged carbonyl groups and a hydrophobic cavity. A number of different nanostructured materials, including nanoparticles, nanocomposites, vesicles and rods, have been prepared by taking advantage of the varying cavity size of the CB homologues, their ability to accommodate more than one guest in their cavities, their rigid symmetrical structures, as well as the water solubility of CB7. These nanostructures could find a wide range of potential applications in the areas of self-healing materials, nanomedicine, plasmonics, and nanocatalysis. Here, we review the recent progresses in the synthesis, properties and application of CB-based supramolecular engineered nanostructures, which are either constructed through CB-assisted self-assembly or from post-functionalized-CB homologues.

  11. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-06

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  13. Polymer Masks for nanostructuring of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvets, Violetta

    This PhD project is a part of Center for Nanostructured Graphene (CNG) activities. The aim of the project is to develop a new lithography method for creation of highly ordered nanostructures with as small as possible feature and period sizes. The method should be applicable for graphene...... polymer masks is developed. Mask fabrication is realized by microtoming of 30-60 nm thin sections from pre-aligned polymer monoliths with different morphologies. The resulting polymer masks are then transferred to both silicon and graphene substrates. Hexagonally packed hole patterns with 10 nm hole...... diameter and 20 nm periodicity are successfully transferred to both substrates. The method allowed to realize the first ever transfer of moiré patterns to silicon. Furthermore, in collaboration with CNG, device with nanostructured graphene are fabricated and electrical measurements made on these devices...

  14. Electrode Nanostructures in Lithium‐Based Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Lithium‐based batteries possessing energy densities much higher than those of the conventional batteries belong to the most promising class of future energy devices. However, there are some fundamental issues related to their electrodes which are big roadblocks in their applications to electric vehicles (EVs). Nanochemistry has advantageous roles to overcome these problems by defining new nanostructures of electrode materials. This review article will highlight the challenges associated with these chemistries both to bring high performance and longevity upon considering the working principles of the various types of lithium‐based (Li‐ion, Li‐air and Li‐S) batteries. Further, the review discusses the advantages and challenges of nanomaterials in nanostructured electrodes of lithium‐based batteries, concerns with lithium metal anode and the recent advancement in electrode nanostructures. PMID:27980896

  15. Electroactive behavior of nanostructured polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ravi

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) offer a new class of actuator materials, which display physical response to electrical excitation. EAPs can be classified into two groups based on their response mechanism: electronic EAPs and ionic EAPs. Electronic EAPs respond due to electrostatic or Coulomb forces developed on application of an electric field, whereas ionic EAPs are driven by mobility or diffusion of ions. Electronic EAPs display better properties than ionic EAPs in terms of their high actuation strain, reliability and durability, efficiency, and response time. Dielectric electroactive polymers or D-EAPs produce large actuation strain on application of an electric field due to Maxwell stress effect. D-EAPs have superior performance than other EAPs, which is ascribed to their high actuation strain, fast response time, high energy density, and high efficiency. Acrylic elastomer is known to be superior amongst electric EAPs due to its highest areal actuation strain (˜160 %), highest elastic energy density (3.4 MJ/m3), and highest pressure (7 MPa). Generally, all the D-EAPs require very high electric field for actuation. In this work, we demonstrate that incorporation of a low-volatility, aliphatic-rich solvent (mineral oil) into a nanostructured poly [styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene] (SEBS) triblock copolymer yields physically cross-linked micellar networks, known as thermoplastic elastomer gels (TPEG). This nanostructured material exhibits excellent displacement under an external electric field, therefore refers as electroactive nanostructured polymers (ENP). Comparison of the ENPs investigated here with EAPs previously reported, confirms that the ENP217 system with 5 wt% copolymer yields the highest areal actuation amongst all D-EAPs currently known. Dielectric strength of both ENPs (ENP of 217kDa and 161kDa molecular weights) increases with increasing copolymer fraction. The ENPs introduced here exhibit coupling efficiencies that are comparable, if not

  16. Cation-Induced Stabilization and Denaturation of DNA Origami Nanostructures in Urea and Guanidinium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Krainer, Georg; Grundmeier, Guido; Schlierf, Michael; Keller, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    The stability of DNA origami nanostructures under various environmental conditions constitutes an important issue in numerous applications, including drug delivery, molecular sensing, and single-molecule biophysics. Here, the effect of Na+ and Mg2+ concentrations on DNA origami stability is investigated in the presence of urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl), two strong denaturants commonly employed in protein folding studies. While increasing concentrations of both cations stabilize the DNA origami nanostructures against urea denaturation, they are found to promote DNA origami denaturation by GdmCl. These inverse behaviors are rationalized by a salting-out of Gdm+ to the hydrophobic DNA base stack. The effect of cation-induced DNA origami denaturation by GdmCl deserves consideration in the design of single-molecule studies and may potentially be exploited in future applications such as selective denaturation for purification purposes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Thermoelectric unipolar spin battery in a suspended carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhan; Fang, Tie-Feng; He, Wan-Xiu; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2017-04-01

    A quantum dot formed in a suspended carbon nanotube exposed to an external magnetic field is predicted to act as a thermoelectric unipolar spin battery which generates pure spin current. The built-in spin flip mechanism is a consequence of the spin-vibration interaction resulting from the interplay between the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and the vibrational modes of the suspended carbon nanotube. On the other hand, utilizing thermoelectric effect, the temperature difference between the electron and the thermal bath to which the vibrational modes are coupled provides the driving force. We find that both magnitude and direction of the generated pure spin current are dependent on the strength of spin-vibration interaction, the sublevel configuration in dot, the temperatures of electron and thermal bath, and the tunneling rate between the dot and the pole. Moreover, in the linear response regime, the kinetic coefficient is non-monotonic in the temperature T and it reaches its maximum when {{k}\\text{B}}T is about one phonon energy. The existence of a strong intradot Coulomb interaction is irrelevant for our spin battery, provided that high-order cotunneling processes are suppressed.

  18. Thermoelectric unipolar spin battery in a suspended carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhan; Fang, Tie-Feng; He, Wan-Xiu; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2017-04-26

    A quantum dot formed in a suspended carbon nanotube exposed to an external magnetic field is predicted to act as a thermoelectric unipolar spin battery which generates pure spin current. The built-in spin flip mechanism is a consequence of the spin-vibration interaction resulting from the interplay between the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and the vibrational modes of the suspended carbon nanotube. On the other hand, utilizing thermoelectric effect, the temperature difference between the electron and the thermal bath to which the vibrational modes are coupled provides the driving force. We find that both magnitude and direction of the generated pure spin current are dependent on the strength of spin-vibration interaction, the sublevel configuration in dot, the temperatures of electron and thermal bath, and the tunneling rate between the dot and the pole. Moreover, in the linear response regime, the kinetic coefficient is non-monotonic in the temperature T and it reaches its maximum when [Formula: see text] is about one phonon energy. The existence of a strong intradot Coulomb interaction is irrelevant for our spin battery, provided that high-order cotunneling processes are suppressed.

  19. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.H. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Suspended animation-like state protects mice from lethal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Eric; Roth, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Joseph Priestley observed the high burn rate of candles in pure oxygen and wondered if people would "live out too fast" if we were in the same environment. We hypothesize that sulfide, a natural reducer of oxygen that is made in many cell types, acts as a buffer to prevent unrestricted oxygen consumption. To test this, we administered sulfide in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to mice (Mus musculus). As we have previously shown, H2S decreases the metabolic rate of mice by approximately 90% and induces a suspended animation-like state. Mice cannot survive for longer than 20 min when exposed to 5% oxygen. However, if mice are first put into a suspended animation-like state by a 20-min pretreatment with H2S and then are exposed to low oxygen, they can survive for more than 6.5 h in 5% oxygen with no apparent detrimental effects. In addition, if mice are exposed to a 20-min pretreatment with H2S followed by 1 h at 5% oxygen, they can then survive for several hours at oxygen tensions as low as 3%. We hypothesize that prior exposure to H2S reduces oxygen demand, therefore making it possible for the mice to survive with low oxygen supply. These results suggest that H2S may be useful to prevent damage associated with hypoxia.