WorldWideScience

Sample records for suspended monolayer graphene

  1. Suspended graphene variable capacitor

    OpenAIRE

    AbdelGhany, M.; Mahvash, F.; Mukhopadhyay, M.; Favron, A.; Martel, R.; Siaj, M.; Szkopek, T.

    2016-01-01

    The tuning of electrical circuit resonance with a variable capacitor, or varactor, finds wide application with the most important being wireless telecommunication. We demonstrate an electromechanical graphene varactor, a variable capacitor wherein the capacitance is tuned by voltage controlled deflection of a dense array of suspended graphene membranes. The low flexural rigidity of graphene monolayers is exploited to achieve low actuation voltage in an ultra-thin structure. Large arrays compr...

  2. Transport properties in monolayer-bilayer-monolayer graphene planar junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Long Chu; Zi-Bo Wang; Jiao-Jiao Zhou; Hua Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The transport study of graphene based junctions has become one of the focuses in graphene research.There are two stacking configurations for monolayer-bilayer-monolayer graphene planar junctions.One is the two monolayer graphene contacting the same side of the bilayer graphene,and the other is the two-monolayer graphene contacting the different layers of the bilayer graphene.In this paper,according to the Landauer-Büttiker formula,we study the transport properties of these two configurations.The influences of the local gate potential in each part,the bias potential in bilayer graphene,the disorder and external magnetic field on conductance are obtained.We find the conductances of the two configurations can be manipulated by all of these effects.Especially,one can distinguish the two stacking configurations by introducing the bias potential into the bilayer graphene.The strong disorder and the external magnetic field will make the two stacking configurations indistinguishable in the transport experiment.

  3. Electrochemical behavior of monolayer and bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valota, Anna T; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Kostya S; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Eckmann, Axel; Hill, Ernie W; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2011-11-22

    Results of a study on the electrochemical properties of exfoliated single and multilayer graphene flakes are presented. Graphene flakes were deposited on silicon/silicon oxide wafers to enable fast and accurate characterization by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Conductive silver paint and silver wires were used to fabricate contacts; epoxy resin was employed as a masking coating in order to expose a stable, well-defined area of graphene. Both multilayer and monolayer graphene microelectrodes showed quasi-reversible behavior during voltammetric measurements in potassium ferricyanide. However, the standard heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant, k°, was estimated to be higher for monolayer graphene flakes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Electrochemical behaviour of monolayer and bilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Valota, Anna T.; Kinloch, Ian A.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Eckmann, Axel; Hill, Ernie W.; Dryfe, Robert A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Results of a study on the electrochemical properties of exfoliated single and multilayer graphene flakes are presented. Graphene flakes were deposited on silicon/silicon oxide wafers to enable fast and accurate characterization by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Conductive silver paint and silver wires were used to fabricate contacts; epoxy resin was employed as masking coating in order to expose a stable, well defined area of graphene. Both multilayer and monolayer graphene microe...

  5. Investigation on gallium ions impacting monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xin; Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: hyzhao@tsinghua.edu.cn; Yan, Dong; Pei, Jiayun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. Chinaand Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the physical phenomena of gallium (Ga{sup +}) ion impacting monolayer graphene in the nanosculpting process are investigated experimentally, and the mechanisms are explained by using Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, the MC method is employed to clarify the phenomena happened to the monolayer graphene target under Ga{sup +} ion irradiation. It is found that substrate has strong influence on the damage mode of graphene. The mean sputtering yield of graphene under 30 keV Ga{sup +} ion irradiation is 1.77 and the least ion dose to completely remove carbon atoms in graphene is 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the focused ion beam over 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2} is used for the irradiation on a monolayer graphene supported by SiO2 experimentally, resulting in the nanostructures, i.e., nanodot and nanowire array on the graphene. The performances of the nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectrum. A plasma plume shielding model is put forward to explain the nanosculpting results of graphene under different irradiation parameters. In addition, two damage mechanisms are found existing in the fabrication process of the nanostructures by using empirical MD simulations. The results can help us open the possibilities for better control of nanocarbon devices.

  6. Suspended graphene devices with local gate control on an insulating substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Florian R; Cui, Zheng; Vojvodin, Cameron; Papaj, Michał; Deng, Chunqing; Bal, Mustafa; Lupascu, Adrian; Yurtalan, Muhammet A; Orgiazzi, Jean-Luc F X

    2015-01-01

    We present a fabrication process for graphene-based devices where a graphene monolayer is suspended above a local metallic gate placed in a trench. As an example we detail the fabrication steps of a graphene field-effect transistor. The devices are built on a bare high-resistivity silicon substrate. At temperatures of 77 K and below, we observe the field-effect modulation of the graphene resistivity by a voltage applied to the gate. This fabrication approach enables new experiments involving graphene-based superconducting qubits and nano-electromechanical resonators. The method is applicable to other two-dimensional materials. (paper)

  7. Sub-THz Characterisation of Monolayer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Dadrasnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the optical and electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene by using pulsed optoelectronic terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the frequency range of 325–500 GHz based on fast direct measurements of phase and amplitude. We also show that these parameters can, however, be measured with higher resolution using a free space continuous wave measurement technique associated with a vector network analyzer that offers a good dynamic range. All the scattering parameters (both magnitude and phase are measured simultaneously. The Nicholson-Ross-Weir method is implemented to extract the monolayer graphene parameters at the aforementioned frequency range.

  8. Piezoconductivity of gated suspended graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medvedyeva, M.V.; Blanter, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the conductivity of graphene sheet deformed over a gate. The effect of the deformation on the conductivity is twofold: The lattice distortion can be represented as pseudovector potential in the Dirac equation formalism, whereas the gate causes inhomogeneous density redistribution. We

  9. Cavity plasmon polaritons in monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, O.V.; Lozovik, Yu.E.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmon polaritons in a new system, a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed; particularly, role of Dirac-like spinor (envelope) wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. Typical Rabi frequencies for maximal (acceptable for Dirac-like electron spectra) Fermi energy and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated. The plasmon polaritons in considered system can be used for high-speed information transfer in the THz region. -- Highlights: → Plasmon polaritons in a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. → The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. → Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed. → Role of Dirac-like wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. → Typical Rabi frequencies and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated.

  10. A pentacene monolayer trapped between graphene and a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Peng, Boyu; Chan, Paddy Kwok Leung; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-09-21

    A self-assembled pentacene monolayer can be fabricated between the solid-solid interface of few-layered graphene (FLG) and the mica substrate, through a diffusion-spreading method. By utilizing a transfer method that allows us to sandwich pentacene between graphene and mica, followed by controlled annealing, we enabled the diffused pentacene to be trapped in the interfaces and led to the formation of a stable monolayer. We found that the formation of a monolayer is kinetically favored by using a 2D Ising lattice gas model for pentacene trapped between the graphene-substrate interfaces. This kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that, due to the graphene substrate enclosure, the spreading of the first layer proceeds faster than the second layer, as the kinetics favors the filling of voids by molecules from the second layer. This graphene assisted monolayer assembly method provides a new avenue for the fabrication of two-dimensional monolayer structures.

  11. Wavepacket revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Trinidad; Rodríguez-Bolívar, Salvador; Cordero, Nicolás A; Romera, Elvira

    2013-06-12

    We have studied the existence of quantum revivals in graphene quantum rings within a simplified model. The time evolution of a Gaussian-populated wavepacket shows revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings. We have also studied this behavior for quantum rings in a perpendicular magnetic field. We have found that revival time is an observable that shows different values for monolayer and bilayer graphene quantum rings. In addition, the revival time shows valley degeneracy breaking.

  12. Wavepacket revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, Trinidad; Rodríguez-Bolívar, Salvador; Cordero, Nicolás A; Romera, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the existence of quantum revivals in graphene quantum rings within a simplified model. The time evolution of a Gaussian-populated wavepacket shows revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings. We have also studied this behavior for quantum rings in a perpendicular magnetic field. We have found that revival time is an observable that shows different values for monolayer and bilayer graphene quantum rings. In addition, the revival time shows valley degeneracy breaking. (paper)

  13. Unconventional fractional quantum Hall effect in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Janusz; Jacak, Lucjan

    2016-01-01

    The commensurability condition is applied to determine the hierarchy of fractional fillings of Landau levels in monolayer and in bilayer graphene. The filling rates for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in graphene are found in the first three Landau levels in one-to-one agreement with the experimental data. The presence of even denominator filling fractions in the hierarchy for FQHE in bilayer graphene is explained. Experimentally observed hierarchy of FQHE in the first and second Landau levels in monolayer graphene and in the zeroth Landau level in bilayer graphene is beyond the conventional composite fermion interpretation but fits to the presented nonlocal topology commensurability condition. PMID:27877866

  14. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  15. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface.

  16. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S.; Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V.; Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface

  17. Transfer matrix theory of monolayer graphene/bilayer graphene heterostructure superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We have formulated a transfer matrix method to investigate electronic properties of graphene heterostructure consisting of monolayer graphene and bilayer counterpart. By evaluating transmission, conductance, and band dispersion, we show that, irrespective of the different carrier chiralities in monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene, superlattice consisting of biased bilayer graphene barrier and monolayer graphene well can mimic the electronic properties of conventional semiconductor superlattice, displaying the extended subbands in the quantum tunneling regime and producing anisotropic minigaps for the classically allowed transport. Due to the lateral confinement, the lowest mode has shifted away from the charge neutral point of monolayer graphene component, opening a sizeable gap in concerned structure. Following the gate-field and geometry modulation, all electronic states and gaps between them can be externally engineered in an electric-controllable strategy.

  18. Point defect weakened thermal contraction in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Zijing

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the thermal expansion behaviors of monolayer graphene and three configurations of graphene with point defects, namely the replacement of one carbon atom with a boron or nitrogen atom, or of two neighboring carbon atoms by boron-nitrogen atoms, based on calculations using first-principles density functional theory. It is found that the thermal contraction of monolayer graphene is significantly decreased by point defects. Moreover, the corresponding temperature for negative linear thermal expansion coefficient with the maximum absolute value is reduced. The cause is determined to be point defects that enhance the mechanical strength of graphene and then reduce the amplitude and phonon frequency of the out-of-plane acoustic vibration mode. Such defect weakening of graphene thermal contraction will be useful in nanotechnology to diminish the mismatching or strain between the graphene and its substrate.

  19. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  20. Easy process to obtain suspended graphene flakes on TEM grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, Hugo; Fernandes, Joel; Moura, Cacilda; Schellenberg, Peter; Belsley, Michael; Alves, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Much of the ongoing research on graphene requires free-hanging (suspended) graphene to eliminate any influence from underlying substrates. Several methods have been developed for its preparation but they are either very complex or not completely reliable. Here, we describe a simple method for the transfer of graphene single layers from glass or silicon substrates onto TEM grids. The method uses a carrier film for the transfer process. By optimizing the process yields greater than 60% were achieved. The integrity of the transferred films was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy; successful suspension of both mono- and double-layer graphene sheets was obtained. (paper)

  1. Friction anisotropy-driven domain imaging on exfoliated monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Byun, Ik-Su; Lee, Duk Hyun; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Bae Ho; Lee, Changgu; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Ki Ho; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel

    2011-07-29

    Graphene produced by exfoliation has not been able to provide an ideal graphene with performance comparable to that predicted by theory, and structural and/or electronic defects have been proposed as one cause of reduced performance. We report the observation of domains on exfoliated monolayer graphene that differ by their friction characteristics, as measured by friction force microscopy. Angle-dependent scanning revealed friction anisotropy with a periodicity of 180° on each friction domain. The friction anisotropy decreased as the applied load increased. We propose that the domains arise from ripple distortions that give rise to anisotropic friction in each domain as a result of the anisotropic puckering of the graphene.

  2. Synthesis of Graphene Based Membranes: Effect of Substrate Surface Properties on Monolayer Graphene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafiah, Feras; Khan, Zafarullah; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Atieh, Muataz; Laoui, Tahar

    2017-01-21

    In this work, we report the transfer of graphene onto eight commercial microfiltration substrates having different pore sizes and surface characteristics. Monolayer graphene grown on copper by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was transferred by the pressing method over the target substrates, followed by wet etching of copper to obtain monolayer graphene/polymer membranes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle (CA) measurements were carried out to explore the graphene layer transferability. Three factors, namely, the substrate roughness, its pore size, and its surface wetting (degree of hydrophobicity) are found to affect the conformality and coverage of the transferred graphene monolayer on the substrate surface. A good quality graphene transfer is achieved on the substrate with the following characteristics; being hydrophobic (CA > 90°), having small pore size, and low surface roughness, with a CA to RMS (root mean square) ratio higher than 2.7°/nm.

  3. Graphene growth by conversion of aromatic self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchanin, Andrey [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany); Jena Center for Soft Matter (JCSM), Jena (Germany); Center for Energy and Environmental Chemistry Jena (CEEC), Jena (Germany); Abbe Center of Photonics (ACP), Jena (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Despite present diversity of graphene production methods there is still a high demand for improvement of the existing production schemes or development of new. Here a method is reviewed to produce graphene employing aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as molecular precursors. This method is based on electron irradiation induced crosslinking of aromatic SAMs resulting in their conversion into carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) with high thermal stability and subsequent pyrolysis of CNMs into graphene in vacuum or in the inert atmosphere. Depending on the production conditions, such as chemical structure of molecular precursors, irradiation and annealing parameters, various properties of the produced graphene sheets including shape, crystallinity, thickness, optical properties and electric transport can be adjusted. The assembly of CNM/graphene van der Waals heterostructures opens a flexible route to non-destructive chemical functionalization of graphene for a variety of applications in electronic and photonic devices. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Transfer-last suspended graphene fabrication on gold, graphite and silicon nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, J.; Boodhoo, L.; Huang, C.C.; Hewak, D.W.; Saito, S.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Mizuta, H.

    2015-01-01

    While most graphene devices fabricated so far have been by transferring graphene onto flat substrates first, an interesting approach would be to transfer graphene onto patterned substrates to suspend graphene for future graphene nanoelectromechanical device applications. This novel "transfer-last" fabrication is beneficial for reducing possible damage of the suspended graphene caused by subsequent undercutting processes and typical substrate interactions. On the other hand, reduction of conta...

  5. Discrete Dynamics of Nanoparticle Channelling in Suspended Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Tim; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Andersen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We have observed a previously undescribed stepwise oxidation of mono- and few layer suspended graphene by silver nanoparticles in situ at subnanometer scale in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Over the range of 600–850 K, we observe crystallographically oriented channelling...

  6. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignardi, L.; Dorp, W.F. van; Gottardi, S.; Ivashenko, O.; Dudin, P.; Barinov, A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Stöhr, M.; Rudolf, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron

  7. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  8. Acoustic analog of monolayer graphene and edge states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic analog of monolayer graphene has been designed by using silicone rubber spheres of honeycomb lattices embedded in water. The dispersion of the structure has been studied theoretically using the rigorous multiple-scattering method. The energy spectra with the Dirac point have been verified and zigzag edge states have been found in ribbons of the structure, which are analogous to the electronic ones in graphene nanoribbons. The guided modes along the zigzag edge excited by a point source have been numerically demonstrated. The open cavity and 'Z' type edge waveguide with 60 o corners have also been realized by using such edge states. -- Highlights: → Acoustic analog of monolayer graphene has been designed. → The energy spectra with the Dirac point have been verified. → The zigzag edge states have been found in ribbons of the structure. → The guided modes excited by a point source have been demonstrated. → The open cavity and 'Z' type edge waveguide have been realized.

  9. Performance of monolayer graphene nanomechanical resonators with electrical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyao; Rosenblatt, Sami; Bolotin, Kirill I; Kalb, William; Kim, Philip; Kymissis, Ioannis; Stormer, Horst L; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James

    2009-12-01

    The enormous stiffness and low density of graphene make it an ideal material for nanoelectromechanical applications. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication and electrical readout of monolayer graphene resonators, and test their response to changes in mass and temperature. The devices show resonances in the megahertz range, and the strong dependence of resonant frequency on applied gate voltage can be fitted to a membrane model to yield the mass density and built-in strain of the graphene. Following the removal and addition of mass, changes in both density and strain are observed, indicating that adsorbates impart tension to the graphene. On cooling, the frequency increases, and the shift rate can be used to measure the unusual negative thermal expansion coefficient of graphene. The quality factor increases with decreasing temperature, reaching approximately 1 x 10(4) at 5 K. By establishing many of the basic attributes of monolayer graphene resonators, the groundwork for applications of these devices, including high-sensitivity mass detectors, is put in place.

  10. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Cezhou; Wang, Pengfei; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density

  11. A primary battery-on-a-chip using monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Kern, Klaus; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2016-07-01

    We present here a bottom-up approach for realizing on-chip on-demand batteries starting out with chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. Single graphene monolayers contacted by electrode lines on a silicon chip serve as electrodes. The anode and cathode are realized by electrodeposition of zinc and copper respectively onto graphene, leading to the realization of a miniature graphene-based Daniell cell on a chip. The electrolyte is housed partly in a gel and partly in liquid form in an on-chip enclosure molded using a 3d printer or made out of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The realized batteries provide a stable voltage (∼1.1 V) for many hours and exhibit capacities as high as 15 μAh, providing enough power to operate a pocket calculator. The realized batteries show promise for deployment as on-chip power sources for autonomous systems in lab-on-a-chip or biomedical applications.

  12. Thinning of multilayer graphene to monolayer graphene in a plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, K S; Misra, D S; Rafiee, J; Rafiee, M A; Koratkar, N; Mathur, A; Roy, S S; McLauhglin, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a facile approach to transform multilayer graphene to single-layer graphene in a gradual thinning process. Our technique is based upon gradual etching of multilayer graphene in a hydrogen and nitrogen plasma environment. High resolution transmission microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirm the transformation of multilayer graphene to monolayer graphene at a substrate temperature of ∼ 400 0 C. The shift in the position of the G-band peak shows a perfect linear dependence with substrate temperature, which indicates a controlled gradual etching process. Selected area electron diffraction also confirmed the removal of functional groups from the graphene surface due to the plasma treatment. We also show that plasma treatment can be used to engineer graphene nanomesh structures.

  13. Nanocomposite Materials of Alternately Stacked C60 Monolayer and Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ishikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized the novel nanocomposite consisting alternately of a stacked single graphene sheet and a C60 monolayer by using the graphite intercalation technique in which alkylamine molecules help intercalate large C60 molecules into the graphite. Moreover, it is found that the intercalated C60 molecules can rotate in between single graphene sheets by using C13 NMR measurements. This preparation method provides a general way for intercalating huge fullerene molecules into graphite, which will lead to promising materials with novel mechanical, physical, and electrical properties.

  14. Nanocomposite Materials of Alternately Stacked C60 Monolayer and Graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Miura, K.; Kamiya, S.; Yoshimoto, S.; Suzuki, M.; Kuwahara, D.; Sasaki, N.

    2010-01-01

    We synthesized the novel nanocomposite consisting alternately of a stacked single graphene sheet and a C 60 monolayer by using the graphite intercalation technique in which alkylamine molecules help intercalate large C 60 molecules into the graphite. Moreover, it is found that the intercalated C 60 molecules can rotate in between single graphene sheets by using C 13 NMR measurements. This preparation method provides a general way for intercalating huge fullerene molecules into graphite, which will lead to promising materials with novel mechanical, physical, and electrical properties.

  15. Infrared beam-steering using acoustically modulated surface plasmons over a graphene monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Paiyen; Farhat, Mohamed; Askarpour, Amir Nader; Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Alù , Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We model and design a graphene-based infrared beamformer based on the concept of leaky-wave (fast traveling wave) antennas. The excitation of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) over a 'one-atom-thick' graphene monolayer is typically

  16. Fluorine and sulfur simultaneously co-doped suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzzi, C.; Sezen, H.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Reckinger, N.; Colomer, J.-F.; Snyders, R.; Bittencourt, C.; Scardamaglia, M.

    2017-11-01

    Suspended graphene flakes are exposed simultaneously to fluorine and sulfur ions produced by the μ-wave plasma discharge of the SF6 precursor gas. The microscopic and spectroscopic analyses, performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and photoelectron spectromicroscopy, show the homogeneity in functionalization yield over the graphene flakes with F and S atoms covalently bonded to the carbon lattice. This promising surface shows potential for several applications ranging from biomolecule immobilization to lithium battery and hydrogen storage devices. The present co-doping process is an optimal strategy to engineer the graphene surface with a concurrent hydrophobic character, thanks to the fluorine atoms, and a high affinity with metal nanoparticles due to the presence of sulfur atoms.

  17. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of graphene/molecule/graphene vertical junctions with aryl alkane monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Inho; Song, Hyunwook

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we fabricated and characterized graphene/molecule/graphene (GMG) vertical junctions with aryl alkane monolayers. The constituent molecules were chemically self-assembled via electrophilic diazonium reactions into a monolayer on the graphene bottom electrode, while the other end physically contacted the graphene top electrode. A full understanding of the transport properties of molecular junctions is a key step in the realization of molecular-scale electronic devices and requires detailed microscopic characterization of the junction's active region. Using a multiprobe approach combining a variety of transport techniques, we elucidated the transport mechanisms and electronic structure of the GMG junctions, including temperature- and length-variable transport measurements, and transition voltage spectroscopy. These results provide criteria to establish a valid molecular junction and to determine the most probable transport characteristics of the GMG junctions.

  19. Nanomechanical mapping of graphene layers and interfaces in suspended graphene nanostructures grown via carbon diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.J. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Rabot, C. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Mazzocco, R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Delamoreanu, A. [Microelectronics Technology Laboratory (LTM), Joseph Fourier University, French National Research Center (CNRS), 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Zenasni, A. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Kolosov, O.V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Graphene's remarkable mechanical, electronic and thermal properties are strongly determined by both the mechanism of its growth and its interaction with the underlying substrate. Evidently, in order to explore the fundamentals of these mechanisms, efficient nanoscale methods that enable observation of features hidden underneath the immediate surface are needed. In this paper we use nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy that employs MHz frequency range ultrasonic vibrations and allows the observation of surface composition and subsurface interfaces with nanoscale resolution, to elucidate the morphology of few layer graphene (FLG) films produced via a recently reported method of carbon diffusion growth (CDG) on platinum-metal based substrate. CDG is known to result in FLG suspended over large areas, which could be of high importance for graphene transfer and applications where a standalone graphene film is required. This study directly reveals the detailed mechanism of CDG three-dimensional growth and FLG film detachment, directly linking the level of graphene decoupling with variations of the substrate temperature during the annealing phase of growth. We also show that graphene initially and preferentially decouples at the substrate grain boundaries, likely due to its negative expansion coefficient at cooling, forming characteristic “nano-domes” at the intersections of the grain boundaries. Furthermore, quantitative nanomechanical mapping of flexural stiffness of suspended FLG “nano-domes” using kHz frequency range force modulation microscopy uncovers the progression of “nano-dome” stiffness from single to bi-modal distribution as CDG growth progresses, suggesting growth instability at advanced CDG stages. - Highlights: • Exploring growth and film-substrate decoupling in carbon diffusion grown graphene • Nanomechanical mapping of few layer graphene and graphene–substrate interfaces • Quantitative stiffness mapping of

  20. Gate-defined Quantum Confinement in Suspended Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Quantum confined devices in carbon-based materials offer unique possibilities for applications ranging from quantum computation to sensing. In particular, nanostructured carbon is a promising candidate for spin-based quantum computation due to the ability to suppress hyperfine coupling to nuclear spins, a dominant source of spin decoherence. Yet graphene lacks an intrinsic bandgap, which poses a serious challenge for the creation of such devices. We present a novel approach to quantum confinement utilizing tunnel barriers defined by local electric fields that break sublattice symmetry in suspended bilayer graphene. This technique electrostatically confines charges via band structure control, thereby eliminating the edge and substrate disorder that hinders on-chip etched nanostructures to date. We report clean single electron tunneling through gate-defined quantum dots in two regimes: at zero magnetic field using the energy gap induced by a perpendicular electric field and at finite magnetic fields using Landau level confinement. The observed Coulomb blockade periodicity agrees with electrostatic simulations based on local top-gate geometry, a direct demonstration of local control over the band structure of graphene. This technology integrates quantum confinement with pristine device quality and access to vibrational modes, enabling wide applications from electromechanical sensors to quantum bits. More broadly, the ability to externally tailor the graphene bandgap over nanometer scales opens a new unexplored avenue for creating quantum devices.

  1. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  2. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-01-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation. (paper)

  3. Anisotropic mechanical properties and Stone-Wales defects in graphene monolayer: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, B.B.; Yang, X.B.; Zhang, R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical properties of graphene monolayer via the density functional theoretical (DFT) method. We find that the strain energies are anisotropic for the graphene under large strain. We attribute the anisotropic feature to the anisotropic sp 2 hybridization in the hexagonal lattice. We further identify that the formation energies of Stone-Wales (SW) defects in the graphene monolayer are determined by the defect concentration and also the direction of applied tensile strain, correlating with the anisotropic feature.

  4. A simple method to tune graphene growth between monolayer and bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhi Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selective growth of either monolayer or bilayer graphene is of great importance. We developed a method to readily tune large area graphene growth from complete monolayer to complete bilayer. In an ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition process, we used the sample temperature at which to start the H2 flow as the control parameter and realized the change from monolayer to bilayer growth of graphene on Cu foil. When the H2 starting temperature was above 700°C, continuous monolayer graphene films were obtained. When the H2 starting temperature was below 350°C, continuous bilayer films were obtained. Detailed characterization of the samples treated under various conditions revealed that heating without the H2 flow caused Cu oxidation. The more the Cu substrate oxidized, the less graphene bilayer could form.

  5. Approaching total absorption at near infrared in a large area monolayer graphene by critical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yonghao; Chadha, Arvinder; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yichen; Menon, Laxmy; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong, E-mail: wzhou@uta.edu [Nanophotonics Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Piper, Jessica R.; Fan, Shanhui [Ginzton Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jia, Yichen; Xia, Fengnian [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ma, Zhenqiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate experimentally close to total absorption in monolayer graphene based on critical coupling with guided resonances in transfer printed photonic crystal Fano resonance filters at near infrared. Measured peak absorptions of 35% and 85% were obtained from cavity coupled monolayer graphene for the structures without and with back reflectors, respectively. These measured values agree very well with the theoretical values predicted with the coupled mode theory based critical coupling design. Such strong light-matter interactions can lead to extremely compact and high performance photonic devices based on large area monolayer graphene and other two–dimensional materials.

  6. Monolayer Graphene Bolometer as a Sensitive Far-IR Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McKitterick, Christopher B.; Prober, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we give a detailed analysis of the expected sensitivity and operating conditions in the power detection mode of a hot-electron bolometer (HEB) made from a few micro m(sup 2) of monolayer graphene (MLG) flake which can be embedded into either a planar antenna or waveguide circuit via NbN (or NbTiN) superconducting contacts with critical temperature approx. 14 K. Recent data on the strength of the electron-phonon coupling are used in the present analysis and the contribution of the readout noise to the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) is explicitly computed. The readout scheme utilizes Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) allowing for Frequency-Domain Multiplexing (FDM) using narrowband filter coupling of the HEBs. In general, the filter bandwidth and the summing amplifier noise have a significant effect on the overall system sensitivity.

  7. Controllable optical bistability and multistability in a graphene monolayer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Duo, E-mail: zhangduo10@126.com [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China); Sun, Zhaoyu [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China); Ding, Chunling [School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Yu, Rong [School of Science, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Intelligent Robot, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Yang, Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-02-15

    We theoretically investigate the behavior of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) in a graphene monolayer system driven by an elliptically polarized control field and a right-hand circularly polarized probe field. Our numerical results show that it is easy to realize the transition from OB to OM or vice versa by adjusting the frequency detunings of the probe field and the control field, as well as the polarization-dependent phase difference between the two components of the control laser field. The influences of the intensity of the control field and the cooperation parameter on the OB behavior are also discussed in detail. These results may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in optoelectronics and solid-state quantum information science.

  8. Superconductivity in the graphene monolayer calculated using the Kubo formulalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L. S.

    2018-03-01

    We have employed the massless Dirac's fermions formalism together with the Kubo's linear response theory to study the transport by electrons in the graphene monolayer. We have calculated the electric conductivity and verified the behavior of the AC and DC electric conductivities of the system that is known to be a relativistic electron plasma. Our results show a superconductor behavior to the electron transport and consequently the spin transport for all values of T > 0 and a behavior of the AC conductivity tending to infinity in the limit ω → 0. In T = 0 our results show an insulator behavior with a transition from a superconductor state at T > 0 to an insulator state at T = 0 .

  9. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices.

  10. Clean Transfer of Large Graphene Single Crystals for High-Intactness Suspended Membranes and Liquid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jincan; Lin, Li; Sun, Luzhao; Huang, Yucheng; Koh, Ai Leen; Dang, Wenhui; Yin, Jianbo; Wang, Mingzhan; Tan, Congwei; Li, Tianran; Tan, Zhenjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2017-07-01

    The atomically thin 2D nature of suspended graphene membranes holds promising in numerous technological applications. In particular, the outstanding transparency to electron beam endows graphene membranes great potential as a candidate for specimen support of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, major hurdles remain to be addressed to acquire an ultraclean, high-intactness, and defect-free suspended graphene membrane. Here, a polymer-free clean transfer of sub-centimeter-sized graphene single crystals onto TEM grids to fabricate large-area and high-quality suspended graphene membranes has been achieved. Through the control of interfacial force during the transfer, the intactness of large-area graphene membranes can be as high as 95%, prominently larger than reported values in previous works. Graphene liquid cells are readily prepared by π-π stacking two clean single-crystal graphene TEM grids, in which atomic-scale resolution imaging and temporal evolution of colloid Au nanoparticles are recorded. This facile and scalable production of clean and high-quality suspended graphene membrane is promising toward their wide applications for electron and optical microscopy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Surface-directed molecular assembly of pentacene on monolayer graphene for high-performance organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Park, Jaesung; Sim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Soojin; Kim, Kwang S; Hong, Byung Hee; Cho, Kilwon

    2011-03-30

    Organic electronic devices that use graphene electrodes have received considerable attention because graphene is regarded as an ideal candidate electrode material. Transfer and lithographic processes during fabrication of patterned graphene electrodes typically leave polymer residues on the graphene surfaces. However, the impact of these residues on the organic semiconductor growth mechanism on graphene surface has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate that polymer residues remaining on graphene surfaces induce a stand-up orientation of pentacene, thereby controlling pentacene growth such that the molecular assembly is optimal for charge transport. Thus, pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs) using source/drain monolayer graphene electrodes with polymer residues show a high field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm(2)/V s. In contrast, epitaxial growth of pentacene having molecular assembly of lying-down structure is facilitated by π-π interaction between pentacene and the clean graphene electrode without polymer residues, which adversely affects lateral charge transport at the interface between electrode and channel. Our studies provide that the obtained high field-effect mobility in pentacene FETs using monolayer graphene electrodes arises from the extrinsic effects of polymer residues as well as the intrinsic characteristics of the highly conductive, ultrathin two-dimensional monolayer graphene electrodes.

  12. Electron transport nonlocality in monolayer graphene modified with hydrogen silsesquioxane polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaverzin, A. A.; van Wees, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of practical and fundamental applications of graphene requires modification of some of its properties. In this paper we study the effect of polymerization of a hydrogen silsesquioxane film on top of monolayer graphene with the intent to increase the strength of the spin-orbit interaction.

  13. Effects of Graphene Monolayer Coating on the Optical Performance of Remote Phosphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.; Vollebregt, S.; van Driel, W.D.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2017-01-01

    A graphene monolayer has been successfully coated on one side of a bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) plate, used as a substrate for remote phosphor applications in light-emitting diode (LED)-based products. Using a photoresist transferring method, graphene sheet has been coated on BPA-PC plates.

  14. Chirality-dependent anisotropic elastic properties of a monolayer graphene nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Gang; Zhou, Li-Jun; Kang, Yi-Lan

    2012-04-01

    An analytical approach is presented to predict the elastic properties of a monolayer graphene nanosheet based on interatomic potential energy and continuum mechanics. The elastic extension and torsional springs are utilized to simulate the stretching and angle variation of carbon-carbon bond, respectively. The constitutive equation of the graphene nanosheet is derived by using the strain energy density, and the analytical formulations for nonzero elastic constants are obtained. The in-plane elastic properties of the monolayer graphene nanosheet are proved to be anisotropic. In addition, Young's moduli, Poisson's ratios and shear modulus of the monolayer graphene nanosheet are calculated according to the force constants derived from Morse potential and AMBER force field, respectively, and they were proved to be chirality-dependent. The comparison with experimental results shows a very agreement.

  15. Tunable ultranarrow spectrum selective absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Complete absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency through the critical coupling effect is investigated. It is achieved by sandwiching the graphene monolayer between a dielectric grating and a Bragg grating. The designed graphene absorber exhibits near-unity absorption at resonance but with an ultranarrow spectrum and antenna-like response, which is attributed to the combined effects of guided mode resonance with dielectric grating and the photonic band gap with Bragg grating. In addition to numerical simulation, the electric field distributions are also illustrated to provide a physical understanding of the perfect absorption effect. Furthermore, the absorption performance can be tuned by only changing the Fermi level of graphene, which is beneficial for real application. It is believed that this study may be useful for designing next-generation graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  16. Toward tunable doping in graphene FETs by molecular self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Klekachev, Alexander V.; Cantoro, Mirco; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Stesmans, André; Asselberghs, Inge; de Gendt, Stefan; de Feyter, Steven

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we report the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oleylamine (OA) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and graphene surfaces and demonstrate the potential of using such organic SAMs to tailor the electronic properties of graphene. Molecular resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) images reveal the detailed molecular ordering. The electrical measurements show that OA strongly interacts with graphene leading to n-doping effects in graphene devices. The doping levels are tunable by varying the OA deposition conditions. Importantly, neither hole nor electron mobilities are decreased by the OA modification. As a benefit from this noncovalent modification strategy, the pristine characteristics of the device are recoverable upon OA removal. From this study, one can envision the possibility to correlate the graphene-based device performance with the molecular structure and supramolecular ordering of the organic dopant.In this paper, we report the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oleylamine (OA) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and graphene surfaces and demonstrate the potential of using such organic SAMs to tailor the electronic properties of graphene. Molecular resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) images reveal the detailed molecular ordering. The electrical measurements show that OA strongly interacts with graphene leading to n-doping effects in graphene devices. The doping levels are tunable by varying the OA deposition conditions. Importantly, neither hole nor electron mobilities are decreased by the OA modification. As a benefit from this noncovalent modification strategy, the pristine characteristics of the device are recoverable upon OA removal. From this study, one can envision the possibility to correlate the graphene-based device performance with the molecular structure and supramolecular ordering of the organic

  17. Current Transport Properties of Monolayer Graphene/n-Si Schottky Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, C. S.; Garg, Manjari; Singh, J. P.; Singh, R.

    2018-05-01

    The present work reports on the fabrication and the detailed macroscopic and nanoscale electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene/n-Si Schottky diodes. The temperature dependent electrical transport properties of monolayer graphene/n-Si Schottky diodes were investigated. Nanoscale electrical characterizations were carried out using Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting atomic force microscopy. Most the values of ideality factor and barrier height are found to be in the range of 2.0–4.4 and 0.50–0.70 eV for monolayer graphene/n-Si nanoscale Schottky contacts. The tunneling of electrons is found to be responsible for the high value of ideality factor for nanoscale Schottky contacts.

  18. Ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer C3N as compared to graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2017-09-21

    Using density functional theory and the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity is massively reduced in monolayer CN as compared to isostructural graphene. We show that larger phase space for three-phonon scattering processes is available in monolayer CN, which results in much shorter phonon life-times. Although both materials are characterized by sp hybridisation, anharmonicity effects are found to be enhanced for the C-N and C-C bonds in monolayer CN, reflected by a Grüneisen parameter of -8.5 as compared to -2.2 in graphene. The combination of these properties with the fact that monolayer CN is organic, non-toxic, and built of earth abundant elements gives rise to great potential in thermoelectric applications.

  19. Low-energy electron point projection microscopy of suspended graphene, the ultimate 'microscope slide'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutus, J Y; Livadaru, L; Urban, R; Salomons, M H; Cloutier, M; Wolkow, R A; Robinson, J T

    2011-01-01

    Point projection microscopy (PPM) is used to image suspended graphene by using low-energy electrons (100-205 eV). Because of the low energies used, the graphene is neither damaged nor contaminated by the electron beam for doses of the order of 10 7 electrons per nm 2 . The transparency of graphene is measured to be 74%, equivalent to electron transmission through a sheet twice as thick as the covalent radius of sp 2 -bonded carbon. Also observed is rippling in the structure of the suspended graphene, with a wavelength of approximately 26 nm. The interference of the electron beam due to diffraction off the edge of a graphene knife edge is observed and is used to calculate a virtual source size of 4.7±0.6 A for the electron emitter. It is demonstrated that graphene can serve as both the anode and the substrate in PPM, thereby avoiding distortions due to strong field gradients around nanoscale objects. Graphene can be used to image objects suspended on the sheet using PPM and, in the future, electron holography.

  20. Membrane cholesterol mediates the cellular effects of monolayer graphene substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Kristina E; Hong, Tu; Lazarenko, Roman M; Ying, Da; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-23

    Graphene possesses extraordinary properties that promise great potential in biomedicine. However, fully leveraging these properties requires close contact with the cell surface, raising the concern of unexpected biological consequences. Computational models have demonstrated that graphene preferentially interacts with cholesterol, a multifunctional lipid unique to eukaryotic membranes. Here we demonstrate an interaction between graphene and cholesterol. We find that graphene increases cell membrane cholesterol and potentiates neurotransmission, which is mediated by increases in the number, release probability, and recycling rate of synaptic vesicles. In fibroblasts grown on graphene, we also find an increase in cholesterol, which promotes the activation of P2Y receptors, a family of receptor regulated by cholesterol. In both cases, direct manipulation of cholesterol levels elucidates that a graphene-induced cholesterol increase underlies the observed potentiation of each cell signaling pathway. These findings identify cholesterol as a mediator of graphene's cellular effects, providing insight into the biological impact of graphene.

  1. Effects of Graphene Monolayer Coating on the Optical Performance of Remote Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.; Volgbert, S.; van Driel, W. D.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2017-10-01

    A graphene monolayer has been successfully coated on one side of a bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) plate, used as a substrate for remote phosphor applications in light-emitting diode (LED)-based products. Using a photoresist transferring method, graphene sheet has been coated on BPA-PC plates. The results show that this graphene monolayer significantly improves the lifetime and performance of LEDs mainly by protecting them against external degradation factors such as moisture and oxygen. Also, LED-based products composed of graphene-coated BPA-PC plates exhibit longer stability with comparatively less loss of luminous efficiency. This method has great potential to significantly improve the reliability of not only LED-based products but also many other microelectronics packaging and components, in which moisture and oxygen are the key causes of failures.

  2. First-principles study on silicon atom doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Hussain, Nayyar

    2018-01-01

    This paper illustrates the structural, electronic and optical properties of individual silicon (Si) atom-doped single layer graphene using density functional theory method. Si atom forms tight bonding with graphene layer. The effect of doping has been investigated by varying the concentration of Si atoms from 3.125% to 9.37% (i.e. From one to three Si atoms in 4 × 4 pure graphene supercell containing 32 carbon atoms), respectively. Electronic structure, partial density of states (PDOS) and optical properties of pure and Si atom-doped graphene sheet were calculated using VASP (Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package). The calculated results for pure graphene sheet were then compared with Si atom doped graphene. It is revealed that upon Si doping in graphene, a finite band gap appears at the high symmetric K-point, thereby making graphene a direct band gap semiconductor. Moreover, the band gap value is directly proportional to the concentration of impurity Si atoms present in graphene lattice. Upon analyzing the optical properties of Si atom-doped graphene structures, it is found that, there is significant change in the refractive index of the graphene after Si atom substitution in graphene. In addition, the overall absorption spectrum of graphene is decreased after Si atom doping. Although a significant red shift in absorption is found to occur towards visible range of radiation when Si atom is substituted in its lattice. The reflectivity of graphene improves in low energy region after Si atom substitution in graphene. These results can be useful for tuning the electronic structure and to manipulate the optical properties of graphene layer in the visible region.

  3. A comparison of the transport properties of bilayer graphene,monolayer graphene, and two-dimensional electron gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Li-Feng; Dong Li-Min; Wu Zhi-Fang; Fang Chao

    2013-01-01

    we studied and compared the transport properties of charge carriers in bilayer graphene,monolayer graphene,and the conventional semiconductors (the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)).It is elucidated that the normal incidence transmission in the bilayer graphene is identical to that in the 2DEG but totally different from that in the monolayer graphene.However,resonant peaks appear in the non-normal incidence transmission profile for a high barrier in the bilayer graphene,which do not occur in the 2DEG.Furthermore,there are tunneling and forbidden regions in the transmission spectrum for each material,and the division of the two regions has been given in the work.The tunneling region covers a wide range of the incident energy for the two graphene systems,but only exists under specific conditions for the 2DEG.The counterparts of the transmission in the conductance profile are also given for the three materials,which may be used as high-performance devices based on the bilayer graphene.

  4. Design of electron wave filters in monolayer graphene by tunable transmission gap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Tao, Jia-Wei

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the transmission in monolayer graphene barrier at nonzero angle of incidence. Taking the influence of parallel wave vector into account, the transmission as the function of incidence energy has a gap due to the evanescent waves in two cases of Klein tunneling and classical motion. The modulation of the transmission gap by the incidence angle, the height, and width of potential barrier may lead to potential applications in graphene-based electronic devices.

  5. Swift heavy ions induced irradiation effects in monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, J.; Yao, H.J.; Zhang, S.X.; Zhai, P.F.; Duan, J.L.; Sun, Y.M.; Li, G.P.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were irradiated by swift heavy ions ( 209 Bi and 112 Sn) with the fluence between 10 11 and 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Both pristine and irradiated samples were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D and D′ peaks appear after irradiation, which indicated the ion irradiation introduced damage both in the graphene and graphite lattice. Due to the special single atomic layer structure of graphene, the irradiation fluence threshold Φ th of the D band of graphene is significantly lower ( 11 ions/cm 2 ) than that (2.5 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 ) of HOPG. The larger defect density in graphene than in HOPG indicates that the monolayer graphene is much easier to be damaged than bulk graphite by swift heavy ions. Moreover, different defect types in graphene and HOPG were detected by the different values of I D /I D′ . For the irradiation with the same electronic energy loss, the velocity effect was found in HOPG. However, in this experiment, the velocity effect was not observed in graphene samples irradiated by swift heavy ions

  6. Limiting Size of Monolayer Graphene Flakes Grown on Silicon Carbide or via Chemical Vapor Deposition on Different Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, N. I.

    2018-05-01

    The maximum size of homogeneous monolayer graphene flakes that form during the high-temperature evaporation of silicon from a surface of SiC or during graphene synthesis via chemical vapor deposition is estimated, based on the theoretical calculations developed in this work. Conditions conducive to the fragmentation of a monolayer graphene sheet to form discrete fragments or terrace-type structures in which excess energy due to dangling bonds at the edges is compensated for by the lack of internal stress are indentified and described. The results from calculations for the sizes of graphene structures are compared with experimental findings for the most successful graphene syntheses reported in the literature.

  7. Functionalizing Arrays of Transferred Monolayer Graphene on Insulating Surfaces by Bipolar Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Line; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund; Thyssen, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Development of versatile methods for graphene functionalization is necessary before use in applications such as composites or as catalyst support. In this study, bipolar electrochemistry is used as a wireless functionalization method to graft 4-bromobenzenediazonium on large (10 × 10 mm2) monolayer...... graphene sheets supported on SiO2. Using this technique, transferred graphene can be electrochemically functionalized without the need of a metal support or the deposition of physical contacts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to map the chemical changes and modifications...

  8. Measuring the height-to-height correlation function of corrugation in suspended graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, D.A.; Brunkov, P.N.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocorrugation of 2D crystals is an important phenomenon since it affects their electronic and mechanical properties. The corrugation may have various sources; one of them is flexural phonons that, in particular, are responsible for the thermal conductivity of graphene. A study of corrugation of just the suspended graphene can reveal much of valuable information on the physics of this complicated phenomenon. At the same time, the suspended crystal nanorelief can hardly be measured directly because of high flexibility of the 2D crystal. Moreover, the relief portion related to rapid out-of-plane oscillations (flexural phonons) is also inaccessible by such measurements. Here we present a technique for measuring the Fourier components of the height–height correlation function H(q) of suspended graphene which includes the effect of flexural phonons. The technique is based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns. The H(q) is measured in the range of wavevectors q≈0.4–4.5 nm"−"1. At the upper limit of this range H(q) does follow the T/κq"4 law. So, we measured the value of suspended graphene bending rigidity κ=1.2±0.4 eV at ambient temperature T≈300 K. At intermediate wave vectors, H(q) follows a slightly weaker exponent than theoretically predicted q"−"3"."1"5 but is closer to the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. At low wave vectors, the dependence becomes even weaker, which may be a sign of influence of charge carriers on the dynamics of undulations longer than 10 nm. The technique presented can be used for studying physics of flexural phonons in other 2D materials. - Highlights: • A technique for measuring free-standing 2D crystal corrugation is proposed. • The height-to-height correlation function of the suspended graphene corrugation is measured. • Various parameters of the intrinsic graphene properties are experimentally determined.

  9. Direct measurement of adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on copper and its application to renewable transfer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taeshik; Shin, Woo Cheol; Kim, Taek Yong; Mun, Jeong Hun; Kim, Taek-Soo; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-03-14

    Direct measurement of the adhesion energy of monolayer graphene as-grown on metal substrates is important to better understand its bonding mechanism and control the mechanical release of the graphene from the substrates, but it has not been reported yet. We report the adhesion energy of large-area monolayer graphene synthesized on copper measured by double cantilever beam fracture mechanics testing. The adhesion energy of 0.72 ± 0.07 J m(-2) was found. Knowing the directly measured value, we further demonstrate the etching-free renewable transfer process of monolayer graphene that utilizes the repetition of the mechanical delamination followed by the regrowth of monolayer graphene on a copper substrate. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...

  11. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  12. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  13. Stamp transferred suspended graphene mechanical resonators for radio frequency electrical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuefeng; Oksanen, Mika; Sillanpää, Mika A; Craighead, H G; Parpia, J M; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2012-01-11

    We present a simple micromanipulation technique to transfer suspended graphene flakes onto any substrate and to assemble them with small localized gates into mechanical resonators. The mechanical motion of the graphene is detected using an electrical, radio frequency (RF) reflection readout scheme where the time-varying graphene capacitor reflects a RF carrier at f = 5-6 GHz producing modulation sidebands at f ± f(m). A mechanical resonance frequency up to f(m) = 178 MHz is demonstrated. We find both hardening/softening Duffing effects on different samples and obtain a critical amplitude of ~40 pm for the onset of nonlinearity in graphene mechanical resonators. Measurements of the quality factor of the mechanical resonance as a function of dc bias voltage V(dc) indicates that dissipation due to motion-induced displacement currents in graphene electrode is important at high frequencies and large V(dc). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Infrared beam-steering using acoustically modulated surface plasmons over a graphene monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Paiyen

    2014-09-01

    We model and design a graphene-based infrared beamformer based on the concept of leaky-wave (fast traveling wave) antennas. The excitation of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) over a \\'one-atom-thick\\' graphene monolayer is typically associated with intrinsically \\'slow light\\'. By modulating the graphene with elastic vibrations based on flexural waves, a dynamic diffraction grating can be formed on the graphene surface, converting propagating SPPs into fast surface waves, able to radiate directive infrared beams into the background medium. This scheme allows fast on-off switching of infrared emission and dynamic tuning of its radiation pattern, beam angle and frequency of operation, by simply varying the acoustic frequency that controls the effective grating period. We envision that this graphene beamformer may be integrated into reconfigurable transmitter/receiver modules, switches and detectors for THz and infrared wireless communication, sensing, imaging and actuation systems.

  15. A new Dirac cone material: a graphene-like Be3C2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Shijun; Li, Yunhai; Shi, Li; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-05-04

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with Dirac cones exhibit rich physics and many intriguing properties, but the search for new 2D Dirac materials is still a current hotspot. Using the global particle-swarm optimization method and density functional theory, we predict a new stable graphene-like 2D Dirac material: a Be 3 C 2 monolayer with a hexagonal honeycomb structure. The Dirac point occurs exactly at the Fermi level and arises from the merging of the hybridized p z bands of Be and C atoms. Most interestingly, this monolayer exhibits a high Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. Moreover, the Dirac cone is very robust and retains even included spin-orbit coupling or external strain. These outstanding properties render the Be 3 C 2 monolayer a promising 2D material for special electronics applications.

  16. Controlled Synthesis of Monolayer Graphene Toward Transparent Flexible Conductive Film Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han-Young

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the synthesis of monolayer graphene using thermal chemical vapor deposition and successive transfer onto arbitrary substrates toward transparent flexible conductive film application. We used electron-beam-deposited Ni thin film as a synthetic catalyst and introduced a gas mixture consisting of methane and hydrogen. To optimize the synthesis condition, we investigated the effects of synthetic temperature and cooling rate in the ranges of 850–1,000°C and 2–8°C/min, respectively. It was found that a cooling rate of 4°C/min after 1,000°C synthesis is the most effective condition for monolayer graphene production. We also successfully transferred as-synthesized graphene films to arbitrary substrates such as silicon-dioxide-coated wafers, glass, and polyethylene terephthalate sheets to develop transparent, flexible, and conductive film application.

  17. Enhancement of Raman scattering from monolayer graphene by photonic crystal nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Issei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sota, Masaki; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kato, Yuichiro K.

    Monolayer graphene is an atomically thin two-dimensional material that shows strong Raman scattering, while photonic crystal nanocavities with small mode volumes allow for efficient optical coupling at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrate resonant enhancement of graphene Raman G' band by coupling to photonic crystal cavity modes. Hexagonal-lattice photonic crystal L3 cavities are fabricated from silicon-on-insulator substrates. and monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition are transferred onto the nanocavities. Excitation wavelength dependence of Raman spectra show that the Raman intensity is enhanced when the G' peak is in resonance with the cavity mode. By performing imaging measurements, we confirm that such an enhancement is only observed at the cavity position. Work supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP16K13613, JP25107002 and MEXT (Photon Frontier Network Program, Nanotechnology Platform).

  18. Fine structure of the lowest Landau level in suspended trilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elferen, H. J.; Veligura, A.; Tombros, N.; Kurganova, E. V.; van Wees, B. J.; Maan, J. C.; Zeitler, U.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotransport experiments on ABC-stacked suspended trilayer graphene reveal a complete splitting of the 12-fold degenerated lowest Landau level, and, in particular, the opening of an exchange-driven gap at the charge neutrality point. A quantitative analysis of distinctness of the quantum Hall

  19. A systematic study of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of large-area monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Yu; Lin, Yung-Chen; Qu, Yongquan; Bai, Jingwei; Ivanov, Ivan A; Liu, Gang; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-28

    Graphene has attracted considerable interest as a potential material for future electronics. Although mechanical peel is known to produce high quality graphene flakes, practical applications require continuous graphene layers over a large area. The catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising synthetic method to deliver wafer-sized graphene. Here we present a systematic study on the nucleation and growth of crystallized graphene domains in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Parametric studies show that the mean size of the graphene domains increases with increasing growth temperature and CH 4 partial pressure, while the density of domains decreases with increasing growth temperature and is independent of the CH 4 partial pressure. Our studies show that nucleation of graphene domains on copper substrate is highly dependent on the initial annealing temperature. A two-step synthetic process with higher initial annealing temperature but lower growth temperature is developed to reduce domain density and achieve high quality full-surface coverage of monolayer graphene films. Electrical transport measurements demonstrate that the resulting graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of up to 3000 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature.

  20. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-03-12

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications.

  1. Contact doping, Klein tunneling, and asymmetry of shot noise in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Antti; Paraoanu, G. S.; Oksanen, Mika; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio; Sonin, Edouard; Hakonen, Pertti

    2016-01-01

    The inherent asymmetry of the electric transport in graphene is attributed to Klein tunneling across barriers defined by p n interfaces between positively and negatively charged regions. By combining conductance and shot noise experiments, we determine the main characteristics of the tunneling barrier (height and slope) in a high-quality suspended sample with Au/Cr/Au contacts. We observe an asymmetric resistance Rodd=100 -70 Ω across the Dirac point of the suspended graphene at carrier density | nG|=(0.3 -4 ) × 1011cm-2 , while the Fano factor displays a nonmonotonic asymmetry in the range Fodd˜0.03 -0.1. Our findings agree with analytical calculations based on the Dirac equation with a trapezoidal barrier. Comparison between the model and the data yields the barrier height for tunneling, an estimate of the thickness of the p n interface d graphene.

  2. An atomistic investigation of the effect of strain on frictional properties of suspended graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshun Bai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of a diamond probe scanned on a suspended graphene to reveal the effect of strain on the frictional properties of suspended graphene. The graphene was subjected to some certain strain along the scanning direction. We compared the friction coefficient obtained from different normal loads and strain. The results show that the friction coefficient can be decreased about one order of magnitude with the increase of the strain. And that can be a result of the decreased asymmetry of the contact region which is caused by strain. The synthetic effect of potential energy and the fluctuation of contact region were found to be the main reason accounting for the fluctuation of the friction force. The strain can reduce the fluctuation of the contact region and improve the stability of friction.

  3. Raman scattering of monolayer graphene: the temperature and oxygen doping effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Haiqing; Qiu Caiyu; Yu Fang; Yang Huaichao; Chen Minjiang; Hu Lijun; Guo Yanjun; Sun Lianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectra of monolayer graphene at various temperatures (303-473 K) are measured. In Raman scattering with wave numbers ranging from 1200 to 3400 cm -1 , the four main Raman peaks (G, 2D, T + D and 2D') show temperature-dependent behaviour, but have different frequency shifts with increase in temperature. We propose that the peak frequency shift is related mainly to the elongation of C-C bond due to thermal expansion or anharmonic coupling of phonon modes, and oxygen-induced strong hole doping on the graphene surface. The doping effect can be confirmed from the frequency shifts, full-width at half-maximum as well as the area and intensity ratios of G and 2D peaks in temperature-dependent Raman scattering of graphene, room-temperature Raman spectra of pristine graphene and graphene cooled down after Raman measurement at 473 K in air. Therefore, the oxygen doping effect and temperature effect coexist in temperature-dependent Raman scattering of monolayer graphene.

  4. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'An; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-09-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  5. Quasi van der Waals epitaxy of copper thin film on single-crystal graphene monolayer buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Sun, Xin; Washington, Morris A.; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2018-03-01

    Quasi van der Waals epitaxial growth of face-centered cubic Cu (~100 nm) thin films on single-crystal monolayer graphene is demonstrated using thermal evaporation at an elevated substrate temperature of 250 °C. The single-crystal graphene was transferred to amorphous (glass) and crystalline (quartz) SiO2 substrates for epitaxy study. Raman analysis showed that the thermal evaporation method had minimal damage to the graphene lattice during the Cu deposition. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction analyses revealed that both Cu films are single-crystal with (1 1 1) out-of-plane orientation and in-plane Σ3 twin domains of 60° rotation. The crystallinity of the SiO2 substrates has a negligible effect on the Cu crystal orientation during the epitaxial growth, implying the strong screening effect of graphene. We also demonstrate the epitaxial growth of polycrystalline Cu on a commercial polycrystalline monolayer graphene consisting of two orientation domains offset 30° to each other. It confirms that the crystal orientation of the epitaxial Cu film follows that of graphene, i.e. the Cu film consists of two orientation domains offset 30° to each other when deposited on polycrystalline graphene. Finally, on the contrary to the report in the literature, we show that the direct current and radio frequency flip sputtering method causes significant damage to the graphene lattice during the Cu deposition process, and therefore neither is a suitable method for Cu epitaxial growth on graphene.

  6. Transfer-Free Growth of Multilayer Graphene Using Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Hong-Yeol; Jang, Soohwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-10-12

    Large-area graphene needs to be directly synthesized on the desired substrates without using a transfer process so that it can easily be used in industrial applications. However, the development of a direct method for graphene growth on an arbitrary substrate remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate a bottom-up and transfer-free growth method for preparing multilayer graphene using a self-assembled monolayer (trimethoxy phenylsilane) as the carbon source. Graphene was directly grown on various substrates such as SiO 2 /Si, quartz, GaN, and textured Si by a simple thermal annealing process employing catalytic metal encapsulation. To determine the optimal growth conditions, experimental parameters such as the choice of catalytic metal, growth temperatures, and gas flow rate were investigated. The optical transmittance at 550 nm and the sheet resistance of the prepared transfer-free graphene are 84.3% and 3500 Ω/□, respectively. The synthesized graphene samples were fabricated into chemical sensors. High and fast responses to both NO 2 and NH 3 gas molecules were observed. The transfer-free graphene growth method proposed in this study is highly compatible with previously established fabrication systems, thereby opening up new possibilities for using graphene in versatile applications.

  7. The fabrication of monolayer graphene by ultrasonication method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江依

    2017-01-01

    Recent years, researchers pay more attention to another outstanding material that could be used in many technique areas of material synthesis and modification, which is named graphene. Graphene can be described as a one-atom thick layer of the mineral graphite, the thickness of graphene is one million times thinner than paper. As we know that carbon has the two -dimensional crystal structure. It can be stacked to form 3D graphite, rolled to form 1D nanotubes, and wrapped to form 0D fullerenes. So graphene is consisted of a single layer of carbon atoms that are bonded together in a repeating pattern of hexagons, which is a one atom thick layer of sp-bonded carbon. Due to the special atom structure, graphene has a range of unusual properties, its strong, conductive and flexible, especially, the excellent thermal conductivity and mechanical stiffness. Except those well-publicized outstanding properties, it is pretty light as well, with a 1-square meter sheet the weight only has 0. 77 milligrams. Those are significant properties in plane values for graphite. Therefore, It is need to discuss that graphene be exfoliated from graphite by the approaching of ultrasonication and centrifugation .

  8. Landau levels in biased graphene structures with monolayer-bilayer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Ketabi, S. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-09-01

    The electron energy spectrum in monolayer-bilayer-monolayer and in bilayer-monolayer-bilayer graphene structures is investigated and the effects of a perpendicular magnetic field and electric bias are studied. Different types of monolayer-bilayer interfaces are considered as zigzag (ZZ) or armchair (AC) junctions which modify considerably the bulk Landau levels (LLs) when the spectra are plotted as a function of the center coordinate of the cyclotron orbit. Far away from the two interfaces, one obtains the well-known LLs for extended monolayer or bilayer graphene. The LL structure changes significantly at the two interfaces or junctions where the valley degeneracy is lifted for both types of junctions, especially when the distance between them is approximately equal to the magnetic length. Varying the nonuniform bias and the width of this junction-to-junction region in either structure strongly influence the resulting spectra. Significant differences exist between ZZ and AC junctions in both structures. The densities of states (DOSs) for unbiased structures are symmetric in energy whereas those for biased structures are asymmetric. An external bias creates interface LLs in the gaps between the LLs of the unbiased system in which the DOS can be quite small. Such a pattern of LLs can be probed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

  9. Magnetotransport of Monolayer Graphene with Inert Gas Adsorption in the Quantum Hall Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, A.; Terasawa, D.; Fujimoto, A.; Kanai, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2018-03-01

    The surface of graphene is easily accessible from outside, and thus it is a suitable material to study the effects of molecular adsorption on the electric transport properties. We investigate the magnetotransport of inert-gas-adsorbed monolayer graphene at a temperature of 4.4 K under a magnetic field ranging from 0 to 7 T. We introduce 4He or Ar gas at low temperature to graphene kept inside a sample cell. The magnetoresistance change ΔRxx and Hall resistance change ΔRxy from the pristine graphene are measured as a function of gate voltage and magnetic field for one layer of adsorbates. ΔRxx and ΔRxy show oscillating patterns related to the constant filling factor lines in a Landau-fan diagram. Magnitudes of these quantities are relatively higher around a charge neutral point and may be mass-sensitive. These conditions could be optimized for development of a highly sensitive gas sensor.

  10. Trigonal warping and photo-induced effects on zone boundary phonon in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, D.

    2018-05-01

    We have reported the electronic band structure of monolayer graphene when the combined effects arising from the trigonal warp and highest zone-boundary phonons having A1 g symmetry with Haldane interaction which induced photo-irradiation effect. On the basis of our model, we have introduced a diagonalization to solve the associated Fröhlich Hamiltonian. We have examined that, a trigonal warping effect is introduced on the K and K ' points, leading to a dynamical band gap in the graphene electronic band spectrum due to the electron-A1 g phonon interaction and Haldane mass interaction. Additionally, the bands exhibited an anisotropy at this point. It is also found that, photo-irradiation effect is quite smaller than the trigonal warp effects in the graphene electronic band spectrum. In spite of this, controllability of the photo induced effects by the Haldane mass will have extensive implications in the graphene.

  11. Creating periodic local strain in monolayer graphene with nanopillars patterned by self-assembled block copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Gui, Gui; Ma, Alice L.; Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: nealey@uchicago.edu, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Liu, Chi-Chun; Nealey, Paul F., E-mail: nealey@uchicago.edu, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    A simple and viable method was developed to produce biaxial strain in monolayer graphene on an array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars. The array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars (1 cm{sup 2} in area, 80 nm in height, and 40 nm in pitch) was fabricated by employing self-assembled block copolymer through simple dry etching and deposition processes. According to high resolution micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses, 0.9% of maximum biaxial tensile strain and 0.17% of averaged biaxial tensile strain in graphene were created. This technique provides a simple and viable method to form biaxial tensile strain in graphene and offers a practical platform for future studies in graphene strain engineering.

  12. Tuning the Interfacial Mechanical Behaviors of Monolayer Graphene/PMMA Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guorui; Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Hu, Hai; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-08-31

    The van der Waals (vdW) force dominated interface between graphene and polymer matrix creates weak points in the mechanical sense. Chemical functionalization was expected to be an effective approach in transfer of the outstanding performance of graphene across multiple length scales up to the macroscopic level, due to possible improvements in the interfacial adhesion. However, published works showed the contradiction that improvements, insensitivity, or even worsening of macro-mechanical performance have all been reported in graphene-based polymer nanocomposites. Particularly central cause of such discrepancy is the variations in graphene/polymer interfacial chemistry, which is critical in nanocomposites with vast interfacial area. Herein, O3/H2O gaseous mixture was utilized to oxidize monolayer graphene sheet with controlled functionalization degrees. Hydrogen bonds (H bonds) are expected to form between oxidized graphene sheet/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) at the interface. On the basis of in situ tensile-micro Raman spectroscopy, the impacts of bonding types (vdW and H-bonds) on both key interfacial parameters (such as interfacial shear strength and critical length) and failure modes of graphene/PMMA nanocomposite were clarified for the first time at the microscopic level. Our results show that owing to improved interfacial interaction via H bonds, the interface tends to be stiffening and strengthening. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the functionalized graphene/PMMA interface will be set by the competition between the enhanced interfacial adhesion and the degraded elastic modulus of graphene, which was caused by structural defects in the graphene sheet during the functionalization process and could lead to catastrophic failure of graphene sheets in our experimental observation. Our results will be helpful to design various nanofiller-based nanocomposites with high mechanical performance.

  13. Contrasting suspended covers reveal the impact of an artificial monolayer on heat transfer processes at the interfacial boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N

    2015-01-01

    The highly variable performance of artificial monolayers in reducing evaporation from water storages has been attributed to wind speed and wave turbulence. Other factors operating at the interfacial boundary layer have seldom been considered. In this paper, two physical shade covers differing in porosity and reflectivity were suspended over 10 m diameter water tanks to attenuate wind and wave turbulence. The monolayer octadecanol was applied to one of the covered tanks, and micrometeorological conditions above and below the covers were monitored to characterise diurnal variation in the energy balance. A high downward (air-to-water) convective heat flux developed under the black cover during the day, whereas diurnal variation in the heat flux under the more reflective, wind-permeable white cover was much less. Hourly air and water temperature profiles under the covers over 3 days when forced convection was minimal (low wind speed) were selected for analysis. Monolayer application reduced temperature gain in surface water under a downward convective heat flux, and conversely reduced temperature loss under an upward convective heat flux. This 'dual property' may explain why repeat application of an artificial monolayer to retard evaporative loss (reducing latent heat loss) does not inevitably increase water temperature.

  14. Nonlinear electro-magneto-mechanical constitutive modelling of monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfyris, D.; Sfyris, G. I.; Bustamante, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using the classical theory of invariants for the specific class of graphene's symmetry, we constitutively characterize electro-magneto-mechanical interactions of graphene at continuum level. Graphene's energy depends on five arguments: the Finger strain tensor, the curvature tensor, the shift vector, the effective electric field intensity and the effective magnetic induction. The Finger strain tensor describes in- surface phenomena, the curvature tensor is responsible for the out-of-surface motions, while the shift vector is used due to the fact that graphene is a multilattice. The electric and the magnetic fields are described by the effective electric field intensity and the effective magnetic induction, respectively. An energy with the above arguments that also respects graphene's symmetries is found to have 42 invariants. Using these invariants, we evaluate all relevant measures by finding derivatives of the energy with respect to the five arguments of the energy. We also lay down the field equations that should be satisfied. These are the Maxwell equations, the momentum equation, the moment of momentum equation and the equation ruling the shift vector. Our framework is general enough to capture fully coupled processes in the finite deformation regime.

  15. Conductance fluctuations in high mobility monolayer graphene: Nonergodicity, lack of determinism and chaotic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, C R; Mineharu, M; Matsunaga, M; Matsumoto, N; Chuang, C; Ochiai, Y; Kim, G-H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ferry, D K; Aoki, N

    2016-09-09

    We have fabricated a high mobility device, composed of a monolayer graphene flake sandwiched between two sheets of hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance fluctuations as functions of a back gate voltage and magnetic field were obtained to check for ergodicity. Non-linear dynamics concepts were used to study the nature of these fluctuations. The distribution of eigenvalues was estimated from the conductance fluctuations with Gaussian kernels and it indicates that the carrier motion is chaotic at low temperatures. We argue that a two-phase dynamical fluid model best describes the transport in this system and can be used to explain the violation of the so-called ergodic hypothesis found in graphene.

  16. Poly(sodium 4-styrenseulfonate)-modified monolayer graphene for anode applications of organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongfang; Wang, Min; Wang, Liang; Liu, Shuli; Chen, Shufen; Cao, Kun; Shang, Wenjuan; Mai, Jiangquan; Zhao, Baomin; Feng, Jing; Lu, Xinhui; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    An insulated poly(sodium 4-styrenseulfonate) (PSS) was used to modify monolayer graphene for anode applications of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). With this PSS interfacial modification layer, the OPVs showed a significant increase of 56.4% in efficiency due to an improved work function and hydrophilic feature of graphene and an enlarged recombination resistance of carriers/excitons. Doping a highly contorted 1,2,5-thiadiazole-fused 12-ring polyaromatic hydrocarbon into the active layer to form ternary blended OPVs further enlarged the recombination resistance of carriers/excitons and improved light absorption of the active layer, with which a high power conversion efficiency of 6.29% was acquired.

  17. Monolayer graphene-insulator-semiconductor emitter for large-area electron lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirley, Matthew P.; Aloui, Tanouir; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid adoption of nanotechnology in fields as varied as semiconductors, energy, and medicine requires the continual improvement of nanopatterning tools. Lithography is central to this evolving nanotechnology landscape, but current production systems are subject to high costs, low throughput, or low resolution. Herein, we present a solution to these problems with the use of monolayer graphene in a graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) electron emitter device for large-area electron lithography. Our GIS device displayed high emission efficiency (up to 13%) and transferred large patterns (500 × 500 μm) with high fidelity (industries and opening opportunities in nanomanufacturing.

  18. Multispectral selective near-perfect light absorption by graphene monolayer using aperiodic multilayer microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Iman; Dalir, Hamed; Chen, Ray T.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate one-dimensional aperiodic multilayer microstructures in order to achieve near-total absorptions at preselected wavelengths in a graphene monolayer. The proposed structures are designed using a genetic optimization algorithm coupled to a transfer matrix code. Coupled-mode-theory analysis, consistent with transfer matrix method results, indicates the existence of a critical coupling in the graphene monolayer for perfect absorptions. Our findings show that the near-total-absorption peaks are highly tunable and can be controlled simultaneously or independently in a wide range of wavelengths in the near-infrared and visible ranges. The proposed approach is metal-free, does not require surface texturing or patterning, and can be also applied for other two-dimensional materials.

  19. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    With remarkably interesting surface activities, two-dimensional Janus materials arouse intensive interests recently in many fields. We demonstrate by molecular dynamic simulations that hydrofluorinated Janus graphene (J-GN) can self-assemble into Janus nanoscroll (J-NS) at room temperature. The van...

  20. Quantum field theory of photon—Dirac fermion interacting system in graphene monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Nguyen, Van Hieu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elaborate quantum field theory of interacting systems comprising Dirac fermion fields in a graphene monolayer and the electromagnetic field. Since the Dirac fermions are confined in a two-dimensional plane, the interaction Hamiltonian of this system contains the projection of the electromagnetic field operator onto the plane of a graphene monolayer. Following the quantization procedure in traditional quantum electrodynamics we chose to work in the gauge determined by the weak Lorentz condition imposed on the state vectors of all physical states of the system. The explicit expression of the two-point Green function of the projection onto a graphene monolayer of a free electromagnetic field is derived. This two-point Green function and the expression of the interaction Hamiltonian together with the two-point Green functions of free Dirac fermion fields established in our previous work form the basics of the perturbation theory of the above-mentioned interacting field system. As an example, the perturbation theory is applied to the study of two-point Green functions of this interacting system of quantum fields. (paper)

  1. Transport properties in a monolayer graphene modulated by the realistic magnetic field and the Schottky metal stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Duo; Li, Yun-Bao; Liu, Hong-Yu; Peng, Shun-Jin; Zhao, Fei-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the transfer-matrix method, a systematic investigation of electron transport properties is done in a monolayer graphene modulated by the realistic magnetic field and the Schottky metal stripe. The strong dependence of the electron transmission and the conductance on the incident angle of carriers is clearly seen. The height, position as well as width of the barrier also play an important role on the electron transport properties. These interesting results are very useful for understanding the tunneling mechanism in the monolayer graphene and helpful for designing the graphene-based electrical device modulated by the realistic magnetic field and the electrical barrier.

  2. High-efficient light absorption of monolayer graphene via cylindrical dielectric arrays and the sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Zheng, Gaige

    2018-04-01

    The efficiency of graphene-based optoelectronic devices is typically limited by the poor absolute absorption of light. A hybrid structure of monolayer graphene with cylindrical titanium dioxide (TiO2) array and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) spacer layer on aluminum (Al) substrate has been proposed to enhance the absorption for two-dimensional (2D) materials. By combining dielectric array with metal substrate, the structure achieves multiple absorption peaks with near unity absorbance at near-infrared wavelengths due to the resonant effect of dielectric array. Completed monolayer graphene is utilized in the design without any demand of manufacture process to form the periodic patterns. Further analysis indicates that the near-field enhancement induced by surface modes gives rise to the high absorption. This favorable field enhancement and tunability of absorption not only open up new approaches to accelerate the light-graphene interaction, but also show great potential for practical applications in high-performance optoelectronic devices, such as modulators and sensors.

  3. Formation, Energetics, and Electronic Properties of Graphene Monolayer and Bilayer Doped with Heteroatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doping with heteroatoms is one of the most effective methods to tailor the electronic properties of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, and such nanomaterials doped with heteroatom dopants might therefore provide not only new physical and chemical properties but also novel nanoelectronics/optoelectronics device applications. The boron and nitrogen are neighboring elements to carbon in the periodic table, and they are considered to be good dopants for carbon nanomaterials. We here review the recent work of boron and nitrogen doping effects into graphene monolayer as well as bilayer on the basis of the first-principles electronic structure calculations in the framework of the density-functional theory. We show the energetics and the electronic properties of boron and nitrogen defects in graphene monolayer and bilayer. As for the nitrogen doping, we further discuss the stabilities, the growth processes, and the electronic properties associated with the plausible nitrogen defect formation in graphene which is suggested by experimental observations.

  4. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  5. Spin precession and spin Hall effect in monolayer graphene/Pt nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savero Torres, W.; Sierra, J. F.; Benítez, L. A.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-12-01

    Spin Hall effects have surged as promising phenomena for spin logics operations without ferromagnets. However, the magnitude of the detected electric signals at room temperature in metallic systems has been so far underwhelming. Here, we demonstrate a two-order of magnitude enhancement of the signal in monolayer graphene/Pt devices when compared to their fully metallic counterparts. The enhancement stems in part from efficient spin injection and the large spin resistance of graphene but we also observe 100% spin absorption in Pt and find an unusually large effective spin Hall angle of up to 0.15. The large spin-to-charge conversion allows us to characterise spin precession in graphene under the presence of a magnetic field. Furthermore, by developing an analytical model based on the 1D diffusive spin-transport, we demonstrate that the effective spin-relaxation time in graphene can be accurately determined using the (inverse) spin Hall effect as a means of detection. This is a necessary step to gather full understanding of the consequences of spin absorption in spin Hall devices, which is known to suppress effective spin lifetimes in both metallic and graphene systems.

  6. On the utility of vacancies and tensile strain-induced quality factor enhancement for mass sensing using graphene monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Harold S

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized classical molecular dynamics to investigate the mass sensing potential of graphene monolayers, using gold as the model adsorbed atom. In doing so, we report two key findings. First, we find that while perfect graphene monolayers are effective mass sensors at very low (T < 10 K) temperatures, their mass sensing capability is lost at higher temperatures due to diffusion of the adsorbed atom at elevated temperatures. We demonstrate that even if the quality (Q) factors are significantly elevated through the application of tensile mechanical strain, the mass sensing resolution is still lost at elevated temperatures, which demonstrates that high Q-factors alone are insufficient to ensure the mass sensing capability of graphene. Second, we find that while the introduction of single vacancies into the graphene monolayer prevents the diffusion of the adsorbed atom, the mass sensing resolution is still lost at higher temperatures, again due to Q-factor degradation. We finally demonstrate that if the Q-factors of the graphene monolayers with single vacancies are kept acceptably high through the application of tensile strain, then the high Q-factors, in conjunction with the single atom vacancies to stop the diffusion of the adsorbed atom, enable graphene to maintain its mass sensing capability across a range of technologically relevant operating temperatures.

  7. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insun Jo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier’s law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm−1K−1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  8. He/Ar-atom scattering from molecular monolayers: C{sub 60}/Pt(111) and graphene/Pt(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y; Sugawara, C; Satake, Y; Yokoyama, Y; Okada, R; Nakayama, T; Sasaki, M [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kondo, T; Oh, J; Nakamura, J [Institute of Material Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayes, W W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    Supersonic He and Ar atomic beam scattering from C{sub 60} and graphene monolayers adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface are demonstrated in order to obtain detailed insight into a gas-molecule collision that has not been studied in detail so far. The effective masses and phonon spectral densities of the monolayers seen by different projectiles are discussed based on classical models such as the hard cube model and the recently developed smooth surface model. Large effective masses are deduced for both the monolayers, suggesting collective effects of surface atoms in the single collision event. The effective Debye temperature of graphene was found to be similar to that reported in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), indicating that the graphene is decoupled well from the Pt substrate. A much smaller Debye-Waller factor was found for the C{sub 60} layer, probably reflecting the strong C{sub 60}-Pt(111) interaction.

  9. Dirac State in the FeB2 Monolayer with Graphene-Like Boron Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Li, Yafei; Hou, Jianhou; Du, Aijun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-10-12

    By introducing the commonly utilized Fe atoms into a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb boron network, we theoretically designed a new Dirac material of FeB 2 monolayer with a Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. The electron transfer from Fe atoms to B networks not only effectively stabilizes the FeB 2 networks but also leads to the strong interaction between the Fe and B atoms. The Dirac state in FeB 2 system primarily arises from the Fe d orbitals and hybridized orbital from Fe-d and B-p states. The newly predicted FeB 2 monolayer has excellent dynamic and thermal stabilities and is also the global minimum of 2D FeB 2 system, implying its experimental feasibility. Our results are beneficial to further uncovering the mechanism of the Dirac cones and providing a feasible strategy for Dirac materials design.

  10. Grüneisen parameter of the G mode of strained monolayer graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2011-03-28

    We present a detailed analysis of the effects of uniaxial and biaxial strain on the frequencies of the G mode of monolayer graphene, using first principles calculations. Our results allow us to explain discrepancies in the experimentally determined values of the Grüneisen parameter. The direction and strength of the applied strain, Poisson\\'s ratio of the substrate, and the intrinsic strain in different experimental setups turn out to be important. A reliable determination of the Grüneisen parameter is a prerequisite of strain engineering.

  11. Grüneisen parameter of the G mode of strained monolayer graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun; Huang, Gaoshan; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhu, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the effects of uniaxial and biaxial strain on the frequencies of the G mode of monolayer graphene, using first principles calculations. Our results allow us to explain discrepancies in the experimentally determined values of the Grüneisen parameter. The direction and strength of the applied strain, Poisson's ratio of the substrate, and the intrinsic strain in different experimental setups turn out to be important. A reliable determination of the Grüneisen parameter is a prerequisite of strain engineering.

  12. An Nd:YLF laser Q-switched by a monolayer-graphene saturable-absorber mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matía-Hernando, Paloma; Guerra, José Manuel; Weigand, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate Q-switched operation of a transversely diode-pumped Nd:YLF (yttrium lithium fluoride) laser using chemical vapour deposition-grown large-area monolayer graphene transferred to a dielectric saturable-absorber mirror (G-SAM). The resulting compact design operates at 1047 nm with 2.5 μs pulses in a 100% modulation Q-switch regime with an average and very stable output power of 0.5 W. Different cavity lengths have been employed and the results are compared against a theoretical model based on rate equations, evidencing the role of transverse pumping in the system. The model also reveals that monolayer graphene effectively leads to shorter and more powerful pulses compared to those with multilayer graphene. These results establish the potential of single-layer graphene for providing a reliable and efficient Q-switch mechanism in solid-state lasers. (paper)

  13. Sub-monolayer growth of titanium, cobalt, and palladium on epitaxial graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolova, Anastasia; Kilchert, Franziska; Schneider, M. Alexander [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Erlangen (Germany); Link, Stefan; Stoehr, Alexander; Starke, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We deposited metals (Ti, Co, Pd) typically used as seed layers for contacts on epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) and studied the early stages of growth in the sub-monolayer regime by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). All three metals do not wet the substrate and Ostwalt ripening occurs at temperatures below 400 K. The analysis of the epitaxial orientation of the metal adislands revealed their specific alignment to the graphene lattice. It is found that the apparent height of the islands as measured by STM strongly deviates from their true topographic height. This is interpreted as an indication of the presence of scattering processes within the metal particles that increase the transparency of the metal-graphene interface for electrons. Even large islands are easily picked up by the tip of the STM allowing insight into the bonding between metal island and graphene surface and into mechanisms leading to metal intercalation. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Effects of UV light intensity on electrochemical wet etching of SiC for the fabrication of suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    O, Ryong-Sok; Takamura, Makoto; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Nagase, Masao; Hibino, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    We report on the effects of UV light intensity on the photo assisted electrochemical wet etching of SiC(0001) underneath an epitaxially grown graphene for the fabrication of suspended structures. The maximum etching rate of SiC(0001) was 2.5 µm/h under UV light irradiation in 1 wt % KOH at a constant current of 0.5 mA/cm2. The successful formation of suspended structures depended on the etching rate of SiC. In the Raman spectra of the suspended structures, we did not observe a significant increase in the intensity of the D peak, which originates from defects in graphene sheets. This is most likely explained by the high quality of the single-crystalline graphene epitaxially grown on SiC.

  15. Strain-tunable half-metallicity in hybrid graphene-hBN monolayer superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Fanchao; Zhang, Shiqi; Lee, In-Ho; Jun, Sukky; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Armchair superlattices have a bandgap modulated by the deformed domain widths. • Strain and domain width lead to novel spin-dependent behavior for zigzag boundaries. • Limits for spin-dependent bandgap and half-metallic behavior have been charted. - Abstract: As research in 2-D materials evolves toward combinations of different materials, interesting electronic and spintronic properties are revealed and may be exploited in future devices. A way to combine materials is the formation of spatially periodic domain boundaries in an atom-thick monolayer: as shown in recent reports, when these domains are made of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, the resulting superlattice has half-metallic properties in which one spin component is (semi)metallic and the other is semiconductor. We explore here the range of spin-dependent electronic properties that such superlattices can develop for different type of domain boundaries, domain widths, and values of tensile strain applied to the monolayer. We show evidence of an interplay between strain and domain width in determining the electronic properties: while for armchair boundaries the bandgap is the same for both spin components, superlattices with zigzag boundaries exhibit rich spin-dependent behavior, including different bandgaps for each spin component, half-metallicity, and reversal of half-metallicity. These findings can lead to new ways of controlling the spintronic properties in hybrid-domain monolayers, which may be exploited in devices based on 2-D materials.

  16. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-03-24

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO2/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  17. Calculation of the number of atoms displaced during the irradiation of monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel Codorniu Pujals; Yuri Aguilera Corrales; Francesco Baldassarre

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of monolayer graphene, combined with chemical functionalization, could be an effective method for modifying its electronic structure and for achieving specific physical properties adjusted to different applications. A difficulty arising during planning and studying the irradiation in this system is that many of the models of interaction of the radiation with the substance cannot be applied to the two-dimensional structure of graphene. In particular, the mathematical expressions available to calculate the number of atoms displaced during the bombardment with particles can be applied only to 3D isotropic solids. In the present work, an alternative analytic expression is presented for the irradiation of graphene with heavy ions or with protons and other light charged particles. The expression was obtained on the basis of the classic theory of dispersion, using a Coulomb potential for the light charged particles and one of Inverse Square for heavy ions. For medium values of the energy of the incident particle a decreasing dependence of the number of displaced atoms with energy is obtained. This behavior, related with the two-dimensional structure of the target, had been observed in other authors' works using computational simulation. (author)

  18. Support-Free Transfer of Ultrasmooth Graphene Films Facilitated by Self-Assembled Monolayers for Electronic Devices and Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Ming; Tao, Li; Lee, Sun Hwa; Jang, A-Rang; Li, Bao-Wen; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-01-26

    We explored a support-free method for transferring large area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to various fluoric self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) modified substrates including SiO2/Si wafers, polyethylene terephthalate films, and glass. This method yields clean, ultrasmooth, and high-quality graphene films for promising applications such as transparent, conductive, and flexible films due to the absence of residues and limited structural defects such as cracks. The F-SAM introduced in the transfer process can also lead to graphene transistors with enhanced field-effect mobility (up to 10,663 cm(2)/Vs) and resistance modulation (up to 12×) on a standard silicon dioxide dielectric. Clean graphene patterns can be realized by transfer of graphene onto only the F-SAM modified surfaces.

  19. Changes in work function due to NO2 adsorption on monolayer and bilayer epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Nuala M.; Armiento, Rickard; Yakimova, Rositsa; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-11-01

    The electronic properties of monolayer graphene grown epitaxially on SiC(0001) are known to be highly sensitive to the presence of NO2 molecules. The presence of small areas of bilayer graphene, on the other hand, considerably reduces the overall sensitivity of the surface. We investigate how NO2 molecules interact with monolayer and bilayer graphene, both free-standing and on a SiC(0001) substrate. We show that it is necessary to explicitly include the effect of the substrate in order to reproduce the experimental results. When monolayer graphene is present on SiC, there is a large charge transfer from the interface between the buffer layer and the SiC substrate to the molecule. As a result, the surface work function increases by 0.9 eV after molecular adsorption. A graphene bilayer is more effective at screening this interfacial charge, and so the charge transfer and change in work function after NO2 adsorption is much smaller.

  20. Enhanced monolayer MoS2/InP heterostructure solar cells by graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Lin, Shisheng; Ding, Guqiao; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Zhijuan; Xu, Sen; Lu, Yanghua; Xu, Wenli; Zheng, Zheyang

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate significantly improved photovoltaic response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)/indium phosphide (InP) van der Waals heterostructure induced by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicate that effective charge transfer takes place between GQDs and MoS2, which results in n-type doping of MoS2. The doping effect increases the barrier height at the MoS2/InP heterojunction, thus the averaged power conversion efficiency of MoS2/InP solar cells is improved from 2.1% to 4.1%. The light induced doping by GQD provides a feasible way for developing more efficient MoS2 based heterostructure solar cells.

  1. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (tgraphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  2. Monolayer Boron Nitride Substrate Interactions with Graphene Under In-Plane and Perpendicular Strains: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of strain on the electronic and optical properties of graphene on monolayer boron nitride (BN) substrate are investigated using first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Strain-free graphene/BN has a small band gap of 97 meV at the K point. The magnitude of band gap increases with in-plane biaxial strain while it decreases with the perpendicular uniaxial strain. The ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum of graphene/BN bilayer for parallel polarization shows red and blue shifts by applying the in-plane tensile and compressive strains, respectively. Also the positions of peaks in the ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum are not significantly changed under perpendicular strain. The calculated results indicate that graphene on the BN substrate has great potential in microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  3. Strain-engineered band parameters of graphene-like SiC monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Using full-potential density functional theory (DFT) calculations we show that the band gap and effective masses of charge carriers in SiC monolayer (ML-SiC) in graphene-like two-dimensional honeycomb structure are tunable by strain engineering. ML-SiC was found to preserve its flat 2D graphene-like structure under compressive strain up to 7%. A transition from indirect-to-direct gap-phase is predicted to occur for a strain value lying within the interval (1.11 %, 1.76%). In both gap-phases band gap decreases with increasing strain, although the rate of decrease is different in the two gap-phases. Effective mass of electrons show a non-linearly decreasing trend with increasing tensile strain in the direct gap-phase. The strain-sensitive properties of ML-SiC, may find applications in future strain-sensors, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) and other nano-devices

  4. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Gyu; Jung, Wonsuk, E-mail: wonsuk81@wku.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-16

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  5. Effects of a piezoelectric substrate on phonon-drag thermopower in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargavi, K. S.; Kubakaddi, S. S.; Ford, C. J. B.

    2017-06-01

    The phonon-drag thermopower is studied in a monolayer graphene on a piezoelectric substrate. The phonon-drag contribution S\\text{PA}\\text{g} from the extrinsic potential of piezoelectric surface acoustic (PA) phonons of a piezoelectric substrate (GaAs) is calculated as a function of temperature T and electron concentration n s. At a very low temperature, S\\text{PA}\\text{g} is found to be much greater than S\\text{DA}\\text{g} of the intrinsic deformation potential of acoustic (DA) phonons of the graphene. There is a crossover of S\\text{PA}\\text{g} and S\\text{DA}\\text{g} at around ~5 K. In graphene samples of about  >10 µm size, we predict S g ~ 20 µV at 10 K, which is much greater than the diffusion component of the thermopower and can be experimentally observed. In the Bloch-Gruneisen (BG) regime T and n s dependence are, respectively, given by the power laws S\\text{PA}\\text{g} (S\\text{DA}\\text{g} ) ~ T 2(T 3) and S\\text{PA}\\text{g} , S\\text{DA}\\text{g} ~ n\\text{s}-1/2 . The T(n s) dependence is the manifestation of the 2D phonons (Dirac phase of the electrons). The effect of the screening is discussed. Analogous to Herring’s law (S g μ p ~ T -1), we predict a new relation S g μ p ~ n\\text{s}0 , where μ p is the phonon-limited mobility. We suggest that the n s dependent measurements will play a more significant role in identifying the Dirac phase and the effect of screening.

  6. Tunable Electrical and Optical Characteristics in Monolayer Graphene and Few-Layer MoS2 Heterostructure Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Servin; Lee, Inyeal; Lim, Dongsuk; Wang, Jianwei; Ochiai, Yuichi; Aoki, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-08-12

    Lateral and vertical two-dimensional heterostructure devices, in particular graphene-MoS2, have attracted profound interest as they offer additional functionalities over normal two-dimensional devices. Here, we have carried out electrical and optical characterization of graphene-MoS2 heterostructure. The few-layer MoS2 devices with metal electrode at one end and monolayer graphene electrode at the other end show nonlinearity in drain current with drain voltage sweep due to asymmetrical Schottky barrier height at the contacts and can be modulated with an external gate field. The doping effect of MoS2 on graphene was observed as double Dirac points in the transfer characteristics of the graphene field-effect transistor (FET) with a few-layer MoS2 overlapping the middle part of the channel, whereas the underlapping of graphene have negligible effect on MoS2 FET characteristics, which showed typical n-type behavior. The heterostructure also exhibits a strongest optical response for 520 nm wavelength, which decreases with higher wavelengths. Another distinct feature observed in the heterostructure is the peak in the photocurrent around zero gate voltage. This peak is distinguished from conventional MoS2 FETs, which show a continuous increase in photocurrent with back-gate voltage. These results offer significant insight and further enhance the understanding of the graphene-MoS2 heterostructure.

  7. Layer-by-layer evolution of structure, strain, and activity for the oxygen evolution reaction in graphene-templated Pt monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ali; Vitale, Adam; Joiner, Corey; Vogel, Eric; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2015-03-25

    In this study, we explore the dimensional aspect of structure-driven surface properties of metal monolayers grown on a graphene/Au template. Here, surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) is used to provide precise layer-by-layer growth of Pt monolayers on graphene. We find that after a few iterations of SLRR, fully wetted 4-5 monolayer Pt films can be grown on graphene. Incorporating graphene at the Pt-Au interface modifies the growth mechanism, charge transfers, equilibrium interatomic distances, and associated strain of the synthesized Pt monolayers. We find that a single layer of sandwiched graphene is able to induce a 3.5% compressive strain on the Pt adlayer grown on it, and as a result, catalytic activity is increased due to a greater areal density of the Pt layers beyond face-centered-cubic close packing. At the same time, the sandwiched graphene does not obstruct vicinity effects of near-surface electron exchange between the substrate Au and adlayers Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques are used to examine charge mediation across the Pt-graphene-Au junction and the local atomic arrangement as a function of the Pt adlayer dimension. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are used as probes to examine the electrochemically active area of Pt monolayers and catalyst activity, respectively. Results show that the inserted graphene monolayer results in increased activity for the Pt due to a graphene-induced compressive strain, as well as a higher resistance against loss of the catalytically active Pt surface.

  8. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d metal trioxide clusters-doped monolayer graphene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Muhammad [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); M.U.E.T, S.Z.A.B, Campus Khairpur Mir' s, Sindh (Pakistan); Shuai, Yong, E-mail: shuaiyong1978@gmail.com [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Tan, He-Ping; Hassan, Muhammad [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • First-principles calculations are performed for TMO{sub 3} cluster-doped and TM atoms adsorbed at three O atoms-doped graphene. • Significant magnetic coupling behavior is observed between TM atoms and neighboring C and O atoms for both cases. • The direction of charge transfer is always from monolayer graphene to TMO{sub 3} clusters incorporated into graphene. • TiO{sub 3} and VO{sub 3} doped structures display dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior. • Five different orbitals (d{sub xy}, d{sub yz}, d{sub z}{sup 2}, d{sub xz} and d{sub x}{sup 2}{sub -y}{sup 2}) of 3d TM atoms give rise to magnetic moments for both cases. - Abstract: We present first-principles density-functional calculations for the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer graphene doped with 3d (Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Mn and Ni) metal trioxide TMO{sub 3} halogen clusters. In this paper we used two approaches for 3d metal trioxide clusters (i) TMO{sub 3} halogen cluster was embedded in monolayer graphene substituting four carbon (C) atoms (ii) three C atoms were substituted by three oxygen (O) atoms in one graphene ring and TM atom was adsorbed at the hollow site of O atoms substituted graphene ring. All the impurities were tightly bonded in the graphene ring. In first case of TMO{sub 3} doped graphene layer, the bond length between C−O atom was reduced and bond length between TM-O atom was increased. In case of Cr, Fe, Co and Ni atoms substitution in between the O atoms, leads to Fermi level shifting to conduction band thereby causing the Dirac cone to move into valence band, however a band gap appears at high symmetric K-point. In case of TiO{sub 3} and VO{sub 3} substitution, system exhibits semiconductor properties. Interestingly, TiO{sub 3}-substituted system shows dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 2.00 μ{sub B} magnetic moment. On the other hand, the substitution of CoO{sub 3}, CrO{sub 3}, FeO{sub 3} and MnO{sub 3} induced 1.015 μ{sub B}, 2

  9. Contact angle hysteresis and motion behaviors of a water nano-droplet on suspended graphene under temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Esmaeilian, Farshad; Fadaei Naeini, Vahid; Baniassadi, Majid

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the effect of temperature gradient on the behavior of a water nano-droplet resting on a suspended graphene was studied based on a non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The acquired results indicate that the applied temperature gradient to the suspended graphene drives the water nano-droplet to the colder region. The droplet accelerates its motion toward the cold reservoir as the temperature gradient is increased. In addition to the translational motion of the nano-droplet, the vortical motion of the water molecules was also observed. Contact angle analysis was also utilized to describe the directional motion of the nano-droplet. The translational motion of the droplet leads to the estimation of contact angle hysteresis through advancing and receding contact angles while the rotational motion resulted in the advancing and receding fronts being switched with one another through the simulation. The average displacement vector of the water molecules shows that parts of the droplet seem to stagnate while other parts rotate around them. The reason behind this particular behavior was studied based on interaction energy contours between a water molecule and the suspended graphene. The obtained data indicate that the rotational motion is in agreement with the migration of the water molecules to low interaction energy regions in order to avoid high interaction energy areas.

  10. Tuning the work function of monolayer graphene on 4H-SiC (0001) with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günes, Fethullah; Arezki, Hakim; Alamarguy, David; Alvarez, José; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Boutchich, Mohamed; Pierucci, Debora; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim; Dappe, Yannick J

    2015-01-01

    Chemical doping of graphene is a key process for the modulation of its electronic properties and the design and fabrication of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices. Here, we study the adsorption of diluted concentrations of nitric acid (HNO_3) onto monolayer graphene/4H-SiC (0001) to induce a variation of the graphene work function (WF). Raman spectroscopy indicates an increase in the defect density subsequent to the doping. Moreover, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) was utilized to quantify the WF shift. UPS data show that the WF of the graphene layer decreased from 4.3 eV (pristine) down to 3.8 eV (30% HNO_3) and then increased to 4.4 eV at 100% HNO_3 concentration. These observations were confirmed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This straightforward process allows a large WF modulation, rendering the molecularly modified graphene/4H-SiC(0001) a highly suitable electron or hole injection electrode. (paper)

  11. Transfer of an exfoliated monolayer graphene flake onto an optical fiber end face for erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Henrique Guimaraes; De Souza, Eunézio A Thoroh; Gomes, José Carlos Viana

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, the successful transfer of exfoliated monolayer graphene flake to the optical fiber end face and alignment to its core. By fabricating and optimizing a polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) substrate, it is possible to obtain a contrast of up to 11% for green light illumination, allowing the identification of monolayer graphene flakes that were transferred to optical fiber samples and aligned to its core. With Raman spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that graphene flake completely covers the optical fiber core, and its quality remains unaltered after the transfer. The generation of mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser pulses, with a duration of 672 fs, with a single-monolayer graphene flake as a saturable absorber, is demonstrated for the first time. This transfer technique is of general applicability and can be used for other two-dimensional (2D) exfoliated materials. (letter)

  12. Transition metal decorated graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jie; Xu, Ming-Chun; Hu, Shu-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal (TM) atoms have been extensively employed to decorate the two-dimensional materials, endowing them with promising physical properties. Here, we have studied the adsorption of TM atoms (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) on graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer (g-ZnO) and the substitution of Zn by TM using first-principles calculations to search for the most likely configurations when TM atoms are deposited on g-ZnO. We found that when a V atom is initially placed on the top of Zn atom, V will squeeze out Zn from the two-dimensional plane then substitute it, which is a no barrier substitution process. For heavier elements (Cr to Co), although the substitution configurations are more stable than the adsorption ones, there is an energy barrier for the adsorption-substitution transition with the height of tens to hundreds meV. Therefore, Cr to Co prefers to be adsorbed on the hollow site or the top of oxygen, which is further verified by the molecular dynamics simulations. The decoration of TM is revealed to be a promising approach in terms of tuning the work function of g-ZnO in a large energy range.

  13. Graphene-like monolayer InSe–X: several promising half-metallic nanosheets in spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Kang, Wei; Zhou, Ting-Yan; Ma, Chong-Geng

    2018-04-01

    Several half-metallic graphene-like nanosheets, namely halogen atom adsorbed InSe–X (X  =  F, Cl, Br and I) nanosheets, are predicted by first-principles calculations. Then, their structural, electric and magnetic properties are studied in detail. The calculated negative adsorption energies of these InSe–X nanosheets ensure that they attain stable adsorption structures, which suggests that they may be prepared experimentally. The pristine InSe monolayer is a typical semi-conductor, whereas it is interesting that the X ion (X  =  F, Cl, Br and I) adsorbed InSe–X nanosheets are electronically conductive. They can be promising and good candidates for applications of half-metallic 2D materials. The calculated magnetic moments of these nanosheets are close to 1.0 µ B. In the InSe–F nanosheet, there are sp2 hybridized orbitals due to the crystal field effect, and its electroconductibility, half-metallicity and magnetic moments originate from the In and Se ions, not the F ion. However, in InSe–X (X  =  Cl, Br and I) nanosheets, there are sp3 hybridized orbitals, and their electroconductibility, half-metallicity and magnetic moments originate mainly from X ions, together partially with the In and Se ions.

  14. The most stable mono-layers of (111)-Pt (fcc) on Graphene: A first-principles GGA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otalora-Acevedo, J; Martínez, J A Rodríguez; Moreno-Armenta, G; Tan, N Takeuchi; Vera, E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate monolayers of planes (111) of Pt in the FCC structure located on graphene. The energy of formation showed that the most stable structure is √3×√3 — Pt on 2 × 2 — graphene. This system has a mismatch in the lattice constant of 0.45. The layers are completely flat, and its band structure shows that the new structure is metallic and the Dirac's cones are displaced 0.6eV above of the Fermi level. In this work we present the dependence of the enthalpy of formation of these structures and we calculated all structural parameters of their relaxation. (paper)

  15. Simulated Nano scale Peeling Process of Monolayer Graphene Sheet: Effect of Edge Structure and Lifting Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, N.; Okamoto, H.; Masuda, S.; Itamura, N.; Miura, K.

    2010-01-01

    The nanoscale peeling of the graphene sheet on the graphite surface is numerically studied by molecular mechanics simulation. For center-lifting case, the successive partial peelings of the graphene around the lifting center appear as discrete jumps in the force curve, which induce the arched deformation of the graphene sheet. For edge-lifting case, marked atomic-scale friction of the graphene sheet during the nanoscale peeling process is found. During the surface contact, the graphene sheet takes the atomic-scale sliding motion. The period of the peeling force curve during the surface contact decreases to the lattice period of the graphite. During the line contact, the graphene sheet also takes the stick-slip sliding motion. These findings indicate the possibility of not only the direct observation of the atomic-scale friction of the graphene sheet at the tip/surface interface but also the identification of the lattice orientation and the edge structure of the graphene sheet.

  16. Excitation of plasmon modes in a graphene monolayer supported on a 2D subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) carbon-based material, whose unique electronic and optical properties have attracted a great deal of research interest. Despite the fact that graphene is an atomically thin layer the optical absorption of a single layer can be as high as 2.3% (defined by the fine...... structure constant). Nevertheless, for light-matter interactions this number is imposing challenges and restrictions for graphene-based optoelectronic devices. One promising way to enhance optical absorption is to excite graphene-plasmon polaritons (GPPs) supported by graphene....

  17. Graphene Oxide Monolayer as a Compatibilizer at the Polymer-Polymer Interface for Stabilizing Polymer Bilayer Films against Dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyeri; Choi, Ki-In; Yoo, Jeseung; Seo, Young-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Koo, Jaseung

    2016-12-06

    We investigate the effect of adding graphene oxide (GO) sheets at the polymer-polymer interface on the dewetting dynamics and compatibility of immiscible polymer bilayer films. GO monolayers are deposited at the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-polystyrene (PS) interface by the Langmuir-Schaefer technique. GO monolayers are found to significantly inhibit the dewetting behavior of both PMMA films (on PS substrates) and PS films (on PMMA substrates). This can be interpreted in terms of an interfacial interaction between the GO sheets and these polymers, which is evidenced by the reduced contact angle of the dewet droplets. The favorable interaction of GO with both PS and PMMA facilitates compatibilization of the immiscible polymer bilayer films, thereby stabilizing their bilayer films against dewetting. This compatibilization effect is verified by neutron reflectivity measurements, which reveal that the addition of GO monolayers broadens the interface between PS and the deuterated PMMA films by 2.2 times over that of the bilayer in the absence of GO.

  18. Quasi-Free-Standing Graphene Monolayer on a Ni Crystal through Spontaneous Na Intercalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Park

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphene on metal substrates often shows different electronic properties from isolated graphene because of graphene-substrate interactions. One needs to remove the metals with acids and then to transfer graphene to weakly interacting substrates to recover electrical properties inherent in graphene. This process is not easy and besides causes undesirable tears, defects, and impurities in graphene. Here, we report a method to recover the electronic structure of graphene from a strongly interacting Ni substrate by spontaneous Na intercalation. In order to characterize the intercalation process, the density-functional-theory calculations and angle-resolved photoemission-spectroscopy (ARPES and scanning-tunneling-microscopy (STM measurements are carried out. From the density-functional-theory calculations, Na atoms energetically prefer interface intercalation to surface adsorption for the graphene/Ni(111 surface. Unlike most intercalants, Na atoms intercalate spontaneously at room temperature due to a tiny diffusion barrier, which is consistent with our temperature-dependent ARPES and core-level photoemission spectroscopy, and with our submonolayer ARPES and STM results at room temperature. As a result of the spontaneous intercalation, the electronic structure of graphene is almost recovered, as confirmed by the Dirac cone with a negligible band gap in ARPES and the sixfold symmetry in STM.

  19. Transport properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene p-n junctions with charge puddles in the quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Shuguang

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed that the electron-hole inhomogeneity in graphene is a new type of charge disorder. Motivated by such confirmation, we theoretically study the transport properties of a monolayer graphene (MLG) based p-n junction and a bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junction in the quantum Hall regime where electron-hole puddles are considered. By using the non-equilibrium Green function method, both the current and conductance are obtained. We find that, in the presence of the electron-hole inhomogeneity, the lowest quantized conductance plateau at e 2 /h emerges in the MLG p-n junction under very small charge puddle disorder strength. For a BLG p-n junction, however, the conductance in the p-n region is enhanced with charge puddles, and the lowest quantized conductance plateau emerges at 2e 2 /h. Besides, when an ideal quantized conductance plateau is formed for a MLG p-n junction, the universal conductance fluctuation is found to be 2e 2 /3h. Furthermore, we also investigate the influence of Anderson disorder on such p-n junctions and the comparison and discussion are given accordingly. To compare the two models with different types of disorder, we investigate the conductance distribution specially. Finally the influence of disorder strength on the conductance of a MLG p-n junction is investigated.

  20. Characterization of TEM Moiré Patterns Originating from Two Monolayer Graphenes Grown on the Front and Back Sides of a Copper Substrate by CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kenji; Maehara, Yosuke; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2018-06-01

    The number of layers affects the electronic properties of graphene owing to its unique band structure, called the Dirac corn. Raman spectroscopy is a key diagnostic tool for identifying the number of graphene layers and for determining their physical properties. Here, we observed moiré structures in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations; these are signature patterns in multilayer, although Raman spectra showed the typical intensity of the 2D/G peak in the monolayer. We also performed a multi-slice TEM image simulation to compare the 3D atomic structures of the two graphene membranes with experimental TEM images. We found that the experimental moiré image was constructed with a 9-12 Å interlayer distance between graphene membranes. This structure was constructed by transferring CVD-grown graphene films that formed on both sides of the Cu substrate at once.

  1. Edge states in gated bilayer-monolayer graphene ribbons and bilayer domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-05-01

    Using the effective continuum model, the electron energy spectrum of gated bilayer graphene with a step-like region of decoupled graphene layers at the edge of the sample is studied. Different types of coupled-decoupled interfaces are considered, i.e., zigzag (ZZ) and armchair junctions, which result in significant different propagating states. Two non-valley-polarized conducting edge states are observed for ZZ type, which are mainly located around the ZZ-ended graphene layers. Additionally, we investigated both BA-BA and BA-AB domain walls in the gated bilayer graphene within the continuum approximation. Unlike the BA-BA domain wall, which exhibits gapped insulating behaviour, the domain walls surrounded by different stackings of bilayer regions feature valley-polarized edge states. Our findings are consistent with other theoretical calculations, such as from the tight-binding model and first-principles calculations, and agree with experimental observations.

  2. Bound states of Dirac fermions in monolayer gapped graphene in the presence of local perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Zareyan, Malek

    2016-01-01

    In graphene, conductance electrons behave as massless relativistic particles and obey an analogue of the Dirac equation in two dimensions with a chiral nature. For this reason, the bounding of electrons in graphene in the form of geometries of quantum dots is impossible. In gapless graphene, due to its unique electronic band structure, there is a minimal conductivity at Dirac points, that is, in the limit of zero doping. This creates a problem for using such a highly motivated new material in electronic devices. One of the ways to overcome this problem is the creation of a band gap in the graphene band structure, which is made by inversion symmetry breaking (symmetry of sublattices). We investigate the confined states of the massless Dirac fermions in an impured graphene by the short-range perturbations for “local chemical potential” and “local gap”. The calculated energy spectrum exhibits quite different features with and without the perturbations. A characteristic equation for bound states (BSs) has been obtained. It is surprisingly found that the relation between the radial functions of sublattices wave functions, i.e., , , and , , can be established by SO (2) group. (paper)

  3. Revivals, classical periodicity, and zitterbewegung of electron currents in monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romera, E.; Santos, F. de los

    2009-01-01

    Revivals of electric current in graphene in the presence of an external magnetic field are described. It is shown that when the electrons are prepared in the form of wave packets assuming a Gaussian population of only positive (or negative) energy Landau levels, the presence of the magnetic field induce revivals of the electron currents, besides the classical cyclotron motion. When the population comprises both positive and negative energy Landau levels, revivals of the electric current manifest simultaneously with zitterbewegung and the classical cyclotron motion. We relate the temporal scales of these three effects and discuss to what extent these results hold for real graphene samples.

  4. SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry and strongly correlated quantum Hall states in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Murphy, Matthew; Guidry, Mike

    2017-03-01

    A formalism is presented for treating strongly correlated graphene quantum Hall states in terms of an SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry that includes pairing as well as particle-hole generators. The graphene SO(8) algebra is isomorphic to an SO(8) algebra that has found broad application in nuclear physics, albeit with physically very different generators, and exhibits a strong formal similarity to SU(4) symmetries that have been proposed to describe high-temperature superconductors. The well-known SU(4) symmetry of quantum Hall ferromagnetism for single-layer graphene is recovered as one subgroup of SO(8), but the dynamical symmetry structure associated with the full set of SO(8) subgroup chains extends quantum Hall ferromagnetism and allows analytical many-body solutions for a rich set of collective states exhibiting spontaneously broken symmetry that may be important for the low-energy physics of graphene in strong magnetic fields. The SO(8) symmetry permits a natural definition of generalized coherent states that correspond to symmetry-constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solutions, or equivalently a microscopically derived Ginzburg-Landau formalism, exhibiting the interplay between competing spontaneously broken symmetries in determining the ground state.

  5. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue

    2015-01-01

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimesional (2D) material for nanomedecine, but its...

  6. Thermionic emission from monolayer graphene, sheath formation and its feasibility towards thermionic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.; Mishra, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    A formalism describing the thermionic emission from a single layer graphene sheet operating at a finite temperature and the consequent formation of the thermionic sheath in its proximity has been established. The formulation takes account of two dimensional densities of state configuration, Fermi-Dirac (f-d) statistics of the electron energy distribution, Fowler's treatment of electron emission, and Poisson's equation. The thermionic current estimates based on the present analysis is found to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental observations (Zhu et al., Nano Res. 07, 1 (2014)). The analysis has further been simplified for the case where f-d statistics of an electron energy distribution converges to Maxwellian distribution. By using this formulation, the steady state sheath features, viz., spatial dependence of the surface potential and electron density structure in the thermionic sheath are derived and illustrated graphically for graphene parameters; the electron density in the sheath is seen to diminish within ˜10 s of Debye lengths. By utilizing the graphene based cathode in configuring a thermionic converter (TC), an appropriate operating regime in achieving the efficient energy conversion has been identified. A TC configured with the graphene based cathode (operating at ˜1200 K/work function 4.74 V) along with the metallic anode (operating at ˜400 K/ work function 2.0 V) is predicted to display ˜56% of the input thermal flux into the electrical energy, which infers approximately ˜84% of the Carnot efficiency.

  7. Temperature-induced strain and doping in monolayer and bilayer isotopically labeled graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhagen, Timotheus; Drogowska, Karolina; Kalbáč, Martin; Vejpravová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 12 (2015), "125437-1"-"125437-9" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02196S; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : isotopically labeled graphene * temperature dependence * Raman spectroscopy * phonons Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  8. Monolayer graphene/SiC Schottky barrier diodes with improved barrier height uniformity as a sensing platform for the detection of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtepliuk, Ivan; Eriksson, Jens; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr; Iakimov, Tihomir; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2016-01-01

    A vertical diode structure comprising homogeneous monolayer epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is fabricated by thermal decomposition of a Si-face 4H-SiC wafer in argon atmosphere. Current-voltage characteristics of the graphene/SiC Schottky junction were analyzed by applying the thermionic-emission theory. Extracted values of the Schottky barrier height and the ideality factor are found to be 0.4879 ± 0.013 eV and 1.01803 ± 0.0049, respectively. Deviations of these parameters from average values are smaller than those of previously observed literature data, thereby implying uniformity of the Schottky barrier height over the whole diode area, a stable rectifying behaviour and a good quality of ohmic palladium-graphene contacts. Keeping in mind the strong sensitivity of graphene to analytes we propose the possibility to use the graphene/SiC Schottky diode as a sensing platform for the recognition of toxic heavy metals. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations we gain insight into the nature of the interaction of cadmium, mercury and lead with graphene as well as estimate the work function and the Schottky barrier height of the graphene/SiC structure before and after applying heavy metals to the sensing material. A shift of the I - V characteristics of the graphene/SiC-based sensor has been proposed as an indicator of presence of the heavy metals. Since the calculations suggested the strongest charge transfer between Pb and graphene, the proposed sensing platform was characterized by good selectivity towards lead atoms and slight interferences from cadmium and mercury. The dependence of the sensitivity parameters on the concentration of Cd, Hg and Pb is studied and discussed.

  9. Monolayer graphene/SiC Schottky barrier diodes with improved barrier height uniformity as a sensing platform for the detection of heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Shtepliuk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A vertical diode structure comprising homogeneous monolayer epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is fabricated by thermal decomposition of a Si-face 4H-SiC wafer in argon atmosphere. Current–voltage characteristics of the graphene/SiC Schottky junction were analyzed by applying the thermionic-emission theory. Extracted values of the Schottky barrier height and the ideality factor are found to be 0.4879 ± 0.013 eV and 1.01803 ± 0.0049, respectively. Deviations of these parameters from average values are smaller than those of previously observed literature data, thereby implying uniformity of the Schottky barrier height over the whole diode area, a stable rectifying behaviour and a good quality of ohmic palladium–graphene contacts. Keeping in mind the strong sensitivity of graphene to analytes we propose the possibility to use the graphene/SiC Schottky diode as a sensing platform for the recognition of toxic heavy metals. Using density functional theory (DFT calculations we gain insight into the nature of the interaction of cadmium, mercury and lead with graphene as well as estimate the work function and the Schottky barrier height of the graphene/SiC structure before and after applying heavy metals to the sensing material. A shift of the I–V characteristics of the graphene/SiC-based sensor has been proposed as an indicator of presence of the heavy metals. Since the calculations suggested the strongest charge transfer between Pb and graphene, the proposed sensing platform was characterized by good selectivity towards lead atoms and slight interferences from cadmium and mercury. The dependence of the sensitivity parameters on the concentration of Cd, Hg and Pb is studied and discussed.

  10. Tailoring the structural and electronic properties of a graphene-like ZnS monolayer using biaxial strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Our first-principles full-potential density functional theory calculations show that a ZnS monolayer (ML-ZnS), which is predicted to adopt a graphene-like planar honeycomb structure with a direct band gap, undergoes strain-induced modifications in its structure and band gap when subjected to in-plane homogeneous biaxial strain (δ). ML-ZnS gets buckled for compressive strain greater than 0.92% ; the buckling parameter Δ(= 0.00 Å for planar ML-ZnS) linearly increases with increasing compressive strain (Δ = 0.435 Å at δ = −5.25%). A tensile strain of 2.91% turns the direct ML-ZnS band gap into indirect. Within our considered strain values of |δ| < 6%, the band gap shows linearly decreasing (non-linearly increasing as well as decreasing) variation with tensile (compressive) strain. These predictions (based on our calculations with two atoms per unit cell) may be exploited in future for potential applications in strain sensors and other nano-devices such as nano-electromechanical systems and nano-optomechanical systems. (paper)

  11. Temperature-induced strain release via rugae on the nanometer and micrometer scale in graphene monolayer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhagen, Timotheus; Valeš, Václav; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin; Vejpravová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, Aug (2017), s. 483-491 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * wrinkle * low temperature Raman mapping * strain * doping * thermal expansion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  12. A fast transfer-free synthesis of high-quality monolayer graphene on insulating substrates by a simple rapid thermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zefei; Guo, Yanqing; Guo, Yuzheng; Huang, Rui; Xu, Shuigang; Song, Jie; Lu, Huanhuan; Lin, Zhenxu; Han, Yu; Li, Hongliang; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Wu, Yingying; Long, Gen; Cai, Yuan; Cheng, Chun; Su, Dangsheng; Robertson, John; Wang, Ning

    2016-02-07

    The transfer-free synthesis of high-quality, large-area graphene on a given dielectric substrate, which is highly desirable for device applications, remains a significant challenge. In this paper, we report on a simple rapid thermal treatment (RTT) method for the fast and direct growth of high-quality, large-scale monolayer graphene on a SiO2/Si substrate from solid carbon sources. The stack structure of a solid carbon layer/copper film/SiO2 is adopted in the RTT process. The inserted copper film does not only act as an active catalyst for the carbon precursor but also serves as a "filter" that prevents premature carbon dissolution, and thus, contributes to graphene growth on SiO2/Si. The produced graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of up to 3000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and standard half-integer quantum oscillations. Our work provides a promising simple transfer-free approach using solid carbon sources to obtain high-quality graphene for practical applications.

  13. Forces and electronic transport in a contact formed by a graphene tip and a defective MoS2 monolayer: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Felice, D.; Dappe, Y. J.; González, C.

    2018-06-01

    A theoretical study of a graphene-like tip used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. Based on first principles simulations, we proved the low reactivity of this kind of tip, using a MoS2 monolayer as the testing sample. Our simulations show that the tip–MoS2 interaction is mediated through weak van der Waals forces. Even on the defective monolayer, the interaction is reduced by one order of magnitude with respect to the values obtained using a highly reactive metallic tip. On the pristine monolayer, the S atoms were imaged for large distances together with the substitutional defects which should be observed as brighter spots in non-contact AFM measurements. This result is in contradiction with previous simulations performed with Cu or Si tips where the metallic defects were imaged for much larger distances than the S atoms. For shorter distances, the Mo sites will be brighter even though a vacancy is formed. On the other hand, the largest conductance value is obtained over the defect formed by two Mo atoms occupying a S divacancy when the half-occupied p y -states of the graphene-like tip find a better coupling with d-orbitals of the highest substitutional atom. Due to the weak interaction, no conductance plateau is formed in any of the sites. A great advantage of this tip lies in the absence of atomic transfer between the tip and the sample leading to a more stable AFM measurement. Finally, and as previously shown, we confirm the atomic resolution in a scanning tunneling microscopy simulation using this graphene-based tip.

  14. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  15. Comparison of mechanical and corrosion properties of graphene monolayer on Ti–Al–V and nanometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer on Ti–Al–V alloy for dental implants applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisz, M., E-mail: malgorzata.kalisz@its.waw.pl [Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Grobelny, M. [Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Mazur, M. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Zdrojek, M. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Wojcieszak, D. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Świniarski, M.; Judek, J. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Kaczmarek, D. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    In this paper the comparative studies on structural, mechanical and corrosion properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Ti–Al–V and graphene/Ti–Al–V alloy systems have been investigated. We show that the hardness of pure niobium pentoxide was ca. 8.64 GPa and graphene deposited on titanium alloy surface was equal 5.63 GPa. However, the graphene monolayer has no effect on surface hardness of titanium alloy and can be easily removed from the surface. On the other hand, the sample with graphene coating has much better corrosion resistance. Our results suggest, that the use of combined layers of niobium pentoxide and graphene, in the hybrid multilayer system can greatly improve the mechanical and corrosion properties of the titanium alloy surface. Such hybrid system can be used in the future, as protection coating for Ti alloy, in biomedical application and in other applications, where Ti alloys work in an aggressive corrosive environment and in engineering applications where friction is involved. - Highlights: • Corrosion properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiAlV and graphene/TiAlV systems were investigated. • Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film improves titanium alloy surface hardness from 5.64 GPa to 8.64 GPa. • Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film improves corrosion resistance of Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V in aggressive environment. • i{sub corr} for graphene monolayer deposited on Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V surface decreases to 0.01 μA/cm{sup 2}. • Graphene monolayer caused decrease in the electrochemical activity of the Ti surface.

  16. Attenuation characteristics of monolayer graphene by Pi-and T-networks modeling of multilayer microstrip line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pulkit Sharma; Sumit Pratap Singh; Kamlesh Patel

    2017-01-01

    The impedances of Pi-and T-networks are obtained from the measured S-parameters of the multilayer microstrip line by modeling as an attenuator.The changes in impedances have been analyzed for the properties of various superstrates at the microwave ranges.With graphene on glass and graphene on quartz loadings,the impedances have increased and shifted towards lower frequency more in Pi-network than T-network modeling.This shift has become more prominent at higher frequency for the graphene on glass than graphene on quartz.A little increase in attenuation is found for graphene on glass or quartz than bare glass and quartz.The present study can be extended to obtain attenuation characteristic of any thin film by simple experimental method in the microwave frequencies.

  17. Tunable continuous wave and passively Q-switched Nd:LuLiF4 laser with monolayer graphene as saturable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Luo, Jianjun; Li, Shixia; Li, Tao; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Tunable continuous wave and passively Q-switched Nd:LuLiF 4 laser performances were demonstrated. Employing a 2 mm thick quartz plate as the birefringence filter, three continuous tuning ranges from 1045.2 to 1049.9 nm, 1051 to 1055.1 nm and 1072.1 to 1074.3 nm could be obtained. Q-switched laser operation was realized by using a monolayer graphene as a saturable absorber. At an incident pump power of 5.94 W, the maximum average output power was 669 mW with the pulse duration of 210 ns and the pulse repetition rate of 145 kHz at T = 10%. (paper)

  18. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  19. Conversion of Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers and bilayers of poly(amic acid) through polyimide to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hye Jin; Lyu, Ji Hong; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Lim, Hyunseob; In Yoon, Seong; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2017-03-01

    Various solid carbon sources, particularly poly(methyl methacrylate), have been used as precursors to graphene. The corresponding growth process generally involves the decomposition of the solids to hydrocarbon gases followed by their adsorption on metallic substrates (e.g., Cu). We report a different approach that uses a thermally-resistant polyimide (PI) as a carbon precursor. Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(amic acid) (PAA) were transferred to copper foils and then converted to graphene via a PI intermediate. The Cu foil substrate was also discovered to facilitate the orientation of aromatic moieties upon carbonization process of the PI. As approximately 50% of the initial quantity of the PAA was found to remain at 1000 °C, thermally-stable polymers may reduce the quantity of starting material required to prepare high quality films of graphene. Graphene grown using this method featured a relatively large domain size and an absence of adventitious adlayers.

  20. Analysis of small biomolecules and xenobiotic metabolism using converted graphene-like monolayer plates and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunook; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2017-06-01

    We report a method of small molecule analysis using a converted graphene-like monolayer (CGM) plate and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) without organic matrices. The CGM plate was prepared from self-assembled monolayers of biphenyl-4-thiol on gold using electron beam irradiation followed by an annealing step. The above plate was utilized for the LDI-TOF MS analyses of various small molecules and their mixtures, e.g., amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, oligoethylene glycols, and flavonoids. The CGM plate afforded high signal-to-noise ratios, good limits of detection (1pmol to 10fmol), and reusability for up to 30 cycles. As a practical application, the enzymatic activity of the cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) enzyme in human liver microsomes was assessed in the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin using the CGM plate without other purification steps. We believe that the prepared CGM plate can be practically used with the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, and reusability for the matrix-free analysis of small biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inter-layer and intra-layer heat transfer in bilayer/monolayer graphene van der Waals heterostructure: Is there a Kapitza resistance analogous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabpour, Ali; Fan, Zheyong; Vaez Allaei, S. Mehdi

    2018-06-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures have exhibited interesting physical properties. In this paper, heat transfer in hybrid coplanar bilayer/monolayer (BL-ML) graphene, as a model layered van der Waals heterostructure, was studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The temperature profile and inter- and intra-layer heat fluxes of the BL-ML graphene indicated that, there is no fully developed thermal equilibrium between layers and the drop in the average temperature profile at the step-like BL-ML interface is not attributable to the effect of Kapitza resistance. By increasing the length of the system up to 1 μm in the studied MD simulations, the thermally non-equilibrium region was reduced to a small area near the step-like interface. All MD results were compared to a continuum model and a good match was observed between the two approaches. Our results provide a useful understanding of heat transfer in nano- and micro-scale layered materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

  2. Graphene paper supported MoS2 nanocrystals monolayer with Cu submicron-buds: High-performance flexible platform for sensing in sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyun; Dong, Shuang; Gui, Mengxi; Asif, Muhammad; Wang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Liu, Hongfang

    2018-02-15

    Flexible sweat biosensors are of considerable current interest for the development of wearable smart miniature devices. In this work, we report a novel type of flexible and electrochemical sweat platform fabricated by depositing Cu submicron buds on freestanding graphene paper (GP) carrying MoS 2 nanocrystals monolayer for bio-functional detection of glucose and lactate. Quantitative analysis of glucose and lactate was carried out by using amperometric i-t method. Linear ranges were obtained between 5 and 1775 μM for glucose and 0.01-18.4 mM for lactate, and their corresponding limits of detection were 500 nM and 0.1 μM, respectively. The platform demonstrates fast response, good selectivity, superb reproducibility and outstanding flexibility, which enable its use for monitoring glucose and lactate in human perspiration. The strategy of structurally integrating 3D transition metal, 0D transition metal sulfide and 2D graphene will provide new insight into the design of flexible electrodes for sweat glucose and lactate monitoring and a wider range of applications in biosensing, bioelectronics, and lab-on-a-chip devices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Adsorption of gas molecules on graphene-like InN monolayer: A first-principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiang; Yang, Qun [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Meng, Ruishen [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Tan, Chunjian [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Liang, Qiuhua [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Jiang, Junke [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Ye, Huaiyu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Chen, Xianping, E-mail: xianpingchen@cqu.edu.cn [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive adsorption mechanism of InN monolayer is theoretical studied to distinguish the physic/chemi-sorption. • Different adsorption sites for different gases are systematically discussed. • The influence (enhanced or weakened) of external electric field to InN-gas system is well investigated. • The influences of gas adsorption to the optical properties (work function and light adsorption ability) of InN monolayer are also researched. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculation within density functional theory (DFT), we study the gas (CO, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}, NO, SO{sub 2}) adsorption properties on the surface of single-layer indium nitride (InN). Four different adsorption sites (Bridge, In, N, Hollow) are chosen to explore the most sensitive adsorption site. On the basis of the adsorption energy, band gap and charge transfer, we find that the most energetic favourable site is changeable between In site and N site for different gases. Moreover, our results reveal that InN is sensitive to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and NO{sub 2}, by a physisorption or a chemisorption nature. We also perform a perpendicular electric field to the system and find that the applied electric field has a significant effect for the adsorption process. Besides, we also observed the desorption effects on NH{sub 3} adsorbed at the hollow site of InN when the electric field applied. In addition, the optical properties of InN monolayer affected by different gases are also discussed. Most of the gas adsorptions will cause the inhibition of light adsorption while the others can reduce the work function or enhance the adsorption ability in visible region. Our theoretical results indicate that monolayer InN is a promising candidate for gas sensing applications.

  4. Understanding the anchoring effect of Graphene, BN, C2N and C3N4 monolayers for lithium-polysulfides in Li-S batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanping; Li, Huanhuan; Yuan, Haiyan; Fan, Honghong; Li, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingping

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Li-S batteries with a high theoretical specific energy have attracted significant attention. However, their practical application is still seriously hindered by the shuttling effect of lithium polysulfides (LiPSs) in the Li-S batteries system. Introducing anchoring materials into the cathode or separator, which can strongly attract LiPSs because of advisable binding energies, has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to alleviate the shuttling effect for achieving the excellent cycling performance of Li-S batteries. In this work, the complete mechanistic understanding of the interaction between non-metallic monolayer materials (N-MMLMs, including Graphene, BN, C2N and C3N4) and LiPSs is given in detail with the aid of density functional theory. The calculation results show that N-MMLM can combine the chemical interaction and the physical entrapment of sulfur species to suppress the shuttling effect. C3N4 and C2N are predicted to trap LiPSs via stronger interfacial interaction and alleviate the interactions between LiPSs and solvents as well as the consequent dissolution. The strong anchoring effect of C3N4/C2N comes from the bonding of Li-N/C-S and charge transfer. Further charge transfer study reveals that the C3N4/C2N can serve as an electrocatalyst, which effectively accelerates the kinetics of LiPSs redox reactions.

  5. Adsorption of 3d transition metal atoms on graphene-like gallium nitride monolayer: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Xiang; Li, Han-Fei; Yang, Xu; Wen, Jun-Qing; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2018-03-01

    We study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) adsorbed GaN monolayer (GaN-ML) using first-principles calculations. The results show that, for 6 different TM adatoms, the most stable adsorption sites are the same. The adsorption of TM atoms results in significant lattice distortions. A covalent chemical bonding character between TM adatom and GaN-ML is found in TM adsorbed systems. Except for Ni adsorbed system, all TM adsorbed systems show spin polarization implying that the adsorption of TM induces magnetization. The magnetic moments of the adsorbed systems are concentrated on the TM adatoms and the nearest-neighbor N atoms of the adsorption site contributed slightly. Our analysis shows that the GaN-ML properties can be effectively modulated by TM adsorption, and exhibit various electronic and magnetic properties, such as magnetic metals (Fe adsorption), half-metal (Co adsorption), and spin gapless semiconductor (Cu adsorption). These present properties of TM adsorbed GaN-ML may be of value in electronics and spintronics applications.

  6. Monte Carlo studies of thermalization of electron-hole pairs in spin-polarized degenerate electron gas in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2018-02-01

    Monte Carlo method is applied to the study of relaxation of excited electron-hole (e-h) pairs in graphene. The presence of background of spin-polarized electrons, with high density imposing degeneracy conditions, is assumed. To such system, a number of e-h pairs with spin polarization parallel or antiparallel to the background is injected. Two stages of relaxation: thermalization and cooling are clearly distinguished when average particles energy and its standard deviation σ _E are examined. At the very beginning of thermalization phase, holes loose energy to electrons, and after this process is substantially completed, particle distributions reorganize to take a Fermi-Dirac shape. To describe the evolution of and σ _E during thermalization, we define characteristic times τ _ {th} and values at the end of thermalization E_ {th} and σ _ {th}. The dependence of these parameters on various conditions, such as temperature and background density, is presented. It is shown that among the considered parameters, only the standard deviation of electrons energy allows to distinguish between different cases of relative spin polarizations of background and excited electrons.

  7. Probing thermal expansion of graphene and modal dispersion at low-temperature using graphene nanoelectromechanical systems resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vibhor; Sengupta, Shamashis; Solanki, Hari S; Dhall, Rohan; Allain, Adrien; Dhara, Sajal; Deshmukh, Mandar M; Pant, Prita

    2010-01-01

    We use suspended graphene electromechanical resonators to study the variation of resonant frequency as a function of temperature. Measuring the change in frequency resulting from a change in tension, from 300 to 30 K, allows us to extract information about the thermal expansion of monolayer graphene as a function of temperature, which is critical for strain engineering applications. We find that thermal expansion of graphene is negative for all temperatures between 300 and 30 K. We also study the dispersion, the variation of resonant frequency with DC gate voltage, of the electromechanical modes and find considerable tunability of resonant frequency, desirable for applications like mass sensing and RF signal processing at room temperature. With a lowering of temperature, we find that the positively dispersing electromechanical modes evolve into negatively dispersing ones. We quantitatively explain this crossover and discuss optimal electromechanical properties that are desirable for temperature-compensated sensors.

  8. Graphene field-effect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtermeyer, T. J.; Lemme, M. C.; Bolten, J.; Baus, M.; Ramsteiner, M.; Kurz, H.

    2007-09-01

    In this article, graphene is investigated with respect to its electronic properties when introduced into field effect devices (FED). With the exception of manual graphene deposition, conventional top-down CMOS-compatible processes are applied. Few and monolayer graphene sheets are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical properties of monolayer graphene sandwiched between two silicon dioxide films are studied. Carrier mobilities in graphene pseudo-MOS structures are compared to those obtained from double-gated Graphene-FEDs and silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs).

  9. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  10. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou

    2017-01-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have...... fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness...... of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error...

  11. Turbostratic stacked CVD graphene for high-performance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kohei; Ikuta, Takashi; Maehashi, Kenzo

    2018-03-01

    We have fabricated turbostratic stacked graphene with high-transport properties by the repeated transfer of CVD monolayer graphene. The turbostratic stacked CVD graphene exhibited higher carrier mobility and conductivity than CVD monolayer graphene. The electron mobility for the three-layer turbostratic stacked CVD graphene surpassed 10,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, which is five times greater than that for CVD monolayer graphene. The results indicate that the high performance is derived from maintenance of the linear band dispersion, suppression of the carrier scattering, and parallel conduction. Therefore, turbostratic stacked CVD graphene is a superior material for high-performance devices.

  12. Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romera, E.; Roldán, J.B.; Santos, F. de los

    2014-01-01

    We study the Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene under a perpendicular magnetic field. Using an effective Hamiltonian, we have investigated the autocorrelation function and the density currents in this material. Moreover, we have analyzed other types of periodicities of the system (classical and revival times). Finally, the above results are compared with their counterparts in two other monolayer materials subject to a magnetic field: graphene and MoS 2 . - Highlights: • We study Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene in a magnetic field. • We have analyzed other types of periodicities in silicene. • The above results are compared with other monolayer materials (graphene and MoS 2 )

  13. Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Roldán, J.B. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de Computadores and CITIC, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Santos, F. de los [Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Física de la Materia, and Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-07-04

    We study the Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene under a perpendicular magnetic field. Using an effective Hamiltonian, we have investigated the autocorrelation function and the density currents in this material. Moreover, we have analyzed other types of periodicities of the system (classical and revival times). Finally, the above results are compared with their counterparts in two other monolayer materials subject to a magnetic field: graphene and MoS{sub 2}. - Highlights: • We study Zitterbewegung in monolayer silicene in a magnetic field. • We have analyzed other types of periodicities in silicene. • The above results are compared with other monolayer materials (graphene and MoS{sub 2})

  14. Physics of graphene

    CERN Document Server

    S Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a state of the art report of the results of graphene research, one of the fastest-moving topics on condensed-matter physics. Covers not only transport but optical and other properties of multilayer as well as monolayer graphene systems.

  15. Unobtrusive graphene coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The contact angle of water drops on substrates for which the wettability is dominated by van der Waals forces remains unchanged when the substrates are coated with a monolayer of graphene. Such 'wetting transparency' could lead to superior conducting and hydrophobic graphene-coated surfaces with

  16. Suspended ceilings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, C.

    1991-05-01

    The retrofitting of existing conventional ceiling systems to suspended ceiling type systems represents an interesting energy savings solution since this method, in addition to providing additional protection against space heat loss and thermal bridges, also creates the possibility of housing, in the void, additional mechanical and electrical lines which may be necessary due to other savings interventions. This paper reviews the various suspended ceiling systems (e.g., those making use of mineral fibre, gypsum panels, wood, vermiculite, etc.) currently marketed in Europe, and reports, for each, some key technical, economic and architectural advantages which include thermal efficiency, noise abatement, as well as, resistance to fire and humidity. Information is also given on the relative installation and maintenance requirements.

  17. Theoretical STM maps of curved graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, G. S.; Ulloa, S. E.

    2010-03-01

    We calculate the effect of curvature on the electronic states in monolayer graphene, considering a local ripple along different directions on the plane. The curvature introduces hybridization between σ and π bands and affects the electronic structure and associated wave functions, even opening a gap of the order of few meV at the Dirac point. Our calculation uses a non-orthogonal four-orbital tight-binding representation up to nearest-neighbors, which fully describes the electronic states of the structure. We focus this study on the analysis of theoretical STM maps for different ripple directions and radius of curvature. We discuss the appearance of a well defined pattern in the STM map near the Dirac point, which is strongly modified when the graphene is rippled along different directions, and discuss this effect in terms of a geometric Berry phase. Although it is difficult experimentally to produce and control a well defined direction for the graphene ripple, recent experiments suggest that this structure may be possible in suspended samples with stressors along the edges [1].[4pt] [1] W. Bao et al., Nature Nanotech. 4, 562 (2009).

  18. Effect of substrate and temperature on the electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qizhi; Fang, Jiajia; Zhang, Guangru; Wang, Quan

    2018-03-01

    The use of two-dimensional nanostructured molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films in field-effect transistors (FETs) in place of graphene was investigated. Monolayer MoS2 films were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition. The output and transfer curves of supported and suspended MoS2 FETs were measured. The mobility of the suspended device reached 364.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 150 °C. The hysteresis of the supported device in transfer curves was much larger than that of the suspended device, and it increased at higher temperatures. These results indicate that the device mobility was limited by Coulomb scattering at ambient temperature, and surface/interface phonon scattering at 150 °C, and the injection of electrons, via quantum tunneling through the Schottky barrier at the contact, was enhanced at higher temperatures and led to the increase of the hysteresis. The suspended MoS2 films show potential for application as a channel material in electronic devices, and further understanding the causes of hysteresis in a material is important for its use in technologies, such as memory devices and sensing cells.

  19. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  20. Transfer-free fabrication of graphene transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Wessely, P.J.; Wessely, F.; Birinci, E.; Schwalke, U.; Riedinger, B.

    2012-01-01

    The authors invented a method to fabricate graphene transistors on oxidized silicon wafers without the need to transfer graphene layers. To stimulate the growth of graphene layers on oxidized silicon, a catalyst system of nanometer thin aluminum/nickel double layer is used. This catalyst system is structured via liftoff before the wafer enters the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) chamber. In the subsequent methane-based growth process, monolayer graphene field-effect transistors and...

  1. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS 2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS 2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene. (paper)

  2. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene.

  3. Spin-Orbit Coupling and Magnetism in Multilayer Graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelderen, R.

    2013-01-01

    The topics covered in this work are - spin-density-wave instabilities in monolayer graphene doped to the van Hove singularity. Nesting of the Fermi surface and a diverging density of states are often ingredients for charge and/or magnetic instabilities. For highly doped monolayer graphene these

  4. Optical bistability of graphene in the terahertz range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Bludov, Yu V.; Santos, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    We use an exact solution of the relaxation-time Boltzmann equation in a uniform ac electric field to describe the nonlinear optical response of graphene in the terahertz (THz) range. The cases of monolayer, bilayer, and ABA-stacked trilayer graphene are considered, and the monolayer species...

  5. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  6. Macroscale tribological properties of fluorinated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Kento; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Choi, Junho

    2018-02-01

    Because graphene is carbon material and has excellent mechanical characteristics, its use as ultrathin lubrication protective films for machine elements is greatly expected. The durability of graphene strongly depends on the number of layers and the load scale. For use in ultrathin lubrication protective films for machine elements, it is also necessary to maintain low friction and high durability under macroscale loads in the atmosphere. In this study, we modified the surfaces of both monolayer and multilayer graphene by fluorine plasma treatment and examined the friction properties and durability of the fluorinated graphene under macroscale load. The durability of both monolayer and multilayer graphene improved by the surface fluorination owing to the reduction of adhesion forces between the friction interfaces. This occurs because the carbon film containing fluorine is transferred to the friction-mating material, and thus friction acts between the two carbon films containing fluorine. On the other hand, the friction coefficient decreased from 0.20 to 0.15 by the fluorine plasma treatment in the multilayer graphene, whereas it increased from 0.21 to 0.27 in the monolayer graphene. It is considered that, in the monolayer graphene, the change of the surface structure had a stronger influence on the friction coefficient than in the multilayer graphene, and the friction coefficient increased mainly due to the increase in defects on the graphene surface by the fluorine plasma treatment.

  7. Atomic defects and doping of monolayer NbSe2

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Lan; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Peters, Jonathan J.P.; Lawlor, Sean; Sanchez, Ana M.; Sloan, Jeremy; Gorbachev, Roman; Grigorieva, Irina; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Haigh, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the structure of atomic defects within monolayer NbSe2 encapsulated in graphene by combining atomic resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and strain mapping using geometric phase analysis. We demonstrate the presence of stable Nb and Se monovacancies in monolayer material and reveal that Se monovacancies are the most frequently observed defects, consistent with DFT calculations of their formation energy. We reve...

  8. Observing grain boundaries in CVD-grown monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuchue; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Li, Mingyang; Zhao, Jiong; Perello, David J.; Cichocka, Magdalena Ola; Oh, Hyemin; Chae, Sanghoon; Jeong, Hyeyun; Yao, Fei; Li, Lain-Jong; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMdCs), driven by graphene science, revisit optical and electronic properties, which are markedly different from bulk characteristics. These properties are easily modified due

  9. Layered graphene-mica substrates induce melting of DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Pham, Phi H. Q.; Crow, Daniel T.; Burke, Peter J.; Norton, Michael L.

    2018-04-01

    Monolayer graphene supported on mica substrates induce melting of cross-shaped DNA origami. This behavior can be contrasted with the case of origami on graphene on graphite, where an expansion or partially re-organized structure is observed. On mica, only well-formed structures are observed. Comparison of the morphological differences observed for these probes after adsorption on these substrates provides insights into the sensitivity of DNA based nanostructures to the properties of the graphene monolayer, as modified by its substrate.

  10. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O.; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A., III; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-01

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 107, along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  11. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  12. FOCUS ON GRAPHENE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, N M R; Ribeiro, Ricardo M

    2009-01-01

    Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dora and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux (editorial)

  13. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  14. Layer Dependence of Graphene for Oxidation Resistance of Cu Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-qing Song; Xiao-ping Wang

    2017-01-01

    We studied the oxidation resistance of graphene-coated Cu surface and its layer dependence by directly growing monolayer graphene with different multilayer structures coexisted,diminishing the influence induced by residue and transfer technology.It is found that the Cu surface coated with the monolayer graphene demonstrate tremendous difference in oxidation pattern and oxidation rate,compared to that coated with the bilayer graphene,which is considered to be originated from the strain-induced linear oxidation channel in monolayer graphene and the intersection of easily-oxidized directions in each layer of bilayer graphene,respectively.We reveal that the defects on the graphene basal plane but not the boundaries are the main oxidation channel for Cu surface under graphene protection.Our finding indicates that compared to putting forth efforts to improve the quality of monolayer graphene by reducing defects,depositing multilayer graphene directly on metal is a simple and effective way to enhance the oxidation resistance of graphene-coated metals.

  15. Ultraviolet-enhanced photodetection in a graphene/SiO{sub 2}/Si capacitor structure with a vacuum channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo, E-mail: hkk@pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    We report photodetection properties of a graphene/oxide/silicon capacitor structure with a nanoscale vacuum channel. The photogenerated two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) inversion charges at SiO{sub 2}/Si interface are extracted out to air and transported along the void channel at low bias voltage (<5 V). A monolayer graphene, placed on top of SiO{sub 2} and suspended on the void channel, is utilized as a photon-transparent counter-electrode to the 2DEG layer and a collector electrode for the out-of-plane transported electrons, respectively. The photocurrent extracted through a void channel reveals high responsivity (1.0 A/W at 633 nm) as measured in a broad spectral range (325–1064 nm), especially demonstrating a UV-enhanced performance (0.43 A/W responsivity and 384% internal quantum efficiency at 325 nm). The mechanisms underlying photocarrier generation, emission, and transport in a suspended-graphene/SiO{sub 2}/Si structure are proposed.

  16. Ultraviolet-enhanced photodetection in a graphene/SiO2/Si capacitor structure with a vacuum channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2015-01-01

    We report photodetection properties of a graphene/oxide/silicon capacitor structure with a nanoscale vacuum channel. The photogenerated two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) inversion charges at SiO 2 /Si interface are extracted out to air and transported along the void channel at low bias voltage (<5 V). A monolayer graphene, placed on top of SiO 2 and suspended on the void channel, is utilized as a photon-transparent counter-electrode to the 2DEG layer and a collector electrode for the out-of-plane transported electrons, respectively. The photocurrent extracted through a void channel reveals high responsivity (1.0 A/W at 633 nm) as measured in a broad spectral range (325–1064 nm), especially demonstrating a UV-enhanced performance (0.43 A/W responsivity and 384% internal quantum efficiency at 325 nm). The mechanisms underlying photocarrier generation, emission, and transport in a suspended-graphene/SiO 2 /Si structure are proposed

  17. Plasmon polaritons in nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its unique electronic and optical properties. When graphene is electrically/chemically doped, it can support surface plasmon where the light propagates along the surface with a very short wavelength and an extremely small mode volume. The optical...... properties of graphene can be tuned by electrical gating, thus proving a promising way to realize a tunable plasmonic material. We firstly investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides, and show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided...... that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. Then we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The silicon grating is realized by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self...

  18. Chiral Tunnelling in Twisted Graphene Bilayer

    OpenAIRE

    He, Wen-Yu; Chu, Zhao-Dong; He, Lin

    2013-01-01

    The perfect transmission in graphene monolayer and the perfect reflection in Bernal graphene bilayer for electrons incident in the normal direction of a potential barrier are viewed as two incarnations of the Klein paradox. Here we show a new and unique incarnation of the Klein paradox. Owing to the different chiralities of the quasiparticles involved, the chiral fermions in twisted graphene bilayer shows adjustable probability of chiral tunnelling for normal incidence: they can be changed fr...

  19. Nonreciprocal optical isolation via graphene based photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan Entezar, S.; Karimi Habil, M.

    2018-03-01

    The transmission properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene mono-layers are studied using the transfer matrix method. It is shown that the structure can be used as a polarization-selective nonreciprocal device which discriminates between the two circularly polarized waves with different handedness impinging in the same direction. This structure may be utilized in designing optical isolators for the circularly polarized waves due to the gyrotropic behavior of the graphene mono-layers under the perpendicularly applied external magnetic field. Moreover, the effect of an external magnetic field and the chemical potential of the graphene mono-layers on the band gap of the structure are investigated.

  20. Wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Joung Real

    2014-01-01

    The wetting control of graphene is of great interest for electronic, mechanical, architectural, and bionic applications. In this study, the wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures was manipulated by changing the height of graphene-laminated structures and employing the trichlorosilane (HDF-S)-based self-assembly monolayer. Graphene-laminated micropillar structures with HDF-S exhibited higher hydrophobicity (contact angle of 129.5°) than pristine graphene thin film (78.8°), pristine graphene-laminated micropillar structures (97.5°), and HDF-S self-assembled graphene thin film (98.5°). Wetting states of the graphene-laminated micropillar structure with HDF-S was also examined by using a urea solution, which flowed across the surface without leaving any residues

  1. Direct transfer of graphene films for polyurethane substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilani, C.; Romani, E.C.; Larrudé, D.G. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barbosa, Gelza M. [Diretoria de Sistemas de Armas da Marinha, Marinha do Brasil, 20010-00 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L., E-mail: lazaro@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by CVD using copper foils as substrates. • Monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene were transferred to PU. • Samples were characterized by Raman and optical spectroscopies. • PU/monolayer graphene has transmittance around 80% in visible range. - Abstract: We have proposed the direct transfer of large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to polymeric substrate by evaporating of solvents of polyurethane/tetrahydrofurane solution. The graphene films on polyurethane substrates were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical and atomic force microscopies and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements. The Raman spectra revealed that it is possible to transfer in a controlled manner monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene films over polyurethane substrate.

  2. Direct transfer of graphene films for polyurethane substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilani, C.; Romani, E.C.; Larrudé, D.G.; Barbosa, Gelza M.; Freire, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by CVD using copper foils as substrates. • Monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene were transferred to PU. • Samples were characterized by Raman and optical spectroscopies. • PU/monolayer graphene has transmittance around 80% in visible range. - Abstract: We have proposed the direct transfer of large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to polymeric substrate by evaporating of solvents of polyurethane/tetrahydrofurane solution. The graphene films on polyurethane substrates were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical and atomic force microscopies and UV–vis spectroscopy measurements. The Raman spectra revealed that it is possible to transfer in a controlled manner monolayer, bilayer and multilayer graphene films over polyurethane substrate.

  3. Formation of graphene on Ru(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yi; Shi Dong-Xia; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report on the formation of a graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface by annealing the Ru(0001) crystal.The samples are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that the Moiré pattern is caused by the graphene layer mismatched with the underlying Ru(0001) surface and has an N × N superlattice. It is further found that the graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface is very stable at high temperatures. Our results provide a simple and convenient method to produce a graphene monolayer on the Ru(0001) surface, which is used as a template for fabricating functional nanostructures needed in future nano devices and catalysis.

  4. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Au-based monolayer derivatives in honeycomb structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Pooja, E-mail: pupooja16@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Centre for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, India, 151001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We present electronic properties of atomic layer of Au, Au{sub 2}-N, Au{sub 2}-O and Au{sub 2}-F in graphene-like structure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constant of derived monolayers are found to be higher than the pristine Au monolayer. Au monolayer is metallic in nature with quantum ballistic conductance calculated as 4G{sub 0}. Similarly, Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers show 4G{sub 0} and 2G{sub 0} quantum conductance respectively while semiconducting nature with calculated band gap of 0.28 eV has been observed for Au{sub 2}-O monolayer. Most interestingly, half metalicity has been predicted for Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers. Our findings may have importance for the application of these monolayers in nanoelectronic and spintronics.

  5. Improvement of Metal-Graphene Ohmic Contact Resistance in Bilayer Epitaxial Graphene Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ze-Zhao; Yang Ke-Wu; Yu Cui; Li Jia; Liu Qing-Bin; Lu Wei-Li; Feng Zhi-Hong; Cai Shu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report on an improved metal-graphene ohmic contact in bilayer epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate with contact resistance below 0.1 ω·mm. Monolayer and bilayer epitaxial graphenes are prepared on a 4H-SiC substrate in this work. Their contact resistances are measured by a transfer length method. An improved photoresist-free device fabrication method is used and is compared with the conventional device fabrication method. Compared with the monolayer graphene, the contact resistance R c of bilayer graphene improves from an average of 0.24 ω·mm to 0.1 ω·mm. Ohmic contact formation mechanism analysis by Landauer's approach reveals that the obtained low ohmic contact resistance in bilayer epitaxial graphene is due to their high carrier density, high carrier transmission probability, and p-type doping introduced by contact metal Au. (paper)

  6. Electron-phonon coupling in quasi free-standing graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christian Johannsen, Jens; Ulstrup, Søren; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Quasi free-standing monolayer graphene can be produced by intercalating species like oxygen or hydrogen between epitaxial graphene and the substrate crystal. If the graphene is indeed decoupled from the substrate, one would expect the observation of a similar electronic dispersion and many......-body effects, irrespective of the substrate and the material used to achieve the decoupling. Here we investigate the electron-phonon coupling in two different types of quasi free-standing monolayer graphene: decoupled from SiC via hydrogen intercalation and decoupled from Ir via oxygen intercalation. Both...

  7. Graphene on transition-metal dichalcogenides: a platform for proximity spin-orbit physics and optospintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hybrids of graphene and two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have the potential to bring graphene spintronics to the next level. As we show here by performing first-principles calculations of graphene on monolayer MoS$_2$, there are several advantages of such hybrids over pristine graphene. First, Dirac electrons in graphene exhibit a giant global proximity spin-orbit coupling, without compromising the semimetallic character of the whole system at zero field. Remarkably, th...

  8. Electromagnetic Field Redistribution in Metal Nanoparticle on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Keke; Liu, Anping; Wei, Dapeng; Yu, Keke; Sun, Xiaonan; Yan, Sheng; Huang, Yingzhou

    2018-04-25

    Benefiting from the induced image charge on metal film, the light energy is confined on a film surface under metal nanoparticle dimer, which is called electromagnetic field redistribution. In this work, electromagnetic field distribution of metal nanoparticle monomer or dimer on graphene is investigated through finite-difference time-domain method. The results point out that the electromagnetic field (EM) redistribution occurs in this nanoparticle/graphene hybrid system at infrared region where light energy could also be confined on a monolayer graphene surface. Surface charge distribution was analyzed using finite element analysis, and surface-enhanced Raman spectrum (SERS) was utilized to verify this phenomenon. Furthermore, the data about dielectric nanoparticle on monolayer graphene demonstrate this EM redistribution is attributed to strong coupling between light-excited surface charge on monolayer graphene and graphene plasmon-induced image charge on dielectric nanoparticle surface. Our work extends the knowledge of monolayer graphene plasmon, which has a wide range of applications in monolayer graphene-related film.

  9. Highly n -doped graphene generated through intercalated terbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukiya, L.; Nair, M. N.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Vonau, F.; Aubel, D.; Bubendorff, J. L.; Cranney, M.; Denys, E.; Florentin, A.; Reiter, G.; Simon, L.

    2018-01-01

    We obtained highly n -type doped graphene by intercalating terbium atoms between graphene and SiC(0001) through appropriate annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. After terbium intercalation angle-resolved-photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) showed a drastic change in the band structure around the K points of the Brillouin zone: the well-known conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer was superposed by a second conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer with an electron density reaching 1015cm-2 . In addition, we demonstrate that atom intercalation proceeds either below the buffer layer or between the buffer layer and the monolayer graphene. The intercalation of terbium below a pure buffer layer led to the formation of a highly n -doped graphene monolayer decoupled from the SiC substrate, as evidenced by ARPES and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band structure of this highly n -doped monolayer graphene showed a kink (a deviation from the linear dispersion of the Dirac cone), which has been associated with an electron-phonon coupling constant one order of magnitude larger than those usually obtained for graphene with intercalated alkali metals.

  10. The graphene/Au/Ni interface and its application in the construction of a graphene spin filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybkina, A A; Rybkin, A G; Adamchuk, V K; Marchenko, D; Shikin, A M; Varykhalov, A; Sánchez -Barriga, J

    2013-01-01

    A modification of the contact of graphene with ferromagnetic electrodes in a model of the graphene spin filter allowing restoration of the graphene electronic structure is proposed. It is suggested for this aim to intercalate into the interface between the graphene and the ferromagnetic (Ni or Co) electrode a Au monolayer to block the strong interaction between the graphene and Ni (Co) and, thus, prevent destruction of the graphene electronic structure which evolves in direct contact of graphene with Ni (Co). It is also suggested to insert an additional buffer graphene monolayer with the size limited by that of the electrode between the main graphene sheet providing spin current transport and the Au/Ni electrode injecting the spin current. This will prevent the spin transport properties of graphene from influencing contact phenomena and eliminate pinning of the graphene electronic structure relative to the Fermi level of the metal, thus ensuring efficient outflow of injected electrons into the graphene. The role of the spin structure of the graphene/Au/Ni interface with enhanced spin–orbit splitting of graphene π states is also discussed, and its use is proposed for additional spin selection in the process of the electron excitation. (paper)

  11. Preparation of graphene by electrical explosion of graphite sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Hao; Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Chen, Pengwan

    2017-08-03

    Graphene nanosheets were produced by electrical explosion of high-purity graphite sticks in distilled water at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by various techniques to find different forms of carbon phases, including graphite nanosheets, few-layer graphene, and especially, mono-layer graphene with good crystallinity. Delicate control of energy injection is critical for graphene nanosheet formation, whereas mono-layer graphene was produced under the charging voltage of 22.5-23.5 kV. On the basis of electrical wire explosion and our experimental results, the underlying mechanism that governs the graphene generation was carefully illustrated. This work provides a simple but innovative route for producing graphene nanosheets.

  12. Topological edge modes in multilayer graphene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Lixin

    2015-08-10

    Plasmons can be supported on graphene sheets as the Dirac electrons oscillate collectively. A tight-binding model for graphene plasmons is a good description as the field confinement in the normal direction is strong. With this model, the topological properties of plasmonic bands in multilayer graphene systems are investigated. The Zak phases of periodic graphene sheet arrays are obtained for different configurations. Analogous to Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model in electronic systems, topological edge plasmon modes emerge when two periodic graphene sheet arrays with different Zak phases are connected. Interestingly, the dispersion of these topological edge modes is the same as that in the monolayer graphene and is invariant as the geometric parameters of the structure such as the separation and period change. These plasmonic edge states in multilayer graphene systems can be further tuned by electrical gating or chemical doping. © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  13. Graphene ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Manuel; Stefanelli, Ulisse

    2018-06-01

    Graphene is locally two-dimensional but not flat. Nanoscale ripples appear in suspended samples and rolling up often occurs when boundaries are not fixed. We address this variety of graphene geometries by classifying all ground-state deformations of the hexagonal lattice with respect to configurational energies including two- and three-body terms. As a consequence, we prove that all ground-state deformations are either periodic in one direction, as in the case of ripples, or rolled up, as in the case of nanotubes.

  14. Thermal conductivity of a h-BCN monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Wei, Ning

    2017-10-18

    A hexagonal graphene-like boron-carbon-nitrogen (h-BCN) monolayer, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has been synthesized recently. Herein we investigate for the first time the thermal conductivity of this novel 2D material. Using molecular dynamics simulations based on the optimized Tersoff potential, we found that the h-BCN monolayers are isotropic in the basal plane with close thermal conductivity magnitudes. Though h-BCN has the same hexagonal lattice as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), it exhibits a much lower thermal conductivity than the latter two materials. In addition, the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers is found to be size-dependent but less temperature-dependent. Modulation of the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers can also be realized by strain engineering. Compressive strain leads to a monotonic decrease in the thermal conductivity while the tensile strain induces an up-then-down trend in the thermal conductivity. Surprisingly, the small tensile strain can facilitate the heat transport of the h-BCN monolayers.

  15. How spectroscopic ellipsometry can aid graphene technology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2014-11-28

    We explore the effects of substrate, grain size, oxidation and cleaning on the optical properties of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline monolayer graphene exploiting spectroscopic ellipsometry in the NIR-Vis–UV range. Both Drude–Lorentz oscillators' and point-by-point fit approaches are used to analyze the ellipsometric spectra. For monolayer graphene, since anisotropy cannot be resolved, an isotropic model is used. A prominent absorption peak at approximately 4.8 eV, which is a mixture of π–π* interband transitions at the M-point of the Brillouin zone and of the π-plasmonic excitation, is observed. We discuss the sensitivity of this peak to the structural and cleaning quality of graphene. The comparison with previous published dielectric function spectra of graphene is discussed giving a rationale for the observed differences. - Highlights: • Optical properties of graphene are determined by ellipsometry on copper and on glass. • Optical spectra reveal the cleaning quality of transferred graphene. • Sensitivity of absorption peak to graphene structural quality is proven. • Optical properties are proven to be sensitive to oxidation of graphene. • Electronic interaction with substrate affects graphene optical properties.

  16. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  17. Metal-doped graphene layers composed with boron nitride-graphene as an insulator: a nano-capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2014-11-01

    A model of a nanoscale dielectric capacitor composed of a few dopants has been investigated in this study. This capacitor includes metallic graphene layers which are separated by an insulating medium containing a few h-BN layers. It has been observed that the elements from group IIIA of the periodic table are more suitable as dopants for hetero-structures of the {metallic graphene/hBN/metallic graphene} capacitors compared to those from groups IA or IIA. In this study, we have specifically focused on the dielectric properties of different graphene/h-BN/graphene including their hetero-structure counterparts, i.e., Boron-graphene/h-BN/Boron-graphene, Al-graphene/h-BN/Al-graphene, Mg-graphene/h-BN/Mg-graphene, and Be-graphene/h-BN/Be-graphene stacks for monolayer form of dielectrics. Moreover, we studied the multi dielectric properties of different (h-BN)n/graphene hetero-structures of Boron-graphene/(h-BN)n/Boron-graphene.

  18. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Ang-Yu

    2017-05-15

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  19. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  20. Structured epitaxial graphene: growth and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; Guo Zelei; Dong Rui; Palmer, James; Hankinson, John; Berger, Claire; Heer, Walt A de

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is generally considered to be a strong candidate to succeed silicon as an electronic material. However, to date, it actually has not yet demonstrated capabilities that exceed standard semiconducting materials. Currently demonstrated viable graphene devices are essentially limited to micrometre-sized ultrahigh-frequency analogue field effect transistors and quantum Hall effect devices for metrology. Nanoscopically patterned graphene tends to have disordered edges that severely reduce mobilities thereby obviating its advantage over other materials. Here we show that graphene grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces overcomes the edge roughness and promises to provide an inroad into nanoscale patterning of graphene. We show that high-quality ribbons and rings can be made using this technique. We also report on the progress towards high-mobility graphene monolayers on silicon carbide for device applications. (paper)

  1. Fabrication of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugawara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have succeeded in fabricating Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on silicon carbide. The low-energy electron diffraction from Li-deposited bilayer graphene shows a sharp 3×3R30° pattern in contrast to Li-deposited monolayer graphene. This indicates that Li atoms are intercalated between two adjacent graphene layers and take the same well-ordered superstructure as in bulk C6Li. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed that Li atoms are fully ionized and the π bands of graphene are systematically folded by the superstructure of intercalated Li atoms, producing a snowflake-like Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. The present result suggests a high potential of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene for application to a nano-scale Li-ion battery.

  2. Vacuum Technology in the study of Graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoshal, A K; Banerjee, S N; Chakraborty, D

    2012-01-01

    Graphene, an allotrope of carbon is a two-dimensional sheet of covalently bonded carbon atoms that has been attracting great attention in the field of electronics. In a recent review graphene is defined as a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a 2-D honeycomb lattice. A survey has been made of the production processes and instrumentation for characterization of graphene. In the production of graphene, the methods mainly used are Epitaxial growth, oxide reduction, growth from metal-carbon melts, growth from sugar. In the characterization of graphene, the instruments that are mainly used to study the atomic properties, electronic properties, optical properties, spin properties are Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy. In all these instruments high or ultra-high vacuum is required. This paper attempts to correlate vacuum technology in the production and characterization of graphene.

  3. Electrical Contacts in Monolayer Arsenene Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Ye, Meng; Weng, Mouyi; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Xiuying; Zhang, Han; Guo, Ying; Pan, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Junku; Pan, Feng; Lu, Jing

    2017-08-30

    Arsenene, arsenic analogue of graphene, as an emerging member of two-dimensional semiconductors (2DSCs), is quite promising in next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. The metal electrical contacts play a vital role in the charge transport and photoresponse processes of nanoscale 2DSC devices and even can mask the intrinsic properties of 2DSCs. Here, we present a first comprehensive study of the electrical contact properties of monolayer (ML) arsenene with different electrodes by using ab initio electronic calculations and quantum transport simulations. Schottky barrier is always formed with bulk metal contacts owing to the Fermi level pinning (pinning factor S = 0.33), with electron Schottky barrier height (SBH) of 0.12, 0.21, 0.25, 0.35, and 0.50 eV for Sc, Ti, Ag, Cu, and Au contacts and hole SBH of 0.75 and 0.78 eV for Pd and Pt contacts, respectively. However, by contact with 2D graphene, the Fermi level pinning effect can be reduced due to the suppression of metal-induced gap states. Remarkably, a barrier free hole injection is realized in ML arsenene device with graphene-Pt hybrid electrode, suggestive of a high device performance in such a ML arsenene device. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of favorable electrodes in future ML arsenene devices.

  4. EDITORIAL: Special issue on Graphene Special issue on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-03-01

    and effectively reflect the status of different areas of graphene research. The excitonic condensation in a double graphene system is discussed by Kharitonov and Efetov. Borca et al report on a method to fabricate and characterize graphene monolayers epitaxially grown on Ru(0001). Furthermore, the energy and transport gaps in etched graphene nanoribbons are analyzed experimentally by Molitor et al. Mucha-Kruczyński et al review the tight-binding model of bilayer graphene, whereas Wurm et al focus on a theoretical description of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in monolayer graphene rings. Screening effects and collective excitations are studied by Roldán et al. Subsequently, Palacios et al review the electronic and magnetic structures of graphene nanoribbons, a problem that is highly relevant for graphene-based transistors. Klein tunneling in single and multiple barriers in graphene is the topic of the review article by Pereira Jr et al, while De Martino and Egger discuss the spectrum of a magnetic quantum dot in graphene. Titov et al study the effect of resonant scatterers on the local density of states in a rectangular graphene setup with metallic leads. Finally, the resistance modulation of multilayer graphene controlled by gate electric fields is experimentally analyzed by Miyazaki et al. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, which combine new results and pedagogical discussions of the state-of-the-art in different areas: it is this combination that most often adds to the value of topical issues. Special thanks also goes to the staff of Institute of Physics Publishing for contributing to the success of this effort.

  5. Graphene: from functionalization to devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Antonio; Soukiassian, Patrick G.

    2014-03-01

    electric field to operate logic gates. Plaçais et al then show the realization of graphene microwave nano-transistors that are especially suitable for fast charge detectors. Matsumoto et al describe next some interesting graphene-based biosensor applications, while the following article by Otsuji et al shows recent advances in plasmonics in terahertz device applications. This section ends with the Dollfus et al article dealing with non-linear effects in graphene devices investigated by simulation methods. The second section concerns the electronic and transport properties and includes four articles. The first one by Gurzadyan et al provides an investigation of graphene oxide in water by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to study its transient absorption properties. Jouault et al then review the quantum Hall effect of self-organized graphene monolayers epitaxially grown on the C-face of SiC. Next, Petkovic et al report on the observation of edge magneto-plasmons in graphene. Finally, Roche and Valenzuela focus on the limits of conventional views in graphene spin transport and offer novel perspectives for further progress. The third section addresses graphene tailoring and functionalization as studied by Genorio and Znidarsic for graphene nanoribbons, or by atomic intercalation as shown by the two articles from Starke and Forti, and from Bisson et al. The last section is devoted to graphene growth and morphology. Ogino et al first describe a method to grow graphene on insulating substrates using polymer films as a carbon source. Then, Suemitsu et al show the recent progresses in epitaxial graphene formation on cubic silicon carbide thin films. Finally, Norimatsu and Kusunoki investigate the structural properties and morphology of epitaxial graphene grown on hexagonal silicon carbide substrates by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, their article closing this Special Issue .

  6. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  7. Asynchronous cracking with dissimilar paths in multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Byungwoon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2017-11-16

    Multilayer graphene consists of a stack of single-atomic-thick monolayer graphene sheets bound with π-π interactions and is a fascinating model material opening up a new field of fracture mechanics. In this study, fracture behavior of single-crystalline multilayer graphene was investigated using an in situ mode I fracture test under a scanning electron microscope, and abnormal crack propagation in multilayer graphene was identified for the first time. The fracture toughness of graphene was determined from the measured load-displacement curves and the realistic finite element modelling of specimen geometries. Nonlinear fracture behavior of the multilayer graphene is discussed based on nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. In situ scanning electron microscope images obtained during the fracture test showed asynchronous crack propagation along independent paths, causing interlayer shear stress and slippages. We also found that energy dissipation by interlayer slippages between the graphene layers is the reason for the enhanced fracture toughness of multilayer graphene. The asynchronous cracking with independent paths is a unique cracking and toughening mechanism for single-crystalline multilayer graphene, which is not observed for the monolayer graphene. This could provide a useful insight for the design and development of graphene-based composite materials for structural applications.

  8. Highly sensitive and selective room-temperature NO_2 gas sensor based on bilayer transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seekaew, Yotsarayuth; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Simple and low-cost fabrication of bilayer graphene gas sensor was presented. • Layer effects of graphene on NO_2 gas-sensing properties were investigated. • Bilayer graphene sensor exhibited a high linear NO_2 sensitivity of 1.409 ppm"−"1. • The NO_2-sensing mechanisms based on band diagram were highlighted. - Abstract: This work presents a highly sensitive room-temperature gas sensor based on bilayer graphene fabricated by an interfacial transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene onto nickel interdigitated electrodes. Scanning electron microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations confirm the presence of graphene on interdigitated nickel electrodes with varying numbers of graphene layers. The NO_2 detection performances of bilayer graphene gas sensor have been investigated in comparison with those of monolayer and multilayer graphene gas sensors at room temperature. From results, the bilayer graphene gas sensor exhibits higher response, sensitivity and selectivity to NO_2 than monolayer and multilayer graphene. The sensitivity of bilayer graphene gas sensor is 1.409 ppm"−"1 towards NO_2 over a concentration range of 1–25 ppm, which is more than twice higher than that of monolayer graphene. The NO_2-sensing mechanism of graphene sensing film has been explained based on the direct charge transfer process due to the adsorption of NO_2 molecules.

  9. WSe2 Monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Chen-Guang; Li, Ming-yang; Huang, Di; Li, Lain-Jong; Ji, Wei; Wu, Shiwei

    2017-01-01

    dichalcogenide materials, intrinsic defects in WSe2 arise surprisingly from single tungsten vacancies, leading to the hole (p-type) doping. Furthermore, we found these defects to dominate the excitonic emission of the WSe2 monolayer at low temperature. Our work

  10. Buckling Behavior of Substrate Supported Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuijian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis. From 70 simulation cases of simple-supported graphene sheets with different sizes under uniaxial compression, two different buckling modes are investigated and revealed to be dominated by the graphene size. Especially, for graphene sheets with length larger than 3 nm and width larger than 1.1 nm, the buckling mode depends only on the length/width ratio. Besides, it is revealed that the existence of graphene substrate can increase the critical buckling stress and strain to 4.39 N/m and 1.58%, respectively, which are about 10 times those for free-standing graphene sheets. Moreover, for graphene sheets with common size (longer than 20 nm, both theoretical and simulation results show that the critical buckling stress and strain are dominated only by the adhesive interactions with substrate and independent of the graphene size. Results in this work provide valuable insight and guidelines for the design and application of graphene-derived materials and nano-electromechanical systems.

  11. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  12. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the graphene substrate plays an important role in the nucleation process of the crystalline phase. Graphene flakes on Ir(111) feature regions that are under more tensile stress than others. We observe that the CuPc molecules form ordered domains initially on those graphene regions that are closest to the fully relaxed lattice. We attribute this effect to a stronger influence of the underlying Ir(111) substrate for molecules adsorbed on those relaxed regions.

  13. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the graphene substrate plays an important role in the nucleation process of the crystalline phase. Graphene flakes on Ir(111) feature regions that are under more tensile stress than others. We observe that the CuPc molecules form ordered domains initially on those graphene regions that are closest to the fully relaxed lattice. We attribute this effect to a stronger influence of the underlying Ir(111) substrate for molecules adsorbed on those relaxed regions. (paper)

  14. Graphene surface plasmon polaritons with opposite in-plane electron oscillations along its two surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Huawei; Ruan, Shuangchen; Zhang, Min; Su, Hong; Li, Irene Ling

    2015-01-01

    We predict the existence of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode that can be guided by a graphene monolayer, regardless of the sign of the imaginary part of its conductivity. In this mode, in-plane electron oscillations along two surfaces of graphene are of opposite directions, which is very different from conventional SPPs on graphene. Significantly, coating graphene with dielectric films yields a way to guide the SPPs with both sub-wavelength mode widths and ultra-long propagation distances. In particular, the mode characteristics are very sensitive to the chemical potential of graphene, so the graphene-based waveguide can find applications in many optoelectronic devices

  15. Graphene surface plasmon polaritons with opposite in-plane electron oscillations along its two surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huawei; Ruan, Shuangchen, E-mail: scruan@szu.edu.cn; Zhang, Min; Su, Hong; Li, Irene Ling [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Laser Engineering, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-08-31

    We predict the existence of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode that can be guided by a graphene monolayer, regardless of the sign of the imaginary part of its conductivity. In this mode, in-plane electron oscillations along two surfaces of graphene are of opposite directions, which is very different from conventional SPPs on graphene. Significantly, coating graphene with dielectric films yields a way to guide the SPPs with both sub-wavelength mode widths and ultra-long propagation distances. In particular, the mode characteristics are very sensitive to the chemical potential of graphene, so the graphene-based waveguide can find applications in many optoelectronic devices.

  16. Localized plasmons in bilayer graphene nanodisks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weihua; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    We study localized plasmonic excitations in bilayer graphene (BLG) nanodisks, comparing AA-stacked and AB-stacked BLG and contrasting the results to the case of two monolayers without electronic hybridization. The electrodynamic response of the BLG electron gas is described in terms of a spatially...

  17. Graphene Oxide as a Monoatomic Blocking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films of C22 fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were...

  18. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports

  19. Transparent Conducting Graphene Hybrid Films To Improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Performance of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Limin; Lu, Zhengang; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian; Ding, Xuemei; Black, Nicola; Li, Tianyi; Gallop, John; Hao, Ling

    2017-10-04

    Conducting graphene-based hybrids have attracted considerable attention in recent years for their scientific and technological significance in many applications. In this work, conductive graphene hybrid films, consisting of a metallic network fully encapsulated between monolayer graphene and quartz-glass substrate, were fabricated and characterized for their electromagnetic interference shielding capabilities. Experimental results show that by integration with a metallic network the sheet resistance of graphene was significantly suppressed from 813.27 to 5.53 Ω/sq with an optical transmittance at 91%. Consequently, the microwave shielding effectiveness (SE) exceeded 23.60 dB at the K u -band and 13.48 dB at the K a -band. The maximum SE value was 28.91 dB at 12 GHz. Compared with the SE of pristine monolayer graphene (3.46 dB), the SE of graphene hybrid film was enhanced by 25.45 dB (99.7% energy attenuation). At 94% optical transmittance, the sheet resistance was 20.67 Ω/sq and the maximum SE value was 20.86 dB at 12 GHz. Our results show that hybrid graphene films incorporate both high conductivity and superior electromagnetic shielding comparable to existing ITO shielding modalities. The combination of high conductivity and shielding along with the materials' earth-abundant nature, and facile large-scale fabrication, make these graphene hybrid films highly attractive for transparent EMI shielding.

  20. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  1. Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Young Hong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report strong third-harmonic generation in monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to an amorphous silica (glass substrate; the photon energy is in three-photon resonance with the exciton-shifted van Hove singularity at the M point of graphene. The polarization selection rules are derived and experimentally verified. In addition, our polarization- and azimuthal-rotation-dependent third-harmonic-generation measurements reveal in-plane isotropy as well as anisotropy between the in-plane and out-of-plane nonlinear optical responses of graphene. Since the third-harmonic signal exceeds that from bulk glass by more than 2 orders of magnitude, the signal contrast permits background-free scanning of graphene and provides insight into the structural properties of graphene.

  2. Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Nika, D L; Pokatilov, E P; Balandin, A A

    2009-01-01

    We review the results of our experimental investigation of heat conduction in suspended graphene and offer a theoretical interpretation of its extremely high thermal conductivity. The direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of graphene were performed using a non-contact optical technique and special calibration procedure with bulk graphite. The measured values were in the range of ∼3000-5300 W mK -1 near room temperature and depended on the lateral dimensions of graphene flakes. We explain the enhanced thermal conductivity of graphene as compared to that of bulk graphite basal planes by the two-dimensional nature of heat conduction in graphene over the whole range of phonon frequencies. Our calculations show that the intrinsic Umklapp-limited thermal conductivity of graphene grows with the increasing dimensions of graphene flakes and can exceed that of bulk graphite when the flake size is on the order of a few micrometers. The detailed theory, which includes the phonon-mode-dependent Gruneisen parameter and takes into account phonon scattering on graphene edges and point defects, gives numerical results that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for suspended graphene. Superior thermal properties of graphene are beneficial for all proposed graphene device applications.

  3. Correlating defect density with growth time in continuous graphene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Nam, Ji Eun; Lee, Jin Seok

    2014-12-01

    We report that graphene flakes and films which were synthesized by copper-catalyzed atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method using a mixture of Ar, H2, and CH4 gases. It was found that variations in the reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature, annealing time, and growth time, influenced the domain size of as-grown graphene. Besides, the reaction parameters influenced the number of layers, degree of defects and uniformity of the graphene films. The increase in growth temperature and annealing time tends to accelerate the graphene growth rate and increase the diffusion length, respectively, thereby increasing the average size of graphene domains. In addition, we confirmed that the number of pinholes reduced with increase in the growth time. Micro-Raman analysis of the as-grown graphene films confirmed that the continuous graphene monolayer film with low defects and high uniformity could be obtained with prolonged reaction time, under the appropriate annealing time and growth temperature.

  4. Graphene-based sample supports for in situ high-resolution TEM electrical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westenfelder, B; Scholz, F; Meyer, J C; Biskupek, J; Algara-Siller, G; Lechner, L G; Kaiser, U; Kusterer, J; Kohn, E; Krill, C E III

    2011-01-01

    Specially designed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample carriers have been developed to enable atomically resolved studies of the heat-induced evolution of adsorbates on graphene and their influence on electrical conductivity. Here, we present a strategy for graphene-based carrier realization, evaluating its design with respect to fabrication effort and applications potential. We demonstrate that electrical current can lead to very high temperatures in suspended graphene membranes, and we determine that current-induced cleaning of graphene results from Joule heating.

  5. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  6. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-01-01

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  7. Strain-mediated electronic properties of pristine and Mn-doped GaN monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Venus; Srivastava, Sunita

    2018-04-01

    Graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) monolayer structures GaN has gained enormous amount of interest due to high thermal stability and inherent energy band gap for practical applications. First principles calculations are performed to investigate the electronic structure and strain-mediated electronic properties of pristine and Mn-doped GaN monolayer. Binding energy of Mn dopant at various adsorption site is found to be nearly same indicating these sites to be equally favorable for adsorption of foreign atom. Depending on the adsorption site, GaN monolayer can act as p-type or n-type magnetic semiconductor. The tensile strength of both pristine and doped GaN monolayer (∼24 GPa) at ultimate tensile strain of 34% is comparable with the tensile strength of graphene. The in-plane biaxial strain modulate the energy band gap of both pristine and doped-monolayer from direct to indirect gap semiconductor and finally retendered theme into metal at critical value of applied strain. These characteristics make GaN monolayer to be potential candidate for the future applications in tunable optoelectronics.

  8. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  9. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, we succeeded in the LPCVD growth of monolayer graphene using acetylene as the precursor gas. • The growth rate is very high when acetylene is used as the source gas. Our process has exhibited the potential to shorten the growth time of CVD graphene. • We found that the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene can be changed by changing the acetylene flow rates. • We found that it is also possible to form bilayer graphene using acetylene. However, further study are necessary to reduce the defects density. - Abstract: Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  10. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Meng, E-mail: youmou@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasaki, Shinichirou [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, we succeeded in the LPCVD growth of monolayer graphene using acetylene as the precursor gas. • The growth rate is very high when acetylene is used as the source gas. Our process has exhibited the potential to shorten the growth time of CVD graphene. • We found that the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene can be changed by changing the acetylene flow rates. • We found that it is also possible to form bilayer graphene using acetylene. However, further study are necessary to reduce the defects density. - Abstract: Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  11. An investigation into graphene exfoliation and potential graphene application in MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fercana, George; Kletetschka, Gunther; Mikula, Vilem; Li, Mary

    2011-02-01

    The design of microelectromecanical systems (MEMS) and micro-opto-electromechanical systems (MOEMS) are often materials-limited with respect to the efficiency and capability of the material. Graphene, a one atom thick honeycomb lattice of carbon, is a highly desired material for MEMS applications. Relevant properties of graphene include the material's optical transparency, mechanical strength, energy efficiency, and electrical and thermal conductivity due to its electron mobility. Aforementioned properties make graphene a strong candidate to supplant existing transparent electrode technology and replace the conventionally used material, indium-tin oxide. In this paper we present preliminary results on work toward integration of graphene with MEMS structures. We are studying mechanical exfoliation of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystals by repeatedly applying and separating adhesive materials from the HOPG surface. The resulting graphene sheets are then transferred to silicon oxide substrate using the previously applied adhesive material. We explored different adhesive options, particularly the use of Kapton tape, to improve the yield of graphene isolation along with chemical cross-linking agents which operate on a mechanism of photoinsertion of disassociated nitrene groups. These perfluorophenyl nitrenes participate in C=C addition reactions with graphene monolayers creating a covalent binding between the substrate and graphene. We are focusing on maximizing the size of isolated graphene sheets and comparing to conventional exfoliation. Preliminary results allow isolation of few layer graphene (FLG) sheets (ntechnology to be used in future deep space telescopes.

  12. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the grap...

  13. Highly sensitive and selective room-temperature NO{sub 2} gas sensor based on bilayer transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seekaew, Yotsarayuth [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Wisitsoraat, Anurat [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal, E-mail: chatchawal.w@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Simple and low-cost fabrication of bilayer graphene gas sensor was presented. • Layer effects of graphene on NO{sub 2} gas-sensing properties were investigated. • Bilayer graphene sensor exhibited a high linear NO{sub 2} sensitivity of 1.409 ppm{sup −1}. • The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanisms based on band diagram were highlighted. - Abstract: This work presents a highly sensitive room-temperature gas sensor based on bilayer graphene fabricated by an interfacial transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene onto nickel interdigitated electrodes. Scanning electron microscopic and Raman spectroscopic characterizations confirm the presence of graphene on interdigitated nickel electrodes with varying numbers of graphene layers. The NO{sub 2} detection performances of bilayer graphene gas sensor have been investigated in comparison with those of monolayer and multilayer graphene gas sensors at room temperature. From results, the bilayer graphene gas sensor exhibits higher response, sensitivity and selectivity to NO{sub 2} than monolayer and multilayer graphene. The sensitivity of bilayer graphene gas sensor is 1.409 ppm{sup −1} towards NO{sub 2} over a concentration range of 1–25 ppm, which is more than twice higher than that of monolayer graphene. The NO{sub 2}-sensing mechanism of graphene sensing film has been explained based on the direct charge transfer process due to the adsorption of NO{sub 2} molecules.

  14. Weak localization behavior observed in graphene grown on germanium substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinbo Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional electron systems (2DES usually show the weak localization behavior in consequence of electron interaction in the limited dimension. Distinct from other 2DES, the monolayer graphene, due to the chirality, exhibits unique weak localization behavior sensitive to not only inelastic but also elastic carrier scattering. Grain boundaries, which usually exist in monolayer graphene, are apparently related to the elastic carrier scattering process, thus affecting the weak localization behavior. However, their effect is scarcely studied due to the lack of an ideal platform. Here, a complementary system consisting of both single-crystalline graphene grown on Ge (110 and poly-crystalline graphene grown on Ge (111 is constructed. From the comparison of magnetoresistivity measurements, the weak localization effect is found to be greatly enhanced for the poly-crystalline graphene on Ge(111 compared to the single-crystalline graphene on Ge(110. The degraded transport performance in graphene/Ge(111 is due to the presence of grain boundary in poly-crystalline graphene, which results in the enhanced elastic intervalley scattering. In addition, the inelastic scattering originating from the strong electron-electron interaction at low temperature also contributes to weak localization of poly-crystalline graphene/Ge(111.

  15. Stable configurations of graphene on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Ravikumar, Abhilash [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India); Hegde, G.M. [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Rizwan, M.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Simulations of epitaxial growth process for silicon–graphene system is performed. • Identified the most favourable orientation of graphene sheet on silicon substrate. • Atomic local strain due to the silicon–carbon bond formation is analyzed. - Abstract: Integration of graphene on silicon-based nanostructures is crucial in advancing graphene based nanoelectronic device technologies. The present paper provides a new insight on the combined effect of graphene structure and silicon (001) substrate on their two-dimensional anisotropic interface. Molecular dynamics simulations involving the sub-nanoscale interface reveal a most favourable set of temperature independent orientations of the monolayer graphene sheet with an angle of ∽15° between its armchair direction and [010] axis of the silicon substrate. While computing the favorable stable orientations, both the translation and the rotational vibrations of graphene are included. The possible interactions between the graphene atoms and the silicon atoms are identified from their coordination. Graphene sheet shows maximum bonding density with bond length 0.195 nm and minimum bond energy when interfaced with silicon substrate at 15° orientation. Local deformation analysis reveals probability distribution with maximum strain levels of 0.134, 0.047 and 0.029 for 900 K, 300 K and 100 K, respectively in silicon surface for 15° oriented graphene whereas the maximum probable strain in graphene is about 0.041 irrespective of temperature. Silicon–silicon dimer formation is changed due to silicon–carbon bonding. These results may help further in band structure engineering of silicon–graphene lattice.

  16. Nanopatched Graphene with Molecular Self-Assembly Toward Graphene-Organic Hybrid Soft Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boseok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Jung, Jaehyuck; Joe, Minwoong; Lee, Seon Baek; Kim, Jinsung; Lee, Changgu; Cho, Kilwon

    2018-04-30

    Increasing the mechanical durability of large-area polycrystalline single-atom-thick materials is a necessary step toward the development of practical and reliable soft electronics based on these materials. Here, it is shown that the surface assembly of organosilane by weak epitaxy forms nanometer-thick organic patches on a monolayer graphene surface and dramatically increases the material's resistance to harsh postprocessing environments, thereby increasing the number of ways in which graphene can be processed. The nanopatched graphene with the improved mechanical durability enables stable operation when used as transparent electrodes of wearable strain sensors. Also, the nanopatched graphene applied as an electrode modulates the molecular orientation of deposited organic semiconductor layers, and yields favorable nominal charge injection for organic transistors. These results demonstrate the potential for use of self-assembled organic nanopatches in graphene-based soft electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Atomic Defects and Doping of Monolayer NbSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Peters, Jonathan J P; Lawlor, Sean; Sanchez, Ana M; Sloan, Jeremy; Gorbachev, Roman V; Grigorieva, Irina V; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Haigh, Sarah J

    2017-03-28

    We have investigated the structure of atomic defects within monolayer NbSe 2 encapsulated in graphene by combining atomic resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and strain mapping using geometric phase analysis. We demonstrate the presence of stable Nb and Se monovacancies in monolayer material and reveal that Se monovacancies are the most frequently observed defects, consistent with DFT calculations of their formation energy. We reveal that adventitious impurities of C, N, and O can substitute into the NbSe 2 lattice stabilizing Se divacancies. We further observe evidence of Pt substitution into both Se and Nb vacancy sites. This knowledge of the character and relative frequency of different atomic defects provides the potential to better understand and control the unusual electronic and magnetic properties of this exciting two-dimensional material.

  18. Functional Molecular Junctions Derived from Double Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-09-25

    Information processing using molecular junctions is becoming more important as devices are miniaturized to the nanoscale. Herein, we report functional molecular junctions derived from double self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) intercalated between soft graphene electrodes. Newly assembled molecular junctions are fabricated by placing a molecular SAM/(top) electrode on another molecular SAM/(bottom) electrode by using a contact-assembly technique. Double SAMs can provide tunneling conjugation across the van der Waals gap between the terminals of each monolayer and exhibit new electrical functions. Robust contact-assembled molecular junctions can act as platforms for the development of equivalent contact molecular junctions between top and bottom electrodes, which can be applied independently to different kinds of molecules to enhance either the structural complexity or the assembly properties of molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Magnetically suspended railway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, C

    1977-07-28

    The invention concerns the emergency support of a magnetically suspended railway. On failure of the magnetic suspension/tracking system, the vehicles touch down on the rail configuration by means of emergency gliding elements like sliding shoes, skids, or the like. In doing this, the touch-down shock of the emergency gliding elements has to be limited to a force maximum as small as possible. According to the invention a spring-attenuator combination is used for this purpose, the spring characteristic being linear while the attenuator has a square-law characteristic for the compressing and a linear characteristic for the yielding motion. The force maximum thus achieved is exactly half the size of the physically smallest possible force maximum for an emergency gliding element springed without damping.

  20. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinholes...

  1. Monolayer Superconductivity in WS2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheliuk, Oleksandr; Lu, Jianming; Yang, Jie; Ye, Jianting

    Superconductivity in monolayer tungsten disulfide (2H-WS2) is achieved by strong electrostatic electron doping of an electric double-layer transistor (EDLT). Single crystals of WS2 are grown by a scalable method - chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on standard Si/SiO2 substrate. The monolayers are

  2. Layer-dependent fluorination and doping of graphene via plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Minjiang; Zhou Haiqing; Qiu Caiyu; Yang Huaichao; Yu Fang; Sun Lianfeng

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the fluorination of n-layer graphene is systematically investigated using CHF 3 and CF 4 plasma treatments. The G and 2D Raman peaks of graphene show upshifts after each of the two kinds of plasma treatment, indicating p-doping to the graphene. Meanwhile, D, D′ and D + G peaks can be clearly observed for monolayer graphene, whereas these peaks are weaker for thicker n-layer graphene (n ≥ 2) at the same experimental conditions. The upshifts of the G and 2D peaks and the ratio of I(2D)/I(G) for CF 4 plasma treated graphene are larger than those of CHF 3 plasma treated graphene. The ratio of I(D)/I(G) of the Raman spectra is notably small in CF 4 plasma treated graphene. These facts indicate that CF 4 plasma treatment introduces more p-doping and fewer defects for graphene. Moreover, the fluorination of monolayer graphene by CF 4 plasma treatment is reversible through thermal annealing while that by CHF 3 plasma treatment is irreversible. These studies explore the information on the surface properties of graphene and provide an optimal method of fluorinating graphene through plasma techniques. (paper)

  3. Graphene on silicon dioxide via carbon ion implantation in copper with PMMA-free transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Jan; Spemann, Daniel; Hamza Hatahet, M.; Mändl, Stephan; Mensing, Michael; Finzel, Annemarie; Varga, Aron; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a synthesis method for the growth of low-defect large-area graphene using carbon ion beam implantation into metallic Cu foils is presented. The Cu foils (1 cm2 in size) were pre-annealed in a vacuum at 950 °C for 2 h, implanted with 35 keV carbon ions at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 850 °C for 2 h to form graphene layers with the layer number controlled by the implantation fluence. The graphene was then transferred to SiO2/Si substrates by a PMMA-free wet chemical etching process. The obtained regions of monolayer graphene are of ˜900 μm size. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy performed at room temperature demonstrated a good quality and homogeneity of the graphene layers, especially for monolayer graphene.

  4. Side-by-side comparison of Raman spectra of anchored and suspended carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, Anton N; Pabba, Santosh; Cohn, Robert W; Sumanasekera, G U; Hewaparakrama, Kapila P

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectra of ordered carbon nanomaterials are quite sensitive to surface perturbations, including trace residues, structural defects and residual stress. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments with carbon nanotubes and graphene. Their spectra change due to subtle changes in preparation and attachment to the substrate and to each other. Differences are most clearly seen by forming a material into an air bridge and probing it in the air gap and at the anchor points. A monolayer graphene sheet, shows a larger disorder band at the anchor points than in the air gap. However, a bundle or rope of parallel-aligned single-wall nanotubes shows a larger disorder band in the gap than at the anchor points. For the graphene sheet the substrate surface deforms the graphene, leading to increases in the disorder band. For the rope, the close proximity of the nanotubes to each other appears to produce a larger stress than the rope resting on the substrate

  5. Green synthesis and characterization of graphene nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, Farnosh [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badiei, Alireza [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • For the first time, we have synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. • Here pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent. • FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDS and TEM were used to characterize the samples. • According to TEM image, graphene nanosheet is individually exfoliated after stirring for 24 h. • As shown in the TEM image, graphene monolayer is obtained. - Abstract: For the first time, we have successfully synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. In this approach, pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent to form graphene nanosheets. At first, the improved Hummer method to oxidize graphite for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO) was applied, and then the as-produced graphene oxide was reduced by pomegranate juice to form graphene nanosheets. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and raman were used to characterize the samples. The results obtained from the characterization techniques proved high purity of the final products.

  6. 1/f noise in graphene nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerema, S J; Schneider, G F; Rozemuller, M; Vicarelli, L; Zandbergen, H W; Dekker, C

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanopores are receiving great attention due to their atomically thin membranes and intrinsic electrical properties that appear greatly beneficial for biosensing and DNA sequencing. Here, we present an extensive study of the low-frequency 1/f noise in the ionic current through graphene nanopores and compare it to noise levels in silicon nitride pore currents. We find that the 1/f noise magnitude is very high for graphene nanopores: typically two orders of magnitude higher than for silicon nitride pores. This is a drawback as it significantly lowers the signal-to-noise ratio in DNA translocation experiments. We evaluate possible explanations for these exceptionally high noise levels in graphene pores. From examining the noise for pores of different diameters and at various salt concentrations, we find that in contrast to silicon nitride pores, the 1/f noise in graphene pores does not follow Hooge’s relation. In addition, from studying the dependence on the buffer pH, we show that the increased noise cannot be explained by charge fluctuations of chemical groups on the pore rim. Finally, we compare single and bilayer graphene to few-layer and multi-layer graphene and boron nitride (h-BN), and we find that the noise reduces with layer thickness for both materials, which suggests that mechanical fluctuations may be the underlying cause of the high 1/f noise levels in monolayer graphene nanopore devices. (paper)

  7. Green synthesis and characterization of graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, Farnosh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Badiei, Alireza; Mohandes, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • For the first time, we have synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. • Here pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent. • FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDS and TEM were used to characterize the samples. • According to TEM image, graphene nanosheet is individually exfoliated after stirring for 24 h. • As shown in the TEM image, graphene monolayer is obtained. - Abstract: For the first time, we have successfully synthesized graphene nanosheets in the presence of pomegranate juice. In this approach, pomegranate juice was used not only as reductant but also as capping agent to form graphene nanosheets. At first, the improved Hummer method to oxidize graphite for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO) was applied, and then the as-produced graphene oxide was reduced by pomegranate juice to form graphene nanosheets. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and raman were used to characterize the samples. The results obtained from the characterization techniques proved high purity of the final products

  8. SiP monolayers: New 2D structures of group IV-V compounds for visible-light photohydrolytic catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhinan; Zhuang, Jibin; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Because of graphene and phosphorene, two-dimensional (2D) layered materials of group IV and group V elements arouse great interest. However, group IV-V monolayers have not received due attention. In this work, three types of SiP monolayers were computationally designed to explore their electronic structure and optical properties. Computations confirm the stability of these monolayers, which are all indirect-bandgap semiconductors with bandgaps in the range 1.38-2.21 eV. The bandgaps straddle the redox potentials of water at pH = 0, indicating the potential of the monolayers for use as watersplitting photocatalysts. The computed optical properties demonstrate that certain monolayers of SiP 2D materials are absorbers of visible light and would serve as good candidates for optoelectronic devices.

  9. Al-Doped ZnO Monolayer as a Promising Transparent Electrode Material: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Al-doped ZnO has attracted much attention as a transparent electrode. The graphene-like ZnO monolayer as a two-dimensional nanostructure material shows exceptional properties compared to bulk ZnO. Here, through first-principle calculations, we found that the transparency in the visible light region of Al-doped ZnO monolayer is significantly enhanced compared to the bulk counterpart. In particular, the 12.5 at% Al-doped ZnO monolayer exhibits the highest visible transmittance of above 99%. Further, the electrical conductivity of the ZnO monolayer is enhanced as a result of Al doping, which also occurred in the bulk system. Our results suggest that Al-doped ZnO monolayer is a promising transparent conducting electrode for nanoscale optoelectronic device applications.

  10. The influence of the preparation conditions on structure and optical properties of solid films of graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliverstova, E; Ibrayev, N; Dzhanabekova, R; Gladkova, V

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the physico-chemical properties of graphene oxide monolayers at the interface water-air. Monolayers were formed by the spreading of dispersion of graphene oxide in acetone and THF. It was found than graphene monolayers are in the “liquid” state on the surface of subphase. Monolayers were transferred onto solid substrates according to Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method. SEM images show that the films have an island structure. The films obtained from acetone solutions are more uniform, which makes them more promising in terms of their use as conductive coatings. Absorption spectrum of graphene LB films exhibits a broad band in the ultraviolet and visible region of the spectrum. The optical density of the film obtained from acetone solution is greater than the optical density of the film prepared from THF. In the visible region of the spectrum both films have high transparency. (paper)

  11. Graphene aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  12. Effect of aromatic SAMs molecules on graphene/silicon schottky diode performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yağmurcukardeş, Nesli; Aydın, Hasan; Can, Mustafa; Yanılmaz, Alper; Mermer, Ömer; Okur, Salih; Selamet, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Au/n-Si/Graphene/Au Schottky diodes were fabricated by transferring atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposited (APCVD) graphene on silicon substrates. Graphene/n-Si interface properties were improved by using 5-[(3-methylphenyl)(phenyl) amino]isophthalic acid (MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (DPIFA) aromatic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules. The surface morphologies of modified and non-modified films were investigated by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron ...

  13. Chiral tunneling in a twisted graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Yu; Chu, Zhao-Dong; He, Lin

    2013-08-09

    The perfect transmission in a graphene monolayer and the perfect reflection in a Bernal graphene bilayer for electrons incident in the normal direction of a potential barrier are viewed as two incarnations of the Klein paradox. Here we show a new and unique incarnation of the Klein paradox. Owing to the different chiralities of the quasiparticles involved, the chiral fermions in a twisted graphene bilayer show an adjustable probability of chiral tunneling for normal incidence: they can be changed from perfect tunneling to partial or perfect reflection, or vice versa, by controlling either the height of the barrier or the incident energy. As well as addressing basic physics about how the chiral fermions with different chiralities tunnel through a barrier, our results provide a facile route to tune the electronic properties of the twisted graphene bilayer.

  14. Tunneling spectra of graphene on copper unraveled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xin; Stradi, Daniele; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms, etc. The interpretation of the spectra can be complicated, however. Specifically for graphene grown on copper, there have been conflicting reports of tunneling spectra. A clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the variability is desired. In this work, we have revealed that the root cause...... of the variability in tunneling spectra is the variation in graphene-substrate coupling under various experimental conditions, providing a salutary perspective on the important role of 2D material-substrate interactions. The conclusions are drawn from measured data and theoretical calculations for monolayer, AB......-stacked bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene coexisting on the same substrates in areas with and without intercalated oxygen, demonstrating a high degree of consistency. The Van Hove singularities of the twisted graphene unambiguously indicate the Dirac energy between them, lending strong evidence to our...

  15. Low-Damage Sputter Deposition on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tzu; Casu, Emanuele; Gajek, Marcin; Raoux, Simone

    2013-03-01

    Despite its versatility and prevalence in the microelectronics industry, sputter deposition has seen very limited applications for graphene-based electronics. We have systematically investigated the sputtering induced graphene defects and identified the reflected high-energy neutrals of the sputtering gas as the primary cause of damage. In this talk, we introduce a novel sputtering technique that is shown to dramatically reduce bombardment of the fast neutrals and improve the structural integrity of the underlying graphene layer. We also demonstrate that sputter deposition and in-situ oxidation of 1 nm Al film at elevated temperatures yields homogeneous, fully covered oxide films with r.m.s. roughness much less than 1 monolayer, which shows the potential of using such technique for gate oxides, tunnel barriers, and multilayer fabrication in a wide range of graphene devices.

  16. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-01-01

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature

  17. Facile synthetic method for pristine graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide quantum dots: origin of blue and green luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Jang, Min-Ho; Ha, Hyun Dong; Kim, Je-Hyung; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Seo, Tae Seok

    2013-07-19

    Pristine graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide quantum dots are synthesized by chemical exfoliation from the graphite nanoparticles with high uniformity in terms of shape (circle), size (less than 4 nm), and thickness (monolayer). The origin of the blue and green photoluminescence of GQDs and GOQDs is attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic energy states, respectively. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effect of water layer at the SiO2/graphene interface on pentacene morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, Manisha; Pavlica, Egon; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš; Bratina, Gvido

    2014-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to examine early stages of pentacene growth on exfoliated single-layer graphene transferred to SiO2 substrates. We have observed 2D growth with mean height of 1.5 ± 0.2 nm on as-transferred graphene. Three-dimensional islands of pentacene with an average height of 11 ± 2 nm were observed on graphene that was annealed at 350 °C prior to pentacene growth. Compellingly similar 3D morphology has been observed on graphene transferred onto SiO2 that was treated with hexamethyldisilazane prior to the transfer of graphene. On multilayer graphene we have observed 2D growth, regardless of the treatment of SiO2. We interpret this behavior of pentacene molecules in terms of the influence of the dipolar field that emerges from the water monolayer at the graphene/SiO2 interface on the surface energy of graphene.

  19. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  20. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-01-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  1. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rajratan, E-mail: basu@usna.edu; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James [Soft Matter and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  2. Graphene Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  3. Opening the band gap of graphene through silicon doping for the improved performance of graphene/GaAs heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S J; Lin, S S; Li, X Q; Liu, X Y; Wu, H A; Xu, W L; Wang, P; Wu, Z Q; Zhong, H K; Xu, Z J

    2016-01-07

    Graphene has attracted increasing interest due to its remarkable properties. However, the zero band gap of monolayered graphene limits it's further electronic and optoelectronic applications. Herein, we have synthesized monolayered silicon-doped graphene (SiG) with large surface area using a chemical vapor deposition method. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the silicon atoms are doped into graphene lattice at a doping level of 2.7-4.5 at%. Electrical measurements based on a field effect transistor indicate that the band gap of graphene has been opened via silicon doping without a clear degradation in carrier mobility, and the work function of SiG, deduced from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, was 0.13-0.25 eV larger than that of graphene. Moreover, when compared with the graphene/GaAs heterostructure, SiG/GaAs exhibits an enhanced performance. The performance of 3.4% silicon doped SiG/GaAs solar cell has been improved by 33.7% on average, which was attributed to the increased barrier height and improved interface quality. Our results suggest that silicon doping can effectively engineer the band gap of monolayered graphene and SiG has great potential in optoelectronic device applications.

  4. Exciton broadening in WS2 /graphene heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Heather M.; Rigosi, Albert F.; Raja, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Here, we have used optical spectroscopy to observe spectral broadening of WS 2 exciton reflectance peaks in heterostructures of monolayer WS 2 capped with mono- to few-layer graphene. The broadening is found to be similar for the A and B excitons and on the order of 5–10 meV. No strong dependence on the number of graphene layers was observed within experimental uncertainty. The broadening can be attributed to charge- and energy-transfer processes between the two materials, providing an observed lower bound for the corresponding time scales of 65 fs.

  5. Phase transitions in surfactant monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casson, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Two-dimensional phase transitions have been studied in surfactant monolayers at the air/water interface by sum-frequency spectroscopy and ellipsometry. In equilibrium monolayers of medium-chain alcohols C n H 2n+1 OH (n = 9-14) a transition from a two-dimensional crystalline phase to a liquid was observed at temperatures above the bulk melting point. The small population of gauche defects in the solid phase increased only slightly at the phase transition. A model of the hydrocarbon chains as freely rotating rigid rods allowed the area per molecule and chain tilt in the liquid phase to be determined. The area per molecule, chain tilt and density of the liquid phase all increased with increasing chain length, but for each chain length the density was higher than in a bulk liquid hydrocarbon. In a monolayer of decanol adsorbed at the air/water interface a transition from a two-dimensional liquid to a gas was observed. A clear discontinuity in the coefficient of ellipticity as a function of temperature showed that the transition is first-order. This result suggests that liquid-gas phase transitions in surfactant monolayers may be more widespread than once thought. A solid-liquid phase transition has also been studied in mixed monolayers of dodecanol with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and with a homologous series of cationic surfactants (alkyltrimethylammonium bromides: C n TABs, n = 12, 14, 16). The composition and structure of the mixed monolayers was studied above and below the phase transition. At low temperatures the mixed monolayers were as densely packed as a monolayer of pure dodecanol in its solid phase. At a fixed temperature the monolayers under-went a first-order phase transition to form a phase that was less dense and more conformationally disordered. The proportion of ionic surfactant in the mixed monolayer was greatest in the high temperature phase. As the chain length of the C n TAB increased the number of conformational defects

  6. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  7. Local Plasmon Engineering in Doped Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hage, Fredrik Sydow; Hardcastle, Trevor P.; Gjerding, Morten Niklas

    2018-01-01

    Single-atom B or N substitutional doping in single-layer suspended graphene, realized by low-energy ion implantation, is shown to induce a dampening or enhancement of the characteristic interband π plasmon of graphene through a high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy study using scanning...... tailoring can no longer be detected within experimental uncertainties beyond a distance of approximately 1 nm from the dopant. Ab initio calculations confirm the trends observed experimentally. Our results directly confirm the possibility of tailoring the plasmonic properties of graphene in the ultraviolet...... waveband at the atomic scale, a crucial step in the quest for utilizing graphene's properties toward the development of plasmonic and optoelectronic devices operating at ultraviolet frequencies....

  8. Graphitization of self-assembled monolayers using patterned nickel-copper layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Hong-Yeol; Kim, Jihyun

    2017-07-01

    Controlling the optical and electrical properties of graphene is of great importance because it is directly related to commercialization of graphene-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. The development of a spatially controlled layer-tunable and direct growth method is a favored strategy because it allows for the manipulation of the optical and electrical properties of graphene without complex processes. Here, patterned Ni on Cu layers is employed to achieve spatially thickness-tuned graphene because its thickness depends on the carbon solubility of catalytic metals. Transfer-free graphene is directly grown on an arbitrary target substrate by using self-assembled monolayers as the carbon source. The optical transmittance at a wavelength of 550 nm and the sheet resistance of graphene are adjusted from 65.0% and 2.33 kΩ/◻ to 85.8% and 7.98 kΩ/◻, respectively. Ambipolar behavior with a hole carrier mobility of 3.4 cm2/(V.s) is obtained from the fabricated device. Therefore, a spatially controlled layer-tunable and transfer-free growth method can be used to realize advanced designs for graphene-based optical and electrical devices.

  9. Monolayer MoS{sub 2} self-switching diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dirini, Feras, E-mail: alf@unimelb.edu.au; Hossain, Md Sharafat [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Neural Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Victorian Research Laboratory, National ICT Australia, West Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hossain, Faruque M.; Skafidas, Efstratios [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Neural Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mohammed, Mahmood A. [Princess Sumaya University for Technology, Amman (Jordan); Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Melbourne Networked Society Institute (MNSI), University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    This paper presents a new molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) nanodevice that acts as a two-terminal field-effect rectifier. The device is an atomically-thin two-dimensional self-switching diode (SSD) that can be realized within a single MoS{sub 2} monolayer with very minimal process steps. Quantum simulation results are presented confirming the device's operation as a diode and showing strong non-linear I-V characteristics. Interestingly, the device shows p-type behavior, in which conduction is dominated by holes as majority charge carriers and the flow of reverse current is enhanced, while the flow of forward current is suppressed, in contrast to monolayer graphene SSDs, which behave as n-type devices. The presence of a large bandgap in monolayer MoS{sub 2} results in strong control over the channel, showing complete channel pinch-off in forward conduction, which was confirmed with transmission pathways plots. The device exhibited large leakage tunnelling current through the insulating trenches, which may have been due to the lack of passivation; nevertheless, reverse current remained to be 6 times higher than forward current, showing strong rectification. The effect of p-type substitutional channel doping of sulphur with phosphorus was investigated and showed that it greatly enhances the performance of the device, increasing the reverse-to-forward current rectification ratio more than an order of magnitude, up to a value of 70.

  10. Detecting the local transport properties and the dimensionality of transport of epitaxial graphene by a multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas; Perkins, Edward; Johannsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of epitaxial monolayer graphene (MLG) and hydrogen-intercalated quasi free-standing bilayer graphene (QFBLG) on SiC(0001) are investigated by micro multi-point probes. Using a probe with 12 contacts, we perform four-point probe measurements with the possibility...

  11. Aromatic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D. K., E-mail: gour.netai@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  12. Aromatic graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  13. Stepwise Reduction of Immobilized Mono layer Graphene Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; He, Yudong; Lang, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    to the pronounced aggregation that accompanies deoxygenation of GO in solution. Surface immobilization of monolayered graphene oxide (mGO) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated as a method to circumvent this problem. Two types of LB films with different density of mGO flakes were prepared, i.e., diluted...

  14. Influence of copper morphology in forming nucleation seeds for graphene growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang Hee; Güneş, Fethullah; Bae, Jung Jun; Kim, Eun Sung; Chae, Seung Jin; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Choi, Jae-Young; Pribat, Didier; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-10-12

    We report that highly crystalline graphene can be obtained from well-controlled surface morphology of the copper substrate. Flat copper surface was prepared by using a chemical mechanical polishing method. At early growth stage, the density of graphene nucleation seeds from polished Cu film was much lower and the domain sizes of graphene flakes were larger than those from unpolished Cu film. At later growth stage, these domains were stitched together to form monolayer graphene, where the orientation of each domain crystal was unexpectedly not much different from each other. We also found that grain boundaries and intentionally formed scratched area play an important role for nucleation seeds. Although the best monolayer graphene was grown from polished Cu with a low sheet resistance of 260 Ω/sq, a small portion of multilayers were also formed near the impurity particles or locally protruded parts.

  15. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials

  16. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  17. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  18. Effect of strain on geometric and electronic structures of graphene on a Ru(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jia-Tao; Du Shi-Xuan; Xiao Wen-De; Hu Hao; Zhang Yu-Yang; Li Guo; Gao Hong-Jun

    2009-01-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of a graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface under compressive strain are investigated by using first-principles calculations. Three models of graphene monolayers with different carbon periodicities due to the lattice mismatch are proposed in the presence and the. absence of the Ru(0001) substrate separately. Considering the strain induced by the lattice mismatch, we optimize the atomic structures and investigate the electronic properties of the graphene. Our calculation results show that the graphene layers turn into periodic corrugations and there exist strong chemical bonds in the interface between the graphene N x N superlattice and the substrate. The strain does not induce significant changes in electronic structure. Furthermore, the results calculated in the local density approximation (LDA) are compared with those obtained in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), showing that the LDA results are more reasonable than the GGA results when only two substrate layers are used in calculation.

  19. Graphene-Nanodiamond Heterostructures and their application to High Current Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Vrajitoarea, Andrei; Jiang, Qi; Han, Xiaoyu; Chaudhary, Aysha; Welch, Joseph O.; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene on hydrogen terminated monolayer nanodiamond heterostructures provides a new way to improve carrier transport characteristics of the graphene, offering up to 60% improvement when compared with similar graphene on SiO2/Si substrates. These heterostructures offers excellent current-carrying abilities whilst offering the prospect of a fast, low cost and easy methodology for device applications. The use of ND monolayers is also a compatible technology for the support of large area graphene films. The nature of the C-H bonds between graphene and H-terminated NDs strongly influences the electronic character of the heterostructure, creating effective charge redistribution within the system. Field effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated based on this novel herterostructure to demonstrate device characteristics and the potential of this approach. PMID:26350107

  20. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2014-10-01

    We study suspended graphene in contact with the organic molecule anisole to analyse the implications of the interaction for the optical absorption, using first principle calculations. Because of a weak interaction multiple orientations of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Landau quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene and its multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Bai, Ke-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xiao; Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Yu; He, Lin

    2017-08-01

    When electrons are confined in a two-dimensional (2D) system, typical quantum-mechanical phenomena such as Landau quantization can be detected. Graphene systems, including the single atomic layer and few-layer stacked crystals, are ideal 2D materials for studying a variety of quantum-mechanical problems. In this article, we review the experimental progress in the unusual Landau quantized behaviors of Dirac fermions in monolayer and multilayer graphene by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Through STS measurement of the strong magnetic fields, distinct Landau-level spectra and rich level-splitting phenomena are observed in different graphene layers. These unique properties provide an effective method for identifying the number of layers, as well as the stacking orders, and investigating the fundamentally physical phenomena of graphene. Moreover, in the presence of a strain and charged defects, the Landau quantization of graphene can be significantly modified, leading to unusual spectroscopic and electronic properties.

  2. Electronic Properties of Graphene-PtSe2 Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Shahid; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2017-05-10

    In this article, we study the electronic properties of graphene in contact with monolayer and bilayer PtSe 2 using first-principles calculations. It turns out that there is no charge transfer between the components because of the weak van der Waals interaction. We calculate the work functions of monolayer and bilayer PtSe 2 and analyze the band bending at the contact with graphene. The formation of an n-type Schottky contact with monolayer PtSe 2 and a p-type Schottky contact with bilayer PtSe 2 is demonstrated. The Schottky barrier height is very low in the bilayer case and can be reduced to zero by 0.8% biaxial tensile strain.

  3. Spin transport through electric field modulated graphene periodic ferromagnetic barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari, F.; Faizabadi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the spin transmission coefficient and the spin conductivity are studied theoretically through the monolayer and bilayer graphene periodic ferromagnetic barriers modulated by a homogeneous electric field. The spin conductivity of the systems has an oscillatory behavior with respect to the external electric field which depends on the spin state of electron. In addition, the oscillation amplitude of the spin conductivity and spin polarization increase by increasing the number of barriers, but for a monolayer system with number of barriers greater than thirty, also for a bilayer system with the number of barriers greater than four, the oscillation amplitude does not change significantly. Our probes show that for bilayer system unlike monolayer structure the highest value of spin polarization achieved can be 1 or (−1). So, for designing spintronic devices, bilayer graphene is more efficient

  4. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  5. Pressure sensing element based on the BN-graphene-BN heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengwei; Wu, Chenggen; Zhao, Shiliang; Deng, Tao; Wang, Junqiang; Liu, Zewen; Wang, Li; Wang, Gao

    2018-04-01

    In this letter, we report a pressure sensing element based on the graphene-boron nitride (BN) heterostructure. The heterostructure consists of monolayer graphene sandwiched between two layers of vertically stacked dielectric BN nanofilms. The BN layers were used to protect the graphene layer from oxidation and pollution. Pressure tests were performed to investigate the characteristics of the BN-graphene-BN pressure sensing element. A sensitivity of 24.85 μV/V/mmHg is achieved in the pressure range of 130-180 kPa. After exposing the BN-graphene-BN pressure sensing element to the ambient environment for 7 days, the relative resistance change in the pressure sensing element is only 3.1%, while that of the reference open-faced graphene device without the BN protection layers is 15.7%. Thus, this strategy is promising for fabricating practical graphene pressure sensors with improved performance and stability.

  6. Layer-controllable graphene by plasma thinning and post-annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lufang; Feng, Shaopeng; Xiao, Shaoqing; Shen, Gang; Zhang, Xiumei; Nan, Haiyan; Gu, Xiaofeng; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2018-05-01

    The electronic structure of graphene depends crucially on its layer number and therefore engineering the number of graphene's atomic stacking layers is of great importance for the preparation of graphene-based devices. In this paper, we demonstrated a relatively less invasive, high-throughput and uniform large-area plasma thinning of graphene based on direct bombardment effect of fast-moving ionic hydrogen or argon species. Any desired number of graphene layers including trilayer, bilayer and monolayer can be obtained. Structural changes of graphene layers are studied by optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Post annealing is adopted to self-heal the lattice defects induced by the ion bombardment effect. This plasma etching technique is efficient and compatible with semiconductor manufacturing processes, and may find important applications for graphene-based device fabrication.

  7. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using transistors based on CVD grown graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Yin; Loan, Phan Thi Kim; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Tse-Wei Wang, Jacob; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Lin, Cheng-Te; Li, Lain-Jong

    2013-03-15

    The high transconductance and low noise of graphene-based field-effect transistors based on large-area monolayer graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition are used for label-free electrical detection of DNA hybridization. The gate materials, buffer concentration and surface condition of graphene have been optimized to achieve the DNA detection sensitivity as low as 1 pM (10(-12) M), which is more sensitive than the existing report based on few-layer graphene. The graphene films obtained using conventional PMMA-assisted transfer technique exhibits PMMA residues, which degrade the sensing performance of graphene. We have demonstrated that the sensing performance of the graphene samples prepared by gold-transfer is largely enhanced (by 125%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-02-22

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm(-1).

  9. Direct Growth of Graphene on Silicon by Metal-Free Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lixuan; Zhu, Daming; Liu, Xing; Yang, Tieying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Rui; Jiang, Sheng; Chen, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhongmin; Li, Xiaolong

    2018-06-01

    The metal-free synthesis of graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates, the most common commercial semiconductor, is of paramount significance for many technological applications. In this work, we report the growth of graphene directly on an upside-down placed, single-crystal silicon substrate using metal-free, ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the growth temperature, in-plane propagation, edge-propagation, and core-propagation, the process of graphene growth on silicon can be identified. This process produces atomically flat monolayer or bilayer graphene domains, concave bilayer graphene domains, and bulging few-layer graphene domains. This work would be a significant step toward the synthesis of large-area and layer-controlled, high-quality graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Epitaxially grown strained pentacene thin film on graphene membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Santos, Elton J G; Lee, Tae Hoon; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-05-06

    Organic-graphene system has emerged as a new platform for various applications such as flexible organic photovoltaics and organic light emitting diodes. Due to its important implication in charge transport, the study and reliable control of molecular packing structures at the graphene-molecule interface are of great importance for successful incorporation of graphene in related organic devices. Here, an ideal membrane of suspended graphene as a molecular assembly template is utilized to investigate thin-film epitaxial behaviors. Using transmission electron microscopy, two distinct molecular packing structures of pentacene on graphene are found. One observed packing structure is similar to the well-known bulk-phase, which adapts a face-on molecular orientation on graphene substrate. On the other hand, a rare polymorph of pentacene crystal, which shows significant strain along the c-axis, is identified. In particular, the strained film exhibits a specific molecular orientation and a strong azimuthal correlation with underlying graphene. Through ab initio electronic structure calculations, including van der Waals interactions, the unusual polymorph is attributed to the strong graphene-pentacene interaction. The observed strained organic film growth on graphene demonstrates the possibility to tune molecular packing via graphene-molecule interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Suspended solids in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    An international literature review and telephone mail survey was conducted with respect to technical and regulatory aspects of suspended solids in radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear power stations. Results of the survey are summarized and show that suspended solids are an important component of some waste streams. The data available, while limited, show these solids to be associated largely with corrosion products. The solids are highly variable in quantity, size and composition. Filtration is commonly applied for their removal from liquid effluents and is effective. Complex interactions with receiving waters can result in physical/chemical changes of released radionuclides and these phenomena have been seen as reason for not applying regulatory controls based on suspended solids content. 340 refs

  12. Nanostructure of highly aromatic graphene nanosheets -- From optoelectronics to electrochemical energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sanjib

    The exceptional electrical properties along with intriguing physical and chemical aspects of graphene nanosheets can only be realized by nanostructuring these materials through the homogeneous and orderly distribution of these nanosheets without compromising the aromaticity of the native basal plane. Graphene nanosheets prepared by direct exfoliation as opposed to the graphene oxide route are necessary in order to preserve the native chemical properties of graphene basal planes. This research has been directed at optimally combining the diverse physical and chemical aspects of graphene nanosheets such as particle size, surface area and edge chemistry to fabricate nanostructured architectures for optoelectronics and high power electrochemical energy storage applications. In the first nanostructuring effort, a monolayer of these ultrathin, highly hydrophobic graphene nanosheets was prepared on a large area substrate via self-assembly at the liquid-liquid interface. Driven by the minimization of interfacial energy these planar graphene nanosheets produce a close packed monolayer structure at the liquid-liquid interface. The resulting monolayer film exhibits high electrical conductivity of more than 1000 S/cm and an optical transmission of more than 70-80% between wavelengths of 550 nm and 2000 nm making it an ideal candidate for optoelectronic applications. In the second part of this research, nanostructuring was used to create a configuration suitable for supercapacitor applications. A free standing, 100% binder free multilayer, flexible film consisting of monolayers of graphene nanosheets was prepared by utilizing the van der Waals forces of attraction between the basal plans of the graphene nanosheets coupled with capillary driven and drying-induced collapse. A major benefit in this approach is that the graphene nanosheet's attractive physical and chemical characteristics can be synthesized into an architecture consisting of large and small nanosheets to create an

  13. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels (tilde 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles

  14. Graphene Nanodevices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calado, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes a divergent set of experiments on graphene, a one-atom thin sheet of carbon. We employ graphene’s unique properties to explore fundamental physics and novel applications. This is done by nano fabricating graphene to nanodevices, which are subject to experiments. Here we first

  15. Production of graphene by exfoliation of graphite in a volatile organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Choi, Won San; Lee, Young Boo; Noh, Yong-Young

    2011-01-01

    The production of unfunctionalized and nonoxidized graphene by exfoliation of graphite in a volatile solvent, 1-propanol, is reported. A stable homogeneous dispersion of graphene was obtained by mild sonication of graphite powder and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of a graphene monolayer was observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The solvent, 1-propanol, from the deposited dispersion was simply and quickly removed by air drying at room temperature, without the help of high temperature annealing or vacuum drying, which shortens production time and does not leave any residue of the solvent in the graphene sheets.

  16. Enhanced Light–Matter Interactions in Graphene-Covered Gold Nanovoid Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Shi, Lei; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2013-01-01

    The combination of graphene with noble-metal nanostructures is currently being explored for strong light–graphene interactions enhanced by plasmons. We introduce a novel hybrid graphene–metal system for studying light–matter interactions with gold-void nanostructures exhibiting resonances...... in the visible range. Enhanced coupling of graphene to the plasmon modes of the nanovoid arrays results in significant frequency shifts of the underlying plasmon resonances, enabling 30% enhanced absolute light absorption by adding a monolayer graphene and up to 700-fold enhancement of the Raman response...

  17. Impact of electron-electron Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-03-01

    Generation of high harmonics in a monolayer graphene initiated by a strong coherent radiation field, taking into account electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is investigated. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear optical response of graphene is developed. The Coulomb interaction of electrons is treated in the scope of dynamic Hartree-Fock approximation. The closed set of integrodifferential equations for the single-particle density matrix of a graphene quantum structure is solved numerically. The obtained solutions show the significance of many-body Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene.

  18. Versatile Polymer-Free Graphene Transfer Method and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Güell, Aleix G; Kirkman, Paul M; Lazenby, Robert A; Miller, Thomas S; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-01

    A new method for transferring chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown monolayer graphene to a variety of substrates is described. The method makes use of an organic/aqueous biphasic configuration, avoiding the use of any polymeric materials that can cause severe contamination problems. The graphene-coated copper foil sample (on which graphene was grown) sits at the interface between hexane and an aqueous etching solution of ammonium persulfate to remove the copper. With the aid of an Si/SiO2 substrate, the graphene layer is then transferred to a second hexane/water interface to remove etching products. From this new location, CVD graphene is readily transferred to arbitrary substrates, including three-dimensional architectures as represented by atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Graphene produces a conformal layer on AFM tips, to the very end, allowing easy production of tips for conductive AFM imaging. Graphene transferred to copper TEM grids provides large-area, highly electron-transparent substrates for TEM imaging. These substrates can also be used as working electrodes for electrochemistry and high-resolution wetting studies. By using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy, it is possible to make electrochemical and wetting measurements at either a freestanding graphene film or a copper-supported graphene area and readily determine any differences in behavior.

  19. Orientational epitaxy in adsorbed monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaco, A.D.; McTague, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The ground state for adsorbed monolayers on crystalline substrates is shown to involve a definite relative orientation of the substrate and adsorbate crystal axes, even when the relative lattice parameters are incommensurate. The rotation angle which defines the structure of the monolayer-substrate system is determined by the competition between adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate energy terms, and is generally not a symmetry angle. Numerical predictions are presented for the rare gas-graphite systems, whose interaction potentials are rather well known. Recent LEED data for some of these systems appear to corroborate these predictions

  20. Graphene Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo

    The production of graphene and the other 2D materials is presented in the beginning of this thesis. Micromechanical exfoliation is the best method for obtaining relatively small and top quality samples. The invention of Graphene Finder simplifies the procedure of finding the exfoliated flakes...... in copper thin films is studied and found to be detrimental for the growth of graphene. The modified synthesis of rGO is introduced, as rGO represents a cheap alternative to CVD for large scale production of graphene. The transfer of flakes is performed by several methods, such as with PVA/PMMA support, CAB...... wedging and the pick-up technique with hBN. Several important improvements of the pick-up technique are introduced. These allowed us to transfer any 2D crystals and patterned graphene flakes with PMMA residues. We also developed the drop-down technique, which is used to release any crystal on the surface...

  1. Hairy Graphenes: Wrapping Nanocellulose Nets around Graphene Oxide Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Rui; Kim, Ho Shin; Korolovych, Volodymyr F; Zhang, Shuaidi; Yingling, Yaroslava; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2018-04-17

    Constructing advanced functional nanomaterials with pre-designed organized morphologies from low-dimension synthetic and biological components is extremely challenging because of complex inter-component interactions, high-aspect ratios, flexible shapes, crumpling instabilities and limited common wet-chemistry processing conditions. Herein, we report an efficient and universal amphiphilicity-driven assembly strategy to construct "hairy" flexible hybrid nanosheets with the net of 1D cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) conformally wrapped around 2D graphene oxide (GO) monolayers. This interface-driven bio-synthetic assembly is facilitated by variable amphiphilic interfacial balance via tailoring the surface chemistry of flexible GO sheets as controllably pre-oxidized 2D template cores, resulting in individual sheets tightly surrounded by dense conformal nanocellulose network. These nanocellulose-net wrapped GO nanosheets demonstrate extremely high compressive elastic modulus above 180 GPa due to the strong bonding between nanofibers and GO sheets and arrest of the buckling events. This unique mechanical stability far exceeds the compressive instability limits of both individual components, 1D cellulose nanofibers and 2D graphene monolayers. Additionally, the presence of CNF reinforced nanocellulose network significantly enhances the wetting ability of initial hydrophobic reduced GO nanosheets, enabling the long-term stability of CNFs-rGO dispersion and allowing fast water transport combined with high filtration efficiency for CNFs-rGO membranes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications

  3. Graphene ribbon growth on structured silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehr, Alexander; Link, Stefan; Starke, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Baringhaus, Jens; Aprojanz, Johannes; Tegenkamp, Christoph [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Niu, Yuran [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); present address: School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Zakharov, Alexei A. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL and Universite Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2017-11-15

    Structured Silicon Carbide was proposed to be an ideal template for the production of arrays of edge specific graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which could be used as a base material for graphene transistors. We prepared periodic arrays of nanoscaled stripe-mesas on SiC surfaces using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Subsequent epitaxial graphene growth by annealing is differentiated between the basal-plane mesas and the faceting stripe walls as monitored by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microscopic low energy electron diffraction (μ-LEED) revealed that the graphene ribbons on the facetted mesa side walls grow in epitaxial relation to the basal-plane graphene with an armchair orientation at the facet edges. The π-band system of the ribbons exhibits linear bands with a Dirac like shape corresponding to monolayer graphene as identified by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Graphene-based hybrid plasmonic modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jin-Soo; Tae Kim, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A graphene-based hybrid plasmonic modulator is designed based on an asymmetric double-electrode plasmonic waveguide structure. The photonic device consists of a monolayer graphene, a thin metal strip, and a thin dielectric layer that is inserted between the grapheme and the metal strip. By electrically tuning the graphene’s refractive index, the propagation loss of the hybrid long-range surface plasmon polariton strip mode in the proposed graphene-based hybrid plasmonic waveguide is switchable, and hence the intensity of the guided modes is modulated. The highest modulation depth is observed at the graphene’s epsilon-near-zero region. The device characteristics are characterized over the entire C-band (1.530–1.565 μm). (paper)

  5. Electrically Controllable Magnetism in Twisted Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A; Lado, J L; Guinea, Francisco; San-Jose, Pablo

    2017-09-08

    Twisted graphene bilayers develop highly localized states around AA-stacked regions for small twist angles. We show that interaction effects may induce either an antiferromagnetic or a ferromagnetic (FM) polarization of said regions, depending on the electrical bias between layers. Remarkably, FM-polarized AA regions under bias develop spiral magnetic ordering, with a relative 120° misalignment between neighboring regions due to a frustrated antiferromagnetic exchange. This remarkable spiral magnetism emerges naturally without the need of spin-orbit coupling, and competes with the more conventional lattice-antiferromagnetic instability, which interestingly develops at smaller bias under weaker interactions than in monolayer graphene, due to Fermi velocity suppression. This rich and electrically controllable magnetism could turn twisted bilayer graphene into an ideal system to study frustrated magnetism in two dimensions.

  6. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-07

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability.

  7. Exposure monitoring of graphene nanoplatelets manufacturing workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Boowook; Bello, Dhimiter; Kim, Jin Kwon; Lee, Gun Ho; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyungmin; Ahn, Kangho; Faustman, Elaine M; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    Graphenes have emerged as a highly promising, two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial that can possibly substitute carbon nanotubes. They are being explored in numerous R&D and industrial applications in laboratories across the globe, leading to possible human and environmental exposures to them. Yet, there are no published data on graphene exposures in occupational settings and no readily available methods for their detection and quantitation exist. This study investigates for the first time the potential exposure of workers and research personnel to graphenes in two research facilities and evaluates the status of the control measures. One facility manufactures graphene using graphite exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the other facility grows graphene on a copper plate using CVD, which is then transferred to a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. Graphene exposures and process emissions were investigated for three tasks - CVD growth, exfoliation, and transfer - using a multi-metric approach, which utilizes several direct reading instruments, integrated sampling, and chemical and morphological analysis. Real-time instruments included a dust monitor, condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor, scanning mobility particle sizer, and an aethalometer. Morphologically, graphenes and other nanostructures released from the work process were investigated using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Graphenes were quantified in airborne respirable samples as elemental carbon via thermo-optical analysis. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate at Workplaces A and B were very low, and elemental carbon concentrations were mostly below the detection limit, indicating very low exposure to graphene or any other particles. The real-time monitoring, especially the aethalometer, showed a good response to the released black carbon, providing a signature of the graphene released during the opening of the CVD reactor

  8. Solution-processable septithiophene monolayer transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defaux, M.; Gholamrezaie, F.; Wang, J.; Kreyes, A.; Ziener, U.; Anokhin, D.V.; Ivanov, D.A.; Moser, A.; Neuhold, A.; Salzmann, I.; Resel, R.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Moeller, M.; Mourran, A.

    2012-01-01

    Septithiophene with endgroups designed to form liquid crystalline phases and allows controlled deposition of an electrically connected monolayer. Field effect mobilies mobilities of charge carriers and spectroscopic properties of the monolayer provide evidence of sustainable transport and

  9. Solution-Processable Septithiophene Monolayer Transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defaux, Matthieu; Gholamrezaie, Fatemeh; Wang, Jingbo; Kreyes, Andreas; Ziener, Ulrich; Anokhin, Denis V.; Ivanov, Dimitri A.; Moser, Armin; Neuhold, Alfred; Salzmann, Ingo; Resel, Roland; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Moeller, Martin; Mourran, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Septithiophene with endgroups designed to form liquid crystalline phases and allows controlled deposition of an electrically connected monolayer. Field effect mobilies mobilities of charge carriers and spectroscopic properties of the monolayer provide evidence of sustainable transport and

  10. Kohn-Luttinger superconductivity in monolayer and bilayer semimetals with the Dirac spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Mitskan, V. A.; Korovushkin, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Coulomb interaction in an ensemble of Dirac fermions on the formation of superconducting pairing in monolayer and bilayer doped graphene is studied using the Kohn-Luttinger mechanism disregarding the Van der Waals potential of the substrate and impurities. The electronic structure of graphene is described using the Shubin-Vonsovsky model taking into account the intratomic, interatomic, and interlayer (in the case of bilayer graphene) Coulomb interactions between electrons. The Cooper instability is determined by solving the Bethe-Saltpeter integral equation. The renormalized scattering amplitude is obtained with allowance for the Kohn-Luttinger polarization contributions up to the second order of perturbation theory in the Coulomb interaction. It plays the role of effective interaction in the Bethe-Salpeter integral equation. It is shown that the allowance for the Kohn-Luttinger renormalizations as well as intersite Coulomb interaction noticeably affects the competition between the superconducting phases with the f-wave and d + id-wave symmetries of the order parameter. It is demonstrated that the superconducting transition temperature for an idealized graphene bilayer with significant interlayer Coulomb interaction between electrons is noticeably higher than in the monolayer case

  11. Opening the band gap of graphene through silicon doping for the improved performance of graphene/GaAs heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. J.; Lin, S. S.; Li, X. Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Wu, H. A.; Xu, W. L.; Wang, P.; Wu, Z. Q.; Zhong, H. K.; Xu, Z. J.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing interest due to its remarkable properties. However, the zero band gap of monolayered graphene limits it's further electronic and optoelectronic applications. Herein, we have synthesized monolayered silicon-doped graphene (SiG) with large surface area using a chemical vapor deposition method. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the silicon atoms are doped into graphene lattice at a doping level of 2.7-4.5 at%. Electrical measurements based on a field effect transistor indicate that the band gap of graphene has been opened via silicon doping without a clear degradation in carrier mobility, and the work function of SiG, deduced from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, was 0.13-0.25 eV larger than that of graphene. Moreover, when compared with the graphene/GaAs heterostructure, SiG/GaAs exhibits an enhanced performance. The performance of 3.4% silicon doped SiG/GaAs solar cell has been improved by 33.7% on average, which was attributed to the increased barrier height and improved interface quality. Our results suggest that silicon doping can effectively engineer the band gap of monolayered graphene and SiG has great potential in optoelectronic device applications.Graphene has attracted increasing interest due to its remarkable properties. However, the zero band gap of monolayered graphene limits it's further electronic and optoelectronic applications. Herein, we have synthesized monolayered silicon-doped graphene (SiG) with large surface area using a chemical vapor deposition method. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the silicon atoms are doped into graphene lattice at a doping level of 2.7-4.5 at%. Electrical measurements based on a field effect transistor indicate that the band gap of graphene has been opened via silicon doping without a clear degradation in carrier mobility, and the work function of SiG, deduced from ultraviolet photoelectron

  12. Etchant-free graphene transfer using facile intercalation of alkanethiol self-assembled molecules at graphene/metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, Manabu; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Wang, Shengnan; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-06-02

    We report a novel etchant-free transfer method of graphene using the intercalation of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) at the graphene/Cu interfaces. The early stage of intercalation proceeds through graphene grain boundaries or defects within a few seconds at room temperature until stable SAMs are formed after a few hours. The formation of SAMs releases the compressive strain of graphene induced by Cu substrates and make graphene slightly n-doped due to the formation of interface dipoles of the SAMs on metal surfaces. After SAM formation, the graphene is easily delaminated off from the metal substrates and transferred onto insulating substrates. The etchant-free process enables us to decrease the density of charged impurities and the magnitude of potential fluctuation in the transferred graphene, which suppress scattering of carriers. We also demonstrate the removal of alkanethiol SAMs and reuse the substrate. This method will dramatically reduce the cost of graphene transfer, which will benefit industrial applications such as of graphene transparent electrodes.

  13. Structures and shear response of lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses our work during the last 3 years using x-ray diffraction and shear measurements to study lipid monolayers (membranes). The report is divided into: (1) structure: phase diagram of saturated fatty acid Langmuir monolayers, effect of head group interactions, studies of transferred monolayers (LB films); (2) mechanical properties: fiber=optic capillary wave probe and centrosymmetric trough, mechanical behavior of heneicosanoic acid monolayer phases

  14. First-Principles Investigation of Phase Stability, Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of MgZnO Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlong Tan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available MgZnO bulk has attracted much attention as candidates for application in optoelectronic devices in the blue and ultraviolet region. However, there has been no reported study regarding two-dimensional MgZnO monolayer in spite of its unique properties due to quantum confinement effect. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we investigated the phase stability, electronic structure and optical properties of MgxZn1−xO monolayer with Mg concentration x range from 0 to 1. Our calculations show that MgZnO monolayer remains the graphene-like structure with various Mg concentrations. The phase segregation occurring in bulk systems has not been observed in the monolayer due to size effect, which is advantageous for application. Moreover, MgZnO monolayer exhibits interesting tuning of electronic structure and optical properties with Mg concentration. The band gap increases with increasing Mg concentration. More interestingly, a direct to indirect band gap transition is observed for MgZnO monolayer when Mg concentration is higher than 75 at %. We also predict that Mg doping leads to a blue shift of the optical absorption peaks. Our results may provide guidance for designing the growth process and potential application of MgZnO monolayer.

  15. Phase transitions in polymer monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschênes, Louise; Lyklema, J.; Danis, Claude; Saint-Germain, François

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the application of the two-dimensional Clapeyron law to polymer monolayers. This is a largely unexplored area of research. The main problems are (1) establishing if equilibrium is reached and (2) if so, identifying and defining phases as functions of the temperature.

  16. Direct transfer of multilayer graphene grown on a rough metal surface using PDMS adhesion engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heejun; Kang, Il-Suk; Lee, Youngbok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Yoon, Dong Ki; Ahn, Chi Won; Lee, Wonhee

    2016-09-01

    The direct transfer of graphene using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamping has advantages such as a ‘pick-and-place’ capability and no chemical residue problems. However, it is not easy to apply direct PDMS stamping to graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition on rough, grainy metal surfaces due to poor contact between the PDMS and graphene. In this study, graphene consisting of a mixture of monolayers and multiple layers grown on a rough Ni surface was directly transferred without the use of an adhesive layer. Liquid PDMS was cured on graphene to effect a conformal contact with the graphene. A fast release of graphene from substrate was achieved by carrying out wet-etching-assisted mechanical peeling. We also carried out a thermal post-curing of PDMS to control the level of adhesion between PDMS and graphene and hence facilitate a damage-free release of the graphene. Characterization of the transferred graphene by micro-Raman spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and optical microscopy showed neither cracks nor contamination from the transfer. This technique allows a fast and simple transfer of graphene, even for multilayer graphene grown on a rough surface.

  17. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  18. Transmission properties of Dirac electrons through Cantor monolayer graphene superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rodríguez-González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo usamos el método de la matriz de transferencia para estudiar el tunelamiento de los electrones de Dirac a través de superredes aperiodicas en grafeno. Consideramos una hoja de grafeno depositada encima de bloques de sustratos de Óxido de Silicio (SiO2 y Carburo de Silicio (SiC, en los cuales aplicamos la serie de Cantor. Calculamos la transmitancia para diferentes parámetros fundamentales tales como: ancho de partida, energía de incidencia, ángulo de incidencia y número de generación de la serie de Cantor. En este caso, la transmitancia como función de la energía presenta rasgos autosimilares al variar el número de generación. También computamos la distribución angular de la transmitancia para energías fijas econtrando un patrón autosimilar entre generaciones. Por último, calculamos los factores de escala para algunos espectros de la transmitancia, los cuales efectivamente muestran escalabilidad.

  19. Characterizing edge and stacking structures of exfoliated graphene by photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Ishii, Ryo; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Morita, Makoto; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Koh, Shinji; Daimon, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    The two-dimensional C 1s photoelectron intensity angular distributions (PIADs) and spectra of exfoliated graphene flakes and crystalline graphite were measured using a focused soft X-ray beam. Suitable graphene samples were selected by thickness characterization using Raman spectromicroscopy after transferring mechanically exfoliated graphene flakes onto a 90-nm-thick SiO 2 film. In every PIAD, a Kagomé interference pattern was observed, particularly clearly in the monolayer graphene PIAD. Its origin is the overlap of the diffraction rings formed by an in-plane C-C bond honeycomb lattice. Thus, the crystal orientation of each sample can be determined. In the case of bilayer graphene, PIAD was threefold-symmetric, while those of monolayer graphene and crystalline graphite were sixfold-symmetric. This is due to the stacking structure of bilayer graphene. From comparisons with the multiple scattering PIAD simulation results, the way of layer stacking as well as the termination types in the edge regions of bilayer graphene flakes were determined. Furthermore, two different C 1s core levels corresponding to the top and bottom layers of bilayer graphene were identified. A chemical shift to a higher binding energy by 0.25 eV for the bottom layer was attributed to interfacial interactions. (author)

  20. Wettability Investigations and Wet Transfer Enhancement of Large-Area CVD-Graphene on Aluminum Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Marius; Hoffmann, René; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2017-08-18

    The two-dimensional and virtually massless character of graphene attracts great interest for radio frequency devices, such as surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators. Due to its good electric conductivity, graphene might be an alternative as a virtually massless electrode by improving resonator performance regarding mass-loading effects . We report on an optimization of the commonly used wet transfer technique for large-area graphene, grown via chemical vapor deposition, onto aluminum nitride (AlN), which is mainly used as an active, piezoelectric material for acoustic devices. Today, graphene wet transfer is well-engineered for silicon dioxide (SiO₂). Investigations on AlN substrates reveal highly different surface properties compared to SiO₂ regarding wettability, which strongly influences the quality of transferred graphene monolayers. Both physical and chemical effects of a plasma treatment of AlN surfaces change wettability and avoid large-scale cracks in the transferred graphene sheet during desiccation. Spatially-resolved Raman spectroscopy reveals a strong strain and doping dependence on AlN plasma pretreatments correlating with the electrical conductivity of graphene. In our work, we achieved transferred crack-free large-area (40 × 40 mm²) graphene monolayers with sheet resistances down to 350 Ω/sq. These achievements make graphene more powerful as an eco-friendly and cheaper replacement for conventional electrode materials used in radio frequency resonator devices.

  1. Effect of copper surface pre-treatment on the properties of CVD grown graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sik Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene on the pre-treated copper (Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition method. The pre-treatment process, which consists of pre-annealing in a hydrogen ambient, followed by diluted nitric acid etching of Cu foil, helps in removing impurities. These impurities include native copper oxide and rolling lines that act as a nucleation center for multilayer graphene. Raman mapping of our graphene grown on pre-treated Cu foil primarily consisted of ∼98% a monolayer graphene with as compared to 75 % for the graphene grown on untreated Cu foil. A high hydrogen flow rate during the pre-annealing process resulted in an increased I2D/IG ratio of graphene up to 3.55. Uniform monolayer graphene was obtained with a I2D/IG ratio and sheet resistance varying from 1.84 – 3.39 and 1110 – 1290 Ω/□, respectively.

  2. Optimal Charge-to-Spin Conversion in Graphene on Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offidani, Manuel; Milletarı, Mirco; Raimondi, Roberto; Ferreira, Aires

    2017-11-01

    When graphene is placed on a monolayer of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) its band structure develops rich spin textures due to proximity spin-orbital effects with interfacial breaking of inversion symmetry. In this work, we show that the characteristic spin winding of low-energy states in graphene on a TMD monolayer enables current-driven spin polarization, a phenomenon known as the inverse spin galvanic effect (ISGE). By introducing a proper figure of merit, we quantify the efficiency of charge-to-spin conversion and show it is close to unity when the Fermi level approaches the spin minority band. Remarkably, at high electronic density, even though subbands with opposite spin helicities are occupied, the efficiency decays only algebraically. The giant ISGE predicted for graphene on TMD monolayers is robust against disorder and remains large at room temperature.

  3. Direct transfer and Raman characterization of twisted graphene bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmen, R.; Arezki, H.; Boutchich, M.; Ajlani, H.; Oueslati, M.; Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A.

    2015-01-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is constituted of a two-graphene layer with a mismatch angle θ between the two hexagonal structures. It has recently attracted much attention—thanks to its diverse electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the tBLG fabricated by the direct transfer of graphene monolayer prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto another CVD graphene layer remaining attached to the copper foil. We show that high quality and homogeneous tBLG can be obtained by the direct transfer which prevents interface contamination. In this situation, the top graphene layer plays a supporting mechanical role to the bottom graphene layer as confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of annealing tBLG was also investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra exhibit a splitting of the G peak as well as a change in the 2D band shape indicating a possible decoupling of the two monolayers. We attribute these changes to the different interactions of the top and bottom layers with the substrate

  4. Nematic phase formation in suspensions of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Nathalie; Campidelli, Stéphane

    The last decade has seen the rise of graphene. Graphene is a single layer of graphite; it can be obtained by direct liquid phase exfoliation of the latter through harsh sonication. This technique presents the disadvantage to produce small graphene flakes (typically in the 0.05 to 0.4 μm2 range for the monolayers) and multilayer graphene with uncontrolled thickness distributions. In order to improve the exfoliation process, one has to counter the strong van der Waals interactions between the carbon planes of graphite. This implies to increase the distance between two planes and it can be done, for example, by oxidizing graphite to introduce oxygen species in the graphenic planes. The fabrication of graphite oxide is known for almost 150 years, and it became popular again these last ten years. Generally, the oxidation of graphite is performed following a method described by Hummers in the 1950's and the material produced by this technique exfoliates quasi-spontaneously into monolayer species called graphene oxide (GO). The highly anisotropic shape of GO (several μm in length and width for a thickness of ca. 1 nm) combined with the presence of oxygenated functions on the sp2 carbon structure of graphene lead to the formation of a lyotropic liquid crystalline phase in water. Above a certain concentration of graphene flakes the gain in translational entropy for a long-range ordered phase outweighs the loss in rotational entropy, and the liquid crystal phase then forms. The value of the threshold is affected by the aspect ratio of the graphene flakes but other factors such as the interactions also play a strong role.

  5. Growth of wrinkle-free graphene on texture-controlled platinum films and thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Kyung; Kwak, Jinsung; Park, Soon-Dong; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kim, Se-Yang; Jung, Minbok; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Sung-Dae; Park, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Su; Hong, Suk-Kyoung; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2015-01-27

    Growth of large-scale patterned, wrinkle-free graphene and the gentle transfer technique without further damage are most important requirements for the practical use of graphene. Here we report the growth of wrinkle-free, strictly uniform monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition on a platinum (Pt) substrate with texture-controlled giant grains and the thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The designed Pt surfaces with limited numbers of grain boundaries and improved surface perfectness as well as small thermal expansion coefficient difference to graphene provide a venue for uniform growth of monolayer graphene with wrinkle-free characteristic. The thermal-assisted transfer technique allows the complete transfer of large-scale patterned graphene films onto arbitrary substrates without any ripples, tears, or folds. The transferred graphene shows high crystalline quality with an average carrier mobility of ∼ 5500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, this transfer technique shows a high tolerance to variations in types and morphologies of underlying substrates.

  6. А mathematical model study of suspended monorail

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor GUTAREVYCH

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical model of suspended monorail track with allowance for elastic strain which occurs during movement of the monorail carriage was developed. Standard forms for single span and double span of suspended monorail sections were established.

  7. А mathematical model study of suspended monorail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor GUTAREVYCH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of suspended monorail track with allowance for elastic strain which occurs during movement of the monorail carriage was developed. Standard forms for single span and double span of suspended monorail sections were established.

  8. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  9. Bias induced up to 100% spin-injection and detection polarizations in ferromagnet/bilayer-hBN/graphene/hBN heterostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurram, Mallikarjuna; Omar, Siddharta; van Wees, Bart

    2017-01-01

    We study spin transport in a fully hBN encapsulated monolayer-graphene van der Waals heterostructure at room temperature. A top-layer of bilayer-hBN is used as a tunnel barrier for spin-injection and detection in graphene with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes. We report surprisingly large and

  10. Andreev reflection in monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Leyla; Rostami, Habib; Asgari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Andreev reflection in a monolayer molybdenum disulfide superconducting-normal (S/N) hybrid junction is investigated. We find, by using a modified Dirac Hamiltonian and the scattering formalism, that the perfect Andreev reflection happens at normal incidence with p-doped S and N regions. The probability of the Andreev reflection and the resulting Andreev conductance, in this system, are demonstrated to be large in comparison with the corresponding gapped graphene structure. We further investigate the effect of a topological term (β ) in the Hamiltonian and show that it results in an enhancement of the Andreev conductance with p-doped S and N regions, while in the corresponding structure with an n-doped S region it is strongly reducible in comparison. This effect can be explained in terms of the dependence of the Andreev reflection probability on the sign of β and the chemical potential in the superconducting region.

  11. Suspended Solids Profiler Shop Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) Instrument is planned to be installed in the AZ-101 tank to measure suspended solids concentrations during mixer pump testing. The SSP sensor uses a reflectance measurement principle to determine the suspended solids concentrations. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the SSP operate properly

  12. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching(SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition,etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000?C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  13. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching (SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition, etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000◦C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  14. Graphene production by dissociation of camphor molecules on nickel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravani, Fotini [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Interdepartmental Program in Polymer Science and Technology, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Dracopoulos, Vassileios; Parthenios, John [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Dassios, Konstantinos G. [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Siokou, Angeliki [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Galiotis, Costas, E-mail: c.galiotis@iceht.forth.gr [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Interdepartmental Program in Polymer Science and Technology, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece)

    2013-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the production of continuous-high quality-graphene layers based on camphor decomposition on polycrystalline Ni foil, is demonstrated. In situ X-ray diffraction at the pyrolysis temperature of the Ni foil indicates the presence of dominant Ni <111> grains which play an important role in the carbon nucleation and growth. The topography of the grown graphene layers is studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy which show that the Ni surface is covered by continuous and wrinkled graphene carpets. Raman spectroscopy reveals the high quality of the graphene film which appears to be only a few monolayers thick. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the existence of graphitic layers and the absence of any spectral features associated with carbides (Ni{sub x}C). The proposed CVD process is a sufficient method for large scale production of graphene films. - Highlights: ► An inexpensive chemical vapor deposition method based on camphor is presented. ► Few-layer graphene carpets of high quality are produced on polycrystalline Ni. ► The working deposition temperature is decreased by about 15%. ► Natural cooling is employed for graphene production. ► Role of Ni surface texture upon the graphene growth process is demonstrated.

  15. Extraordinary epitaxial alignment of graphene islands on Au(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wofford, Joseph M; Dubon, Oscar D; Starodub, Elena; Nie Shu; Bartelt, Norman C; Thürmer, Konrad; McCarty, Kevin F; Walter, Andrew L; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Pristine, single-crystalline graphene displays a unique collection of remarkable electronic properties that arise from its two-dimensional, honeycomb structure. Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy, we show that when deposited on the (111) surface of Au carbon forms such a structure. The resulting monolayer, epitaxial film is formed by the coalescence of dendritic graphene islands that nucleate at a high density. Over 95% of these islands can be identically aligned with respect to each other and to the Au substrate. Remarkably, the dominant island orientation is not the better lattice-matched 30° rotated orientation but instead one in which the graphene [01] and Au [011] in-plane directions are parallel. The epitaxial graphene film is only weakly coupled to the Au surface, which maintains its reconstruction under the slightly p-type doped graphene. The linear electronic dispersion characteristic of free-standing graphene is retained regardless of orientation. That a weakly interacting, non-lattice matched substrate is able to lock graphene into a particular orientation is surprising. This ability, however, makes Au(111) a promising substrate for the growth of single crystalline graphene films. (paper)

  16. Rebar Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  17. Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persist above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high-mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to the absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low-dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics.

  18. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen; Jou, Shyankay; Chen, Guan-Yu; Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  19. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jou, Shyankay, E-mail: sjou@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  20. Graphene-based absorber exploiting guided mode resonances in one-dimensional gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M; Vincenti, M A; Stomeo, T; Bianco, G V; de Ceglia, D; Aközbek, N; Petruzzelli, V; Bruno, G; De Vittorio, M; Scalora, M; D'Orazio, A

    2014-12-15

    A one-dimensional dielectric grating, based on a simple geometry, is proposed and investigated to enhance light absorption in a monolayer graphene exploiting guided mode resonances. Numerical findings reveal that the optimized configuration is able to absorb up to 60% of the impinging light at normal incidence for both TE and TM polarizations resulting in a theoretical enhancement factor of about 26 with respect to the monolayer graphene absorption (≈2.3%). Experimental results confirm this behavior showing CVD graphene absorbance peaks up to about 40% over narrow bands of a few nanometers. The simple and flexible design points to a way to realize innovative, scalable and easy-to-fabricate graphene-based optical absorbers.

  1. Plasmonic silicon Schottky photodetectors: The physics behind graphene enhanced internal photoemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Levy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have shown that the plasmonic assisted internal photoemission from a metal to silicon can be significantly enhanced by introducing a monolayer of graphene between the two media. This is despite the limited absorption in a monolayer of undoped graphene ( ∼ π α = 2.3 % . Here we propose a physical model where surface plasmon polaritons enhance the absorption in a single-layer graphene by enhancing the field along the interface. The relatively long relaxation time in graphene allows for multiple attempts for the carrier to overcome the Schottky barrier and penetrate into the semiconductor. Interface disorder is crucial to overcome the momentum mismatch in the internal photoemission process. Our results show that quantum efficiencies in the range of few tens of percent are obtainable under reasonable experimental assumptions. This insight may pave the way for the implementation of compact, high efficiency silicon based detectors for the telecom range and beyond.

  2. Electronic and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengqiang

    The ability to isolate single atomic layers of van der Waals materials has led to renewed interest in the electronic and optical properties of these materials as they can be fundamentally different at the monolayer limit. Moreover, these 2D crystals can be assembled together layer by layer, with controllable sequence and orientation, to form artificial materials that exhibit new features that are not found in monolayers nor bulk. Twisted bilayer graphene is one such prototype system formed by two monolayer graphene layers placed on top of each other with a twist angle between their lattices, whose electronic band structure depends on the twist angle. This thesis presents the efforts to explore the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We first synthesize twisted bilayer graphene with various twist angles via chemical vapor deposition. Using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, the twist angles are determined. The strength of the Raman G peak is sensitive to the electronic band structure of twisted bilayer graphene and therefore we use this peak to monitor changes upon doping. Our results demonstrate the ability to modify the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene with doping. We also fabricate twisted bilayer graphene by controllable stacking of two graphene monolayers with a dry transfer technique. For twist angles smaller than one degree, many body interactions play an important role. It requires eight electrons per moire unit cell to fill up each band instead of four electrons in the case of a larger twist angle. For twist angles smaller than 0.4 degree, a network of domain walls separating AB and BA stacking regions forms, which are predicted to host topologically protected helical states. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, these states are confirmed to appear on the domain walls when inversion

  3. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    graphene amplifier can be strongly enhanced in a structure with a narrow-slit Bragg grating and/or a thin barrier layer. Reserbat-Plantey et al [12] report on the fabrication and optical characterization of microcavities, made of multilayer graphene cantilevers, clamped by metallic electrodes and suspended over Si/SiO2 substrate. The authors demonstrate the potential of these simple systems for high-sensitivity Raman measurements of generic molecular species grafted on a multilayer graphene surface. In addition to graphene structures, the studies of related low-dimensional systems are also represented in this special issue. Renoux et al [13] investigate how reduction in the size of subwavelength metallic thin-film bolometers affects their performance. The major finding is that, due to plasmonic effects, the responsivity can strongly increase when the sample width is narrowed, something that may also occur in graphene-based structures. Di Gaspare et al [14] discover that a channel in a high electron mobility transistor can work as a resonant microcavity for plasma waves. The results presented in these studies are an excellent overview of the activity being currently conducted in this nascent field and form the basis for very interesting potential applications, such as active optical elements, bio- and chemical sensors, highly sensitive Raman detection, lasing, optical graphene amplifiers, and switching or frequency demultiplexing. References [1] Bonaccorso F, Sun Z, Hasan T and Ferrari A C 2010 Nature Photon. 4 611 [2] Grigorenko A N, Polini M and Novoselov K S 2012 Nature Photon. 6 749 [3] Polyushkin D K, Milton J, Santandrea S, Russo S, Craciun M F, Green S J, Mahe L, Winolve C P and Barnes W L 2013 J. Opt. 15 114001 [4] Thackray B, Kravets V G, Schedin F, Jalil R and Grigorenko A N 2013 J. Opt. 15 114002 [5] Nefedov I S, Valaginnopoulos C A and Melnikov L A 2013 J. Opt. 15 114003 [6] Bludov Y V, Peres N M R and Vasilevskiy M I 2013 J. Opt. 15 114004 [7] Guti

  4. Perfect-absorption graphene metamaterials for surface-enhanced molecular fingerprint spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangdong; Hu, Hai; Liao, Baoxin; Zhu, Xing; Yang, Xiaoxia; Dai, Qing

    2018-05-01

    Graphene plasmon with extremely strong light confinement and tunable resonance frequency represents a promising surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) sensing platform. However, plasmonic absorption is relatively weak (approximately 1%-9%) in monolayer graphene nanostructures, which would limit its sensitivity. Here, we theoretically propose a hybrid plasmon-metamaterial structure that can realize perfect absorption in graphene with a low carrier mobility of 1000 cm2 V-1 s-1. This structure combines a gold reflector and a gold grating to the graphene plasmon structures, which introduce interference effect and the lightning-rod effect, respectively, and largely enhance the coupling of light to graphene. The vibration signal of trace molecules can be enhanced up to 2000-fold at the hotspot of the perfect-absorption structure, enabling the SEIRA sensing to reach the molecular level. This hybrid metal-graphene structure provides a novel path to generate high sensitivity in nanoscale molecular recognition for numerous applications.

  5. Changes in the vibrational properties of graphene and other related nanostructures under strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codorniu Pujals, D.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of strain in solids modifies their vibrational properties due to the variation of the atomic position and the changes of the interatomic distances. Monolayer graphene is especially sensible to the effects of strain, for example, to that produced by the curvature of some region of the graphene plane. These changes in the vibrational properties of graphene modifies in different way its Raman spectrum. In the case of other graphene-related materials as fullerenes, nano-onions and nano tubes, the curvature is always present, consequently, there is a modification of the vibrational properties in relation with those in graphene, due to the strain provoked by curvature. In this paper, the overall picture of the effect of strain on the vibrational properties of graphene and other carbon nanostructures is presented from a theoretical point of view and the main considerations are correlated with experimental results from Raman spectroscopy (Author)

  6. Step driven competitive epitaxial and self-limited growth of graphene on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Fan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of surface steps was found to have significant function and influence on the growth of graphene on copper via chemical vapor deposition. The two typical growth modes involved were found to be influenced by the step morphologies on copper surface, which led to our proposed step driven competitive growth mechanism. We also discovered a protective role of graphene in preserving steps on copper surface. Our results showed that wide and high steps promoted epitaxial growth and yielded multilayer graphene domains with regular shape, while dense and low steps favored self-limited growth and led to large-area monolayer graphene films. We have demonstrated that controllable growth of graphene domains of specific shape and large-area continuous graphene films are feasible.

  7. Electronic transport in graphene; Elektronischer Transport in Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Timm

    2010-06-08

    In 2004 graphene, a monolayer of carbon atoms, has been isolated as the first real two-dimensional solid by the group of A. Geim at the University of Manchester. Graphene's properties have been theoretically investigated since the 1950s. Until the successful preparation by Geim et al., graphene was suspected to be unstable under ambient conditions above 0 K (Mermin-Wagner theorem). Its two dimensionality and hexagonal lattice symmetry cause interesting novel properties and effects. At experimentally relevant energies, graphene has a linear band structure and charge carrier dynamics must be treated using Dirac's equation. Therefore charge carriers in graphene are called ''Dirac fermions''. Beside exotic effects like ''Klein tunneling'' an unconventional quantum Hall effect (QHE) can be observed with a Hall conductance quantized in units of 2e{sup 2}/h, 6e{sup 2}/h, 10e{sup 2}/h, 14e{sup 2}/h. As a starting point for in-depth transport measurements the processing of graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) has been developed and optimized, based on the pioneering work by Novoselov et al. The optimized process provides samples with carrier mobilities up to 16000 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a well defined Hall geometry. These samples are used to investigate external influences on the electronic properties of graphene. Among those influences molecular adsorbates are responsible for various effects of freshly prepared graphene samples e.g. an intrinsic p-doping, a mobility asymmetry of electrons and holes, the so called ''minimal conductivity'' and a field effect hysteresis at room temperature. In collaboration with the group of A. Yacoby (Harvard) density fluctuations in the vicinity of the Dirac point (''electron-hole puddles'') could be observed using a scanning single electron transistor (SSET). These fluctuations might be one reason for the ''minimal conductivity'' at

  8. Graphene: powder, flakes, ribbons, and sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dustin K; Tour, James M

    2013-10-15

    fibers and in the fabrication of large area transparent electrodes. Using solid carbon sources such as polymers, food, insects, and waste, we can grow monolayer and bilayer graphene directly on metal catalysts, and carbon-sources containing nitrogen can produce nitrogen-doped graphene. The resulting graphene can be transferred to other surfaces, such as metal grids, for potential use in transparent touch screens for applications in personal electronics and large area photovoltaic devices. Because the transfer of graphene from one surface to another can lead to defects, low yields, and higher costs, we have developed methods for growing graphene directly on the substrates of interest. We can also produce patterned graphene to make GNRs or graphane/graphene superlattices within a single sheet. These superlattices could have multiple functions for use in sensors and other devices. This Account only touches upon this burgeoning area of materials chemistry, and the field will continue to expand as researchers imagine new forms and applications of graphene.

  9. Pressure-mediated doping in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Jimmy; Machon, Denis; Poncharal, Philippe; Pierre-Louis, Olivier; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2011-09-14

    Exfoliated graphene and few layer graphene samples supported on SiO(2) have been studied by Raman spectroscopy at high pressure. For samples immersed on a alcohol mixture, an electron transfer of ∂n/∂P ∼ 8 × 10(12) cm(-2) GPa(-1) is observed for monolayer and bilayer graphene, leading to giant doping values of n ∼ 6 × 10(13) cm(-2) at the maximum pressure of 7 GPa. Three independent and consistent proofs of the doping process are obtained from (i) the evolution of the Raman G-band to 2D-band intensity ratio, (ii) the pressure coefficient of the G-band frequency, and (iii) the 2D band components splitting in the case of the bilayer sample. The charge transfer phenomena is absent for trilayer samples and for samples immersed in argon or nitrogen. We also show that a phase transition from a 2D biaxial strain response, resulting from the substrate drag upon volume reduction, to a 3D hydrostatic compression takes place when going from the bilayer to the trilayer sample. By model calculations we relate this transition to the unbinding of the graphene-SiO(2) system when increasing the number of graphene layers and as function of the surface roughness parameters. We propose that the formation of silanol groups on the SiO(2) substrate allows for a capacitance-induced substrate-mediated charge transfer.

  10. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5-2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  11. Thermal properties of graphene under tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2018-05-01

    Thermal properties of graphene display peculiar characteristics associated to the two-dimensional nature of this crystalline membrane. These properties can be changed and tuned in the presence of applied stresses, both tensile and compressive. Here, we study graphene monolayers under tensile stress by using path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations, which allows one to take into account quantization of vibrational modes and analyze the effect of anharmonicity on physical observables. The influence of the elastic energy due to strain in the crystalline membrane is studied for increasing tensile stress and for rising temperature (thermal expansion). We analyze the internal energy, enthalpy, and specific heat of graphene, and compare the results obtained from PIMD simulations with those given by a harmonic approximation for the vibrational modes. This approximation turns out to be precise at low temperatures, and deteriorates as temperature and pressure are increased. At low temperature, the specific heat changes as cp˜T for stress-free graphene, and evolves to a dependence cp˜T2 as the tensile stress is increased. Structural and thermodynamic properties display non-negligible quantum effects, even at temperatures higher than 300 K. Moreover, differences in the behavior of the in-plane and real areas of graphene are discussed, along with their associated properties. These differences show up clearly in the corresponding compressibility and thermal expansion coefficient.

  12. Oxidation-assisted graphene heteroepitaxy on copper foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, Nicolas; Tang, Xiaohui; Joucken, Frédéric; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Dubois, Emmanuel; Hackens, Benoît; Henrard, Luc; Colomer, Jean-François

    2016-11-10

    We propose an innovative, easy-to-implement approach to synthesize aligned large-area single-crystalline graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil. This method doubly takes advantage of residual oxygen present in the gas phase. First, by slightly oxidizing the copper surface, we induce grain boundary pinning in copper and, in consequence, the freezing of the thermal recrystallization process. Subsequent reduction of copper under hydrogen suddenly unlocks the delayed reconstruction, favoring the growth of centimeter-sized copper (111) grains through the mechanism of abnormal grain growth. Second, the oxidation of the copper surface also drastically reduces the nucleation density of graphene. This oxidation/reduction sequence leads to the synthesis of aligned millimeter-sized monolayer graphene domains in epitaxial registry with copper (111). The as-grown graphene flakes are demonstrated to be both single-crystalline and of high quality.

  13. Large local lattice expansion in graphene adlayers grown on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Arezki, Hakim; Nguyen, Van Luan; Shen, Jiahong; Mucha-Kruczyński, Marcin; Yao, Fei; Boutchich, Mohamed; Chen, Yue; Lee, Young Hee; Asensio, Maria C.

    2018-05-01

    Variations of the lattice parameter can significantly change the properties of a material, and, in particular, its electronic behaviour. In the case of graphene, however, variations of the lattice constant with respect to graphite have been limited to less than 2.5% due to its well-established high in-plane stiffness. Here, through systematic electronic and lattice structure studies, we report regions where the lattice constant of graphene monolayers grown on copper by chemical vapour deposition increases up to 7.5% of its relaxed value. Density functional theory calculations confirm that this expanded phase is energetically metastable and driven by the enhanced interaction between the substrate and the graphene adlayer. We also prove that this phase possesses distinctive chemical and electronic properties. The inherent phase complexity of graphene grown on copper foils revealed in this study may inspire the investigation of possible metastable phases in other seemingly simple heterostructure systems.

  14. Anomalous Hooke’s law in disordered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornyi, I. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu; Mirlin, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of graphene, a single monolayer of graphite, has provided an experimental demonstration of stability of 2D crystals. Although thermal fluctuations of such crystals tend to destroy the long-range order in the system, the crystal can be stabilized by strong anharmonicity effects. This competition is the central issue of the crumpling transition, i.e., a transition between flat and crumpled phases. We show that anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations of a graphene membrane around equilibrium flat phase lead to unusual elastic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that stretching ξ of a flake of graphene is a nonlinear function of the applied tension at small tension: ξ \\propto {σ }η /(2-η ) and ξ \\propto {σ }η /(8-η ) for clean and strongly disordered graphene, respectively. Conventional linear Hooke’s law, ξ \\propto σ , is realized at sufficiently large tensions: σ \\gg {σ }* , where {σ }* depends both on temperature and on the disorder strength.

  15. Sublattice asymmetry of impurity doping in graphene: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Lawlor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review we highlight recent theoretical and experimental work on sublattice asymmetric doping of impurities in graphene, with a focus on substitutional nitrogen dopants. It is well known that one current limitation of graphene in regards to its use in electronics is that in its ordinary state it exhibits no band gap. By doping one of its two sublattices preferentially it is possible to not only open such a gap, which can furthermore be tuned through control of the dopant concentration, but in theory produce quasi-ballistic transport of electrons in the undoped sublattice, both important qualities for any graphene device to be used competetively in future technology. We outline current experimental techniques for synthesis of such graphene monolayers and detail theoretical efforts to explain the mechanisms responsible for the effect, before suggesting future research directions in this nascent field.

  16. Interface structure and mechanics between graphene and metal substrates: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Graphene is a fascinating material not only for technological applications, but also as a test bed for fundamental insights into condensed matter physics due to its unique two-dimensional structure. One of the most intriguing issues is the understanding of the properties of graphene and various substrate materials. In particular, the interfaces between graphene and metal substrates are of critical importance in applications of graphene in integrated electronics, as thermal materials, and in electromechanical devices. Here we investigate the structure and mechanical interactions at a graphene-metal interface through density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations. We focus on copper (111) and nickel (111) surfaces adhered to a monolayer of graphene, and find that their cohesive energy, strength and electronic structure correlate directly with their atomic geometry. Due to the strong coupling between open d-orbitals, the nickel-graphene interface has a much stronger cohesive energy with graphene than copper. We also find that the interface cohesive energy profile features a well-and-shoulder shape that cannot be captured by simple pair-wise models such as the Lennard-Jones potential. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the interfacial properties of graphene-metal systems, and help to predict the performance of graphene-based nanoelectronics and nanocomposites. The availability of structural and energetic data of graphene-metal interfaces could also be useful for the development of empirical force fields for molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Inhomogeneity in barrier height at graphene/Si (GaAs) Schottky junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Tomer, D.; Rajput, S.; Hudy, L. J.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene interfaced with a semiconductor forms a Schottky junction with rectifying properties, however, fluctuations in the Schottky barrier height are often observed. In this work, Schottky junctions are fabricated by transferring chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene onto n-type Si and GaAs substrates. Temperature dependence of the barrier height and ideality factor are obtained by current-voltage measurements between 215 and 350 K. An increase in the zero bias barrier height and decr...

  18. Band gap tunning in BN-doped graphene systems with high carrier mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2014-02-17

    Using density functional theory, we present a comparative study of the electronic properties of BN-doped graphene monolayer, bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer systems. In addition, we address a superlattice of pristine and BN-doped graphene. Five doping levels between 12.5% and 75% are considered, for which we obtain band gaps from 0.02 eV to 2.43 eV. We demonstrate a low effective mass of the charge carriers.

  19. Directed self-assembled crystalline oligomer domains on graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2014-01-01

    We observe the formation of thin films of fibre-like aggregates from the prototypical organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) on graphite thin flakes and on monolayer graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized fluorescence...... show that the graphene surface can be used as a growth substrate to direct the self-assembly of organic molecular thin films and nanofibres, both with and without lithographical processing....

  20. Distribution and transportation of suspended sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubel, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A number of studies of the distribution and character of suspended matter in the waters of the Atlantic shelf have documented the variations in the concentration of total suspended matter in both time and space. Very little is known, however, about the ultimate sources of inorganic suspended matter, and even less is known about the routes and rates of suspended sediment transport in shelf waters. Suspended particulate matter constitutes a potential vehicle for the transfer of energy-associated contaminants, radionuclides and oil, back to the coast and therefore to man. The concentrations of total suspended matter in shelf waters are typically so low, however, that the mechanism is ineffective. Studies of suspended particulate matter have a high scientific priority, but in this investigator's opinion the state of knowledge is adequate for preparation of the environmental impact statements that would be required for siting of offshore nuclear power plants and for oil drilling on the Atlantic Continental Shelf

  1. Barrier mechanism of multilayers graphene coated copper against atomic oxygen irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijing; Ren, Siming; Pu, Jibin; Xue, Qunji

    2018-06-01

    Graphene has been demonstrated as a protective coating for Cu under ambient condition because of its high impermeability and light-weight oxidation barrier. However, it lacks the research of graphene as a protective coating in space environment. Here, we experimentally and theoretically study the oxidation behavior of graphene-coated Cu in vacuum atomic oxygen (AO) condition. After AO irradiation, the experimental results show multilayer graphene has better anti-oxidation than monolayer graphene. Meanwhile, the calculation results show the oxidation appeared on the graphene's grain boundaries or the film's vacancy defects for the monolayer graphene coated Cu foil. Moreover, the calculation results show the oxidation process proceeds slowly in multilayers because of the matched defects overlaps each other to form a steric hindrance to suppress the O atom diffusion in the vertical direction, and the mismatched defects generates potential energy barriers for interlayer to suppress the O atom diffusion in the horizontal direction. Hence, multilayer graphene films could serve as protection coatings to prevent diffusion of O atom.

  2. Determination of a refractive index and an extinction coefficient of standard production of CVD-graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Martínez, Efraín; Gabás, Mercedes; Barrutia, Laura; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Palanco, Santiago; Zurutuza, Amaia; Algora, Carlos

    2015-01-28

    The refractive index and extinction coefficient of chemical vapour deposition grown graphene are determined by ellipsometry analysis. Graphene films were grown on copper substrates and transferred as both monolayers and bilayers onto SiO2/Si substrates by using standard manufacturing procedures. The chemical nature and thickness of residual debris formed after the transfer process were elucidated using photoelectron spectroscopy. The real layered structure so deduced has been used instead of the nominal one as the input in the ellipsometry analysis of monolayer and bilayer graphene, transferred onto both native and thermal silicon oxide. The effect of these contamination layers on the optical properties of the stacked structure is noticeable both in the visible and the ultraviolet spectral regions, thus masking the graphene optical response. Finally, the use of heat treatment under a nitrogen atmosphere of the graphene-based stacked structures, as a method to reduce the water content of the sample, and its effect on the optical response of both graphene and the residual debris layer are presented. The Lorentz-Drude model proposed for the optical response of graphene fits fairly well the experimental ellipsometric data for all the analysed graphene-based stacked structures.

  3. Preliminary Studies on the Reflectance Characteristics of graphene/SiO2 under Different Applied Voltages for Optical Modulation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, K. P.; Yam, F. K.; Abdalrheem, Raed; Ng, Y. Z.; Suhaimi, F. H. A.; Lim, H. S.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.

    2018-04-01

    A preliminary study on the interband transition of graphene was done via reflectance spectra of graphene/SiO2 sample at various applied potential. Prior to that, Raman spectroscopy and four-point probe measurement was done on graphene/SiO2 sample. It was found that the sample consisted of monolayer graphene with sheet resistance around 402.32 Ω/□. Post-processing of the reflectance data lead to the plot of ratio of change in reflectance towards reflectance at 0 V (ΔR/R) against applied potential. From there, the ratio increases along with applied potential, indicative of higher absorption due to interband transition.

  4. Diverse carrier mobility of monolayer BNCx: A combined density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2017-09-19

    BNCX monolayer as a kind of two-dimensional material has numerous chemical atomic ratios and arrangements with different electronic structures. Via calculations on the basis of density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory under deformation potential approximation, the band structures and carrier mobilities of BNCX (x=1,2,3,4) nanosheets are systematically investigated. The calculated results show that BNC2-1 is a material with very small band gap (0.02 eV) among all the structures while other BNCX monolayers are semiconductors with band gap ranging from 0.51 to 1.32 eV. The carrier mobility of BNCX varies considerably from tens to millions of cm2 V-1 s-1. For BNC2-1, the hole mobility and electron mobility along both x and y directions can reach 105 orders of magnitude, which is similar to the carrier mobility of graphene. Besides, all studied BNCX monolayers obviously have anisotropic hole mobility and electron mobility. In particular, for semiconductor BNC4, its hole mobility along y direction and electron mobility along x direction unexpectedly reach 106 orders of magnitude, even higher than that of graphene. Our findings suggest that BNCX layered materials with proper ratio and arrangement of carbon atoms will possess desirable charge transport properties, exhibiting potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  6. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarek, M., E-mail: mpisarek@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  7. Atomic Scale Simulation on the Anti-Pressure and Friction Reduction Mechanisms of MoS2 Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 nanosheets can be used as solid lubricants or additives of lubricating oils to reduce friction and resist wear. However, the atomic scale mechanism still needs to be illustrated. Herein, molecular simulations on the indentation and scratching process of MoS2 monolayer supported by Pt(111 surface were conducted to study the anti-pressure and friction reduction mechanisms of the MoS2 monolayer. Three deformation stages of Pt-supported MoS2 monolayer were found during the indentation process: elastic deformation, plastic deformation and finally, complete rupture. The MoS2 monolayer showed an excellent friction reduction effect at the first two stages, as a result of enhanced load bearing capacity and reduced deformation degree of the substrate. Unlike graphene, rupture of the Pt-supported MoS2 monolayer was related primarily to out-of-plane compression of the monolayer. These results provide a new insight into the relationship between the mechanical properties and lubrication properties of 2D materials.

  8. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo, Wenlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji, E-mail: hongjili@yeah.net [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Xu, Sheng [School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g{sup −1}. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  9. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingji; Guo, Wenlong; Li, Hongji; Xu, Sheng; Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g −1 at current density of 0.5 A g −1 . The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g −1 . The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices

  10. Interlayer thermal conductance within a phosphorene and graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jingchao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-24

    Monolayer graphene possesses unusual thermal properties, and is often considered as a prototype system for the study of thermal physics of low-dimensional electronic/thermal materials, despite the absence of a direct bandgap. Another two-dimensional (2D) atomic layered material, phosphorene, is a natural p-type semiconductor and it has attracted growing interest in recent years. When a graphene monolayer is overlaid on phosphorene, the hybrid van der Waals (vdW) bilayer becomes a potential candidate for high-performance thermal/electronic applications, owing to the combination of the direct-bandgap properties of phosphorene with the exceptional thermal properties of graphene. In this work, the interlayer thermal conductance at the phosphorene/graphene interface is systematically investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The transient pump-probe heating method is employed to compute the interfacial thermal resistance (R) of the bilayer. The predicted R value at the phosphorene/graphene interface is 8.41 × 10 -8 K m 2 W -1 at room temperature. Different external and internal conditions, i.e., temperature, contact pressure, vacancy defect, and chemical functionalization, can all effectively reduce R at the interface. Numerical results of R reduction as a function of temperature, interfacial coupling strength, defect ratio, or hydrogen coverage are reported with the most R reduction amounting to 56.5%, 70.4%, 34.8% and 84.5%, respectively.

  11. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity, the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of mixed ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers was investigated at the air-water interface. Mixed monolayers of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mol% ganglioside GM, and the phospholipid...... monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic...

  12. Structure and shear response of lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    Organic monolayers and multilayers are both scientifically fascinating and technologically promising; they are, however, both complex systems and relatively inaccessible to experimental probes. In this Progress Report, we describe our X-ray diffraction studies, which have given us substantial new information about the structures and phase transitions in monolayers on the surface of water; our use of these monolayers as a unique probe of the dynamics of wetting and spreading; and our studies of monolayer mechanical properties using a simple but effective technique available to anyone using the Wilhelmy method to measure surface tension

  13. Plasmons in Dimensionally Mismatched Coulomb Coupled Graphene Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, S M; Shylau, A A; Jauho, A P

    2017-09-22

    We calculate the plasmon dispersion relation for Coulomb coupled metallic armchair graphene nanoribbons and doped monolayer graphene. The crossing of the plasmon curves, which occurs for uncoupled 1D and 2D systems, is split by the interlayer Coulomb coupling into a lower and an upper plasmon branch. The upper branch exhibits an unusual behavior with end points at finite q. Accordingly, the structure factor shows either a single or a double peak behavior, depending on the plasmon wavelength. The new plasmon structure is relevant to recent experiments, its properties can be controlled by varying the system parameters and be used in plasmonic applications.

  14. Nonlinear properties of gated graphene in a strong electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avetisyan, A. A., E-mail: artakav@ysu.am; Djotyan, A. P., E-mail: adjotyan@ysu.am [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics (Armenia); Moulopoulos, K., E-mail: cos@ucy.ac.cy [University of Cyprus, Department of Physics (Cyprus)

    2017-03-15

    We develop a microscopic theory of a strong electromagnetic field interaction with gated bilayer graphene. Quantum kinetic equations for density matrix are obtained using a tight binding approach within second quantized Hamiltonian in an intense laser field. We show that adiabatically changing the gate potentials with time may produce (at resonant photon energy) a full inversion of the electron population with high density between valence and conduction bands. In the linear regime, excitonic absorption of an electromagnetic radiation in a graphene monolayer with opened energy gap is also studied.

  15. Graphene-Based Josephson-Junction Single-Photon Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    2017-08-01

    We propose to use graphene-based Josephson junctions (GJJs) to detect single photons in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible to radio frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of the exceptionally low electronic heat capacity of monolayer graphene and its constricted thermal conductance to its phonon degrees of freedom. Such a system could provide high-sensitivity photon detection required for research areas including quantum information processing and radio astronomy. As an example, we present our device concepts for GJJ single-photon detectors in both the microwave and infrared regimes. The dark count rate and intrinsic quantum efficiency are computed based on parameters from a measured GJJ, demonstrating feasibility within existing technologies.

  16. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  17. Raman spectroscopy of boron-doped single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoong Ahm; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Katsumi; Terrones, Mauricio; Behrends, Jan; Eckmann, Axel; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-07-24

    The introduction of foreign atoms, such as nitrogen, into the hexagonal network of an sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom monolayer has been demonstrated and constitutes an effective tool for tailoring the intrinsic properties of graphene. Here, we report that boron atoms can be efficiently substituted for carbon in graphene. Single-layer graphene substitutionally doped with boron was prepared by the mechanical exfoliation of boron-doped graphite. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the amount of substitutional boron in graphite was ~0.22 atom %. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the boron atoms were spaced 4.76 nm apart in single-layer graphene. The 7-fold higher intensity of the D-band when compared to the G-band was explained by the elastically scattered photoexcited electrons by boron atoms before emitting a phonon. The frequency of the G-band in single-layer substitutionally boron-doped graphene was unchanged, which could be explained by the p-type boron doping (stiffening) counteracting the tensile strain effect of the larger carbon-boron bond length (softening). Boron-doped graphene appears to be a useful tool for engineering the physical and chemical properties of graphene.

  18. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth

  19. Insitu CCVD grown bilayer graphene transistors for applications in nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessely, Pia Juliane; Schwalke, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We invented a method to fabricate graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) on oxidized silicon wafers in a Silicon CMOS compatible process. The graphene layers needed are grown in situ by means of a transfer-free catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process directly on silicon dioxide. Depending on the process parameters the fabrication of single, double or multi-layer graphene FETs (GFETs) is possible. The produced graphene layers have been characterized by SEM, TEM, TEM-lattice analysis as well as Raman-Spectroscopy. Directly after growth, the fabricated GFETs are electrically functional and can be electrically characterized via the catalyst metals which are used as contact electrodes. In contrast to monolayer graphene FETs, the fabricated bilayer graphene FETs (BiLGFETs) exhibit unipolar p-type MOSFET behavior. Furthermore, the on/off current-ratio of 10 4 up to several 10 7 at room temperature of the fabricated BiLGFETs allows their use in digital logic applications [1]. In addition, a stable hysteresis of the GFETs enables their use as memory devices without the need of storage capacitors and therefore very high memory device-densities are possible. The whole fabrication process is fully Si-CMOS compatible, enabling the use of hybrid silicon/graphene electronics.

  20. Origin of the monolayer Raman signature in hexagonal boron nitride: a first-principles analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontaneda, Jorge; Singh, Anjali; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2018-05-01

    Monolayers of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) can in principle be identified by a Raman signature, consisting of an upshift in the frequency of the E2g vibrational mode with respect to the bulk value, but the origin of this shift (intrinsic or support-induced) is still debated. Herein we use density functional theory calculations to investigate whether there is an intrinsic Raman shift in the h-BN monolayer in comparison with the bulk. There is universal agreement among all tested functionals in predicting the magnitude of the frequency shift upon a variation in the in-plane cell parameter. It is clear that a small in-plane contraction can explain the Raman peak upshift from bulk to monolayer. However, we show that the larger in-plane parameter in the bulk (compared to the monolayer) results from non-local correlation effects, which cannot be accounted for by local functionals or those with empirical dispersion corrections. Using a non-local-correlation functional, we then investigate the effect of finite temperatures on the Raman signature. We demonstrate that bulk h-BN thermally expands in the direction perpendicular to the layers, while the intralayer distances slightly contract, in agreement with observed experimental behavior. Interestingly, the difference in in-plane cell parameter between bulk and monolayer decreases with temperature, and becomes very small at room temperature. We conclude that the different thermal expansion of bulk and monolayer partially ‘erases’ the intrinsic Raman signature, accounting for its small magnitude in recent experiments on suspended samples.

  1. Origin of the monolayer Raman signature in hexagonal boron nitride: a first-principles analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontaneda, Jorge; Singh, Anjali; Waghmare, Umesh V; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2018-05-10

    Monolayers of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) can in principle be identified by a Raman signature, consisting of an upshift in the frequency of the E 2g vibrational mode with respect to the bulk value, but the origin of this shift (intrinsic or support-induced) is still debated. Herein we use density functional theory calculations to investigate whether there is an intrinsic Raman shift in the h-BN monolayer in comparison with the bulk. There is universal agreement among all tested functionals in predicting the magnitude of the frequency shift upon a variation in the in-plane cell parameter. It is clear that a small in-plane contraction can explain the Raman peak upshift from bulk to monolayer. However, we show that the larger in-plane parameter in the bulk (compared to the monolayer) results from non-local correlation effects, which cannot be accounted for by local functionals or those with empirical dispersion corrections. Using a non-local-correlation functional, we then investigate the effect of finite temperatures on the Raman signature. We demonstrate that bulk h-BN thermally expands in the direction perpendicular to the layers, while the intralayer distances slightly contract, in agreement with observed experimental behavior. Interestingly, the difference in in-plane cell parameter between bulk and monolayer decreases with temperature, and becomes very small at room temperature. We conclude that the different thermal expansion of bulk and monolayer partially 'erases' the intrinsic Raman signature, accounting for its small magnitude in recent experiments on suspended samples.

  2. Discrete quantum dot like emitters in monolayer MoSe{sub 2}: Spatial mapping, magneto-optics, and charge tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branny, Artur; Kumar, Santosh; Gerardot, Brian D., E-mail: b.d.gerardot@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wang, Gang; Robert, Cedric; Lassagne, Benjamin; Marie, Xavier; Urbaszek, Bernhard, E-mail: urbaszek@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 Av. Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France)

    2016-04-04

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers such as MoSe{sub 2}, MoS{sub 2}, and WSe{sub 2} are direct bandgap semiconductors with original optoelectronic and spin-valley properties. Here we report on spectrally sharp, spatially localized emission in monolayer MoSe{sub 2}. We find this quantum dot-like emission in samples exfoliated onto gold substrates and also suspended flakes. Spatial mapping shows a correlation between the location of emitters and the existence of wrinkles (strained regions) in the flake. We tune the emission properties in magnetic and electric fields applied perpendicular to the monolayer plane. We extract an exciton g-factor of the discrete emitters close to −4, as for 2D excitons in this material. In a charge tunable sample, we record discrete jumps on the meV scale as charges are added to the emitter when changing the applied voltage.

  3. Electric field effect of GaAs monolayer from first principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongyao Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principle calculations, we investigate two-dimensional (2D honeycomb monolayer structures composed of group III-V binary elements. It is found that such compound like GaAs should have a buckled structure which is more stable than graphene-like flat structure. This results a polar system with out-of-plane dipoles arising from the non-planar structure. Here, we optimized GaAs monolayer structure, then calculated the electronic band structure and the change of buckling height under external electric field within density functional theory using generalized gradient approximation method. We found that the band gap would change proportionally with the electric field magnitude. When the spin-orbit coupling (SOC is considered, we revealed fine spin-splitting at different points in the reciprocal space. Furthermore, the valence and conduction bands spin-splitting energies due to SOC at the K point of buckled GaAs monolayers are found to be weakly dependent on the electric field strength. Finally electric field effects on the spin texture and second harmonic generation are discussed. The present work sheds light on the control of physical properties of GaAs monolayer by the applied electric field.

  4. Studying the influence of substrate conductivity on the optoelectronic properties of quantum dots langmuir monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwani, Ammar J.; Chumakov, A. S.; Begletsova, N. N.; Shinkarenko, O. A.; Markin, A. V.; Gorbachev, I. A.; Bratashov, D. N.; Gavrikov, M. V.; Venig, S. B.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.

    2018-04-01

    The formation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) monolayers was studied by Langmuir Blodgett method. The fluorescence (PL) spectra of QD monolayers were investigated at different substrate type (glass, silicon and ITO glass) and the influence of graphene sheets layer (as a conductive surface) on the QDs properties has also been studied. The optoelectronic properties of QDs can be tuned by deposition of insulating nano-size layers of the liquid crystal between QDs and conductive substrate. The monolayer of QDs transferred on conductive surface (glass with ITO) has lowest intensity of PL spectra due to quenching effect. The PL intensity of QDs could be tuned by using various type of substrates or/and by transformed high conductive layer. Also the photooxidation processes of CdSe QDs monolayer on the solid surface can be controlled by selection of suitable substrate. The current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of QDs thin film on ITO surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscope (STM).

  5. Thickness-Dependent Strain Effect on the Deformation of the Graphene-Encapsulated Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangli Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain effect on graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles is investigated. A finite-element calculation is performed to simulate the strain distribution and morphology of the monolayer and multilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, respectively. It can be found that the inhomogeneous strain and deformation are enhanced with the increasing shrinkage of the graphene shell. Moreover, the strain distribution and deformation are very sensitive to the layer number of the graphene shell. Especially, the inhomogeneous strain at the interface between the graphene shell and encapsulated Au nanoparticles is strongly tuned by the graphene thickness. For the mono- and bilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, the dramatic shape transformation can be observed. However, with increasing the graphene thickness further, there is hardly deformation for the encapsulated Au nanoparticles. These simulated results indicate that the strain and deformation can be designed by the graphene layer thickness, which provides an opportunity to engineer the structure and morphology of the graphene-encapsulated nanoparticles.

  6. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine ‘single-layer’ graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards ‘single-layer’ graphene (that is, with thicknesses oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml-1, and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  7. High-temperature electron-hole superfluidity with strong anisotropic gaps in double phosphorene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Zarenia, M.; Perali, A.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-05-01

    Excitonic superfluidity in double phosphorene monolayers is investigated using the BCS mean-field equations. Highly anisotropic superfluidity is predicted where we found that the maximum superfluid gap is in the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regime along the armchair direction and in the BCS-BEC crossover regime along the zigzag direction. We estimate the highest Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature with maximum value up to ˜90 K with onset carrier densities as high as 4 ×1012cm-2 . This transition temperature is significantly larger than what is found in double electron-hole few-layers graphene. Our results can guide experimental research toward the realization of anisotropic condensate states in electron-hole phosphorene monolayers.

  8. Near-field heat transfer between graphene/hBN multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bo; Guizal, Brahim; Zhang, Zhuomin M.; Fan, Shanhui; Antezza, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    We study the radiative heat transfer between multilayer structures made by a periodic repetition of a graphene sheet and a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) slab. Surface plasmons in a monolayer graphene can couple with a hyperbolic phonon polaritons in a single hBN film to form hybrid polaritons that can assist photon tunneling. For periodic multilayer graphene/hBN structures, the stacked metallic/dielectric array can give rise to a further effective hyperbolic behavior, in addition to the intri...

  9. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S., E-mail: sestrade@ub.edu [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT, Universitat de Barcelona, Solé i Sabarís 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F. [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Darbal, A. D. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); Weiss, J. K. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); NanoMEGAS SPRL, Blvd. Edmond Machtens 79, B-1080 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  10. Graphene field effect transistors with niobium contacts and asymmetric transfer characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolomeo, Antonio Di; Romeo, Francesco; Sabatino, Paolo; Carapella, Giovanni; Iemmo, Laura; Giubileo, Filippo; Schroeder, Thomas; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We fabricate back-gated field effect transistors using niobium electrodes on mechanically exfoliated monolayer graphene and perform electrical characterization in the pressure range from atmospheric down to 10 −4 mbar. We study the effect of room temperature vacuum degassing and report asymmetric transfer characteristics with a resistance plateau in the n-branch. We show that weakly chemisorbed Nb acts as p-dopant on graphene and explain the transistor characteristics by Nb/graphene interaction with unpinned Fermi level at the interface. (paper)

  11. Antibiotic interaction with phospholipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambinossi, F.; Mecheri, B.; Caminati, G.; Nocentini, M.; Puggelli, M.; Gabrielli, G.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the interactions of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic molecules with phospholipid monolayers with the two-fold aim of elucidating the mechanism of action and providing a first step for the realization of bio-mimetic sensors for such drugs by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. We examined spreading monolayers of three phospholipids in the presence of tetracycline in the subphase by means of surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms as a function of bulk pH. We selected phospholipids with hydrophobic chains of the same length but polar head groups differing either in dimensions and protonation equilibria, i.e. dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA). The interaction of tetracycline with the three phospholipids was found to be highly dependent on the electric charge of the antibiotic and on the ionization state of the lipid. Significant interactions are established between the negatively charged form of dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid and the zwitterionic form of tetracycline. The drug was found to migrate at the interface where it is adsorbed underneath or/and among the head groups, depending on the surface pressure of the film, whereas penetration through the hydrophobic layer was excluded for all the three phospholipids

  12. Antibiotic interaction with phospholipid monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambinossi, F.; Mecheri, B.; Caminati, G.; Nocentini, M.; Puggelli, M.; Gabrielli, G

    2002-12-01

    We studied the interactions of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic molecules with phospholipid monolayers with the two-fold aim of elucidating the mechanism of action and providing a first step for the realization of bio-mimetic sensors for such drugs by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. We examined spreading monolayers of three phospholipids in the presence of tetracycline in the subphase by means of surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms as a function of bulk pH. We selected phospholipids with hydrophobic chains of the same length but polar head groups differing either in dimensions and protonation equilibria, i.e. dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA). The interaction of tetracycline with the three phospholipids was found to be highly dependent on the electric charge of the antibiotic and on the ionization state of the lipid. Significant interactions are established between the negatively charged form of dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid and the zwitterionic form of tetracycline. The drug was found to migrate at the interface where it is adsorbed underneath or/and among the head groups, depending on the surface pressure of the film, whereas penetration through the hydrophobic layer was excluded for all the three phospholipids.

  13. Valley–spin Seebeck effect in heavy group-IV monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Wang, Shengdong; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Akin to electron spin, the valley has become another highly valued degree of freedom in modern electronics, specifically after tremendous studies on monolayers of group-IV materials, i.e. graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene. Except for graphene, the other heavy group-IV monolayers have observable intrinsic spin–orbit interactions due to their buckled structures. Distinct from the usual electric or optical control of valley and spin, we here employ a temperature difference to drive electron motion in ferromagnetic heavy group-IV monolayers via designing a caloritronic device locally modulated by an interlayer electric (E z ) field. A unique valley–spin Seebeck (VSS) effect is discovered, with the current contributed only by one (the other) valley and one (the other) spin moving along one (the opposite) direction. This effect is suggested to be detected below the critical temperature about 18 K for silicene, 200 K for germanene and 400 K for stanene, arising from the characteristic valley–spin nondegenerate band structures tuned by the E z field, but cannot be driven in graphene without spin–orbit interaction. Above the critical temperature, the VSS effect is broken by overlarge temperature broadening. Besides the temperature, it is also found that the E z field can drive a transition between the VSS effect and the normal spin Seebeck effect. Further calculations indicate that the VSS effect is robust against many realistic perturbations. Our research represents a conceptually but substantially major step towards the study of the Seebeck effect. These findings provide a platform for encoding information simultaneously by the valley and spin quantum numbers of electrons in future thermal-logic circuits and energy-saving devices. (paper)

  14. Anisotropic Intervalley Plasmon Excitations in Graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Xu Huai-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the intervalley plasmon excitations (IPEs) in graphene monolayer within the random-phase approximation. We derive an analytical expression of the real part of the dielectric function. We find a low-energy plasmon mode with a linear anisotropic dispersion which depends on the Fermi energy and the dielectric constant of substrate. The IPEs show strongly anisotropic behavior, which becomes significant around the zigzag crystallographic direction. More interestingly, the group velocity of IPE varies from negative to positive, and vanishes at special energy. (paper)

  15. Effect of graphene on photoluminescence properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot hybrid structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Ma, Y. J.; Wang, W. Q.; Ding, K.; Wu, Q.; Fan, Y. L.; Yang, X. J.; Zhong, Z. Y.; Jiang, Z. M.; Chen, D. D.; Xu, F.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488 nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325 nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. For the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.

  16. Lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2010-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained and atomistic models to study the lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers. We first consider simple oil/air and oil/water interfaces, and then proceed to lipid monolayers at air/water and oil/water interfaces. The results are

  17. Viscous bursting of suspended films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrégeas, G.; Martin, P.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    1995-11-01

    Soap films break up by an inertial process. We present here the first observations on freely suspended films of long-chain polymers, where viscous effects are dominant and no surfactant is present. A hole is nucleated at time 0 and grows up to a radius R(t) at time t. A surprising feature is that the liquid from the hole is not collected into a rim (as it is in soap films): The liquid spreads out without any significant change of the film thickness. The radius R(t) grows exponentially with time, R~exp(t/τ) [while in soap films R(t) is linear]. The rise time τ~ηe/2γ where η is viscosity, e is thickness (in the micron range), and γ is surface tension. A simple model is developed to explain this growth law.

  18. The band structure of carbonmonoxide on 2-D Au islands on graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Losovyj, Ya B.; Lozova, Natalia; Wang, Lu; Mei, Waining; Zheng, Jiaxin; Vescovo, Elio; Liu, Li; Dowben, Peter A.; Goodman, David Wayne

    2014-01-01

    to CO monolayers adsorbed on many single crystal metal surfaces. Thus not only are the adsorbed gold islands on graphene flat and crystalline, as evident in the dispersion of the Au d-states, but the CO molecular adlayer is both molecular and ordered

  19. Thermal treatment of fluorinated graphene: An in situ Raman spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    da Costa, Sara; Ek Weis, Johan; Frank, Otakar; Bastl, Zdeněk; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2015), s. 347-354 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1062 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fluorine * graphene * monolayers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.198, year: 2015

  20. Magnetic anisotropy energy and effective exchange interactions in Co intercalated graphene on Ir(111)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shick, Alexander; Hong, S.C.; Máca, František; Lichtenstein, A.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 47 (2014), "476003-1"-"476003-6" ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/10/0330; GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy * Co monolayer * graphene Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  1. Silicon micro-levers and a multilayer graphene membrane studied via laser photoacoustic detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinger, Zdeněk; Janda, Pavel; Suchánek, Jan; Dostál, M.; Kubát, Pavel; Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2015), s. 103-109 ISSN 2194-8771 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14696S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) R200401401; COST(XE) TD1105 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TRACE GAS-ANALYSIS * MONOLAYER GRAPHENE * CANTILEVER ARRAY Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. The effects of growth time on the quality of graphene synthesized by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The graphene has several unique characteristics and many applications in all fields. Some of these characteristics are the quantum Hall effect at room temperature, the ambipolar field effect, the optical properties, the high electron mobility and the best electronic properties. The ability of fabricating large-area monolayer ...

  3. Preparation and Photoluminescence of Tungsten Disulfide Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Lv

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten disulfide (WS2 monolayer is a direct band gap semiconductor. The growth of WS2 monolayer hinders the progress of its investigation. In this paper, we prepared the WS2 monolayer through chemical vapor transport deposition. This method makes it easier for the growth of WS2 monolayer through the heterogeneous nucleation-and-growth process. The crystal defects introduced by the heterogeneous nucleation could promote the photoluminescence (PL emission. We observed the strong photoluminescence emission in the WS2 monolayer, as well as thermal quenching, and the PL energy redshift as the temperature increases. We attribute the thermal quenching to the energy or charge transfer of the excitons. The redshift is related to the dipole moment of WS2.

  4. Ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films as transparent top-contacts for light switchable solid-state molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Jevric, Martyn; Hauptmann, Jonas Rahlf

    2013-01-01

    A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules. The electr......A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules...

  5. Switchable Polarization in Mn Embedded Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor-A-Alam, Mohammad; Ullah, Hamid; Shin, Young-Han

    2018-03-14

    Graphene, despite its many unique properties, is neither intrinsically polar due to inversion symmetry nor magnetic. However, based on density functional theory, we find that Mn, one of transition metals, embedded in single or double vacancy (Mn@SV and Mn@DV) in a graphene monolayer induces a dipole moment perpendicular to the sheet, which can be switched from up to down by Mn penetration through the graphene. Such switching could be realized by an external stimuli introduced through the tip of a scanning probe microscope, as already utilized in the studies of molecular switches. We estimate the energy barriers for dipole switching, which are found to be 2.60 eV and 0.28 eV for Mn@SV and Mn@DV, respectively. However, by applying biaxial tensile strain, we propose a mechanism for tuning the barrier. We find that 10% biaxial tensile strain, which is already experimentally achievable in graphene-like two-dimensional materials, can significantly reduce the barrier to 0.16 eV in Mn@SV. Moreover, in agreement with previous studies, we find a high magnetic moment of 3 μ B for both Mn@SV and Mn@DV, promising the potential of these structures in spintronics as well as in nanoscale electro-mechanical or memory devices.

  6. Permeability of two-dimensional graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride to hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ankit; Ray, Nirat

    2018-05-01

    The permeability of atomic hydrogen in monolayer hexagonal Boron Nitride(h-BN) and graphene has been studied using first-principles density functional theory based simulations. For the specific cases of physisorption and chemisoroption, barrier heights are calculated using the nudged elastic band approach. We find that the barrier potential for physisorption through the ring is lower for graphene than h-BN. In the case of chemisorption, where the H atom passes through by making bonds with the atoms in the ring, the barrier potential for the graphene was found to be higher than that of h-BN. We conclude that the penetration of H atom with notable kinetic energy (graphene as compared to h-BN. Whereas through chemisorption, lower kinetic energy (>3eV) H-atoms have a higher chance to penetrate through h-BN than graphene.

  7. Intercalating cobalt between graphene and iridium (111): Spatially dependent kinetics from the edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaic, Sergio; Rougemaille, Nicolas; Kimouche, Amina; Burgos, Benito Santos; Locatelli, Andrea; Coraux, Johann

    2017-10-01

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we image in real time the intercalation of a cobalt monolayer between graphene and the (111) surface of iridium. Our measurements reveal that the edges of a graphene flake represent an energy barrier to intercalation. Based on a simple description of the growth kinetics, we estimate this energy barrier and find small, but substantial, local variations. These local variations suggest a possible influence of the graphene orientation with respect to its substrate and of the graphene edge termination on the energy value of the barrier height. Besides, our measurements show that intercalated cobalt is energetically more favorable than cobalt on bare iridium, indicating a surfactant role of graphene.

  8. The longitudinal optical conductivity in bilayer graphene and other two-dimensional systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.H., E-mail: chyang@nuist.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Ao, Z.M., E-mail: zhimin.ao@uts.edu.au [Centre for Clean Energy Technology, School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology, Sydney ,PO Box 123, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Wei, X.F. [West Anhui University, Luan 237012 (China); Jiang, J.J. [Department of Physics, Sanjing College, Nanjing 210012 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The longitudinal optical conductivity in bilayer graphene is calculated using the dielectric function by defining the density operator theoretically, while the effect of the broadening width determined by the scattering sources on the optical conductivity is also investigated. Some features, such as chirality, energy dispersion and density of state (DOS) in bilayer graphene, are similar to those in monolayer graphene and a traditional two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Therefore, in this paper, the bilayer graphene optical conductivity is compared with the results in these two systems. The analytical and numerical results show that the optical conductivity per graphene layer is almost a constant and close to e{sup 2}/(4ℏ), which agrees with the experimental results.

  9. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM.

  10. Bloch Surface Waves Using Graphene Layers: An Approach toward In-Plane Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Dubey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A dielectric multilayer platform was investigated as a foundation for two-dimensional optics. In this paper, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration of absorption of Bloch surface waves in the presence of graphene layers. Graphene is initially grown on a Cu foil via Chemical Vapor Deposition and transferred layer by layer by a wet-transfer method using poly(methyl methacrylate, (PMMA. We exploit total internal reflection configuration and multi-heterodyne scanning near-field optical microscopy as a far-field coupling method and near-field characterization tool, respectively. The absorption is quantified in terms of propagation lengths of Bloch surface waves. A significant drop in the propagation length of the BSWs is observed in the presence of graphene layers. The propagation length of BSWs in bare multilayer is reduced to 17 times shorter in presence of graphene monolayer, and 23 times shorter for graphene bilayer.

  11. Growth of graphene from SiC{0001} surfaces and its mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimatsu, Wataru; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, a one-atom-layer carbon material, can be grown by thermal decomposition of SiC. On Si-terminated SiC(0001), graphene nucleates at steps and grows layer-by-layer, and as a result a homogeneous monolayer or bilayer can be obtained. We demonstrate this mechanism both experimentally and theoretically. On the C-face (000 1-bar ), multilayer graphene nucleates not only at steps, but also on the terraces. These differences reflect the distinct differences in the reactivity of these faces. Due to its high quality and structural controllability, graphene on SiC{0001} surfaces will be a platform for high-speed graphene device applications. (paper)

  12. Transient Zitterbewegung of charge carriers in mono- and bilayer graphene, and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, Tomasz M.; Zawadzki, Wlodek

    2007-01-01

    Observable effects due to trembling motion [Zitterbewegung (ZB)] of charge carriers in bilayer graphene, monolayer graphene, and carbon nanotubes are calculated. It is shown that, when the charge carriers are prepared in the form of Gaussian wave packets, the ZB has a transient character with the decay time of femtoseconds in graphene and picoseconds in nanotubes. Analytical results for bilayer graphene allow us to investigate phenomena which accompany the trembling motion. In particular, it is shown that the transient character of ZB in graphene is due to the fact that wave subpackets related to positive and negative electron energies move in opposite directions, so their overlap diminishes with time. This behavior is analogous to that of the wave packets representing relativistic electrons in a vacuum

  13. Pentacene on Ni(111): room-temperature molecular packing and temperature-activated conversion to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, L E; De Marchi, F; MacLeod, J M; Lipton-Duffin, J; Gatti, R; Ma, D; Perepichka, D F; Rosei, F

    2015-02-21

    We investigate, using scanning tunnelling microscopy, the adsorption of pentacene on Ni(111) at room temperature and the behaviour of these monolayer films with annealing up to 700 °C. We observe the conversion of pentacene into graphene, which begins from as low as 220 °C with the coalescence of pentacene molecules into large planar aggregates. Then, by annealing at 350 °C for 20 minutes, these aggregates expand into irregular domains of graphene tens of nanometers in size. On surfaces where graphene and nickel carbide coexist, pentacene shows preferential adsorption on the nickel carbide phase. The same pentacene to graphene transformation was also achieved on Cu(111), but at a higher activation temperature, producing large graphene domains that exhibit a range of moiré superlattice periodicities.

  14. Analysis of transient electromagnetic wave interactions on graphene-based devices using integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2015-10-26

    Graphene is a monolayer of carbon atoms structured in the form of a honeycomb lattice. Recent experimental studies have revealed that it can support surface plasmons at Terahertz frequencies thanks to its dispersive conductivity. Additionally, characteristics of these plasmons can be dynamically adjusted via electrostatic gating of the graphene sheet (K. S. Novoselov, et al., Science, 306, 666–669, 2004). These properties suggest that graphene can be a building block for novel electromagnetic and photonic devices for applications in the fields of photovoltaics, bio-chemical sensing, all-optical computing, and flexible electronics. Simulation of electromagnetic interactions on graphene-based devices is not an easy task. The thickness of the graphene sheet is orders of magnitude smaller than any other geometrical dimension of the device. Consequently, discretization of such a device leads to significantly large number of unknowns and/or ill-conditioned matrix systems.

  15. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes on functionalized graphene film grown by chemical vapor deposition and characterization of the hybrid material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanta Dhoj Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the surface functionalization of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition and fabrication of a hybrid material combining multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene (CNT–G. Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers were prepared on graphene by the UV-modification of oxidized groups introduced onto the film surface. Amine-termination led to effective interaction with functionalized CNTs to assemble a CNT–G hybrid through covalent bonding. Characterization clearly showed no defects of the graphene film after the immobilization reaction with CNT. In addition, the hybrid graphene material revealed a distinctive CNT–G structure and p–n type electrical properties. The introduction of functional groups on the graphene film surface and fabrication of CNT–G hybrids with the present technique could provide an efficient, novel route to device fabrication.

  16. Raman Enhancement and Photo-Bleaching of Organic Dyes in the Presence of Chemical Vapor Deposition-Grown Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxin Weng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent organic dyes photobleach under intense light. Graphene has been shown to improve the photo-stability of organic dyes. In this paper, we investigated the Raman spectroscopy and photo-bleaching kinetics of dyes in the absence/presence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD-grown graphene. We show that graphene enhances the Raman signal of a wide range of dyes. The photo-bleaching of the dyes was reduced when the dyes were in contact with graphene. In contrast, monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN was much less effective in reducing the photo-bleaching rate of the dyes. We attribute the suppression of photo-bleaching to the energy or electron transfer from dye to graphene. The results highlight the potential of CVD graphene as a substrate for protecting and enhancing Raman response of organic dyes.

  17. Intermodal resonance of vibrating suspended cables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear free vibrations of a single suspended cable, or a coupled system of suspended cables, may be classified as gravity modes (no tension variations to leading order) and elasto-gravity modes (tension and vertical displacement equally important). It was found earlier [12] that the

  18. Thermal conductivity of graphene mediated by strain and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Youdi; Shi, Sanqiang; Wang, Xinjiang

    2016-01-01

    Based on first-principles calculations and full iterative solution of the linearized Boltzmann–Peierls transport equation for phonons, we systematically investigate effects of strain, size and temperature on the thermal conductivity k of suspended graphene. The calculated size-dependent and temperature-dependent k for finite samples agree well with experimental data. The results show that, contrast to the convergent room-temperature k = 5450 W/m-K of unstrained graphene at a sample size ~8 cm, k of strained graphene diverges with increasing the sample size even at high temperature. Out-of-plane acoustic phonons are responsible for the significant size effect in unstrained and strained graphene due to their ultralong mean free path and acoustic phonons with wavelength smaller than 10 nm contribute 80% to the intrinsic room temperature k of unstrained graphene. Tensile strain hardens the flexural modes and increases their lifetimes, causing interesting dependence of k on sample size and strain due to the competition between boundary scattering and intrinsic phonon–phonon scattering. k of graphene can be tuned within a large range by strain for the size larger than 500 μm. These findings shed light on the nature of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials and may guide predicting and engineering k of graphene by varying strain and size

  19. First-principles study of intrinsic phononic thermal transport in monolayer C3N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Sun, Maozhu; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Lichun; Li, Qingfang

    2018-05-01

    Very recently, a new graphene-like crystalline, hole-free, 2D-single-layer carbon nitride C3N, has been fabricated by polymerization of 2,3-diaminophenazine and used to fabricate a field-effect transistor device with an on-off current ratio reaching 5. 5 ×1010 (Adv. Mater. 2017, 1605625). Heat dissipation plays a vital role in its practical applications, and therefore the thermal transport properties need to be explored urgently. In this paper, we perform first-principles calculations combined with phonon Boltzmann transport equation to investigate the phononic thermal transport properties of monolayer C3N, and meanwhile, a comparison with graphene is given. Our calculated intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of C3N is 380 W/mK at room temperature, which is one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene (3550 W/mK at 300 K), but is greatly higher than many other typical 2D materials. The underlying mechanisms governing the thermal transport were thoroughly discussed and compared to graphene, including group velocities, phonon relax time, the contribution from phonon branches, phonon anharmonicity and size effect. The fundamental physics understood from this study may shed light on further studies of the newly fabricated 2D crystalline C3N sheets.

  20. Probing the interaction of noble gases with pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene through Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Renato; Perea-López, Néstor; Elías, Ana Laura; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Carozo, Victor; Feng, Simin; Lv, Ruitao; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Terrones, Mauricio; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2018-05-01

    The interactions of adsorbates with graphene have received increasing attention due to its importance in the development of applications involving graphene-based coatings. Here, we present a study of the adsorption of noble gases on pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene. Single-layer graphene samples were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Several noble gases were allowed to adsorb on the suspended graphene substrate at very low temperatures. Raman spectra show distinct frequency blue shifts in both the 2D and G bands, which are induced by gas adsorption onto high quality single layer graphene (1LG). These shifts, which we associate with compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layers induced by the noble gases, are negligible for nitrogen-doped graphene. Additionally, a thermal depinning transition, which is related to the desorption of a noble gas layer from the graphene surface at low temperatures (ranging from 20 to 35 K), was also observed at different transition temperatures for different noble gases. These transition temperatures were found to be 25 K for argon and 35 K for xenon. Moreover, we were able to obtain values for the compressive biaxial strain in graphene induced by the adsorbed layer of noble gases, using Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations confirmed the correlation between the noble gas-induced strain and the changes in the Raman features observed.

  1. Morphological and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimova, R.; Iakimov, T.; Yazdi, G.R.; Bouhafs, C.; Eriksson, J.; Zakharov, A.; Boosalis, A.; Schubert, M.; Darakchieva, V.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the structural and electronic properties of graphene grown on SiC by high-temperature sublimation. We have studied thickness uniformity of graphene grown on 4H–SiC (0 0 0 1), 6H–SiC (0 0 0 1), and 3C–SiC (1 1 1) substrates and investigated in detail graphene surface morphology and electronic properties. Differences in the thickness uniformity of the graphene layers on different SiC polytypes is related mainly to the minimization of the terrace surface energy during the step bunching process. It is also shown that a lower substrate surface roughness results in more uniform step bunching and consequently better quality of the grown graphene. We have compared the three SiC polytypes with a clear conclusion in favor of 3C–SiC. Localized lateral variations in the Fermi energy of graphene are mapped by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. It is found that the overall single-layer graphene coverage depends strongly on the surface terrace width, where a more homogeneous coverage is favored by wider terraces. It is observed that the step distance is a dominating, factor in determining the unintentional doping of graphene from the SiC substrate. Microfocal spectroscopic ellipsometry mapping of the electronic properties and thickness of epitaxial graphene on 3C–SiC (1 1 1) is also reported. Growth of one monolayer graphene is demonstrated on both Si- and C-polarity of the 3C–SiC substrates and it is shown that large area homogeneous single monolayer graphene can be achieved on the Si-face substrates. Correlations between the number of graphene monolayers on one hand and the main transition associated with an exciton enhanced van Hove singularity at ∼4.5 eV and the free-charge carrier scattering time, on the other are established. It is shown that the interface structure on the Si- and C-polarity of the 3C–SiC (1 1 1) differs and has a determining role for the thickness and electronic properties homogeneity of the epitaxial graphene.

  2. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  3. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  4. Adsorption of gas molecules on Cu impurities embedded monolayer MoS{sub 2}: A first- principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.; Li, C.Y. [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, L.L. [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Eduaction, Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhou, B.; Zhang, Q.K. [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Z.Q., E-mail: chenzq@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tang, Z., E-mail: ztang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education of China, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS{sub 2}. • Transition-metal Cu atom can break the chemical inactivation of MoS{sub 2} surface. • MoS{sub 2}-Cu system is a promising for future application in gas molecules sensing. - Abstract: Adsorption of small gas molecules (O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}) on transition-metal Cu atom embedded monolayer MoS{sub 2} was investigated by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with a high diffusion barrier. The stable adsorption geometry, charge transfer and electronic structures of these gas molecules on monolayer MoS{sub 2} embedded with transition-metal Cu atom are discussed in detail. It is found that the monolayer MoS{sub 2} with embedded Cu atom can effectively capture these gas molecules with high adsorption energy. The NH{sub 3} molecule acts as electron donor after adsorption, which is different from the other gas molecules (O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2}). The results suggest that MoS{sub 2}-Cu system may be promising for future applications in gas molecules sensing and catalysis, which is similar to those of the transition-metal embedded graphene.

  5. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng; Kaur, Gurpreet; Eriksson, Jens; Lakshmi, G.B.V.S.; Avasthi, D.K.; Gupta, Vinay; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M.; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yazdi, G. Reza

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing application of SHI irradiated epitaxial graphene on SiC is explored. • Surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles. • Existence of an optimal fluence which maximize the gas sensing response towards NO_2 and NH_3 gases. - Abstract: In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 10"1"3 ions/cm"2). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and spintronic

  6. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni, E-mail: kaushik.priyadarshni@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Kaur, Gurpreet [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Eriksson, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lakshmi, G.B.V.S. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Noida 201313 (India); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Syväjärvi, Mikael [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Yazdi, G. Reza, E-mail: yazdi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing application of SHI irradiated epitaxial graphene on SiC is explored. • Surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles. • Existence of an optimal fluence which maximize the gas sensing response towards NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases. - Abstract: In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and

  7. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferralis, Nicola; Carraro, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm −1 corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching

  8. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferralis, Nicola, E-mail: ferralis@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Carraro, Carlo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  9. Magneto-optical fingerprints of distinct graphene multilayers using the giant infrared Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Chase T.; Stier, Andreas V.; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glaser, Evan R.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Tedesco, Joseph L.; Eddy, Charles R.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Cerne, John

    2013-11-01

    The remarkable electronic properties of graphene strongly depend on the thickness and geometry of graphene stacks. This wide range of electronic tunability is of fundamental interest and has many applications in newly proposed devices. Using the mid-infrared, magneto-optical Kerr effect, we detect and identify over 18 interband cyclotron resonances (CR) that are associated with ABA and ABC stacked multilayers as well as monolayers that coexist in graphene that is epitaxially grown on 4H-SiC. Moreover, the magnetic field and photon energy dependence of these features enable us to explore the band structure, electron-hole band asymmetries, and mechanisms that activate a CR response in the Kerr effect for various multilayers that coexist in a single sample. Surprisingly, we find that the magnitude of monolayer Kerr effect CRs is not temperature dependent. This unexpected result reveals new questions about the underlying physics that makes such an effect possible.

  10. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  11. Graphene prehistory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geim, A K

    2012-01-01

    After the 2010 Nobel Prize recognized the research breakthrough reported by our group in a 2004 paper, I feel that, as my contribution to the proceedings of the Nobel symposium held earlier in 2010, it is both appropriate and important to review pre-2004 scientific literature and acknowledge early ideas. With the benefit of hindsight, I also try to analyze why our first graphene paper has attracted so much interest.

  12. The Preparation of Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has unique structure and possesses excellent physical and chemical properties, and it has received a great deal of attention in related research fields. The quality, quantity and application of graphene are related to its preparation methods. At present the bottleneck of graphene research is that both high-quality and large quantity of graphene could not be obtained simultaneously and the reason is that the basic mechanism of graphene formation has mot been wel understood.

  13. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides.

  14. Efficient heat generation in large-area graphene films by electromagnetic wave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sangmin; Choi, Haehyun; Lee, Soo Bin; Park, Seong Chae; Park, Jong Bo; Lee, Sangkyu; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Byung Hee

    2017-06-01

    Graphene has been intensively studied due to its outstanding electrical and thermal properties. Recently, it was found that the heat generation by Joule heating of graphene is limited by the conductivity of graphene. Here we suggest an alternative method to generate heat on a large-area graphene film more efficiently by utilizing the unique electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption property of graphene. The EM wave induces an oscillating magnetic moment generated by the orbital motion of moving electrons, which efficiently absorbs the EM energy and dissipate it as a thermal energy. In this case, the mobility of electron is more important than the conductivity, because the EM-induced diamagnetic moment is directly proportional to the speed of electron in an orbital motion. To control the charge carrier mobility of graphene we functionalized substrates with self-assembled monolayers (SAM). As the result, we find that the graphene showing the Dirac voltage close to zero can be more efficiently heated by EM waves. In addition, the temperature gradient also depends on the number of graphene. We expect that the efficient and fast heating of graphene films by EM waves can be utilized for smart heating windows and defogging windshields.

  15. Characterization of Elastic Properties of Porous Graphene Using an Ab Initio Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ansari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Importance of covalent bonded two-dimensional monolayer nanostructures and also hydrocarbons is undeniably responsible for creation of new fascinating materials like polyphenylene polymer, a hydrocarbon super honeycomb network, so-called porous graphene. The mechanical properties of porous graphene such as its Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and the bulk modulus as the determinative properties are calculated in this paper using ab initio calculations. To accomplish this aim, the density functional theory on the basis of generalized gradient approximation and the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof exchange correlation is employed. Density functional theory calculations are used to calculate strain energy of porous graphene with respect to applied strain. Selected numerical results are then presented to study the properties of porous graphene. Comparisons are made between the properties of porous graphene and those of other analogous nanostructures. The results demonstrated lower stiffness of porous graphene than those of graphene and graphyne, and higher stiffness than that of graphdyine and other graphyne families. Unlikely, Poisson’s ratio is observed to be more than that of graphene and also less than that of graphyne. It is further observed that the presence of porosity and also formation of C-H bond in the pore sites is responsible for these discrepancies. Porous graphene is found to behave as the isotropic material.

  16. Computational studies at the density functional theory (DFT) level about the surface functionalization of hexagonal monolayers by chitosan monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Javad; Ahangari, Morteza Ghorbanzadeh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical investigations based on density functional theory have been carried out to understand the underlying interactions between the chitosan monomer and several types of hexagonal monolayers consisting of pristine and defected graphene and boron-nitride nanosheets. Based on the obtained results, it was found that the type of the interaction for all the systems is of non-covalent nature and the chitosan monomer physically interacts with the surface of mentioned nanostructures. The interaction strength was evaluated by calculating the adsorption energies for the considered systems and it was found that the adsorption of chitosan monomer accompanies by the release of about -0.67 and -0.66 eV energy for pristine graphene and h-BN monolayer, respectively. The role of structural defect has also been considered by embedding a Stone-Wales defect within the structure of mentioned monolayers and it was found that the introduced defect enhances the interactions between the chitosan monomer and nanostructures. The role of dispersion interactions has also been taken into account and it was found that these long-range interactions play the dominating role in the attachment of chitosan monomer onto the graphene sheet, while having strong contribution together with the electrostatic interactions for the stabilization of chitosan onto the surface of h-BN monolayer. For all the cases, the adsorption of chitosan monomer did not change the inherent electronic properties of the nanostructures based on the results of charge transfer analysis and energy gap calculations. The findings of the present work would be very useful in future investigations to explore the potential applications of these hybrid materials in materials science and bio-related fields.

  17. Graphene and Graphene Metamaterials for Terahertz Absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, due to the possibility to tune its conductivity, is the promising material for a range of the terahertz (THz) applications, such as tunable reflectors, absorbers, modulators, filters and polarization converters. Subwavelength structuring of graphene in order to form metamaterials allows...... for even more control over the THz waves. In this poster presentation I will show an elegant way to describe the graphene metamaterials and the design of graphene based absorbers. I will also present our recent experimental results on the graphene absorbers characterization....

  18. Fundamental studies of graphene/graphite and graphene-based Schottky photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaochang

    In the carbon allotropes family, graphene is one of the most versatile members and has been extensively studied since 2004. The goal of this dissertation is not only to investigate the novel fundamental science of graphene and its three-dimensional sibling, graphite, but also to explore graphene's promising potential in modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. The first two chapters provide a concise introduction to the fundamental solid state physics of graphene (as well as graphite) and the physics at the metal/semiconductor interfaces. In the third chapter, we demonstrate the formation of Schottky junctions at the interfaces of graphene (semimetal) and various inorganic semiconductors that play dominating roles in today's semiconductor technology, such as Si, SiC, GaAs and GaN. As shown from their current-voltage (I -V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, the interface physics can be well described within the framework of the Schottky-Mott model. The results are also well consist with that from our previous studies on graphite based Schottky diodes. In the fourth chapter, as an extension of graphene based Schottky work, we investigate the photovoltaic (PV) effect of graphene/Si junctions after chemically doped with an organic polymer (TFSA). The power conversion efficiency of the solar cell improves from 1.9% to 8.6% after TFSA doping, which is the record in all graphene based PVs. The I -V, C-V and external quantum efficiency measurements suggest 12 that such a significant enhancement in the device performance can be attributed to a doping-induced decrease in the series resistance and a simultaneous increase in the built-in potential. In the fifth chapter, we investigate for the first time the effect of uniaxial strains on magneto-transport properties of graphene. We find that low-temperature weak localization effect in monolayer graphene is gradually suppressed under increasing strains, which is due to a strain-induced decreased intervalley

  19. Berry Curvature and Nonlocal Transport Characteristics of Antidot Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Pan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antidot graphene denotes a monolayer of graphene structured by a periodic array of holes. Its energy dispersion is known to display a gap at the Dirac point. However, since the degeneracy between the A and B sites is preserved, antidot graphene cannot be described by the 2D massive Dirac equation, which is suitable for systems with an inherent A/B asymmetry. From inversion and time-reversal-symmetry considerations, antidot graphene should therefore have zero Berry curvature. In this work, we derive the effective Hamiltonian of antidot graphene from its tight-binding wave functions. The resulting Hamiltonian is a 4×4 matrix with a nonzero intervalley scattering term, which is responsible for the gap at the Dirac point. Furthermore, nonzero Berry curvature is obtained from the effective Hamiltonian, owing to the double degeneracy of the eigenfunctions. The topological manifestation is shown to be robust against randomness perturbations. Since the Berry curvature is expected to induce a transverse conductance, we have experimentally verified this feature through nonlocal transport measurements, by fabricating three antidot graphene samples with a triangular array of holes, a fixed periodicity of 150 nm, and hole diameters of 100, 80, and 60 nm. All three samples display topological nonlocal conductance, with excellent agreement with the theory predictions.

  20. Chemical gating of epitaxial graphene through ultrathin oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Omiciuolo, Luca; Baraldi, Alessandro; Lizzit, Silvano

    2015-08-07

    We achieved a controllable chemical gating of epitaxial graphene grown on metal substrates by exploiting the electrostatic polarization of ultrathin SiO2 layers synthesized below it. Intercalated oxygen diffusing through the SiO2 layer modifies the metal-oxide work function and hole dopes graphene. The graphene/oxide/metal heterostructure behaves as a gated plane capacitor with the in situ grown SiO2 layer acting as a homogeneous dielectric spacer, whose high capacity allows the Fermi level of graphene to be shifted by a few hundreds of meV when the oxygen coverage at the metal substrate is of the order of 0.5 monolayers. The hole doping can be finely tuned by controlling the amount of interfacial oxygen, as well as by adjusting the thickness of the oxide layer. After complete thermal desorption of oxygen the intrinsic doping of SiO2 supported graphene is evaluated in the absence of contaminants and adventitious adsorbates. The demonstration that the charge state of graphene can be changed by chemically modifying the buried oxide/metal interface hints at the possibility of tuning the level and sign of doping by the use of other intercalants capable of diffusing through the ultrathin porous dielectric and reach the interface with the metal.

  1. Tunneling time and Hartman effect in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Sattari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using transfer-matrix and stationary phase methods, we study the tunneling time (group delay time in a ferromagnetic monolayer graphene superlattice. The system we peruse consists of a sequence of rectangular barriers and wells, which can be realized by putting a series of electronic gates on the top of ferromagnetic graphene. The magnetization in the two ferromagnetic layers is aligned parallel. We find out that the tunneling time for normal incident is independent of spin state of electron as well as the barrier height and electron Fermi energy while for the oblique incident angles the tunneling time depends on the spin state of electron and has an oscillatory behavior. Also the effect of barrier width on tunneling time is also investigated and shown that, for normal incident, the Hartman effect disappears in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice but it appears for oblique incident angles when the x component of the electron wave vector in the barrier is imaginary.

  2. Hydration layers trapped between graphene and a hydrophilic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmen, M; Reichling, M; Bollmann, T R J; Ochedowski, O; Schleberger, M

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is mechanically exfoliated on CaF 2 (111) under ambient conditions. We demonstrate the formation of a several monolayer thick hydration layer on the hydrophilic substrate and its response to annealing at temperatures up to 750 K in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Upon heating, water is released, however, it is impossible to remove the first layer. The initially homogeneous film separates into water-containing and water-free domains by two-dimensional Ostwald ripening. Upon severe heating, thick graphene multilayers undergo rupture, while nanoblisters confining sealed water appear on thinner sheets, capable of the storage and release of material. From modeling the dimensions of the nanoblisters, we estimate the graphene/CaF 2 (111) interfacial adhesion energy to be 0.33±0.13 J m −2 , thereby viable for polymer-assisted transfer printing. (paper)

  3. Direct visualization of atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Geng; Lu, Jianchen; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun; Lin, Xiao; Berger, Reinhard; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated atomically precise nitrogen-doped chevron-type graphene nanoribbons by using the on-surface synthesis technique combined with the nitrogen substitution of the precursors. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that the well-defined nanoribbons tend to align with the neighbors side-by-side with a band gap of 1.02 eV, which is in good agreement with the density functional theory calculation result. The influence of the high precursor coverage on the quality of the nanoribbons is also studied. We find that graphene nanoribbons with sufficient aspect ratios can only be fabricated at sub-monolayer precursor coverage. This work provides a way to construct atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons.

  4. Polarization-independent transparency window induced by complementary graphene metasurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei Bing; Liu, Ji Long; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhen Guo

    2017-01-01

    A fourfold symmetric graphene-based complementary metasurface featuring a polarization-independent transparency window is proposed and numerically analysed in this paper. The unit cell of the metamaterial consists of a monolayer graphene perforated with a cross and four identical split-ring resonators deposited on a substrate. Our analysis shows that the transparency window can be interpreted as a plasmonic analogy of Autler–Townes splitting. The polarization independence is achieved due to the fourfold symmetry of graphene’s complementary structure. In addition, the frequency range of the transparency window can be dynamically tuned over a broad band by changing the chemical potential of graphene, and the width of the transparency window can also be controlled by changing the split-gap orientation. This work may lead to potential applications in many area, such as slow-light devices and optical sensing. (paper)

  5. A New Measure for Transported Suspended Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Non-uniform suspended sediment plays an important role in many geographical and biological processes. Despite extensive study, understanding to it seems to stagnate when times to consider non-uniformity and non-equilibrium scenarios comes. Due to unsatisfactory reproducibility, large-scaled flume seems to be incompetent to conduct more fundamental research in this area. To push the realm a step further, experiment to find how suspended sediment exchanges is conducted in a new validated equipment, in which turbulence is motivated by oscillating grids. Analysis shows that 1) suspended sediment exchange is constrained by ωS invariance, 2) ωS of the suspended sediment that certain flow regime could support is unique regardless of the sediment gradation and 3) the more turbulent the flow, the higher ωS of the suspension the flow could achieve. A new measure for suspended sediment ωS, the work required to sustain sediment in suspension transport mode if multiplied by gravitational acceleration, is thus proposed to better describe the dynamics of transported suspended sediment. Except for the further understanding towards suspended sediment transportation mechanics, with this energy measure, a strategy to distribute total transport capacity to different fractions could be derived and rational calculation of non-uniform sediment transport capacity under non-equilibrium conditions be possible.

  6. Gate tuneable beamsplitter in ballistic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickhaus, Peter; Makk, Péter, E-mail: Peter.Makk@unibas.ch; Schönenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Liu, Ming-Hao; Richter, Klaus [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-12-21

    We present a beam splitter in a suspended, ballistic, multiterminal, bilayer graphene device. By using local bottomgates, a p-n interface tilted with respect to the current direction can be formed. We show that the p-n interface acts as a semi-transparent mirror in the bipolar regime and that the reflectance and transmittance of the p-n interface can be tuned by the gate voltages. Moreover, by studying the conductance features appearing in magnetic field, we demonstrate that the position of the p-n interface can be moved by 1 μm. The herein presented beamsplitter device can form the basis of electron-optic interferometers in graphene.

  7. Preventing Thin Film Dewetting via Graphene Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peigen; Bai, Peter; Omrani, Arash A; Xiao, Yihan; Meaker, Kacey L; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Yan, Aiming; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Rodgers, Griffin F; Kim, Youngkyou; Aikawa, Andrew S; Kolaczkowski, Mattew A; Liu, Yi; Zettl, Alex; Xu, Ke; Crommie, Michael F; Xu, Ting

    2017-09-01

    A monolayer 2D capping layer with high Young's modulus is shown to be able to effectively suppress the dewetting of underlying thin films of small organic semiconductor molecule, polymer, and polycrystalline metal, respectively. To verify the universality of this capping layer approach, the dewetting experiments are performed for single-layer graphene transferred onto polystyrene (PS), semiconducting thienoazacoronene (EH-TAC), gold, and also MoS 2 on PS. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the exceptionally high Young's modulus and surface conformity of 2D capping layers such as graphene and MoS 2 substantially suppress surface fluctuations and thus dewetting. As long as the uncovered area is smaller than the fluctuation wavelength of the thin film in a dewetting process via spinodal decomposition, the dewetting should be suppressed. The 2D monolayer-capping approach opens up exciting new possibilities to enhance the thermal stability and expands the processing parameters for thin film materials without significantly altering their physical properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties

  9. Molecular diffusion in monolayer and submonolayer nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    2001-01-01

    The orientational and translational motions in a monolayer fluid of physisorbed molecular nitrogen are treated using molecular dynamics simulations. Dynamical response functions and several approximations to the coefficient of translational diffusion are determined for adsorption on the basal plane...

  10. Dark excitations in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) possess unique optoelectronic properties, including strongly bound excitons and trions. To date, most studies have focused on optically active excitations, but recent experiments have highlighted the existence of dark states, which are equally...

  11. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  12. Janus Monolayer Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Jia, Shuai; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Chen, Weibing; Guo, Hua; Jin, Zehua; Shenoy, Vivek B; Shi, Li; Lou, Jun

    2017-08-22

    The crystal configuration of sandwiched S-Mo-Se structure (Janus SMoSe) at the monolayer limit has been synthesized and carefully characterized in this work. By controlled sulfurization of monolayer MoSe 2 , the top layer of selenium atoms is substituted by sulfur atoms, while the bottom selenium layer remains intact. The structure of this material is systematically investigated by Raman, photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to better understand the Raman vibration modes and electronic structures of the Janus SMoSe monolayer, which are found to correlate well with corresponding experimental results. Finally, high basal plane hydrogen evolution reaction activity is discovered for the Janus monolayer, and DFT calculation implies that the activity originates from the synergistic effect of the intrinsic defects and structural strain inherent in the Janus structure.

  13. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube

  14. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  15. Anisotropic transport of normal metal-barrier-normal metal junctions in monolayer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Agarwal, Amit; Sengupta, K

    2017-07-19

    We study transport properties of a phosphorene monolayer in the presence of single and multiple potential barriers of height U 0 and width d, using both continuum and microscopic lattice models, and show that the nature of electron transport along its armchair edge (x direction) is qualitatively different from its counterpart in both conventional two-dimensional electron gas with Schrödinger-like quasiparticles and graphene or surfaces of topological insulators hosting massless Dirac quasiparticles. We show that the transport, mediated by massive Dirac electrons, allows one to achieve collimated quasiparticle motion along x and thus makes monolayer phosphorene an ideal experimental platform for studying Klein paradox in the context of gapped Dirac materials. We study the dependence of the tunneling conductance [Formula: see text] as a function of d and U 0 , and demonstrate that for a given applied voltage V its behavior changes from oscillatory to decaying function of d for a range of U 0 with finite non-zero upper and lower bounds, and provide analytical expression for these bounds within which G decays with d. We contrast such behavior of G with that of massless Dirac electrons in graphene and also with that along the zigzag edge (y direction) in phosphorene where the quasiparticles obey an effective Schrödinger equation at low energy. We also study transport through multiple barriers along x and demonstrate that these properties hold for transport through multiple barriers as well. Finally, we suggest concrete experiments which may verify our theoretical predictions.

  16. Two-dimensional spin-orbit Dirac point in monolayer HfGeTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shan; Liu, Ying; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Shan-Shan; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Shengyuan A.

    2017-10-01

    Dirac points in two-dimensional (2D) materials have been a fascinating subject of research, with graphene as the most prominent example. However, the Dirac points in existing 2D materials, including graphene, are vulnerable against spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Here, based on first-principles calculations and theoretical analysis, we propose a new family of stable 2D materials, the HfGeTe-family monolayers, which host so-called spin-orbit Dirac points (SDPs) close to the Fermi level. These Dirac points are special in that they are formed only under significant SOC, hence they are intrinsically robust against SOC. We show that the existence of a pair of SDPs are dictated by the nonsymmorphic space group symmetry of the system, which are very robust under various types of lattice strains. The energy, the dispersion, and the valley occupation around the Dirac points can be effectively tuned by strain. We construct a low-energy effective model to characterize the Dirac fermions around the SDPs. Furthermore, we find that the material is simultaneously a 2D Z2 topological metal, which possesses nontrivial Z2 invariant in the bulk and spin-helical edge states on the boundary. From the calculated exfoliation energies and mechanical properties, we show that these materials can be readily obtained in experiment from the existing bulk materials. Our result reveals HfGeTe-family monolayers as a promising platform for exploring spin-orbit Dirac fermions and topological phases in two-dimensions.

  17. Monatomic chemical-vapor-deposited graphene membranes bridge a half-millimeter-scale gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Kwang; Hwangbo, Yun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Seung-Mo; Kim, Seong-Su; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Lee, Hak-Joo; Choi, Byung-Ik; Song, Chang-Kyu; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2014-03-25

    One of the main concerns in nanotechnology is the utilization of nanomaterials in macroscopic applications without losing their extreme properties. In an effort to bridge the gap between the nano- and macroscales, we propose a clever fabrication method, the inverted floating method (IFM), for preparing freestanding chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene membranes. These freestanding membranes were then successfully suspended over a gap a half-millimeter in diameter. To understand the working principle of IFM, high-speed photography and white light interferometry were used to characterize and analyze the deformation behaviors of the freestanding graphene membranes in contact with a liquid during fabrication. Some nanoscale configurations in the macroscopic graphene membranes were able to be characterized by simple optical microscopy. The proposed IFM is a powerful approach to investigating the macroscopic structures of CVD graphene and enables the exploitation of freestanding CVD graphene for device applications.

  18. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  19. Model of ripples in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carpio, A.

    2012-11-01

    We propose a model of ripples in suspended graphene sheets based on plate equations that are made discrete with the periodicity of the honeycomb lattice and then periodized. In addition, the equation for the displacements with respect to the planar configuration contains a double-well site potential, a nonlinear friction, and a multiplicative white-noise term satisfying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The nonlinear friction terms agree with those proposed by Eichler [Nature Nanotech.1748-338710.1038/nnano.2011.71 6, 339 (2011)] to explain their experiments with a graphene resonator. The site double-well potential indicates that the carbon atoms at each lattice point have equal probability to move upward or downward off plane. For the considered parameter values, the relaxation time due to friction is much larger than the periods of membrane vibrations and the noise is quite small. Then ripples with no preferred orientation appear as long-lived metastable states for any temperature. Numerical solutions confirm this picture.

  20. Layer-selective synthesis of bilayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Choi, Kyoungjun; Robertson, John; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    A controlled synthesis of high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition demands a detailed understanding of the mechanism and kinetics. By decoupling the growth of the two layers via a growth-and-regrowth scheme, we report the kinetics and termination mechanisms of the bilayer graphene growth on copper. We observe, for the first time, that the secondary layer growth follows Gompertzian kinetics. Our observations affirm the postulate of a time-variant transition from a mass-transport-limited to a reaction-limited regimes and identify the mechanistic disparity between the monolayer growth and the secondary-layer expansion underneath the monolayer cover. It is the continuous carbon supply that drives the expansion of the graphene secondary layer, rather than the initially captured carbon amount, suggesting an essential role of the surface diffusion of reactant adsorbates in the interspace between the top graphene layer and the underneath copper surface. We anticipate that the layer selectivity of the growth relies on the entrance energetics of the adsorbed reactants to the graphene-copper interspace across the primary-layer edge, which could be engineered by tailoring the edge termination state. The temperature-reliant saturation area of the secondary-layer expansion is understood as a result of competitive attachment of carbon and hydrogen adatoms to the secondary-layer graphene edge.

  1. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  2. Nanotoxicity of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B; Paula, Amauri J; de Lima, Renata; Alves, Oswaldo L; Durán, Nelson

    2014-02-17

    Graphene and its derivatives are promising candidates for important biomedical applications because of their versatility. The prospective use of graphene-based materials in a biological context requires a detailed comprehension of the toxicity of these materials. Moreover, due to the expanding applications of nanotechnology, human and environmental exposures to graphene-based nanomaterials are likely to increase in the future. Because of the potential risk factors associated with the manufacture and use of graphene-related materials, the number of nanotoxicological studies of these compounds has been increasing rapidly in the past decade. These studies have researched the effects of the nanostructural/biological interactions on different organizational levels of the living system, from biomolecules to animals. This review discusses recent results based on in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of graphene-related materials and critically examines the methodologies employed to evaluate their toxicities. The environmental impact from the manipulation and application of graphene materials is also reported and discussed. Finally, this review presents mechanistic aspects of graphene toxicity in biological systems. More detailed studies aiming to investigate the toxicity of graphene-based materials and to properly associate the biological phenomenon with their chemical, structural, and morphological variations that result from several synthetic and processing possibilities are needed. Knowledge about graphene-based materials could ensure the safe application of this versatile material. Consequently, the focus of this review is to provide a source of inspiration for new nanotoxicological approaches for graphene-based materials.

  3. Doping characteristics of iodine on as-grown chemical vapor deposited graphene on Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, HoKwon, E-mail: hknano@gmail.com [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Renault, Olivier [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tyurnina, Anastasia; Guillet, Jean-François; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LITEN/DTMN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rouchon, Denis; Mariolle, Denis; Chevalier, Nicolas [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Dijon, Jean [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LITEN/DTMN, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using laboratory X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM), we investigated the doping efficiency and thermal stability of iodine on as-grown graphene on Pt. After iodine adsorption of graphene in saturated vapor of I{sub 2,} monolayer and bilayer graphene exhibited work function of 4.93 eV and 4.87 eV, respectively. Annealing of the doped monolayer graphene at 100 °C led to desorption of hydrocarbons, which increased the work function of monolayer graphene by ~0.2 eV. The composition of the polyiodide complexes evolved upon a step-by-step annealing at temperatures from 100 °C to 300 °C while the work-function non-monotonically changed with decreasing iodine content. The iodine dopant was stable at relatively high temperature as a significant amount of iodine remained up to the annealing temperature of 350 °C. - Highlights: • Laboratory XPEEM demonstrates that iodine can effectively p-dope as-grown graphene on Pt with a work-function value up to 5.1 eV. • On the other hand, residual hydrocarbon contamination decreases the work function by up to ~0.2 eV. • The spontaneous intercalation of as-grown few-layered graphene is not easily feasible. • The iodine dopant was not completely removed up to the annealing temperature of 350 °C. • The I{sub 3}{sup −} and I{sub 5}{sup −} polyiodide content ratio of I-doped Gr/Pt decreases with annealing temperature.

  4. Diverse carrier mobility of monolayer BNC x : a combined density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Weiqiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2017-10-19

    BNC x monolayer as a kind of two-dimensional material has numerous chemical atomic ratios and arrangements with different electronic structures. Via calculations on the basis of density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory under deformation potential approximation, the band structures and carrier mobilities of BNC x (x  =  1,2,3,4) nanosheets are systematically investigated. The calculated results show that BNC 2 -1 is a material with very small band gap (0.02 eV) among all the structures while other BNC x monolayers are semiconductors with band gap ranging from 0.51 eV to 1.32 eV. The carrier mobility of BNC x varies considerably from tens to millions of cm 2 V -1 s -1 . For BNC 2 -1, the hole mobility and electron mobility along both x and y directions can reach 10 5 orders of magnitude, which is similar to the carrier mobility of graphene. Besides, all studied BNC x monolayers obviously have anisotropic hole mobility and electron mobility. In particular, for semiconductor BNC 4 , its hole mobility along the y direction and electron mobility along the x direction unexpectedly reach 10 6 orders of magnitude, even higher than that of graphene. Our findings suggest that BNC x layered materials with the proper ratio and arrangement of carbon atoms will possess desirable charge transport properties, exhibiting potential applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  5. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  6. The computational design of junctions by carbon nanotube insertion into a graphene matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yuliang; Zhong Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, two types of junction models constructed from armchair and zigzag carbon nanotube (CNT) insertion into a graphene matrix have been envisioned. It has been found that the insertion of the CNT into the graphene matrix leads to the formation of C-C covalent bonds between graphene and the CNT that distort the CNT geometry. However, the hydrogenation of the suspended carbon bonds on the graphene resumes the graphene-like structure of the pristine tube. The calculated band structure of armchair CNT insertion into graphene or hydrogenation graphene opens up a band gap and converts the metallic CNT into a semiconductor. For the zigzag CNT, the sp 3 hybridization between the graphene and nanotube alters the band structure of the tube significantly, whereas saturating the dangling bonds of terminal carbon atoms of graphene makes the CNT almost keep the same character of the bands as that in the pristine tube. The synthesis of our designed hybrid structures must be increasingly driven by an interest in molecules that not only have intriguing structures but also have special functions such as hydrogen storage.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of the Two-Dimensional Chalcogenides: Monolayers, Alloys, and Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeffrey D.

    Inspired by the triumphs of graphene, and motivated by its limitations, the science and engineering community is rapidly exploring the landscape of other layered materials in their atomically-thin forms. Dominating this landscape are the layered chalcogenides; diverse in chemistry, crystal structure, and properties, there are well over 100 primary members of this material family. Driven by quantum confinement, single layers (or few, in some cases) of these materials exhibit electronic, optical, and mechanical properties that diverge dramatically from their bulk counterparts. While initially isolated in monolayer form via mechanical exfoliation, the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials is being forced evolve to more scalable and reliable methods. Focusing on the chalcogenides (e.g. MoS2, Bi 2Se3, etc.), this dissertation introduces and mechanistically examines multiple novel synthetic approaches for the direct growth of monolayers, heterostructures, and alloys with the desired quality, reproducibility and generality. The first methods described in this thesis are physical vapor transport (PVT) and evaporative thinning (ET): a facile, top-down synthesis approach for creating ultrathin specimens of layered materials down to the two-dimensional limit. Evaporative thinning, applied in this study to the fabrication of A2X3 (Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3) monolayers, is based on the controlled evaporation of material from initially thick specimens until the 2D limit is reached. The resultant flakes are characterized with a suite of imaging and spectroscopic techniques and the mechanism of ET is investigated via in-situ heating within a transmission electron microscope. Additionally, the basic transport properties of the resultant flakes are probed. The growth of ultrathin GeSe flakes is explored using PVT and the material's basic structure, properties, and stability are addressed. Second, oxide precursor based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is presented for the direct growth of

  8. Ultrahigh mobility and efficient charge injection in monolayer organic thin-film transistors on boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daowei; Qiao, Jingsi; Zhang, Linglong; Wang, Junya; Lan, Tu; Qian, Jun; Li, Yun; Shi, Yi; Chai, Yang; Lan, Wei; Ono, Luis K; Qi, Yabing; Xu, Jian-Bin; Ji, Wei; Wang, Xinran

    2017-09-01

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with high mobility and low contact resistance have been actively pursued as building blocks for low-cost organic electronics. In conventional solution-processed or vacuum-deposited OTFTs, due to interfacial defects and traps, the organic film has to reach a certain thickness for efficient charge transport. Using an ultimate monolayer of 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2- b ][1]benzothiophene (C 8 -BTBT) molecules as an OTFT channel, we demonstrate remarkable electrical characteristics, including intrinsic hole mobility over 30 cm 2 /Vs, Ohmic contact with 100 Ω · cm resistance, and band-like transport down to 150 K. Compared to conventional OTFTs, the main advantage of a monolayer channel is the direct, nondisruptive contact between the charge transport layer and metal leads, a feature that is vital for achieving low contact resistance and current saturation voltage. On the other hand, bilayer and thicker C 8 -BTBT OTFTs exhibit strong Schottky contact and much higher contact resistance but can be improved by inserting a doped graphene buffer layer. Our results suggest that highly crystalline molecular monolayers are promising form factors to build high-performance OTFTs and investigate device physics. They also allow us to precisely model how the molecular packing changes the transport and contact properties.

  9. Electrically tunable coherent optical absorption in graphene with ion gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, Vrinda; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Yuan, Hongtao; Milaninia, Kaveh M; Hwang, Harold Y; Cui, Yi; Kik, Pieter G; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-03-11

    We demonstrate electrical control over coherent optical absorption in a graphene-based Salisbury screen consisting of a single layer of graphene placed in close proximity to a gold back reflector. The screen was designed to enhance light absorption at a target wavelength of 3.2 μm by using a 600 nm-thick, nonabsorbing silica spacer layer. An ionic gel layer placed on top of the screen was used to electrically gate the charge density in the graphene layer. Spectroscopic reflectance measurements were performed in situ as a function of gate bias. The changes in the reflectance spectra were analyzed using a Fresnel based transfer matrix model in which graphene was treated as an infinitesimally thin sheet with a conductivity given by the Kubo formula. The analysis reveals that a careful choice of the ionic gel layer thickness can lead to optical absorption enhancements of up to 5.5 times for the Salisbury screen compared to a suspended sheet of graphene. In addition to these absorption enhancements, we demonstrate very large electrically induced changes in the optical absorption of graphene of ∼3.3% per volt, the highest attained so far in a device that features an atomically thick active layer. This is attributable in part to the more effective gating achieved with the ion gel over the conventional dielectric back gates and partially by achieving a desirable coherent absorption effect linked to the presence of the thin ion gel that boosts the absorption by 40%.

  10. A graphene-based non-volatile memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Loïc.; Maurice, Ange; Lebental, Bérengère; Vezzoli, Stefano; Cojocaru, Costel-Sorin; Tay, Beng Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a simple two-terminal non-volatile graphene switch. After an initial electroforming step during which Joule heating leads to the formation of a nano-gap impeding the current flow, the devices can be switched reversibly between two well-separated resistance states. To do so, either voltage sweeps or pulses can be used, with the condition that VSET achieve reversible switching on more than 100 cycles with resistance ratio values of 104. This approach of graphene memory is competitive as compared to other graphene approaches such as redox of graphene oxide, or electro-mechanical switches with suspended graphene. We suggest a switching model based on a planar electro-mechanical switch, whereby electrostatic, elastic and friction forces are competing to switch devices ON and OFF, and the stability in the ON state is achieved by the formation of covalent bonds between the two stretched sides of the graphene, hence bridging the nano-gap. Developing a planar electro-mechanical switch enables to obtain the advantages of electro-mechanical switches while avoiding most of their drawbacks.

  11. Direct measurement of exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Kai

    2016-02-29

    In crystals, energy band extrema in momentum space can be identified by a valley index. The internal quantum degree of freedom associated with valley pseudospin indices can act as a useful information carrier, analogous to electronic charge or spin. Interest in valleytronics has been revived in recent years following the discovery of atomically thin materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the valley coherence time—a crucial quantity for valley pseudospin manipulation—is difficult to directly probe. In this work, we use two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy to resonantly generate and detect valley coherence of excitons (Coulomb-bound electron–hole pairs) in monolayer WSe2 (refs ,). The imposed valley coherence persists for approximately one hundred femtoseconds. We propose that the electron–hole exchange interaction provides an important decoherence mechanism in addition to exciton population recombination. This work provides critical insight into the requirements and strategies for optical manipulation of the valley pseudospin for future valleytronics applications.

  12. An oscillating dynamic model of collective cells in a monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2018-03-01

    Periodic oscillations of collective cells occur in the morphogenesis and organogenesis of various tissues and organs. In this paper, an oscillating cytodynamic model is presented by integrating the chemomechanical interplay between the RhoA effector signaling pathway and cell deformation. We show that both an isolated cell and a cell aggregate can undergo spontaneous oscillations as a result of Hopf bifurcation, upon which the system evolves into a limit cycle of chemomechanical oscillations. The dynamic characteristics are tailored by the mechanical properties of cells (e.g., elasticity, contractility, and intercellular tension) and the chemical reactions involved in the RhoA effector signaling pathway. External forces are found to modulate the oscillation intensity of collective cells in the monolayer and to polarize their oscillations along the direction of external tension. The proposed cytodynamic model can recapitulate the prominent features of cell oscillations observed in a variety of experiments, including both isolated cells (e.g., spreading mouse embryonic fibroblasts, migrating amoeboid cells, and suspending 3T3 fibroblasts) and multicellular systems (e.g., Drosophila embryogenesis and oogenesis).

  13. Probing the Gas-Phase Dynamics of Graphene Chemical Vapour Deposition using in-situ UV Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shivayogimath, Abhay; Mackenzie, David; Luo, Birong

    2017-01-01

    The processes governing multilayer nucleation in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene are important for obtaining high-quality monolayer sheets, but remain poorly understood. Here we show that higher-order carbon species in the gas-phase play a major role in multilayer nucleation...

  14. Spatially resolved mapping of electrical conductivity across individual domain (grain) boundaries in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kendal W; Zhang, X-G; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; He, Guowei; Feenstra, Randall M; Li, An-Ping

    2013-09-24

    All large-scale graphene films contain extended topological defects dividing graphene into domains or grains. Here, we spatially map electronic transport near specific domain and grain boundaries in both epitaxial graphene grown on SiC and CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate, with one-to-one correspondence to boundary structures. Boundaries coinciding with the substrate step on SiC exhibit a significant potential barrier for electron transport of epitaxial graphene due to the reduced charge transfer from the substrate near the step edge. Moreover, monolayer-bilayer boundaries exhibit a high resistance that can change depending on the height of substrate step coinciding at the boundary. In CVD graphene, the resistance of a grain boundary changes with the width of the disordered transition region between adjacent grains. A quantitative modeling of boundary resistance reveals the increased electron Fermi wave vector within the boundary region, possibly due to boundary induced charge density variation. Understanding how resistance change with domain (grain) boundary structure in graphene is a crucial first step for controlled engineering of defects in large-scale graphene films.

  15. Self-folding mechanics of graphene tearing and peeling from a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze-Zhou; Zhu, Yin-Bo; Wu, Heng-An

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism in the tearing and peeling processes of graphene is crucial for the further hierarchical design of origami-like folding and kirigami-like cutting of graphene. However, the complex effects among bending moduli, adhesion, interlayer interaction, and local crystal structure during origami-like folding and kirigami-like cutting remain unclear, resulting in challenges to the practical applications of existing theoretical and experimental findings as well as to potential manipulations of graphene in metamaterials and nanodevices. Toward this end, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed with synergetic theoretical analysis to explore the tearing and peeling of self-folded graphene from a substrate driven by external force and by thermal activation. It is found that the elastic energy localized at the small folding ridge plays a significant role in the crack trajectory. Due to the extremely small bending modulus of monolayer graphene, its taper angle when pulled by an external force follows a scaling law distinct from that in case of bilayer graphene. With the increase in the initial width of the folding ridge, the self-folded graphene, motivated by thermal fluctuations, can be self-assembled by spontaneous self-tearing and peeling from a substrate. Simultaneously, the scaling law between the taper angle and adhesive energy is independent of the motivations for thermal activation-induced self-assembly and external force tearing, providing effective insights into the underlying physics for graphene-based origami-like folding and kirigami-like cutting.

  16. Synthesis and electronic properties of chemically functionalized graphene on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grüneis, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A review on the electronic properties, growth and functionalization of graphene on metals is presented. Starting from the derivation of the electronic properties of an isolated graphene layer using the nearest neighbor tight-binding (TB) approximation for π and σ electrons, the TB model is then extended to third-nearest neighbors and interlayer coupling. The latter is relevant to few-layer graphene and graphite. Next, the conditions under which epitaxial graphene can be obtained by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed with a particular emphasis on the Ni(111) surface. Regarding functionalization, I first discuss the intercalation of monolayer Au into the graphene/Ni(111) interface, which renders graphene quasi-free-standing. The Au intercalated quasi-free-standing graphene is then the basis for chemical functionalization. Functionalization of graphene is classified into covalent, ionic and substitutional functionalization. As archetypical examples for these three possibilities I discuss covalent functionalization by hydrogen, ionic functionalization by alkali metals and substitutional functionalization by nitrogen heteroatoms.

  17. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangwal Pandey, A., E-mail: arti.pandey@desy.de; Grånäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Krausert, K.; Franz, D.; Müller, P.; Keller, T. F.; Stierle, A., E-mail: andreas.stierle@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Universität Hamburg, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-08-21

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated systematically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Our study reveals (111) oriented iridium films with high crystalline quality and extremely low surface roughness, on which the formation of large-area epitaxial graphene is achieved. The presence of defects, like dislocations, twins, and 30° rotated domains in the iridium films is also discussed. The coverage of graphene was found to be influenced by the presence of 30° rotated domains in the Ir films. Low iridium deposition rates suppress these rotated domains and an almost complete coverage of graphene was obtained. This synthesis route yields inexpensive, air-stable, and large-area graphene with a well-defined orientation, making it accessible to a wider community of researchers for numerous experiments or applications, including those which use destructive analysis techniques or irreversible processes. Moreover, this approach can be used to tune the structural quality of graphene, allowing a systematic study of the influence of defects in various processes like intercalation below graphene.

  18. Rational design of multifunctional devices based on molybdenum disulfide and graphene hybrid nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yi Rang; Lee, Young Bum; Kim, Seong Ku; Kim, Seong Jun [Thin Film Materials Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Post Office Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yooseok; Jeon, Cheolho [Nano-Surface Research Group, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 302-333 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wooseok, E-mail: wssong@krict.re.kr [Thin Film Materials Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Post Office Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Myung, Sung; Lee, Sun Sook; An, Ki-Seok [Thin Film Materials Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Post Office Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jongsun, E-mail: jslim@krict.re.kr [Thin Film Materials Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong, Post Office Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • We fabricated MoS{sub 2}-graphene hybrid thin films for multifunctional applications. • Large-area, uniform multilayer MoS{sub 2} was synthesized on TCVD-grown graphene. • The mobility and photocurrent of the hybrid devices were improved significantly. - Abstract: We rationally designed a new type of hybrid materials, molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) synthesized by Mo pre-deposition followed by subsequent sulfurization process directly on thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD)-grown graphene, for applications in a multifunctional device. The synthesis of stoichiometric and uniform multilayer MoS{sub 2} and high-crystalline monolayer graphene was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. To examine the electrical transport and photoelectrical properties of MoS{sub 2}-graphene hybrid films, field effect transistors (FETs) and visible-light photodetectors based on MoS{sub 2}-graphene were both fabricated. As a result, the extracted mobility for MoS{sub 2}-graphene hybrid FETs was two times higher than that of MoS{sub 2} FETs. In addition, the MoS{sub 2}-graphene photodetectors revealed a significant photocurrent with abrupt switching behavior under periodic illumination.

  19. Controlling the growth of epitaxial graphene on metalized diamond (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooil, S. P.; Wells, J. W.; Hu, D.; Evans, D. A.; Niu, Y. R.; Zakharov, A. A.; Bianchi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2-dimensional transformation of the diamond (111) surface to graphene has been demonstrated using ultrathin Fe films that catalytically reduce the reaction temperature needed for the conversion of sp 3 to sp 2 carbon. An epitaxial system is formed, which involves the re-crystallization of carbon at the Fe/vacuum interface and that enables the controlled growth of monolayer and multilayer graphene films. In order to study the initial stages of single and multilayer graphene growth, real time monitoring of the system was preformed within a photoemission and low energy electron microscope. It was found that the initial graphene growth occurred at temperatures as low as 500 °C, whilst increasing the temperature to 560 °C was required to produce multi-layer graphene of high structural quality. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the electronic properties of the grown material, where a graphene-like energy momentum dispersion was observed. The Dirac point for the first layer is located at 2.5 eV below the Fermi level, indicating an n-type doping of the graphene due to substrate interactions, while that of the second graphene layer lies close to the Fermi level

  20. Graphene for Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Individual talks by JPL and Caltech experts on graphene to present the different ambits of application in which graphene is currently being used on campus,...