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Sample records for suspended monolayer graphene

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Bing-Jie; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Shih, Fu-Yu; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chih-Yi; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between phonons and electrons induced by the dopants or the substrate of graphene in spectroscopic investigation reveal a rich source of interesting physics. Raman spectra and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of supported and suspended monolayer graphenes were measured and analyzed systemically with different approaches. The weak Raman signals are greatly enhanced by the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which has attracted considerable interests. The technique is regarded as wonderful and useful tool, but the dopants that are produced by depositing metallic nanoparticles may affect the electron scattering processes of graphene. Therefore, the doping and substrate influences on graphene are also important issues to be investigated. In this work, the peak positions of G peak and 2D peak, the I 2D/ I G ratios, and enhancements of G and 2D bands with suspended and supported graphene flakes were measured and analyzed. The peak shifts of G and 2D bands between the Raman and SERS signals demonstrate the doping effect induced by silver nanoparticles by n-doping. The I 2D/ I G ratio can provide a more sensitive method to carry out the doping effect on the graphene surface than the peak shifts of G and 2D bands. The enhancements of 2D band of suspended and supported graphenes reached 138, and those of G band reached at least 169. Their good enhancements are helpful to measure the optical properties of graphene. The different substrates that covered the graphene surface with doping effect are more sensitive to the enhancements of G band with respect to 2D band. It provides us a new method to distinguish the substrate and doping effect on graphene.

  2. Experimental study of thermal rectification in suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Hu, Shiqian; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Thermal rectification is a fundamental phenomenon for active heat flow control. Significant thermal rectification is expected to exist in the asymmetric nanostructures, such as nanowires and thin films. As a one-atom-thick membrane, graphene has attracted much attention for realizing thermal rectification as shown by many molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate thermal rectification in various asymmetric monolayer graphene nanostructures. A large thermal rectification factor of 26% is achieved in a defect-engineered monolayer graphene with nanopores on one side. A thermal rectification factor of 10% is achieved in a pristine monolayer graphene with nanoparticles deposited on one side or with a tapered width. The results indicate that the monolayer graphene has great potential to be used for designing high-performance thermal rectifiers for heat flow control and energy harvesting.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of electrical and thermal conductivities of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Ago, Hiroki; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We measured both in-plane electrical and thermal properties of the same suspended monolayer graphene using a novel T-type sensor method. At room temperature, the values are about 240 000 Ω-1 m-1 and 2100 W m-1 K-1 for the electrical and thermal conductivities, respectively. Based on the Wiedemann-Franz law, the electrons have negligible contribution to the thermal conductivity of graphene, while the in-plane LA and TA modes phonons are the dominant heat carriers. In monolayer graphene, the absence of layer-layer and layer-substrate interactions enhances the contribution of long wave-length phonons to the heat transport and increases the thermal conductivity accordingly. The reported method and experimental data of suspended monolayer graphene are useful for understanding the basic physics and designing the future graphene electronic devices.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of electrical and thermal conductivities of suspended monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi, E-mail: takamatsu@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: x-zhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ago, Hiroki [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Zhang, Xing, E-mail: takamatsu@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: x-zhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takata, Yasuyuki [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-06-28

    We measured both in-plane electrical and thermal properties of the same suspended monolayer graphene using a novel T-type sensor method. At room temperature, the values are about 240 000 Ω{sup −1} m{sup −1} and 2100 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} for the electrical and thermal conductivities, respectively. Based on the Wiedemann-Franz law, the electrons have negligible contribution to the thermal conductivity of graphene, while the in-plane LA and TA modes phonons are the dominant heat carriers. In monolayer graphene, the absence of layer-layer and layer-substrate interactions enhances the contribution of long wave-length phonons to the heat transport and increases the thermal conductivity accordingly. The reported method and experimental data of suspended monolayer graphene are useful for understanding the basic physics and designing the future graphene electronic devices.

  5. Electrochemical behavior of monolayer and bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valota, Anna T; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Kostya S; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Eckmann, Axel; Hill, Ernie W; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2011-11-22

    Results of a study on the electrochemical properties of exfoliated single and multilayer graphene flakes are presented. Graphene flakes were deposited on silicon/silicon oxide wafers to enable fast and accurate characterization by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Conductive silver paint and silver wires were used to fabricate contacts; epoxy resin was employed as a masking coating in order to expose a stable, well-defined area of graphene. Both multilayer and monolayer graphene microelectrodes showed quasi-reversible behavior during voltammetric measurements in potassium ferricyanide. However, the standard heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant, k°, was estimated to be higher for monolayer graphene flakes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Giant magneto-photoelectric effect in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Jens; Kurzmann, Annika; Geller, Martin; Queisser, Friedemann; Lorke, Axel; Schützhold, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We study the optical response of a suspended, monolayer graphene field-effect transistor structure in magnetic fields of up to 9 T (quantum Hall regime). With an illumination power of only 3 μW, we measure a photocurrent of up to 400 nA (without an applied bias) corresponding to a photo-responsivity of 0.13 A W-1, which we believe to be one of the highest values ever measured in single-layer graphene. We discuss possible mechanisms for generating this strong photo-response (17 electron-hole pairs per 100 incident photons). Based on our experimental findings, we believe that the most likely scenario is a ballistic two-stage process including carrier multiplication via Auger-type inelastic Coulomb scattering at the graphene edge.

  7. Suspended graphene devices with local gate control on an insulating substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Florian R; Cui, Zheng; Yurtalan, Muhammet A; Vojvodin, Cameron; Papaj, Michał; Orgiazzi, Jean-Luc F X; Deng, Chunqing; Bal, Mustafa; Lupascu, Adrian

    2015-10-09

    We present a fabrication process for graphene-based devices where a graphene monolayer is suspended above a local metallic gate placed in a trench. As an example we detail the fabrication steps of a graphene field-effect transistor. The devices are built on a bare high-resistivity silicon substrate. At temperatures of 77 K and below, we observe the field-effect modulation of the graphene resistivity by a voltage applied to the gate. This fabrication approach enables new experiments involving graphene-based superconducting qubits and nano-electromechanical resonators. The method is applicable to other two-dimensional materials.

  8. Sub-THz Characterisation of Monolayer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Dadrasnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the optical and electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene by using pulsed optoelectronic terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the frequency range of 325–500 GHz based on fast direct measurements of phase and amplitude. We also show that these parameters can, however, be measured with higher resolution using a free space continuous wave measurement technique associated with a vector network analyzer that offers a good dynamic range. All the scattering parameters (both magnitude and phase are measured simultaneously. The Nicholson-Ross-Weir method is implemented to extract the monolayer graphene parameters at the aforementioned frequency range.

  9. Optomechanics for thermal characterization of suspended graphene

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    Dolleman, Robin J.; Houri, Samer; Davidovikj, Dejan; Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J.; Blanter, Yaroslav M.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steeneken, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal response of graphene is expected to be extremely fast due to its low heat capacity and high thermal conductivity. In this work, the thermal response of suspended single-layer graphene membranes is investigated by characterization of their mechanical motion in response to a high-frequency modulated laser. A characteristic delay time τ between the optical intensity and mechanical motion is observed, which is attributed to the time required to raise the temperature of the membrane. We find, however, that the measured time constants are significantly larger than the predicted ones based on values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity. In order to explain the discrepancy between measured and modeled τ , a model is proposed that takes a thermal boundary resistance at the edge of the graphene drum into account. The measurements provide a noninvasive way to characterize thermal properties of suspended atomically thin membranes, providing information that can be hard to obtain by other means.

  10. Monolayer adsorption of noble gases on graphene

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    Maiga, Sidi M.; Gatica, Silvina M.

    2018-02-01

    We report our results of simulations of the adsorption of noble gases (Kr, Ar, Xe) on graphene. For Kr, we consider two configurations: supported and free-standing graphene, where atoms are adsorbed only on one or two sides of the graphene. For Ar and Xe, we studied only the case of supported graphene. For the single-side adsorption, we calculated the two-dimensional gas-liquid critical temperature for each adsorbate. We determined the different phases of the monolayers and constructed the phase diagrams. We found two-dimensional incommensurate solid phases for krypton, argon and xenon, and a two-dimensional commensurate solid phase for krypton. For double side adsorption of Kr, we do not see evidence of an ordering transition driven by the interlayer forces.

  11. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  12. Elastic Properties of Hybrid Graphene/Boron Nitride Monolayer

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qing; Zamiri, Amir R.; Ji, Wei; De, Suvranu

    2011-01-01

    Recently hybridized monolayers consisting of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) phases inside graphene layer have been synthesized and shown to be an effective way of opening band gap in graphene monolayers [1]. In this letter, we report an ab initio density functional theory (DFT)- based study of h-BN domain size effect on the elastic properties of graphene/boron nitride hybrid monolayers (h-BNC). We found both inplane stiffness and longitudinal sound velocity of h-BNC linearly decrease with h-B...

  13. Towards intrinsic graphene biosensor: A label-free, suspended single crystalline graphene sensor for multiplex lung cancer tumor markers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Cui, Tianhong

    2015-10-15

    Graphene biosensors reported so far are based on polycrystalline graphene flakes which are anchored on supporting substrates. The influence of grain boundary and the scattering from substrate drastically degrade the properties of graphene and conceal the performance of intrinsic graphene as a sensor. Here we report a label-free biosensor based on suspended single crystalline graphene (SCG), which can get rid of grain boundary and substrate scattering, revealing the biosensing mechanism of intrinsic graphene for the first time. Monolayer SCG flakes were derived from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method. Multiplex detection of three different lung cancer tumor markers was realized. The suspended structure can largely improve the sensitivity and detection limit (0.1 pg/ml) of the sensor, and the single crystalline nature of SCG enable the biosensor to have superior uniformity compared to polycrystalline ones. The SCG sensors exhibit superb specificity and large linear detection range from 1 pg/ml to 1 μg/ml, showing the prominent advantages of graphene as a sensing material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of charge carriers on corrugation of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Demid A.; Gorodetsky, Andrei; Baidakova, Marina V.

    2018-02-01

    Electronic degrees of freedom are predicted to play a significant role in mechanics of two-dimensional crystalline membranes. Here we show that appearance of charge carriers may cause a considerable impact on suspended graphene corrugation, thus leading to additional mechanism resulting in charge carriers mobility variation with their density. This finding may account for some details of suspended graphene conductivity dependence on its doping level and suggests that proper modeling of suspended graphene-based device properties must include the influence of charge carriers on its surface corrugation.

  15. Transfer of CVD-grown monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates.

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    Suk, Ji Won; Kitt, Alexander; Magnuson, Carl W; Hao, Yufeng; Ahmed, Samir; An, Jinho; Swan, Anna K; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-09-27

    Reproducible dry and wet transfer techniques were developed to improve the transfer of large-area monolayer graphene grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The techniques reported here allow transfer onto three different classes of substrates: substrates covered with shallow depressions, perforated substrates, and flat substrates. A novel dry transfer technique was used to make graphene-sealed microchambers without trapping liquid inside. The dry transfer technique utilizes a polydimethylsiloxane frame that attaches to the poly(methyl methacrylate) spun over the graphene film, and the monolayer graphene was transferred onto shallow depressions with 300 nm depth. The improved wet transfer onto perforated substrates with 2.7 μm diameter holes yields 98% coverage of holes covered with continuous films, allowing the ready use of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to study the intrinsic properties of CVD-grown monolayer graphene. Additionally, monolayer graphene transferred onto flat substrates has fewer cracks and tears, as well as lower sheet resistance than previous transfer techniques. Monolayer graphene films transferred onto glass had a sheet resistance of ∼980 Ω/sq and a transmittance of 97.6%. These transfer techniques open up possibilities for the fabrication of various graphene devices with unique configurations and enhanced performance. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. The Electromechanical Responses of Suspended Graphene Ribbons for Electrostatic Discharge Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    This dissertation presents a novel suspended graphene ribbon device for electrostatic discharge (ESD) applications. The device structure is proposed and fabricated after careful design considerations. Compared to the conventional ESD devices such as diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), the proposed device structure is believed to render several advantages including zero leakage, low parasitic effects, fast response, and high current carrying capability, etc. A process flow is developed for higher yield and reliability of the suspended graphene ribbon device which is very delicate in nature. Direct current (DC) and transmission-line pulse test (TLP) measurements are carried out to investigate the switch-on behavior of the device which is crucial for ESD protection. DC measurement with a different configuration is used to characterize the mechanical shape evolution of the graphene ribbon upon biasing. Finite Element Simulations are also conducted to verify the experimental results, which are in good agreements. Furthermore, the breakdown properties of graphene ribbons are tested using TLP. It is found that graphene has a better current drivability compared to copper wires which is widely used as interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs). Also, bi-layer graphene has a higher breakdown current than monolayer graphene which indicates that multilayer graphene should be superior in current discharging. Last, Ab inito calculations are carried out to study the growth mechanism of multilayer graphene which is needed for graphene homo-epitaxy with precise control. It is found that a carbon cluster with six carbon atoms has the smallest kinetic barrier thus largest surface diffusivity during surface diffusion. So it is believed to be the most favorable diffusing species for graphene homo-epitaxy.

  17. Quantum Hall effect in multi-terminal suspended graphene devices

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    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zhao, Yue; Bolotin, Kirill; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    The integer and fractional quantum hall effects have been already observed in two terminal suspended graphene devices. However in this two probe device geometry, mixing between magnetoresistance ρxx and Hall resistance ρxy for incompletely developed quantum Hall states leads to substantial deviation of conductance plateaus values. In this talk, we present the experimental results from four terminal suspended graphene devices. The quality of quantum Hall effect will be discussed in muti-terminal device geometry in conjunction with the current-induced annealing process to improve the quality of graphene samples.

  18. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  19. Top-grid monolayer graphene/Si Schottkey solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yusheng; Chen, Caiyun; Fang, Xiao [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Zhipeng [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton 3800, VIC (Australia); Qiao, Hong; Sun, Baoquan [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Bao, Qiaoliang, E-mail: qlbao@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton 3800, VIC (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    Monolayer graphene/Si Schottkey solar cell was fabricated using a top-grid structure. In comparison with the prevailing “top-window” structure, the newly-designed device structure has simplified the fabrication procedures to avoid ultraviolet (UV) photolithography and SiO{sub 2}-eching. We systematically investigated the effect of chemical doping as well as device area on the device performance. It was found that a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.9% can be achieved by engineering the work function of graphene through chemical doping. Our study indicates that top grid structure is suitable to make low-cost, large area and high efficiency graphene/Si Schottkey solar cell. - Graphical abstract: The engineering of the work function of graphene through chemical doping is an effective approach to improve the performance of monolayer graphene/Si Schottky solar cell. - Highlights: • Monolayer graphene/Si Schottkey solar cell was fabricated. • Chemical doping can effectively tune the work function of graphene film. • Chemical doping has significant effect on the device performance. • The top-grid device structure with graphene is promising with low-cost and high efficiency.

  20. Synthesis of Graphene Based Membranes: Effect of Substrate Surface Properties on Monolayer Graphene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Kafiah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the transfer of graphene onto eight commercial microfiltration substrates having different pore sizes and surface characteristics. Monolayer graphene grown on copper by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD process was transferred by the pressing method over the target substrates, followed by wet etching of copper to obtain monolayer graphene/polymer membranes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and contact angle (CA measurements were carried out to explore the graphene layer transferability. Three factors, namely, the substrate roughness, its pore size, and its surface wetting (degree of hydrophobicity are found to affect the conformality and coverage of the transferred graphene monolayer on the substrate surface. A good quality graphene transfer is achieved on the substrate with the following characteristics; being hydrophobic (CA > 90°, having small pore size, and low surface roughness, with a CA to RMS (root mean square ratio higher than 2.7°/nm.

  1. Synthesis of Graphene Based Membranes: Effect of Substrate Surface Properties on Monolayer Graphene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafiah, Feras; Khan, Zafarullah; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Atieh, Muataz; Laoui, Tahar

    2017-01-21

    In this work, we report the transfer of graphene onto eight commercial microfiltration substrates having different pore sizes and surface characteristics. Monolayer graphene grown on copper by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was transferred by the pressing method over the target substrates, followed by wet etching of copper to obtain monolayer graphene/polymer membranes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle (CA) measurements were carried out to explore the graphene layer transferability. Three factors, namely, the substrate roughness, its pore size, and its surface wetting (degree of hydrophobicity) are found to affect the conformality and coverage of the transferred graphene monolayer on the substrate surface. A good quality graphene transfer is achieved on the substrate with the following characteristics; being hydrophobic (CA > 90°), having small pore size, and low surface roughness, with a CA to RMS (root mean square) ratio higher than 2.7°/nm.

  2. Dynamically tunable extraordinary light absorption in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Alireza; Chandra, Sayan; Vázquez-Guardado, Abraham; Calderon, Jean; Franklin, Daniel; Tetard, Laurene; Zhai, Lei; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Chanda, Debashis

    2017-10-01

    The high carrier mobility of graphene makes it an attractive material for electronics, however, graphene's application for optoelectronic systems is limited due to its low optical absorption. We present a cavity-coupled nanopatterned graphene absorber designed to sustain temporal and spatial overlap between localized surface plasmon resonance and cavity modes, thereby resulting in enhanced absorption up to an unprecedented value of theoretically (60 %) and experimentally measured (45 %) monolayer graphene in the technologically relevant 8-12-μm atmospheric transparent infrared imaging band. We demonstrate a wide electrostatic tunability of the absorption band (˜2 μ m ) by modifying the Fermi energy. The proposed device design allows enhanced absorption and dynamic tunability of chemical vapor deposition grown low carrier mobility graphene which provides a significant advantage over previous strategies where absorption enhancement was limited to exfoliated high carrier mobility graphene. We developed an analytical model that incorporates the coupling of the graphene electron and substrate phonons, providing valuable and instructive insights into the modified plasmon-phonon dispersion relation necessary to interpret the experimental observations. Such gate voltage and cavity tunable enhanced absorption in chemical vapor deposited large area monolayer graphene paves the path towards the scalable development of ultrasensitive infrared photodetectors, modulators, and other optoelectronic devices.

  3. Fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended graphene: Transport coefficients and electron interaction strength

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    Abanin, D. A.; Skachko, I.; Du, X.; Andrei, E. Y.; Levitov, L. S.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, fractional-quantized Hall effect was observed in suspended graphene (SG), a free-standing monolayer of carbon, where it was found to persist up to T=10K . The best results in those experiments were obtained on micron-size flakes, on which only two-terminal transport measurements could be performed. Here we address the problem of extracting transport coefficients of a fractional quantum Hall state from the two-terminal conductance. We develop a general method, based on the conformal invariance of two-dimensional magnetotransport, and employ it to analyze the measurements on SG. From the temperature dependence of longitudinal conductivity, extracted from the measured two-terminal conductance, we estimate the energy gap of quasiparticle excitations in the fractional-quantized ν=1/3 state. The gap is found to be significantly larger than in GaAs-based structures, signaling much stronger electron interactions in suspended graphene. Our approach provides a tool for the studies of quantum transport in suspended graphene and other nanoscale systems.

  4. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignardi, L.; Dorp, W.F. van; Gottardi, S.; Ivashenko, O.; Dudin, P.; Barinov, A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Stöhr, M.; Rudolf, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron

  5. Spin Transport in High-Quality Suspended Graphene Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guimaraes, Marcos H. D.; Veligura, A.; Zomer, P. J.; Maassen, T.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Tombros, N.; van Arees, B. J.; Wees, B.J. van

    We measure spin transport in high mobility suspended graphene (mu approximate to 10(5)cm(2)/(V s)), obtaining a (spin) diffusion coefficient of 0.1 m(2)/s and giving a lower bound on the spin relaxation time (tau(s) approximate to 150 ps) and spin relaxation length (lambda(s) = 4.7 mu m) for

  6. Discrete Dynamics of Nanoparticle Channelling in Suspended Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Tim; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Andersen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We have observed a previously undescribed stepwise oxidation of mono- and few layer suspended graphene by silver nanoparticles in situ at subnanometer scale in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Over the range of 600–850 K, we observe crystallographically oriented channelling...

  7. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

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    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  8. Measurements of Interaction-Driven States in Monolayer and Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Benjamin Ezekiel

    In materials systems with flat energy bands and limited disorder, interactions among electrons dominate and can dramatically alter physical behavior. Traditionally, two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) have offered excellent platforms to study these effects because the kinetic energy of the electrons is effectively quenched by a perpendicular magnetic field. The recent discovery of graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, has opened the door for further exploration into many-body phenomena. Graphene, unlike conventional 2DEGs, has fourfold degenerate electronic states due to its spin and valley degrees of freedom. This thesis describes several experiments that show how these underlying symmetries combine with electron-electron interactions to produce novel and tunable correlated electronic phases of matter. We perform transport measurements of bilayer graphene flakes that are suspended above the substrate to minimize disorder. The data reveal full lifting of the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level (LL) due to electron-electron interactions as well as insulating behavior at the charge neutrality point. Using a scanning single-electron transistor (SET) to measure the local electronic compressibility, we quantitatively explore these broken-symmetry quantum Hall states as a function of magnetic field. Surprisingly, the measurements also reveal a correlated phase at zero electric and magnetic field. When applied to suspended monolayer graphene, the high SET sensitivity and low disorder afforded by local measurements combine to reveal a multitude of fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states whose sequence differs from that in conventional 2DEGs. This unique pattern reflects the spin and valley degeneracies in graphene, and changing the magnetic field leads to a series of phase transitions between FQH states with different spin and/or valley polarization. We also perform compressibility measurements of a bilayer graphene sample on boron nitride that show an electron

  9. Evidence for superconductivity in Li-decorated monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, B M; Levy, G; Nigge, P; Zonno, M; Schneider, M; Dvorak, D J; Veenstra, C N; Zhdanovich, S; Wong, D; Dosanjh, P; Straßer, C; Stöhr, A; Forti, S; Ast, C R; Starke, U; Damascelli, A

    2015-09-22

    Monolayer graphene exhibits many spectacular electronic properties, with superconductivity being arguably the most notable exception. It was theoretically proposed that superconductivity might be induced by enhancing the electron-phonon coupling through the decoration of graphene with an alkali adatom superlattice [Profeta G, Calandra M, Mauri F (2012) Nat Phys 8(2):131-134]. Although experiments have shown an adatom-induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling, superconductivity has never been observed. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we show that lithium deposited on graphene at low temperature strongly modifies the phonon density of states, leading to an enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling of up to λ ≃ 0.58. On part of the graphene-derived π*-band Fermi surface, we then observe the opening of a Δ ≃ 0.9-meV temperature-dependent pairing gap. This result suggests for the first time, to our knowledge, that Li-decorated monolayer graphene is indeed superconducting, with Tc ≃ 5.9 K.

  10. Nanocomposite Materials of Alternately Stacked C60 Monolayer and Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ishikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized the novel nanocomposite consisting alternately of a stacked single graphene sheet and a C60 monolayer by using the graphite intercalation technique in which alkylamine molecules help intercalate large C60 molecules into the graphite. Moreover, it is found that the intercalated C60 molecules can rotate in between single graphene sheets by using C13 NMR measurements. This preparation method provides a general way for intercalating huge fullerene molecules into graphite, which will lead to promising materials with novel mechanical, physical, and electrical properties.

  11. Acoustic analog of monolayer graphene and edge states

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    Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2011-09-01

    Acoustic analog of monolayer graphene has been designed by using silicone rubber spheres of honeycomb lattices embedded in water. The dispersion of the structure has been studied theoretically using the rigorous multiple-scattering method. The energy spectra with the Dirac point have been verified and zigzag edge states have been found in ribbons of the structure, which are analogous to the electronic ones in graphene nanoribbons. The guided modes along the zigzag edge excited by a point source have been numerically demonstrated. The open cavity and “Z” type edge waveguide with 60° corners have also been realized by using such edge states.

  12. Functional single-layer graphene sheets from aromatic monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Dan G; Weber, Nils-Eike; Kurasch, Simon; Wundrack, Stefan; Woszczyna, Mirosław; Grothe, Miriam; Weimann, Thomas; Ahlers, Franz; Stosch, Rainer; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2013-08-14

    Self-assembled monolayers of aromatic molecules on copper substrates can be converted into high-quality single-layer graphene using low-energy electron irradiation and subsequent annealing. This two-dimensional solid state transformation is characterized on the atomic scale and the physical and chemical properties of the formed graphene sheets are studied by complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and by electrical transport measurements. As substrates, Cu(111) single crystals and the technologically relevant polycrystalline copper foils are successfully used. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A comparative study of transport properties of monolayer graphene and AlGaN-GaN heterostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ozdemir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic transport properties of monolayer graphene are presented with an Ensemble Monte Carlo method where a rejection technique is used to account for the occupancy of the final states after scattering. Acoustic and optic phonon scatterings are considered for intrinsic graphene and in addition, ionized impurity and surface roughness scatterings are considered for the case of dirty graphene. The effect of screening is considered in the ionized impurity scattering of electrons. The time dependence of drift velocity of carriers is obtained where overshoot and undershoot effects are observed for certain values of applied field and material parameters for intrinsic graphene. The field dependence of drift velocity of carriers showed negative differential resistance and disappeared as acoustic scattering becomes dominant for intrinsic graphene. The variation of electron mobility with temperature is calculated for intrinsic (suspended and dirty monolayer graphene sheets separately and they are compared. These are also compared with the mobility of two dimensional electrons at an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure. It is observed that interface roughness may become very effective in limiting the mobility of electrons in graphene.

  14. Symmetry breaking of zero energy landau level in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Cadden-Zimansky, Paul; Ghahari, Fereshte; Kim, Philip

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally study the nature of the symmetry breaking of the zero energy landau level (LL) in monolayer graphene using Corbino geometry and Hall bar geometry devices. At high magnetic fields, in the absence of the edge state channel connection in Corbino devices, we observe a gap opening in ν = 0 QH state whose gap is independent of in-plane magnetic field. In Hall-bar geometry devices where edge state connection is allowed, we observe similar QH Insulator behavior independent of the in-plane magnetic field, indicating that the observed insulating behavior at the charge neutrality point of monolayer graphene at high magnetic field is originated from the degeneracy lifting of the zero LL via the valley pseudospin polarization rather spin polarization.

  15. Fluorine and sulfur simultaneously co-doped suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, C.; Sezen, H.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Reckinger, N.; Colomer, J.-F.; Snyders, R.; Bittencourt, C.; Scardamaglia, M.

    2017-11-01

    Suspended graphene flakes are exposed simultaneously to fluorine and sulfur ions produced by the μ-wave plasma discharge of the SF6 precursor gas. The microscopic and spectroscopic analyses, performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and photoelectron spectromicroscopy, show the homogeneity in functionalization yield over the graphene flakes with F and S atoms covalently bonded to the carbon lattice. This promising surface shows potential for several applications ranging from biomolecule immobilization to lithium battery and hydrogen storage devices. The present co-doping process is an optimal strategy to engineer the graphene surface with a concurrent hydrophobic character, thanks to the fluorine atoms, and a high affinity with metal nanoparticles due to the presence of sulfur atoms.

  16. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Charge Trapping in Monolayer and Multilayer Epitaxial Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-I Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the carrier densities n of multilayer and monolayer epitaxial graphene devices over a wide range of temperatures T. It is found that, in the high temperature regime (typically T ≥ 200 K, ln⁡(n shows a linear dependence of 1/T, showing activated behavior. Such results yield activation energies ΔE for charge trapping in epitaxial graphene ranging from 196 meV to 34 meV. We find that ΔE decreases with increasing mobility. Vacuum annealing experiments suggest that both adsorbates on EG and the SiC/graphene interface play a role in charge trapping in EG devices.

  18. First-principles study of the electrical and lattice thermal transport in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Ransell; Mukherjee, Sugata

    2017-01-01

    We report the transport properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene from first principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory (BTE). Our resistivity studies on monolayer graphene show Bloch-Gr${\\rm \\ddot{u}}$neisen behavior in a certain range of chemical potentials. By substituting boron nitride in place of a carbon dimer of graphene, we predict a twofold increase in the Seebeck coefficient. A similar increase in the Seebeck coefficient for bilayer graphene under the influence of a s...

  19. Wavelength-Tunable IR Detector based on Suspended Bilayer Graphene Micro Ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    high purity copper foil using a low pressure CVD furnace at 1000 oC in a hydrogen, argon and methane environment. Raman spectrum of the graphene ...characterized in Year One a device with suspended graphene microribbons, and found that fully suspended CVD -grown graphene devices are dominated by the...photoelectric effect, which is promising towards CVD -grown graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies. chemical vapor deposition, strain

  20. Laser thinning for monolayer graphene formation: heat sink and interference effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Seung Jin; Kim, Eun Sung; Güneş, Fethullah; Lee, Il Ha; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Si Young; Lim, Seong Chu; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-01-25

    Despite the availability of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the control of a uniform monolayer graphene remained challenging. Here, we report a method of acquiring monolayer graphene by laser irradiation. The accumulation of heat on graphene by absorbing light, followed by oxidative burning of upper graphene layers, which strongly relies on the wavelength of light and optical parameters of the substrate, was in situ measured by the G-band shift in Raman spectroscopy. The substrate plays a crucial role as a heat sink for the bottom monolayer graphene, resulting in no burning or etching. Oscillatory thinning behavior dependent on the substrate oxide thickness was evaluated by adopting a simple Fresnel's equation. This paves the way for future research in utilizing monolayer graphene for high-speed electronic devices.

  1. Path-integral simulation of graphene monolayers under tensile stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-11-27

    Finite-temperature properties of graphene monolayers under tensile stress have been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. This method allows one to consider the quantization of vibrational modes in these crystalline membranes and to analyze the influence of anharmonic effects on the membrane properties. Quantum nuclear effects turn out to be appreciable on the structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene at low temperature, and they can even be noticeable at room temperature. Such quantum effects become more relevant as the applied stress is increased, mainly for properties related to out-of-plane atomic vibrations. The relevance of quantum dynamics in the out-of-plane motion depends on the system size, and is enhanced by tensile stress. For applied tensile stresses, we analyze the contribution of the elastic energy to the internal energy of graphene. Results of PIMD simulations are compared with calculations based on a harmonic approximation for the vibrational modes of the graphene lattice. This approximation describes rather well the structural properties of graphene, provided that the frequencies of ZA (flexural) acoustic modes in the transverse direction include a pressure-dependent correction.

  2. Proximity-induced superconductivity in Landau-quantized graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohnitz, Laura; De Martino, Alessandro; Häusler, Wolfgang; Egger, Reinhold

    2017-10-01

    We consider massless Dirac fermions in a graphene monolayer in the ballistic limit, subject to both a perpendicular magnetic field B and a proximity-induced pairing gap Δ . When the chemical potential is at the Dirac point, our exact solution of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation yields Δ -independent relativistic Landau levels. Since eigenstates depend on Δ , many observables nevertheless are sensitive to pairing, e.g., the local density of states or the edge state spectrum. By solving the problem with an additional in-plane electric field, we also discuss how snake states are influenced by a pairing gap.

  3. Nonlinear transmission of an intense terahertz field through monolayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Hafez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report nonlinear terahertz (THz effects in monolayer graphene, giving rise to transmission enhancement of a single-cycle THz pulse when the incident THz peak electric field is increased. This transmission enhancement is attributed to reduced photoconductivity, due to saturation effects in the field-induced current and increased intraband scattering rates arising from transient heating of electrons. We have developed a tight-binding model of the response using the length gauge interaction Hamiltonian that provides good qualitative agreement. The model fully accounts for the nonlinear response arising from the linear dispersion energy spectrum in graphene. The results reveal a strong dependence of the scattering time on the THz field, which is at the heart of the observed nonlinear response.

  4. Monolayer graphene sensing enabled by the strong Fano-resonant metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Xu, Ningning; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xueqian; Tian, Zhen; Du, Liangliang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-10-06

    Recent advances in graphene photonics reveal promising applications in the technologically important terahertz spectrum, where graphene-based active terahertz metamaterial modulators have been experimentally demonstrated. However, the sensitivity of the atomically thin graphene monolayer towards sharp Fano resonant terahertz metasurfaces remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate thin-film sensing of the graphene monolayer with a high quality factor terahertz Fano resonance in metasurfaces consisting of a two-dimensional array of asymmetric resonators. A drastic change in the transmission amplitude of the Fano resonance was observed due to strong interactions between the monolayer graphene and the tightly confined electric fields in the capacitive gaps of the Fano resonator. The deep-subwavelength sensing of the atomically thin monolayer graphene further highlights the extreme sensitivity of the resonant electric field excited at the dark Fano resonance, allowing the detection of an analyte that is λ/1 000 000 thinner than the free space wavelength.

  5. Imaging of Edge Inactive Layer in Micro Patterned Graphene Monolayer (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0374 IMAGING OF EDGE INACTIVE LAYER IN MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) K. Brockdorf, Z.Jia, N...MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5801-0013 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...electrically inactive layer (EIL) near the edge of micro-patterned graphene lines was investigated using both scanning microwave microscopy (SMM

  6. First-principles study of the electrical and lattice thermal transport in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Ransell; Mukherjee, Sugata

    2017-02-01

    We report the transport properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene from first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory (BTE). Our resistivity studies on monolayer graphene show Bloch-Grüneisen behavior in a certain range of chemical potentials. By substituting boron nitride in place of a carbon dimer of graphene, we predict a twofold increase in the Seebeck coefficient. A similar increase in the Seebeck coefficient for bilayer graphene under the influence of a small electric field ˜0.3 eV has been observed in our calculations. Graphene with impurities shows a systematic decrease of electrical conductivity and mobility. We have also calculated the lattice thermal conductivities of monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene using phonon BTE which show excellent agreement with experimental data available in the temperature range 300-700 K.

  7. High-field electrical and thermal transport in suspended graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Vincent E; Behnam, Ashkan; Conley, Hiram J; Bolotin, Kirill I; Pop, Eric

    2013-10-09

    We study the intrinsic transport properties of suspended graphene devices at high fields (≥1 V/μm) and high temperatures (≥1000 K). Across 15 samples, we find peak (average) saturation velocity of 3.6 × 10(7) cm/s (1.7 × 10(7) cm/s) and peak (average) thermal conductivity of 530 W m(-1) K(-1) (310 W m(-1) K(-1)) at 1000 K. The saturation velocity is 2-4 times and the thermal conductivity 10-17 times greater than in silicon at such elevated temperatures. However, the thermal conductivity shows a steeper decrease at high temperature than in graphite, consistent with stronger effects of second-order three-phonon scattering. Our analysis of sample-to-sample variation suggests the behavior of "cleaner" devices most closely approaches the intrinsic high-field properties of graphene. This study reveals key features of charge and heat flow in graphene up to device breakdown at ~2230 K in vacuum, highlighting remaining unknowns under extreme operating conditions.

  8. Patterning monolayer graphene with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride by anisotropic etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guole; Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Peng; Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wang, Duoming; Shi, Dongxia; Yang, Rong, E-mail: ryang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: gyzhang@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Guangyu, E-mail: ryang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: gyzhang@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Nanomaterials and Nanodevices, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanostructures are potential building blocks for nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. However, the production of monolayer graphene nanostructures with well-defined zigzag edges remains a challenge. In this paper, we report the patterning of monolayer graphene nanostructures with zigzag edges on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrates by an anisotropic etching technique. We found that hydrogen plasma etching of monolayer graphene on h-BN is highly anisotropic due to the inert and ultra-flat nature of the h-BN surface, resulting in zigzag edge formation. The as-fabricated zigzag-edged monolayer graphene nanoribbons (Z-GNRs) with widths below 30 nm show high carrier mobility and width-dependent energy gaps at liquid helium temperature. These high quality Z-GNRs are thus ideal structures for exploring their valleytronic or spintronic properties.

  9. A simple method to tune graphene growth between monolayer and bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhi Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selective growth of either monolayer or bilayer graphene is of great importance. We developed a method to readily tune large area graphene growth from complete monolayer to complete bilayer. In an ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition process, we used the sample temperature at which to start the H2 flow as the control parameter and realized the change from monolayer to bilayer growth of graphene on Cu foil. When the H2 starting temperature was above 700°C, continuous monolayer graphene films were obtained. When the H2 starting temperature was below 350°C, continuous bilayer films were obtained. Detailed characterization of the samples treated under various conditions revealed that heating without the H2 flow caused Cu oxidation. The more the Cu substrate oxidized, the less graphene bilayer could form.

  10. Superconductivity in the graphene monolayer calculated using the Kubo formulalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L. S.

    2018-03-01

    We have employed the massless Dirac's fermions formalism together with the Kubo's linear response theory to study the transport by electrons in the graphene monolayer. We have calculated the electric conductivity and verified the behavior of the AC and DC electric conductivities of the system that is known to be a relativistic electron plasma. Our results show a superconductor behavior to the electron transport and consequently the spin transport for all values of T > 0 and a behavior of the AC conductivity tending to infinity in the limit ω → 0. In T = 0 our results show an insulator behavior with a transition from a superconductor state at T > 0 to an insulator state at T = 0 .

  11. Monolayer Graphene Bolometer as a Sensitive Far-IR Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McKitterick, Christopher B.; Prober, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we give a detailed analysis of the expected sensitivity and operating conditions in the power detection mode of a hot-electron bolometer (HEB) made from a few micro m(sup 2) of monolayer graphene (MLG) flake which can be embedded into either a planar antenna or waveguide circuit via NbN (or NbTiN) superconducting contacts with critical temperature approx. 14 K. Recent data on the strength of the electron-phonon coupling are used in the present analysis and the contribution of the readout noise to the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) is explicitly computed. The readout scheme utilizes Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) allowing for Frequency-Domain Multiplexing (FDM) using narrowband filter coupling of the HEBs. In general, the filter bandwidth and the summing amplifier noise have a significant effect on the overall system sensitivity.

  12. Low-energy electron point projection microscopy/diffraction study of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Wei-Tse; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Mu-Tung; Hsieh, Chia-Tso; Wang, Chang-Ran; Lee, Wei-Li; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present our study of suspended graphene with low-energy electrons based on a point projection microscopic/diffractive imaging technique. Both exfoliated and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene samples were studied in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. This method allows imaging of individual adsorbates at the nanometer scale and characterizing graphene layers, graphene lattice orientations, ripples on graphene membranes, etc. We found that long-duration exposure to low-energy electron beams induced aggregation of adsorbates on graphene when the electron dose rate was above a certain level. We also discuss the potential of this technique to conduct coherent diffractive imaging for determining the atomic structures of biological molecules adsorbed on suspended graphene.

  13. Surface-directed molecular assembly of pentacene on monolayer graphene for high-performance organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Park, Jaesung; Sim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Soojin; Kim, Kwang S; Hong, Byung Hee; Cho, Kilwon

    2011-03-30

    Organic electronic devices that use graphene electrodes have received considerable attention because graphene is regarded as an ideal candidate electrode material. Transfer and lithographic processes during fabrication of patterned graphene electrodes typically leave polymer residues on the graphene surfaces. However, the impact of these residues on the organic semiconductor growth mechanism on graphene surface has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate that polymer residues remaining on graphene surfaces induce a stand-up orientation of pentacene, thereby controlling pentacene growth such that the molecular assembly is optimal for charge transport. Thus, pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs) using source/drain monolayer graphene electrodes with polymer residues show a high field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm(2)/V s. In contrast, epitaxial growth of pentacene having molecular assembly of lying-down structure is facilitated by π-π interaction between pentacene and the clean graphene electrode without polymer residues, which adversely affects lateral charge transport at the interface between electrode and channel. Our studies provide that the obtained high field-effect mobility in pentacene FETs using monolayer graphene electrodes arises from the extrinsic effects of polymer residues as well as the intrinsic characteristics of the highly conductive, ultrathin two-dimensional monolayer graphene electrodes.

  14. Flexible Indium–Tin Oxide Crystal on Plastic Substrates Supported by Graphene Monolayer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sang Jin Lee; Yekyung Kim; Jun-Yeon Hwang; Ju-Ho Lee; Seungon Jung; Hyesung Park; Seungmin Cho; Sahn Nahm; Woo Seok Yang; Hyeongkeun Kim; Seung Ho Han

    2017-01-01

    ...) films with monolayered graphene as a platform. The highly crystalline ITO (c-ITO) was first fabricated on a rigid substrate of graphene on copper foil and it was subsequently transferred onto a PET substrate by a well-established technique...

  15. Density functional theory calculations on transition metal atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-11-01

    Transition metal atom adsorption on graphene monolayers has been elucidated using periodic density functional theory under hybrid and generalized gradient approximation functionals. More specifically, we examined the adsorption of Cu, Fe, Zn, Ru, and Os on graphene monolayers by calculating, among others, the electronic density-of-states spectra of the adatom-graphene system and the overlap populations of the adatom with the nearest adsorbing graphene carbon atoms. These calculations reveal that Cu form primarily covalent bonds with graphene atoms via strong hybridization between the adatom orbitals and the sp band of the graphene substrate, whereas the interaction of the Ru and Os with graphene also contain ionic parts. Although the interaction of Fe with graphene atoms is mostly covalent, some charge transfer to graphene is also observed. The interaction of Zn with graphene is weak. Mulliken population analysis and charge contour maps are used to elucidate charge transfers between the adatom and the substrate. The adsorption strength is correlated with the metal adsorption energy and the height of the metal adatom from the graphene plane for the geometrically optimized adatom-graphene system. Our analysis shows that show that metal adsorption strength follows the adatom trend Ru ≈ Os > Fe > Cu > Zn, as verified by corresponding changes in the adsorption energies. The increased metal-carbon orbital overlap for the Ru relative to Os adatom is attributed to hybridization defects.

  16. Flexible Indium?Tin Oxide Crystal on Plastic Substrates Supported by Graphene Monolayer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Yekyung; Hwang, Jun-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Ho; Jung, Seungon; Park, Hyesung; Cho, Seungmin; Nahm, Sahn; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Han, Seung Ho

    2017-01-01

    Flexible and crystallized indium?tin oxide (ITO) thin films were successfully obtained on plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films with monolayered graphene as a platform. The highly crystalline ITO (c-ITO) was first fabricated on a rigid substrate of graphene on copper foil and it was subsequently transferred onto a PET substrate by a well-established technique. Despite the plasma damage during ITO deposition, the graphene layer effectively acted as a Cu-diffusion barrier. The c-ITO/gr...

  17. Free electromagnetic radiation from the graphene monolayer with spatially modulated conductivity in THz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasik, Vladimir; Wartak, Marek S.; Zhukov, Alexander V.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2016-03-01

    An infinite graphene layer is known to support graphene surface plasmon polariton (GSP) confined at the interface between the two dielectric half-spaces. In the case of finite width graphene stripe, the termination of the graphene layer acts both as a scattering source and as a “mirror”, thus producing Fabry-Perot (FP)-type resonance. These resonant wavelengths in the presence of free-standing graphene stripe are investigated using the homogeneous convolution-type integral equation approach. The capabilities of the suggested numerical method are illustrated with the results for the transmission spectrum of TM electromagnetic waves travelling in the direction perpendicular to the graphene stripe. Special attention is paid to the case of spatially modulated conductivity of the graphene monolayer, and thus the feasibility of controlling the GSP response.

  18. Ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer C3N as compared to graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2017-09-21

    Using density functional theory and the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity is massively reduced in monolayer CN as compared to isostructural graphene. We show that larger phase space for three-phonon scattering processes is available in monolayer CN, which results in much shorter phonon life-times. Although both materials are characterized by sp hybridisation, anharmonicity effects are found to be enhanced for the C-N and C-C bonds in monolayer CN, reflected by a Grüneisen parameter of -8.5 as compared to -2.2 in graphene. The combination of these properties with the fact that monolayer CN is organic, non-toxic, and built of earth abundant elements gives rise to great potential in thermoelectric applications.

  19. Effects of Graphene Monolayer Coating on the Optical Performance of Remote Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.; Volgbert, S.; van Driel, W. D.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2017-10-01

    A graphene monolayer has been successfully coated on one side of a bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) plate, used as a substrate for remote phosphor applications in light-emitting diode (LED)-based products. Using a photoresist transferring method, graphene sheet has been coated on BPA-PC plates. The results show that this graphene monolayer significantly improves the lifetime and performance of LEDs mainly by protecting them against external degradation factors such as moisture and oxygen. Also, LED-based products composed of graphene-coated BPA-PC plates exhibit longer stability with comparatively less loss of luminous efficiency. This method has great potential to significantly improve the reliability of not only LED-based products but also many other microelectronics packaging and components, in which moisture and oxygen are the key causes of failures.

  20. Length-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Pereira, Luiz F C; Wang, Yu; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Kaiwen; Zhao, Xiangming; Bae, Sukang; Tinh Bui, Cong; Xie, Rongguo; Thong, John T L; Hong, Byung Hee; Loh, Kian Ping; Donadio, Davide; Li, Baowen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-04-16

    Graphene exhibits extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, and extremely high thermal conductivity. Being a very stable atomically thick membrane that can be suspended between two leads, graphene provides a perfect test platform for studying thermal conductivity in two-dimensional systems, which is of primary importance for phonon transport in low-dimensional materials. Here we report experimental measurements and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conduction in suspended single-layer graphene as a function of both temperature and sample length. Interestingly and in contrast to bulk materials, at 300 K, thermal conductivity keeps increasing and remains logarithmically divergent with sample length even for sample lengths much larger than the average phonon mean free path. This result is a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of phonons in graphene, and provides fundamental understanding of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials.

  1. First-principles study on silicon atom doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Hussain, Nayyar

    2018-01-01

    This paper illustrates the structural, electronic and optical properties of individual silicon (Si) atom-doped single layer graphene using density functional theory method. Si atom forms tight bonding with graphene layer. The effect of doping has been investigated by varying the concentration of Si atoms from 3.125% to 9.37% (i.e. From one to three Si atoms in 4 × 4 pure graphene supercell containing 32 carbon atoms), respectively. Electronic structure, partial density of states (PDOS) and optical properties of pure and Si atom-doped graphene sheet were calculated using VASP (Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package). The calculated results for pure graphene sheet were then compared with Si atom doped graphene. It is revealed that upon Si doping in graphene, a finite band gap appears at the high symmetric K-point, thereby making graphene a direct band gap semiconductor. Moreover, the band gap value is directly proportional to the concentration of impurity Si atoms present in graphene lattice. Upon analyzing the optical properties of Si atom-doped graphene structures, it is found that, there is significant change in the refractive index of the graphene after Si atom substitution in graphene. In addition, the overall absorption spectrum of graphene is decreased after Si atom doping. Although a significant red shift in absorption is found to occur towards visible range of radiation when Si atom is substituted in its lattice. The reflectivity of graphene improves in low energy region after Si atom substitution in graphene. These results can be useful for tuning the electronic structure and to manipulate the optical properties of graphene layer in the visible region.

  2. Band gap opening of monolayer and bilayer graphene doped with aluminium, silicon, phosphorus, and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Pablo A.

    2010-06-01

    The chemical doping of monolayer and bilayer graphene with aluminium, silicon, phosphorus and sulfur was investigated. Si-doped graphene has the lowest formation energy although it is semimetallic. P-doped graphene has a magnetic moment of 1 μ B and for 3 at.% of doping the band gap is 0.67 eV. Al-doped graphene is very unstable but it is an attractive material because it is metallic. To reduce the formation energies of the substitutional defects we investigated the formation of interlayer bonds in bilayer graphene. Phosphorus forms the strongest bonds between layers giving particular stability to this material. P-doped bilayer graphene has a gap of 0.43 eV but it is has no magnetic moment.

  3. Effects of vacancies on spin-dependent behavior of monolayer and bilayer graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, E. Keshavarz; Shokri, A. A.; BabaeiPour, M.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the effect of vacancies on magnetic properties and spin-dependent behaviors of monolayer and bilayer armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons is investigated using first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons are composed of 6 rows and 4 rows of carbon atoms with the edges closed by the hydrogen atoms, respectively. Our results show that vacancies affect the magnetic properties and spin polarization of the graphene nanoribbons. It is seen that the monolayer armchair graphene nanoribbon with one vacancy in its supercell (24 carbon sites + 8 hydrogen sites) gives the magnetic moment of 0.79 μB , while magnetic moment in the monolayer zigzag graphene nanoribbon with one vacancy in its supercell (24 carbon sites + 6 hydrogen sites) is 1.72 μB (for site α) and 1.84 μB (for site β). The highest and lowest values of magnetic moment in different configurations of the bilayer armchair (zigzag) graphene nanoribbons with one vacancy in each layer of the supercell give 1.54 μB and 1.29 μB (3.51 μB and 2.72 μB), respectively. Numerical values of the magnetic moment in different configurations depended on the distance of vacancies from each other and from nanoribbon's edge as well as their orientations.

  4. Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyo-Ki; Jo, Junhyeon; Hwang, Daeyeon; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Son, Seungwoo; Kim, Jung Hwa; Jin, Mi-Jin; Jun, Young Chul; Erni, Rolf; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Zonghoon

    2017-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconducting oxide on graphene carries a unique combination of wide band gap, high charge carrier mobility, and optical transparency, which can be widely applied for optoelectronics. However, study on the epitaxial formation and properties of oxide monolayer on graphene remains unexplored due to hydrophobic graphene surface and limits of conventional bulk deposition technique. Here, we report atomic scale study of heteroepitaxial growth and relationship of a single-atom-thick ZnO layer on graphene using atomic layer deposition. We demonstrate atom-by-atom growth of zinc and oxygen at the preferential zigzag edge of a ZnO monolayer on graphene through in situ observation. We experimentally determine that the thinnest ZnO monolayer has a wide band gap (up to 4.0 eV), due to quantum confinement and graphene-like structure, and high optical transparency. This study can lead to a new class of atomically thin two-dimensional heterostructures of semiconducting oxides formed by highly controlled epitaxial growth.

  5. Sticking of Hydrogen on Supported and Suspended Graphene at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Jackson, Bret

    2011-12-01

    The physisorption of atomic hydrogen on graphene is investigated quantum mechanically using a semiempirical model for the lattice dynamics. A thermally averaged wave packet propagation describes the motion of the H atoms with respect to the membrane. Two graphene configurations, either supported on a silicone oxide substrate or suspended over a hole in the substrate, are considered. In both cases, the phonon spectrum is modified in such a way that graphene is stabilized with respect to thermal fluctuations. The sticking probabilities of hydrogen on these stabilized membranes at 10 K are high at low collision energies, and larger than on graphite.

  6. Measuring the height-to-height correlation function of corrugation in suspended graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilenko, D.A., E-mail: Demid.Kirilenko@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); EMAT, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Brunkov, P.N. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, 194021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Kronverksky pr. 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Nanocorrugation of 2D crystals is an important phenomenon since it affects their electronic and mechanical properties. The corrugation may have various sources; one of them is flexural phonons that, in particular, are responsible for the thermal conductivity of graphene. A study of corrugation of just the suspended graphene can reveal much of valuable information on the physics of this complicated phenomenon. At the same time, the suspended crystal nanorelief can hardly be measured directly because of high flexibility of the 2D crystal. Moreover, the relief portion related to rapid out-of-plane oscillations (flexural phonons) is also inaccessible by such measurements. Here we present a technique for measuring the Fourier components of the height–height correlation function H(q) of suspended graphene which includes the effect of flexural phonons. The technique is based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns. The H(q) is measured in the range of wavevectors q≈0.4–4.5 nm{sup −1}. At the upper limit of this range H(q) does follow the T/κq{sup 4} law. So, we measured the value of suspended graphene bending rigidity κ=1.2±0.4 eV at ambient temperature T≈300 K. At intermediate wave vectors, H(q) follows a slightly weaker exponent than theoretically predicted q{sup −3.15} but is closer to the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. At low wave vectors, the dependence becomes even weaker, which may be a sign of influence of charge carriers on the dynamics of undulations longer than 10 nm. The technique presented can be used for studying physics of flexural phonons in other 2D materials. - Highlights: • A technique for measuring free-standing 2D crystal corrugation is proposed. • The height-to-height correlation function of the suspended graphene corrugation is measured. • Various parameters of the intrinsic graphene properties are experimentally determined.

  7. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  8. Adiabatic quantum pumping in normal-metal–insulator–superconductor junctions in a monolayer of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alos-Palop, M.; Blaauboer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate adiabatic quantum pumping through a normal-metal–“insulator”–superconductor (NIS) junction in a monolayer of graphene. The pumped current is generated by periodic modulation of two gate voltages, applied to the insulating and superconducting regions, respectively. In the bilinear

  9. Direct measurement of adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on copper and its application to renewable transfer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taeshik; Shin, Woo Cheol; Kim, Taek Yong; Mun, Jeong Hun; Kim, Taek-Soo; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-03-14

    Direct measurement of the adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on metal substrates is important to better understand its bonding mechanism and control the mechanical release of the graphene from the substrates, but it has not been reported yet. We report the adhesion energy of large-area monolayer graphene synthesized on copper measured by double cantilever beam fracture mechanics testing. The adhesion energy of 0.72 ± 0.07 J m(-2) was found. Knowing the directly measured value, we further demonstrate the etching-free renewable transfer process of monolayer graphene that utilizes the repetition of the mechanical delamination followed by the regrowth of monolayer graphene on a copper substrate. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Band Alignment and Minigaps in Monolayer MoS2-Graphene van der Waals Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierucci, Debora; Henck, Hugo; Avila, Jose; Balan, Adrian; Naylor, Carl H; Patriarche, Gilles; Dappe, Yannick J; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Johnson, A T Charlie; Asensio, Maria C; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional layered MoS2 shows great potential for nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices due to its high photosensitivity, which is the result of its indirect to direct band gap transition when the bulk dimension is reduced to a single monolayer. Here, we present an exhaustive study of the band alignment and relativistic properties of a van der Waals heterostructure formed between single layers of MoS2 and graphene. A sharp, high-quality MoS2-graphene interface was obtained and characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HRXPS), and scanning high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (STEM/HRTEM). Moreover, direct band structure determination of the MoS2/graphene van der Waals heterostructure monolayer was carried out using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), shedding light on essential features such as doping, Fermi velocity, hybridization, and band-offset of the low energy electronic dynamics found at the interface. We show that, close to the Fermi level, graphene exhibits a robust, almost perfect, gapless, and n-doped Dirac cone and no significant charge transfer doping is detected from MoS2 to graphene. However, modification of the graphene band structure occurs at rather larger binding energies, as the opening of several miniband-gaps is observed. These miniband-gaps resulting from the overlay of MoS2 and the graphene layer lattice impose a superperiodic potential.

  11. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  12. Infrared beam-steering using acoustically modulated surface plasmons over a graphene monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Paiyen

    2014-09-01

    We model and design a graphene-based infrared beamformer based on the concept of leaky-wave (fast traveling wave) antennas. The excitation of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) over a \\'one-atom-thick\\' graphene monolayer is typically associated with intrinsically \\'slow light\\'. By modulating the graphene with elastic vibrations based on flexural waves, a dynamic diffraction grating can be formed on the graphene surface, converting propagating SPPs into fast surface waves, able to radiate directive infrared beams into the background medium. This scheme allows fast on-off switching of infrared emission and dynamic tuning of its radiation pattern, beam angle and frequency of operation, by simply varying the acoustic frequency that controls the effective grating period. We envision that this graphene beamformer may be integrated into reconfigurable transmitter/receiver modules, switches and detectors for THz and infrared wireless communication, sensing, imaging and actuation systems.

  13. Controllable perfect absorption in a double-cavity photonic crystal with one graphene monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Li-An; Yang, Liang; Liu, Peiguo; Chen, Yuwei; Liu, Hanqing; Zhou, Qihui

    2018-01-01

    Depending on one graphene monolayer solely, two absorption modes are obtained in a double-cavity photonic crystal. The Fabry–Perot (FP) resonance or Fano resonance can be excited in the graphene cavity, while the FP resonance only is enabled in the empty cavity. At each resonance, the perfect absorption is realized in the case of critical coupling. By controlling the chemical potential of graphene, two FP resonance modes can be tuned independently. In the presence of the embedding inaccuracy of graphene, the FP resonance mode is robust and yet the Fano resonance mode behaves more sensitively. By changing the geometries of two cavities, FP–FP resonances or FP-Fano resonances are coupled to generate the peculiar coupling lineshape. Finally, the absorption structure allows to be characterized by perfect absorption, double modes, few graphene, flexible tuning and coupling lineshape.

  14. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm-3. Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir-Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  15. A new Dirac cone material: a graphene-like Be3C2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Shijun; Li, Yunhai; Shi, Li; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-05-04

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with Dirac cones exhibit rich physics and many intriguing properties, but the search for new 2D Dirac materials is still a current hotspot. Using the global particle-swarm optimization method and density functional theory, we predict a new stable graphene-like 2D Dirac material: a Be3C2 monolayer with a hexagonal honeycomb structure. The Dirac point occurs exactly at the Fermi level and arises from the merging of the hybridized pz bands of Be and C atoms. Most interestingly, this monolayer exhibits a high Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. Moreover, the Dirac cone is very robust and retains even included spin-orbit coupling or external strain. These outstanding properties render the Be3C2 monolayer a promising 2D material for special electronics applications.

  16. The electro-mechanical responses of suspended graphene ribbons for electrostatic discharge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Rui; Chen, Qi; Xia, Ming; Ng, Jimmy; Wang, Albert; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a suspended graphene ribbon device for electrostatic discharge (ESD) applications. The device structure was proposed and fabricated after careful design considerations. Compared to the conventional ESD devices such as diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, the proposed device structure is believed to render several advantages including zero leakage, low parasitic effects, fast response, and high critical current density. A process flow was developed for higher yield and reliability of the suspended graphene ribbons. Direct current (DC) and transmission-line pulse (TLP) measurements were carried out to investigate the switching behavior of the device, which is crucial for ESD operation. DC measurements with a different configuration were used to assess the mechanical shape evolution of the graphene ribbon upon biasing. Finite Element Simulations were conducted and agreed well with the experimental results. Furthermore, the current carrying capability of non-suspended graphene ribbons was tested using TLP. It was found that the critical current density of graphene is higher than that of copper wires widely used as interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs).

  17. Controlled Synthesis of Monolayer Graphene Toward Transparent Flexible Conductive Film Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han-Young

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the synthesis of monolayer graphene using thermal chemical vapor deposition and successive transfer onto arbitrary substrates toward transparent flexible conductive film application. We used electron-beam-deposited Ni thin film as a synthetic catalyst and introduced a gas mixture consisting of methane and hydrogen. To optimize the synthesis condition, we investigated the effects of synthetic temperature and cooling rate in the ranges of 850–1,000°C and 2–8°C/min, respectively. It was found that a cooling rate of 4°C/min after 1,000°C synthesis is the most effective condition for monolayer graphene production. We also successfully transferred as-synthesized graphene films to arbitrary substrates such as silicon-dioxide-coated wafers, glass, and polyethylene terephthalate sheets to develop transparent, flexible, and conductive film application.

  18. Near-unity absorption of graphene monolayer with a triple-layer waveguide coupled grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haojing; Zheng, Gaige; Xian, Fenglin; Zou, Xiujuan; Wang, Jicheng

    2017-10-01

    In order to achieve the enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene monolayer within the visible (Vis) and near infrared (NIR) regions, a design of absorber inspired by contact coupled gratings with an absentee layer is demonstrated. It is proved that the absorptance of monolayer graphene can be greatly enhanced to near unity through rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) numerical calculation. The thickness of grating and homogeneous absentee layers can significantly change the linewidth and resonant mode position in absorption spectrum. Furthermore, the lateral shift of the contact coupled gratings changes the magnetic field distributions in the grating cavity and the surface-confined mode at the cover/grating interface, thus facilitating the dynamic control of the spectral bandwidth of the graphene absorber. The proposed devices could be efficiently exploited as tunable and selective absorbers, allowing to realize other two-dimensional (2D) materials-based selective photo-detectors.

  19. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-08-01

    The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic properties could be well-described by specific DFT functionals paired with high-quality adatom basis sets. For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, increased adatom surface coverage weakens the adatom-graphene interaction. However, this statement does not apply for Ca adsorbed on graphene. In this case, the Ca adsorption strength, which is stronger at higher coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca-4s orbital population.

  20. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshun Bai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  1. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Qingshun; He, Xin; Bai, Jinxuan [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tong, Zhen [Centre for precision technologies, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  2. Efficient absorption by monolayer graphene in microring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyu

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a graphene photodetector based on a SOI microring resonator. The absorption of the graphene was enhanced by the resonating, so to improve the detection efficiency by 5 times. The impact of graphene’s position and length on the absorption rate was also been studied. The frequency selective effect shows the potential on spectrum detection and WDM photoelectric conversion.

  3. Suspended graphene with periodic dimer nanostructure on Si cavities for surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Chia; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2017-04-01

    Periodic gold dimer nanoantennas on a one-atomic-layer graphene sheet elevated above Si cavities were fabricated to systematically study the effects of the cavity depth on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The periodic trend of Raman intensity as a function of the cavity depth resulting from the interference effect between the plasmonic resonance of the gold dimer and the cavity resonance of the underlying Si cavity was observed, and the electric field was greatly enhanced compared with the non-suspended system. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the suspended system and to verify the observed SERS response in experiments. Our work has the advantages of combining the superior properties of graphene with suspended metallic nanostructures to result in the enhanced electric field for SERS applications.

  4. Synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene at reduced temperature on hydrogen-enriched evaporated copper (111) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Lee, Jongho; Chou, Harry; Holt, Milo; Ruoff, Rodney S; Akinwande, Deji

    2012-03-27

    We report new findings on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of monolayer graphene with negligible defects (≥95% negligible defect-peak over 200 μm × 200 μm areas) on evaporated copper films. Compared to copper foils used in the CVD of graphene, several new unexpected results have been observed including high-quality monolayer synthesis at temperatures graphene grains on underlying copper grains. These thermal, chemical, and physical growth characteristics of graphene on copper films can be attributed to the distinct differences in the dominant crystal orientation of copper films (111) versus foils (100), and consequent dissimilar interplay with the precursor gas. This study suggests that reduced temperature, hydrogen-free synthesis of defect-negligible monolayer graphene is feasible, with the potential to shape and scale graphene grains by controlling the size and crystal orientation of the underlying copper grains. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  5. Realization of large-area wrinkle-free monolayer graphene films transferred to functional substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeong-Ju; Choi, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun-You; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Jung, Hyun-June; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2015-06-05

    Structural inhomogeneities, such as the wrinkles and ripples within a graphene film after transferring the free-standing graphene layer to a functional substrate, degrade the physical and electrical properties of the corresponding electronic devices. Here, we introduced titanium as a superior adhesion layer for fabricating wrinkle-free graphene films that is highly applicable to flexible and transparent electronic devices. The Ti layer does not influence the electronic performance of the functional substrates. Experimental and theoretical investigations confirm that the strong chemical interactions between Ti and any oxygen atoms unintentionally introduced on/within the graphene are responsible for forming the clean, defect-free graphene layer. Our results accelerate the practical application of graphene-related electronic devices with enhanced functionality. The large-area monolayer graphenes were prepared by a simple attachment of the Ti layer with the multi-layer wrinkle-free graphene films. For the first time, the graphene films were addressed for applications of superior bottom electrode for flexible capacitors instead of the novel metals.

  6. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-03-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications.

  7. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications. PMID:24619247

  8. Measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of supported and suspended graphene by a comprehensive Raman optothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin-Yi; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Yingying; Li, Qunyang; Takahashi, Koji; Zhang, Xing

    2017-08-03

    The last decade has seen the rapid growth of research on two-dimensional (2D) materials, represented by graphene, but research on their thermophysical properties is still far from sufficient owing to the experimental challenges. Herein, we report the first measurement of the specific heat of multilayer and monolayer graphene in both supported and suspended geometries. Their thermal conductivities were also simultaneously measured using a comprehensive Raman optothermal method without needing to know the laser absorption. Both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed lasers were used to heat the samples, based on consideration of the variable laser spot radius and pulse duration as well as the heat conduction within the substrate. The error from the laser absorption was eliminated by comparing the Raman-measured temperature rises for different spot radii and pulse durations. The thermal conductivity and specific heat were extracted by analytically fitting the temperature rise ratios as a function of spot size and pulse duration, respectively. The measured specific heat was about 700 J (kg K)(-1) at room temperature, which is in accordance with theoretical predictions, and the measured thermal conductivities were in the range of 0.84-1.5 × 10(3) W (m K)(-1). The measurement method demonstrated here can be used to investigate in situ and comprehensively the thermophysical properties of many other emerging 2D materials.

  9. Thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene by a modified T-bridge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, W.; Bao, W.; Jing, L.; Lau, C. N.; Dames, C.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene flakes by a modified T-bridge technique from 300 K to below 100 K. The thermal conductivities at room temperature are 389, 344, 302, and 596 W/m K for 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-layer graphene, respectively. The thinner (2-, 3-, 4-layer) graphene samples did not show any clear thickness dependence, while the thicker (8-layer) sample clearly has higher thermal conductivity. In situ current annealing was used to remove polymer residues from the central portion of the 3- and 8-layer graphene samples, as confirmed by electrical transport measurements and post-experiment characterization by Raman and scanning electron microscopy, although some residues still remained near both ends (heater and heat sink). Comparing the 2, 3, and 4-layer samples suggests the annealing had little effect near room temperature but leads to increased thermal conductivity at low temperature. These results also show that the thermal conductivities of suspended few-layer graphene are higher than those of encased few-layer graphene of similar thickness measured previously [Jang et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3909 (2010)].

  10. Strong plasmon reflection at nanometer-size gaps in monolayer graphene on SiC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianing; Nesterov, Maxim L; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Alonso-González, Pablo; Slipchenko, Tetiana M; Speck, Florian; Ostler, Markus; Seyller, Thomas; Crassee, Iris; Koppens, Frank H L; Martin-Moreno, Luis; García de Abajo, F Javier; Kuzmenko, Alexey B; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    We employ tip-enhanced infrared near-field microscopy to study the plasmonic properties of epitaxial quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene on silicon carbide. The near-field images reveal propagating graphene plasmons, as well as a strong plasmon reflection at gaps in the graphene layer, which appear at the steps between the SiC terraces. When the step height is around 1.5 nm, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than the plasmon wavelength, the reflection signal reaches 20% of its value at graphene edges, and it approaches 50% for step heights as small as 5 nm. This intriguing observation is corroborated by numerical simulations and explained by the accumulation of a line charge at the graphene termination. The associated electromagnetic fields at the graphene termination decay within a few nanometers, thus preventing efficient plasmon transmission across nanoscale gaps. Our work suggests that plasmon propagation in graphene-based circuits can be tailored using extremely compact nanostructures, such as ultranarrow gaps. It also demonstrates that tip-enhanced near-field microscopy is a powerful contactless tool to examine nanoscale defects in graphene.

  11. Contrasting suspended covers reveal the impact of an artificial monolayer on heat transfer processes at the interfacial boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N

    2015-01-01

    The highly variable performance of artificial monolayers in reducing evaporation from water storages has been attributed to wind speed and wave turbulence. Other factors operating at the interfacial boundary layer have seldom been considered. In this paper, two physical shade covers differing in porosity and reflectivity were suspended over 10 m diameter water tanks to attenuate wind and wave turbulence. The monolayer octadecanol was applied to one of the covered tanks, and micrometeorological conditions above and below the covers were monitored to characterise diurnal variation in the energy balance. A high downward (air-to-water) convective heat flux developed under the black cover during the day, whereas diurnal variation in the heat flux under the more reflective, wind-permeable white cover was much less. Hourly air and water temperature profiles under the covers over 3 days when forced convection was minimal (low wind speed) were selected for analysis. Monolayer application reduced temperature gain in surface water under a downward convective heat flux, and conversely reduced temperature loss under an upward convective heat flux. This 'dual property' may explain why repeat application of an artificial monolayer to retard evaporative loss (reducing latent heat loss) does not inevitably increase water temperature.

  12. Self-assembly of suspended graphene wrinkles with high pre-tension and elastic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liusi; Niu, Tianxiao; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Xu, Lu; Cao, Guoxin; Cao, Anyuan

    2017-12-01

    Wrinkles exist universally in graphene-based structures, yet their controlled fabrication remains challenging; most graphene wrinkles have been produced either in attachment to elastic substrates or limited in small single sheets. Here, we utilize the phenomenon of gel-cracking to generate uniaxial strains locally on solution-precipitated graphene oxide (GO) sheets, thus creating suspended and aligned wrinkles over the trenches between cracked TiO2 islands. In particular, those GO wrinkles are subjected to a high pre-tension, which is important for making stable suspended configuration, as confirmed by theoretical calculations based on the wrinkle geometry and measured spring constants, respectively. As a result, in situ atomic force microscope indentation reveals elastic deformation with tunable spring constants depending on the gap width. We further obtain chemically reduced GO wrinkles with enhanced spring constants and reversible behavior after 1000 indentation cycles. Our suspended and aligned graphene wrinkles have potential applications in many areas such as sensors, actuators, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.

  13. Simulation of Strain Induced Pseudomagnetic Fields in Graphene Suspended on MEMS Chevron Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    Graphene has been shown to withstand remarkable levels of mechanical strain an order of magnitude larger than bulk crystalline materials. This exceptional stretchability of graphene allows for the direct tuning of fundamental material properties, as well as for the investigation of novel physics such as generation of strain induced pseudomagnetic fields. However, current methods for strain such as polymer elongation or pressurized wells do not integrate well into devices. We propose microelectromechanical (MEMS) Chevron actuators as a reliable platform for applying strain to graphene. In addition to their advantageous controllable output force, low input power and ease of integration into existing technologies, MEMS allow for different strain orientations to optimize pseudomagnetic field generation in graphene. Here, we model nonuniform strain in suspended graphene on Chevron actuators using COMSOL Multiphysics. By simulating the deformation of the graphene geometry under the device actuation, we explore the pseudomagnetic field map induced by numerically calculating the components of the strain tensor. Our models provide the theoretical framework with which experimental analysis is compared, and optimize our MEMS designs for further exploration of novel physics in graphene. The authors would like to thank NSF DMR 1411008 for their support on this project.

  14. Annealing and polycrystallinity effects on the thermal conductivity of supported CVD graphene monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shyamprasad N; Osenberg, David; Choi, Kyoungjun; Park, Hyung Gyu; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-10-19

    The thermal transport properties of graphene are strongly influenced by its contact environment and the strength of such interactions can be used to tailor these properties. Here we find that annealing suppresses the basal plane thermal conductivity (κ) of graphene supported on silicon dioxide, due to the increased conformity of graphene to the nanoscale asperities of the substrate after annealing. Intriguingly, increasing the polycrystallinity of graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper, increases the severity of this suppression after annealing, revealing the role of grain boundaries and associated defects in aiding phonon scattering by the substrate. In highly polycrystalline graphene, the value of κ after annealing is comparable to that after significant fluorination of an identical unannealed sample. Our experiments employ the suspended micro-bridge platform for basal plane thermal conductivity measurements. Using xenon difluoride gas for the final release also enables the investigation of thermal transport in graphene in contact with polymers. We find evidence for weaker phonon scattering in graphene, due to a 10 nm thick polymer layer on top compared to the pre-existing silicon dioxide substrate, which is a promising result for flexible electronics applications of graphene.

  15. Measurement of the ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall Energy Gap in Suspended Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Zhao, Yue; Cadden-Zimansky, Paul; Bolotin, Kirill; Kim, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements of multiterminal suspended graphene devices. Fully developed integer quantum Hall states appear in magnetic fields as low as 2 T. At higher fields the formation of longitudinal resistance minima and transverse resistance plateaus are seen corresponding to fractional quantum Hall states, most strongly for ν=1/3. By measuring the temperature dependence of these resistance minima, the energy gap for the 1/3 fractional state in graphene is determined to be at ˜20K at 14 T.

  16. Analytical modelling of monolayer graphene-based ion-sensitive FET to pH changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Karimi Feiz Abadi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Meisam; Hashim, Amin; Che harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2013-04-01

    Graphene has attracted great interest because of unique properties such as high sensitivity, high mobility, and biocompatibility. It is also known as a superior candidate for pH sensing. Graphene-based ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) is currently getting much attention as a novel material with organic nature and ionic liquid gate that is intrinsically sensitive to pH changes. pH is an important factor in enzyme stabilities which can affect the enzymatic reaction and broaden the number of enzyme applications. More accurate and consistent results of enzymes must be optimized to realize their full potential as catalysts accordingly. In this paper, a monolayer graphene-based ISFET pH sensor is studied by simulating its electrical measurement of buffer solutions for different pH values. Electrical detection model of each pH value is suggested by conductance modelling of monolayer graphene. Hydrogen ion (H+) concentration as a function of carrier concentration is proposed, and the control parameter ( Ƥ) is defined based on the electro-active ions absorbed by the surface of the graphene with different pH values. Finally, the proposed new analytical model is compared with experimental data and shows good overall agreement.

  17. Evanescent wave absorption sensor based on tapered multimode fiber coated with monolayer graphene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Gao, Saisai; Chen, Peixi; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Huo, Yanyan; Yue, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    An evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor based on tapered multimode fiber (TMMF) coated with monolayer graphene film for the detection of double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) is investigated in this work. The TMMF is a silica multimode fiber (nominally at 62.5 μm), which was tapered to symmetric taper with waist diameters of ~30 μm and total length of ~3 mm. Monolayer graphene film was grown on a copper foil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology and transferred onto skinless tapered fiber core via dry transfer technology. All the components of the sensor are coupled together by fusion splicer in order to eliminate the external disturbance. DS-DNA is created by the assembly of two relatively complemented oligonucleotides. The measurements are obtained by using a spectrometer in the optical wavelength range of 400-900 nm. With the increase of DS-DNA concentration, the output light intensity (OPLI) arisen an obvious attenuation. Importantly, the absorbance (A) and the DS-DNA concentrations shown a reasonable linear variation in a wide range of 5-400 μM. Through a series of comparison, the accuracy of TMMF sensor with graphene (G-TMMF) is much better than that without graphene (TMMF), which can be attributed to the molecular enrichment of graphene by π-π stacking.

  18. Conductance fluctuations in high mobility monolayer graphene: Nonergodicity, lack of determinism and chaotic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, C R; Mineharu, M; Matsunaga, M; Matsumoto, N; Chuang, C; Ochiai, Y; Kim, G-H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ferry, D K; Aoki, N

    2016-09-09

    We have fabricated a high mobility device, composed of a monolayer graphene flake sandwiched between two sheets of hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance fluctuations as functions of a back gate voltage and magnetic field were obtained to check for ergodicity. Non-linear dynamics concepts were used to study the nature of these fluctuations. The distribution of eigenvalues was estimated from the conductance fluctuations with Gaussian kernels and it indicates that the carrier motion is chaotic at low temperatures. We argue that a two-phase dynamical fluid model best describes the transport in this system and can be used to explain the violation of the so-called ergodic hypothesis found in graphene.

  19. Poly(sodium 4-styrenseulfonate)-modified monolayer graphene for anode applications of organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongfang; Wang, Min; Wang, Liang; Liu, Shuli; Chen, Shufen; Cao, Kun; Shang, Wenjuan; Mai, Jiangquan; Zhao, Baomin; Feng, Jing; Lu, Xinhui; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    An insulated poly(sodium 4-styrenseulfonate) (PSS) was used to modify monolayer graphene for anode applications of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). With this PSS interfacial modification layer, the OPVs showed a significant increase of 56.4% in efficiency due to an improved work function and hydrophilic feature of graphene and an enlarged recombination resistance of carriers/excitons. Doping a highly contorted 1,2,5-thiadiazole-fused 12-ring polyaromatic hydrocarbon into the active layer to form ternary blended OPVs further enlarged the recombination resistance of carriers/excitons and improved light absorption of the active layer, with which a high power conversion efficiency of 6.29% was acquired.

  20. Robustness of the universal optical transmittance in monolayer and multilayer graphene flakes under Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Premlata; Srivastava, Pawan Kumar; Ray, Nirat; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental investigation on the universality of the optical transmittance of mono- and multilayer chemically exfoliated graphene flakes. By varying the exfoliating solvent, and thereby modulating the strength of electron-electron interactions, we find that the universality is not impacted over the visible region. The impact of modulating the interaction strength is clearly seen as shifts in the M-point exciton spectra. These shifts can then lead to a reduction in the wavelength regime over which universal wavelength independent optical transmittance is observed. At the level of first-order perturbation theory, our results are consistent with existing theoretical predictions for interaction corrections in optical properties of monolayer graphene.

  1. Intrinsic terahertz plasmons and magnetoplasmons in large scale monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassee, I; Orlita, M; Potemski, M; Walter, A L; Ostler, M; Seyller, Th; Gaponenko, I; Chen, J; Kuzmenko, A B

    2012-05-09

    We show that in graphene epitaxially grown on SiC the Drude absorption is transformed into a strong terahertz plasmonic peak due to natural nanoscale inhomogeneities, such as substrate terraces and wrinkles. The excitation of the plasmon modifies dramatically the magneto-optical response and in particular the Faraday rotation. This makes graphene a unique playground for plasmon-controlled magneto-optical phenomena thanks to a cyclotron mass 2 orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional plasmonic materials such as noble metals.

  2. Investigation of multilayer domains in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene by optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanfang; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Wenhui; Guo, Xitao; Jiang, Jie; Nan, Haiyan; Ni, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    CVD graphene is a promising candidate for optoelectronic applications due to its high quality and high yield. However, multi-layer domains could inevitably form at the nucleation centers during the growth. Here, we propose an optical imaging technique to precisely identify the multilayer domains and also the ratio of their coverage in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene. We have also shown that the stacking disorder in twisted bilayer graphene as well as the impurities on the graphene surface could be distinguished by optical imaging. Finally, we investigated the effects of bilayer domains on the optical and electrical properties of CVD graphene, and found that the carrier mobility of CVD graphene is seriously limited by scattering from bilayer domains. Our results could be useful for guiding future optoelectronic applications of large-scale CVD graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61422503, 61376104), the Open Research Funds of Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education (SEU, China), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  3. A monolayer graphene - Nafion sandwich membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. H.; Wu, Ruizhe; Xu, J. B.; Luo, Zhengtang; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Methanol crossover due to the low selectivity of proton exchange membranes is a long-standing issue in direct methanol fuel cell technology. Here we attempt to address this issue by designing a composite membrane fabricated by sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two thin Nafion membranes to take advantage of monolayer graphene's selective permeability to only protons. The methanol permeability of the present membrane is demonstrated to have a 68.6% decrease in comparison to that of the pristine Nafion membrane. The test in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) shows that the designed membrane retains high proton conductivity while substantially suppressing methanol crossover. As a result, the present membrane enables the passive DMFC to exhibit a decent performance even at a methanol concentration as high as 10.0 M.

  4. Effects of dry oxidation treatments on monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Jongyeong; Kang, Dongwoo; Jo, Hye Jin; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Lee, Zonghoon

    2017-06-01

    Ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) and oxygen plasma are widely used to modify the surface of materials because these processes are facile and accessible. These dry oxidation treatments are also commonly applied to 2D graphene and are presumed to induce similar oxidation effects on the graphene surface. However, in this work, these treatments are revealed to induce the formation of different types of defects on the surface of graphene because the UVO treatment causes a chemical reaction, whereas the oxygen plasma treatment causes both physical and chemical reactions. The oxygen plasma treatment results mainly in topological defects, which effectively induce the attachment of oxygen atoms onto the treated surface; by contrast, the UVO treatment induces only the attachment of oxygen atoms onto the treated surface, without inducing lattice distortion. These results are confirmed mainly by atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Using such facile dry oxidation treatments, we experimentally modified the surface states of graphene at the atomic scale.

  5. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (tgraphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  6. Experimental observation of plasmons in a graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate graphene-plasmon polariton excitation in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The subwavelength silicon grating is fabricated by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self-assembled nanosphere array...... as a template. Measured transmission spectra illustrate the excitation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, which is further supported by numerical simulations and theoretical prediction of plasmon-band diagrams. Our grating-assisted coupling to graphene-plasmon polaritons forms an important platform for graphene......-based opto-electronics applications....

  7. Quantum field theory of photon-Dirac fermion interacting system in graphene monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elaborate quantum field theory of interacting systems comprising Dirac fermion fields in a graphene monolayer and the electromagnetic field. Since the Dirac fermions are confined in a two-dimensional plane, the interaction Hamiltonian of this system contains the projection of the electromagnetic field operator onto the plane of a graphene monolayer. Following the quantization procedure in traditional quantum electrodynamics we chose to work in the gauge determined by the weak Lorentz condition imposed on the state vectors of all physical states of the system. The explicit expression of the two-point Green function of the projection onto a graphene monolayer of a free electromagnetic field is derived. This two-point Green function and the expression of the interaction Hamiltonian together with the two-point Green functions of free Dirac fermion fields established in our previous work form the basics of the perturbation theory of the above-mentioned interacting field system. As an example, the perturbation theory is applied to the study of two-point Green functions of this interacting system of quantum fields.

  8. Large yield production of high mobility freely suspended graphene electronic devices on a polydimethylglutarimide based organic polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Veligura, Alina; Junesch, Juliane; Berg, J. Jasper van den; Zomer, Paul J.; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Vera Marun, Ivan J.; Jonkman, Harry T.; Wees, Bart J. van

    2011-01-01

    The recent observation of a fractional quantum Hall effect in high mobility suspended graphene devices introduced a new direction in graphene physics, the field of electron–electron interaction dynamics. However, the technique used currently for the fabrication of such high mobility devices has

  9. Multi-mode absorption in multi-cavity photonic crystal with two graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Li-an; Liu, Peiguo; Li, Gaosheng; Chen, Yuwei; Liu, Hanqing; Liu, Chenxi

    2017-12-01

    Multi-mode absorption is achieved theoretically at terahertz frequencies by using the one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) incorporating multiple Fabry-Perot resonance cavities. To simulate this multilayered structure, the method of rigorous coupled-wave analysis is adopted. Results show that for single-cavity PC with two graphene monolayers in this cavity, there are two near-unity absorption modes with low Q-factors. By cascading one empty cavity without graphene behind, an extra high-Q mode is induced in the middle. The number of modes is controlled directly by changing the positions of graphene sheets. Also, these modes are allowed to tune separately and be shifted by many manners. After another empty cavity is cascaded, two modes with higher Q-factors replace the middle one and then four near-unity absorption modes arise. Thus, the multi-cavity PC with a small number of graphene monolayers has the ability to gain multiple strong absorption modes.

  10. Spectroscopic Investigation of Plasma-Fluorinated Monolayer Graphene and Application for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Fan, Liwei; Dong, Huilong; Zhang, Pingping; Nie, Kaiqi; Zhong, Jun; Li, Youyong; Guo, Jinghua; Sun, Xuhui

    2016-04-06

    Large-area monolayer fluorinated graphene (FG) is synthesized by a controllable SF6 plasma treatment. The functional groups of FG are elucidated by various spectroscopies, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Raman results suggest that the defects are introduced into the monolayer graphene during the fluorination process. The fluorine content can be varied by the plasma treatment and can reach the maximum (∼24.6 atom % F) under 20 s of plasma treatment as examined by XPS measurement. The angle-dependent NEXAFS results reveal that the fluorine atoms interact with the graphene matrix to form covalent C-F bonds, which are perpendicular to the basal plane of FG. FG is applied as a gas-sensing material and owns much better performance for ammonia detection compared to pristine graphene. On the basis of our density functional theory simulation results, the fast response/recovery behavior and high sensitivity of the FG gas sensor are attributed to enhanced physical absorption due to the C-F covalent bonds on the surface of FG.

  11. Formation, Energetics, and Electronic Properties of Graphene Monolayer and Bilayer Doped with Heteroatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doping with heteroatoms is one of the most effective methods to tailor the electronic properties of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, and such nanomaterials doped with heteroatom dopants might therefore provide not only new physical and chemical properties but also novel nanoelectronics/optoelectronics device applications. The boron and nitrogen are neighboring elements to carbon in the periodic table, and they are considered to be good dopants for carbon nanomaterials. We here review the recent work of boron and nitrogen doping effects into graphene monolayer as well as bilayer on the basis of the first-principles electronic structure calculations in the framework of the density-functional theory. We show the energetics and the electronic properties of boron and nitrogen defects in graphene monolayer and bilayer. As for the nitrogen doping, we further discuss the stabilities, the growth processes, and the electronic properties associated with the plausible nitrogen defect formation in graphene which is suggested by experimental observations.

  12. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter; Van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; De Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.

  13. Asymmetric Electron Transport at Monolayer-Bilayer Heterojunctions of Epitaxial Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); He, Guowei [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Feenstra, Randall [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2014-01-01

    The symmetry of the graphene honeycomb lattice is a key element determining many of graphene s unique electronic properties, such as the linear energy-momentum dispersion and the suppressed backscattering 1,2. However, line defects in large-scale epitaxial graphene films, such as grain boundaries, edges, surface steps, and changes in layer thickness, often break the sublatttice symmetry and can impact transport properties of graphene profoundly 3-6. Here we report asymmetric electron transport upon polarity reversal at individual monolayer-bilayer (ML-BL) boundaries in epitaxial graphene on SiC (0001), revealed by scanning tunneling potentiometry. A greater voltage drop is observed when the current flows from BL to ML graphene than in the reverse direction, and the difference remains nearly unchanged with increasing current. This is not a typical nonlinear conductance due to electron transmission through an asymmetric potential. Rather, it indicates the opening of a dynamic energy gap at the Fermi energy due to the Coulomb interaction between the injected nonequilibrium electron density and the pseudospin polarized Friedel oscillation charge density at the boundary. This intriguing heterojunction transport behavior opens a new avenue towards novel quantum functions such as quantum switching.

  14. Electromagnetic properties of a monolayer of polarisable particles deposited on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, André; Pereira, Rui M. S.; Santos, Jaime E.; Peres, Nuno; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail

    2017-08-01

    Interesting plasmonic effects can arise from the combination of small polarisable particles with graphene, related to surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) supported by the latter in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. The electromagnetic coupling between graphene SPPs and dipole moments of nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on top of it gives rise to optical properties that aren't present in the individual components of this system. The NPs' polarisability is renormalized due to the electromagnetic back action of the SPPs which are excited in graphene when an external propagating electromagnetic wave impinges on the particle. Moreover, beyond the usual dipole-dipole interaction, an indirect particle-particle coupling arises via polarisation charges induced on the graphene-covered interface by each particle - this indirect coupling oscillates with the interparticle distance. We derived coupled-dipole equations taking into account all these effects, allowing us to calculate an effective optical conductivity of the particles' monolayer. One of the G+NPs system's unique properties is a collective polariton mode, causing a considerable enhancement of the THz radiation absorption in graphene, while the reflection drops to nearly zero for a broad range of angles of incidence. The frequency of this resonant mode can be adjusted by changing the Fermi energy in graphene via electrostatic gating and therefore it can be used for electrically controlled reflection and transmission of THz radiation

  15. Temperature effects on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of a weakly modulated graphene monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha (Pakistan); Sabeeh, K [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); MacKinnon, A, E-mail: m.tahir@uos.edu.pk, E-mail: ksabeeh@qau.edu.pk, E-mail: kashifsabeeh@hotmail.com, E-mail: a.mackinnon@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-26

    In this work, we determine the effects of temperature on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of an electrically modulated graphene monolayer as well as a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The intra-Landau band magnetoplasmon spectrum within the self-consistent field approach is investigated for both the aforementioned systems. Results obtained not only exhibit Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations but also commensurability oscillations (Weiss oscillations). These oscillations are periodic as a function of inverse magnetic field. We find that both the magnetic oscillations, SdH and Weiss, have a greater amplitude and are more robust against temperature in graphene compared to a conventional 2DEG. Furthermore, there is a {pi} phase shift between the magnetoplasmon oscillations in the two systems which can be attributed to Dirac electrons in graphene acquiring a Berry's phase as they traverse a closed path in a magnetic field. (paper)

  16. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...... increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics...... with a conductivity of 267.2-537.5S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp2networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective...

  17. Signatures of evanescent transport in ballistic suspended graphene-superconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2016-04-01

    In Dirac materials, the low energy excitations behave like ultra-relativistic massless particles with linear energy dispersion. A particularly intriguing phenomenon arises with the intrinsic charge transport behavior at the Dirac point where the charge density approaches zero. In graphene, a 2-D Dirac fermion gas system, it was predicted that charge transport near the Dirac point is carried by evanescent modes, resulting in unconventional “pseudo-diffusive” charge transport even in the absence of disorder. In the past decade, experimental observation of this phenomenon remained challenging due to the presence of strong disorder in graphene devices which limits the accessibility of the low carrier density regime close enough to the Dirac point. Here we report transport measurements on ballistic suspended graphene-Niobium Josephson weak links that demonstrate a transition from ballistic to pseudo-diffusive like evanescent transport below a carrier density of ~1010 cm-2. Approaching the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structures due to multiple Andreev reflections display a strong Fermi energy-dependence and become increasingly pronounced, while the normalized excess current through the superconductor-graphene interface decreases sharply. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the long standing theoretical prediction for the emergence of evanescent transport mediated pseudo-diffusive transport in graphene.

  18. Spin precession and spin Hall effect in monolayer graphene/Pt nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savero Torres, W.; Sierra, J. F.; Benítez, L. A.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-12-01

    Spin Hall effects have surged as promising phenomena for spin logics operations without ferromagnets. However, the magnitude of the detected electric signals at room temperature in metallic systems has been so far underwhelming. Here, we demonstrate a two-order of magnitude enhancement of the signal in monolayer graphene/Pt devices when compared to their fully metallic counterparts. The enhancement stems in part from efficient spin injection and the large spin resistance of graphene but we also observe 100% spin absorption in Pt and find an unusually large effective spin Hall angle of up to 0.15. The large spin-to-charge conversion allows us to characterise spin precession in graphene under the presence of a magnetic field. Furthermore, by developing an analytical model based on the 1D diffusive spin-transport, we demonstrate that the effective spin-relaxation time in graphene can be accurately determined using the (inverse) spin Hall effect as a means of detection. This is a necessary step to gather full understanding of the consequences of spin absorption in spin Hall devices, which is known to suppress effective spin lifetimes in both metallic and graphene systems.

  19. Photoactive hybrid material based on pyrene functionalized PbS nanocrystals decorating CVD monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Bianco, Giuseppe V; Corricelli, Michela; Comparelli, Roberto; Altamura, Davide; Agostiano, Angela; Striccoli, Marinella; Losurdo, Maria; Curri, M Lucia; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-02-25

    A simple and facile solution-based procedure is implemented for decorating a large area, monolayer graphene film, grown by chemical vapor deposition, with size-tunable light absorbing colloidal PbS nanocrystals (NCs). The hybrid is obtained by exposing a large area graphene film to a solution of 1-pyrene butyric acid surface coated PbS NCs, obtained by a capping exchange procedure onto presynthesized organic-capped NCs. The results demonstrate that at the interface, multiple and cooperative π-π stacking interactions promoted by the pyrene ligand coordinating the NC surface lead to a successful anchoring of the nano-objects on the graphene platform which concomitantly preserves its aromatic structure. Interligand interactions provide organization of the nano-objects in highly interconnected nanostructured multilayer coatings, where the NCs retain geometry and composition. The resulting hybrid exhibits a sheet resistance lower than that of bare graphene, which is explained in terms of electronic communication in the hybrid, due to the interconnection of the NC film and to a hole transfer from photoexcited PbS NCs to graphene, channelled at the interface by pyrene. Such a direct electron coupling makes the manufactured hybrid material an interesting component for optoelectronics, sensors and for optical communication and information technology.

  20. One-step synthesis of a suspended ultrathin graphene oxide film: application in transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, D A; Dideykin, A T; Aleksenskiy, A E; Sitnikova, A A; Konnikov, S G; Vul', A Ya

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin graphene films find their use as advantageous support for nano- and biomaterials investigations. Thin film causes a very slight deterioration to measured signals, thus providing more details of the object's structure at nanoscale. The ultimate thinness of graphene works in the best way for this purpose. However, obtaining suspended thin film of a large-area, which is convenient for applications, is often a relatively complicated and time-consuming task. Here we present a one-step 1-min technique for synthesis of an extremely thin (about 1-2 nm) continuous film suspended over cells of a conventional copper grid (50-400 μm mesh). This technique enables us to acquire a large-area film which is water-resistant, stable in organic solvents and can act as a support when studying nanoparticles or biomaterials. Moreover, the very mechanism of the film formation can be interesting from the point of view of other applications of ultrathin graphene oxide papers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insun Jo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier’s law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm−1K−1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  2. The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yu; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shifted from SPP-like toward SPhP-like. Both the figure of merit and field enhancement of hybrid modes are improved over 3 times than those of BNNT SPhP modes, which may further enable sub-wavelength mid-infrared applications.

  3. Dirac State in the FeB2 Monolayer with Graphene-Like Boron Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Li, Yafei; Hou, Jianhou; Du, Aijun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-10-12

    By introducing the commonly utilized Fe atoms into a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb boron network, we theoretically designed a new Dirac material of FeB2 monolayer with a Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. The electron transfer from Fe atoms to B networks not only effectively stabilizes the FeB2 networks but also leads to the strong interaction between the Fe and B atoms. The Dirac state in FeB2 system primarily arises from the Fe d orbitals and hybridized orbital from Fe-d and B-p states. The newly predicted FeB2 monolayer has excellent dynamic and thermal stabilities and is also the global minimum of 2D FeB2 system, implying its experimental feasibility. Our results are beneficial to further uncovering the mechanism of the Dirac cones and providing a feasible strategy for Dirac materials design.

  4. Broken-Symmetry States and Divergent Resistance in Suspended Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Benjamin; Martin, Jens; Weitz, Thomas; Allen, Monica; Yacoby, Amir

    2010-03-01

    We report the fabrication of suspended bilayer graphene devices with very little disorder. Transport measurements at zero magnetic field indicate that charge inhomogeneity in these flakes reaches as low as 10^10 cm-2. We observe quantum Hall states that are fully quantized at a magnetic field of 0.2 T, as well as broken-symmetry states at intermediate filling factors ν = 0, ±1, ±2 and ±3. In the ν = 0 state, the resistance of the flakes increases exponentially with applied magnetic field and scales as magnetic field divided by temperature. This resistance is predominantly affected by the perpendicular component of the applied field and the extracted gap size is larger than expected from Zeeman splitting, indicating that the broken-symmetry states arise from many-body interactions and underscoring the importance of Coulomb interactions in bilayer graphene.

  5. Sub-harmonic gap structure and Magneto-transport in suspended graphene -Superconductor ballistic junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Inducing superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect enables to study the rich transport of the massless Dirac fermions at the Superconductor(S) - Graphene (G) interface. Some of the predictions are pseudo diffusive transport in Ballistic SGS junctions at low carrier densities and the unique specular and retro Andreev reflections in graphene. One of the challenges in observing these experimentally is to fabricate highly transparent ballistic SGS junctions that can be probed at low carrier densities near the Dirac point. In this talk we will present our recent results on suspended graphene- Niobium Josephson weak links. Our devices exhibit a mobility of ~ 350000 cm2V-1s-1 with a carrier density as low as 109 cm-2. Below the Superconducting transition temperature (Tc) ~ 9K, the devices show supercurrent and sub-harmonic gap structure due to Multiple Andreev reflections. In the vicinity of the Dirac point, the sub-harmonic gap structure becomes more pronounced, which as predicated, is indicative of pseudo-diffusive transport. With a fine scanning of gate voltage close to Dirac point we see emergence of some unusual sub- gap structures. We also report on our study of these samples below the upper critical field of Nb (~ 3.5T), where superconducting proximity effect coexists with Quantum Hall effect.

  6. Improved photoresponse with enhanced photoelectric contribution in fully suspended graphene photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vikram; Capone, Aaron; Strauf, Stefan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2013-09-27

    Graphene's unique optoelectronic properties are promising to realize photodetectors with ultrafast photoresponse over a wide spectral range from far-infrared to ultraviolet radiation. The underlying mechanism of the photoresponse has been a particular focus of recent work and was found to be either photoelectric or photo-thermoelectric in nature and enhanced by hot carrier effects. Graphene supported by a substrate was found to be dominated by the photo-thermoelectric effect, which is known to be an order of magnitude slower than the photoelectric effect. Here we demonstrate fully-suspended chemical vapor deposition grown graphene microribbon arrays that are dominated by the faster photoelectric effect. Substrate removal was found to enhance the photoresponse by four-fold compared to substrate-supported microribbons. Furthermore, we show that the light-current input/output curves give valuable information about the underlying photophysical process responsible for the generated photocurrent. These findings are promising towards wafer-scale fabrication of graphene photodetectors approaching THz cut-off frequencies.

  7. Effect of Tensile Strain on Thermal Conductivity in Monolayer Graphene Nanoribbons: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhou Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs with different tensile strain is investigated by using a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. Significant increasing amplitude of the molecular thermal vibration, molecular potential energy vibration and thermal conductivity vibration of stretching GNRs were detected. Some 20%~30% thermal conductivity decay is found in 9%~15% tensile strain of GNR cases. It is explained by the fact that GNR structural ridges scatter some low-frequency phonons which pass in the direction perpendicular to the direction of GNR stretching which was indicated by a phonon density of state investigation.

  8. Energy Gap Induced by Friedel Oscillations Manifested as Transport Asymmetry at Monolayer-Bilayer Graphene Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal W. Clark

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that Friedel charge oscillation near an interface opens a gap at the Fermi energy for electrons with wave vectors perpendicular to the interface. If the Friedel gaps on two sides of the interface are different, a nonequilibrium effect—shifting of these gaps under bias—leads to asymmetric transport upon reversing the bias polarity. The predicted transport asymmetry is revealed by scanning tunneling potentiometry at monolayer-bilayer interfaces in epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001. This intriguing interfacial transport behavior opens a new avenue toward novel quantum functions such as quantum switching.

  9. Monte Carlo method for studies of spin relaxation in degenerate electron gas: Application to monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Monte Carlo method allowing to account for the effect of Pauli Exclusion Principle in the case of spin polarized electron gas is demonstrated. Modeling requires calculation of electron states occupancy accounting for the direction of the spin of the scattered electron. As an example of application, calculations for the case of spin and energy relaxation of initially polarized electrons in monolayer graphene have been performed. Model includes D'yakonov-Perel' and Elliot-Yafet relaxation mechanisms. It is demonstrated that electron distribution function and energy relaxation follow the spin polarization relaxation and they are mainly governed by spin related scattering processes.

  10. Grüneisen parameter of the G mode of strained monolayer graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2011-03-28

    We present a detailed analysis of the effects of uniaxial and biaxial strain on the frequencies of the G mode of monolayer graphene, using first principles calculations. Our results allow us to explain discrepancies in the experimentally determined values of the Grüneisen parameter. The direction and strength of the applied strain, Poisson\\'s ratio of the substrate, and the intrinsic strain in different experimental setups turn out to be important. A reliable determination of the Grüneisen parameter is a prerequisite of strain engineering.

  11. Theoretical investigations in active control of plasmon induced nanofocusing based on graphene monolayer on substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Buzheng; Yang, Yuguang; Xu, Yao; Ye, Shen; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-11-01

    A compact graphene monolayer on substrate nano-structure to realize nanofocusing and slow light effect is analytically and numerically investigated in this letter. By creating a chemical potential well in the desired positions via chemical doping or external gating, the normalized electric field enhancement factor here reaches over 300 where the mid-infrared (MIR) light is slowed down to over as high as 1/7000 times the speed in vacuum at the same time. The spot size is in 1 nm magnitude. Furthermore, when the chemical potential along the graphene sheet is properly designed, multi-focusing can be successfully controlled. The incident wave can also be trapped at the corresponding positions if it contains multiple frequency components. This structure may find applications for energy focusing on nano chips or lenses in the MIR regime beyond the diffraction limit.

  12. Strain-tunable band parameters of ZnO monolayer in graphene-like honeycomb structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-10-01

    We present ab initio calculations which show that the direct-band-gap, effective masses and Fermi velocities of charge carriers in ZnO monolayer (ML-ZnO) in graphene-like honeycomb structure are all tunable by application of in-plane homogeneous biaxial strain. Within our simulated strain limit of ± 10%, the band gap remains direct and shows a strong non-linear variation with strain. Moreover, the average Fermi velocity of electrons in unstrained ML-ZnO is of the same order of magnitude as that in graphene. The results promise potential applications of ML-ZnO in mechatronics/straintronics and other nano-devices such as the nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS).

  13. Hybrid Monte Carlo study of monolayer graphene with partially screened Coulomb interactions at finite spin density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Michael; Smith, Dominik; Buividovich, Pavel; Ulybyshev, Maksim; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2017-11-01

    We report on Hybrid Monte Carlo simulations at finite spin density of the π -band electrons in monolayer graphene with realistic interelectron interactions. Unlike simulations at finite charge-carrier density, these are not affected by a fermion-sign problem. Our results are in qualitative agreement with an interaction-induced warping of the Fermi contours and a reduction of the bandwidth as observed in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments on charge-doped graphene systems. Furthermore, we find evidence that the neck-disrupting Lifshitz transition, which occurs when the Fermi level traverses the van Hove singularity (VHS), becomes a true quantum phase transition due to interactions. This is in line with an instability of the VHS toward the formation of ordered electronic phases, which has been predicted by a variety of different theoretical approaches.

  14. Monolayer graphene-insulator-semiconductor emitter for large-area electron lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirley, Matthew P.; Aloui, Tanouir; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid adoption of nanotechnology in fields as varied as semiconductors, energy, and medicine requires the continual improvement of nanopatterning tools. Lithography is central to this evolving nanotechnology landscape, but current production systems are subject to high costs, low throughput, or low resolution. Herein, we present a solution to these problems with the use of monolayer graphene in a graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) electron emitter device for large-area electron lithography. Our GIS device displayed high emission efficiency (up to 13%) and transferred large patterns (500 × 500 μm) with high fidelity (<50% spread). The performance of our device demonstrates a feasible path to dramatic improvements in lithographic patterning systems, enabling continued progress in existing industries and opening opportunities in nanomanufacturing.

  15. High-performance and high-sensitivity applications of graphene transistors with self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao-Hui; Kumar, Vinod; Moyano, David Ricardo; Wen, Shao-Hsuan; Parashar, Vyom; Hsiao, She-Hsin; Srivastava, Anchal; Saxena, Preeti S; Huang, Kun-Ping; Chang, Chien-Chung; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-15

    Charge impurities and polar molecules on the surface of dielectric substrates has long been a critical obstacle to using graphene for its niche applications that involve graphene's high mobility and high sensitivity nature. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been found to effectively reduce the impact of long-range scatterings induced by the external charges. Yet, demonstrations of scalable device applications using the SAMs technique remains missing due to the difficulties in the device fabrication arising from the strong surface tension of the modified dielectric environment. Here, we use patterned SAM arrays to build graphene electronic devices with transport channels confined on the modified areas. For high-mobility applications, both rigid and flexible radio-frequency graphene field-effect transistors (G-FETs) were demonstrated, with extrinsic cutoff frequency and maximum oscillation frequency enhanced by a factor of ~2 on SiO2/Si substrates. For high sensitivity applications, G-FETs were functionalized by monoclonal antibodies specific to cancer biomarker chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, enabling its detection at a concentration of 0.01 fM, five orders of magnitude lower than that detectable by a conventional colorimetric assay. These devices can be very useful in the early diagnosis and monitoring of a malignant disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetism in non-metal atoms adsorbed graphene-like gallium nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wencheng; Sun, Minglei; Yu, Jin; Chou, Jyh-Pin

    2018-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of graphene-like gallium nitride (g-GaN) with adsorbed H, B, C, N, O, and F atoms were investigated using spin-polarized first-principles calculations. We found that H, B, C, N, O, and F atoms can be chemisorbed on a g-GaN monolayer. The total magnetic moments of 1.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 1.0 μB are founded in B-, C-, N-, and F-adsorbed g-GaN monolayers, respectively. In addition, a half-metallic state appears in the N- and F-adsorbed g-GaN, while a spin-polarized semiconducting state appears in other g-GaN monolayers after the adsorption of B or C. These findings demonstrate that the magnetic properties of g-GaN can be effectively tuned by the adsorption of non-metal atoms. In particular, the F-adsorbed system that exhibits a half-metallic state and high Curie temperature of 367 K has great potential for application in spintronics.

  17. Reduced graphene oxide directed self-assembly of phospholipid monolayers in liquid and gel phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Longfei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Li, Jingliang; Weng, Yuyan; Dou, Yujiang; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yuqiang

    2015-05-01

    The response of cell membranes to the local physical environment significantly determines many biological processes and the practical applications of biomaterials. A better understanding of the dynamic assembly and environmental response of lipid membranes can help understand these processes and design novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications. The present work demonstrates the directed assembly of lipid monolayers, in both liquid and gel phases, on the surface of a monolayered reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The results from atomic force microscopy indicate that the hydrophobic aromatic plane and the defect holes due to reduction of GO sheets, along with the phase state and planar surface pressure of lipids, corporately determine the morphology and lateral structure of the assembled lipid monolayers. The DOPC molecules, in liquid phase, probably spread over the rGO surface with their tails associating closely with the hydrophobic aromatic plane, and accumulate to form circles of high area surrounding the defect holes on rGO sheets. However, the DPPC molecules, in gel phase, prefer to form a layer of continuous membrane covering the whole rGO sheet including defect holes. The strong association between rGO sheets and lipid tails further influences the melting behavior of lipids. This work reveals a dramatic effect of the local structure and surface property of rGO sheets on the substrate-directed assembly and subsequent phase behavior of the supported lipid membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring the size dependence of thermal conductivity of suspended graphene disks using null-point scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwangseok; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2016-03-07

    Using null-point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM), we have measured and analyzed the size dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene. To do so, we rigorously re-derived the principal equation of NP SThM in terms of thermal property measurements so as to explain how this technique can be effectively used to quantitatively measure the local thermal resistance with nanoscale spatial resolution. This technique has already been proven to resolve the major problems of conventional SThM, and to quantitatively measure the temperature profile. Using NP SThM, we measured the variation in the thermal resistance of suspended chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene disks with radii of 50-3680 nm from the center to the edge with respect to the size. By thoroughly analyzing the size dependence of the thermal resistance, we show that, with increasing graphene size, the ballistic resistance becomes more dominant in the thermal resistance experienced by a heat source of finite size and that the thermal conductivity experienced by such a heat source can even decrease. The results of this study reveal that the thermal conductivity of graphene detected by a heat source depends on the size of the heat source relative to that of the suspended graphene and on how the heat source and graphene are connected. As demonstrated in this study, NP SThM will be very useful for quantitative thermal characterization of not only CVD-grown graphene but also various other nanomaterials and nanodevices.

  19. Investigation of plasmonic whispering-gallery mode characteristics for graphene monolayer coated dielectric nanodisks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Qiu, Weibin; Huang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2014-10-01

    In this Letter, we theoretically studied high-quality (Q) factor plasmonic whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) with ultrasmall mode volumes in graphene monolayer coated semiconductor nanodisks in the mid-infrared range. The influence of the chemical potential, the relaxation time of graphene, and the radius of the nanodisk on the cavity Q factor and the mode volume was numerically investigated. The numerical simulations showed that the plasmonic WGMs excited in this cavity had a deep subwavelength mode volume of 1.4×10(-5)(λ(0)/2n)(3), a cavity Q factor as high as 266 at a temperature lower than 250 K, and, consequently, a large Purcell factor of ∼1.2×10(7) when the chemical potential and relaxation time were assumed to be 0.9 eV and 1.4 ps, respectively. The results provide a possible application of plasmonic WGMs in the integration of nano-optoelectronic devices based on graphene.

  20. Novel behavior of monolayer quantum gases on graphene, graphane and fluorographene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reatto, Luciano; Galli, Davide E; Nava, Marco; Cole, Milton W

    2013-11-06

    This article discusses the behavior of submonolayer quantum films (He and H2) on graphene and newly discovered surfaces that are derived from graphene. Among these substrates are graphane (abbreviated GH), which has an H atom bonded to each C atom, and fluorographene (GF). The subject is introduced by describing the related problem of monolayer films on graphite. For that case, extensive experimental and theoretical investigations have revealed that the phase diagrams of the Bose gases (4)He and para-H2 are qualitatively similar, differing primarily in a higher characteristic temperature scale for H2 than for He. The phase behavior of these films on one side of pristine graphene, or both sides of free-standing graphene, is expected to be similar to that on graphite. We point out the possibility of novel phenomena in adsorption on graphene related to the large flexibility of the graphene sheet, to the non-negligible interaction between atoms adsorbed on opposite sides of the sheet and to the perturbation effect of the adsorbed layer on the Dirac electrons. In contrast, the behavior predicted on GF and GH surfaces is very different from that on graphite, a result of the different corrugation, i.e., the lateral variation of the potential experienced by these gases. This arises because on GF, for example, half of the F atoms are located above the C plane while the other half are below this plane. Hence, the He and H2 gases experience very different potentials from those on graphite or graphene. As a result of this novel geometry and potential, distinct properties are observed. For example, the (4)He film's ground state on graphite is a two-dimensional (2D) crystal commensurate with the substrate, the famous [Formula: see text] phase; on GF and GH, instead, it is predicted to be an anisotropic superfluid. On GF the anisotropy is so extreme that the roton excitations are very anisotropic, as if the bosons are moving in a multiconnected space along the bonds of a

  1. Ab initio calculations for structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of nitrogenized monolayer graphene decorated with 5d transition metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Guohua; Guo, Yanming

    2017-09-01

    Graphene-based magnetic materials have revealed great potential for developing high-performance electronic units at sub-nanometer such as spintronic data storage devices. However, a significant ferromagnetism behavior and ample band gap in the electronic structure of graphene is required before it can be used for actual engineering applications. Based on first-principles calculations, here we demonstrate the structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of 5d transition metal (TM) atom-substituted nitrogenized monolayer graphene. We find that, during TMN(3)4 cluster-substitution, tight bonding occurs between impurity atoms and graphene with significant binding energies. Charge transfer occurs from graphene layer to the TMN(3)4 clusters. Interestingly, PtN3, TaN4 and ReN4 cluster-doped graphene structures exhibit dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 1.00 μB, 1.04 μB and 1.05 μB magnetic moments, respectively. While, OsN4 and PtN4 cluster-doped structures display nonmagnetic direct band gap semiconductor behavior. Remaining, TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes exhibit half metal properties. Detailed analysis of density of states (DOS) plots indicate that d orbitals of TM atoms should be responsible for arising magnetic moments in graphene. Given results pave a new route for potential applications of dilute magnetic semiconductors and half-metals in spintronic devices by employing TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes.

  2. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungjin; Kim, Kijeong; Lee, Hangil

    2013-09-02

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation.

  3. Enhanced monolayer MoS2/InP heterostructure solar cells by graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Lin, Shisheng; Ding, Guqiao; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Zhijuan; Xu, Sen; Lu, Yanghua; Xu, Wenli; Zheng, Zheyang

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate significantly improved photovoltaic response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)/indium phosphide (InP) van der Waals heterostructure induced by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicate that effective charge transfer takes place between GQDs and MoS2, which results in n-type doping of MoS2. The doping effect increases the barrier height at the MoS2/InP heterojunction, thus the averaged power conversion efficiency of MoS2/InP solar cells is improved from 2.1% to 4.1%. The light induced doping by GQD provides a feasible way for developing more efficient MoS2 based heterostructure solar cells.

  4. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue

    2015-01-01

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimesional (2D) material for nanomedecine, but its...... stability in biological environments is limited. Systematic probing on the binding of proteins to CCG is currently lacking. Herein, we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between blood proteins and stabilized CCG (sCCG). CCG nanosheets are functionalized by monolayers of perylene leading...... for blood protein binding involve the π–π interacations between the π-plane of sCCG and surface aromatic amonic acid (sAA) residues of proteins. Several key binding parameters including the binding amount, Hill coefficient, and binding constant are determined. Through a detailed analysis of key controlling...

  5. The effects of transverse magnetic field and local electronic interaction on thermoelectric properties of monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed; Azizi, Farshad

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of a transverse magnetic field and electron doping on the thermoelectric properties of monolayer graphene in the context of Hubbard model at the antiferromagnetic sector. In particular, the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient has been investigated. Mean field approximation has been employed in order to obtain the electronic spectrum of the system in the presence of local electron-electron interaction. Our results show the peak in thermal conductivity moves to higher temperatures with increase of both chemical potential and Hubbard parameter. Moreover the increase of magnetic field leads to shift of peak in temperature dependence of thermal conductivity to higher temperatures. Finally the behavior of Seebeck coefficient in terms of temperature has been studied and the effects of magnetic field and Hubbard parameter on this coefficient have been investigated in details.

  6. Driving forces for the self-assembly of graphene oxide on organic monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Johannes; Wang, Zhenxing; Eigler, Siegfried; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Jäger, Christof M.; Clark, Timothy; Hirsch, Andreas; Halik, Marcus

    2014-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes were self-assembled from solution on surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), varying in the chemical structure of their head groups. The coverage density of GO relates to strength of attractive interaction, which is largest for Coulomb interaction provided by positively charged SAM head groups and negatively charged GO. A rough surface enhances the coverage density but with the same trend in driving force dependency. The self-assembly approach was used to fabricate field-effect transistors with reduced GO (rGO) as active layer. The SAMs as attractive layer for self-assembly remain almost unaffected by the reduction from GO to rGO and serve as ultra-thin gate dielectrics in devices, which operate at low voltages of maximum 3 V and exhibit a shift of the Dirac voltage related to the dipole moment of the SAMs.Graphene oxide (GO) flakes were self-assembled from solution on surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), varying in the chemical structure of their head groups. The coverage density of GO relates to strength of attractive interaction, which is largest for Coulomb interaction provided by positively charged SAM head groups and negatively charged GO. A rough surface enhances the coverage density but with the same trend in driving force dependency. The self-assembly approach was used to fabricate field-effect transistors with reduced GO (rGO) as active layer. The SAMs as attractive layer for self-assembly remain almost unaffected by the reduction from GO to rGO and serve as ultra-thin gate dielectrics in devices, which operate at low voltages of maximum 3 V and exhibit a shift of the Dirac voltage related to the dipole moment of the SAMs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02527j

  7. Strong electron-hole symmetric Rashba spin-orbit coupling in graphene/monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bowen; Lohmann, Mark; Barroso, David; Liao, Ingrid; Lin, Zhisheng; Liu, Yawen; Bartels, Ludwig; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shi, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Despite its extremely weak intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC), graphene has been shown to acquire considerable SOC by proximity coupling with exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Here we demonstrate strong induced Rashba SOC in graphene that is proximity coupled to a monolayer TMD film, Mo S2 or WS e2 , grown by chemical-vapor deposition with drastically different Fermi level positions. Graphene/TMD heterostructures are fabricated with a pickup-transfer technique utilizing hexagonal boron nitride, which serves as a flat template to promote intimate contact and therefore a strong interfacial interaction between TMD and graphene as evidenced by quenching of the TMD photoluminescence. We observe strong induced graphene SOC that manifests itself in a pronounced weak-antilocalization (WAL) effect in the graphene magnetoconductance. The spin-relaxation rate extracted from the WAL analysis varies linearly with the momentum scattering time and is independent of the carrier type. This indicates a dominantly Dyakonov-Perel spin-relaxation mechanism caused by the induced Rashba SOC. Our analysis yields a Rashba SOC energy of ˜1.5 meV in graphene/WS e2 and ˜0.9 meV in graphene/Mo S2 . The nearly electron-hole symmetric nature of the induced Rashba SOC provides a clue to possible underlying SOC mechanisms.

  8. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Gyu; Jung, Wonsuk, E-mail: wonsuk81@wku.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-16

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  9. First-principles calculations of the superconducting properties in Li-decorated monolayer graphene within the anisotropic Migdal-Eliashberg formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Jing-Jing; Margine, E. R.

    2017-01-01

    The ab initio anisotropic Migdal-Eliashberg formalism has been used to examine the pairing mechanism and the nature of the superconducting gap in the recently discovered lithium-decorated monolayer graphene superconductor. Our results provide evidence that the superconducting transition in Li-decorated monolayer graphene can be explained within a standard phonon-mediated mechanism. We predict a single anisotropic superconducting gap and a critical temperature Tc = 5.1-7.6 K, in very good agre...

  10. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d metal trioxide clusters-doped monolayer graphene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping; Hassan, Muhammad

    2017-03-01

    We present first-principles density-functional calculations for the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer graphene doped with 3d (Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Mn and Ni) metal trioxide TMO3 halogen clusters. In this paper we used two approaches for 3d metal trioxide clusters (i) TMO3 halogen cluster was embedded in monolayer graphene substituting four carbon (C) atoms (ii) three C atoms were substituted by three oxygen (O) atoms in one graphene ring and TM atom was adsorbed at the hollow site of O atoms substituted graphene ring. All the impurities were tightly bonded in the graphene ring. In first case of TMO3 doped graphene layer, the bond length between Csbnd O atom was reduced and bond length between TM-O atom was increased. In case of Cr, Fe, Co and Ni atoms substitution in between the O atoms, leads to Fermi level shifting to conduction band thereby causing the Dirac cone to move into valence band, however a band gap appears at high symmetric K-point. In case of TiO3 and VO3 substitution, system exhibits semiconductor properties. Interestingly, TiO3-substituted system shows dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 2.00 μB magnetic moment. On the other hand, the substitution of CoO3, CrO3, FeO3 and MnO3 induced 1.015 μB, 2.347 μB, 2.084 μB and 3.584 μB magnetic moment, respectively. In second case of O atoms doped in graphene and TM atoms adsorbed at the hollow site, the O atom bulges out of graphene plane and bond length between TM-O atom is increased. After TM atoms adsorption at the O substituted graphene ring the Fermi level (EF) shifts into conduction band. In case of Cr and Ni adsorption, system displays indirect band gap semiconductor properties with 0.0 μB magnetic moment. Co adsorption exhibits dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior producing 0.916 μB magnetic moment. Fe, Mn, Ti and V adsorption introduces band gap at high symmetric K-point also inducing 1.54 μB, 0.9909 μB, 1.912 μB, and 0.98 μB magnetic moments, respectively

  11. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d metal trioxide clusters-doped monolayer graphene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Muhammad [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); M.U.E.T, S.Z.A.B, Campus Khairpur Mir' s, Sindh (Pakistan); Shuai, Yong, E-mail: shuaiyong1978@gmail.com [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Tan, He-Ping; Hassan, Muhammad [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • First-principles calculations are performed for TMO{sub 3} cluster-doped and TM atoms adsorbed at three O atoms-doped graphene. • Significant magnetic coupling behavior is observed between TM atoms and neighboring C and O atoms for both cases. • The direction of charge transfer is always from monolayer graphene to TMO{sub 3} clusters incorporated into graphene. • TiO{sub 3} and VO{sub 3} doped structures display dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior. • Five different orbitals (d{sub xy}, d{sub yz}, d{sub z}{sup 2}, d{sub xz} and d{sub x}{sup 2}{sub -y}{sup 2}) of 3d TM atoms give rise to magnetic moments for both cases. - Abstract: We present first-principles density-functional calculations for the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer graphene doped with 3d (Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Mn and Ni) metal trioxide TMO{sub 3} halogen clusters. In this paper we used two approaches for 3d metal trioxide clusters (i) TMO{sub 3} halogen cluster was embedded in monolayer graphene substituting four carbon (C) atoms (ii) three C atoms were substituted by three oxygen (O) atoms in one graphene ring and TM atom was adsorbed at the hollow site of O atoms substituted graphene ring. All the impurities were tightly bonded in the graphene ring. In first case of TMO{sub 3} doped graphene layer, the bond length between C−O atom was reduced and bond length between TM-O atom was increased. In case of Cr, Fe, Co and Ni atoms substitution in between the O atoms, leads to Fermi level shifting to conduction band thereby causing the Dirac cone to move into valence band, however a band gap appears at high symmetric K-point. In case of TiO{sub 3} and VO{sub 3} substitution, system exhibits semiconductor properties. Interestingly, TiO{sub 3}-substituted system shows dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 2.00 μ{sub B} magnetic moment. On the other hand, the substitution of CoO{sub 3}, CrO{sub 3}, FeO{sub 3} and MnO{sub 3} induced 1.015 μ{sub B}, 2

  12. Transfer of an exfoliated monolayer graphene flake onto an optical fiber end face for erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes Rosa, Henrique; Viana Gomes, José Carlos; Thoroh de Souza, Eunézio A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, the successful transfer of exfoliated monolayer graphene flake to the optical fiber end face and alignment to its core. By fabricating and optimizing a polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) substrate, it is possible to obtain a contrast of up to 11% for green light illumination, allowing the identification of monolayer graphene flakes that were transferred to optical fiber samples and aligned to its core. With Raman spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that graphene flake completely covers the optical fiber core, and its quality remains unaltered after the transfer. The generation of mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser pulses, with a duration of 672 fs, with a single-monolayer graphene flake as a saturable absorber, is demonstrated for the first time. This transfer technique is of general applicability and can be used for other two-dimensional (2D) exfoliated materials.

  13. Self-assembled monolayer assisted binding of partially oxidized graphene on gold: Tunable electron-transfer mediation and in-situ electrochemical disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Ding, Kejian; Huang, Ximing; Shao, Huibo

    2017-12-01

    In this research a class of graphene modified electrodes based on self-assembled monolayer assisted binding of partially oxidized graphene on gold was achieved. The electrodes show two features: (1) the tunable electron-transfer mediation ability which is controlled by the oxidation degree of the graphene, and (2) the ability of in-situ electrochemical disassembly. The tunable electron-transfer mediation ability was investigated by interpreting the cyclic voltammogram recorded with the classic redox couple, potassium ferricyanide/ferrocyanide. The ability of in-situ electrochemical disassembly was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the case of enzyme adsorption. It was found that the "on" and "off" conditions of the partially oxidized graphene correspond to the assembly and disassembly of the mercaptosuccinic acid self-assembled monolayer respectively, endowing the electrodes with the ability of in-situ electrochemical disassembly. In addition, the experimental results on glucose sensing illustrate the potential applications of the graphene modified electrodes.

  14. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2 : Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po-Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Dadap, Jerry I.; Sutter, Peter; Herman, Irving P.; Osgood, Richard M.

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide ( Mo S 2 ) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer Mo S 2 elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. A suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer Mo S 2 crystals. For suspended Mo S 2 , a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at $\\bar{Γ}$ and $\\bar{K}$ of 2.00 m 0 and 0.43 m 0 , respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of $\\bar{Γ}$ K to the vicinity of $\\bar{K}$ and briefly discuss its possible origin.

  15. Josephson coupling in junctions made of monolayer graphene on SiC

    OpenAIRE

    Jouault, B.; Charpentier, S.; Massarotti, D.; Michon, A.; Paillet, M.; Huntzinger, J. -R.; Tiberj, A.; Zahab, A.; Bauch, T.; Lucignano, P.; Tagliacozzo, A.; Lombardi, F.; Tafuri, F.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) has proved to be highly successful in Hall conductance quantization for its homogeneity at the centimetre scale. Robust Josephson coupling has been measured in co-planar diffusive Al/monololayer graphene/Al junctions. Graphene on SiC substrates is a concrete candidate to provide scalability of hybrid Josephson graphene/superconductor devices, giving also promise of ballistic propagation.

  16. Suppressing thermal conductivity of suspended tri-layer graphene by gold deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Zhu, Liyan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L

    2013-12-17

    A simple and general strategy for suppressing the thermal conductivity in graphene is shown. The strategy uses gold nano-particles physically deposited on graphene to continuously reduce the thermal conductivity of graphene with increasing coverage, which demonstrates the potential for practical development of graphene-based devices with tunable thermal conductivity for thermal management. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Formation and optoelectronic properties of graphene sheets with CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots monolayer formed by Langmuir-Schaefer hybrid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwani, Ammar J. K.; Chumakov, A. S.; Shinkarenko, O. A.; Gorbachev, I. A.; Pozharov, M. V.; Venig, S.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The monolayer formations of graphene sheets and CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) are studied at air-water interface by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The heterojunction structures of graphene sheets covered by QDs and placed between metal electrodes demonstrate excellent and high sensitive ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse to detection wavelength of 365 nm. Excitation of QDs located at the surface of a single graphene layer induces very efficient electron transfer from the QDs to graphene monolayer. The thin film of hybrid structure is deposited by Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method. The photoresponse of hybrid structure is obtained by UV illumination as photoexcited electron-hole pairs can be separated at the interface between graphene monolayer and QDs. The charge mobility can be enhanced by reducing the rate of recombination by directly transferring photogenerated charge carriers from QDs to graphene sheets. Application of CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs with graphene sheets will open unique opportunities for high performance UV photodetector.

  18. Low-temperature thermal reduction of suspended graphene oxide film for electrical sensing of DNA-hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tun; Guo, Hong-Chen; Chen, Xin-Yi; Lu, Miao

    2017-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based capacitive real time bio-sensor was presented. Suspended graphene oxide (GO) film was assembled electrophoretically between the source and drain electrodes of a transistor and then reduced by annealing in hydrogen/nitrogen forming gas to optimize the surface functional groups and conductivity. The resonance frequency of the transmission coefficient (S21) of the transistor was observed to shift with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-hybridization, with a detecting limit of ~5nM. The advantages of the bio-sensing approach include low-noise frequency output, solution based real time detection and capable of on-chip integration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of ageing on Raman spectra and the conductivity of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by heavy and light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butenko, A.; Zion, E.; Richter, V.; Sharoni, A. [Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Kaganovskii, Yu.; Wolfson, L.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I. [Department of Physics, Jack and Pearl Resnick Institute, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2016-07-28

    The influence of long-term ageing (about one year) on the Raman scattering (RS) spectra and the temperature dependence of conductivity has been studied in two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by different doses of C{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ions. It is shown that the main result of ageing consists of changes in the intensity and position of D- and G- and 2D-lines in RS spectra and in an increase of the conductivity. The observed effects are explained in terms of an increase of the radius of the “activated” area around structural defects.

  20. Mechanical properties of freely suspended semiconducting graphene-like layers based on MoS2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Poot, M.; Steele, G.A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Agrait, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate freely suspended nanosheets of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) which are characterized by quantitative optical microscopy and high-resolution friction force microscopy. We study the elastic deformation of freely suspended nanosheets of MoS2 using an atomic force microscope. The Young’s

  1. Realization of Large-Area Wrinkle-Free Monolayer Graphene Films Transferred to Functional Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byeong-Ju; Choi, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hyun-You; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Jung, Hyun-June; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Structural inhomogeneities, such as the wrinkles and ripples within a graphene film after transferring the free-standing graphene layer to a functional substrate, degrade the physical and electrical properties of the corresponding electronic devices. Here, we introduced titanium as a superior adhesion layer for fabricating wrinkle-free graphene films that is highly applicable to flexible and transparent electronic devices. The Ti layer does not influence the electronic performance of the func...

  2. Excitation of plasmon modes in a graphene monolayer supported on a 2D subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) carbon-based material, whose unique electronic and optical properties have attracted a great deal of research interest. Despite the fact that graphene is an atomically thin layer the optical absorption of a single layer can be as high as 2.3% (defined by the fin...

  3. Functionalizing Arrays of Transferred Monolayer Graphene on Insulating Surfaces by Bipolar Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Line; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund; Thyssen, Lena

    2016-01-01

    and stability of the electrode compared to conventional electrografting using a three-electrode setup. On one side, the graphene will be blocked by the attached organic film, but the conductivity is also altered upon functionalization, which makes the graphene electrode different from a normal metal electrode...

  4. Thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyang; Ying, Hao; Chen, Xiangping; Nika, Denis L; Cocemasov, Alexandr I; Cai, Weiwei; Balandin, Alexander A; Chen, Shanshan

    2014-11-21

    We have investigated experimentally the thermal conductivity of suspended twisted bilayer graphene. The measurements were performed using an optothermal Raman technique. It was found that the thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene is lower than that of monolayer graphene and the reference, Bernal stacked bilayer graphene in the entire temperature range examined (∼300-700 K). This finding indicates that the heat carriers - phonons - in twisted bilayer graphene do not behave in the same manner as that observed in individual graphene layers. The decrease in the thermal conductivity found in twisted bilayer graphene was explained by the modification of the Brillouin zone due to plane rotation and the emergence of numerous folded phonon branches that enhance the phonon Umklapp and normal scattering. The results obtained are important for understanding thermal transport in two-dimensional systems.

  5. Photoresponse mechanisms of a graphene-based quantum-dot monolayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwani, Ammar J. K.; Chumakov, A. S.; Pozharov, M. V.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid structures of graphene sheets based quantum dots (QDs) are produced via Langmuir – Blodgett (LB) technique. Morphology of the structures produced is investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two types of hybrid structures are prepared from graphene covered by sublayers of CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS QDs. Photocurrent properties are studied by current – voltage characteristics (CVCs) in the dark and while exposed to visible light and ultraviolet (UV) light with an excitation wavelength of 365 nm. The rise and decay times of graphene and QDs after UV illumination are estimated.

  6. Temperature dependence of electron density and electron-electron interactions in monolayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chieh-Wen; Chuang, Chiashain; Yang, Yanfei; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Ho, Yi-Ju; Lee, Hsin-Yen; Liang, Chi-Te

    2017-06-01

    We report carrier density measurements and electron-electron (e-e) interactions in monolayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC. The temperature (T)-independent carrier density determined from the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations clearly demonstrates that the observed logarithmic temperature dependence of the Hall slope in our system must be due to e-e interactions. Since the electron density determined from conventional SdH measurements does not depend on e-e interactions based on Kohn’s theorem, SdH experiments appear to be more reliable compared with the classical Hall effect when one studies the T dependence of the carrier density in the low T regime. On the other hand, the logarithmic T dependence of the Hall slope δR xy /δB can be used to probe e-e interactions even when the conventional conductivity method is not applicable due to strong electron-phonon scattering.

  7. Enhanced monolayer MoS{sub 2}/InP heterostructure solar cells by graphene quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng [College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Physics, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Lin, Shisheng, E-mail: shishenglin@zju.edu.cn; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Zhijuan; Xu, Sen; Lu, Yanghua; Xu, Wenli; Zheng, Zheyang [College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ding, Guqiao [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate significantly improved photovoltaic response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})/indium phosphide (InP) van der Waals heterostructure induced by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicate that effective charge transfer takes place between GQDs and MoS{sub 2}, which results in n-type doping of MoS{sub 2}. The doping effect increases the barrier height at the MoS{sub 2}/InP heterojunction, thus the averaged power conversion efficiency of MoS{sub 2}/InP solar cells is improved from 2.1% to 4.1%. The light induced doping by GQD provides a feasible way for developing more efficient MoS{sub 2} based heterostructure solar cells.

  8. The effect of Holstein phonons on the electrical conductivity of doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity of graphene sheets is studied in the presence of coupling between lattice optical vibrations and electrons. Green's function approach is implemented to find the temperature behavior of electrical conductivity. Moreover, the effect of electronic doping on the electrical conductivity of graphene with electron-phonon interaction is investigated. Our results show that electrical conductivity increases as a function of temperature at low temperature and gets a maximum value and then decays at high temperature.

  9. Structure and spectroscopic analysis of the graphene monolayer film directly grown on the quartz substrate via the HF-CVD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Waleed E.; Al-Hazmi, Farag S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Shokr, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2016-08-01

    Direct growth of a monolayer graphene film on a quartz substrate by a hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique is reported. The monolayer graphene film prepared was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties were studied by spectroscopic elliposmetry. The experimental data were fitted by the Forouhi-Bloomer model to estimate the extinction coefficient and the refractive index of the monolayer graphene film. The refractive index spectrum in the visible region was studied based on the harmonic oscillator model. The lattice dielectric constant, real and imaginary dielectric constants and the ratio of the charge carrier number to the effective mass were determined. The surface and volume energy loss parameters were also found and showed that the value of the surface energy loss is greater than the volume energy loss. The determination of these optical constants will open new avenue for novel applications of graphene films in the field of wave plates, light modulators, ultrahigh-frequency signal processing and LCDs.

  10. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  11. Electrical and thermal conductivities of the graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron honeycomb monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Jabbar [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Yarmohammadi, Zahra [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-25

    Density of states, electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron single sheets are studied within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism, based on the linear response theory. The results show that while boron nitride keeps significantly the lowest amounts overall with an interval of zero value in low temperatures, due to its insulating nature, graphene exhibits the most electrical and thermal conductivities, slightly higher than silicon boron except for low temperature region where the latter surpasses, owing to its metallic character. This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures. - Highlights: • Electronic properties of graphene, silicon boron, and boron nitride planes are compared. • Tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism are implemented. • This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures.

  12. Electrical and thermal conductivities of the graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron honeycomb monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Hamze; Khodadadi, Jabbar; Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid; Yarmohammadi, Zahra

    2016-11-01

    Density of states, electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron single sheets are studied within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism, based on the linear response theory. The results show that while boron nitride keeps significantly the lowest amounts overall with an interval of zero value in low temperatures, due to its insulating nature, graphene exhibits the most electrical and thermal conductivities, slightly higher than silicon boron except for low temperature region where the latter surpasses, owing to its metallic character. This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures.

  13. Emergence of electromotive force by time dependent gauge fields in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahpour, T.; Phirouznia, A.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a valley-dependent electromotive force in a graphene device based on a deformed graphene in the presence of magnetic field. The coexistence of the strain and magnetic field in the presented mechanism leads to a valley dependent electromotive force in zero Fermi energy. In the non-zero Fermi energies strain alone could induce a valley dependent electromotive force while the magnetic field alone could not induce any electromotive force in zero and any level of Fermi energy. The calculations are based on the Berry curvature approaches.

  14. Nano-graphene monolayer with higher-order exchange couplings: Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraoun, A.; Kerouad, M.

    2018-01-01

    We have used the Monte Carlo simulation to study the phase diagrams and the magnetic properties of a single nano-graphene layer with next-nearest neighbors coupling J2 and four-spin interaction J4. Interesting behaviors have been found. In particular, the nanographene can present tricritical and triple points for appropriate system parameters.

  15. Graphite from the viewpoint of Landau level spectroscopy: an effective graphene bilayer and monolayer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orlita, Milan; Faugeras, C.; Schneider, J.M.; Martinez, G.; Maude, D. K.; Potemski, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 16 (2009), 166401/1-166401/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652 Grant - others:ANR(FR) ANR-06-NANO-019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : IR spectroscopy * graphene * graphite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.328, year: 2009

  16. Far-field and near-field monitoring of hybridized optical modes from Au nanoprisms suspended on a graphene/Si nanopillar array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Li-Wei; Chen, Kai; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2017-11-09

    The optical hybridization of localized surface plasmons and photonic modes of dielectric nanostructures provides us wide arenas of opportunities for designing tunable nanophotonics with excellent spectral selectivity, signal enhancement, and light harvesting for many optical applications. Graphene-supported Au nanoprisms on a periodic Si nanopillar array will be an ideal model system for examining such an optical hybridization effect between plasmonic modes and photonic modes. Here, through the measurement of the reflectance spectra as well as graphene phonons by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we investigated both the far-field and near-field properties of these optically hybridized modes. The effects of photonic modes and Mie resonances of the Si nanopillars on the localized surface plasmons of the Au nanoprisms and on their near-field enhancement were experimentally elucidated through the measurements of graphene phonons using two excitation lasers with wavelengths of 532 and 785 nm. The wavelength-dependent SERS intensities of monolayer graphene are clearly understood in terms of the optical hybridization, and the SERS enhancement factor estimated from finite-difference time-domain simulations exhibited good agreement with the measurements. The elucidated spectral tunability in the near-field light-matter interaction would be useful for potential applications in various types of graphene-based photonics.

  17. Monolayer graphene film on ZnO nanorod array for high-performance Schottky junction ultraviolet photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Biao; Hu, Ji-Gang; Luo, Lin-Bao; Xie, Chao; Zeng, Long-Hui; Lv, Peng; Li, Fang-Ze; Jie, Jian-Sheng; Feng, Mei; Wu, Chun-Yan; Yu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-09-09

    A new Schottky junction ultraviolet photodetector (UVPD) is fabricated by coating a free-standing ZnO nanorod (ZnONR) array with a layer of transparent monolayer graphene (MLG) film. The single-crystalline [0001]-oriented ZnONR array has a length of about 8-11 μm, and a diameter of 100∼600 nm. Finite element method (FEM) simulation results show that this novel nanostructure array/MLG heterojunction can trap UV photons effectively within the ZnONRs. By studying the I-V characteristics in the temperature range of 80-300 K, the barrier heights of the MLG film/ZnONR array Schottky barrier are estimated at different temperatures. Interestingly, the heterojunction diode with typical rectifying characteristics exhibits a high sensitivity to UV light illumination and a quick response of millisecond rise time/fall times with excellent reproducibility, whereas it is weakly sensitive to visible light irradiation. It is also observed that this UV photodetector (PD) is capable of monitoring a fast switching light with a frequency as high as 2250 Hz. The generality of the above results suggest that this MLG film/ZnONR array Schottky junction UVPD will have potential application in future optoelectronic devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Disorder-assisted transmission due to charge puddles in monolayer graphene: Transmission enhancement and local currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leandro R. F.; Lewenkopf, Caio H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of charge puddles to the nonvanishing conductivity minimum in disordered graphene flakes at the charge neutrality point. For that purpose, we study systems with a geometry that suppresses the transmission due to evanescent modes allowing us to single out the effect of charge fluctuations in the transport properties. We use the recursive Green's function technique to obtain local and total transmissions through systems that mimic vanishing density of states at the charge neutrality point in the presence of a local disordered local potential to model the charge puddles. Our microscopic model includes electron-electron interactions via a spin resolved Hubbard mean field term. We establish the relationship between the charge puddle disorder potential and the electronic transmission at the charge neutrality point. We find that electronic interactions do not play a significant role in this setting. We discuss the implications of our findings to high mobility graphene samples deposited on different substrates and provide a qualitative interpretation of recent experimental results.

  19. Controlled graphene oxide assembly on silver nanocube monolayers for SERS detection: dependence on nanocube packing procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Banchelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid graphene oxide/silver nanocubes (GO/AgNCs arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS applications were prepared by means of two procedures differing for the method used in the assembly of the silver nanocubes onto the surface: Langmuir–Blodgett (LB transfer and direct sequential physisorption of silver nanocubes (AgNCs. Adsorption of graphene oxide (GO flakes on the AgNC assemblies obtained with both procedures was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM technique as a function of GO bulk concentration. The experiment provided values of the adsorbed GO mass on the AgNC array and the GO saturation limit as well as the thickness and the viscoelastic properties of the GO film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements of the resulting samples revealed that a similar surface coverage was achieved with both procedures but with a different distribution of silver nanoparticles. In the GO covered LB film, the AgNC distribution is characterized by densely packed regions alternating with empty surface areas. On the other hand, AgNCs are more homogeneously dispersed over the entire sensor surface when the nanocubes spontaneously adsorb from solution. In this case, the assembly results in less-packed silver nanostructures with higher inter-cube distance. For the two assembled substrates, AFM of silver nanocubes layers fully covered with GO revealed the presence of a homogeneous, flexible and smooth GO sheet folding over the silver nanocubes and extending onto the bare surface. Preliminary SERS experiments on adenine showed a higher SERS enhancement factor for GO on Langmuir–Blodgett films of AgNCs with respect to bare AgNC systems. Conversely, poor SERS enhancement for adenine resulted for GO-covered AgNCs obtained by spontaneous adsorption. This indicated that the assembly and packing of AgNCs obtained in this way, although more homogeneous over the substrate surface, is not as effective for SERS analysis.

  20. Pulse characteristics in a doubly Q-switched Nd:GGG laser with an acousto-optic modulator and a monolayer graphene saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Zhao, Jia; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Tao; Li, Dechun; Li, Guiqiu; Qiao, Wenchao

    2017-11-01

    A doubly Q-switched Nd:GGG laser emitting 1064 nm wavelength with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a monolayer graphene saturable absorber (SA) is presented to study the pulse characteristics. In comparison with singly passive Q-switched laser (SPQSL) with grapheme SA, the doubly Q-switched laser (DQSL) can effectively shorten the pulse width and improve the pulse peak power. The existence of the ramping behavior of pulse characteristics versus modulation frequency in DQSL is shown. The average output power, the pulse width, the pulse energy and the peak power are related to modulation frequency of AOM, and the point of inflection is dominated by pump power.

  1. Proximity Effects in Bilayer Graphene on Monolayer WSe2 : Field-Effect Spin Valley Locking, Spin-Orbit Valve, and Spin Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2017-10-01

    Proximity orbital and spin-orbit effects of bilayer graphene on monolayer WSe2 are investigated from first principles. We find that the built-in electric field induces an orbital band gap of about 10 meV in bilayer graphene. Remarkably, the proximity spin-orbit splitting for holes is 2 orders of magnitude—the spin-orbit splitting of the valence band at K is about 2 meV—more than for electrons. Effectively, holes experience spin valley locking due to the strong proximity of the lower graphene layer to WSe2 . However, applying an external transverse electric field of some 1 V /nm , countering the built-in field of the heterostructure, completely reverses this effect and allows, instead of holes, electrons to be spin valley locked with 2 meV spin-orbit splitting. Such a behavior constitutes a highly efficient field-effect spin-orbit valve, making bilayer graphene on WSe2 a potential platform for a field-effect spin transistor.

  2. Self-organizing properties of triethylsilylethynyl-anthradithiophene on monolayer graphene electrodes in solution-processed transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaeyoung; Park, Jaesung; Nam, Sooji; Anthony, John E; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Keun Soo; Kim, Kwang S; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Chan Eon

    2013-11-21

    Graphene has shown great potential as an electrode material for organic electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors (FETs) because of its high conductivity, thinness, and good compatibility with organic semiconductor materials. To achieve high performance in graphene-based organic FETs, favorable molecular orientation and good crystallinity of organic semiconductors on graphene are desired. This strongly depends on the surface properties of graphene. Here, we investigate the effects of polymer residues that remain on graphene source/drain electrodes after the transfer/patterning processes on the self-organizing properties and field-effect characteristics of the overlying solution-processed triethylsilylethynyl-anthradithiophene (TES-ADT). A solvent-assisted polymer residue removal process was introduced to effectively remove residues or impurities on the graphene surface. Unlike vacuum-deposited small molecules, TES-ADT displayed a standing-up molecular assembly, which facilitates lateral charge transport, on both the residue-removed clean graphene and as-transferred graphene with polymer residues. However, TES-ADT films grown on the cleaned graphene showed a higher crystallinity and larger grain size than those on the as-transferred graphene. The resulting TES-ADT FETs using cleaned graphene source/drain electrodes therefore exhibited a superior device performance compared to devices using as-transferred graphene electrodes, with mobilities as high as 1.38 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  3. Graphene as a thin-film catalyst booster: graphene-catalyst interface plays a critical role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Jin Choi, Won; Sang Chae, Soo; Jang, Seunghun; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Youn Sang; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-12-08

    Due to its extreme thinness, graphene can transmit some surface properties of its underlying substrate, a phenomenon referred to as graphene transparency. Here we demonstrate the application of the transparency of graphene as a protector of thin-film catalysts and a booster of their catalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic degradation of dye molecules by ZnO thin films was chosen as a model system. A ZnO thin film coated with monolayer graphene showed greater catalytic efficiency and long-term stability than did bare ZnO. Interestingly, we found the catalytic efficiency of the graphene-coated ZnO thin film to depend critically on the nature of the bottom ZnO layer; graphene transferred to a relatively rough, sputter-coated ZnO thin film showed rather poor catalytic degradation of the dye molecules while a smooth sol-gel-synthesized ZnO covered with monolayer graphene showed enhanced catalytic degradation. Based on a systematic investigation of the interface between graphene and ZnO thin films, we concluded the transparency of graphene to be critically dependent on its interface with a supporting substrate. Graphene supported on an atomically flat substrate was found to efficiently transmit the properties of the substrate, but graphene suspended on a substrate with a rough nanoscale topography was completely opaque to the substrate properties. Our experimental observations revealed the morphology of the substrate to be a key factor affecting the transparency of graphene, and should be taken into account in order to optimally apply graphene as a protector of catalytic thin films and a booster of their catalysis.

  4. Graphene as a thin-film catalyst booster: graphene-catalyst interface plays a critical role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Choi, Won Jin; Chae, Soo Sang; Jang, Seunghun; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Youn Sang; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2017-12-01

    Due to its extreme thinness, graphene can transmit some surface properties of its underlying substrate, a phenomenon referred to as graphene transparency. Here we demonstrate the application of the transparency of graphene as a protector of thin-film catalysts and a booster of their catalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic degradation of dye molecules by ZnO thin films was chosen as a model system. A ZnO thin film coated with monolayer graphene showed greater catalytic efficiency and long-term stability than did bare ZnO. Interestingly, we found the catalytic efficiency of the graphene-coated ZnO thin film to depend critically on the nature of the bottom ZnO layer; graphene transferred to a relatively rough, sputter-coated ZnO thin film showed rather poor catalytic degradation of the dye molecules while a smooth sol–gel-synthesized ZnO covered with monolayer graphene showed enhanced catalytic degradation. Based on a systematic investigation of the interface between graphene and ZnO thin films, we concluded the transparency of graphene to be critically dependent on its interface with a supporting substrate. Graphene supported on an atomically flat substrate was found to efficiently transmit the properties of the substrate, but graphene suspended on a substrate with a rough nanoscale topography was completely opaque to the substrate properties. Our experimental observations revealed the morphology of the substrate to be a key factor affecting the transparency of graphene, and should be taken into account in order to optimally apply graphene as a protector of catalytic thin films and a booster of their catalysis.

  5. First principle study on the electronic properties and Schottky contact of graphene adsorbed on MoS2 monolayer under applied out-plane strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuc, Huynh V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Hoi, Bui D.; Phuong, Le T. T.; Nguyen, Chuong V.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, electronic properties and Schottky contact of graphene adsorbed on the MoS2 monolayer under applied out-plane strain are studied using density functional theory calculations. Our calculations show that weak van derpp Waals interactions between graphene and monolayer MoS2 are dominated at the interlayer distance of 3.34 Å and the binding energy per C atom of - 25.1 meV. A narrow band gap of 3.6 meV has opened in G/MoS2 heterointerface, and it can be modulated by the out-plane strain. Furthermore, the Schottky barrier and Schottky contact types in the G/MoS2 heterointerface can be controlled by the out-plane strain. At the equilibrium state (d = 3.34 Å), the intrinsic electronic structure of G/MoS2 heterointerface is well preserved and forms an n-type Schottky barrier of 0.49 eV. When the interlayer distance decreases, the transition from n-type to p-type Schottky contact occurs at d = 2.74 Å. Our studies promote the application of ultrathin G/MoS2 heterointerface in the next-generation nanoelectronic and photonic devices such as van-der-Waals-based field effect transistors.

  6. Atomic-Scale Topographic and Electronic Structure of Graphene Films on Ultraflat Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Zhao, Liuyan; Ghahari, Fereshte; Dean, Cory; Rim, Kwang; Hone, James; Flynn, George; Kim, Philip; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2011-03-01

    Graphene, a unique two-dimensional material, has attracted much attention for its exotic electronic properties. But owing to its nature as a single monolayer, many of these interesting properties depend heavily on the substrate on which the graphene rests. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments offer the unique ability to investigate the effect of the substrate on the surface roughness (via topography maps) as well as the local electronic properties (via spectroscopy maps) of graphene. In this talk we will present such experimental results of graphene on atomically flat insulating substrates such as mica and boron nitride, as well as suspended graphene sheets. We will describe experiments performed both on exfoliated graphene flakes as well as large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

  7. Suspended graphene device fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltunen, Vesa-Matti

    2016-01-01

    Tämän pro gradu -tutkielman aiheena oli tutkia itsekantavien grafeeninäytteiden valmistusta. Grafeeni syntetisoitiin kaasufaasikasvatuksella ilmakehän paineessa kupariohutkalvoille. Kupariohutkalvot valmistattiin käyttämällä elektronisuihkuhöyrystystä. Projektin aikana synteesiprosessia parannettiin optimoimalla synteesiparametreja. Syntetisoinnin jälkeen grafeeninäytteet siirrettiin piinitridikalvoille, joihin oli valmistettu reikiä. Viimeinen vaihe siirrossa on PMMA tukikerro...

  8. Pulsed-Plasma Physical Vapor Deposition Approach Toward the Facile Synthesis of Multilayer and Monolayer Graphene for Anticoagulation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K; Gaman, Cezar; Jose, Bincy; McCoy, Anthony P; Cafolla, Tony; McNally, Patrick J; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the growth of multilayer and single-layer graphene on copper foil using bipolar pulsed direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering of a graphite target in pure argon atmosphere. Single-layer graphene (SG) and few-layer graphene (FLG) films are deposited at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 920 °C within graphene films formed. The films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and optical transmission spectroscopy techniques. Based on the above studies, a diffusion-controlled mechanism was proposed for the graphene growth. A single-step whole blood assay was used to investigate the anticoagulant activity of graphene surfaces. Platelet adhesion, activation, and morphological changes on the graphene/glass surfaces, compared to bare glass, were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and SEM techniques. We have found significant suppression of the platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation on the graphene-covered surfaces, compared to the bare glass, indicating the anticoagulant activity of the deposited graphene films. Our production technique represents an industrially relevant method for the growth of SG and FLG for various applications including the biomedical field.

  9. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  10. Comparison of mechanical and corrosion properties of graphene monolayer on Ti–Al–V and nanometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer on Ti–Al–V alloy for dental implants applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisz, M., E-mail: malgorzata.kalisz@its.waw.pl [Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Grobelny, M. [Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Mazur, M. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Zdrojek, M. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Wojcieszak, D. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Świniarski, M.; Judek, J. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Kaczmarek, D. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    In this paper the comparative studies on structural, mechanical and corrosion properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Ti–Al–V and graphene/Ti–Al–V alloy systems have been investigated. We show that the hardness of pure niobium pentoxide was ca. 8.64 GPa and graphene deposited on titanium alloy surface was equal 5.63 GPa. However, the graphene monolayer has no effect on surface hardness of titanium alloy and can be easily removed from the surface. On the other hand, the sample with graphene coating has much better corrosion resistance. Our results suggest, that the use of combined layers of niobium pentoxide and graphene, in the hybrid multilayer system can greatly improve the mechanical and corrosion properties of the titanium alloy surface. Such hybrid system can be used in the future, as protection coating for Ti alloy, in biomedical application and in other applications, where Ti alloys work in an aggressive corrosive environment and in engineering applications where friction is involved. - Highlights: • Corrosion properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiAlV and graphene/TiAlV systems were investigated. • Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film improves titanium alloy surface hardness from 5.64 GPa to 8.64 GPa. • Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film improves corrosion resistance of Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V in aggressive environment. • i{sub corr} for graphene monolayer deposited on Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V surface decreases to 0.01 μA/cm{sup 2}. • Graphene monolayer caused decrease in the electrochemical activity of the Ti surface.

  11. Nonlinear Nanomechanical Resonators using CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Robert; Chaudhuri, Arnab

    Graphene is an ideal material for high quality nanoelectromechanical resonators due to high Young's modulus, low mass, ability to sustain high in-plane strain, and unique electrical properties. In this work, atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition is employed to obtain monolayer graphene on copper. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman imaging and two-terminal electrical measurements reveal the presence of high quality, monolayer graphene. The graphene is transferred to Si/SiO2 substrate and electron beam lithography is used to fabricate suspended doubly-clamped resonators. The devices are electrostatically actuated and their motion is read out using nonlinear mixing of graphene's electrical conductivity. Modeling the devices as Duffing resonators shows the presence of mechanical nonlinearity in response to an applied force even at moderate bias voltages. We discuss implications of this nonlinearity for parametric amplification, mode-mixing and the generation and measurement of squeezed thermomechanical states. The models are compared with experimental data and prospects for developing measurement techniques for high precision sensors and quantum-limited mechanical measurements of graphene are explored.

  12. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-02-11

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems.

  13. Broadband perfect light trapping in the thinnest monolayer graphene-MoS2 photovoltaic cell: the new application of spectrum-splitting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Ben; Yang, Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2016-02-01

    The light absorption of a monolayer graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic (GM-PV) cell in a wedge-shaped microcavity with a spectrum-splitting structure is investigated theoretically. The GM-PV cell, which is three times thinner than the traditional photovoltaic cell, exhibits up to 98% light absorptance in a wide wavelength range. This rate exceeds the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells. The effects of defect layer thickness, GM-PV cell position in the microcavity, incident angle, and lens aberration on the light absorptance of the GM-PV cell are explored. Despite these effects, the GM-PV cell can still achieve at least 90% light absorptance with the current technology. Our proposal provides different methods to design light-trapping structures and apply spectrum-splitting systems.

  14. Small-size effect on wrinkle and fracture of monolayer graphene subjected to in-plane shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhong; Guo, Xingming; Lu, Lu

    2017-11-01

    Controlling surface patterns are useful in a wide range of applications including flexible electronics, biological templates, microelectromechanical systems and device fabrication. The present paper investigates the wrinkling and fracture of graphene subjected to in-plane shear. It is found that the size of a graphene sheet has significant effect on the wrinkle and fracture based on both molecular dynamics simulation and nonlocal plate theory. The analytical expressions for wrinkle amplitude and wavelength are deduced. The nonlocal parameter of nonlocal plate theory is evaluated. Furthermore, the higher aspect ratio has enhanced the wrinkle resistance and shear strength of graphene. Temperature and chirality have insignificant impact on the wrinkling, but significantly influence the fracture of the graphene sheet. This work is expected to provide a better understanding of the mechanism of nanometer scale wrinkles.

  15. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  16. Analysis of small biomolecules and xenobiotic metabolism using converted graphene-like monolayer plates and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunook; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2017-06-01

    We report a method of small molecule analysis using a converted graphene-like monolayer (CGM) plate and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) without organic matrices. The CGM plate was prepared from self-assembled monolayers of biphenyl-4-thiol on gold using electron beam irradiation followed by an annealing step. The above plate was utilized for the LDI-TOF MS analyses of various small molecules and their mixtures, e.g., amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, oligoethylene glycols, and flavonoids. The CGM plate afforded high signal-to-noise ratios, good limits of detection (1pmol to 10fmol), and reusability for up to 30 cycles. As a practical application, the enzymatic activity of the cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) enzyme in human liver microsomes was assessed in the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin using the CGM plate without other purification steps. We believe that the prepared CGM plate can be practically used with the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, and reusability for the matrix-free analysis of small biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  18. Adsorption of gas molecules on graphene-like InN monolayer: A first-principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiang; Yang, Qun [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Meng, Ruishen [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Tan, Chunjian [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Liang, Qiuhua [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Jiang, Junke [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Ye, Huaiyu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Chen, Xianping, E-mail: xianpingchen@cqu.edu.cn [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive adsorption mechanism of InN monolayer is theoretical studied to distinguish the physic/chemi-sorption. • Different adsorption sites for different gases are systematically discussed. • The influence (enhanced or weakened) of external electric field to InN-gas system is well investigated. • The influences of gas adsorption to the optical properties (work function and light adsorption ability) of InN monolayer are also researched. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculation within density functional theory (DFT), we study the gas (CO, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}, NO, SO{sub 2}) adsorption properties on the surface of single-layer indium nitride (InN). Four different adsorption sites (Bridge, In, N, Hollow) are chosen to explore the most sensitive adsorption site. On the basis of the adsorption energy, band gap and charge transfer, we find that the most energetic favourable site is changeable between In site and N site for different gases. Moreover, our results reveal that InN is sensitive to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and NO{sub 2}, by a physisorption or a chemisorption nature. We also perform a perpendicular electric field to the system and find that the applied electric field has a significant effect for the adsorption process. Besides, we also observed the desorption effects on NH{sub 3} adsorbed at the hollow site of InN when the electric field applied. In addition, the optical properties of InN monolayer affected by different gases are also discussed. Most of the gas adsorptions will cause the inhibition of light adsorption while the others can reduce the work function or enhance the adsorption ability in visible region. Our theoretical results indicate that monolayer InN is a promising candidate for gas sensing applications.

  19. Voltage-controlled enhancement of optical absorption in a graphene monolayer with a one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Mao-Ting; Zheng, Gai-Ge

    2017-09-01

    The structure of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PhC) with a graphene-based defect is proposed and investigated to enhance the optical response of graphene in the visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region. An electro-optical (EO) tuning material lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) is selected as the spacer layer with an external voltage applied on it. By means of the transfer-matrix method (TMM), the dependence of the absorption characteristics on the incident angle and period numbers is analyzed. The possibility of the resonant wavelength being tunable via the external voltage and thickness of the LN layer is also discussed. It is shown that nearly perfect absorption can be achieved by a certain choice of the period numbers of the 1D-PhC surrounding the defect layer at a specific incidence. The linear relation between the peak wavelength and the applied external voltage is also demonstrated, and it is possible to control the position and number of the resonant wavelengths by varying the voltage and thickness of the LN defect layer.

  20. Charge transfer modeling in monolayer circular graphene quantum dots-ZnO nanowires system for application in photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamandani, Shahryar; Darvish, Ghafar

    2017-01-01

    We investigate electron transport between circular graphene quantum dots (CGQDs) and ZnO nanowires (ZnO NWs). This structure can be used as donor and acceptor in hybrid solar cells. We consider circular quantum dots (QDs) and use analytical calculation in order to estimate wavefunctions of GQD and ZnO NWs. After calculating the wavefunctions overlap, we use Marcus relation in order to calculate electron transfer rate. Also, we calculate this transfer rate for CdSe QDs-ZnO NWs system. Results from analytical calculation show that the transfer rate is limited to 1013 s-1. This result is in agreement with experimental results which are reported earlier. Such systems could be suitable for solar cells.

  1. Large scale integration of CVD-graphene based NEMS with narrow distribution of resonance parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmandi-Tash, Hadi; Allain, Adrien; (Vitto Han, Zheng; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of the arrays of suspended micron-sized membranes, based on monolayer pulsed-CVD graphene. Such devices are the source of an efficient integration of graphene nano-electro-mechanical resonators, compatible with production at the wafer scale using standard photolithography and processing tools. As the graphene surface is continuously protected by the same polymer layer during the whole process, suspended graphene membranes are clean and free of imperfections such as deposits, wrinkles and tears. Batch fabrication of 100 μm-long multi-connected suspended ribbons is presented. At room temperature, mechanical resonance of electrostatically-actuated devices show narrow distribution of their characteristic parameters with high quality factor and low effective mass and resonance frequencies, as expected for low stress and adsorbate-free membranes. Upon cooling, a sharp increase of both resonant frequency and quality factor is observed, enabling to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of CVD graphene. Comparison with state-of-the-art graphene NEMS is presented.

  2. Adsorption of 3d transition metal atoms on graphene-like gallium nitride monolayer: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Xiang; Li, Han-Fei; Yang, Xu; Wen, Jun-Qing; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2018-03-01

    We study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) adsorbed GaN monolayer (GaN-ML) using first-principles calculations. The results show that, for 6 different TM adatoms, the most stable adsorption sites are the same. The adsorption of TM atoms results in significant lattice distortions. A covalent chemical bonding character between TM adatom and GaN-ML is found in TM adsorbed systems. Except for Ni adsorbed system, all TM adsorbed systems show spin polarization implying that the adsorption of TM induces magnetization. The magnetic moments of the adsorbed systems are concentrated on the TM adatoms and the nearest-neighbor N atoms of the adsorption site contributed slightly. Our analysis shows that the GaN-ML properties can be effectively modulated by TM adsorption, and exhibit various electronic and magnetic properties, such as magnetic metals (Fe adsorption), half-metal (Co adsorption), and spin gapless semiconductor (Cu adsorption). These present properties of TM adsorbed GaN-ML may be of value in electronics and spintronics applications.

  3. Graphene Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Si Ping; McEuen, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Graphene, which features unparalleled in-plane strength and low out-of-plane bending energy, is an ideal material with which to tackle the challenge of building three-dimensional structures and moving parts at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrate laser-induced folding and scrolling of large-area monolayer graphene in solution. Monolayer graphene is typically well-adhered to its substrate, but we have achieved control of the adhesion using a combination of an aluminum sacrificial layer and surfactants. Once the graphene can move, local heating with an infrared laser and the interfacial tension of laser-nucleated bubbles allow us to lift, fold, and scroll the graphene. We have also formed a regular array of polymer dots on the graphene surface which can be easily imaged in three dimensions, allowing us to optically track the shape of the graphene as it moves. And finally, we establish graphene's viability as a strong but flexible sheet hinge by building and manipulating structures of rigid metallic panels connected by strips of graphene.

  4. Processing of monolayer materials via interfacial reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2014-05-20

    A method of forming and processing of graphene is disclosed based on exposure and selective intercalation of the partially graphene-covered metal substrate with atomic or molecular intercalation species such as oxygen (O.sub.2) and nitrogen oxide (NO.sub.2). The process of intercalation lifts the strong metal-carbon coupling and restores the characteristic Dirac behavior of isolated monolayer graphene. The interface of graphene with metals or metal-decorated substrates also provides for controlled chemical reactions based on novel functionality of the confined space between a metal surface and a graphene sheet.

  5. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  6. Monolayer ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zangi, R; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    We report results from molecular dynamics simulations of water under confinement and at ambient conditions that predict a first-order freezing transition from a monolayer of liquid water to a monolayer of ice induced by increasing the distance between the confining parallel plates. Since a slab

  7. Physics of graphene

    CERN Document Server

    S Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a state of the art report of the results of graphene research, one of the fastest-moving topics on condensed-matter physics. Covers not only transport but optical and other properties of multilayer as well as monolayer graphene systems.

  8. Cryomicroscopy of radiation sensitive specimens on unmodified graphene sheets: reduction of electron-optical effects of charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Kasim; Stopps, Martyn; Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    Images of radiation-sensitive specimens obtained by electron microscopy suffer a reduction in quality beyond that expected from radiation damage alone due to electron beam-induced charging or movement of the specimen. For biological specimens, charging and movement are most severe when they are suspended in an insulating layer of vitreous ice, which is otherwise optimal for preserving hydrated specimens in a near native state. We image biological specimens, including a single particle protein complex and a lipid-enveloped virus in thin, vitreous ice films over suspended sheets of unmodified graphene. We show that in such preparations, the charging of ice, as assessed by electron-optical perturbation of the imaging beam, is eliminated. We also use the same specimen supports to record high resolution images at liquid nitrogen temperature of monolayer paraffin crystals grown over graphene. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cryomicroscopy of radiation sensitive specimens on unmodified graphene sheets: Reduction of electron-optical effects of charging☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Kasim; Stopps, Martyn; Calder, Lesley J.; Rosenthal, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Images of radiation-sensitive specimens obtained by electron microscopy suffer a reduction in quality beyond that expected from radiation damage alone due to electron beam-induced charging or movement of the specimen. For biological specimens, charging and movement are most severe when they are suspended in an insulating layer of vitreous ice, which is otherwise optimal for preserving hydrated specimens in a near native state. We image biological specimens, including a single particle protein complex and a lipid-enveloped virus in thin, vitreous ice films over suspended sheets of unmodified graphene. We show that in such preparations, the charging of ice, as assessed by electron-optical perturbation of the imaging beam, is eliminated. We also use the same specimen supports to record high resolution images at liquid nitrogen temperature of monolayer paraffin crystals grown over graphene. PMID:23664842

  10. Suspended microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jean BERTHIER; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale...

  11. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B; Ionescu, Adrian M; Mosig, Juan R; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection...

  12. Magnetothermoelectric transport in modulated and unmodulated graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, R.; Sabeeh, K.

    2011-01-01

    We draw motivation from recent experimental studies and present a comprehensive study of magnetothermoelectric transport in a graphene monolayer within the linear response regime. We employ the modified Kubo formalism developed for thermal transport in a magnetic field. Thermopower as well as thermal conductivity as a function of the gate voltage of a graphene monolayer in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene plane is determined for low magnetic fields (~1 Tesla) as ...

  13. Tunable Band Gaps of Mono-layer Hexagonal BNC Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qing; Zamiri, Amir; De, Suvranu

    2011-01-01

    Bandgap engineering by substituting C with B and N atoms in graphene has been shown to be a promising way to improve semiconducting properties of graphene. Such hybridized monolayers consisting of hexagonal BN phases in graphene (h-BNC) have been recently synthesized and char- acterized. In this paper, we present an ab initio density functional theory (DFT)-based study of h-BN domain size effect on band gap of mono-layer h-BNC heterostructures. The atomic structures, electronic band structure...

  14. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  15. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Timothy J.

    2017-07-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error to the rms vibrational amplitudes of carbon atoms in bulk graphite. Our first-principles calculations of the phonon bands in graphene/hBN heterostructures show that the flexural acoustic phonon mode is localized predominantly in the hBN layer. Consequently, the flexural displacement of the atoms in the graphene layer is strongly suppressed when it is supported by hBN, and this effect increases when graphene is fully encapsulated.

  16. Effects of low energy E-beam irradiation on graphene and graphene field effect transistors and raman metrology of graphene on split gate test structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gayathri S.

    2011-12-01

    Apart from its compelling performance in conventional nanoelectronic device geometries, graphene is an appropriate candidate to study certain interesting phenomenon (e.g. the Veselago lens effect) predicted on the basis of its linear electron dispersion relation. A key requirement for the observation of such phenomenon in graphene and for its use in conventional field-effect transistor (FET) devices is the need to minimize defects such as consisting of -- or resulting from -- adsorbates and lattice non-uniformities, and reduce deleterious substrate effects. Consequently the investigation of the origin and interaction of defects in the graphene lattice is essential to improve and tailor graphene-based device performance. In this thesis, optical spectroscopic studies on the influence of low-energy electron irradiation on adsorbate-induced defectivity and doping for substrate supported and suspended graphene were carried out along with spectroscopic and transport measurements on graphene FETs. A comparative investigation of the effects of single-step versus multi-step, low-energy electron irradiation (500 eV) on suspended, substrate supported graphene and on graphene FETs is reported. E-beam irradiation (single-step and multi-step) of substrate-supported graphene resulted in an increase in the Raman ID/IG ratio largely from hydrogenation due to radiolysis of the interfacial water layer between the graphene and the SiO2 substrate and from irradiated surface adsorbates. GFETs subjected to single and multi-step irradiation showed n-doping from CNP (charge neutrality point) shift of ˜ -8 and ˜ -16 V respectively. Correlation of this data with Raman analysis of suspended and supported graphene samples implied a strong role of the substrate and irradiation sequence in determining the level of doping. A correspondingly higher reduction in mobility per incident electron was also observed for GFETs subjected to multi-step irradiation compared to single step, in line with

  17. Great light absorption enhancement in a graphene photodetector integrated with a metamaterial perfect absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shichao; Chen, Qin; Jin, Lin; Sun, Fuhe

    2013-10-21

    A novel graphene photodetector with graphene embedded in a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) is proposed and its light absorption property is numerically investigated. Absorption above 40% in graphene is obtained, which is over 17 times that of a bare monolayer graphene. Both horizontally and vertically cascaded MPAs integrated with graphene are also investigated.

  18. Perforated monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regen, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research program is to create ultrathin organic membranes that possess uniform and adjustable pores ( < 7[angstrom] diameter). Such membranes are expected to possess high permeation selectivity (permselectivity) and high permeability, and to provide the basis for energy-efficient methods of molecular separation. Work carried out has demonstrated feasibility of using perforated monolayer''-based composites as molecular sieve membranes. Specifically, composite membranes derived from Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers of the calix[6]arene-based surfactant shown below plus poly[l-(trimethylsilyl)-l-propyne] (PTMSP) were found to exhibit sieving behavior towards He, N[sub 2] and SF[sub 6]. Results of derivative studies that have also been completed are also described in this report.

  19. Graphene superstrates for metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Papasimakis, N.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z.X.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Nikolaenko, A.E.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a photonic metamaterial are dramatically modified by a graphene monolayer superstrate. The strong polarizability of the graphene layer combined with the Fano-type, resonant plasmonic modes supported by the metamaterial leads to substantial red-shift of the narrow metamaterial resonances. These frequency shifts translate to multi-fold increase in the measured transmission at a specific wavelength. In our experiments we used chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graph...

  20. Rippling instabilities in suspended nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Upmanyu, Moneesh

    2012-11-01

    Morphology mediates the interplay between the structure and electronic transport in atomically thin nanoribbons such as graphene as the relaxation of edge stresses occurs preferentially via out-of-plane deflections. In the case of end-supported suspended nanoribbons that we study here, past experiments and computations have identified a range of equilibrium morphologies, in particular, for graphene flakes, yet a unified understanding of their relative stability remains elusive. Here, we employ atomic-scale simulations and a composite framework based on isotropic elastic plate theory to chart out the morphological stability space of suspended nanoribbons with respect to intrinsic (ribbon elasticity) and engineered (ribbon geometry) parameters, and the combination of edge and body actuation. The computations highlight a rich morphological shape space that can be naturally classified into two competing shapes, bendinglike and twistlike, depending on the distribution of ripples across the interacting edges. The linearized elastic framework yields exact solutions for these rippled shapes. For compressive edge stresses, the body strain emerges as a key variable that controls their relative stability and in extreme cases stabilizes coexisting transverse ripples. Tensile edge stresses lead to dimples within the ribbon core that decay into the edges, a feature of obvious significance for stretchable nanoelectronics. The interplay between geometry and mechanics that we report should serve as a key input for quantifying the transport along these ribbons.

  1. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  2. Ultrafast laser patterning of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Lin, Chih-Lang; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the recent results in ultrafast (femtoseconds and picoseconds) pulsed laser patterning of graphene films (single layer graphene, graphene oxide (GO)). We investigated such effects of nonlinear optical interaction like selective laser ablation of graphene, laser reduction of graphene oxide and local functionalization (oxidation) of graphene based on multiphoton absorption for microelectrode patterning. The graphene oxide and reduction was demonstrated under femtosecond laser pulses as well as fine ablation for monolayer GO films under ps laser pulses. We demonstrated the patterned laser reduction over the GO film leads to minimum in resistance for laser fluence because of interplay of chemical and thermal effects in carbon lattice and photons. The micro-scale patterns in graphene on SiO2 substrates were fabricated using ultrashort 515 nm laser pulses. For both picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses two competitive processes, based on photo-thermal (ablation) and photochemical (oxidation/etching) effects, were observed. The laser-induced etching of graphene starts just below the threshold energy of graphene ablation. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. Patterned graphene was investigated by AFM, microRaman, SEM and sheet resistance measurements and other techniques. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. The comprehensive models of graphene oxidation/reduction are suggested.

  3. Macroscale tribological properties of fluorinated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Kento; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Choi, Junho

    2018-02-01

    Because graphene is carbon material and has excellent mechanical characteristics, its use as ultrathin lubrication protective films for machine elements is greatly expected. The durability of graphene strongly depends on the number of layers and the load scale. For use in ultrathin lubrication protective films for machine elements, it is also necessary to maintain low friction and high durability under macroscale loads in the atmosphere. In this study, we modified the surfaces of both monolayer and multilayer graphene by fluorine plasma treatment and examined the friction properties and durability of the fluorinated graphene under macroscale load. The durability of both monolayer and multilayer graphene improved by the surface fluorination owing to the reduction of adhesion forces between the friction interfaces. This occurs because the carbon film containing fluorine is transferred to the friction-mating material, and thus friction acts between the two carbon films containing fluorine. On the other hand, the friction coefficient decreased from 0.20 to 0.15 by the fluorine plasma treatment in the multilayer graphene, whereas it increased from 0.21 to 0.27 in the monolayer graphene. It is considered that, in the monolayer graphene, the change of the surface structure had a stronger influence on the friction coefficient than in the multilayer graphene, and the friction coefficient increased mainly due to the increase in defects on the graphene surface by the fluorine plasma treatment.

  4. Structural and dynamic characteristics in monolayer square ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, YinBo; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2017-07-28

    When water is constrained between two sheets of graphene, it becomes an intriguing monolayer solid with a square pattern due to the ultrahigh van der Waals pressure. However, the square ice phase has become a matter of debate due to the insufficient experimental interpretation and the slightly rhomboidal feature in simulated monolayer square-like structures. Here, we performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to reveal monolayer square ice in graphene nanocapillaries from the perspective of structure and dynamic characteristics. Monolayer square-like ice (instantaneous snapshot), assembled square-rhombic units with stacking faults, is a long-range ordered structure, in which the square and rhombic units are assembled in an order of alternative distribution, and the other rhombic unit forms stacking faults (polarized water chains). Spontaneous flipping of water molecules in monolayer square-like ice is intrinsic and induces transformations among different elementary units, resulting in the structural evolution of monolayer square ice in dynamics. The existence of stacking faults should be attributed to the spontaneous flipping behavior of water molecules under ambient temperature. Statistical averaging results (thermal average positions) demonstrate the inherent square characteristic of monolayer square ice. The simulated data and insight obtained here might be significant for understanding the topological structure and dynamic behavior of monolayer square ice.

  5. Methanol Adsorption on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsebeth Schröder

    2013-01-01

    bonds like the covalent and hydrogen bonds. The adsorption of a single methanol molecule and small methanol clusters on graphene is studied at various coverages. Adsorption in clusters or at high coverages (less than a monolayer is found to be preferable, with the methanol C-O axis approximately parallel to the plane of graphene. The adsorption energies calculated with vdW-DF are compared with previous DFT-D and MP2-based calculations for single methanol adsorption on flakes of graphene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For the high coverage adsorption energies, we also find reasonably good agreement with previous desorption measurements.

  6. Highly efficient synthesis of graphene nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haixiong; Ehlert, Gregory J; Lin, Yirong; Sodano, Henry A

    2012-01-11

    Graphene consists of a monolayer of sp(2) bonded carbon atoms and has attracted considerable interest over recent years due to its extreme mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Graphene nanocomposites have naturally begun to be studied to capitalize upon these properties. A range of complex chemical and physical processing methods have been devised that achieve isolated graphene sheets that attempt to prevent aggregation. Here we demonstrate that the simple casting of a polymer solution containing dispersed graphene oxide, followed by thermal reduction, can produce well-isolated monolayer reduced-graphene oxide. The presence of single layer reduced-graphene oxide is quantitatively demonstrated through transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction studies and the reduction is verified by thermogravimetric, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectrum, and electrical conductivity studies. These findings provide a simple, environmentally benign and commercially viable process to produce reduced-graphene oxide reinforced polymers without complex manufacturing, dispersion or reduction processes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. My Spring with Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Timothy Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Graphene is a two-dimensional structure, one atom thick, with many uses in the world of technology. It has many useful electrical properties, is a very strong and durable material, and can be used to protect different types of substances. The world would be able to use these properties to further the strength of cars, protect metals from oxidation, increase computer speeds, use to improve superconductors, and whatever future uses that scientist invent or discover. We sought to optimize the growth and transfer of graphene. We grew graphene on copper foils by heating the foil in a furnace, and having various gases flow through a tube, where the copper foil was placed. We varied some of the concentrations of gases, along with having different times for heating the copper foil, different times for graphene growth, or a combination of the two. The focus of our experiment was to specifically grow monolayer single crystal graphene, which means that we do not want multiplayers of graphene, and do not want multiple crystals growing to form a bigger crystal. Our goal was to grow large single crystals from the growth experiment. We used a few different types of transfer methods that ranged from: using heat and pressure to press the graphene on different materials, using a polymer to cover the graphene with a method to destroy the copper, but leave the graphene and polymer intact, and using a type of heat tape with a combination of varying pressures to transfer the graphene, and then destroy the copper foil. To discover if we grew graphene we used different techniques involving lasers and microscopes to take different types of measurements. Discovering the best way of growing and transferring graphene will help with managing the cost of the future uses of graphene.

  8. Substrate-induced solvent intercalation for stable graphene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ho; Yang, Jae Won; Jo, Sae Byeok; Kang, Boseok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Bong, Hyojin; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S; Cho, Kilwon

    2013-02-26

    Here, we report a substrate-induced intercalation phenomenon of an organic solvent at the interface between monolayer graphene and a target substrate. A simple dipping of the transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene on the SiO₂ substrate into chloroform (CHCl₃, CF), a common organic solvent, induces a spontaneous formation of CF clusters beneath the basal plane of the graphene as well as inside the wrinkles. The microscopic and spectroscopic observations showed the doping behavior of monolayer graphene, which indicates the adsorption of CF to monolayer graphene. Interestingly, the intercalated organic solvent showed remarkable stability for over 40 days under ambient conditions. To reveal the underlying mechanism of the stable solvent intercalation, desorption energy of CF molecules at the graphene/substrate interface was measured using Arrhenius plots of the conductance change upon time and temperature. Two stages of solvent intercalations with high desorption energies (70 and 370 meV) were observed along with the consecutive shrinkage of the solvent clusters at the basal plane and the wrinkles, respectively. Moreover, the theoretical calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) also shows the strong intercalation energy of CF between monolayer graphene and the SiO₂ substrate, which results from the stabilization of the graphene-SiO₂ interactions. Furthermore, the thermal response of the conductance could be utilized to maintain a certain degree of p-doping of monolayer graphene, which provides the facile, sustainable, and controllable large-area doping method of graphene for future generation of printed flexible electronics.

  9. Plasmon polaritons in nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its unique electronic and optical properties. When graphene is electrically/chemically doped, it can support surface plasmon where the light propagates along the surface with a very short wavelength and an extremely small mode volume. The optical...... properties of graphene can be tuned by electrical gating, thus proving a promising way to realize a tunable plasmonic material. We firstly investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides, and show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided...... that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. Then we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The silicon grating is realized by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self...

  10. Direct transfer of graphene films for polyurethane substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilani, C.; Romani, E.C.; Larrudé, D.G. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barbosa, Gelza M. [Diretoria de Sistemas de Armas da Marinha, Marinha do Brasil, 20010-00 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L., E-mail: lazaro@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by CVD using copper foils as substrates. • Monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene were transferred to PU. • Samples were characterized by Raman and optical spectroscopies. • PU/monolayer graphene has transmittance around 80% in visible range. - Abstract: We have proposed the direct transfer of large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to polymeric substrate by evaporating of solvents of polyurethane/tetrahydrofurane solution. The graphene films on polyurethane substrates were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical and atomic force microscopies and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements. The Raman spectra revealed that it is possible to transfer in a controlled manner monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene films over polyurethane substrate.

  11. Wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Park, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Joung Real; Ju, Sanghyun

    2014-12-01

    The wetting control of graphene is of great interest for electronic, mechanical, architectural, and bionic applications. In this study, the wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures was manipulated by changing the height of graphene-laminated structures and employing the trichlorosilane (HDF-S)-based self-assembly monolayer. Graphene-laminated micropillar structures with HDF-S exhibited higher hydrophobicity (contact angle of 129.5°) than pristine graphene thin film (78.8°), pristine graphene-laminated micropillar structures (97.5°), and HDF-S self-assembled graphene thin film (98.5°). Wetting states of the graphene-laminated micropillar structure with HDF-S was also examined by using a urea solution, which flowed across the surface without leaving any residues.

  12. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Au-based monolayer derivatives in honeycomb structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Pooja, E-mail: pupooja16@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Centre for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, India, 151001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We present electronic properties of atomic layer of Au, Au{sub 2}-N, Au{sub 2}-O and Au{sub 2}-F in graphene-like structure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constant of derived monolayers are found to be higher than the pristine Au monolayer. Au monolayer is metallic in nature with quantum ballistic conductance calculated as 4G{sub 0}. Similarly, Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers show 4G{sub 0} and 2G{sub 0} quantum conductance respectively while semiconducting nature with calculated band gap of 0.28 eV has been observed for Au{sub 2}-O monolayer. Most interestingly, half metalicity has been predicted for Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers. Our findings may have importance for the application of these monolayers in nanoelectronic and spintronics.

  13. Electronic transmission in Graphene suppressed by interlayer interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Valencia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate electronic transport property of a graphene monolayer covered by a graphene nanoribbon. We demonstrate that electronic transmission of a monolayer can be reduced when covered by a nanoribbon. The energy at which the transmission reduction occurs depends on the width of nanoribbon. We explain the transmission reduction as interference between wavefunctions in the monolayer and the nanoribbon. Furthermore, we show that the transmission reduction of a monolayer is combinable when covered by more than one nanoribbon and we propose a concept of “combination of control” for possible nano-application designs.

  14. Liquid phase production of graphene by exfoliation of graphite in surfactant/water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotya, Mustafa; Hernandez, Yenny; King, Paul J; Smith, Ronan J; Nicolosi, Valeria; Karlsson, Lisa S; Blighe, Fiona M; De, Sukanta; Wang, Zhiming; McGovern, I T; Duesberg, Georg S; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2009-03-18

    We have demonstrated a method to disperse and exfoliate graphite to give graphene suspended in water-surfactant solutions. Optical characterization of these suspensions allowed the partial optimization of the dispersion process. Transmission electron microscopy showed the dispersed phase to consist of small graphitic flakes. More than 40% of these flakes had flakes consisting of monolayers. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy shows the monolayers to be generally free of defects. The dispersed graphitic flakes are stabilized against reaggregation by Coulomb repulsion due to the adsorbed surfactant. We use DLVO and Hamaker theory to describe this stabilization. However, the larger flakes tend to sediment out over approximately 6 weeks, leaving only small flakes dispersed. It is possible to form thin films by vacuum filtration of these dispersions. Raman and IR spectroscopic analysis of these films suggests the flakes to be largely free of defects and oxides, although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a small oxide population. Individual graphene flakes can be deposited onto mica by spray coating, allowing statistical analysis of flake size and thickness. Vacuum filtered films are reasonably conductive and are semitransparent. Further improvements may result in the development of cheap transparent conductors.

  15. Mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Yağmurcukardeş, Mehmet; Senger, Ramazan Tuğrul; Peeters, François M.; Şahin, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of monolayer GaS and GaSe crystals are investigated in terms of their elastic constants: in-plane stiffness (C), Poisson ratio (ν), and ultimate strength (σU) by means of first-principles calculations. The calculated elastic constants are compared with those of graphene and monolayer MoS2. Our results indicate that monolayer GaS is a stiffer material than monolayer GaSe crystals due to the more ionic character of the Ga-S bonds than the Ga-Se bonds. Although their Po...

  16. Silicon-nitride photonic circuits interfaced with monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Guohua [Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Stanev, Teodor K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P., E-mail: n-stern@northwestern.edu [Applied Physics Program, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    We report on the integration of monolayer molybdenum disulphide with silicon nitride microresonators assembled by visco-elastic layer transfer techniques. Evanescent coupling from the resonator mode to the monolayer is confirmed through measurements of cavity transmission. The absorption of the monolayer semiconductor flakes in this geometry is determined to be 850 dB/cm, which is larger than that of graphene and black phosphorus with the same thickness. This technique can be applied to diverse monolayer semiconductors for assembling hybrid optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and modulators operating over a wide spectral range.

  17. Silicon-nitride photonic circuits interfaced with monolayer MoS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Guohua; Stanev, Teodor K.; Czaplewski, David; Jung, Il Woong; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    2015-01-01

    We report integration of monolayer molybdenum disulphide with silicon nitride microresonators assembled by visco-elastic layer transfer techniques. Evanescent coupling from the resonator mode to the monolayer is confirmed through measurements of cavity transmission. The absorption of the monolayer semiconductor flakes in this geometry is determined to be 850 dB/cm, which is larger than that of graphene and black phosphorus with the same thickness. This technique can be applied to diverse monolayer semiconductors for assembling hybrid optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and modulators operating over a wide spectrum range.

  18. Electron-phonon coupling in quasi free-standing graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christian Johannsen, Jens; Ulstrup, Søren; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Quasi free-standing monolayer graphene can be produced by intercalating species like oxygen or hydrogen between epitaxial graphene and the substrate crystal. If the graphene is indeed decoupled from the substrate, one would expect the observation of a similar electronic dispersion and many......-body effects, irrespective of the substrate and the material used to achieve the decoupling. Here we investigate the electron-phonon coupling in two different types of quasi free-standing monolayer graphene: decoupled from SiC via hydrogen intercalation and decoupled from Ir via oxygen intercalation. Both...

  19. Smart antennas based on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea, E-mail: mircea.dragoman@imt.ro [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnology (IMT), P.O. Box 38-160, 023573 Bucharest (Romania); Dragoman, Daniela [Physics Faculty, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-09-21

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  20. A coarse-grained molecular model of graphene: application to graphene-based multilayered nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Single-layer graphene exhibits remarkable electronic and thermal properties and it is the strongest material known, thus it offers great promise for a broad range of nanotechnological applications. Despite the exceptional properties exhibited by pristine graphene monolayers, harnessing the mechanical performance of single-sheets at larger length scales or for higher material hierarchies (e.g., graphene paper) remains a bottleneck. One promising strategy is to enhance the interlayer shear stre...

  1. Multiscale mechanics of graphene oxide and graphene based composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changhong

    The mechanical behavior of graphene oxide is length scale dependent: orders of magnitude different between the bulk forms and monolayer counterparts. Understanding the underlying mechanisms plays a significant role in their versatile application. A systematic multiscale mechanical study from monolayer to multilayer, including the interactions between layers of GO, can provide fundamental support for material engineering. In this thesis, an experimental coupled with simulation approach was used to study the multiscale mechanics of graphene oxide (GO) and the methods developed for GO study are proved to be applicable also to mechanical study of graphene based composites. GO is a layered nanomaterial comprised of hierarchical units whose characteristic dimension lies between monolayer GO (0.7 nm - 1.2 nm) and bulk GO papers (≥ 1 mum). Mechanical behaviors of monolayer GO and GO nanosheets (10 nm- 100 nm) were comprehensively studied this work. Monolayer GO was measured to have an average strength of 24.7 GPa,, orders of magnitude higher than previously reported values for GO paper and approximately 50% of the 2D intrinsic strength of pristine graphene. The huge discrepancy between the strength of monolayer GO and that of bulk GO paper motivated the study of GO at the intermediate length scale (GO nanosheets). Experimental results showed that GO nanosheets possess high strength in the gigapascal range. Molecular Dynamic simulations showed that the transition in the failure behavior from interplanar fracture to intraplanar fracture was responsible for the huge strength discrepancy between nanometer scale GO and bulk GO papers. Additionally, the interfacial shear strength between GO layers was found to be a key contributing factor to the distinct mechanical behavior among hierarchical units of GO. The understanding of the multiscale mechanics of GO is transferrable in heterogeneous layered nanomaterials, such as graphene-metal oxide based anode materials in Li

  2. Preparation of graphene by electrical explosion of graphite sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Hao; Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Chen, Pengwan

    2017-08-03

    Graphene nanosheets were produced by electrical explosion of high-purity graphite sticks in distilled water at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by various techniques to find different forms of carbon phases, including graphite nanosheets, few-layer graphene, and especially, mono-layer graphene with good crystallinity. Delicate control of energy injection is critical for graphene nanosheet formation, whereas mono-layer graphene was produced under the charging voltage of 22.5-23.5 kV. On the basis of electrical wire explosion and our experimental results, the underlying mechanism that governs the graphene generation was carefully illustrated. This work provides a simple but innovative route for producing graphene nanosheets.

  3. Thermal conductivity of a h-BCN monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Wei, Ning

    2017-10-18

    A hexagonal graphene-like boron-carbon-nitrogen (h-BCN) monolayer, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has been synthesized recently. Herein we investigate for the first time the thermal conductivity of this novel 2D material. Using molecular dynamics simulations based on the optimized Tersoff potential, we found that the h-BCN monolayers are isotropic in the basal plane with close thermal conductivity magnitudes. Though h-BCN has the same hexagonal lattice as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), it exhibits a much lower thermal conductivity than the latter two materials. In addition, the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers is found to be size-dependent but less temperature-dependent. Modulation of the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers can also be realized by strain engineering. Compressive strain leads to a monotonic decrease in the thermal conductivity while the tensile strain induces an up-then-down trend in the thermal conductivity. Surprisingly, the small tensile strain can facilitate the heat transport of the h-BCN monolayers.

  4. Graphene-Nanodiamond Heterostructures and their application to High Current Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Zhao; Andrei Vrajitoarea; Qi Jiang; Xiaoyu Han; Aysha Chaudhary; Welch, Joseph O.; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene on hydrogen terminated monolayer nanodiamond heterostructures provides a new way to improve carrier transport characteristics of the graphene, offering up to 60% improvement when compared with similar graphene on SiO2/Si substrates. These heterostructures offers excellent current-carrying abilities whilst offering the prospect of a fast, low cost and easy methodology for device applications. The use of ND monolayers is also a compatible technology for the support of large area graphe...

  5. Topological edge modes in multilayer graphene systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lixin; Wang, Li; Xiao, Meng; Wen, Weijia; Chan, C T; Han, Dezhuan

    2015-08-24

    Plasmons can be supported on graphene sheets as the Dirac electrons oscillate collectively. A tight-binding model for graphene plasmons is a good description as the field confinement in the normal direction is strong. With this model, the topological properties of plasmonic bands in multilayer graphene systems are investigated. The Zak phases of periodic graphene sheet arrays are obtained for different configurations. Analogous to Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model in electronic systems, topological edge plasmon modes emerge when two periodic graphene sheet arrays with different Zak phases are connected. Interestingly, the dispersion of these topological edge modes is the same as that in the monolayer graphene and is invariant as the geometric parameters of the structure such as the separation and period change. These plasmonic edge states in multilayer graphene systems can be further tuned by electrical gating or chemical doping.

  6. Topological edge modes in multilayer graphene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Lixin

    2015-08-10

    Plasmons can be supported on graphene sheets as the Dirac electrons oscillate collectively. A tight-binding model for graphene plasmons is a good description as the field confinement in the normal direction is strong. With this model, the topological properties of plasmonic bands in multilayer graphene systems are investigated. The Zak phases of periodic graphene sheet arrays are obtained for different configurations. Analogous to Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model in electronic systems, topological edge plasmon modes emerge when two periodic graphene sheet arrays with different Zak phases are connected. Interestingly, the dispersion of these topological edge modes is the same as that in the monolayer graphene and is invariant as the geometric parameters of the structure such as the separation and period change. These plasmonic edge states in multilayer graphene systems can be further tuned by electrical gating or chemical doping. © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  7. Negligible environmental sensitivity of graphene in a hexagonal boron nitride/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Zheyuan; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Brus, Louis E; Hone, James

    2012-10-23

    Using Raman spectroscopy, we study the environmental sensitivity of mechanically exfoliated and electrically floating single-layer graphene transferred onto a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate, in comparison with graphene deposited on a SiO(2) substrate. In order to understand and isolate the substrate effect on graphene electrical properties, we model and correct for Raman optical interference in the substrates. As-deposited and unannealed graphene shows a large I(2D)/I(G) ratio on both substrates, indicating extremely high quality, close to that of graphene suspended in vacuum. Thermal annealing strongly activates subsequent environmental sensitivity on the SiO(2) substrate; such activation is reduced but not eliminated on the h-BN substrate. In contrast, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, with graphene protected on both sides, graphene remains pristine despite thermal processing. Raman data provide a deeper understanding of the previously observed improved graphene electrical conductivity on h-BN substrates. In the sandwich structure, the graphene 2D Raman feature has a higher frequency and narrower line width than in pristine suspended graphene, implying that the local h-BN environment modestly yet measurably changes graphene electron and phonon dispersions.

  8. Methods of making monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA; Simmons, Kevin L [Kennewick, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA; Zemanian, Thomas S [Richland, WA; Liu, Jun [Albuquerque, NM; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Fryxell, Glen E [Kennewick, WA

    2009-12-08

    The invention pertains to methods of forming monolayers on various surfaces. The surfaces can be selected from a wide array of materials, including, for example, aluminum dioxide, silicon dioxide, carbon and SiC. The substrates can be planar or porous. The monolayer is formed under enhanced pressure conditions. The monolayer contains functionalized molecules, and accordingly functionalizes a surface of the substrate. The properties of the functionalized substrate can enhance the substrate's applicability for numerous purposes including, for example, utilization in extracting contaminants, or incorporation into a polymeric matrix.

  9. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  10. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  11. Graphene-Si heterogeneous nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwande, Deji; Tao, Li

    2013-05-01

    It is widely envisioned that graphene, an atomic sheet of carbon that has generated very broad interest has the largest prospects for flexible smart systems and for integrated graphene-silicon (G-Si) heterogeneous very large-scale integrated (VLSI) nanoelectronics. In this work, we focus on the latter and elucidate the research progress that has been achieved for integration of graphene with Si-CMOS including: wafer-scale graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition on Cu/SiO2/Si substrates, wafer-scale graphene transfer that afforded the fabrication of over 10,000 devices, wafer-scalable mitigation strategies to restore graphene's device characteristics via fluoropolymer interaction, and demonstrations of graphene integrated with commercial Si- CMOS chips for hybrid nanoelectronics and sensors. Metrology at the wafer-scale has led to the development of custom Raman processing software (GRISP) now available on the nanohub portal. The metrology reveals that graphene grown on 4-in substrates have monolayer quality comparable to exfoliated flakes. At room temperature, the high-performance passivated graphene devices on SiO2/Si can afford average mobilities 3000cm2/V-s and gate modulation that exceeds an order of magnitude. The latest growth research has yielded graphene with high mobilities greater than 10,000cm2/V-s on oxidized silicon. Further progress requires track compatible graphene-Si integration via wafer bonding in order to translate graphene research from basic to applied research in commercial R and D laboratories to ultimately yield a viable nanotechnology.

  12. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Ang-Yu

    2017-05-15

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  13. Robust ferromagnetism in monolayer chromium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunhong; Li, Yawei; Zhao, Tianshan; Wang, Qian

    2014-06-10

    Design and synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) materials with robust ferromagnetism and biocompatibility is highly desirable due to their potential applications in spintronics and biodevices. However, the hotly pursued 2D sheets including pristine graphene, monolayer BN, and layered transition metal dichalcogenides are nonmagnetic or weakly magnetic. Using biomimetic particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique combined with ab initio calculations we predict the existence of a 2D structure, a monolayer of rocksalt-structured CrN (100) surface, which is both ferromagnetic and biocompatible. Its dynamic, thermal and magnetic stabilities are confirmed by carrying out a variety of state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. Analyses of its band structure and density of states reveal that this material is half-metallic, and the origin of the ferromagnetism is due to p-d exchange interaction between the Cr and N atoms. We demonstrate that the displayed ferromagnetism is robust against thermal and mechanical perturbations. The corresponding Curie temperature is about 675 K which is higher than that of most previously studied 2D monolayers.

  14. Plasmons in Dimensionally Mismatched Coulomb Coupled Graphene Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badalyan, S. M.; Shylau, A. A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the plasmon dispersion relation for Coulomb coupled metallic armchair graphene nanoribbons and doped monolayer graphene. The crossing of the plasmon curves, which occurs for uncoupled 1D and 2D systems, is split by the interlayer Coulomb coupling into a lower and an upper plasmon...... by varying the system parameters and be used in plasmonic applications....

  15. Strain Relaxation of Graphene Layers by Cu Surface Roughening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Hyoun; Moon, Joonhee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yooseok; Jo, Insu; Jeon, Cheolho; Lee, Jouhahn; Hong, Byung Hee

    2016-10-03

    The surface morphology of copper (Cu) often changes after the synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Cu foil, which affects the electrical properties of graphene, as the Cu step bunches induce the periodic ripples on graphene that significantly disturb electrical conduction. However, the origin of the Cu surface reconstruction has not been completely understood yet. Here, we show that the compressive strain on graphene induced by the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient with Cu surface can be released by forming periodic Cu step bunching that depends on graphene layers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and the Raman analysis show the noticeably longer and higher step bunching of Cu surface under multilayer graphene and the weaker biaxial compressive strain on multilayer graphene compared to monolayer. We found that the surface areas of Cu step bunches under multilayer and monolayer graphene are increased by ∼1.41% and ∼0.77% compared to a flat surface, respectively, indicating that the compressive strain on multilayer graphene can be more effectively released by forming the Cu step bunching with larger area and longer periodicity. We believe that our finding on the strain relaxation of graphene layers by Cu step bunching formation would provide a crucial idea to enhance the electrical performance of graphene electrodes by controlling the ripple density of graphene.

  16. Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene from toluene on electropolished copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Piner, Richard; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Wu, Yaping; Li, Huifeng; Ji, Hengxing; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2012-03-27

    A two-step CVD route with toluene as the carbon precursor was used to grow continuous large-area monolayer graphene films on a very flat, electropolished Cu foil surface at 600 °C, lower than any temperature reported to date for growing continuous monolayer graphene. Graphene coverage is higher on the surface of electropolished Cu foil than that on the unelectropolished one under the same growth conditions. The measured hole and electron mobilities of the monolayer graphene grown at 600 °C were 811 and 190 cm(2)/(V·s), respectively, and the shift of the Dirac point was 18 V. The asymmetry in carrier mobilities can be attributed to extrinsic doping during the growth or transfer. The optical transmittance of graphene at 550 nm was 97.33%, confirming it was a monolayer, and the sheet resistance was ~8.02 × 10(3) Ω/□. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    CERN Document Server

    Satarifard, Vahid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assessed. Simulation results demonstrate the strong effect of the pore shape as well as geometrical symmetry on free energy barrier, orientations and dynamic of DNA translocation through graphene nanopore. Our study proposes that the symmetric circular geometry of monolayer graphene nanopore with high pulling velocity can be used for DNA sequencing.

  18. Interface thermal conductance of van der Waals monolayers on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Gabriela C.; Foss, Cameron J.; Aksamija, Zlatan

    2017-03-01

    Heterostructures based on atomic monolayers are emerging as leading materials for future energy efficient and multifunctional electronics. Due to the single atom thickness of monolayers, their properties are strongly affected by interactions with the external environment. We develop a model for interface thermal conductance (ITC) in an atomic monolayer van der Waals bonded to a disordered substrate. Graphene on SiO2 is initially used in our model and contrasted against available experimental data; the model is then applied to monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) on SiO2 substrate. Our findings show the dominant carrier of heat in both graphene and MoS2 in the cross-plane direction is the flexural (ZA) phonon mode, owing to the large overlap between graphene ZA and substrate vibrational density of states. The rate of phonon transfer across the interface depends quadratically on the substrate coupling constant K a , but this interaction also causes a lifting of the lowest flexural phonon modes. As a result, ITC depends roughly linearly on the strength of the coupling between a monolayer and its substrate. We conclude that, in both graphene and MoS2 on SiO2, substrate adhesion plays a strong role in determining ITC, requiring further study of substrate coupling in TMDCs.

  19. Photovoltage responses of graphene-Au heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ying, Xiangxiao; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Yadong; Liu, Zhijun

    2017-10-01

    As an emerging 2D material, graphene's several unique properties, such as high electron mobility, zero-bandgap and low density of states, present new opportunities for light detections. Here, we report on photovoltage responses of graphene-Au heterojunctions, which are made of monolayer graphene sheets atop Au electrodes designed as finger-shape and rectangle-shape, respectively. Besides confirming the critical role of space charge regions located at the graphene-Au boundary, photovoltage responses are measured in the visible to infrared spectral region with a cut-off wavelength at about 980 nm, which is likely imposed by the Pauli blocking of interband transition in the contact-doped graphene. The photoresponsivity is shown to decrease with increasing wavelength. A band diagram of the graphene-Au heterojunction is proposed to understand the photoresponse mechanism.

  20. Fabrication of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugawara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have succeeded in fabricating Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on silicon carbide. The low-energy electron diffraction from Li-deposited bilayer graphene shows a sharp 3×3R30° pattern in contrast to Li-deposited monolayer graphene. This indicates that Li atoms are intercalated between two adjacent graphene layers and take the same well-ordered superstructure as in bulk C6Li. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed that Li atoms are fully ionized and the π bands of graphene are systematically folded by the superstructure of intercalated Li atoms, producing a snowflake-like Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. The present result suggests a high potential of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene for application to a nano-scale Li-ion battery.

  1. EDITORIAL: Special issue on Graphene Special issue on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-03-01

    and effectively reflect the status of different areas of graphene research. The excitonic condensation in a double graphene system is discussed by Kharitonov and Efetov. Borca et al report on a method to fabricate and characterize graphene monolayers epitaxially grown on Ru(0001). Furthermore, the energy and transport gaps in etched graphene nanoribbons are analyzed experimentally by Molitor et al. Mucha-Kruczyński et al review the tight-binding model of bilayer graphene, whereas Wurm et al focus on a theoretical description of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in monolayer graphene rings. Screening effects and collective excitations are studied by Roldán et al. Subsequently, Palacios et al review the electronic and magnetic structures of graphene nanoribbons, a problem that is highly relevant for graphene-based transistors. Klein tunneling in single and multiple barriers in graphene is the topic of the review article by Pereira Jr et al, while De Martino and Egger discuss the spectrum of a magnetic quantum dot in graphene. Titov et al study the effect of resonant scatterers on the local density of states in a rectangular graphene setup with metallic leads. Finally, the resistance modulation of multilayer graphene controlled by gate electric fields is experimentally analyzed by Miyazaki et al. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, which combine new results and pedagogical discussions of the state-of-the-art in different areas: it is this combination that most often adds to the value of topical issues. Special thanks also goes to the staff of Institute of Physics Publishing for contributing to the success of this effort.

  2. Experimental realization of graphene-like borophene

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenbin; Kong, Longjuan; Chen, Caiyun; Gou, Jian; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Hui; Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-01-01

    We report a successful preparation of a purely honeycomb, graphene-like borophene, by using an Al(111) surface as the substrate and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth in ultrahigh vacuum. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveals perfect monolayer borophene with planar, non-buckled honeycomb lattice similar as graphene. Theoretical calculations show that the honeycomb borophene on Al(111) is energetically stable. Remarkably, nearly one electron charge is transferred to each boron atom ...

  3. Optical bistability of graphene in the terahertz range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Bludov, Yu V.; Santos, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    We use an exact solution of the relaxation-time Boltzmann equation in a uniform ac electric field to describe the nonlinear optical response of graphene in the terahertz (THz) range. The cases of monolayer, bilayer, and ABA-stacked trilayer graphene are considered, and the monolayer species...... is shown to be the most appropriate one to exploit the nonlinear free electron response. We find that a single layer of graphene shows optical bistability in the THz range, within the electromagnetic power range attainable in practice. The current associated with the third harmonic generation is also...

  4. Multilayer Graphene Enables Higher Efficiency in Improving Thermal Conductivities of Graphene/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Wang, Zhenyu; Wu, Ying; Liu, Xu; He, Yan-Bing; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2016-06-08

    The effects of number of graphene layers (n) and size of multilayer graphene sheets on thermal conductivities (TCs) of their epoxy composites are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the in-plane TCs of graphene sheets and the TCs across the graphene/epoxy interface simultaneously increase with increasing n. However, such higher TCs of multilayer graphene sheets will not translate into higher TCs of bulk composites unless they have large lateral sizes to maintain their aspect ratios comparable to the monolayer counterparts. The benefits of using large, multilayer graphene sheets are confirmed by experiments, showing that the composites made from graphite nanoplatelets (n > 10) with over 30 μm in diameter deliver a TC of ∼1.5 W m(-1) K(-1) at only 2.8 vol %, consistently higher than those containing monolayer or few-layer graphene at the same graphene loading. Our findings offer a guideline to use cost-effective multilayer graphene as conductive fillers for various thermal management applications.

  5. Hypervelocity impact properties of graphene armor via molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impact properties of two different graphene armor systems are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. One system is the so-called spaced armor which consists of a number of graphene plates spaced certain distance apart. Its response under normal impact of a spherical projectile is studied, focusing on the effect of the number of graphene monolayers per plate (denoted by n on the penetration resistance of the armor. We find that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the penetration resistance increases with decreasing number of monolayers per plate (n, and the best penetration resistance is achieved in the system with one graphene layer for each plate. Note that the monolayers in all the simulated multilayer graphene plates were AB-stacked. The second system being studied is the laminated copper/graphene composites with the graphene layers inside copper, on impact or back surface, or on both the impact and back surfaces. The simulation results show that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the laminated copper/graphene composite has much higher penetration resistance than the monolithic copper plate. The best efficiency is achieved when the graphene layers are on both the impact and back surfaces.

  6. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  7. Thermal conductivity of graphene laminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, H; Chang, K-H; Chen, J-C; Lu, C-Y; Nika, D L; Novoselov, K S; Balandin, A A

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated thermal conductivity of graphene laminate films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Two types of graphene laminate were studied, as deposited and compressed, in order to determine the physical parameters affecting the heat conduction the most. The measurements were performed using the optothermal Raman technique and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 μm. The thermal conductivity of graphene laminate was found to be in the range from 40 to 90 W/mK at room temperature. It was found unexpectedly that the average size and the alignment of graphene flakes are more important parameters defining the heat conduction than the mass density of the graphene laminate. The thermal conductivity scales up linearly with the average graphene flake size in both uncompressed and compressed laminates. The compressed laminates have higher thermal conductivity for the same average flake size owing to better flake alignment. Coating plastic materials with thin graphene laminate films that have up to 600× higher thermal conductivity than plastics may have important practical implications.

  8. Asynchronous cracking with dissimilar paths in multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Byungwoon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2017-11-16

    Multilayer graphene consists of a stack of single-atomic-thick monolayer graphene sheets bound with π-π interactions and is a fascinating model material opening up a new field of fracture mechanics. In this study, fracture behavior of single-crystalline multilayer graphene was investigated using an in situ mode I fracture test under a scanning electron microscope, and abnormal crack propagation in multilayer graphene was identified for the first time. The fracture toughness of graphene was determined from the measured load-displacement curves and the realistic finite element modelling of specimen geometries. Nonlinear fracture behavior of the multilayer graphene is discussed based on nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. In situ scanning electron microscope images obtained during the fracture test showed asynchronous crack propagation along independent paths, causing interlayer shear stress and slippages. We also found that energy dissipation by interlayer slippages between the graphene layers is the reason for the enhanced fracture toughness of multilayer graphene. The asynchronous cracking with independent paths is a unique cracking and toughening mechanism for single-crystalline multilayer graphene, which is not observed for the monolayer graphene. This could provide a useful insight for the design and development of graphene-based composite materials for structural applications.

  9. Cable suspended windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Moses G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A windmill is disclosed which includes an airframe having an upwind end and a downwind end. The first rotor is rotatably connected to the airframe, and a generator is supported by the airframe and driven by the rotor. The airframe is supported vertically in an elevated disposition by poles which extend vertically upwardly from the ground and support cables which extend between the vertical poles. Suspension cables suspend the airframe from the support cable.

  10. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  11. Plasmonic silicon Schottky photodetectors: the physics behind graphene enhanced internal photoemission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levy, Uriel; Grajower, Meir; Gonçalves, P. A. D.

    2017-01-01

    a physical model where surface plasmon polaritons enhance the absorption in a single-layer graphene by enhancing the field along the interface. The relatively long relaxation time in graphene allows for multiple attempts for the carrier to overcome the Schottky barrier and penetrate into the semiconductor......Recent experiments have shown that the plasmonic assisted internal photoemission from a metal to silicon can be significantly enhanced by introducing a monolayer of graphene between the two media. This is despite the limited absorption in a monolayer of undoped graphene (∼πα=2.3%). Here we propose...

  12. Unexpectedly high thermal boundary resistance of Cr/graphene/SiO2 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Wang, Haidong; Xu, Yibin

    2017-05-01

    We measured the thermal resistances of the Au/graphene/SiO2, Au/Ti/graphene/SiO2, and Au/Cr/graphene/SiO2 structures. The thermal resistances of the three structures were found to be significantly higher than those of the corresponding graphene-free structures, indicating that even monolayer graphene can greatly increase the thermal boundary resistance at metal/SiO2 interfaces. Furthermore, the thermal resistance of the Au/Cr/graphene/SiO2 structure is unexpectedly significantly higher than those of the other two structures, indicating that the diffusion mismatch model (DMM) fails to predict the thermal boundary resistance at metal/graphene interfaces. The poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) residue contamination layer on the graphene surface may play an important role in increasing the thermal resistances of metal/graphene/SiO2 structures. Also, transition metal/graphene and transition metal/PMMA interactions may also affect the thermal boundary resistance.

  13. Graphene surface plasmon polaritons with opposite in-plane electron oscillations along its two surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huawei; Ruan, Shuangchen, E-mail: scruan@szu.edu.cn; Zhang, Min; Su, Hong; Li, Irene Ling [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Laser Engineering, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-08-31

    We predict the existence of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode that can be guided by a graphene monolayer, regardless of the sign of the imaginary part of its conductivity. In this mode, in-plane electron oscillations along two surfaces of graphene are of opposite directions, which is very different from conventional SPPs on graphene. Significantly, coating graphene with dielectric films yields a way to guide the SPPs with both sub-wavelength mode widths and ultra-long propagation distances. In particular, the mode characteristics are very sensitive to the chemical potential of graphene, so the graphene-based waveguide can find applications in many optoelectronic devices.

  14. Three-fold diffraction symmetry in epitaxial graphene and the SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, D A; Zhou, S Y; El Gabaly, F; Schmid, A K; McCarty, K F; Lanzara, A

    2009-12-10

    The crystallographic symmetries and spatial distribution of stacking domains in graphene films on 6H-SiC(0001) have been studied by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and dark field imaging in a low energy electron microscope (LEEM). We find that the graphene diffraction spots from 2 and 3 atomic layers of graphene have 3-fold symmetry consistent with AB (Bernal or rhombohedral) stacking of the layers. On the contrary, graphene diffraction spots from the buffer layer and monolayer graphene have apparent 6-fold symmetry, although the 3-fold nature of the satellite spots indicates a more complex periodicity in the graphene sheets.

  15. Graphene-Based Superconducting Weak Links in Low Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Scott; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    The impact of magnetic field on Andreev reflection is studied in graphene-based superconducting weak links. We found, through studying weak links with different adhesion layers and superconducting leads (including Graphene-Ti/Au-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-Nb, Graphene-V-Nb, Graphene-Ti-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-NbN), that in low field (B graphene-superconductor interface. As the effective gap of the weak link approaches the intrinsic gap of the superconducting leads, a remnant of Andreev reflection can survive into the quantum Hall regime, allowing study of the interplay between the quantum Hall effect and Andreev reflection in high quality suspended graphene-superconductor weak links.

  16. Bright visible light emission from graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Duck; Kim, Hakseong; Cho, Yujin; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Pilkwang; Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Sunwoo; Li, Yilei; Park, Seung-Nam; Yoo, Yong Shim; Yoon, Duhee; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Sang Wook; Bae, Myung-Ho; Park, Yun Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here, we report the observation of bright visible light emission from electrically biased suspended graphene devices. In these devices, heat transport is greatly reduced. Hot electrons (∼2,800 K) therefore become spatially localized at the centre of the graphene layer, resulting in a 1,000-fold enhancement in thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be used to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realization of commercially viable large-scale, atomically thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low operation voltage and graphene-based on-chip ultrafast optical communications.

  17. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Graphene: Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Balandin, A. A.; Ghosh, S.; Bao, W.; Calizo, I.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Miao, F.; Lau, C. N.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of the thermal conductivity of a suspended single layer graphene. The measurements were performed using a non-contact optical technique. The near room-temperature values of the thermal conductivity in the range ~ 4840 to 5300 W/mK were extracted for a single-layer graphene. The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction.

  18. Graphene Oxide as a Monoatomic Blocking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films of C22 fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were...

  19. Localized plasmons in bilayer graphene nanodisks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weihua; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    We study localized plasmonic excitations in bilayer graphene (BLG) nanodisks, comparing AA-stacked and AB-stacked BLG and contrasting the results to the case of two monolayers without electronic hybridization. The electrodynamic response of the BLG electron gas is described in terms of a spatially...

  20. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  1. The role of graphene in enhancing electrical heating and mechanical performances of graphene-aligned silver nanowire hybrid transparent heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Ma, J. G.; Xu, H. Y.; Zhu, H. C.; Liu, Y. C.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, flexible and energy-efficient transparent heaters based on graphene and aligned silver nanowire (G-ASNW) hybrid structures are fabricated by thermal evaporation of silver on the aligned electrospun nanofiber templates and subsequent transfer of monolayer graphene onto the ASNWs. The G-ASNW films exhibit few wire-wire junctions and low resistance along the aligned direction, which are favorable for low-voltage transparent heater applications. Coating the ASNW network with monolayer graphene increases the saturated temperature of the hybrid heater due to the high thermal conductivity and low convective heat-transfer coefficient of graphene. Meanwhile, G-ASNW films show excellent electromechanical stability under cyclic bending because the graphene anchoring on the top surface of ASNWs could share tensile stress and serve as local conducting pathways at break-points even if small cracks were generated. The G-ASNW hybrid structures present a perspective on wearable transparent heaters.

  2. Two-dimensional layered semiconductor/graphene heterostructures for solar photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Song, Eui Sang; Yu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Schottky barriers formed by graphene (monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer) on 2D layered semiconductor tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets are explored for solar energy harvesting. The characteristics of the graphene-WS2 Schottky junction vary significantly with the number of graphene layers on WS2, resulting in differences in solar cell performance. Compared with monolayer or stacked bilayer graphene, multilayer graphene helps in achieving improved solar cell performance due to superior electrical conductivity. The all-layered-material Schottky barrier solar cell employing WS2 as a photoactive semiconductor exhibits efficient photon absorption in the visible spectral range, yielding 3.3% photoelectric conversion efficiency with multilayer graphene as the Schottky contact. Carrier transport at the graphene/WS2 interface and the interfacial recombination process in the Schottky barrier solar cells are examined.

  3. Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Young Hong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report strong third-harmonic generation in monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to an amorphous silica (glass substrate; the photon energy is in three-photon resonance with the exciton-shifted van Hove singularity at the M point of graphene. The polarization selection rules are derived and experimentally verified. In addition, our polarization- and azimuthal-rotation-dependent third-harmonic-generation measurements reveal in-plane isotropy as well as anisotropy between the in-plane and out-of-plane nonlinear optical responses of graphene. Since the third-harmonic signal exceeds that from bulk glass by more than 2 orders of magnitude, the signal contrast permits background-free scanning of graphene and provides insight into the structural properties of graphene.

  4. Induced superconductivity in graphene grown on rhenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnoir, C; Kimouche, A; Coraux, J; Magaud, L; Delsol, B; Gilles, B; Chapelier, C

    2013-12-13

    We report a new way to strongly couple graphene to a superconductor. The graphene monolayer has been grown directly on top of a superconducting Re(0001) thin film and characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We observed a moiré pattern due to the mismatch between Re and graphene lattice parameters that we have simulated with ab initio calculations. The density of states around the Fermi energy appears to be position dependent on this moiré pattern. Tunneling spectroscopy performed at 50 mK shows that the superconducting behavior of graphene on Re is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory and stands for a very good interface between the graphene and its metallic substrate.

  5. Magnetothermoelectric transport in modulated and unmodulated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, R; Sabeeh, K

    2011-09-21

    We draw motivation from recent experimental studies and present a comprehensive study of magnetothermoelectric transport in a graphene monolayer within the linear response regime. We employ the modified Kubo formalism developed for thermal transport in a magnetic field. Thermopower as well as thermal conductivity as a function of the gate voltage of a graphene monolayer in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene plane is determined for low magnetic fields (∼1 T) as well as high fields (∼8 T). We include the effects of screened charged impurities on thermal transport. We find good qualitative and quantitative agreement with recent experimental work on the subject. In addition, in order to analyze the effects of modulation, which can be induced by various means, on the thermal transport in graphene, we evaluate the thermal transport coefficients for a graphene monolayer subjected to a periodic electric modulation in a magnetic field. The results are presented as a function of the magnetic field and the gate voltage.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of monolayer group III monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, S.; Avazlı, N.; Durgun, E.; Cahangirov, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of the two-dimensional hexagonal structure of group III-VI binary monolayers, M X (M =B , Al, Ga, In and X =O , S, Se, Te) using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. The structural optimization calculations and phonon spectrum analysis indicate that all of the 16 possible binary compounds are thermally stable. In-plane stiffness values cover a range depending on the element types and can be as high as that of graphene, while the calculated bending rigidity is found to be an order of magnitude higher than that of graphene. The obtained electronic band structures show that M X monolayers are indirect band-gap semiconductors. The calculated band gaps span a wide optical spectrum from deep ultraviolet to near infrared. The electronic structure of oxides (M O ) is different from the rest because of the high electronegativity of oxygen atoms. The dispersions of the electronic band edges and the nature of bonding between atoms can also be correlated with electronegativities of constituent elements. The unique characteristics of group III-VI binary monolayers can be suitable for high-performance device applications in nanoelectronics and optics.

  7. Deposition of thin silicon layers on transferred large area graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupina, Grzegorz, E-mail: lupina@ihp-microelectronics.com; Kitzmann, Julia; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Dabrowski, Jarek; Wolff, Andre; Mehr, Wolfgang [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2013-12-23

    Physical vapor deposition of Si onto transferred graphene is investigated. At elevated temperatures, Si nucleates preferably on wrinkles and multilayer graphene islands. In some cases, however, Si can be quasi-selectively grown only on the monolayer graphene regions while the multilayer islands remain uncovered. Experimental insights and ab initio calculations show that variations in the removal efficiency of carbon residuals after the transfer process can be responsible for this behavior. Low-temperature Si seed layer results in improved wetting and enables homogeneous growth. This is an important step towards realization of electronic devices in which graphene is embedded between two Si layers.

  8. Nonlinear optics of graphene in a strong magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xianghan; Belyanin, Alexey

    2013-02-06

    Graphene placed in a magnetic field possesses an extremely high mid/far-infrared optical nonlinearity originating from its unusual band structure and selection rules for the optical transitions near the Dirac point. Here, we study the linear and nonlinear optical response of graphene in strong magnetic and optical fields using a quantum-mechanical density-matrix formalism. We calculate the power of the coherent terahertz radiation generated as a result of the four-wave mixing in graphene. We show that even one monolayer of graphene gives rise to an appreciable nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency and Raman gain for modest intensities of the incident infrared radiation.

  9. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  10. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-03-16

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  11. Transport through graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttinger, J.; Molitor, F.; Stampfer, C.; Schnez, S.; Jacobsen, A.; Dröscher, S.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review transport experiments on graphene quantum dots and narrow graphene constrictions. In a quantum dot, electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. The recently isolated two-dimensional carbon allotrope graphene is an interesting host to study quantum phenomena, due to its novel electronic properties and the expected weak interaction of the electron spin with the material. Graphene quantum dots are fabricated by etching mono-layer flakes into small islands (diameter 60-350 nm) with narrow connections to contacts (width 20-75 nm), serving as tunneling barriers for transport spectroscopy. Electron confinement in graphene quantum dots is observed by measuring Coulomb blockade and transport through excited states, a manifestation of quantum confinement. Measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane allowed to identify the regime with only a few charge carriers in the dot (electron-hole transition), and the crossover to the formation of the graphene specific zero-energy Landau level at high fields. After rotation of the sample into parallel magnetic field orientation, Zeeman spin splitting with a g-factor of g ≈ 2 is measured. The filling sequence of subsequent spin states is similar to what was found in GaAs and related to the non-negligible influence of exchange interactions among the electrons.

  12. Self-organized arrays of graphene and few-layer graphene quantum dots in fluorographene matrix: Charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, Irina V., E-mail: antonova@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Lavrentiev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov st. 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Nebogatikova, Nadezhda A.; Prinz, Victor Ya. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Lavrentiev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-12

    Arrays of graphene or few-layer graphene quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a partially fluorinated graphene matrix were created by chemical functionalization of layers. Charge transient spectroscopy employed for investigation of obtained QD systems (size 20–70 nm) has allowed us to examine the QD energy spectra and the time of carrier emission (or charge relaxation) from QDs as a function of film thickness. It was found that the characteristic time of carrier emission from QDs decreased markedly (by about four orders of magnitude) on increasing the QD thickness from one graphene monolayer to 3 nm. Daylight-assisted measurements also demonstrate a strong decrease of the carrier emission time.

  13. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  14. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  15. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Meng, E-mail: youmou@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasaki, Shinichirou [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, we succeeded in the LPCVD growth of monolayer graphene using acetylene as the precursor gas. • The growth rate is very high when acetylene is used as the source gas. Our process has exhibited the potential to shorten the growth time of CVD graphene. • We found that the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene can be changed by changing the acetylene flow rates. • We found that it is also possible to form bilayer graphene using acetylene. However, further study are necessary to reduce the defects density. - Abstract: Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  16. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Highly sensitive and selective room-temperature NO{sub 2} gas sensor based on bilayer transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seekaew, Yotsarayuth [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Wisitsoraat, Anurat [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal, E-mail: chatchawal.w@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Simple and low-cost fabrication of bilayer graphene gas sensor was presented. • Layer effects of graphene on NO{sub 2} gas-sensing properties were investigated. • Bilayer graphene sensor exhibited a high linear NO{sub 2} sensitivity of 1.409 ppm{sup −1}. • The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanisms based on band diagram were highlighted. - Abstract: This work presents a highly sensitive room-temperature gas sensor based on bilayer graphene fabricated by an interfacial transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene onto nickel interdigitated electrodes. Scanning electron microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations confirm the presence of graphene on interdigitated nickel electrodes with varying numbers of graphene layers. The NO{sub 2} detection performances of bilayer graphene gas sensor have been investigated in comparison with those of monolayer and multilayer graphene gas sensors at room temperature. From results, the bilayer graphene gas sensor exhibits higher response, sensitivity and selectivity to NO{sub 2} than monolayer and multilayer graphene. The sensitivity of bilayer graphene gas sensor is 1.409 ppm{sup −1} towards NO{sub 2} over a concentration range of 1–25 ppm, which is more than twice higher than that of monolayer graphene. The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanism of graphene sensing film has been explained based on the direct charge transfer process due to the adsorption of NO{sub 2} molecules.

  18. Ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube network framed graphene hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2015-03-11

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent thermal, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Here, a simple method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. These novel two-dimensional hybrids show enhanced mechanical strength that allows them to float on water without polymer supporting layers. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that SWNTs can interlace as a concrete backbone for the subsequent growth of monolayer graphene. Optical and electrical transport measurements further show that SWNT-graphene hybrids inherit high optical transparency and superior electrical conductivity from monolayer graphene. We also explore the local optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids through spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy and find that the interactions between SWNTs and graphene can induce a strong photocurrent response in the areas where SWNTs link different graphene domains together. These fundamental studies may open a door for engineering optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids by controlling the morphologies of the SWNT frames.

  19. Epitaxial Growth and Band Structure of Te Film on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaochun; Guan, Jiaqi; Lin, Zijian; Liu, Bing; Xing, Shuya; Wang, Weihua; Guo, Jiandong

    2017-08-09

    Tellurium (Te) films with monolayer and few-layer thickness are obtained by molecular beam epitaxy on a graphene/6H-SiC(0001) substrate and investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS). We reveal that the Te films are composed of parallel-arranged helical Te chains flat-lying on the graphene surface, exposing the (1 × 1) facet of (101̅0) of the bulk crystal. The band gap of Te films increases monotonically with decreasing thickness, reaching the near-infrared band for the monolayer Te. An explicit band bending at the edge between the monolayer Te and graphene substrate is visualized. With the thickness controlled in the atomic scale, Te films show potential applications of electronics and optoelectronics.

  20. Functional Molecular Junctions Derived from Double Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-09-25

    Information processing using molecular junctions is becoming more important as devices are miniaturized to the nanoscale. Herein, we report functional molecular junctions derived from double self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) intercalated between soft graphene electrodes. Newly assembled molecular junctions are fabricated by placing a molecular SAM/(top) electrode on another molecular SAM/(bottom) electrode by using a contact-assembly technique. Double SAMs can provide tunneling conjugation across the van der Waals gap between the terminals of each monolayer and exhibit new electrical functions. Robust contact-assembled molecular junctions can act as platforms for the development of equivalent contact molecular junctions between top and bottom electrodes, which can be applied independently to different kinds of molecules to enhance either the structural complexity or the assembly properties of molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Stable configurations of graphene on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Ravikumar, Abhilash [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India); Hegde, G.M. [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Rizwan, M.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Simulations of epitaxial growth process for silicon–graphene system is performed. • Identified the most favourable orientation of graphene sheet on silicon substrate. • Atomic local strain due to the silicon–carbon bond formation is analyzed. - Abstract: Integration of graphene on silicon-based nanostructures is crucial in advancing graphene based nanoelectronic device technologies. The present paper provides a new insight on the combined effect of graphene structure and silicon (001) substrate on their two-dimensional anisotropic interface. Molecular dynamics simulations involving the sub-nanoscale interface reveal a most favourable set of temperature independent orientations of the monolayer graphene sheet with an angle of ∽15° between its armchair direction and [010] axis of the silicon substrate. While computing the favorable stable orientations, both the translation and the rotational vibrations of graphene are included. The possible interactions between the graphene atoms and the silicon atoms are identified from their coordination. Graphene sheet shows maximum bonding density with bond length 0.195 nm and minimum bond energy when interfaced with silicon substrate at 15° orientation. Local deformation analysis reveals probability distribution with maximum strain levels of 0.134, 0.047 and 0.029 for 900 K, 300 K and 100 K, respectively in silicon surface for 15° oriented graphene whereas the maximum probable strain in graphene is about 0.041 irrespective of temperature. Silicon–silicon dimer formation is changed due to silicon–carbon bonding. These results may help further in band structure engineering of silicon–graphene lattice.

  2. Germanium-Assisted Direct Growth of Graphene on Arbitrary Dielectric Substrates for Heating Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziwen; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K; Zhou, Peng; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2017-07-01

    Direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates is a prerequisite to the development of graphene-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the current graphene synthesis methods on dielectric substrates always involve a metal contamination problem, and the direct production of graphene patterns still remains unattainable and challenging. Herein, a semiconducting, germanium (Ge)-assisted, chemical vapor deposition approach is proposed to produce monolayer graphene directly on arbitrary dielectric substrates. By the prepatterning of a catalytic Ge layer, the graphene with desired pattern can be achieved conveniently and readily. Due to the catalysis of Ge, monolayer graphene is able to form on Ge-covered dielectric substrates including SiO2 /Si, quartz glass, and sapphire substrates. Optimization of the process parameters leads to complete sublimation of the catalytic Ge layer during or immediately after formation of the monolayer graphene, enabling direct deposition of large-area and continuous graphene on dielectric substrates. The large-area, highly conductive graphene synthesized on a transparent dielectric substrate using the proposed approach has exhibited a wide range of applications, including in both defogger and thermochromic displays, as already successfully demonstrated here. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effect of the conditions of transfer on the structure and optical properties of Langmuir graphene oxide films during deposition on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliverstova, E. V.; Ibrayev, N. Kh.; Dzhanabekova, R. Kh.

    2017-09-01

    The effect the solvent and transfer pressure of graphene oxide (SLGO) Langmuir-Blodgett films on the physicochemical properties of monolayers, and on their structural and optical properties, is studied. Examination of the physicochemical properties of SLGO monolayers on subphase surfaces that are formed from SLGO dispersions in different organic solvents reveals that monolayer behavior is virtually independent of the solvent. Electron microscope and optical studies show that the monolayers formed from SLGO dispersions in DMF and acetone have the highest transfer coefficients. It is concluded that the structural heterogeneity of the surfaces of graphene oxide films results from simultaneous effect of electrostatic interactions between graphene oxide particles and Van der Waals interactions with the solvation shell of the particles. Studies focusing on the effect the pressure of transferring a graphene oxide monolayer onto the surface of a solid substrate has on structural features of LB films show that films produced at low surface pressures have more homogeneous structures.

  4. Al-Doped ZnO Monolayer as a Promising Transparent Electrode Material: A First-Principles Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mingyang Wu; Dan Sun; Changlong Tan; Xiaohua Tian; Yuewu Huang

    2017-01-01

    Al-doped ZnO has attracted much attention as a transparent electrode. The graphene-like ZnO monolayer as a two-dimensional nanostructure material shows exceptional properties compared to bulk ZnO. Here, through first-principle calculations, we found that the transparency in the visible light region of Al-doped ZnO monolayer is significantly enhanced compared to the bulk counterpart. In particular, the 12.5 at% Al-doped ZnO monolayer exhibits the highest visible transmittance of above 99%. Fur...

  5. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance.

  6. Al-Doped ZnO Monolayer as a Promising Transparent Electrode Material: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Al-doped ZnO has attracted much attention as a transparent electrode. The graphene-like ZnO monolayer as a two-dimensional nanostructure material shows exceptional properties compared to bulk ZnO. Here, through first-principle calculations, we found that the transparency in the visible light region of Al-doped ZnO monolayer is significantly enhanced compared to the bulk counterpart. In particular, the 12.5 at% Al-doped ZnO monolayer exhibits the highest visible transmittance of above 99%. Further, the electrical conductivity of the ZnO monolayer is enhanced as a result of Al doping, which also occurred in the bulk system. Our results suggest that Al-doped ZnO monolayer is a promising transparent conducting electrode for nanoscale optoelectronic device applications.

  7. Al-Doped ZnO Monolayer as a Promising Transparent Electrode Material: A First-Principles Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyang; Sun, Dan; Tan, Changlong; Tian, Xiaohua; Huang, Yuewu

    2017-03-29

    Al-doped ZnO has attracted much attention as a transparent electrode. The graphene-like ZnO monolayer as a two-dimensional nanostructure material shows exceptional properties compared to bulk ZnO. Here, through first-principle calculations, we found that the transparency in the visible light region of Al-doped ZnO monolayer is significantly enhanced compared to the bulk counterpart. In particular, the 12.5 at% Al-doped ZnO monolayer exhibits the highest visible transmittance of above 99%. Further, the electrical conductivity of the ZnO monolayer is enhanced as a result of Al doping, which also occurred in the bulk system. Our results suggest that Al-doped ZnO monolayer is a promising transparent conducting electrode for nanoscale optoelectronic device applications.

  8. Graphene on silicon dioxide via carbon ion implantation in copper with PMMA-free transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Jan; Spemann, Daniel; Hamza Hatahet, M.; Mändl, Stephan; Mensing, Michael; Finzel, Annemarie; Varga, Aron; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a synthesis method for the growth of low-defect large-area graphene using carbon ion beam implantation into metallic Cu foils is presented. The Cu foils (1 cm2 in size) were pre-annealed in a vacuum at 950 °C for 2 h, implanted with 35 keV carbon ions at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 850 °C for 2 h to form graphene layers with the layer number controlled by the implantation fluence. The graphene was then transferred to SiO2/Si substrates by a PMMA-free wet chemical etching process. The obtained regions of monolayer graphene are of ˜900 μm size. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy performed at room temperature demonstrated a good quality and homogeneity of the graphene layers, especially for monolayer graphene.

  9. Green synthesis and characterization of graphene nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, Farnosh [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badiei, Alireza [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • For the first time, we have synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. • Here pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent. • FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDS and TEM were used to characterize the samples. • According to TEM image, graphene nanosheet is individually exfoliated after stirring for 24 h. • As shown in the TEM image, graphene monolayer is obtained. - Abstract: For the first time, we have successfully synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. In this approach, pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent to form graphene nanosheets. At first, the improved Hummer method to oxidize graphite for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO) was applied, and then the as-produced graphene oxide was reduced by pomegranate juice to form graphene nanosheets. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and raman were used to characterize the samples. The results obtained from the characterization techniques proved high purity of the final products.

  10. Giant amplification of terahertz plasmons in a double-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, M. Yu; Moiseenko, I. M.; Popov, V. V.

    2018-02-01

    The amplification of terahertz plasmons in a pair of parallel active graphene monolayers is studied theoretically. The plasmon wave in a symmetric double-layer graphene structure splits into two branches with a symmetric and an antisymmetric distribution of tangential to graphene component of the electric field across the plane of symmetry of the structure. It is shown that, normalized to the wavelength, the terahertz plasmon amplification factor of the symmetric mode in the double-layer graphene structure could be greater than that in a single graphene layer by four orders of magnitude.

  11. Effective electro-optical modulation with high extinction ratio by a graphene-silicon microring resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Sanshui

    2015-01-01

    -optical modulation, optical-optical switching, and other optoelectronics applications. However, achieving a high modulation depth remains a challenge because of the modest graphene-light interaction in the graphene-silicon devices, typically, utilizing only a monolayer or few layers of graphene. Here, we...... comprehensively study the interaction between graphene and a microring resonator, and its influence on the optical modulation depth. We demonstrate graphene-silicon microring devices showing a high modulation depth of 12.5 dB with a relatively low bias voltage of 8.8 V. On-off electro-optical switching...

  12. Graphene Calisthenics: Straintronics of Graphene with Light-Reactive Azobenzene Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaker, Kacey; Cao, Peigen; Huo, Mandy; Crommie, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Although a promising target for next-generation electronics, graphene's lack of a band gap is a severe hindrance. There are many ways of opening a gap, and one controllable way is through application of specific non-uniform strains which can produce extremely large pseudomagnetic fields. This effect was predicted and verified experimentally, but so far there have been few methods developed that reliably control the size, location, separation and amount of strain in graphene. We have used a layer of light-reactive azobenzene polymer beneath the graphene to produce strained monolayer graphene with light exposure. Using Raman spectroscopy, we have measured a shift of up to 20 cm-1 in the 2D peak when the graphene and polymer sample was exposed to 532 nm laser illumination indicating that the graphene is undergoing a strain from deformation of the azobenzene layer below. AFM topographic measurements and COMSOL simulations were used to verify this assertion. Use of polymeric materials to reliably strain graphene in non-uniform ways could result in controllable production of large pseudomagnetic fields in graphene and more control over graphene's low-energy charge carriers.

  13. Graphene Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Wei; Kawakami, Roland K.; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of graphene has triggered an avalanche of studies into the spin-dependent physical properties of this material and of graphene-based spintronic devices. Here, we review the experimental and theoretical state-of-art concerning spin injection and transport, defect-induced magnetic moments, spin–orbit coupling and spin relaxation in graphene. Future research in graphene spintronics will need to address the development of applications such as spin transistors and spin logic devices,...

  14. Graphene aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  15. Luminescent Organic Semiconducting Langmuir Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agina, Elena V; Mannanov, Artur A; Sizov, Alexey S; Vechter, Olga; Borshchev, Oleg V; Bakirov, Artem V; Shcherbina, Maxim A; Chvalun, Sergei N; Konstantinov, Vladislav G; Bruevich, Vladimir V; Kozlov, Oleg V; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu; Ponomarenko, Sergei A

    2017-05-31

    In recent years, monolayer organic field-effect devices such as transistors and sensors have demonstrated their high potential. In contrast, monolayer electroluminescent organic field-effect devices are still in their infancy. One of the key challenges here is to create an organic material that self-organizes in a monolayer and combines efficient charge transport with luminescence. Herein, we report a novel organosilicon derivative of oligothiophene-phenylene dimer D2-Und-PTTP-TMS (D2, tetramethyldisiloxane; Und, undecylenic spacer; P, 1,4-phenylene; T, 2,5-thiophene; TMS, trimethylsilyl) that meets these requirements. The self-assembled Langmuir monolayers of the dimer were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectometry, and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated in organic field-effect transistors. We found that the best uniform, fully covered, highly ordered monolayers were semiconducting. Thus, the ordered two-dimensional (2D) packing of conjugated organic molecules in the semiconducting Langmuir monolayer is compatible with its high-yield luminescence, so that 2D molecular aggregation per se does not preclude highly luminescent properties. Our findings pave the way to the rational design of functional materials for monolayer organic light-emitting transistors and other optoelectronic devices.

  16. A Novel Biomolecule-Mediated Reduction of Graphene Oxide: A Multifunctional Anti-Cancer Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Jung Choi; Eunsu Kim; JaeWoong Han; Jin-Hoi Kim; Sangiliyandi Gurunathan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a monolayer of carbon atoms that form a dense honeycomb structure, consisting of hydroxyl and epoxide functional groups on the two accessible sides and carboxylic groups at the edges. In contrast, graphene is a two-dimensional sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb lattice. Graphene has great potential for use in biomedical applications due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this study, we report a facile and environmentally frie...

  17. Localized States at Zigzag Edges of Multilayer Graphene and Graphite Steps

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Eduardo V.; Peres, N. M. R.; Santos, J. M. B. Lopes dos

    2008-01-01

    We report the existence of zero energy surface states localized at zigzag edges of $N$-layer graphene. Working within the tight-binding approximation, and using the simplest nearest-neighbor model, we derive the analytic solution for the wavefunctions of these peculiar surface states. It is shown that zero energy edge states in multilayer graphene can be divided into three families: (i) states living only on a single plane, equivalent to surface states in monolayer graphene; (ii) states with ...

  18. Graphene and ZnO Nanostructures for Nano- Optoelectronic & Biosensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    ul Hasan, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    There has been a remarkable excitement in graphene research since the famous discovery in 2004 by isolating a monolayer with the help of scotch tape. Graphene, merely a single layer of carbon atoms, is progressively making inroads into a wide range of applications, from ballistic electronics to biosensors to flexible/transparent displays. Graphene is a matchless material that is strong, light, transparent, and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. On the other hand, zinc oxide (ZnO)...

  19. Tunneling spectra of graphene on copper unraveled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xin; Stradi, Daniele; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms, etc. The interpretation of the spectra can be complicated, however. Specifically for graphene grown on copper, there have been conflicting reports of tunneling spectra. A clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the variability is desired. In this work, we have revealed that the root cause...... of the variability in tunneling spectra is the variation in graphene-substrate coupling under various experimental conditions, providing a salutary perspective on the important role of 2D material-substrate interactions. The conclusions are drawn from measured data and theoretical calculations for monolayer, AB......-stacked bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene coexisting on the same substrates in areas with and without intercalated oxygen, demonstrating a high degree of consistency. The Van Hove singularities of the twisted graphene unambiguously indicate the Dirac energy between them, lending strong evidence to our...

  20. Defect Evolution in Graphene upon Electrochemical Lithiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Puntambekar, Kanan P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Tavassol, Hadi [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States; Yildirim, Handan [School of; Kinaci, Alper [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kumar, Rajan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Saldaña, Spencer J. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Gewirth, Andrew A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States; Greeley, Jeffrey P. [School of; Chan, Maria K. Y. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Department of; Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611, United States

    2014-10-09

    Despite rapidly growing interest in the application of graphene in lithium ion batteries, the interaction of the graphene with lithium ions and electrolyte species during electrochemical cycling is not fully understood. In this work, we use Raman spectroscopy in a model system of monolayer graphene transferred on a Si(111) substrate and density functional theory (DFT) to investigate defect formation as a function of lithiation. This model system enables the early stages of defect formation to be probed in a manner previously not possible with commonly used reduced graphene oxide or multilayer graphene substrates. Using ex situ and Ar-atmosphere Raman spectroscopy, we detected a rapid increase in graphene defect level for small increments in the number of lithiation/delithiation cycles until the I(D)/I(G) ratio reaches ~1.5–2.0 and the 2D peak intensity drops by ~50%, after which the Raman spectra show minimal changes upon further cycling. Using DFT, the interplay between graphene topological defects and chemical functionalization is explored, thus providing insight into the experimental results. In particular, the DFT results show that defects can act as active sites for species that are present in the electrochemical environment such as Li, O, and F. Furthermore, chemical functionalization with these species lowers subsequent defect formation energies, thus accelerating graphene degradation upon cycling. This positive feedback loop continues until the defect concentration reaches a level where lithium diffusion through the graphene can occur in a relatively unimpeded manner, with minimal further degradation upon extended cycling. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insight into graphene defect formation during lithiation, thus informing ongoing efforts to employ graphene in lithium ion battery technology.

  1. Fabrication of nanoporous graphene/polymer composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madauß, Lukas; Schumacher, Jens; Ghosh, Mandakranta; Ochedowski, Oliver; Meyer, Jens; Lebius, Henning; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia; Trautmann, Christina; Lammertink, Rob G H; Ulbricht, Mathias; Schleberger, Marika

    2017-07-27

    Graphene is currently investigated as a promising membrane material in which selective pores can be created depending on the requirements of the application. However, to handle large-area nanoporous graphene a stable support material is needed. Here, we report on composite membranes consisting of large-area single layer nanoporous graphene supported by a porous polymer. The fabrication is based on ion-track nanotechnology with swift heavy ions directly creating atomic pores in the graphene lattice and damaged tracks in the polymer support. Subsequent chemical etching converts the latent ion tracks in the supporting polymer foil, here polyethylene terephthalate (PET), into open microchannels while the perfectly aligned pores in the graphene top layer remain unaffected. To avoid unintentional damage creation and delamination of the graphene layer from the substrate, the graphene is encapsulated by a protecting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer. By this procedure a stable composite membrane is obtained consisting of nanoporous graphene (coverage close to 100%) suspended across selfaligned track-etched microchannels in a polymer support film. Our method presents a facile way to create high quality suspended graphene of tunable pore size supported on a flexible porous polymeric support, thus enabling the development of membranes for fast and selective ultrafiltration separation processes.

  2. The effect of copper pre-cleaning on graphene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Min; Hsu, Allen; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kim, Ki Kang; Kong, Jing

    2013-09-13

    Copper foil is the most common substrate to synthesize monolayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The surface morphology and conditions of the copper foil can be very different depending on the various suppliers or different batches. These surface properties of copper strongly affect the growth behavior of graphene, thus rendering the growth conditions irreproducible when different batches of Cu foil are used. Furthermore, the quality of the graphene is severely affected as well. In this work, we report a facile method of copper pre-cleaning to improve the graphene quality and the reproducibility of the growth process. We found that the commercial Ni etchant (based on nitric acid) or nitric acid is the most effective cleaning agent among various acidic or basic solutions. The graphene grown on thus-treated copper surfaces is very clean and mostly monolayer when observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical imaging, as compared to the graphene grown on untreated copper foil. Different batches (but with the same catalog number) of copper foil from Alfa Aesar Company were examined to explore the effect of copper pre-cleaning; consistent growth results were obtained when pre-cleaning was used. This method overcomes a commonly encountered problem in graphene growth and could become one of the standard protocols for preparing the copper foil substrate for growing graphene or other 2D materials.

  3. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cretu, Ovidiu, E-mail: cretu.ovidiu@nims.go.jp; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  4. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-11-21

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of (12)C-lattice and surface deposition of (13)C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like (13)C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique.

  5. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rajratan, E-mail: basu@usna.edu; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James [Soft Matter and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  6. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  7. Graphene Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  8. Toward the synthesis of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene on copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Sun, Zhengzong; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Xiang, Changsheng; Samuel, E Loïc; Kittrell, Carter; Tour, James M

    2012-10-23

    In this research, we constructed a controlled chamber pressure CVD (CP-CVD) system to manipulate graphene's domain sizes and shapes. Using this system, we synthesized large (~4.5 mm(2)) single-crystal hexagonal monolayer graphene domains on commercial polycrystalline Cu foils (99.8% purity), indicating its potential feasibility on a large scale at low cost. The as-synthesized graphene had a mobility of positive charge carriers of ~11,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) on a SiO(2)/Si substrate at room temperature, suggesting its comparable quality to that of exfoliated graphene. The growth mechanism of Cu-based graphene was explored by studying the influence of varied growth parameters on graphene domain sizes. Cu pretreatments, electrochemical polishing, and high-pressure annealing are shown to be critical for suppressing graphene nucleation site density. A pressure of 108 Torr was the optimal chamber pressure for the synthesis of large single-crystal monolayer graphene. The synthesis of one graphene seed was achieved on centimeter-sized Cu foils by optimizing the flow rate ratio of H(2)/CH(4). This work should provide clear guidelines for the large-scale synthesis of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene, which is essential for the optimized graphene device fabrication.

  9. Opening the band gap of graphene through silicon doping for the improved performance of graphene/GaAs heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S J; Lin, S S; Li, X Q; Liu, X Y; Wu, H A; Xu, W L; Wang, P; Wu, Z Q; Zhong, H K; Xu, Z J

    2016-01-07

    Graphene has attracted increasing interest due to its remarkable properties. However, the zero band gap of monolayered graphene limits it's further electronic and optoelectronic applications. Herein, we have synthesized monolayered silicon-doped graphene (SiG) with large surface area using a chemical vapor deposition method. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the silicon atoms are doped into graphene lattice at a doping level of 2.7-4.5 at%. Electrical measurements based on a field effect transistor indicate that the band gap of graphene has been opened via silicon doping without a clear degradation in carrier mobility, and the work function of SiG, deduced from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, was 0.13-0.25 eV larger than that of graphene. Moreover, when compared with the graphene/GaAs heterostructure, SiG/GaAs exhibits an enhanced performance. The performance of 3.4% silicon doped SiG/GaAs solar cell has been improved by 33.7% on average, which was attributed to the increased barrier height and improved interface quality. Our results suggest that silicon doping can effectively engineer the band gap of monolayered graphene and SiG has great potential in optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Exciton broadening in WS2/graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather M.; Rigosi, Albert F.; Raja, Archana; Chernikov, Alexey; Roquelet, Cyrielle; Heinz, Tony F.

    2017-11-01

    We have used optical spectroscopy to observe spectral broadening of WS2 exciton reflectance peaks in heterostructures of monolayer WS2 capped with mono- to few-layer graphene. The broadening is found to be similar for the A and B excitons and on the order of 5-10 meV. No strong dependence on the number of graphene layers was observed within experimental uncertainty. The broadening can be attributed to charge- and energy-transfer processes between the two materials, providing an observed lower bound for the corresponding time scales of 65 fs.

  11. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  12. Fabrication of Graphene Using Carbon Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Tomeka; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb lattice and is a basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensionalities. It can be wrapped up into 0D fullerenes, rolled into 1D nanotubes, or stacked into 3D graphite. Graphene's high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency make it a candidate for transparent conducting electrodes, required for such applications as touchscreens, liquid crystal displays, organic photovoltaic cells, and organic light-emitting diodes. In particular, graphene's mechanical strength and flexibility are advantageous compared to indium tin oxide, which is brittle, and graphene films may be deposited from solution over large areas. One method to grow epitaxial graphene is by starting with single crystal silicon carbide (SiC). When SiC is heated under certain conditions, silicon evaporates leaving behind carbon that reorganizes into layers of graphene. Here we report on an alternate method of producing graphene by using low energy carbon implantation in a nickel layer deposited on silicon dioxide mechanical support, followed by heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere to induce carbon migration and self-assembly. We used high resolution RBS and Raman spectroscopy for process and sample characterization. Details will be discussed during the meeting.

  13. Graphitization of self-assembled monolayers using patterned nickel-copper layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Hong-Yeol; Kim, Jihyun

    2017-07-01

    Controlling the optical and electrical properties of graphene is of great importance because it is directly related to commercialization of graphene-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. The development of a spatially controlled layer-tunable and direct growth method is a favored strategy because it allows for the manipulation of the optical and electrical properties of graphene without complex processes. Here, patterned Ni on Cu layers is employed to achieve spatially thickness-tuned graphene because its thickness depends on the carbon solubility of catalytic metals. Transfer-free graphene is directly grown on an arbitrary target substrate by using self-assembled monolayers as the carbon source. The optical transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm and the sheet resistance of graphene are adjusted from 65.0% and 2.33 kΩ/◻ to 85.8% and 7.98 kΩ/◻, respectively. Ambipolar behavior with a hole carrier mobility of 3.4 cm2/(V.s) is obtained from the fabricated device. Therefore, a spatially controlled layer-tunable and transfer-free growth method can be used to realize advanced designs for graphene-based optical and electrical devices.

  14. Monolayer MoS{sub 2} self-switching diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dirini, Feras, E-mail: alf@unimelb.edu.au; Hossain, Md Sharafat [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Neural Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Victorian Research Laboratory, National ICT Australia, West Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hossain, Faruque M.; Skafidas, Efstratios [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Neural Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mohammed, Mahmood A. [Princess Sumaya University for Technology, Amman (Jordan); Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Melbourne Networked Society Institute (MNSI), University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    This paper presents a new molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) nanodevice that acts as a two-terminal field-effect rectifier. The device is an atomically-thin two-dimensional self-switching diode (SSD) that can be realized within a single MoS{sub 2} monolayer with very minimal process steps. Quantum simulation results are presented confirming the device's operation as a diode and showing strong non-linear I-V characteristics. Interestingly, the device shows p-type behavior, in which conduction is dominated by holes as majority charge carriers and the flow of reverse current is enhanced, while the flow of forward current is suppressed, in contrast to monolayer graphene SSDs, which behave as n-type devices. The presence of a large bandgap in monolayer MoS{sub 2} results in strong control over the channel, showing complete channel pinch-off in forward conduction, which was confirmed with transmission pathways plots. The device exhibited large leakage tunnelling current through the insulating trenches, which may have been due to the lack of passivation; nevertheless, reverse current remained to be 6 times higher than forward current, showing strong rectification. The effect of p-type substitutional channel doping of sulphur with phosphorus was investigated and showed that it greatly enhances the performance of the device, increasing the reverse-to-forward current rectification ratio more than an order of magnitude, up to a value of 70.

  15. Lithium halide monolayers: Structural, electronic and optical properties by first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mandana; Maskaneh, Pegah; Moghadam, Atousa Dashti; Jalilian, Jaafar

    2016-09-01

    Using first principle study, we investigate the structural, electronic and optical properties of lithium halide monolayers (LiF, LiCl, LiBr). In contrast to graphene and other graphene-like structures that form hexagonal rings in plane, these compounds can form and stabilize in cubic shape interestingly. The type of band structure in these insulators is identified as indirect type and ionic nature of their bonds are illustrated as well. The optical properties demonstrate extremely transparent feature for them as a result of wide band gap in the visible range; also their electron transitions are indicated for achieving a better vision on the absorption mechanism in these kinds of monolayers.

  16. Enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit in engineered graphene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that thermoelectric properties of graphene nanoribbons can be dramatically improved by introducing nanopores. In monolayer graphene, this increases the electronic thermoelectric figure of merit ZTe from 0.01 to 0.5. The largest values of ZTe are found when a nanopore is introduced into bilayer graphene, such that the current flows from one layer to the other via the inner surface of the pore, for which values as high as ZTe = 2.45 are obtained. All thermoelectric properties can be further enhanced by tuning the Fermi energy of the leads.

  17. High-quality monolayer superconductor NbSe2grown by chemical vapour deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Huang, Xiangwei; Lin, Junhao; Cui, Jian; Chen, Yu; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Fucai; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xuewen; He, Haiyong; Tsang, Siu Hon; Gao, Weibo; Suenaga, Kazu; Ma, Fengcai; Yang, Changli; Lu, Li; Yu, Ting; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Liu, Guangtong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-08-30

    The discovery of monolayer superconductors bears consequences for both fundamental physics and device applications. Currently, the growth of superconducting monolayers can only occur under ultrahigh vacuum and on specific lattice-matched or dangling bond-free substrates, to minimize environment- and substrate-induced disorders/defects. Such severe growth requirements limit the exploration of novel two-dimensional superconductivity and related nanodevices. Here we demonstrate the experimental realization of superconductivity in a chemical vapour deposition grown monolayer material-NbSe 2 . Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope imaging reveals the atomic structure of the intrinsic point defects and grain boundaries in monolayer NbSe 2 , and confirms the low defect concentration in our high-quality film, which is the key to two-dimensional superconductivity. By using monolayer chemical vapour deposited graphene as a protective capping layer, thickness-dependent superconducting properties are observed in as-grown NbSe 2 with a transition temperature increasing from 1.0 K in monolayer to 4.56 K in 10-layer.Two-dimensional superconductors will likely have applications not only in devices, but also in the study of fundamental physics. Here, Wang et al. demonstrate the CVD growth of superconducting NbSe2 on a variety of substrates, making these novel materials increasingly accessible.

  18. Fluorene-Perylene Diimide Arrays onto Graphene Sheets for Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2016-08-24

    A facile approach for introducing photoactive poly(fluorene-perylene diimide) arrays (PFPDI) onto graphene sheets was accomplished. Noncovalent PFPDI/graphene ensembles formed via π-π stacking interactions between the two components and covalent PFPDI-graphene hybrids realized upon a Stille polycondensation reaction between an iodobenzyl-functionalized graphene, a 9,9-dialkyl substituted fluorene diboronic acid, and a 1,7-dibromo-PDI derivative were prepared. The morphology of PFPDI/graphene and PFPDI-graphene was evaluated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), revealing the presence of even monolayered graphene sheets. Moreover, their photophysical and redox properties as assessed by electronic absorption spectroscopy and steady-state as well as time-resolved photoluminescence assays and electrochemistry, respectively, disclosed charge-transfer characteristics owing to the high photoluminescence quenching of PFPDI in the presence of graphene and the fast component attributed to the decay of the emission intensity of the singlet excited state of PFPDI in both PFPDI/graphene and PFPDI-graphene. Next, testing their ability to operate in energy conversion schemes, the PFPDI-graphene was successfully employed as catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. Notably, the kinetics for the reduction were enhanced by visible light photoirradiation as compared to dark conditions as well as the presence of PFPDI-graphene, contrasting the case where only PFPDI, in the absence of graphene, was employed. Finally, recycling of the catalyst PFPDI-graphene was achieved and reutilization in successive reduction reactions of 4-nitrophenol was found to proceed with the same efficiency.

  19. Detecting the local transport properties and the dimensionality of transport of epitaxial graphene by a multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas; Perkins, Edward; Johannsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of epitaxial monolayer graphene (MLG) and hydrogen-intercalated quasi free-standing bilayer graphene (QFBLG) on SiC(0001) are investigated by micro multi-point probes. Using a probe with 12 contacts, we perform four-point probe measurements with the possibility...

  20. Noncommutative Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Dias, N.; Prata, J.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a noncommutative description of graphene. This description consists of a Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions plus noncommutative corrections, which are treated in the presence of an external magnetic field. We argue that, being a two-dimensional Dirac system, graphene is particularly interesting to test noncommutativity. We find that momentum noncommutativity affects the energy levels of graphene, but that it does not entail any kind of correction to the Hall conductivity.

  1. Epitaxial graphene

    OpenAIRE

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and l...

  2. Aromatic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D. K., E-mail: gour.netai@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  3. Coexistence of electron and hole transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedmann, S.; van Elferen, H. J.; Kurganova, E. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Giesbers, A. J. M.; Veligura, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Maan, J. C.; Zeitler, U.

    2011-01-01

    When sweeping the carrier concentration in monolayer graphene through the charge neutrality point, the experimentally measured Hall resistivity shows a smooth zero crossing. Using a two-component model of coexisting electrons and holes around the charge neutrality point, we unambiguously show that

  4. Spin-dependent Klein tunneling in graphene: Role of Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Hao; Bundesmann, Jan; Richter, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Within an effective Dirac theory the low-energy dispersions of monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and spin-degenerate bilayer graphene are described by formally identical expressions. We explore implications of this correspondence for transport by choosing chiral tunneling through pn and pnpjunctions as a concrete example. A real-space Green's function formalism based on a tight-binding model is adopted to perform the ballistic transport calculations, which cover and confirm previous theoretical results based on the Dirac theory. Chiral tunneling in monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba coupling is shown to indeed behave like in bilayer graphene. Combined effects of a forbidden normal transmission and spin separation are observed within the single-band n↔p transmission regime. The former comes from real-spin conservation, in analogy with pseudospin conservation in bilayer graphene, while the latter arises from the intrinsic spin-Hall mechanism of the Rashba coupling.

  5. Large single crystals of graphene on melted copper using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yimin A; Fan, Ye; Speller, Susannah; Creeth, Graham L; Sadowski, Jerzy T; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Allen, Christopher S; Warner, Jamie H

    2012-06-26

    A simple method is presented for synthesizing large single crystal graphene domains on melted copper using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This is achieved by performing the reaction above the melting point of copper (1090 °C) and using a molybdenum or tungsten support to prevent balling of the copper from dewetting. By controlling the amount of hydrogen during growth, individual single crystal domains of monolayer graphene greater than 200 μm are produced within a continuous film. Stopping growth before a complete film is formed reveals individual hexagonal domains of graphene that are epitaxially aligned in their orientation. Angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy is used to show that the graphene grown on copper exhibits a linear dispersion relationship and no sign of doping. HRTEM and electron diffraction reveal a uniform high quality crystalline atomic structure of monolayer graphene.

  6. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2014-10-01

    We study suspended graphene in contact with the organic molecule anisole to analyse the implications of the interaction for the optical absorption, using first principle calculations. Because of a weak interaction multiple orientations of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Semi-Metallic Be5C2 Monolayer Global Minimum with Quasi-Planar Pentacoordinate Carbons and Negative Poissons Ratio (Open Access Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-03

    some promise to be realized experimentally. Be5C2 monolayer is a gapless semiconductor with a Dirac-like point in the band structure and also has an...For example, on the basis of ptC molecule CB4 (ref. 43), Wu et al.35 designed the first ptC-containing 2D material, namely B2C graphene , which was...and then to 2D infinite graphene . Inspired by the ppC-containing Be9C24 , we designed a new 2D inorganic material, namely Be5C2 monolayer by

  8. Backside absorbing layer microscopy: Watching graphene chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campidelli, Stéphane; Abou Khachfe, Refahi; Jaouen, Kevin; Monteiller, Jean; Amra, Claude; Zerrad, Myriam; Cornut, Renaud; Derycke, Vincent; Ausserré, Dominique

    2017-05-01

    The rapid rise of two-dimensional nanomaterials implies the development of new versatile, high-resolution visualization and placement techniques. For example, a single graphene layer becomes observable on Si/SiO2 substrates by reflected light under optical microscopy because of interference effects when the thickness of silicon oxide is optimized. However, differentiating monolayers from bilayers remains challenging, and advanced techniques, such as Raman mapping, atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are more suitable to observe graphene monolayers. The first two techniques are slow, and the third is operated in vacuum; hence, in all cases, real-time experiments including notably chemical modifications are not accessible. The development of optical microscopy techniques that combine the speed, large area, and high contrast of SEM with the topological information of AFM is therefore highly desirable. We introduce a new widefield optical microscopy technique based on the use of previously unknown antireflection and absorbing (ARA) layers that yield ultrahigh contrast reflection imaging of monolayers. The BALM (backside absorbing layer microscopy) technique can achieve the subnanometer-scale vertical resolution, large area, and real-time imaging. Moreover, the inverted optical microscope geometry allows its easy implementation and combination with other techniques. We notably demonstrate the potentiality of BALM by in operando imaging chemical modifications of graphene oxide. The technique can be applied to the deposition, observation, and modification of any nanometer-thick materials.

  9. Properties of the Free-Standing Two-Dimensional Copper Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ming Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We use density functional theory to study a free-standing 2D copper monolayer. We find that the Cu monolayer is stable in 15 ps ab initio molecular dynamics simulations up to 1200 K. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk, we observe a significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.92 versus 0.58 eV/bond. This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. We predict various properties of this material, including band structure and density of states. The free-standing 2D Cu monolayer is hexagonal close packed and is the global minimum structure. One valence electron from each atom is delocalized and is donated into a 2D nearly free electron gas.

  10. Splitting of Van Hove singularities in slightly twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Yu; Liu, Ke-Qin; Yin, Long-Jing; Wang, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Wei; Yang, Xu-Qin; Yang, Jun-Kai; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; He, Lin

    2017-10-01

    A variety of new and interesting electronic properties have been predicted in graphene monolayer doped to Van Hove singularities (VHSs) of its density of state. However, tuning the Fermi energy to reach a VHS of graphene by either gating or chemical doping is prohibitively difficult, owing to their large energy distance (˜3 eV). This difficulty can be easily overcome in twisted bilayer graphene (TBG). By introducing a small twist angle between two adjacent graphene sheets, we are able to generate two low-energy VHSs arbitrarily approaching the Fermi energy. Here, we report experimental studies of electronic properties around the VHSs of a slightly TBG through scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. The split of the VHSs is observed and the spatial symmetry breaking of electronic states around the VHSs is directly visualized. These exotic results provide motivation for further theoretical and experimental studies of graphene systems around the VHSs.

  11. Electrically tunable terahertz metamaterials based on graphene stacks array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanqing; Liu, Peiguo; Bian, Li-an; Liu, Chenxi; Zhou, Qihui; Chen, Yuwei

    2017-12-01

    With the ability of tuning chemical potential via gate voltage, the permittivity of graphene stack can be dynamically adjusted over a wide range. In this paper, we design electrically tunable metamaterials based on the graphene/Al2O3 stacks array, which can achieve a good modulation of resonant frequency and peak value in terahertz region. Due to the enlargement of plasmonic resonance response and the broaden distribution of electric field, our proposed structures perform a better tunability compared with traditional metamaterials loaded monolayer graphene. Since the dipole-dipole coupling between adjacent stacks strengthens immensely as reduces the filling factor of array, the modulated capacity could be further improved. It is found that for oblique incidence, the transmission property is also sensitive to the chemical potential of graphene as well as the polarization direction of incident terahertz wave. These results could be very instructive for the potential applications in voltage-sensitive devices, tunable sensors and photovoltaic switches.

  12. Solution-processable organic dielectrics for graphene electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattevi, Cecilia; Colléaux, Florian; Kim, HoKwon; Lin, Yen-Hung; Park, Kyung T; Chhowalla, Manish; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2012-08-31

    We report the fabrication, at low-temperature, of solution processed graphene transistors based on carefully engineered graphene/organic dielectric interfaces. Graphene transistors based on these interfaces show improved performance and reliability when compared with traditional SiO(2) based devices. The dielectric materials investigated include Hyflon AD (Solvay), a low-k fluoropolymer, and various organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) nanodielectrics. Both types of dielectric are solution processed and yield graphene transistors with similar operating characteristics, namely high charge carrier mobility, hysteresis free operation, negligible doping effect and improved operating stability as compared to bare SiO(2) based devices. Importantly, the use of SAM nanodielectrics enables the demonstration of low operating voltage ( transistors with tunable doping characteristics through molecular engineering of the SAM's molecular length and terminal group. The work is a significant step towards graphene microelectronics where large-volume and low-temperature processing are required.

  13. Graphene hot-electron light bulb: incandescence from hBN-encapsulated graphene in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seok-Kyun; Šiškins, Makars; Mullan, Ciaran; Yin, Jun; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Kozikov, Aleksey; Ozdemir, Servet; Alhazmi, Manal; Holwill, Matthew; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ghazaryan, Davit; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Fal’ko, Vladimir I.; Mishchenko, Artem

    2018-01-01

    The excellent electronic and mechanical properties of graphene allow it to sustain very large currents, enabling its incandescence through Joule heating in suspended devices. Although interesting scientifically and promising technologically, this process is unattainable in ambient environment, because graphene quickly oxidises at high temperatures. Here, we take the performance of graphene-based incandescent devices to the next level by encapsulating graphene with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Remarkably, we found that the hBN encapsulation provides an excellent protection for hot graphene filaments even at temperatures well above 2000 K. Unrivalled oxidation resistance of hBN combined with atomically clean graphene/hBN interface allows for a stable light emission from our devices in atmosphere for many hours of continuous operation. Furthermore, when confined in a simple photonic cavity, the thermal emission spectrum is modified by a cavity mode, shifting the emission to the visible range spectrum. We believe our results demonstrate that hBN/graphene heterostructures can be used to conveniently explore the technologically important high-temperature regime and to pave the way for future optoelectronic applications of graphene-based systems.

  14. Atomistic modeling of interfacial interaction between polyvinyl chloride and polypropylene with Boron-Nitride monolayer sheet: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Mashhadzadeh, A.; Fereidoon, A.; Ghorbanzadeh Ahangari, M.

    2017-11-01

    In present work, we performed Density Functional Theory calculation (DFT) to prepare polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nanocomposite. For mentioned purpose, we chose Boron-Nitride graphene (BN-graphene) sheet as nano reinforcement. Next, we calculated adsorbed energy between these two polymeric matrixes with BN-monolayer sheet. Our DFT results demonstrated that interaction energy between PP/BN-graphene and PVC/BN-graphene are equal, approximately, because in mentioned two nanocomposite systems, polymer matrix approached to nano reinforcement from hydrogen atom in optimized structure. Then, the adsorbed energy and equilibrium distance between mentioned polymeric matrixes and BN-graphene sheet in nanocomposite with increasing the number of polymer monomers onto surface of BN-graphene were calculated. Finally, we modeled van der Waals interfacial interaction between polymer matrixes and nano reinforcement with linear classical spring by using lennard-jones parameters.

  15. Structural phase transitions in two-dimensional Mo- and W-dichalcogenide monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N; Li, Yao; Reed, Evan J

    2014-07-01

    Mo- and W-dichalcogenide compounds have a two-dimensional monolayer form that differs from graphene in an important respect: it can potentially have more than one crystal structure. Some of these monolayers exhibit tantalizing hints of a poorly understood structural metal-to-insulator transition with the possibility of long metastable lifetimes. If controllable, such a transition could bring an exciting new application space to monolayer materials beyond graphene. Here we discover that mechanical deformations provide a route to switching thermodynamic stability between a semiconducting and a metallic crystal structure in these monolayer materials. Based on state-of-the-art density functional and hybrid Hartree-Fock/density functional calculations including vibrational energy corrections, we discover that MoTe2 is an excellent candidate phase change material. We identify a range from 0.3 to 3% for the tensile strains required to transform MoTe2 under uniaxial conditions at room temperature. The potential for mechanical phase transitions is predicted for all six studied compounds.

  16. h-BN-layer-induced chiral decomposition in the electronic properties of multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, I.; Maślanka, P.; Molenda, A.; Łuczak, K.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the chiral decomposition of non-symmetric stacking structures. It is shown that the low-energy electronic structure of a Bernal stacked graphene multilayer deposited on h-BN consists of chiral pseudospin doublets. N-layer graphene stacks on the h-BN layer have N/2 effective bilayer graphene systems and one effective h-BN layer if N is even or (N-1)/2 effective graphene bilayers plus one graphene monolayer modified by an h-BN layer if N is odd. We present the decomposition procedure and derive the recurrence relations for the effective parameters characterizing the chiral subsystems. In this case, the effective parameters consist of interlayer couplings and on-site potentials in contrast to pure graphene multilayer systems where only interlayer couplings are modified. We apply this procedure to discuss the Klein tunnelling phenomena and quantitatively compare the results with pure graphene multilayer systems.

  17. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  18. Protein adsorption to graphene surfaces controlled by chemical modification of the substrate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ogino, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated effects of the support substrate surfaces on properties of the attached graphene flakes by observing protein adsorption to the graphene surfaces on SiO2/Si substrates that are modified with self-assembled monolayers to control their hydrophilicity. Using atomic force microscopy operated in aqueous environment, we found that high-density clusters of agglomerated avidin molecules form on the graphene flakes in the areas supported by a hydrophobic substrate surface, whereas very low density of large avidin clusters form at the edge of graphene flakes in the area supported by a hydrophilic surface. These results demonstrate that hydrophilicity of the support surface affects hydrophilicity of the graphene surface also in aqueous environment and that surface modification of the support substrate is a useful technique to control protein adsorption phenomena on graphene surfaces for realization of high sensitive graphene biosensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  20. Positional order in Langmuir monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaganer, V.M.; Brezesinski, G.; Möhwald, H.

    1998-01-01

    We find that a structural solid-solid phase transition in a two-dimensional Langmuir film is accompanied by strong positional disorder. Specifically, we find by a grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction experiment that in monolayers of octadecanol both the hexagonal phase LS and the centered rectangu......We find that a structural solid-solid phase transition in a two-dimensional Langmuir film is accompanied by strong positional disorder. Specifically, we find by a grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction experiment that in monolayers of octadecanol both the hexagonal phase LS and the centered...

  1. Graphene hydrogenation by molecular hydrogen in the process of graphene oxide thermal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikoushkin, V. M.; Nikonov, S. Yu.; Dideykin, A. T.; Vul', A. Ya.; Sakseev, D. A.; Baidakova, M. V.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Nelyubov, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    Thermal reduction in molecular hydrogen of the graphene oxide films has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The restoration process was revealed to be accompanied by hydrogenation due to collisionally induced interaction of molecular hydrogen with carbon atoms. One side hydrogenated graphene films consisting of 20 μm one monolayer flakes were fabricated on SiO2/Si surface with hydrogen concentration as far as 40 at. %, at which the 0.3 eV bandgap opening was observed. It was shown that both H-coverage and bandgap width of the films can be controlled by varying the temperature of the heat treatment.

  2. Star polymer unimicelles on graphene oxide flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikjun; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Xu, Weinan; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-08-06

    We report the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm star copolymers (PSnP2VPn and PSn(P2VP-b-PtBA)n (n = 28 arms)) on graphene oxide flakes at the air-water interface. Adsorption, spreading, and ordering of star polymer micelles on the surface of the basal plane and edge of monolayer graphene oxide sheets were investigated on a Langmuir trough. This interface-mediated assembly resulted in micelle-decorated graphene oxide sheets with uniform spacing and organized morphology. We found that the surface activity of solvated graphene oxide sheets enables star polymer surfactants to subsequently adsorb on the presuspended graphene oxide sheets, thereby producing a bilayer complex. The positively charged heterocyclic pyridine-containing star polymers exhibited strong affinity onto the basal plane and edge of graphene oxide, leading to a well-organized and long-range ordered discrete micelle assembly. The preferred binding can be related to the increased conformational entropy due to the reduction of interarm repulsion. The extent of coverage was tuned by controlling assembly parameters such as concentration and solvent polarity. The polymer micelles on the basal plane remained incompressible under lateral compression in contrast to ones on the water surface due to strongly repulsive confined arms on the polar surface of graphene oxide and a preventive barrier in the form of the sheet edges. The densely packed biphasic tile-like morphology was evident, suggesting the high interfacial stability and mechanically stiff nature of graphene oxide sheets decorated with star polymer micelles. This noncovalent assembly represents a facile route for the control and fabrication of graphene oxide-inclusive ultrathin hybrid films applicable for layered nanocomposites.

  3. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Peter J; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-04-01

    'Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation' is a new concept for attempting resuscitation from cardiac arrest of patients who currently (totally or temporarily) cannot be resuscitated, such as traumatic exsanguination cardiac arrest. Suspended animation means preservation of the viability of brain and organism during cardiac arrest, until restoration of stable spontaneous circulation or prolonged artificial circulation is possible. Suspended animation for exsanguination cardiac arrest of trauma victims would have to be induced within the critical first 5 min after the start of cardiac arrest no-flow, to buy time for transport and resuscitative surgery (hemostasis) performed during no-flow. Cardiac arrest is then reversed with all-out resuscitation, usually requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Suspended animation has been explored and documented as effective in dogs in terms of long-term survival without brain damage after very prolonged cardiac arrest. In the 1990s, the Pittsburgh group achieved survival without brain damage in dogs after cardiac arrest of up to 90 min no-flow at brain (tympanic) temperature of 10 degrees C, with functionally and histologically normal brains. These studies used emergency cardiopulmonary bypass with heat exchanger or a single hypothermic saline flush into the aorta, which proved superior to pharmacologic strategies. For the large number of normovolemic sudden cardiac death victims, which currently cannot be resuscitated, more research in large animals is needed.

  4. Study of the interaction between graphene and planar terahertz metamaterial with toroidal dipolar resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Fan, Wenhui

    2017-05-15

    A planar terahertz metamaterial consisting of square split ring resonators is proposed, and the excitation of toroidal dipolar resonance is demonstrated. Moreover, we theoretically investigate the strong interaction between graphene and toroidal dipolar resonance of the metamaterial. By varying its Fermi energy, the simulations show that graphene can actively modulate the transmission amplitude of toroidal dipolar resonance and even switch it off. The interaction of the toroidal dipolar resonance with monolayer graphene further highlights the ultrasensitive sensing characteristic of the planar metamaterial, which can be utilized for other graphene-like two-dimensional materials. These intriguing properties of the proposed metamaterial may have potential applications in terahertz modulators and ultrasensitive sensors.

  5. Intersubband Landau Level Couplings Induced by In-Plane Magnetic Fields in Trilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuta; Masubuchi, Satoru; Inoue, Naoko; Morikawa, Sei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Machida, Tomoki

    2017-11-01

    We observed broken-symmetry quantum Hall effects and level crossings between spin- and valley- resolved Landau levels (LLs) in Bernal stacked trilayer graphene. When the magnetic field was tilted with respect to the sample normal from 0° to 66°, the LL crossings formed at intersections of zeroth and second LLs from monolayer-graphene-like and bilayer-graphene-like subbands, respectively, exhibited a sequence of transitions. The results indicate the LLs from different subbands are coupled by in-plane magnetic fields (B∥), which was explained by developing the tight-binding model Hamiltonian of trilayer graphene under B∥.

  6. Arsenic carbide monolayer: First principles prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mosayeb

    2017-11-01

    Using the first principles calculation, a new pentagonal indirect band gap semiconductor namely arsenic carbide monolayer (As2C) is predicted. The calculated cohesive energy of -5.69 eV/atom the thermodynamic stability of the predicted monolayer. Furthermore, the kinetic stability of the monolayer is examined by phonon dispersion calculation, where the absence of imaginary modes and high value of maximum phonon frequency confirms the high dynamic stability of the proposed monolayer. Investigating in the electronic properties of the As2C monolayer indicates that it is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.62 eV. Analyzing the optical properties of the As2C monolayer imply that the monolayer has high UV light absorption, however, it has an almost zero absorption in visible region of electromagnetic spectra. The specific electronic and optical properties imply that As2C monolayer may be used in new generation of nano-optoelectronic technology design.

  7. Graphene Nanodevices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calado, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes a divergent set of experiments on graphene, a one-atom thin sheet of carbon. We employ graphene’s unique properties to explore fundamental physics and novel applications. This is done by nano fabricating graphene to nanodevices, which are subject to experiments. Here we first

  8. Versatile Polymer-Free Graphene Transfer Method and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Güell, Aleix G; Kirkman, Paul M; Lazenby, Robert A; Miller, Thomas S; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-01

    A new method for transferring chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown monolayer graphene to a variety of substrates is described. The method makes use of an organic/aqueous biphasic configuration, avoiding the use of any polymeric materials that can cause severe contamination problems. The graphene-coated copper foil sample (on which graphene was grown) sits at the interface between hexane and an aqueous etching solution of ammonium persulfate to remove the copper. With the aid of an Si/SiO2 substrate, the graphene layer is then transferred to a second hexane/water interface to remove etching products. From this new location, CVD graphene is readily transferred to arbitrary substrates, including three-dimensional architectures as represented by atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Graphene produces a conformal layer on AFM tips, to the very end, allowing easy production of tips for conductive AFM imaging. Graphene transferred to copper TEM grids provides large-area, highly electron-transparent substrates for TEM imaging. These substrates can also be used as working electrodes for electrochemistry and high-resolution wetting studies. By using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy, it is possible to make electrochemical and wetting measurements at either a freestanding graphene film or a copper-supported graphene area and readily determine any differences in behavior.

  9. Graphene Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo

    The production of graphene and the other 2D materials is presented in the beginning of this thesis. Micromechanical exfoliation is the best method for obtaining relatively small and top quality samples. The invention of Graphene Finder simplifies the procedure of finding the exfoliated flakes...... in copper thin films is studied and found to be detrimental for the growth of graphene. The modified synthesis of rGO is introduced, as rGO represents a cheap alternative to CVD for large scale production of graphene. The transfer of flakes is performed by several methods, such as with PVA/PMMA support, CAB...... wedging and the pick-up technique with hBN. Several important improvements of the pick-up technique are introduced. These allowed us to transfer any 2D crystals and patterned graphene flakes with PMMA residues. We also developed the drop-down technique, which is used to release any crystal on the surface...

  10. Graphene-based liquid crystal microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yong; Luo, Jun; Lei, Yu; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we design and fabricate a kind of liquid crystal microlens arrays (LCMAs) with patterned electrodes made of monolayer graphene, which is grown on copper sheet by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene is the first two-dimensional atomic crystal. It uniquely combines extreme mechanical strength, high optically transmittance from visible light to infrared spectrum, and excellent electrical conductivity. These properties make it highly attractive for various applications in photonic devices that require conductive but transparent thin films. The graphene-based LCMAs have shown excellent optical performances in the tests. By adjusting the voltage signal loaded over the graphene-based LCMAs, the point spread functions (PSF) and focusing images of incident laser beams with different wavelengths, could be obtained. At the same time, we also get the focusing images of the common ITO-based LCMAs under the same experimental conditions to discuss the advantages and disadvantages between them. Further, the graphene-based LCMAs are also used in visible imaging. During the imaging tests, the graphene electrodes in the LCMAs work well.

  11. Electrically Controllable Magnetism in Twisted Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A; Lado, J L; Guinea, Francisco; San-Jose, Pablo

    2017-09-08

    Twisted graphene bilayers develop highly localized states around AA-stacked regions for small twist angles. We show that interaction effects may induce either an antiferromagnetic or a ferromagnetic (FM) polarization of said regions, depending on the electrical bias between layers. Remarkably, FM-polarized AA regions under bias develop spiral magnetic ordering, with a relative 120° misalignment between neighboring regions due to a frustrated antiferromagnetic exchange. This remarkable spiral magnetism emerges naturally without the need of spin-orbit coupling, and competes with the more conventional lattice-antiferromagnetic instability, which interestingly develops at smaller bias under weaker interactions than in monolayer graphene, due to Fermi velocity suppression. This rich and electrically controllable magnetism could turn twisted bilayer graphene into an ideal system to study frustrated magnetism in two dimensions.

  12. Exposure monitoring of graphene nanoplatelets manufacturing workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Boowook; Bello, Dhimiter; Kim, Jin Kwon; Lee, Gun Ho; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyungmin; Ahn, Kangho; Faustman, Elaine M; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    Graphenes have emerged as a highly promising, two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial that can possibly substitute carbon nanotubes. They are being explored in numerous R&D and industrial applications in laboratories across the globe, leading to possible human and environmental exposures to them. Yet, there are no published data on graphene exposures in occupational settings and no readily available methods for their detection and quantitation exist. This study investigates for the first time the potential exposure of workers and research personnel to graphenes in two research facilities and evaluates the status of the control measures. One facility manufactures graphene using graphite exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the other facility grows graphene on a copper plate using CVD, which is then transferred to a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. Graphene exposures and process emissions were investigated for three tasks - CVD growth, exfoliation, and transfer - using a multi-metric approach, which utilizes several direct reading instruments, integrated sampling, and chemical and morphological analysis. Real-time instruments included a dust monitor, condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor, scanning mobility particle sizer, and an aethalometer. Morphologically, graphenes and other nanostructures released from the work process were investigated using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Graphenes were quantified in airborne respirable samples as elemental carbon via thermo-optical analysis. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate at Workplaces A and B were very low, and elemental carbon concentrations were mostly below the detection limit, indicating very low exposure to graphene or any other particles. The real-time monitoring, especially the aethalometer, showed a good response to the released black carbon, providing a signature of the graphene released during the opening of the CVD reactor

  13. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... part thereof during a particular period of time specified in the rule. ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means to...

  14. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    der Waals (vdW) interaction and the coupling of C-H/π/C-F interaction and π/π interaction are proven to offer the continuous driving force of self-assembly of J-GN. The results show that J-GN can self-assemble into various J-NSs structures, including arcs, multi-wall J-NS and arm-chair-like J...... driving force of the self-assembly. Finally, we studied the hydrogen sorption over the formed J-NS with a considerable interlayer spacing, which reaches the US DOE target, indicating that J-NS is a promising candidate for hydrogen storage by controlling the temperature of system. Our theoretical results...

  15. Transmission properties of Dirac electrons through Cantor monolayer graphene superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rodríguez-González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo usamos el método de la matriz de transferencia para estudiar el tunelamiento de los electrones de Dirac a través de superredes aperiodicas en grafeno. Consideramos una hoja de grafeno depositada encima de bloques de sustratos de Óxido de Silicio (SiO2 y Carburo de Silicio (SiC, en los cuales aplicamos la serie de Cantor. Calculamos la transmitancia para diferentes parámetros fundamentales tales como: ancho de partida, energía de incidencia, ángulo de incidencia y número de generación de la serie de Cantor. En este caso, la transmitancia como función de la energía presenta rasgos autosimilares al variar el número de generación. También computamos la distribución angular de la transmitancia para energías fijas econtrando un patrón autosimilar entre generaciones. Por último, calculamos los factores de escala para algunos espectros de la transmitancia, los cuales efectivamente muestran escalabilidad.

  16. Noninvasive Scanning Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography for Graphene Membrane Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stefan; Dieing, Thomas; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Smith, Anderson D; Östling, Mikael; Kataria, Satender; Lemme, Max C

    2017-03-08

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, making it a promising material for membrane-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene is transferred onto target substrates to suspend it over cavities and trenches for pressure-sensor applications. The development of such devices requires suitable metrology methods, i.e., large-scale characterization techniques, to confirm and analyze successful graphene transfer with intact suspended graphene membranes. We propose fast and noninvasive Raman spectroscopy mapping to distinguish between free-standing and substrate-supported graphene, utilizing the different strain and doping levels. The technique is expanded to combine two-dimensional area scans with cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy, resulting in three-dimensional Raman tomography of membrane-based graphene NEMS. The potential of Raman tomography for in-line monitoring is further demonstrated with a methodology for automated data analysis to spatially resolve the material composition in micrometer-scale integrated devices, including free-standing and substrate-supported graphene. Raman tomography may be applied to devices composed of other two-dimensional materials as well as silicon micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  17. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  18. Amplifying charge-transfer characteristics of graphene for triiodide reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Santanu; Verma, Ved [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, 33174 (United States); Sudhagar, P.; Song, Donghoon; Kang, Yong Soo [WCU Program Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133791 (Korea, Republic of); Ito, Eisuke; Lee, Sang Yun [Flucto-Order Functions Research Team, RIKEN-ASI, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Choi, WonBong [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, 33174 (United States); WCU Program Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-07

    The fabrication and functionalization of large-area graphene and its electrocatalytic properties for iodine reduction in a dye-sensitized solar cell are reported. The graphene film, grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition, contains three to five layers of monolayer graphene, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Further, the graphene film is treated with CF{sub 4} reactive-ion plasma and fluorine ions are successfully doped into graphene as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-photoemission spectroscopy. The fluorinated graphene shows no structural deformations compared to the pristine graphene except an increase in surface roughness. Electrochemical characterization reveals that the catalytic activity of graphene for iodine reduction increases with increasing plasma treatment time, which is attributed to an increase in catalytic sites. Further, the fluorinated graphene is characterized in use as a counter-electrode in a full dye-sensitized solar cell and shows ca. 2.56% photon to electron conversion efficiency with ca. 11 mA cm{sup -2} current density. The shift in work function in F{sup -} doped graphene is attributed to the shift in graphene redox potential which results in graphene's electrocatalytic-activity enhancement. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  20. Characterizing Edge and Stacking Structures of Exfoliated Graphene by Photoelectron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Ishii, Ryo; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Morita, Makoto; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Koh, Shinji; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    The two-dimensional C 1s photoelectron intensity angular distributions (PIADs) and spectra of exfoliated graphene flakes and crystalline graphite were measured using a focused soft X-ray beam. Suitable graphene samples were selected by thickness characterization using Raman spectromicroscopy after transferring mechanically exfoliated graphene flakes onto a 90-nm-thick SiO2 film. In every PIAD, a Kagomé interference pattern was observed, particularly clearly in the monolayer graphene PIAD. Its origin is the overlap of the diffraction rings formed by an in-plane C-C bond honeycomb lattice. Thus, the crystal orientation of each sample can be determined. In the case of bilayer graphene, PIAD was threefold-symmetric, while those of monolayer graphene and crystalline graphite were sixfold-symmetric. This is due to the stacking structure of bilayer graphene. From comparisons with the multiple scattering PIAD simulation results, the way of layer stacking as well as the termination types in the edge regions of bilayer graphene flakes were determined. Furthermore, two different C 1s core levels corresponding to the top and bottom layers of bilayer graphene were identified. A chemical shift to a higher binding energy by 0.25 eV for the bottom layer was attributed to interfacial interactions.

  1. Effect of copper surface pre-treatment on the properties of CVD grown graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sik Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene on the pre-treated copper (Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition method. The pre-treatment process, which consists of pre-annealing in a hydrogen ambient, followed by diluted nitric acid etching of Cu foil, helps in removing impurities. These impurities include native copper oxide and rolling lines that act as a nucleation center for multilayer graphene. Raman mapping of our graphene grown on pre-treated Cu foil primarily consisted of ∼98% a monolayer graphene with as compared to 75 % for the graphene grown on untreated Cu foil. A high hydrogen flow rate during the pre-annealing process resulted in an increased I2D/IG ratio of graphene up to 3.55. Uniform monolayer graphene was obtained with a I2D/IG ratio and sheet resistance varying from 1.84 – 3.39 and 1110 – 1290 Ω/□, respectively.

  2. Optimal Charge-to-Spin Conversion in Graphene on Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offidani, Manuel; Milletarı, Mirco; Raimondi, Roberto; Ferreira, Aires

    2017-11-01

    When graphene is placed on a monolayer of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) its band structure develops rich spin textures due to proximity spin-orbital effects with interfacial breaking of inversion symmetry. In this work, we show that the characteristic spin winding of low-energy states in graphene on a TMD monolayer enables current-driven spin polarization, a phenomenon known as the inverse spin galvanic effect (ISGE). By introducing a proper figure of merit, we quantify the efficiency of charge-to-spin conversion and show it is close to unity when the Fermi level approaches the spin minority band. Remarkably, at high electronic density, even though subbands with opposite spin helicities are occupied, the efficiency decays only algebraically. The giant ISGE predicted for graphene on TMD monolayers is robust against disorder and remains large at room temperature.

  3. Direct transfer and Raman characterization of twisted graphene bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmen, R., E-mail: riadh.othmen@lpn.cnrs.fr [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, Campus Universitaire, 2092 El Manar Tunis (Tunisia); CNRS/LPN, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Arezki, H.; Boutchich, M. [GeePs, CNRS UMR8507, CentraleSupelec, Univ Paris-Sud, Sorbonne Universités-UPMC, Univ Paris 06, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ajlani, H.; Oueslati, M. [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, Campus Universitaire, 2092 El Manar Tunis (Tunisia); Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A. [CNRS/LPN, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France)

    2015-03-09

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is constituted of a two-graphene layer with a mismatch angle θ between the two hexagonal structures. It has recently attracted much attention—thanks to its diverse electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the tBLG fabricated by the direct transfer of graphene monolayer prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto another CVD graphene layer remaining attached to the copper foil. We show that high quality and homogeneous tBLG can be obtained by the direct transfer which prevents interface contamination. In this situation, the top graphene layer plays a supporting mechanical role to the bottom graphene layer as confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of annealing tBLG was also investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra exhibit a splitting of the G peak as well as a change in the 2D band shape indicating a possible decoupling of the two monolayers. We attribute these changes to the different interactions of the top and bottom layers with the substrate.

  4. Magnetism in a graphene-4 f -3 d hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttmann, Felix; Klar, David; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Schmitz-Antoniak, Carolin; Smekhova, Alevtina; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Caciuc, Vasile; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Blügel, Stefan; Michely, Thomas; Wende, Heiko

    2017-02-01

    We create an interface of graphene with a metallic and magnetic support that leaves its electronic structure largely intact. This is achieved by exposing epitaxial graphene on ferromagnetic thin films of Co and Ni to vapor of the rare earth metal Eu at elevated temperatures, resulting in the intercalation of an Eu monolayer in between graphene and its substrate. The system is atomically well defined, with the Eu monolayer forming a (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure with respect to the graphene lattice. Thereby, we avoid the strong hybridization with the (Ni,Co) substrate 3 d states that otherwise drastically modify the electronic structure of graphene. This picture is suggested by our x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements which show that after Eu intercalation the empty 2 p states of C atoms resemble more the ones measured for graphite in contrast to graphene directly bound to 3 d ferromagnetic substrates. We use x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co and Ni L2 ,3 and Eu M4 ,5 as an element-specific probe to investigate magnetism in these systems. An antiferromagnetic coupling between Eu and Co/Ni moments is found, which is so strong that a magnetic moment of the Eu layer can be detected at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the antiferromagnetic coupling and provide an atomic insight into the magnetic coupling mechanism.

  5. Intrinsic ferromagnetism and quantum anomalous Hall effect in a CoBr2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zou, Jin-Yu; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2017-05-31

    The electronic, magnetic, and topological properties of a CoBr2 monolayer are studied in the framework of density-functional theory (DFT) combined with tight-binding (TB) modeling in terms of the Wannier basis. Our DFT investigation and Monte Carlo simulation show that there exists intrinsic two-dimensional ferromagnetism in the CoBr2 monolayer, thanks to the large out-of-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropic energy. Our further study indicates that the spin-orbit coupling makes it become a topologically nontrivial insulator with a quantum anomalous Hall effect and topological Chern number [script C] = 4 and its edge states can be manipulated by changing the width of its nanoribbons and applying strains. The CoBr2 monolayer can be exfoliated from the layered CoBr2 bulk material because its exfoliation energy is between those of graphene and the MoS2 monolayer and it is dynamically stable. These results make us believe that the CoBr2 monolayer can make a promising spintronic material for future high-performance devices.

  6. Hexagonal boron nitride: a promising substrate for graphene with high heat dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Hu, Shiqian; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2017-06-01

    Supported graphene on a standard SiO2 substrate exhibits unsatisfactory heat dissipation performance that is far inferior to the intrinsic ultrahigh thermal conductivity of a suspended sample. A suitable substrate for enhancing thermal transport in supported graphene is highly desirable for the development of graphene devices for thermal management. By using molecular dynamics simulations, here we demonstrate that bulk hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a more appealing substrate to achieve high performance heat dissipation in supported graphene. Notable length dependence and high thermal conductivity are observed in h-BN-supported single-layer graphene (SLG), suggesting that the thermal transport characteristics are close to that of suspended SLG. At room temperature, the thermal conductivity of h-BN-supported SLG is as high as 1347.3 ± 20.5 Wm-1 K-1, which is about 77% of that for the suspended case, and is more than twice that of the SiO2-supported SLG. Furthermore, we find that the smooth and atomically flat h-BN substrate gives rise to a regular and weak stress distribution in graphene, resulting in a less affected phonon relaxation time and dominant phonon mean free path. We also find that stacking and rotation significantly impacts the thermal transport in h-BN-supported graphene. Our study provides valuable insights towards the design of graphene devices on realistic substrate for high performance heat dissipation applications.

  7. Nematic phase formation in suspensions of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Nathalie; Campidelli, Stéphane

    The last decade has seen the rise of graphene. Graphene is a single layer of graphite; it can be obtained by direct liquid phase exfoliation of the latter through harsh sonication. This technique presents the disadvantage to produce small graphene flakes (typically in the 0.05 to 0.4 μm2 range for the monolayers) and multilayer graphene with uncontrolled thickness distributions. In order to improve the exfoliation process, one has to counter the strong van der Waals interactions between the carbon planes of graphite. This implies to increase the distance between two planes and it can be done, for example, by oxidizing graphite to introduce oxygen species in the graphenic planes. The fabrication of graphite oxide is known for almost 150 years, and it became popular again these last ten years. Generally, the oxidation of graphite is performed following a method described by Hummers in the 1950's and the material produced by this technique exfoliates quasi-spontaneously into monolayer species called graphene oxide (GO). The highly anisotropic shape of GO (several μm in length and width for a thickness of ca. 1 nm) combined with the presence of oxygenated functions on the sp2 carbon structure of graphene lead to the formation of a lyotropic liquid crystalline phase in water. Above a certain concentration of graphene flakes the gain in translational entropy for a long-range ordered phase outweighs the loss in rotational entropy, and the liquid crystal phase then forms. The value of the threshold is affected by the aspect ratio of the graphene flakes but other factors such as the interactions also play a strong role.

  8. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  9. Nanomechanical properties of few-layer graphene membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical properties of few-layer graphene and graphite flakes that are suspended over circular holes. The spatial profile of the flake’s spring constant is measured with an atomic force microscope. The bending rigidity of and the tension in the membranes are extracted by

  10. Chemical and Bandgap Engineering in Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Kun; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jingxin; Bao, Jingxian; Xuan, Ningning; Sun, Yangye; Liu, Bing; Xie, Aozhen; Wu, Shiwei; Sun, Zhengzong

    2017-04-03

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses a wide bandgap of ~6 eV. Trimming down the bandgap is technically attractive, yet poses remarkable challenges in chemistry. One strategy is to topological reform the h-BN's hexagonal structure, which involves defects or grain boundaries (GBs) engineering in the basal plane. The other way is to invite foreign atoms, such as carbon, to forge bizarre hybrid structures like hetero-junctions or semiconducting h-BNC materials. Here we successfully developed a general chemical method to synthesize these different h-BN derivatives, showcasing how the chemical structure can be manipulated with or without a graphene precursor, and the bandgap be tuned to ~2 eV, only one third of the pristine one's.

  11. Graphene Exfoliation at a Ferroelectric Domain Wall Induced by the Piezoelectric Effect: Impact on the Conductance of the Graphene Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Kurchak, Anatolii I.; Strikha, Maksym V.

    2017-11-01

    p -n junctions in graphene on ferroelectric substrates have been actively studied, but the impact of the piezoelectric effect in ferroelectric substrate with ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) on graphene characteristics was not considered. Because of the piezoeffect, ferroelectric domain stripes with opposite spontaneous polarizations elongate or contract depending on the polarity of voltage applied to the substrate. We show that the alternating piezoelectric displacement of the ferroelectric domain surfaces can lead to the alternate stretching and separation of graphene areas at the steps between elongated and contracted domains. Graphene separation at FDWs induced by the piezoeffect can cause unusual effects. In particular, the conductance of the graphene channel in a field-effect transistor increases significantly because electrons in the stretched section scatter on acoustic phonons. At the same time, the graphene conductance is determined by ferroelectric spontaneous polarization and varies greatly in the presence of FDWs. The revealed piezomechanism of graphene conductance control is promising for next generations of graphene-based field-effect transistors, modulators, electrical transducers, and piezoresistive elements. Also, our results propose the method of suspended graphene fabrication based on the piezoeffect in a ferroelectric substrate that does not require any additional technological procedures.

  12. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine 'single-layer' graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards 'single-layer' graphene (that is, with thicknesses graphene sheets show negligible structural deterioration. They are also readily redispersible in oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml(-1), and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  13. Beyond graphene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Service, Robert F

    2015-01-01

      In 2013, researchers around the globe published more than 15000 papers on single-layer graphite, called graphene, a number that has grown exponentially since the material was invented 11 years ago...

  14. Temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuation due to development of weak localization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, D.; Fukuda, A.; Fujimoto, A.; Ohno, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2017-11-01

    The temperature effect of quantum interference on resistivity is examined in monolayer graphene, with experimental results showing that the amplitude of the conductance fluctuation increases as temperature decreases. We find that this behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the inelastic scattering (dephasing) rate, which enhances the weak localization (WL) correction to resistivity. Following a previous report that explained the relationship between the universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) and WL regarding the gate voltage dependence (Terasawa et al., 2017) [19], we propose that the temperature dependence of the UCF in monolayer graphene can be interpreted by the WL theory.

  15. Rebar Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  16. Unusually low and density-insensitive thermal conductivity of three-dimensional gyroid graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gang Seob; Yeo, Jingjie; Tian, Zhiting; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-09-21

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. However, there are limitations in utilizing monolayers of graphene for mechanical engineering applications due to its atomic thickness and lack of bending rigidity. Synthesizing graphene aerogels or foams is one approach to utilize graphene in three-dimensional bulk forms. Recently, graphene with a gyroidal geometry has been proposed. A gyroid is a triply periodic minimal surface that allows graphene sheets to form a three-dimensional structure. Its light weight and high mechanical strength suggests that the graphene that constitutes this geometry can synergistically contribute to the mechanics of the bulk material. However, it is not clear whether gyroid graphene can preserve the high thermal conductivity of pristine graphene sheets. Here, we investigate the thermal conductivities of gyroid graphene with different porosities by using full-atom molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to its excellent mechanical properties, we find that the thermal conductivity of gyroid graphene is more than 300 times lower than that of pristine graphene, with a bulk density of only about one-third of that of graphene. We derive a scaling law showing that the thermal conductivity does not vary much with different bulk densities, which contrasts the behavior of conventional porous materials. Our analysis shows that the poor thermal conductivity of gyroid graphene can be attributed to defects and curvatures of graphene, which increase with the density, resulting in the reduction of a phonon mean free path by phonon scattering. Our study shows that three-dimensional porous graphene has potential that may be utilized in designing new lightweight structural materials with low and density-insensitive thermal properties and superior mechanical strength.

  17. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jou, Shyankay, E-mail: sjou@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  18. Static Capacitive Pressure Sensing Using a Single Graphene Drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovikj, Dejan; Scheepers, Paul H; van der Zant, Herre S J; Steeneken, Peter G

    2017-12-13

    To realize nanomechanical graphene-based pressure sensors, it is beneficial to have a method to electrically readout the static displacement of a suspended graphene membrane. Capacitive readout, typical in micro-electromechanical systems, gets increasingly challenging as one starts shrinking the dimensions of these devices because the expected responsivity of such devices is below 0.1 aF/Pa. To overcome the challenges of detecting small capacitance changes, we design an electrical readout device fabricated on top of an insulating quartz substrate, maximizing the contribution of the suspended membrane to the total capacitance of the device. The capacitance of the drum is further increased by reducing the gap size to 110 nm. Using an external pressure load, we demonstrate the successful detection of capacitance changes of a single graphene drum down to 50 aF, and pressure differences down to 25 mbar.

  19. Plasmonic silicon Schottky photodetectors: The physics behind graphene enhanced internal photoemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Levy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have shown that the plasmonic assisted internal photoemission from a metal to silicon can be significantly enhanced by introducing a monolayer of graphene between the two media. This is despite the limited absorption in a monolayer of undoped graphene ( ∼ π α = 2.3 % . Here we propose a physical model where surface plasmon polaritons enhance the absorption in a single-layer graphene by enhancing the field along the interface. The relatively long relaxation time in graphene allows for multiple attempts for the carrier to overcome the Schottky barrier and penetrate into the semiconductor. Interface disorder is crucial to overcome the momentum mismatch in the internal photoemission process. Our results show that quantum efficiencies in the range of few tens of percent are obtainable under reasonable experimental assumptions. This insight may pave the way for the implementation of compact, high efficiency silicon based detectors for the telecom range and beyond.

  20. Synthesis and assembly of Pd nanoparticles on graphene for enhanced electrooxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Guo, Shaojun; Zuo, Jing-Lin; Sun, Shouheng

    2012-12-01

    Monodisperse 4.5 nm Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by solution phase reduction of palladium acetylacetonate with morpholine borane in a mixture of oleylamine and 1-octadecene. These NPs were assembled on graphene uniformly in the form of a monolayer, and showed much enhanced catalysis for electrooxidation of formic acid. The work demonstrates the great potential of graphene as a support to enhance NP catalysis and stability for important chemical oxidation reactions.Monodisperse 4.5 nm Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by solution phase reduction of palladium acetylacetonate with morpholine borane in a mixture of oleylamine and 1-octadecene. These NPs were assembled on graphene uniformly in the form of a monolayer, and showed much enhanced catalysis for electrooxidation of formic acid. The work demonstrates the great potential of graphene as a support to enhance NP catalysis and stability for important chemical oxidation reactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33060a

  1. Tuning the electronic transport properties of graphene through functionalisation with fluorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubois Marc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the possibility to tune the electronic transport properties of graphene mono-layers and multi-layers by functionalisation with fluorine. For mono-layer samples, with increasing the fluorine content, we observe a transition from electronic transport through Mott variable range hopping (VRH in two dimensions to Efros-Shklovskii VRH. Multi-layer fluorinated graphene with high concentration of fluorine show two-dimensional Mott VRH transport, whereas CF0.28 multi-layer flakes exhibit thermally activated transport through near neighbour hopping. Our experimental findings demonstrate that the ability to control the degree of functionalisation of graphene is instrumental to engineer different electronic properties in graphene materials.

  2. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of van der Waals graphene/semiconductor interfaces: absence of Fermi level pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quang, T.; Cherkez, V.; Nogajewski, K.; Potemski, M.; Dau, M. T.; Jamet, M.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), namely trilayer WSe2 and monolayer MoSe2, deposited on epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide, by using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) in ultra-high vacuum. Depending on the number of graphene layers below the TMD flakes, we identified variations in the electronic dI/dV(V) spectra measured by the STM tip: the most salient feature is a rigid shift of the TMD spectra (i.e. of the different band onset positions) towards occupied states by about 120 mV when passing from bilayer to monolayer underlying graphene. Since both graphene phases are metallic and present a work function difference in the same energy range, our measurements point towards the absence of Fermi-level pinning for such van der Waals 2D TMD/Metal heterojunctions, following the prediction of the Schottky-Mott model.

  3. Spin and valley resolved Landau level crossing in tri-layer ABA stacked graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Biswajit; Gupta, Vishakha; Borah, Abhinandan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We present quantum Hall measurements on a high quality encapsulated tri-layer graphene device. Low temperature field effect mobility of this device is around 500,000 cm2/Vs and we see SdH oscillations at a magnetic field as low as 0.3 T. Quantum Hall measurements confirm that the chosen tri layer graphene is Bernal (ABA) stacked. Due to the presence of both mass-less monolayer like Dirac fermions and massive bi-layer like Dirac fermions in Bernal stacked tri-layer graphene, there are Landau level crossings between monolayer and bi-layer bands in quantum Hall regime. Although most of the Landau Level crossings are predominantly present on the electron sides, we also observe signatures of the crossings on the hole side. This behaviour is consistent with the asymmetry of electron and hole in ABA tri-layer graphene. We observe a series of crossings of the spin and valley resolved Landau Levels.

  4. Bound states in nanoscale graphene quantum dots in a continuous graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jia-Bin; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Haiwen; Yang, Hong; Yang, Ning; Qiao, Kai-Yao; He, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Considerable efforts have been made to trap massless Dirac fermions in a graphene monolayer, but only quasibound states have been realized in continuous graphene sheets up to now. Here, we demonstrate the realization of bound states in nanoscale graphene quantum dots (GQDs) in a continuous graphene sheet. The GQDs are electronically isolated from the surrounding continuous graphene sheet by circular boundaries, which are generated by strong coupling between graphene and the substrate. By using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we observe single-electron charging states of the GQDs, seen as Coulomb oscillations in the tunneling conductance. The evolution of single-electron tunneling of the GQDs between the Coulomb blockade regime and the Coulomb staircase regime is observed by tuning the STM tip-sample distances. Spatial maps of the local electronic densities reveal concentric rings inside the GQDs with each ring corresponding to a single Coulomb oscillation of the tunneling spectra. These results indicate explicitly that the electrons are completely trapped inside the nanoscale GQDs.

  5. Ion trapping by the graphene electrode in a graphene-ITO hybrid liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Lee, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    A monolayer graphene coated glass slide and an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slide with a planar-aligning polyimide layer were placed together to make a planar hybrid liquid crystal (LC) cell. The free-ion concentration in the LC was found to be significantly reduced in the graphene-ITO hybrid cell compared to that in a conventional ITO-ITO cell. The free-ion concentration was suppressed in the hybrid cell due to the graphene-electrode's ion trapping process. The dielectric anisotropy of the LC was found to increase in the hybrid cell, indicating an increase in the nematic order parameter of the LC due to the reduction of ionic impurities.

  6. Step driven competitive epitaxial and self-limited growth of graphene on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Fan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of surface steps was found to have significant function and influence on the growth of graphene on copper via chemical vapor deposition. The two typical growth modes involved were found to be influenced by the step morphologies on copper surface, which led to our proposed step driven competitive growth mechanism. We also discovered a protective role of graphene in preserving steps on copper surface. Our results showed that wide and high steps promoted epitaxial growth and yielded multilayer graphene domains with regular shape, while dense and low steps favored self-limited growth and led to large-area monolayer graphene films. We have demonstrated that controllable growth of graphene domains of specific shape and large-area continuous graphene films are feasible.

  7. Rational design of multifunctional devices based on molybdenum disulfide and graphene hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yi Rang; Lee, Young Bum; Kim, Seong Ku; Kim, Seong Jun; Kim, Yooseok; Jeon, Cheolho; Song, Wooseok; Myung, Sung; Lee, Sun Sook; An, Ki-Seok; Lim, Jongsun

    2017-01-01

    We rationally designed a new type of hybrid materials, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) synthesized by Mo pre-deposition followed by subsequent sulfurization process directly on thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD)-grown graphene, for applications in a multifunctional device. The synthesis of stoichiometric and uniform multilayer MoS2 and high-crystalline monolayer graphene was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. To examine the electrical transport and photoelectrical properties of MoS2-graphene hybrid films, field effect transistors (FETs) and visible-light photodetectors based on MoS2-graphene were both fabricated. As a result, the extracted mobility for MoS2-graphene hybrid FETs was two times higher than that of MoS2 FETs. In addition, the MoS2-graphene photodetectors revealed a significant photocurrent with abrupt switching behavior under periodic illumination.

  8. Photovoltaic Effect and Evidence of Carrier Multiplication in Graphene Vertical Homojunctions with Asymmetrical Metal Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Qinsheng; Meng, Jie; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bie, Ya-Qing; Liu, Junku; Liu, Kaihui; Liao, Zhi-Min; Sun, Dong; Yu, Dapeng

    2015-09-22

    Graphene exhibits exciting potentials for high-speed wideband photodetection and high quantum efficiency solar energy harvest because of its broad spectral absorption, fast photoelectric response, and potential carrier multiplication. Although photocurrent can be generated near a metal-graphene interface in lateral devices, the photoactive area is usually limited to a tiny one-dimensional line-like interface region. Here, we report photoelectric devices based on vertical graphene two-dimensional homojunction, which is fabricated via vertically stacking four graphene monolayers with asymmetric metal contacts. The devices show excellent photovoltaic output with excitation wavelength ranging from visible light to mid-infrared. The wavelength dependence of the internal quantum efficiency gives direct evidence of the carrier multiplication effect in graphene. The simple fabrication process, easy scale-up, large photoresponsive active area, and broadband response of the vertical graphene device are very promising for practical applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  9. Graphene and Graphene Nanomesh Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Haruyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spintronics, which manipulate spins but not electron charge, are highly valued as energy and thermal dissipationless systems. A variety of materials are challenging the realization of spintronic devices. Among those, graphene, a carbon mono-atomic layer, is very promising for efficient spin manipulation and the creation of a full spectrum of beyond-CMOS spin-based nano-devices. In the present article, the recent advancements in graphene spintronics are reviewed, introducing the observation of spin coherence and the spin Hall effect. Some research has reported the strong spin coherence of graphene. Avoiding undesirable influences from the substrate are crucial. Magnetism and spintronics arising from graphene edges are reviewed based on my previous results. In spite of carbon-based material with only sp2 bonds, the zigzag-type atomic structure of graphene edges theoretically produces spontaneous spin polarization of electrons due to mutual Coulomb interaction of extremely high electron density of states (edge states localizing at the flat energy band. We fabricate honeycomb-like arrays of low-defect hexagonal nanopores (graphene nanomeshes; GNMs on graphenes, which produce a large amount of zigzag pore edges, by using a nonlithographic method (nanoporous alumina templates and critical temperature annealing under high vacuum and hydrogen atmosphere. We observe large-magnitude ferromagnetism, which arises from polarized spins localizing at the hydrogen-terminated zigzag-nanopore edges of the GNMs, even at room temperature. Moreover, spin pumping effects are found for magnetic fields applied in parallel with the few-layer GNM planes. Strong spin coherence and spontaneously polarized edge spins of graphene can be expected to lead to novel spintronics with invisible, flexible, and ultra-light (wearable features.

  10. Enhanced universal absorption of graphene in a Salisbury screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiangxiao; Pu, Yang; Luo, Yi; Peng, Hao; Li, Zhe; Jiang, Yadong; Xu, Jimmy; Liu, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    As an emerging optoelectronic material, graphene's universal absorption of about 2.3% over a broad frequency range from infrared to visible, as determined by its interband transition, presents both a new opportunity and a limitation. Here we report on a multifold enhancement of the absorption using a simple strategy, often referred to as the Salisbury screen. It consists of a graphene sheet on top of a SiO2 dielectric layer backed with a copper metallic reflector. For a monolayer graphene, peak absorptions of 9% at near normal incidence and 40% at near grazing angle are experimentally demonstrated in the near-infrared region, in good agreement with calculations using transfer matrix method. The resultant absorption enhancement suggests a great potential for graphene to be used in infrared optoelectronic components.

  11. Oxidation-assisted graphene heteroepitaxy on copper foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, Nicolas; Tang, Xiaohui; Joucken, Frédéric; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Dubois, Emmanuel; Hackens, Benoît; Henrard, Luc; Colomer, Jean-François

    2016-11-10

    We propose an innovative, easy-to-implement approach to synthesize aligned large-area single-crystalline graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil. This method doubly takes advantage of residual oxygen present in the gas phase. First, by slightly oxidizing the copper surface, we induce grain boundary pinning in copper and, in consequence, the freezing of the thermal recrystallization process. Subsequent reduction of copper under hydrogen suddenly unlocks the delayed reconstruction, favoring the growth of centimeter-sized copper (111) grains through the mechanism of abnormal grain growth. Second, the oxidation of the copper surface also drastically reduces the nucleation density of graphene. This oxidation/reduction sequence leads to the synthesis of aligned millimeter-sized monolayer graphene domains in epitaxial registry with copper (111). The as-grown graphene flakes are demonstrated to be both single-crystalline and of high quality.

  12. Sublattice asymmetry of impurity doping in graphene: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Lawlor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review we highlight recent theoretical and experimental work on sublattice asymmetric doping of impurities in graphene, with a focus on substitutional nitrogen dopants. It is well known that one current limitation of graphene in regards to its use in electronics is that in its ordinary state it exhibits no band gap. By doping one of its two sublattices preferentially it is possible to not only open such a gap, which can furthermore be tuned through control of the dopant concentration, but in theory produce quasi-ballistic transport of electrons in the undoped sublattice, both important qualities for any graphene device to be used competetively in future technology. We outline current experimental techniques for synthesis of such graphene monolayers and detail theoretical efforts to explain the mechanisms responsible for the effect, before suggesting future research directions in this nascent field.

  13. Detection of graphene chirality using achiral liquid crystalline platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Garvey, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    Monolayer graphene flakes were dispersed at low concentrations into two achiral liquid crystals (LCs) alkoxyphenylbenzoate (9OO4) and 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), separately. The presence of graphene resulted in two types of chiral signatures in the LCs: an electroclinic effect (a polar tilt of the LC director perpendicular to, and linear in, an applied electric field) in the smectic-A phase of 9OO4, and a macroscopic helical twist of the LC director in the nematic phase of 5CB. Graphene flakes generally possess strain chirality and edge chirality. The non-covalent interactions between the LC molecules and chiral graphene flakes induce molecular conformational deracemization in the LC, exhibiting a bulk electroclinic effect and a macroscopic helical twist.

  14. Quantum imaging of current flow in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Dontschuk, Nikolai; Broadway, David A.; Stacey, Alastair; Simpson, David A.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2017-01-01

    Since its first discovery in 2004, graphene has been found to host a plethora of unusual electronic transport phenomena, making it a fascinating system for fundamental studies in condensed matter physics as well as offering tremendous opportunities for future electronic and sensing devices. Typically, electronic transport in graphene has been investigated via resistivity measurements; however, these measurements are generally blind to spatial information critical to observing and studying landmark transport phenomena in real space and in realistic imperfect devices. We apply quantum imaging to the problem and demonstrate noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of current flow in monolayer graphene structures. Our method uses an engineered array of near-surface, atomic-sized quantum sensors in diamond to map the vector magnetic field and reconstruct the vector current density over graphene geometries of varying complexity, from monoribbons to junctions, with spatial resolution at the diffraction limit and a projected sensitivity to currents as small as 1 μA. The measured current maps reveal strong spatial variations corresponding to physical defects at the submicrometer scale. The demonstrated method opens up an important new avenue to investigate fundamental electronic and spin transport in graphene structures and devices and, more generally, in emerging two-dimensional materials and thin-film systems. PMID:28508040

  15. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5-2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  16. Polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Adam W; Brown, Lola; Havener, Robin W; Park, Jiwoong

    2013-10-15

    Graphene, a truly two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms, possesses remarkable properties not seen in any other material, including ultrahigh electron mobility, high tensile strength, and uniform broadband optical absorption. While scientists initially studied its intrinsic properties with small, mechanically exfoliated graphene crystals found randomly, applying this knowledge would require growing large-area films with uniform structural and physical properties. The science of graphene has recently experienced revolutionary change, mainly due to the development of several large-scale growth methods. In particular, graphene synthesis by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper is a reliable method to obtain films with mostly monolayer coverage. These films are also polycrystalline, consisting of multiple graphene crystals joined by grain boundaries. In addition, portions of these graphene films contain more than one layer, and each layer can possess a different crystal orientation and stacking order. In this Account, we review the structural and physical properties that originate from polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene. To begin, we introduce dark-field transmission electron microscopy (DF-TEM), a technique which allows rapid and accurate imaging of key structural properties, including the orientation of individual domains and relative stacking configurations. Using DF-TEM, one can easily identify "lateral junctions," or grain boundaries between adjacent domains, as well as "vertical junctions" from the stacking of graphene multilayers. With this technique, we can distinguish between oriented (Bernal or rhombohedral) and misoriented (twisted) configurations. The structure of lateral junctions in CVD graphene is sensitive to growth conditions and is reflected in the material's electrical and mechanical properties. In particular, grain boundaries in graphene grown under faster reactant flow conditions have no gaps or overlaps, unlike more

  17. Graphene: powder, flakes, ribbons, and sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dustin K; Tour, James M

    2013-10-15

    fibers and in the fabrication of large area transparent electrodes. Using solid carbon sources such as polymers, food, insects, and waste, we can grow monolayer and bilayer graphene directly on metal catalysts, and carbon-sources containing nitrogen can produce nitrogen-doped graphene. The resulting graphene can be transferred to other surfaces, such as metal grids, for potential use in transparent touch screens for applications in personal electronics and large area photovoltaic devices. Because the transfer of graphene from one surface to another can lead to defects, low yields, and higher costs, we have developed methods for growing graphene directly on the substrates of interest. We can also produce patterned graphene to make GNRs or graphane/graphene superlattices within a single sheet. These superlattices could have multiple functions for use in sensors and other devices. This Account only touches upon this burgeoning area of materials chemistry, and the field will continue to expand as researchers imagine new forms and applications of graphene.

  18. Enhancement of polar anchoring strength in a graphene-nematic suspension and its effect on nematic electro-optic switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan

    2017-07-01

    A small quantity of monolayer graphene flakes is doped in a nematic liquid crystal (LC), and the effective polar anchoring strength coefficient between the LC and the alignment substrate is found to increase by an order of magnitude. The hexagonal pattern of graphene can interact with the LC's benzene rings via π -π electron stacking, enabling the LC to anchor to the graphene surface homogeneously (i.e., planar anchoring). When the LC cell is filled with the graphene-doped LC, some graphene flakes are preferentially attached to the alignment layer and modify the substrate's anchoring property. These spontaneously deposited graphene flakes promote planar anchoring at the substrate and the polar anchoring energy at alignment layer is enhanced significantly. The enhanced anchoring energy is found to impact favorably on the electro-optic response of the LC. Additional studies reveal that the nematic electro-optic switching is significantly faster in the LC-graphene hybrid than that of the pure LC.

  19. Template Effect of the Graphene Moiré Lattice on Phthalocyanine Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Néel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Superstructures of metal-free phthalocyanine (2H-Pc molecules on graphene-covered Ir(111 have been explored by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Depending on the sub-monolayer coverage different molecular assemblies form at the surface. They reflect the transition from a graphene template effect on the 2H-Pc arrangement to molecular superstructures that are mainly governed by the intermolecular coupling.

  20. Template Effect of the Graphene Moiré Lattice on Phthalocyanine Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néel, Nicolas; Kröger, Jörg

    2017-05-03

    Superstructures of metal-free phthalocyanine (2H-Pc) molecules on graphene-covered Ir(111) have been explored by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Depending on the sub-monolayer coverage different molecular assemblies form at the surface. They reflect the transition from a graphene template effect on the 2H-Pc arrangement to molecular superstructures that are mainly governed by the intermolecular coupling.

  1. Formulation and Physical Properties of Cyanate Ester Nanocomposites Based on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Composite resins were fabricated by first mixing LECy with two parts per hundred by weight of catalyst and 1 wt % GO, TRGO or M-25 graphite . The mixture was...compatibility; nanocom- posites; resins ; toughness INTRODUCTION Graphene, an allotrope of carbon, is an atomically thick monolayer of carbon atoms...fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and dia- mond) graphene can be isolated as individual sheets from relatively inexpensive graphite .7–10 The strong pi

  2. Rotationally Commensurate Growth of MoS2 on Epitaxial Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    at the monolayer MoS2 edges. KEYWORDS: transition metal dichalcogenide, silicon carbide, scanning tunneling microscopy, synchrotron X-ray scattering...hydrogen evolution reactions13 and a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries.14 The properties of MoS2/graphene heterostructures depend strongly on the... silicon from SiC not only offers uniform large-area synthesis of graphene but also provides technological advantages over alternative methods such as

  3. Spin-dependent Klein tunneling in graphene: Role of Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ming-Hao; Bundesmann, Jan; Richter, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Within an effective Dirac theory the low-energy dispersions of monolayer graphene in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and spin-degenerate bilayer graphene are described by formally identical expressions. We explore implications of this correspondence for transport by choosing chiral tunneling through pn and pnp junctions as a concrete example. A real-space Green's function formalism based on a tight-binding model is adopted to perform the ballistic transport calculations, which cove...

  4. Directed self-assembled crystalline oligomer domains on graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2014-01-01

    We observe the formation of thin films of fibre-like aggregates from the prototypical organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) on graphite thin flakes and on monolayer graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized fluorescence...... show that the graphene surface can be used as a growth substrate to direct the self-assembly of organic molecular thin films and nanofibres, both with and without lithographical processing....

  5. All-Graphene Planar Self-Switching MISFEDs, Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Field-Effect Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2014-01-01

    Graphene normally behaves as a semimetal because it lacks a bandgap, but when it is patterned into nanoribbons a bandgap can be introduced. By varying the width of these nanoribbons this band gap can be tuned from semiconducting to metallic. This property allows metallic and semiconducting regions within a single Graphene monolayer, which can be used in realising two-dimensional (2D) planar Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor field effect devices. Based on this concept, we present a new class of na...

  6. Band gap tunning in BN-doped graphene systems with high carrier mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2014-02-17

    Using density functional theory, we present a comparative study of the electronic properties of BN-doped graphene monolayer, bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer systems. In addition, we address a superlattice of pristine and BN-doped graphene. Five doping levels between 12.5% and 75% are considered, for which we obtain band gaps from 0.02 eV to 2.43 eV. We demonstrate a low effective mass of the charge carriers.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yijun; Xu, Pengyu; Pan, Zhenghui; Chen, Sheng; Shen, Qishen; Zhan, Li; Zhang, Yuegang; Ni, Weihai

    2015-10-01

    We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials.We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, electric field enhancement profiles, Raman scattering spectra, and structure-dependent peak ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04500b

  8. Diverse carrier mobility of monolayer BNCx: A combined density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2017-09-19

    BNCX monolayer as a kind of two-dimensional material has numerous chemical atomic ratios and arrangements with different electronic structures. Via calculations on the basis of density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory under deformation potential approximation, the band structures and carrier mobilities of BNCX (x=1,2,3,4) nanosheets are systematically investigated. The calculated results show that BNC2-1 is a material with very small band gap (0.02 eV) among all the structures while other BNCX monolayers are semiconductors with band gap ranging from 0.51 to 1.32 eV. The carrier mobility of BNCX varies considerably from tens to millions of cm2 V-1 s-1. For BNC2-1, the hole mobility and electron mobility along both x and y directions can reach 105 orders of magnitude, which is similar to the carrier mobility of graphene. Besides, all studied BNCX monolayers obviously have anisotropic hole mobility and electron mobility. In particular, for semiconductor BNC4, its hole mobility along y direction and electron mobility along x direction unexpectedly reach 106 orders of magnitude, even higher than that of graphene. Our findings suggest that BNCX layered materials with proper ratio and arrangement of carbon atoms will possess desirable charge transport properties, exhibiting potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. One dimensional graphene based photonic crystals: Graphene stacks with sequentially-modulated doping for photonic band gap tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentecilla-Carcamo, I.; Palomino-Ovando, M.; Ramos-Mendieta, F.

    2017-12-01

    In a periodic arrangement of equally-doped graphene monolayers the electromagnetic wave propagation is described by band theory. We have found that the photonic response of this system enriches when the doping level is sequentially-modulated acquiring periodic, quasi-periodic or harmonic profiles along the superlattice axis. Because the dielectric background that supports the graphene layers is homogeneous, it is the doping modulation superimposed on the graphene layers that produces a particular photonic band structure. We report that the fixed separation between the layers generates a persistent structural band gap which is tunable by gating. We also demonstrate that doping modulations following continuous cosine or semi-continuous square envelope functions give place to frequency mini-bands. In our calculations the doping levels correspond to chemical potentials within the range 0.2 eV eV and the model for the graphene conductivity is valid in the limit of low temperatures in the THz spectrum.

  10. Coating of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as a sensor, etc. The invention therefor also relates to use of coated graphene.

  11. Determination of a refractive index and an extinction coefficient of standard production of CVD-graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Martínez, Efraín; Gabás, Mercedes; Barrutia, Laura; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Palanco, Santiago; Zurutuza, Amaia; Algora, Carlos

    2015-01-28

    The refractive index and extinction coefficient of chemical vapour deposition grown graphene are determined by ellipsometry analysis. Graphene films were grown on copper substrates and transferred as both monolayers and bilayers onto SiO2/Si substrates by using standard manufacturing procedures. The chemical nature and thickness of residual debris formed after the transfer process were elucidated using photoelectron spectroscopy. The real layered structure so deduced has been used instead of the nominal one as the input in the ellipsometry analysis of monolayer and bilayer graphene, transferred onto both native and thermal silicon oxide. The effect of these contamination layers on the optical properties of the stacked structure is noticeable both in the visible and the ultraviolet spectral regions, thus masking the graphene optical response. Finally, the use of heat treatment under a nitrogen atmosphere of the graphene-based stacked structures, as a method to reduce the water content of the sample, and its effect on the optical response of both graphene and the residual debris layer are presented. The Lorentz-Drude model proposed for the optical response of graphene fits fairly well the experimental ellipsometric data for all the analysed graphene-based stacked structures.

  12. Measuring Interlayer Shear Stress in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guorui; Dai, Zhaohe; Wang, Yanlei; Tan, PingHeng; Liu, Luqi; Xu, Zhiping; Wei, Yueguang; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Zhong

    2017-07-21

    Monolayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals exhibit a host of intriguing properties, but the most exciting applications may come from stacking them into multilayer structures. Interlayer and interfacial shear interactions could play a crucial role in the performance and reliability of these applications, but little is known about the key parameters controlling shear deformation across the layers and interfaces between 2D materials. Herein, we report the first measurement of the interlayer shear stress of bilayer graphene based on pressurized microscale bubble loading devices. We demonstrate continuous growth of an interlayer shear zone outside the bubble edge and extract an interlayer shear stress of 40 kPa based on a membrane analysis for bilayer graphene bubbles. Meanwhile, a much higher interfacial shear stress of 1.64 MPa was determined for monolayer graphene on a silicon oxide substrate. Our results not only provide insights into the interfacial shear responses of the thinnest structures possible, but also establish an experimental method for characterizing the fundamental interlayer shear properties of the emerging 2D materials for potential applications in multilayer systems.

  13. Graphene flakes under controlled biaxial deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Parthenios, John; Kalosakas, George; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-12-15

    Thin membranes, such as monolayer graphene of monoatomic thickness, are bound to exhibit lateral buckling under uniaxial tensile loading that impairs its mechanical behaviour. In this work, we have developed an experimental device to subject 2D materials to controlled equibiaxial strain on supported beams that can be flexed up or down to subject the material to either compression or tension, respectively. Using strain gauges in tandem with Raman spectroscopy measurements, we monitor the G and 2D phonon properties of graphene under biaxial strain and thus extract important information about the uptake of stress under these conditions. The experimental shift over strain for the G and 2D Raman peaks were found to be in the range of 62.3 ± 5 cm(-1)/%, and 148.2 ± 6 cm(-1)/%, respectively, for monolayer but also bilayer graphenes. The corresponding Grüneisen parameters for the G and 2D peaks were found to be between 1.97 ± 0.15 and 2.86 ± 0.12, respectively. These values agree reasonably well with those obtained from small-strain bubble-type experiments. The results presented are also backed up by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and excellent agreement of Γ-E2g shifts with strains and the Grüneisen parameter was observed.

  14. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarek, M., E-mail: mpisarek@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  15. Conducting Gramicidin Channel Activity in Phospholipid Monolayers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Potential step amperometry (chronoamperometry) of the Tl(I)/Tl(Hg) electrochemical reduction process has been used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of gramicidin activity in phospholipid monolayers...

  16. Switch on the high thermal conductivity of graphene paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangsu; Yuan, Pengyu; Wang, Tianyu; Hashemi, Nastaran; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-10-14

    This work reports on the discovery of a high thermal conductivity (κ) switch-on phenomenon in high purity graphene paper (GP) when its temperature is reduced from room temperature down to 10 K. The κ after switch-on (1732 to 3013 W m(-1) K(-1)) is 4-8 times that before switch-on. The triggering temperature is 245-260 K. The switch-on behavior is attributed to the thermal expansion mismatch between pure graphene flakes and impurity-embedded flakes. This is confirmed by the switch behavior of the temperature coefficient of resistance. Before switch-on, the interactions between pure graphene flakes and surrounding impurity-embedded flakes efficiently suppress phonon transport in GP. After switch-on, the structure separation frees the pure graphene flakes from the impurity-embedded neighbors, leading to a several-fold κ increase. The measured κ before and after switch-on is consistent with the literature reported κ values of supported and suspended graphene. By conducting comparison studies with pyrolytic graphite, graphene oxide paper and partly reduced graphene paper, the whole physical picture is illustrated clearly. The thermal expansion induced switch-on is feasible only for high purity GP materials. This finding points out a novel way to switch on/off the thermal conductivity of graphene paper based on substrate-phonon scattering.

  17. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo, Wenlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji, E-mail: hongjili@yeah.net [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Xu, Sheng [School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g{sup −1}. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  18. Biomedical applications of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul; Kim, Young-Kwan; Shin, Dolly; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Min, Dal-Hee

    2013-10-15

    Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors. Recently, the understanding of various chemical properties of graphene has facilitated its application in high-performance devices that generate and store energy. Graphene is now expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides (GO) to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications. Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications. In addition, the hydrophobicity and flexibility of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allow this material to play an important role in cell growth and differentiation. The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives. The development of an efficient graphene-based biosensor requires stable biofunctionalization of graphene derivatives under physiological conditions with minimal loss of their unique properties. For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives. Although several

  19. Modeling Graphene Contrast on Copper Surfaces Using Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    lattice match with graphene. The high carbon solubility, however, made it difficult to synthesize single monolayers because of surface segregation and...2008;112(22):8192–8195. 18. Ferrari AC, Meyer JC , Scardaci V, Casiraghi C, Lazzeri M, Mauri F, Piscanec S, Jiang D, Novoselov KS, Roth S, Geim AK...2007;45(7):1558–1565. 20. Wang Y, Miao C, Huang B-C, Zhu J, Liu W, Park Y, Xie Y-h, Woo JCS . Scalable synthesis of graphene on patterned Ni and transfer

  20. Sharp Zero-Energy Landau Levels in Multilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro; Aoki, Hideo; Kawarabayashi, Tohru

    Stability of the zero-energy Landau levels in trilayer graphene is theoretically investigated for both ABA and ABC stackings with a tight-binding model that incorporates a bond disorder. The zero-energy Landau level is shown to exhibit an anomalous sharpness as soon as the spatial correlation length of random bonds, which respect the chiral symmetry, exceeds a few lattice constants, as in the monolayer and bilayer graphene. Effect of the broken chiral symmetry due to the interlayer hopping that does not respect the symmetry is then examined. The result indicates that the broken chiral symmetry indeed degrades the anomalous sharpness of the zero-energy Landau levels.

  1. Graphene-Based Josephson-Junction Single-Photon Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    2017-08-01

    We propose to use graphene-based Josephson junctions (GJJs) to detect single photons in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible to radio frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of the exceptionally low electronic heat capacity of monolayer graphene and its constricted thermal conductance to its phonon degrees of freedom. Such a system could provide high-sensitivity photon detection required for research areas including quantum information processing and radio astronomy. As an example, we present our device concepts for GJJ single-photon detectors in both the microwave and infrared regimes. The dark count rate and intrinsic quantum efficiency are computed based on parameters from a measured GJJ, demonstrating feasibility within existing technologies.

  2. Tunable terahertz optical properties of graphene in dc electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H. M.; Huang, F.; Xu, W.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a simple theoretical approach to investigate terahertz (THz) optical properties of monolayer graphene in the presence of an external dc electric field. The analytical results for optical coefficients such as the absorptance and reflectivity are obtained self-consistently on the basis of a diagrammatic self-consistent field theory and a Boltzmann equilibrium equation. It is found that the optical refractive index, reflectivity and conductivity can be effectively tuned by not only a gate voltage but also a driving dc electric field. This study is relevant to the applications of graphene as advanced THz optoelectronic devices.

  3. Nonlinear properties of gated graphene in a strong electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avetisyan, A. A., E-mail: artakav@ysu.am; Djotyan, A. P., E-mail: adjotyan@ysu.am [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics (Armenia); Moulopoulos, K., E-mail: cos@ucy.ac.cy [University of Cyprus, Department of Physics (Cyprus)

    2017-03-15

    We develop a microscopic theory of a strong electromagnetic field interaction with gated bilayer graphene. Quantum kinetic equations for density matrix are obtained using a tight binding approach within second quantized Hamiltonian in an intense laser field. We show that adiabatically changing the gate potentials with time may produce (at resonant photon energy) a full inversion of the electron population with high density between valence and conduction bands. In the linear regime, excitonic absorption of an electromagnetic radiation in a graphene monolayer with opened energy gap is also studied.

  4. Discrete quantum dot like emitters in monolayer MoSe{sub 2}: Spatial mapping, magneto-optics, and charge tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branny, Artur; Kumar, Santosh; Gerardot, Brian D., E-mail: b.d.gerardot@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wang, Gang; Robert, Cedric; Lassagne, Benjamin; Marie, Xavier; Urbaszek, Bernhard, E-mail: urbaszek@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 Av. Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France)

    2016-04-04

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers such as MoSe{sub 2}, MoS{sub 2}, and WSe{sub 2} are direct bandgap semiconductors with original optoelectronic and spin-valley properties. Here we report on spectrally sharp, spatially localized emission in monolayer MoSe{sub 2}. We find this quantum dot-like emission in samples exfoliated onto gold substrates and also suspended flakes. Spatial mapping shows a correlation between the location of emitters and the existence of wrinkles (strained regions) in the flake. We tune the emission properties in magnetic and electric fields applied perpendicular to the monolayer plane. We extract an exciton g-factor of the discrete emitters close to −4, as for 2D excitons in this material. In a charge tunable sample, we record discrete jumps on the meV scale as charges are added to the emitter when changing the applied voltage.

  5. Shuffle dislocation induced magnetic moment in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Sancho, M.P., E-mail: pilar@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Juan, F. de; Vozmediano, M.A.H. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Graphene, a honeycomb arrangement of carbon atoms, is a promising material for nanoelectronics applications due to its unusual electronic properties. Recent experiments performed on suspended graphene indicate the existence of intrinsic defects on the samples. It is known that lattice defects such as vacancies or voids leaving unpaired atoms, lead to the formation of local magnetic moments (Vozmediano et al., 2005). The existence and ordering of these moments is largely determined by the bipartite character of the honeycomb lattice seen as two interpenetrating triangular sublattices. Dislocations made by pentagon-heptagon pairs or octagons with an unpaired atom have been studied recently and found to be stable in the graphene lattice (Carpio et al., 2008). These defects frustrate the sublattice structure and affect the magnetic properties of graphene. We study the magnetic properties of graphene in the presence of these defects. The system is described by a p{sub z} tight-binding model with electron-electron interactions modelled by a Hubbard term. Spin-polarized mean-field solutions are investigated within an unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation.

  6. Influence of the Total Gas Flow at Different Reaction Times for CVD-Graphene Synthesis on Polycrystalline Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the total gas flow (CH4+H2 during the reaction step for different reaction times for CVD-graphene synthesis on polycrystalline nickel foil using an atmospheric pressure set-up is reported. A thickness value related to number of graphene layers in each of the synthesized samples was determined using an Excel-VBA application. This method assigned a thickness value between 1 and 1000 and provided information on the percentage of each type of graphene (monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer deposited onto the polycrystalline nickel sheet. The influence of the total gas flow during the reaction step and the reaction time was studied in detail. Optical microscopy showed that samples were covered with different types of graphene, such as multilayer, few-layer, bilayer, and monolayer graphene. The synthesis variables were optimized according to the thickness value and the results were verified by Raman spectroscopy. The best conditions were obtained with a reaction temperature of 980°C, a CH4/H2 flow rate ratio of 0.07 v/v, a reaction time of 1 minute, and a total gas flow of 80 NmL/min. In the sample obtained under the optimized conditions, 80% of the area was covered with monolayer graphene and less than 1% with multilayer graphene.

  7. Graphene formation mechanisms on 4H-SiC(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolen, Michael L.; Harrison, Sara E.; Biedermann, Laura B.; Capano, Michael A.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene is created through thermal decomposition of the Si face of 4H-SiC in high-vacuum. Growth temperature and time are varied independently to gain a better understanding of how surface features and morphology affect graphene formation. Growth mechanisms of graphene are studied by ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). On the route toward a continuous graphene film, various growth features, such as macroscale step bunching, terrace pits, and fingers, are found and analyzed. Topographic and phase AFM analysis demonstrates how surface morphology changes with experimental conditions. Step-bunched terraces and terrace pits show a strong preference for eroding along the {112¯0} planes. Data from AFM are corroborated with STM to determine the surface structure of the growth features. It is shown that elevated finger structures are SiC while the depressed interdigitated areas between the fingers are comprised of at least a monolayer of graphene. Graphene formation at the bottom of terrace pits shows a dependence on pit depth. These features lend support for a stoichiometric view of graphene formation based on the number of decomposing SiC bilayers.

  8. Direct transfer of wafer-scale graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Maria; Shah, Ali; Li, Changfeng; Mustonen, Petri; Susoma, Jannatul; Manoocheri, Farshid; Riikonen, Juha; Lipsanen, Harri

    2017-09-01

    Flexible electronics serve as the ubiquitous platform for the next-generation life science, environmental monitoring, display, and energy conversion applications. Outstanding multi-functional mechanical, thermal, electrical, and chemical properties of graphene combined with transparency and flexibility solidifies it as ideal for these applications. Although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) enables cost-effective fabrication of high-quality large-area graphene films, one critical bottleneck is an efficient and reproducible transfer of graphene to flexible substrates. We explore and describe a direct transfer method of 6-inch monolayer CVD graphene onto transparent and flexible substrate based on direct vapor phase deposition of conformal parylene on as-grown graphene/copper (Cu) film. The method is straightforward, scalable, cost-effective and reproducible. The transferred film showed high uniformity, lack of mechanical defects and sheet resistance for doped graphene as low as 18 Ω/sq and 96.5% transparency at 550 nm while withstanding high strain. To underline that the introduced technique is capable of delivering graphene films for next-generation flexible applications we demonstrate a wearable capacitive controller, a heater, and a self-powered triboelectric sensor.

  9. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mopeli Fabiane

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT to yield poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA/graphene/glass or (2 inverted transfer (IT to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  10. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu, E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  11. Macroscopic quantum coherence and mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyun; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi; Lan, Yueheng

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of a mechanical oscillator in a hybrid optomechanical system consisting of a suspended graphene sheet and an ultracold atomic ensemble trapped inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the study the vacuum is used to mediate an effective optomechanical coupling between the graphene oscillator and the cavity field driven by an external laser beam. We find that in the presence of this coupling, the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of the graphene sheet can be attained in a certain range of driving power. In particular, the quantum coherence in the optomechanical system can be transferred from the optical field to the mechanical oscillator. We also investigate in detail the spectrum and the squeezing of the output field and the attained results may be used to study the mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet.

  12. Hydrophilic and size-controlled graphene nanopores for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Bok Lee, Yong; Darvish, Armin; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a general approach for transferring clean single-layer graphene onto silicon nitride nanopore devices and the use of the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to drill size-controlled nanopores in freely suspended graphene. Besides nanopore drilling, we also used the TEM to heal and completely close the unwanted secondary holes formed by electron beam damage during the drilling process. We demonstrate electron beam assisted shrinking of irregularly shaped 40-60 nm pores down to 2 nm, exhibiting an exquisite control of graphene nanopore diameter. Our fabrication workflow also rendered graphene nanopores hydrophilic, allowing easy wetting and use of the pores for studying protein translocation and protein-protein interaction with a high signal to noise ratio.

  13. Observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Ghahari, Fereshte; Shulman, Michael D.; Stormer, Horst L.; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Only a glimpse of correlated electron physics has been observed in graphene so far, mostly due to the strong electron scattering caused by charged impurities in the substrate. To overcome this limitation,we fabricate devices where electrically contacted and electrostatically gated graphene samples are suspended over a substrate. The measured low-temperature sample mobility is found to exceed 100,000 cm2/Vs in such devices. The very high mobility of our specimens allows us to observe previously inaccessible transport regimes in graphene. We report the observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect, supporting the existence of interaction induced correlated electron states in the presence of a magnetic field. In addition, at low carrier density graphene becomes an insulator with an energy gap tunable by magnetic field.

  14. Development of an ultra-thin film comprised of a graphene membrane and carbon nanotube vein support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Wei, Yang; Li, Qunqing; Wang, Jiaping; Wu, Yang; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Lina; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, exhibiting superior mechanical, thermal, optical and electronic properties, has attracted great interest. Considering it being one-atom-thick, and the reduced mechanical strength at grain boundaries, the fabrication of large-area suspended chemical vapour deposition graphene remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of an ultra-thin free-standing carbon nanotube/graphene hybrid film, inspired by the vein-membrane structure found in nature. Such a square-centimetre-sized hybrid film can realize the overlaying of large-area single-layer chemical vapour deposition graphene on to a porous vein-like carbon nanotube network. The vein-membrane-like hybrid film, with graphene suspended on the carbon nanotube meshes, possesses excellent mechanical performance, optical transparency and good electrical conductivity. The ultra-thin hybrid film features an electron transparency close to 90%, which makes it an ideal gate electrode in vacuum electronics and a high-performance sample support in transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Thickness-Dependent Strain Effect on the Deformation of the Graphene-Encapsulated Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangli Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain effect on graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles is investigated. A finite-element calculation is performed to simulate the strain distribution and morphology of the monolayer and multilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, respectively. It can be found that the inhomogeneous strain and deformation are enhanced with the increasing shrinkage of the graphene shell. Moreover, the strain distribution and deformation are very sensitive to the layer number of the graphene shell. Especially, the inhomogeneous strain at the interface between the graphene shell and encapsulated Au nanoparticles is strongly tuned by the graphene thickness. For the mono- and bilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, the dramatic shape transformation can be observed. However, with increasing the graphene thickness further, there is hardly deformation for the encapsulated Au nanoparticles. These simulated results indicate that the strain and deformation can be designed by the graphene layer thickness, which provides an opportunity to engineer the structure and morphology of the graphene-encapsulated nanoparticles.

  16. Synthesis of 2D and 1D graphene structures and their magnetic and plasmonic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Changgan

    The synthesis of 2D and 1D graphene structures is critical to explore their unique physical properties, including Dirac plasmonics in 2D graphene and spin-polarized edge states in zigzag graphene nanoribbons. We have developed a universal new method to synthesize 2D and 1D graphene structures, and further revealed the exotic magnetic and plasmonic properties of graphene at the quantum level. Our central findings include: 1) Self-assembled synthesis of monolayer graphene from aromatic molecules at low temperatures; 2) One-dimensional self-assembled synthesis of the narrowest zigzag graphene nanoribbons, with the pentacene segments connected by carbon tetragons, which are predicted to serve as definitive spin switches to reverse the spin orientations of the two edge channels; 3) Quantum control of the plasmon excitation and propagation in graphene; 4) Substantial enhancement of quantum coherence in graphene by plasmon coupling. Collectively, these findings help to shed new light on the synthesis of graphene structures with designed patterns and exploration of their emergent quantum properties. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Basic Research Program of China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  17. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng; Kaur, Gurpreet; Eriksson, Jens; Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Gupta, Vinay; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M.; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yazdi, G. Reza

    2017-05-01

    In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 1013 ions/cm2). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and spintronic applications.

  18. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferralis, Nicola; Carraro, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer-SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm-1 corresponding to the Sisbnd H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  19. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  20. Antiferromagnets Structure in Adsorbed O2 Monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; McTague, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron diffraction from monolayers of O2 adsorbed on graphite shows structural arrangements similar to the dense planes of bulk O2. At monolayer completion and above, a magnetic superlattice reflection shows well-developed antiferromagnetic order for T ⩽ 10 K. The submonolayer phase also shows s...

  1. Stilling Waves with Ordered Molecular Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    A demonstration of the damping effect of an oil monolayer on water waves is described. The history of this remarkable demonstration--with a 2000 (or more) year span--and a brief explanation in terms of the properties of water and the monolayer are presented. If a layer of olive oil, one molecule thick (about one-ten millionth of a centimeter), is…

  2. Polariton Enhanced IR Reflection Spectra of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC

    OpenAIRE

    Daas, B. K.; Daniels, K. M.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2010-01-01

    We show ~10x polariton-enhanced infrared reflectivity of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC, in SiC's restrahlen band (8-10um). By fitting measurements to theory, we extract the thickness, N, in monolayers (ML), momentum scattering time, Fermi level position of graphene and estimate carrier mobility. By showing that 1/root(ns), the carrier concentration/ML, we argue that scattering is dominated by short-range interactions at the SiC/graphene interface. Polariton formation finds application in near-...

  3. Synergistic Effect of Fullerene-Capped Gold Nanoparticles on Graphene Electrochemical Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of graphene/fullerene-capped gold nanoparticle nanocomposite film which was used to construct supercapacitor electrodes. The fullerene-based self-assembled monolayers on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were attained via the fullerene(C60)-gold interaction. The fullerene-capped AuNPs effectively separated the graphene sheets preventing aggregation. A synergistic effect was observed—the specific capacitance of graphene/fullerene-capped AuNP electrode is 197 F/g, which is high...

  4. 23 Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Elemental Composition of Suspended Particulate Matter Collected at Two Different. Heights above the Ground in A Sub-Urban Site in Kenya. Gitari W. M1, Kinyua A. M. 2, Kamau G. N3 and C. K. Gatebe C. K4. Abstract. Suspended particulate matter samples were collected in a sub-urban area in Nairobi over a 12 month ...

  5. Electronic and optical properties of beryllium sulfide monolayer: Under stress and strain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Jaafar; Safari, Mandana

    2016-10-01

    Electronic and optical properties of two-dimensional graphene-like structure of beryllium sulfide (BeS) have been studied in the framework of the density functional theory. Different values of stress and strain are exerted for tuning electronic and optical parameters. The electronic results show that both biaxial stress and strain effects cause band gap reduction with different rates. Also, we have red and blue shifts in the optical absorption spectrum peaks by applying strain and stress, respectively. Our results express that BeS monolayer can be the promising candidate for the future nano-devices.

  6. Strained monolayer germanene with 1 × 1 lattice on Sb(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jian; Zhong, Qing; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Li, Wenbin; Cheng, Peng; Li, Hui; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-12-01

    Monolayer germanene, the germanium analog of graphene, has been successfully synthesized on Sb(111) surface via molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning tunneling microscopy revealed a dendrite structure at low Ge coverage and mosaic patterns at high coverage, both with local 1 × 1 lattice. First-principle calculations confirmed the 1 × 1 low-buckled structure of germanene. The dendrite and mosaic patterns stem from strain modulation induced by large lattice mismatch between germanene and Sb substrate. This work provide a new system to explore the physical properties and applications of germanene.

  7. Effect of graphene on photoluminescence properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. L.; Ma, Y. J.; Wang, W. Q.; Ding, K.; Wu, Q.; Fan, Y. L.; Yang, X. J.; Zhong, Z. Y.; Jiang, Z. M., E-mail: zmjiang@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, D. D.; Xu, F. [SHU-SolarE R and D Lab, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488 nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325 nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. For the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.

  8. Terahertz wave manipulation with metamaterials based on metal and graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) technology provides with exciting possibilities for spectroscopy, food quality control, defense, communication and biomedical imaging [1]. Being relatively young (the massive exploitation of the THz range began only in the beginning of 1990-ies), the THz science demands...... for active and passive materials and devices. Metamaterials, metal-dielectric artificial composites, propose wide possibilities for achieving unconventional electromagnetic properties, not found in nature. Moreover, metamaterials constructed of graphene, a monolayer of carbon atoms, allow for tunable...

  9. Playing peekaboo with graphene oxide: a scanning electrochemical microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapino, Stefania; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo; Marcaccio, Massimo; Paolucci, Francesco; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2014-11-07

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can image graphene oxide (GO) flakes on insulating and conducting substrates. The contrast between GO and the substrate is controlled by the electrostatic interactions that are established between the charges of the molecular redox mediator and the charges present in the sheet/substrate. SECM also allows quantitative measurement - at the nano/microscale - of the charge transfer kinetics between single monolayer sheets and agent molecules.

  10. Even-odd oscillation and valley polarization of transmission between multilayer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Takeshi [Nanosystem Research Institute, AIST, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Ando, Tsuneya [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    Electron transmission through a boundary between multi-layer graphenes with Bernal stacking consisting of different number of layers is studied. A valley polarization in transmission probability appears as in monolayer and bilayer systems, exhibits considerable oscillation depending of even or odd layer numbers, and its amplitude gradually decreases with the layer number. The total transmission shows oscillation with much smaller amplitude.

  11. Hybrid platforms of graphane-graphene 2D structures: prototypes for atomically precise nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F de B; Rivelino, R; Medeiros, P V C; Mascarenhas, A J S; de Castilho, C M C

    2014-11-21

    First-principles calculations demonstrate that line/ribbon defects, resulting from a controlled dehydrogenation in graphane, lead to the formation of low-dimensional electron-rich tracks in a monolayer. The present simulations point out that hybrid graphane-graphene nanostructures exhibit important elements, greatly required for the fabrication of efficient electronic circuits at the atomic level.

  12. The effects of growth time on the quality of graphene synthesized by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The graphene has several unique characteristics and many applications in all fields. Some of these characteristics are the quantum Hall effect at room temperature, the ambipolar field effect, the optical properties, the high electron mobility and the best electronic properties. The ability of fabricating large-area monolayer ...

  13. Peptide interfaces with graphene: an emerging intersection of analytical chemistry, theory, and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Shane R; Claridge, Shelley A

    2016-04-01

    Because noncovalent interface functionalization is frequently required in graphene-based devices, biomolecular self-assembly has begun to emerge as a route for controlling substrate electronic structure or binding specificity for soluble analytes. The remarkable diversity of structures that arise in biological self-assembly hints at the possibility of equally diverse and well-controlled surface chemistry at graphene interfaces. However, predicting and analyzing adsorbed monolayer structures at such interfaces raises substantial experimental and theoretical challenges. In contrast with the relatively well-developed monolayer chemistry and characterization methods applied at coinage metal surfaces, monolayers on graphene are both less robust and more structurally complex, levying more stringent requirements on characterization techniques. Theory presents opportunities to understand early binding events that lay the groundwork for full monolayer structure. However, predicting interactions between complex biomolecules, solvent, and substrate is necessitating a suite of new force fields and algorithms to assess likely binding configurations, solvent effects, and modulations to substrate electronic properties. This article briefly discusses emerging analytical and theoretical methods used to develop a rigorous chemical understanding of the self-assembly of peptide-graphene interfaces and prospects for future advances in the field.

  14. Towards wafer-size graphene layers by atmospheric pressure graphitization of silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtsev, Konstantin V; Bostwick, Aaron; Horn, Karsten; Jobst, Johannes; Kellogg, Gary L; Ley, Lothar; McChesney, Jessica L; Ohta, Taisuke; Reshanov, Sergey A; Röhrl, Jonas; Rotenberg, Eli; Schmid, Andreas K; Waldmann, Daniel; Weber, Heiko B; Seyller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Graphene, a single monolayer of graphite, has recently attracted considerable interest owing to its novel magneto-transport properties, high carrier mobility and ballistic transport up to room temperature. It has the potential for technological applications as a successor of silicon in the post Moore's law era, as a single-molecule gas sensor, in spintronics, in quantum computing or as a terahertz oscillator. For such applications, uniform ordered growth of graphene on an insulating substrate is necessary. The growth of graphene on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces by high-temperature annealing in vacuum was previously proposed to open a route for large-scale production of graphene-based devices. However, vacuum decomposition of SiC yields graphene layers with small grains (30-200 nm; refs 14-16). Here, we show that the ex situ graphitization of Si-terminated SiC(0001) in an argon atmosphere of about 1 bar produces monolayer graphene films with much larger domain sizes than previously attainable. Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements confirm the improved quality of the films thus obtained. High electronic mobilities were found, which reach mu=2,000 cm (2) V(-1) s(-1) at T=27 K. The new growth process introduced here establishes a method for the synthesis of graphene films on a technologically viable basis.

  15. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas; Huang, Baoling

    2015-09-09

    Using the Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach with the inputs of interatomic force constants from the self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice thermal conductivities k of multilayer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite monolayer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. For unstrained graphene systems, both the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime present a drastic dimensional transition in going from monolayer to 2-layer graphene and thereafter a gradual transition to the graphite limit. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multilayer graphene and graphite with increasing strain with the largest enhancement amplitude ∼40%. Competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems. This study provides insights into engineering k of multilayer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.

  16. Pharmaceutical applications of graphene-based nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Park, Joo Y; Shon, Yuna; Shim, Gayong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-based nanosheets (GNS) are atomic-thickness monolayers of hexagonally arranged, graphite-derived carbon atoms that may be composed of graphene, graphene oxide, or reduced graphene oxide. They have attracted tremendous interest for their potential in pharmaceutical applications, due to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties GNS exhibit highly uniform surface areas and may have hydroxyl (-OH), epoxide (-O-), and carboxyl functional groups at their basal surfaces and plane edges, depending on their oxidized and reduced surface properties. GNS show high-level optical absorption of near infrared (NIR) light and elevate the temperature of nearby environments. Furthermore, they can be loaded with anticancer drugs via hydrophobic interactions, π-π stacking, or electrostatic binding. Given these properties, GNS can be used in chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy, and theranostics. However, although GNS appear to have far-reaching potential in the field of biomedical research, their widespread pharmaceutical application has been limited by issues such as poor stability in physiological buffers, undefined mechanisms of cellular uptake, toxicity problems, and a lack of standard preparation methods. Here, we review the current pharmaceutical applications of GNS, focusing on chemotherapy, phototherapy, combo therapy and theranostic applications with challenging issues.

  17. Chip-integrated nearly perfect absorber at telecom wavelengths by graphene coupled with nanobeam cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; Zhu, Z H; Liu, K; Zhang, J F; Yuan, X D; Lu, Q S; Qin, S Q

    2015-07-15

    We exploit the concept of critical coupling to graphene based chip-integrated applications and numerically demonstrate that a chip-integrated nearly perfect graphene absorber at wavelengths around 1.55 μm can be obtained by graphene nearly critical coupling with a nanobeam cavity. The key points are reducing the radiation loss and transmission possibly, together with controlling the coupling rate of the cavity to the input waveguide to be equal to the absorption rate of the cavity caused by graphene. Simulation results show that the absorption of monolayer graphene with a total length of only a few microns is raised up to 97%. Our study may have potential applications in chip-integrated photodetectors.

  18. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM.

  19. Can graphene outperform indium tin oxide as transparent electrode in organic solar cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletti, Paolo; Pawar, Ravinder; Ulisse, Giacomo; Brunetti, Francesca; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Fiori, Gianluca

    2015-12-01

    Graphene holds promises as a transparent electrode in flexible solar cells due to its high mobility and transparency. However, the experimental power conversion efficiency of cells with graphene electrode is still small (graphene contacts to improve electrode workfunction and conductance, electromagnetic simulations to improve light management, and electrical simulations of complete cells. We find that the combined effect of using a transparent electrode of graphene with a few monolayers of MoO3 on top to optimize work function and resistivity, and of applying optimized grating to the graphene electrode, can increase power efficiency by up to 29%-47%, with respect to the ITO benchmark, depending on the material used for the hole transport layer (P3HT,PTB7, and Perovskite).

  20. Analysis of transient electromagnetic wave interactions on graphene-based devices using integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2015-10-26

    Graphene is a monolayer of carbon atoms structured in the form of a honeycomb lattice. Recent experimental studies have revealed that it can support surface plasmons at Terahertz frequencies thanks to its dispersive conductivity. Additionally, characteristics of these plasmons can be dynamically adjusted via electrostatic gating of the graphene sheet (K. S. Novoselov, et al., Science, 306, 666–669, 2004). These properties suggest that graphene can be a building block for novel electromagnetic and photonic devices for applications in the fields of photovoltaics, bio-chemical sensing, all-optical computing, and flexible electronics. Simulation of electromagnetic interactions on graphene-based devices is not an easy task. The thickness of the graphene sheet is orders of magnitude smaller than any other geometrical dimension of the device. Consequently, discretization of such a device leads to significantly large number of unknowns and/or ill-conditioned matrix systems.

  1. Effects of metallic contacts on electron transport through graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Vanevic, Mihajlo; Kindermann, Markus; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2010-03-01

    Despite their undoubted importance in eventual graphene electronics, theoretical studies of the specific features of electron transport through graphene between metal contacts are in their first stages. In order to bridge this gap we perform a first-principles based, non-equilibrium Green's functions study of the conductance through graphene junctions suspended between noncovalent aluminum contacts as a function of the distance L between metal leads and the width W (up to 100 nm) of the junction. Electron-hole asymmetry is obtained as a consequence of doping at the leads. Furthermore, the doping in graphene originated by charge transfer from metals at the leads results in two conductance minima at the energies of the crossing of the linear bands in suspended and clamped graphene, for sufficiently large L. We present a tight-binding model that accounts for the first-principles results and can be employed for larger lengths and widths of the junctions up to experimental accessible values and for arbitrary noncovalent-bonding metal leads.

  2. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes on functionalized graphene film grown by chemical vapor deposition and characterization of the hybrid material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanta Dhoj Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the surface functionalization of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition and fabrication of a hybrid material combining multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene (CNT–G. Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers were prepared on graphene by the UV-modification of oxidized groups introduced onto the film surface. Amine-termination led to effective interaction with functionalized CNTs to assemble a CNT–G hybrid through covalent bonding. Characterization clearly showed no defects of the graphene film after the immobilization reaction with CNT. In addition, the hybrid graphene material revealed a distinctive CNT–G structure and p–n type electrical properties. The introduction of functional groups on the graphene film surface and fabrication of CNT–G hybrids with the present technique could provide an efficient, novel route to device fabrication.

  3. Enhanced optical second-harmonic generation from the current-biased graphene/SiO2/Si(001) structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yong Q; Nelson, Florence; Lee, Ji Ung; Diebold, Alain C

    2013-05-08

    We find that optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in reflection from a chemical-vapor-deposition graphene monolayer transferred onto a SiO2/Si(001) substrate is enhanced about 3 times by the flow of direct current electric current in graphene. Measurements of rotational-anisotropy SHG revealed that the current-induced SHG from the current-biased graphene/SiO2/Si(001) structure undergoes a phase inversion as the measurement location on graphene is shifted laterally along the current flow direction. The enhancement is due to current-associated charge trapping at the graphene/SiO2 interface, which introduces a vertical electric field across the SiO2/Si interface that produces electric field-induced SHG. The phase inversion is due to the positive-to-negative polarity switch in the current direction of the trapped charges at the current-biased graphene/SiO2 interface.

  4. The structure of graphene oxide membranes in liquid water, ethanol and water-ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talyzin, Alexandr V; Hausmaninger, Tomas; You, Shujie; Szabó, Tamás

    2014-01-07

    The structure of graphene oxide (GO) membranes was studied in situ in liquid solvents using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in a broad temperature interval. GO membranes are hydrated by water similarly to precursor graphite oxide powders but intercalation of alcohols is strongly hindered, which explains why the GO membranes are permeated by water and not by ethanol. Insertion of ethanol into the membrane structure is limited to only one monolayer in the whole studied temperature range, in contrast to precursor graphite oxide powders, which are intercalated with up to two ethanol monolayers (Brodie) and four ethanol monolayers (Hummers). As a result, GO membranes demonstrate the absence of "negative thermal expansion" and phase transitions connected to insertion/de-insertion of alcohols upon temperature variations reported earlier for graphite oxide powders. Therefore, GO membranes are a distinct type of material with unique solvation properties compared to parent graphite oxides even if they are composed of the same graphene oxide flakes.

  5. Coating of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as

  6. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  7. Thermal Transport in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander A. Balandin; Nika, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we review thermal properties of graphene and multilayer graphene and discuss the optothermal technique developed for the thermal conductivity measurements. We also outline different theoretical approaches used for the description of phonon transport in graphene and provide comparison with available experimental thermal conductivity data.

  8. Ballistic thermophoresis on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatti, Erio; Panizon, Emanuele; Guerra, Roberto

    The textbook thermophoretic force acting on a diffusing body in a fluid is proportional to the local temperature gradient. Not so for a diffusing physisorbed body on a submicron sized 2D suspended layer. A non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics study of a test nanosystem - a gold nanocluster adsorbed on a single graphene sheet of length L clamped between two temperatures ΔT apart - reveals a phoretic force that is parallel to, but essentially independent of, the gradient magnitude ΔT / L up to a substantial L of up to 150 nm. This is argued to represent ballistic thermophoresis, where the force is provided by the flux of massively excited flexural phonons, whose flow is in turn known to be ballistic and distance-independent up to relatively long scattering lengths before the eventual onset of the more standard diffusive regime. The surprising thrust and real momentum provided by the flexural modes are analysed and understood in terms of the large mass non-uniformity involved with these modes. The ensuing surf-riding of adsorbates on the vibrating 2D hard sheet, and the resulting gradient independent thermophoretic force, are not unlikely to possess practical applications. ERC MODPHYSFRICT Advanced Grant No. 320796.

  9. Large-area synthesis of high-quality and uniform monolayer WS2 on reusable Au foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Sun, Dong-Ming; Huang, Le; Ma, Lai-Peng; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Teng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-10-01

    Large-area monolayer WS2 is a desirable material for applications in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. However, the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with rigid and inert substrates for large-area sample growth suffers from a non-uniform number of layers, small domain size and many defects, and is not compatible with the fabrication process of flexible devices. Here we report the self-limited catalytic surface growth of uniform monolayer WS2 single crystals of millimetre size and large-area films by ambient-pressure CVD on Au. The weak interaction between the WS2 and Au enables the intact transfer of the monolayers to arbitrary substrates using the electrochemical bubbling method without sacrificing Au. The WS2 shows high crystal quality and optical and electrical properties comparable or superior to mechanically exfoliated samples. We also demonstrate the roll-to-roll/bubbling production of large-area flexible films of uniform monolayer, double-layer WS2 and WS2/graphene heterostructures, and batch fabrication of large-area flexible monolayer WS2 film transistor arrays.

  10. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  11. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferralis, Nicola, E-mail: ferralis@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Carraro, Carlo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  12. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni, E-mail: kaushik.priyadarshni@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Kaur, Gurpreet [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Eriksson, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lakshmi, G.B.V.S. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Noida 201313 (India); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Syväjärvi, Mikael [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Yazdi, G. Reza, E-mail: yazdi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing application of SHI irradiated epitaxial graphene on SiC is explored. • Surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles. • Existence of an optimal fluence which maximize the gas sensing response towards NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases. - Abstract: In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and

  13. Separating electrons and holes by monolayer increments in van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Frank; Zereshki, Peymon; Zhao, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of graphene and its outstanding chemical, optical, and mechanical properties, other layered materials have been fiercely hunted for throughout various techniques. Thanks to their van der Waals interaction, acting as weak glue, different types of layered materials with mismatched lattices can be stacked with high quality interfaces. The properties of the resulting multilayer structures can be tuned by choice of the materials, layer thicknesses, and sequence in which they are arranged. This opens the possibility for a large array of applications across many different fields. Here we present a systematic study with two-dimensional stacked layered materials, where their properties are tailored monolayer by monolayer. By arranging WSe2,MoSe2,WS2, and MoS2 monolayers in predetermined sequences, that are predicted to have a ladder band alignment in both the conduction and valence bands, we separate electrons and holes between the two utmost layers by monolayer increments. The samples studied are a WSe2 monolayer, a WSe2-MoSe2 bilayer, a WSe2-MoSe2-WS2 trilayer, and a WSe2-MoSe2-WS2-MoS2 four-layer. We observe an increase in absorbance, a decrease in photoluminescence, a variation in interlayer charge transfer, and photocarrier lifetimes that are extended up to a few nanoseconds as additional layers were added. With these results, we demonstrate that van der Waals stacked two-dimensional materials can form effective complex stacks and are promising platforms for fabricating ultrathin and flexible optoelectronics.

  14. Intrinsic Catalytic Activity of Graphene Defects for the Co(II/III)(bpy)3 Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Redox Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Mayhew, Joseph D; Pope, Michael A; Punckt, Christian; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrate that functionalized graphene, rich with lattice defects but lean with oxygen sites, catalyzes the reduction of Co(III)(bpy)3 as well as platinum does, exhibiting a rate of heterogeneous electron transfer, k0, of ∼6 × 10(-3) cm/s. We show this rate to be an order of magnitude higher than on oxygen-site-rich graphene oxide, and over 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the basal plane of graphite (as a surrogate for pristine graphene). Furthermore, dye-sensitized solar cells using defect-rich graphene monolayers perform similarly to those using platinum nanoparticles as the catalyst.

  15. Freely suspended nanocomposite membranes as highly sensitive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaoyang; Markutsya, Sergiy; Pikus, Yuri; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2004-10-01

    Highly sensitive sensor arrays are in high demand for prospective applications in remote sensing and imaging. Measuring microscopic deflections of compliant micromembranes and cantilevers is developing into one of the most versatile approaches for thermal, acoustic and chemical sensing. Here, we report on an innovative fabrication of compliant nanocomposite membranes with nanoscale thickness showing extraordinary sensitivity and dynamic range, which makes them candidates for a new generation of membrane-based sensor arrays. These nanomembranes with a thickness of 25-70 nm, which can be freely suspended over large (hundred micrometres) openings are fabricated with molecular precision by time-efficient, spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembly. They are designed as multilayered molecular composites made of a combination of polymeric monolayers and a metal nanoparticle intralayer. We demonstrate that these nanocomposite membranes possess unparalleled sensitivity and a unique autorecovering ability. The membrane nanostructure that is responsible for these outstanding properties combines multilayered polymer/nanoparticle organization, high polymer-chain orientation, and a pre-stretched state.

  16. Phase Transformation in Monolayer Molybdenum Disulphide (MoS2) with and without Defects under Tension Predicted by Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Keith

    In addition to its use as a solid lubricant, molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2) has gained recent attention as a possible substitute for silicon as it is increasingly difficult to keep shrinking down electronic devices made of silicon, the conventional electronic material. When thinned down to atomic thickness, monolayer MoS2 possesses very unique and promising electronic and electrical properties. Unlike electronic and electrical properties, knowledge of the mechanical properties and role of structural defects on these properties of monolayer MoS2 is unexplored. For this thesis, the two main objectives are (1) to gain insight about the failure mechanism of monolayer MoS2 by modeling nanoindentation performed on suspended free standing membrane with comparison to experiment and (2) to explore the influence of structural defects on the mechanical properties of monolayer MoS2 by modelling monolayer MoS2 membranes with defects and simulating the same nanoindentation process as in part (1). It is shown that the force required for fracture of the MoS2 monolayer increases with increasing indenter diameter. This relationship and the magnitudes of the breaking forces computed in this work are consistent with experiments presented in the literature. A phase transformation, caused by an abrupt drop in the S-S intralayer Z dimension, is observed prior to failure during both defect-free and defect-containing membrane simulations. This phase transformation is also observed in uniaxial tension simulations. Analysis suggests that structural defects alter the failure mechanisms of monolayer MoS2 and thus reduce its mechanical performance. For point defects, the phase transformation initiates from accumulated vacancies away from the center of the membrane and accelerates the new phase propagation process. For grain boundary structures, it was found that their fracture strength is independent of the grain boundary energy.

  17. Light propagation in quasiperiodic dielectric multilayers separated by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carlos H.; Pereira, Luiz F. C.; Bezerra, Claudionor G.

    2017-09-01

    The study of photonic crystals, artificial materials whose dielectric properties can be tailored according to the stacking of its constituents, remains an attractive research area. In this article we have employed a transfer matrix treatment to study the propagation of light waves in Fibonacci quasiperiodic dielectric multilayers with graphene embedded. We calculated their dispersion and transmission spectra in order to investigate the effects of the graphene monolayers and quasiperiodic disorder on the system physical behavior. The quasiperiodic dielectric multilayer is composed of two building blocks, silicon dioxide (building block A =SiO2 ) and titanium dioxide (building block B =TiO2 ). Our numerical results show that the presence of graphene monolayers reduces the transmissivity on the whole range of frequency and induces a transmission gap in the low frequency region. Regarding the polarization of the light wave, we found that the transmission coefficient is higher for the transverse magnetic (TM) case than for the transverse electric (TE) one. We also conclude from our numerical results that the graphene induced photonic band gaps (GIPBGs) do not depend on the polarization (TE or TM) of the light wave nor on the Fibonacci generation index n . Moreover, the GIPBGs are omnidirectional photonic band gaps, therefore light cannot propagate in these structures for frequencies lower than a certain value, whatever the incidence angle. Finally, a plot of the transmission spectra versus chemical potential shows that one can, in principle, adjust the width of the photonic band gap by tuning the chemical potential via a gate voltage.

  18. Continuous graphene films synthesized at low temperatures by introducing coronene as nucleation seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianru; Ding, Guqiao; Shen, Honglie; Wang, Haomin; Sun, Lei; Zhu, Yun; Jiang, Da; Xie, Xiaoming

    2013-06-21

    In this paper, we systematically studied the effects of coronene as nucleation seeds for graphene synthesis at low temperatures by chemical vapor deposition. Naphthalene was used as a solid carbon source which is capable of producing graphene at temperatures down to 300 °C. The experimental results showed clear evidence that coronene seeds work as preferred nucleation sites, through which the nucleation density and graphene domain size could be modulated. The introduction of the seeds greatly improved the homogeneity of monolayer graphene by suppressing uncontrolled nucleation and multilayer growth of graphene domains. The obtained carrier mobility of graphene fabricated at 400 °C by the seed-assisted process reached ~912 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which is considerably higher than that of ~300 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) measured on graphene prepared without seeding. Besides offering cost advantages for large scale application, the technique proposed in this study may find significant applications in graphene/copper hybrid interconnects and graphene based flexible electronics.

  19. Selective mechanical transfer of graphene from seed copper foil using rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seung Ryul; Suk, Ji Won; Tao, Li; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S; Huang, Rui; Liechti, Kenneth M

    2015-02-24

    A very fast, dry transfer process based on mechanical delamination successfully effected the transfer of large-area, CVD grown graphene on copper foil to silicon. This has been achieved by bonding silicon backing layers to both sides of the graphene-coated copper foil with epoxy and applying a suitably high separation rate to the backing layers. At the highest separation rate considered (254.0 μm/s), monolayer graphene was completely transferred from the copper foil to the target silicon substrate. On the other hand, the lowest rate (25.4 μm/s) caused the epoxy to be completely separated from the graphene. Fracture mechanics analyses were used to determine the adhesion energy between graphene and its seed copper foil (6.0 J/m(2)) and between graphene and the epoxy (3.4 J/m(2)) at the respective loading rates. Control experiments for the epoxy/silicon interface established a rate dependent adhesion, which supports the hypothesis that the adhesion of the graphene/epoxy interface was higher than that of the graphene/copper interface at the higher separation rate, thereby providing a controllable mechanism for selective transfer of graphene in future nanofabrication systems such as roll-to-roll transfer.

  20. Efficient heat generation in large-area graphene films by electromagnetic wave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangmin; Choi, Haehyun; Lee, Soo Bin; Park, Seong Chae; Park, Jong Bo; Lee, Sangkyu; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Byung Hee

    2017-06-01

    Graphene has been intensively studied due to its outstanding electrical and thermal properties. Recently, it was found that the heat generation by Joule heating of graphene is limited by the conductivity of graphene. Here we suggest an alternative method to generate heat on a large-area graphene film more efficiently by utilizing the unique electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption property of graphene. The EM wave induces an oscillating magnetic moment generated by the orbital motion of moving electrons, which efficiently absorbs the EM energy and dissipate it as a thermal energy. In this case, the mobility of electron is more important than the conductivity, because the EM-induced diamagnetic moment is directly proportional to the speed of electron in an orbital motion. To control the charge carrier mobility of graphene we functionalized substrates with self-assembled monolayers (SAM). As the result, we find that the graphene showing the Dirac voltage close to zero can be more efficiently heated by EM waves. In addition, the temperature gradient also depends on the number of graphene. We expect that the efficient and fast heating of graphene films by EM waves can be utilized for smart heating windows and defogging windshields.